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Sample records for minimizing drug interactions

  1. Optimization of drug-drug interaction study design: comparison of minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic models on prediction of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Mao, Jialin; Chien, Jenny Y; Hall, Stephen D

    2013-07-01

    Ketoconazole is a potent CYP3A inhibitor used to assess the contribution of CYP3A to drug clearance and quantify the increase in drug exposure due to a strong inhibitor. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to evaluate treatment regimens resulting in maximal CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole but have reached different conclusions. We compare two PBPK models of the ketoconazole-midazolam interaction, model 1 (Chien et al., 2006) and model 2 implemented in Simcyp (version 11), to predict 16 published treatment regimens. With use of model 2, 41% of the study point estimates of area under the curve (AUC) ratio and 71% of the 90% confidence intervals were predicted within 1.5-fold of the observed, but these increased to 82 and 100%, respectively, with model 1. For midazolam, model 2 predicted a maximal midazolam AUC ratio of 8 and a hepatic fraction metabolized by CYP3A (f(m)) of 0.97, whereas model 1 predicted 17 and 0.90, respectively, which are more consistent with observed data. On the basis of model 1, ketoconazole (400 mg QD) for at least 3 days and substrate administration within 2 hours is required for maximal CYP3A inhibition. Ketoconazole treatment regimens that use 200 mg BID underestimate the systemic fraction metabolized by CYP3A (0.86 versus 0.90) for midazolam. The systematic underprediction also applies to CYP3A substrates with high bioavailability and long half-lives. The superior predictive performance of model 1 reflects the need for accumulation of ketoconazole at enzyme site and protracted inhibition. Model 2 is not recommended for inferring optimal study design and estimation of fraction metabolized by CYP3A.

  2. Food and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Ko, Chang Mann

    2017-01-01

    Natural foods and vegetal supplements have recently become increasingly popular for their roles in medicine and as staple foods. This has, however, led to the increased risk of interaction between prescribed drugs and the bioactive ingredients contained in these foods. These interactions range from pharmacokinetic interactions (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion influencing blood levels of drugs) to pharmacodynamic interactions (drug effects). In a quantitative respect, these interactions occur mainly during metabolism. In addition to the systemic metabolism that occurs mainly in the liver, recent studies have focused on the metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract endothelium before absorption. Inhibition of metabolism causes an increase in the blood levels of drugs and could have adverse reactions. The food-drug interactions causing increased blood levels of drugs may have beneficial or detrimental therapeutic effects depending on the intensity and predictability of these interactions. It is therefore important to understand the potential interactions between foods and drugs should and the specific outcomes of such interactions.

  3. Turkish Final Year Medical Students' Exposure to and Attitudes Concerning Drug Company Interactions: A Perspective from a Minimally Regulated Environment for Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Beyhun, Nazim Ercument; Kolayli, Cevriye Ceyda; Can, Gamze; Topbas, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between drug companies and medical students may affect evidence-based medical practice and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess drug company-medical student interactions in a medical faculty where limited specific national or institutional regulations apply between drug companies and medical students. The objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and attitudes of final year medical students in terms of drug company-medical student and physician interactions, to identify factors affecting those attitudes and to provide data for policymakers working on the regulation of interactions between drug companies and medical students. This anonymous questionnaire-based study of 154 medical final year medical students at the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, Trabzon, Turkey, in April and May 2015 attracted a response rate of 92.2% (n/N, 154/164). Exposure to interaction with a pharmaceutical representative was reported by 90.3% (139/154) of students, and 68.8% (106/154) reported experiencing such interaction alongside a resident. In addition, 83.7% (128/153) of students reported an interaction during internship. Furthermore, 69.9% (107/153) of students agreed that interactions influence physicians' prescription preferences, while 33.1% (51/154) thought that a medical student should never accept a gift from a drug company and 24.7% (38/154) agreed with the proposition that "drug companies should not hold activities in medical faculties". Students with rational prescription training expressed greater agreement with the statement "I am skeptical concerning the information provided by drug companies during interactions" than those who had not received such training, and this finding was supported by logistic regression [O.R.(C.I), p -3.7(1.2-11.5), p = 0.022]. Acceptance of advertisement brochures was found to significantly reduce the level of agreement with the proposition that "A physician should not accept any gift from a

  4. Food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen; Khan, Arshad Yar

    2011-03-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on its own. These interactions may occur out of accidental misuse or due to lack of knowledge about the active ingredients involved in the relevant substances. Regarding food-drug interactions physicians and pharmacists recognize that some foods and drugs, when taken simultaneously, can alter the body's ability to utilize a particular food or drug, or cause serious side effects. Clinically significant drug interactions, which pose potential harm to the patient, may result from changes in pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic, or pharmacodynamic properties. Some may be taken advantage of, to the benefit of patients, but more commonly drug interactions result in adverse drug events. Therefore it is advisable for patients to follow the physician and doctors instructions to obtain maximum benefits with least food-drug interactions. The literature survey was conducted by extracting data from different review and original articles on general or specific drug interactions with food. This review gives information about various interactions between different foods and drugs and will help physicians and pharmacists prescribe drugs cautiously with only suitable food supplement to get maximum benefit for the patient.

  5. Drug-drug interactions: antiretroviral drugs and recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Staltari, Orietta; Leporini, Christian; Caroleo, Benedetto; Russo, Emilio; Siniscalchi, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Gallelli, Luca

    2014-01-01

    With the advances in antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are living longer, however, some patients encounter co- morbidities which sometimes require treatment. Therefore, during the treatment with ARV drugs these patients could take several recreational drugs (e.g. amphetamines, hallucinogenes, opiates, or alcohol) with a possible development of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In particular, Nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs/NtRTIs) are mainly excreted through the kidney and are not substrates of the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein, therefore the DDIs during this treatment are minimal. In contrast, the other ARV drugs (i.e. non-nucleoside reversetranscriptase inhibitors, Protease inhibitors, Integrase inhibitors, chemokine receptor 5 antagonists and HIV-fusion inhibitors) are an important class of antiretroviral medications that are frequent components of HAART regimens but show several DDIs related to interaction with the cytochrome P450 or P-glycoprotein. In this paper we will review data concerning the possibility of DDI in HIV patients treated with ARV and taking recreational drugs.

  6. Turkish Final Year Medical Students’ Exposure to and Attitudes Concerning Drug Company Interactions: A Perspective from a Minimally Regulated Environment for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Beyhun, Nazim Ercument; Kolayli, Cevriye Ceyda; Can, Gamze; Topbas, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between drug companies and medical students may affect evidence-based medical practice and patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess drug company–medical student interactions in a medical faculty where limited specific national or institutional regulations apply between drug companies and medical students. The objectives of the study were to determine the exposure and attitudes of final year medical students in terms of drug company–medical student and physician interactions, to identify factors affecting those attitudes and to provide data for policymakers working on the regulation of interactions between drug companies and medical students. This anonymous questionnaire-based study of 154 medical final year medical students at the Karadeniz Technical University Medical Faculty, Trabzon, Turkey, in April and May 2015 attracted a response rate of 92.2% (n/N, 154/164). Exposure to interaction with a pharmaceutical representative was reported by 90.3% (139/154) of students, and 68.8% (106/154) reported experiencing such interaction alongside a resident. In addition, 83.7% (128/153) of students reported an interaction during internship. Furthermore, 69.9% (107/153) of students agreed that interactions influence physicians’ prescription preferences, while 33.1% (51/154) thought that a medical student should never accept a gift from a drug company and 24.7% (38/154) agreed with the proposition that “drug companies should not hold activities in medical faculties”. Students with rational prescription training expressed greater agreement with the statement “I am skeptical concerning the information provided by drug companies during interactions” than those who had not received such training, and this finding was supported by logistic regression [O.R.(C.I), p -3.7(1.2–11.5), p = 0.022]. Acceptance of advertisement brochures was found to significantly reduce the level of agreement with the proposition that “A physician should not

  7. Minimizing drug misuse among elders: a proposal.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J A; Eves, G B

    1987-01-01

    This proposal is aimed at reducing the risk of adverse drug interactions that may occur when over-the-counter (OTC) preparations are taken in conjunction with prescription drugs in an unsupervised regimen. Such polymedicating is practiced widely among the elderly. A pilot program would be implemented over 12 months at three drugstores of a major retail chain. A barcode-based computer system would be used to identify potential adverse drug interactions for elderly customers. All volunteers admitted to the study, controls and subjects, would agree to buy all their medications, prescriptions and OTC, at the participating pharmacies. In return, the volunteers would receive discounts of 25 percent on prescription and OTC drugs and 10 percent on vitamins. Study subjects (N = 375) would carry barcoded identification (BID) cards that would activate the computerized program to assess each purchase for compatibility with their other medications; controls (N = 375) would carry "dummy" BID cards that would prompt the computer to approve all drug purchases. A final comparison of the subjects with the controls, as well as with a sample of elderly residents selected randomly from the community, would determine whether such a computerized, commercially based drug use review system could reduce the potential for adverse interactions between OTC and prescription drugs among the elderly. PMID:3101129

  8. [Drug-drug interactions: interactions between xenobiotics].

    PubMed

    Haen, E

    2014-04-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDI) are a major topic in programs for continuous medical education (CME). Many physicians are afraid of being trapped into charges of malpractice; however, DDI cannot be avoided in many cases. They belong to routine medical practice and it is often impossible to avoid them. Moreover, they do not just occur between drugs but between any kind of foreign substance (xenobiotica), such as food (e.g. grapefruit juice, broccoli, barbecue) as well as legal (e.g. tobacco smoke, caffeine and alcohol) and illegal drugs. Therefore, the medical challenge is not just to avoid any interaction. Instead the physician faces the question of how to proceed with drug treatment in the presence of such interactions. Based on the medical education a physician has to judge first of all whether there is a risk for interactions in the prescription being planned for an individual patient. The classification of interactions proposed in this article (PD1-PD4, PK1-PK3) might help as a sort of check list. For more detailed information the physician can then consult one of the many databases available on the internet, such as PSIAConline (http://www.psiac.de) and MediQ (http://www.mediq.ch). Pharmacokinetic interactions can be easily assessed, monitored and controlled by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Besides these tools it is important to keep in mind that nobody knows everything; even physicians do not know everything. So take pride in asking someone who might help and for this purpose AGATE offers a drug information service AID (http://www.amuep-agate.de). Just good for nothing, without being based on any kind of medical approach are computer programs that judge prescriptions without taking into account a patient's individual peculiarities. In case these types of programs produce red exclamation marks or traffic lights to underline their judgment, they might even work in a contrapuntal way by just eliciting insecurity and fear.

  9. Food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those associated with a high risk of treatment failure arising from a significantly reduced bioavailability in the fed state. Such interactions are frequently caused by chelation with components in food (as occurs with alendronic acid, clodronic acid, didanosine, etidronic acid, penicillamine and tetracycline) or dairy products (ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin), or by other direct interactions between the drug and certain food components (avitriptan, indinavir, itraconazole solution, levodopa, melphalan, mercaptopurine and perindopril). In addition, the physiological response to food intake, in particular gastric acid secretion, may reduce the bioavailability of certain drugs (ampicillin, azithromycin capsules, didanosine, erythromycin stearate or enteric coated, and isoniazid). For other drugs, concomitant food intake may result in an increase in drug bioavailability either because of a food-induced increase in drug solubility (albendazole, atovaquone, griseofulvin, isotretinoin, lovastatin, mefloquine, saquinavir and tacrolimus) or because of the secretion of

  10. Predicting Drug-Target Interactions Using Drug-Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shinhyuk; Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2013-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting drug-target interactions have become important in drug research because they can help to reduce the time, cost, and failure rates for developing new drugs. Recently, with the accumulation of drug-related data sets related to drug side effects and pharmacological data, it has became possible to predict potential drug-target interactions. In this study, we focus on drug-drug interactions (DDI), their adverse effects () and pharmacological information (), and investigate the relationship among chemical structures, side effects, and DDIs from several data sources. In this study, data from the STITCH database, from drugs.com, and drug-target pairs from ChEMBL and SIDER were first collected. Then, by applying two machine learning approaches, a support vector machine (SVM) and a kernel-based L1-norm regularized logistic regression (KL1LR), we showed that DDI is a promising feature in predicting drug-target interactions. Next, the accuracies of predicting drug-target interactions using DDI were compared to those obtained using the chemical structure and side effects based on the SVM and KL1LR approaches, showing that DDI was the data source contributing the most for predicting drug-target interactions. PMID:24278248

  11. Drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander

    2013-07-01

    Drug-nutrient interactions are defined as physical, chemical, physiologic, or pathophysiologic relationships between a drug and a nutrient. The causes of most clinically significant drug-nutrient interactions are usually multifactorial. Failure to identify and properly manage drug-nutrient interactions can lead to very serious consequences and have a negative impact on patient outcomes. Nevertheless, with thorough review and assessment of the patient's history and treatment regimens and a carefully executed management strategy, adverse events associated with drug-nutrient interactions can be prevented. Based on the physiologic sequence of events after a drug or a nutrient has entered the body and the mechanism of interactions, drug-nutrient interactions can be categorized into 4 main types. Each type of interaction can be managed using similar strategies. The existing data that guide the clinical management of most drug-nutrient interactions are mostly anecdotal experience, uncontrolled observations, and opinions, whereas the science in understanding the mechanism of drug-nutrient interactions remains limited. The challenge for researchers and clinicians is to increase both basic and higher level clinical research in this field to bridge the gap between the science and practice. The research should aim to establish a better understanding of the function, regulation, and substrate specificity of the nutrient-related enzymes and transport proteins present in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as assess how the incidence and management of drug-nutrient interactions can be affected by sex, ethnicity, environmental factors, and genetic polymorphisms. This knowledge can help us develop a true personalized medicine approach in the prevention and management of drug-nutrient interactions.

  12. Adverse Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for interactions with current medications should always be considered when administering or prescribing any drug. Considering the staggering number of drugs patients may be taking, this task can be daunting. Fortunately, drug classes employed in dental practice are relatively few in number and therapy is generally brief in duration. While this reduces the volume of potential interactions, there are still a significant number to be considered. This article will review basic principles of drug interactions and highlight those of greatest concern in dental practice. PMID:21410363

  13. Food and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Hwan; Ko, Chang Mann

    2017-01-01

    Natural foods and vegetal supplements have recently become increasingly popular for their roles in medicine and as staple foods. This has, however, led to the increased risk of interaction between prescribed drugs and the bioactive ingredients contained in these foods. These interactions range from pharmacokinetic interactions (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion influencing blood levels of drugs) to pharmacodynamic interactions (drug effects). In a quantitative respect, these interactions occur mainly during metabolism. In addition to the systemic metabolism that occurs mainly in the liver, recent studies have focused on the metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract endothelium before absorption. Inhibition of metabolism causes an increase in the blood levels of drugs and could have adverse reactions. The food-drug interactions causing increased blood levels of drugs may have beneficial or detrimental therapeutic effects depending on the intensity and predictability of these interactions. It is therefore important to understand the potential interactions between foods and drugs should and the specific outcomes of such interactions. PMID:28261555

  14. Grapefruit and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Since the late 1980s, grapefruit juice has been known to affect the metabolism of certain drugs. Several serious adverse effects involving drug interactions with grapefruit juice have been published in detail. The components of grapefruit juice vary considerably depending on the variety, maturity and origin of the fruit, local climatic conditions, and the manufacturing process. No single component accounts for all observed interactions. Other grapefruit products are also occasionally implicated, including preserves, lyophylised grapefruit juice, powdered whole grapefruit, grapefruit seed extract, and zest. Clinical reports of drug interactions with grapefruit juice are supported by pharmacokinetic studies, each usually involving about 10 healthy volunteers, in which the probable clinical consequences were extrapolated from the observed plasma concentrations. Grapefruit juice inhibits CYP3A4, the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme most often involved in drug metabolism. This increases plasma concentrations of the drugs concerned, creating a risk of overdose and dose-dependent adverse effects. Grapefruit juice also inhibits several other cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, but they are less frequently implicated in interactions with clinical consequences. Drugs interacting with grapefruit and inducing serious clinical consequences (confirmed or very probable) include: immunosuppressants, some statins, benzodiazepines, most calcium channel blockers, indinavir and carbamazepine. There are large inter-individual differences in enzyme efficiency. Along with the variable composition of grapefruit juice, this makes it difficult to predict the magnitude and clinical consequences of drug interactions with grapefruit juice in a given patient. There is increasing evidence that transporter proteins such as organic anion transporters and P-glycoprotein are involved in interactions between drugs and grapefruit juice. In practice, numerous drugs interact with grapefruit juice. Although only a few

  15. Drug Interaction and Pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, JA

    2010-01-01

    The topic of drug–drug interactions has received a great deal of recent attention from the regulatory, scientific, and health care communities worldwide. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. The pharmacist, along with the prescriber has a duty to ensure that patients are aware of the risk of side effects and a suitable course of action should they occur. With their detailed knowledge of medicine, pharmacists have the ability to relate unexpected symptoms experienced by patients to possible adverse effects of their drug therapy. PMID:21042495

  16. Herb-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Fugh-Berman, A

    2000-01-08

    Concurrent use of herbs may mimic, magnify, or oppose the effect of drugs. Plausible cases of herb-drug interactions include: bleeding when warfarin is combined with ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), garlic (Allium sativum), dong quai (Angelica sinensis), or danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza); mild serotonin syndrome in patients who mix St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) with serotonin-reuptake inhibitors; decreased bioavailability of digoxin, theophylline, cyclosporin, and phenprocoumon when these drugs are combined with St John's wort; induction of mania in depressed patients who mix antidepressants and Panax ginseng; exacerbation of extrapyramidal effects with neuroleptic drugs and betel nut (Areca catechu); increased risk of hypertension when tricyclic antidepressants are combined with yohimbine (Pausinystalia yohimbe); potentiation of oral and topical corticosteroids by liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra); decreased blood concentrations of prednisolone when taken with the Chinese herbal product xaio chai hu tang (sho-salko-to); and decreased concentrations of phenytoin when combined with the Ayurvedic syrup shankhapushpi. Anthranoid-containing plants (including senna [Cassia senna] and cascara [Rhamnus purshiana]) and soluble fibres (including guar gum and psyllium) can decrease the absorption of drugs. Many reports of herb-drug interactions are sketchy and lack laboratory analysis of suspect preparations. Health-care practitioners should caution patients against mixing herbs and pharmaceutical drugs.

  17. Drug interactions of lipid-altering drugs.

    PubMed

    Bays, H E; Dujovne, C A

    1998-11-01

    The use of lipid-altering drugs has been shown to reduce the progression of atherosclerotic lesions and reduce the risk of atherosclerotic events (such as myocardial infarction and stroke). In general, these lipid-altering drugs are well tolerated but there is the potential for drug interactions. For example, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors may interact with macrolides, azalides, azole antifungals and cyclosporin. Resins (such as cholestyramine and colestipol) may impair the absorption of many concurrent medications. Fibrates have potential drug interactions with warfarin, furosemide (frusemide), oral hypoglycaemics and probenecid. Nicotinic acid (niacin) may have potential drug interactions with high dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), uricosuric agents (such as sulfapyrazone) and alcohol (ethanol). Finally, probucol may have potential drug interactions with antidysrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants and phenothiazines. In addition, lipid-altering drugs, used in combination, may have the potential for drug interactions, enhancing some of the risks of adverse effects, such as myositis and hepatotoxicity. Therefore, in order to use lipid-altering drugs in the most effective, and safest manner, it is important for the clinician to have an understanding of the mechanisms of potential drug interactions, which drug interactions may theoretically occur, and specifically, which spe cific drug interactions have already been described.

  18. Text mining for drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug-drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases.To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis.The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions.

  19. [Drug interactions with grapefruit].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Zoran Z; Bojanić, Novica Z; Bojanić, Vladmila V

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of many orally given medications may be affected by grapefruit or grapefruit juice consumption. It may result in numerous harmful effects. Taking only one cup of juice may induce interactions with different drugs even during the period of a few days. The effect is induced by suppression of cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 in the intestinal wall. The Latin name of grapefruit, Citrus paradisi, is quite opposite to the effects which could be induced by taking grapefruit and some medications at the same time. It is necessary to avoid taking grapefruit with the drugs whose pharmacokinetics could be altered by the active principles found in that fruit. The coloured grapefruit contains less furanocoumarins, but there is no difference in induction and intensity of pharmacokinetic interaction with drugs related to its colour. Other citrus fruits (orange, lemon) do not have such effects, but some other fruits (pomegranate, stella fruit, banpeiyu, hassaku, takaoka-buntan and kinkan) exert inhibitory effects on the activity of cytochrome P450 isoenzyme.

  20. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  1. Clinically significant drug interactions with atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, William Klugh; Jann, Michael W; Kutscher, Eric C

    2013-12-01

    well as other antiepileptic drugs such as phenobarbital and phenytoin, may decrease plasma SGA concentrations. Some anti-infective agents such as protease inhibitors and fluoroquinolones are of concern as well. Two additional important factors that influence drug interactions with SGAs are dose and time dependence. Smoking is very common among psychiatric patients and can induce CYP1A2 enzymes, thereby lowering expected plasma levels of certain SGAs. It is recommended that ziprasidone and lurasidone are taken with food to promote drug absorption, otherwise their bioavailability can be reduced. Clinicians must be aware of the variety of factors that can increase the likelihood of clinically significant drug interactions with SGAs, and must carefully monitor patients to maximize treatment efficacy while minimizing adverse events.

  2. Drug-Drug Interactions in Headache Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Ziad, Sanaz

    2016-07-01

    The main treatments in a majority of headache patients are pharmacologic therapies. As a result, it is imperative to have strong background in pharmacotherapy used to treat headaches in order to provide optimal therapy and avoid drug interactions. One of the main reasons for failure of pharmacologic treatment of headaches is drug-drug interactions (DDIs). While there are many distinct pathways and mechanisms in which DDIs can occur, most occur through alterations within the cytochrome P450 pathways (CYP). Drugs that cause induction, inhibition, or are simply substrates for these pathways are responsible for many of the DDIs. We review and discuss the important and potential DDIs of commonly used headache medication often encountered in clinical practice. We divide the drugs into two classes, abortive and preventive. Within each group we select the most commonly used drugs and provide a detailed discussion of the mechanisms of interaction for each. Also included are commonly used herbal supplements, which can interact with headache medications. Drug-drug-interactions are a major concern when developing a treatment regimen for patients suffering from headaches. There is a growing need for physician attention to the pharmacokinetics of drugs to improve the quality of patient care. It is vital that prescribing physicians be aware of the DDIs associated with the commonly prescribed headache medications to optimize patient care and therapy results. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  3. Clinically relevant drug interactions with antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, Emilio

    2006-01-01

    Some patients with difficult-to-treat epilepsy benefit from combination therapy with two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Additionally, virtually all epilepsy patients will receive, at some time in their lives, other medications for the management of associated conditions. In these situations, clinically important drug interactions may occur. Carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and primidone induce many cytochrome P450 (CYP) and glucuronyl transferase (GT) enzymes, and can reduce drastically the serum concentration of associated drugs which are substrates of the same enzymes. Examples of agents whose serum levels are decreased markedly by enzyme-inducing AEDs, include lamotrigine, tiagabine, several steroidal drugs, cyclosporin A, oral anticoagulants and many cardiovascular, antineoplastic and psychotropic drugs. Valproic acid is not enzyme inducer, but it may cause clinically relevant drug interactions by inhibiting the metabolism of selected substrates, most notably phenobarbital and lamotrigine. Compared with older generation agents, most of the recently developed AEDs are less likely to induce or inhibit the activity of CYP or GT enzymes. However, they may be a target for metabolically mediated drug interactions, and oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, felbamate and, at high dosages, topiramate may stimulate the metabolism of oral contraceptive steroids. Levetiracetam, gabapentin and pregabalin have not been reported to cause or be a target for clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Pharmacodynamic interactions involving AEDs have not been well characterized, but their understanding is important for a more rational approach to combination therapy. In particular, neurotoxic effects appear to be more likely with coprescription of AEDs sharing the same primary mechanism of action. PMID:16487217

  4. Clinical nutrition and drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ekincioğlu, Aygin Bayraktar; Demirkan, Kutay

    2013-01-01

    A drug’s plasma level, pharmacological effects or side effects, elimination, physicochemical properties or stability could be changed by interactions of drug-drug or drug-nutrition products in patients who receive enteral or parenteral nutritional support. As a result, patients might experience ineffective outcomes or unexpected effects of therapy (such as drug toxicity, embolism). Stability or incompatibility problems between parenteral nutrition admixtures and drugs might lead to alterations in expected therapeutic responses from drug and/or parenteral nutrition, occlusion in venous catheter or symptoms or mortality due to infusion of composed particles. Compatibilities between parenteral nutrition and drugs are not always guaranteed in clinical practice. Although the list of compatibility or incompatibilities of drugs are published for the use of clinicians in their practices, factors such as composition of parenteral nutrition admixture, drug concentration, contact time in catheter, temperature of the environment and exposure to light could change the status of compatibilities between drugs and nutrition admixtures. There could be substantial clinical changes occurring in the patient’s nutritional status and pharmacological effects of drugs due to interactions between enteral nutrition and drugs. Drug toxicity and ineffective nutritional support might occur as a result of those predictable interactions. Although administration of drugs via feeding tube is a complex and problematic route for drug usage, it is possible to minimise the risk of tube occlusion, decreased effects of drug and drug toxicity by using an appropriate technique. Therefore, it is important to consider pharmacological dosage forms of drugs while administering drugs via a feeding tube. In conclusion, since the pharmacists are well-experienced and more knowledgeable professionals in drugs and drug usage compared to other healthcare providers, it is suggested that provision of information

  5. Drug interactions with oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J M; Christensen, L K

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the oral sulphonylurea hypoglycaemic drugs may be influenced by a large number of other drugs. Some of these combinations (e.g. phenylbutazone, sulphaphenazole) may result in cases of severe hypoglycaemic collapse. Tolbutamide and chlorpropamide should never be given to a patient without a prior careful check of which medicaments are already being given. Similarly, no drug should be given to a diabetic treated with tolbutamide and chlorpropamide without consideration of the possibility of interaction phenomena.

  6. Drug interactions with herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shaojun; Klotz, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the issue of herbal medicine-drug interactions has generated significant concern. Such interactions can increase the risk for an individual patient, especially with regard to drugs with a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. warfarin, ciclosporin and digoxin). The present article summarizes herbal medicine-drug interactions involving mainly inhibition or induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes and/or drug transporters. An increasing number of in vitro and animal studies, case reports and clinical trials evaluating such interactions have been reported, and the majority of the interactions may be difficult to predict. Potential pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic interactions of commonly used herbal medicines (black cohosh, garlic, Ginkgo, goldenseal, kava, milk thistle, Panax ginseng, Panax quinquefolius, saw palmetto and St John's wort) with conventional drugs are presented, and sometimes the results are contradictory. Clinical implications of herbal medicine-drug interactions depend on a variety of factors, such as the co-administered drugs, the patient characteristics, the origin of the herbal medicines, the composition of their constituents and the applied dosage regimens. To optimize the use of herbal medicines, further controlled studies are urgently needed to explore their potential for interactions with conventional drugs and to delineate the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Drug interactions and the statins

    PubMed Central

    Herman, R J

    1999-01-01

    Drug interactions commonly occur in patients receiving treatment with multiple medications. Most interactions remain unrecognized because drugs, in general, have a wide margin of safety or because the extent of change in drug levels is small when compared with the variation normally seen in clinical therapy. All drug interactions have a pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic basis and are predictable given an understanding of the pharmacology of the drugs involved. Drugs most liable to pose problems are those having concentration-dependent toxicity within, or close to, the therapeutic range; those with steep dose-response curves; those having high first-pass metabolism or those with a single, inhibitable route of elimination. Knowing which drugs possess these intrinsic characteristics, together with a knowledge of hepatic P-450 metabolism and common enzyme-inducing and enzyme-inhibiting drugs, can greatly assist physicians in predicting interactions that may be clinically relevant. This article reviews the pharmacology of drug interactions that can occur with hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) to illustrate the scope of the problem and the ways in which physicians may manage this important therapeutic class of drugs. PMID:10584091

  8. [Drug interactions and the elderly].

    PubMed

    Le Jeunne, C; Hugues, F C

    1995-01-01

    Elderly people are particularly at risk for drug interactions, for several reasons. They are the part of the population who consume the most drugs: over 75 years the mean number of drugs on a prescription is 5.6. As they suffer from various associated diseases, they see several medical specialists, each of them adding a new prescription to the others. Self-prescriptions complicate the problem because they are rarely mentioned. Changes in pharmacokinetics in the elderly tend to increase blood concentrations of drugs. Elderly people suffer from altered homeostatic mechanisms to compensate for adverse drug effects. As a whole, such individuals are more exposed to the side effects of drugs. The drugs most often involved in these interactions are diuretics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, benzodiazepines, antiarrhythmics, cardiac glycosides, antihypertensive drugs, oral antidiabetics and antalgics. The clinical accidents most often occurring with these drug interactions are: malaise, orthostatic hypotension, loss of conciousness, amnesia, confusion, renal insufficiency, digestive problems. Since elderly people are less likely to recover easily, this problem of drug interaction should be looked for systematically.

  9. Health implications of drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Dukes, M N

    1990-01-01

    The awareness of the digoxin-quinidine interaction in the mid-70s led to increased interest in drug interactions. Much has been published on the subject in the form of interaction reports, handbooks, lists, cards, discs etc. However, only a few interactions in the literature have clinical significance and can be remembered by thinking in terms of groups, pharmacokinetics and probabilities. It is important to realise that drugs in a given class will have similar properties. Thus, phenylbutazone, like any other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), is likely to potentiate the effects of warfarin. A knowledge of drug pharmacokinetics is also essential; a highly protein-bound drug may displace another when they are administered together. Remembering those drugs which induce liver enzyme formation will prevent their co-administration with drugs which have a critical dose-range. If a general practitioner can remember the few drugs in clinical practice with a narrow therapeutic index, he can consult a handbook before anything else is prescribed. Some interactions will rarely be encountered in daily general practice, i.e. those associated with tuberculosis treatment or anesthetic agents. Other interactions, e.g. the interaction between antihypertensive treatment and over-the-counter medication containing phenylpropanolamine, are more common. While most drug interactions can be avoided by thinking in terms of groups, pharmacokinetics and probabilities, some learning by rote is required, e.g. the potential for heart failure with concomitant beta-blocker and nifedipine therapy. In general, a schematic approach using thinking in terms of groups, pharmacokinetics and probabilities will prevent most clinically significant drug interactions; the rest can be avoided by consulting appropriate handbooks and specialists.

  10. Studies of food drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Aman, Syed Faisal; Hassan, Fouzia; Naqvi, Baqar S; Hasan, Syed Muhammmad Farid

    2010-07-01

    Medicines can treat and alleviate many diseases provided that they must be taken properly to ensure that they are safe and useful. One issue related with the medicines is that whether to take on empty stomach or with food. The present work gives information regarding food-drug interactions that were studied by collecting seventy five prescriptions from various hospitals. In most of the collected prescriptions, food-drug interactions were detected using the literature available. It was also found that only few studies have been carried out so far on the effect of food on drug disposition in the Asian population. Thus more studies on food-drug interactions particularly in the local population is recommended in order to determine the effect of food and food components on drug disposition and to the kinetics of the drugs which has not yet well highlighted in this part of the world.

  11. Drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and novel cardiovascular drugs.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Marazzi, Giuseppe; Greco, Cesare; Gaudio, Carlo; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2015-10-15

    The combination of aspirin and the thienopyridine clopidogrel is a cornerstone in the prevention of atherothrombotic events. These two agents act in concert to ameliorate the prothrombotic processes stimulated by plaque rupture and vessel injury complicating cardiovascular disease. Guidelines recommend the use of clopidogrel in patients with acute coronary syndromes and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, and the drug remains the most utilized P2Y12 receptor inhibitor despite the fact that newer antiplatelet agents are now available. In recent years, numerous studies have shown inconsistency in the efficacy of clopidogrel to prevent atherothrombotic events. Studies of platelet function testing have shown variability in the response to clopidogrel. One of the major reason for this phenomenon lies in the interaction between clopidogrel and other drugs that may affect clopidogrel absorption, metabolism, and ultimately its antiplatelet action. Importantly, these drug-drug interactions have prognostic implications, since patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity associated with reduced clopidogrel metabolism have an increased risk of ischemia. Previous systematic reviews have focused on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and specific pharmacologic classes, such as proton pump inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, and statins. However, more recent pieces of scientific evidence show that clopidogrel may also interact with newer drugs that are now available for the treatment of cardiovascular patients. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight and discuss recent data on drug-drug interactions between clopidogrel and third-generation proton pump inhibitors, pantoprazole and lansoprazole, statins, pitavastatin, and antianginal drug, ranolazine.

  12. Drug-drug interactions that interfere with statin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Takeshi; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-lowering drugs, especially hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), are widely used in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic diseases. The benefits of statins are well documented. However, myotoxic side effects, which can sometimes be severe, including myopathy or rhabdomyolysis, have been associated with the use of statins. In some cases, this toxicity is associated with pharmacokinetic alterations. Potent inhibitors of CYP 3A4 significantly increase plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin is metabolized by CYP2C9, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to inhibition by any CYP. This review discusses the pharmacokinetic aspects of the drug-drug interaction with statins and genetic polymorphisms in CYPs, which are involved in the metabolism of statins, and highlights the importance of establishing a system utilizing electronic medical information practically to avoid adverse drug reactions. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions. Quantitatively analyzed information for the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering effects of statin based on electronic medical records may be useful for avoiding the adverse effect of statins.

  13. Drug-mineral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, L.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of drugs such as glucocorticoids and thyroid extract on calcium metabolism is unknown. However, several other medications affect the excretion and intestinal absorption of calcium. A controlled study was carried out to investigate these aspects. Urinary calcium was determined for 3 months during the long-term intake of the antituberculous drug isoniazid (INH) and of the antibiotic tetracycline. The effect of the diuretics furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide, of several aluminum-containing antacids, of thyroid extract and of corticosteroids was also studied. Metabolic balances of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc were determined, as well as the intestinal absorption of calcium using Ca 47. Plasma levels, urinary and fecal excretions of Ca 47 were determined. All drugs tested increased urinary calcium except for the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide. Regarding the effect of corticosteroids: the intestinal absorption of calcium was unchanged after the short-term use and was very high after long-term use. The studies have shown that several commonly used drugs induce an increase in urinary calcium excretion which may contribute to calcium loss, if this increase persists for prolonged periods of time. Urinary excretions of phosphorus, magnesium and zinc increased in some of the studies.

  14. Party pills and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Meghan; Antia, Ushtana; Chang, Hsin-Yao; Han, Jae Young; Ibrahim, Ushtana; Tingle, Malcolm; Russell, Bruce

    2009-04-24

    This study aimed to explore the potential for drug-drug interactions involving benzylpiperazine (BZP) and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP). This was achieved by determining the effects of BZP and TFMPP on the metabolism of drugs commonly found in the clinical setting by using pooled human liver microsomes. Incubations consisted of a probe substrate (drug of interest), a potential inhibitor (BZP or TFMPP), a suitable enzyme co-factor (NADPH), and pooled human liver microsomes. Loss of substrate was determined by analysing pre- and post-incubation concentrations in the samples by using HPLC/UV analysis. Both TFMPP and BZP were found to inhibit the metabolism of dextromethorphan, caffeine, and ethinyloestradiol. These are reported substrates of CYP2D6, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 respectively. Greater enzyme inhibition was observed in TFMPP microsomal assays in comparison to those using BZP. The metabolism of omeprazole was not affected, suggesting that BZP and TFMPP do not have a significant inhibitory effect on CYP2C19. The inhibitory effects of BZP and TFMPP observed in this study are of potential significance to clinical practice because CYP2D6, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 are involved in the metabolism of many commonly used drugs. Knowledge about the observed inhibitory effects will be a useful aid in preventing toxicity when drugs metabolised by these isoenzymes are taken with party pills.

  15. Drug Interactions in Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Cyrine; Jeha, Sima

    2016-01-01

    Children with cancer are increasingly benefiting from novel therapeutic strategies and advances in supportive care, as reflected in improvements in both their survival and quality of life. However, the continuous emergence of new oncology drugs and supportive care agents has also increased the possibility of deleterious drug interactions and healthcare providers need to practice extreme caution when combining medications. In this review, we discuss the most common interactions of chemotherapeutic agents with supportive care drugs such as anticonvulsants, antiemetics, uric acid–lowering agents, acid suppressants, antimicrobials, and pain management medications in pediatric oncology patients. As chemotherapy agents interact not only with medications but also with foods and herbal supplements that patients receive during the course of their treatment, we also briefly review such interactions and provide recommendations to avoid unwanted and potentially fatal interactions in children with cancer. PMID:20869315

  16. Endogenous Biomarkers to Assess Drug-Drug Interactions by Drug Transporters and Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, T Thanga; Shen, Hong; Marathe, Punit

    2017-07-24

    Drug-drug interactions (DDI) by modulation of drug transporters or drug metabolizing enzymes are common in multi-drug therapy. DDI potential of any new drugs are assessed by conducting separate clinical studies using relevant probe substrates, which involves additional resource and cost. Recently, several endogenous compounds were evaluated as substrates of transporters and enzymes that could be assessed as part of early clinical trials along with the assessment of drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety studies. This enables an early readout on potential DDIs avoiding or minimally delaying the conduct of definitive DDI studies until later in clinical development. This review describes various endogenous biomarkers reported for drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes with their advantages and limitations. Further the authors describe strategies to adopt while exploring a new endogenous biomarker, factors to be considered in selection of biomarkers with the current challenges and opportunities. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Radiation and platinum drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Nias, A H

    1985-09-01

    Platinum drugs have chemical as well as biochemical and biological effects on cells, all of which may interact with radiation effects. They inhibit recovery from sublethal and potentially lethal radiation damage. They produce a pattern of chromosome aberrations analogous to that from alkylating agents. Cellular sensitivity to platinum is increased when glutathione levels are reduced, just as is radiosensitivity. There is a pattern of drug sensitivity throughout the phases of the cell cycle which is different from that for radiosensitivity. The ideal platinum drug-radiation interaction would achieve radiosensitization of hypoxic tumour cells with the use of a dose of drug which is completely non-toxic to normal tissues. Electron-affinic agents are employed with this aim, but the commoner platinum drugs are only weakly electron-affinic. They do have a quasi-alkylating action however, and this DNA targeting may account for the radiosensitizing effect which occurs with both pre- and post-radiation treatments. Because toxic drug dosage is usually required for this, the evidence of the biological responses to the drug and to the radiation, as well as to the combination, requires critical analysis before any claim of true enhancement, rather than simple additivity, can be accepted. The amount of enhancement will vary with both the platinum drug dose and the time interval between drug administration and radiation. Clinical schedules may produce an increase in tumour response and/or morbidity, depending upon such dose and time relationships.

  18. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  19. [Antibiotics: drug and food interactions].

    PubMed

    Hodel, M; Genné, D

    2009-10-07

    Antibiotics are widely prescribed in medical practice. Many of them induce or are subject to interactions that may diminish their anti-infectious efficiency or elicit toxic effects. Food intake can influence the effectiveness of an antibiotic. Certain antibiotics can lower the effectiveness of oral contraception. Oral anticoagulation can be influenced to a great extent by antibiotics and controls are necessary. Interactions are also possible via enzymatic induction or inhibition of cytochromes. The use of an interaction list with substrates of cytochromes enables to anticipate. Every new prescription should consider a possible drug or food interaction.

  20. Addressing drug-drug and drug-food interactions through personalized empowerment services for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Marios; Spanakis, Emmanouil G; Kondylakis, Haridimos; Sfakianakis, Stelios; Genitsaridi, Irini; Sakkalis, Vangelis; Tsiknakis, Manolis; Marias, Kostas

    2016-08-01

    Personalized healthcare systems support the provision of timely and appropriate information regarding healthcare options and treatment alternatives. Especially for patients that receive multi-drug treatments a key issue is the minimization of the risk of adverse effects due to drug-drug interactions (DDIs). DDIs may be the result of doctor prescribed drugs but also due to self-medication of conventional drugs, alternative medicines, food habits, alcohol or smoking. It is therefore crucial for personalized health systems, apart from assisting physicians for optimal prescription practices, to also provide appropriate information for individual users for drug-drug interactions or similar information regarding risks for modulation of the ensuing treatment. In this manuscript we describe a DDI service including drug-food, drug-herb and other lifestyle-related factors, developed in the context of a personalized patient empowerment platform. The solution enables guidance to patients for their medication on how to reduce the risk of unwanted drug interactions and side effects in a seamless and transparent way. We present and analyze the implemented services and provide examples on using an alerting service to identify potential DDIs in two different chronic diseases, congestive heart failure and osteoarthritis.

  1. Clinical risk management of herb–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Peter A G M

    2007-01-01

    The concomitant use of conventional and herbal medicines can lead to clinically relevant herb–drug interactions. Clinical risk management offers a systematic approach to minimize the untoward consequences of these interactions by paying attention to: (i) risk identification and assessment; (ii) development and execution of risk reduction strategies; and (iii) evaluation of risk reduction strategies. This paper reviews which steps should be explored or taken in these domains to improve the clinical risk management of adverse herb–drug interactions. PMID:17116126

  2. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  3. Optimizing drug exposure to minimize selection of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Sara K; Cars, Otto

    2007-09-01

    The worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance is a concern for public health. The fact that the choice of dose and treatment duration can affect the selection of antibiotic-resistant mutants is becoming more evident, and an increased number of studies have used pharmacodynamic models to describe the drug exposure and pharmacodynamic breakpoints needed to minimize and predict the development of resistance. However, there remains a lack of sufficient data, and future work is needed to fully characterize these target drug concentrations. More knowledge is also needed of drug pharmacodynamics versus bacteria with different resistance mutations and susceptibility levels. The dosing regimens should exhibit high efficacy not only against susceptible wild-type bacteria but, preferably, also against mutated bacteria that may exist in low numbers in "susceptible" populations. Thus, to prolong the life span of existing and new antibiotics, it is important that dosing regimens be carefully selected on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that prevent emergence of preexisting and newly formed mutants.

  4. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  5. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Chandra; Zuniga, Baltazar; Song, Chung Seog; Jiang, Shoulei; Cropper, Jodie; Park, Sulgi; Chatterjee, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR), due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs) present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification) facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs) on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome) of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug’s impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse models and

  6. The Clinician's Approach to Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Morrelli, Howard F.; Melmon, Kenneth L.

    1968-01-01

    Drug interactions are important causes of both unexpected toxic and therapeutic effects. Adverse reactions due to drug interaction are proportional to the number of drugs given and the duration of administration. Although drug interactions may be beneficial, they are most often recognized when they increase mortality or morbidity. The frequency of adverse drug interactions in clinical practice makes it mandatory for physicians to know the drugs and mechanisms involved. A drug may potentiate or antagonize the effects of another drug by direct chemical or physical combination, by altering gastrointestinal absorption, by influencing metabolism, transport, or renal clearance, by changing the activity of a drug at its receptor site, or by modifying the patient's response to the drug by a variety of means. This article stresses the importance of avoiding multible drug therapy. When such treatment is unavoidable, patients must be carefully observed for evidence of intensified or diminished drug effect. Only this permits the detection and prevention of untoward drug interactions. PMID:4881984

  7. Food and drug interactions: a general review.

    PubMed

    Ötles, Semih; Senturk, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well known and identified that drug-drug interactions exist, the recognition of importance of food and drug interactions to practice has been growing much slower. On the other hand, drug-food/nutrient interactions continue to grow with the common use of medications. Beside the awareness of this type of interactions, food-drug interaction studies are critical to evaluate appropriate dosing, timing, and formulation of new drug candidates. Drug-food interactions take place mechanistically due to altered intestinal transport and metabolism, or systemic distribution, metabolism and excretion. In addition, some people have greater risk of food and drug interactions who have a poor diet, have serious health problems, childrens and pregnant women. In this article, basic informations about importance, classifications, transporters and enzymes of drug and nutrient interaction are given and some specific examples of both drug and nutrients and influences on each other are included.

  8. [The drug-drug interactions in a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Kirilochev, O O; Umerova, A R; Dorfman, I P; Khryashchev, A V

    An analysis of 132 drugs used in a psychiatric hospital for the estimation of the possibility of drug-drug interactions has been carried out. It has been established that one in five potential combination has a drug-drug interaction with clinically significant interactions being more frequent. Psychotropic drugs occupy a leading position in the number of such interactions. This analysis is able to improve the safety of the combined pharmacotherapies by choosing an alternative drug, correction of dose or active monitoring of the clinical condition of the patient, including laboratory and instrumental data.

  9. Irreversible enzyme inhibition kinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Mohutsky, Michael; Hall, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the types of irreversible inhibition of drug-metabolizing enzymes and the methods commonly employed to quantify the irreversible inhibition and subsequently predict the extent and time course of clinically important drug-drug interactions.

  10. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  11. Use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for assessment of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Baneyx, Guillaume; Fukushima, Yumi; Parrott, Neil

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between co-administered medicines can reduce efficacy or lead to adverse effects. Understanding and managing such interactions is essential in bringing safe and effective medicines to the market. Ideally, interaction potential should be recognized early and minimized in compounds that reach late stages of drug development. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models combine knowledge of physiological factors with compound-specific properties to simulate how a drug behaves in the human body. These software tools are increasingly used during drug discovery and development and, when integrating relevant in vitro data, can simulate drug interaction potential. This article provides some background and presents illustrative examples. Physiologically based models are an integral tool in the discovery and development of drugs, and can significantly aid our understanding and prediction of drug interactions.

  12. Medication Interactions: Food, Supplements and Other Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are prescribed a new medication. Ask about food, beverages, dietary supplements and other drugs. Check with your ... it with other drugs? Should I avoid certain foods, beverages or other products? What are possible drug interaction ...

  13. Understanding and preventing drug–drug and drug–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Sheehan, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant administration of multiple drugs can lead to unanticipated drug interactions and resultant adverse drug events with their associated costs. A more thorough understanding of the different cytochrome P450 isoenzymes and drug transporters has led to new methods to try to predict and prevent clinically relevant drug interactions. There is also an increased recognition of the need to identify the impact of pharmacogenetic polymorphisms on drug interactions. More stringent regulatory requirements have evolved for industry to classify cytochrome inhibitors and inducers, test the effect of drug interactions in the presence of polymorphic enzymes, and evaluate multiple potentially interacting drugs simultaneously. In clinical practice, drug alert software programs have been developed. This review discusses drug interaction mechanisms and strategies for screening and minimizing exposure to drug interactions. We also provide future perspectives for reducing the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. PMID:24745854

  14. [Importance of drug interactions with smoking in modern drug research].

    PubMed

    Laki, Szilvia; Kalapos-Kovács, Bernadett; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Drug interaction is a process during which a drug's fate in the body or its pharmacological properties are altered by an influencing factor. The extent of the drug interaction's effect can vary. The interaction could result from the modulation by another drug, food, alcohol, caffeine, narcotics, a drug influencing absorption or smoking. Moreover, transporter interactions with smoking could also have a major impact on many drug's efficacy. Clinically relevant drug interactions with smoking were classified in terms of their effect: pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and transporter interactions. Policyclic aromatic carbohydrates, found in cigarette smoke, have enzyme inducing properties. The interaction affects mainly the hepatic isoenzyme CYP1A2. Interactions caused by smoking have an effect on all drugs being substrates of and therefore metabolised by CYP1A2. Pharmacokinetic alteration can also occur during the absorption, distribution and elimination process. The pharmacodynamic interactions are mainly caused by the effects of nicotine, a cigarette smoke component. Through interactions, smoking could also modify the activity of transporter proteins, altering this way the ADME properties of many drugs. Since smoking is one of the deadliest artefact in the history of human civilisation, identifying drug interactions with smoking is the physician's and pharmacist's major responsibility and task. Moreover, it is necessary to identify the patient's smoking habits during a medical treatment. This review aims to investigate the main types of drug interactions (PK/PD), identify factors influencing the activity of CYP enzymes and transporters, and also summarize the mechanisms of the most important drug interactions with smoking and their clinically relevant consequences (Table II-VI.). Drugs, with effects somehow altered by smoking-interactions, have been studied.

  15. Live minimal path for interactive segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartrand, Gabriel; Tang, An; Chav, Ramnada; Cresson, Thierry; Chantrel, Steeve; De Guise, Jacques A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical image segmentation is nowadays required for medical device development and in a growing number of clinical and research applications. Since dedicated automatic segmentation methods are not always available, generic and efficient interactive tools can alleviate the burden of manual segmentation. In this paper we propose an interactive segmentation tool based on image warping and minimal path segmentation that is efficient for a wide variety of segmentation tasks. While the user roughly delineates the desired organs boundary, a narrow band along the cursors path is straightened, providing an ideal subspace for feature aligned filtering and minimal path algorithm. Once the segmentation is performed on the narrow band, the path is warped back onto the original image, precisely delineating the desired structure. This tool was found to have a highly intuitive dynamic behavior. It is especially efficient against misleading edges and required only coarse interaction from the user to achieve good precision. The proposed segmentation method was tested for 10 difficult liver segmentations on CT and MRI images, and the resulting 2D overlap Dice coefficient was 99% on average..

  16. Drug-pyridoxal phosphate interactions.

    PubMed

    Ebadi, M; Gessert, C F; Al-Sayegh, A

    1982-01-01

    In this review it has been pointed out that vitamin B6 and its vitamers can be involved in many interactions with a number of drugs, as well as with the actions of various endocrines and neurotransmitters. Nutritional deficiencies, especially of vitamins and proteins, can affect the manner in which drugs undergo biotransformation, and thereby may also modify the therapeutic efficacy of certain drugs. The differences between nutritional vitamin B6 deficiency and the hereditary disorder producing pyridoxine dependency are discussed. In addition to a pyridoxine deficiency being able to adversely affect drug actions, the improper supplementation with vitamin B6 can in some instances also adversely affect drug efficacy. A decrease by pyridoxine in the efficacy of levodopa used in the treatment of Parkinsonism is an example. The interrelationships and enzymatic interconversions among pyridoxine vitamers, both phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated, are briefly discussed, particularly regarding their pharmacokinetic properties. The ways in which the normal biochemical functions of vitamin B6 may be interfered with by various drugs are reviewed. (1) The chronic administration of isoniazid for the prevention or treatment of tuberculosis can produce peripheral neuropathy which can be prevented by the concurrent administration of pyridoxine. An acute toxic overdose of isoniazid causes generalized convulsions, and the intravenous administration of pyridoxine hydrochloride will prevent or stop these seizures. (2) The acute ingestion of excessive monosodium glutamate will, in some individuals, cause a group of symptoms including among others headache, weakness, stiffness, and heartburn, collectively known as the 'Chinese Restaurant Syndrome.' These symptoms can be prevented by prior supplementation with vitamin B6. The beneficial effect is ascribed to the correction of a deficiency in the activity of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, an enzyme that is dependent on pyridoxal

  17. Psychological Effects of Stimulant Drugs in Children with Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, C. Keith

    1972-01-01

    Two technical studies involving the drugs dextroamphetamine, methylphenidate, and magnesium pemoline were reported in regard to the psychological characteristics and effects of stimulant drugs in children with minimal brain injuries. (CB)

  18. Psychological Effects of Stimulant Drugs in Children with Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, C. Keith

    1972-01-01

    Two technical studies involving the drugs dextroamphetamine, methylphenidate, and magnesium pemoline were reported in regard to the psychological characteristics and effects of stimulant drugs in children with minimal brain injuries. (CB)

  19. Clinical Drug-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction Potential of Sucralfate with Other Drugs: Review and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, Suresh P; Syed, Muzeeb; Chandrasekar, Devaraj V; Mullangi, Ramesh; Srinivas, Nuggehally R

    2016-10-01

    Sucralfate, a complex of aluminium hydroxide with sulfated sucrose, forms a strong gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosal barrier with excellent anti-ulcer property. Because sucralfate does not undergo any significant oral absorption, sucralfate resides in the GIT for a considerable length of time. The unabsorbed sucralfate may alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral drugs by impeding its absorption and reducing the oral bioavailability. Because of the increased use of sucralfate, it was important to provide a reappraisal of the published clinical drug-drug interaction studies of sucralfate with scores of drugs. This review covers several category of drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, fluoroquinolones, histamine H2-receptor blockers, macrolides, anti-fungals, anti-diabetics, salicylic acid derivatives, steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and provides pharmacokinetic data summary along with study design, objectives and key remarks. While the loss of oral bioavailability was significant for the fluoroquinolone class, it generally varied for other classes of drugs, suggesting that impact of the co-administration of sucralfate is manageable in clinical situations. Given the technology advancement in formulation development, it may be in order feasible to develop appropriate formulation strategies to either avoid or minimize the absorption-related issues when co-administered with sucralfate. It is recommended that consideration of both in vitro and preclinical studies may be in order to gauge the level of interaction of a drug with sucralfate. Such data may aid in the development of appropriate strategies to navigate the co-administration of sucralfate with other drugs in this age of polypharmacy.

  20. Clinically Relevant Drug Interactions with Anti-Alzheimer's Drugs.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Sultana, Janet; Drago, Filippo; Spina, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The aging world population had led to an increase in the prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The drugs used to slow down the onset of AD, galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine and memantine, are generally well-tolerated. However, drug interactions between these drugs and other drugs are an important aspect of patient safety that should be borne in mind, particularly given the high burden of polypharmacy in the elderly. The aim of this review is to provide an updated review of clinically significant drug-drug interactions concerning drugs approved for AD. PubMed was searched for relevant keywords. No time limit was imposed but only articles in English published in peer-reviewed journals were selected. Relevant literature was also identified from the references of identified articles. Further information was obtained from drug summary of product characteristics. The major pharmacokinetic interactions identified concerned fluoxetine, paroxetine and ketoconazole when used with galantamine or donepezil. On the other hand, the major potential pharmacodynamic interactions concerned anti-dementia drugs and general anesthesia agents, anti-cholinergic drugs, conventional antipsychotics and bradycardia-inducing drugs. In clinical practice memantine shows a lower potential for pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) compared to other drug classes. The concomitant use of anti-dementia drugs with other drugs can have variable clinical effects, making appropriate prescribing of these drugs very challenging. A simple and coherent way of presenting evidence on complex drug interaction information from heterogenous sources to clinicians is needed in order for the voluminous data available to have an impact on clinical practice. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Quantifying drug-drug interactions in pharmaco-EEG.

    PubMed

    Barbanoj, M J; Antonijoan, R M; Riba, J; Valle, M; Romero, S; Jané, F

    2006-04-01

    A drug interaction refers to an event in which the usual pharmacological effect of a drug is modified by other factors, most frequently additional drugs. When two drugs are administered simultaneously, or within a short time of each other, an interaction can occur that may increase or decrease the intended magnitude or duration of the effect of one or both drugs. Drugs may interact on a pharmaceutical, pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic basis. Pharmacodynamic interactions arise when the alteration of the effects occurs at the site of action. This is a wide field where not only interactions between different drugs are considered but also drug and metabolites (midazolam/alpha-hydroxy-midazolam), enantiomers (ketamine), as well as phenomena such as tolerance (nordiazepam) and sensitization (diazepam). Pharmacodynamic interactions can result in antagonism or synergism and can originate at a receptor level (antagonism, partial agonism, down-regulation, up-regulation), at an intraneuronal level (transduction, uptake), or at an interneuronal level (physiological pathways). Alternatively, psychotropic drug interactions assessed through quantitative pharmaco-EEG can be viewed according to the broad underlying objective of the study: safety-oriented (ketoprofen/theophylline, lorazepam/diphenhydramine, granisetron/haloperidol), strictly pharmacologically-oriented (benzodiazepine receptors), or broadly neuro-physiologically-oriented (diazepam/buspirone). Methodological issues are stressed, particularly drug plasma concentrations, dose-response relationships and time-course of effects (fluoxetine/buspirone), and unsolved questions are addressed (yohimbine/caffeine, hydroxizyne/alcohol).

  2. HIV Treatment: What is a Drug Interaction?

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV/AIDS-related drugs, including information on drug interactions. This fact sheet is based on information from the following sources: From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents ...

  3. Weakly interacting dark matter from the minimal walking technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi; Tuominen, Kimmo E-mail: jussi.virkajarvi@jyu.fi

    2010-02-01

    We study a weakly interacting dark matter particle motivated by minimal walking technicolor theories. Our WIMP is a mixture of a sterile state and a state with the charges of a standard model fourth family neutrino. We show that the model can give the right amount of dark matter over a range of the WIMP mass and mixing angle. We compute bounds on the model parameters from the current accelerator data including the oblique corrections to the precision electroweak parameters, as well as from cryogenic experiments, Super-Kamiokande and from the IceCube experiment. We show that consistent dark matter solutions exist which satisfy all current constraints. However, almost the entire parameter range of the model lies within the the combined reach of the next generation experiments.

  4. Clinical drug-drug interactions: focus on venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Paulo; Alves, Gilberto; LLerena, Adrián; Falcão, Amílcar

    2015-03-01

    Venlafaxine (VEN) is an antidepressant agent widely used nowadays as an alternative to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), particularly for the treatment of SSRI-resistant depression. As the co-administration of antidepressant drugs with other medications is very common in clinical practice, the potential risk for pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic drug interactions that may be clinically meaningful increases. Bearing in mind that VEN has exhibited large variability in antidepressant response, besides the individual genetic background, several other factors may contribute to those variable clinical outcomes, such as the occurrence of significant drug-drug interactions. Indeed, the presence of drug interactions is possibly one of the major reasons for interindividual variability, and their anticipation should be considered in conjugation with other specific patients' characteristics to optimize the antidepressant therapy. Hence, a comprehensive overview of the pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based drug interactions involving VEN is herein provided, particularly addressing their clinical relevance.

  5. Text Mining for Drug–Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heng-Yi; Chiang, Chien-Wei; Li, Lang

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of drug–drug interaction (DDI), the study of pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and pharmacogenetics (PG) data are significant. In recent years, drug PK parameters, drug interaction parameters, and PG data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in literature. Also the lack of an appropriate PK ontology and a well-annotated PK corpus, which provide the background knowledge and the criteria of determining DDI, respectively, lead to the difficulty of developing DDI text mining tools for PK data collection from the literature and data integration from multiple databases. To conquer the issues, we constructed a comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology. It includes all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments, in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, as well as drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three-level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:24788261

  6. Drug interaction in the emergency service

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Cintra, Raíssa Silveira; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To identify the occurrence of potential drug interactions in prescriptions for adult patients admitted to the Emergency Department of Hospital São Paulo. Methods: A cross-sectional and descriptive study. Its sample consisted of 200 medical prescriptions. The analysis of drug interactions was performed using the Drugs.com database, where they are classified according to severity of interaction as severe, moderate, mild and without interaction. Results: The number of drugs in prescriptions ranged from 2 to 19, and the average per prescription was 4.97 drugs. A total of 526 potential drug interactions were identified in 159 prescriptions (79.5%); in that, 109 were severe, 354 moderate, 63 mild interactions, and 41 showed no interaction. Conclusion: This study demonstrated potential drug interactions in 79.5% of prescriptions examined in the Emergency Department. Drug interactions can occur at any time when using medications and, during this working process, the nursing staff is involved in several steps. Therefore, training the nursing staff for the rational use of drugs can increase safety of care delivered to patients. PMID:24488385

  7. A clinician's guide to statin drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kellick, Kenneth A; Bottorff, Michael; Toth, Peter P; The National Lipid Association's Safety Task Force

    2014-01-01

    The statins are widely used worldwide to reduce risk for cardiovascular events in both the primary and secondary prevention settings. Although generally quite safe, the statins can be associated with a variety of serious side adverse effects, including myalgia, myopathy, and changes in plasma enzymes of hepatic origin. Although rare, the most serious of these is rhabdomyolysis. Several drugs can interfere with the metabolism and disposal of the statins, thereby increasing risk for adverse events. It is important that clinicians treating patients with statins be aware of the potential for drug-drug interactions between each statin and specific other drugs and take measures to prevent them. The prediction of potential drug-drug interactions derives from basic pharmacokinetic principles. Certain drug interactions are predicted by measuring the effect of interacting drugs on blood plasma concentrations of the statin. Individual patient variations resulting in part from polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes confound some of these predictions. Based on these known effects, a new classification for predicting statin drug interactions is proposed. This report discusses likely prescription and nonprescription interactions as well as potential alternatives for special populations.

  8. [Interactions of cytostatic agents with other drugs].

    PubMed

    Sauter, C

    1991-08-31

    With the degree of polypharmacy currently practiced in the field of oncology, there are undoubtedly many drug interactions. In the present study the influence of "non-cytotoxic" drugs on anticancer drugs is discussed, but not the reverse. Not only is the augmentation (reversal of multidrug resistance) or the reduction of antitumor properties of cytotoxic drugs observed, but also cytostatic activities of "non-cytotoxic" drugs themselves. Examples are calmodulin inhibitors such as phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. Interactions may also increase side effects of cytostatic drugs or even neutralize the antitumoral activity. To ensure that interactions are not overlooked, all medicaments being administered should be listed. It is, however, not feasible yet to determine serum concentrations of all the drugs given to the patient. The antitumor activity of supportive care could be evaluated in randomized studies (e.g. cytostatic drugs +/- antidepressants).

  9. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 1)

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    knowledge of the mechanisms of herbal drug interactions is necessary for assessing and minimizing clinical risks. These processes help prediction of interactions between herbal supplements and prescription drugs. Healthcare professionals should remain vigilant for potential interactions between herbal supplements/medicines and prescription drugs, especially for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index are used. PMID:26417265

  10. Adverse drug interactions in dental practice: interactions associated with vasoconstrictors. Part V of a series.

    PubMed

    Yagiela, J A

    1999-05-01

    Adrenergic vasoconstrictors are commonly used by dentists to enhance the pain-relieving action of local anesthetics and to control local bleeding. Although normally considered safe for these applications, vasoconstrictors can participate in drug interactions that potentially are harmful to patients. The faculty of a March 1998 symposium entitled "Adverse Drug Interactions in Dentistry: Separating the Myths From the Facts" extensively reviewed the literature on drug interactions. They then established a significance rating of alleged adverse drug interactions pertaining to dentistry, based on the quality of documentation and severity of effect. The author of this article focused on the adrenergic vasoconstrictors epinephrine and levonordefrin. Vasoconstrictor drug interactions involving tricyclic antidepressants, nonselective beta-adrenergic blocking drugs, certain general anesthetics and cocaine are well-documented in both humans and animals as having the potential for causing serious morbidity or death. Evidence for adverse interactions involving adrenergic neuronal blocking drugs, drugs with alpha-adrenergic blocking activity, local anesthetics and thyroid hormones is much less compelling, suggesting for the most part that clinically significant reactions may occur only when both the vasoconstrictor and the interacting drug are used in excessive doses. In the case of monoamine oxidase inhibitors, there is no credible evidence of a significant interaction with epinephrine or levonordefrin. Potentially serious adverse drug interactions involving adrenergic vasoconstrictors can occur in dental practice. In most circumstances, careful administration of small doses of vasoconstrictors and avoidance of gingival retraction cord containing epinephrine, coupled with monitoring of vita signs, will permit these drugs to be used with no risk or only minimally increased risk. Only in the case of cocaine intoxication must adrenergic vasoconstrictors be avoided completely. For

  11. Herb-drug, food-drug, nutrient-drug, and drug-drug interactions: mechanisms involved and their medical implications.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Janina Maria

    2002-06-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and iatrogenic diseases have been identified as significant factors responsible for patient morbidity and mortality. Significant studies on drug metabolism in humans have been published during the last few years, offering a deeper comprehension of the mechanisms underlying adverse drug reactions and interactions. More understanding of these mechanisms, and of recent advances in laboratory technology, can help to evaluate potential drug interactions when drugs are prescribed concurrently. Increasing knowledge of interindividual variation in drug breakdown capacity and recent findings concerning the influence of environment, diet, nutrients, and herbal products can be used to reduce ADRs and iatrogenic diseases. Reviewed data suggest that drug treatment should be increasingly custom tailored to suit the individual patient and that appropriately co-prescribed diet and herbal remedies, could increase drug efficacy and lessen drug toxicity. This review focuses mainly on recently published research material. The cytochrome p450 enzymes, their role in metabolism, and their mechanisms of action are reviewed, and their role in drug-drug interactions are discussed. Drug-food and drug-herb interactions have garnered attention. Interdisciplinary communication among medical herbalists, medical doctors, and dietetic experts needs to be improved and encouraged. Internet resources for obtaining current information regarding drug-drug, drug-herb, and drug-nutrient interactions are provided.

  12. Profile of drug interactions in hospitalized children

    PubMed Central

    Martinbiancho, Jacqueline; Zuckermann, Joice; Dos Santos, Luciana; Silva, Mariane M.

    Introduction The expected therapeutic response may be affected by the presence of drug interactions. With the high number of reports on new drug interactions, it has been difficult for health professionals to keep constantly updated. For this reason, computer systems have helped identify such interactions. Objectives To verify the rate and profile of drug interactions in medical prescriptions to hospitalized pediatric patients. Methods A descriptive study investigated prescriptions to hospitalized pediatric patients. The study included patients between 0 and 12 years old, containing 4 or more drugs in their prescriptions. The analysis of interaction and incompatibility possibilities in prescribed drugs used Micromedex / Drug-Reax® program. Results From 2005 to 2006, 3,170 patients were investigated, and 11,181 prescriptions were analyzed, a mean value of 3.5 prescriptions/patient. In total, 6,857 drug interactions were found, which corresponds to 1.9 interaction/prescription. Among them, relevance to ampicillin and gentamicin, found in 220 (3.2%) prescriptions. In total, 2,411 drug incompatibilities in via y were found, a mean value of 0.5/prescription, with emphasis on vancomycin and cefepime, found in 243 (10.0%) prescriptions. Conclusion The presence of drug interactions is a permanent risk in hospitals. This way, the utilization of computer programs, pharmacotherapy monitoring of patients and the pharmacist presence in the multidisciplinary team are some manners of contributing to hospitalized patients’ treatment. PMID:25170352

  13. Botanical-drug interactions: a scientific perspective.

    PubMed

    de Lima Toccafondo Vieira, Manuela; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2012-09-01

    There is a continued predisposition of concurrent use of drugs and botanical products. A general lack of knowledge of the interaction potential together with an under-reporting of botanical use poses a challenge for the health care providers and a safety concern for patients. Botanical-drug interactions increase the patient risk, especially with regard to drugs with a narrow therapeutic index (e.g., warfarin, cyclosporine, and digoxin). Examples of case reports and clinical studies evaluating botanical-drug interactions of commonly used botanicals in the US are presented. The potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic bases of such interactions are discussed, as well as the challenges associated with the interpretation of the available data and prediction of botanical-drug interactions. Recent FDA experiences with botanical products and interactions including labeling implications as a risk management strategy are highlighted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Clinically significant drug-drug interactions between analgesics and psychotopics].

    PubMed

    Strobach, Dorothea

    2012-07-01

    Combining analgesic and psychotropic drugs can lead to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Under treatment with several serotonergic substances serotonin syndrome can occur, e.g., with certain opioids and antidepressant drugs. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors also affect the serotonin level in platelets, this can raise the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding especially in combination with non-steroidal antirheumatic drugs. Anticholinergic effects and sedation are common side effects of psychotropic but also analgesic drugs with possible additive results. A wide range of interactions between analgesics and psychotropics can occure during metabolism, especially via the cytochrome-P-system. The clinical relevance of warnings on drug interactions from data banks has always to be judged for the individual patient.

  15. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor.

  16. Prescribing in prison: minimizing psychotropic drug diversion in correctional practice.

    PubMed

    Pilkinton, Patricia D; Pilkinton, James C

    2014-04-01

    Correctional facilities are a major provider of mental health care throughout the United States. In spite of the numerous benefits of providing care in this setting, clinicians are sometimes concerned about entering into correctional care because of uncertainty in prescribing practices. This article provides an introduction to prescription drug use, abuse, and diversion in the correctional setting, including systems issues in prescribing, commonly abused prescription medications, motivation for and detection of prescription drug abuse, and the use of laboratory monitoring. By understanding the personal and systemic factors that affect prescribing habits, the clinician can develop a more rewarding correctional practice and improve care for inmates with mental illness.

  17. Gaussian interaction profile kernels for predicting drug-target interaction.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Twan; Nabuurs, Sander B; Marchiori, Elena

    2011-11-01

    The in silico prediction of potential interactions between drugs and target proteins is of core importance for the identification of new drugs or novel targets for existing drugs. However, only a tiny portion of all drug-target pairs in current datasets are experimentally validated interactions. This motivates the need for developing computational methods that predict true interaction pairs with high accuracy. We show that a simple machine learning method that uses the drug-target network as the only source of information is capable of predicting true interaction pairs with high accuracy. Specifically, we introduce interaction profiles of drugs (and of targets) in a network, which are binary vectors specifying the presence or absence of interaction with every target (drug) in that network. We define a kernel on these profiles, called the Gaussian Interaction Profile (GIP) kernel, and use a simple classifier, (kernel) Regularized Least Squares (RLS), for prediction drug-target interactions. We test comparatively the effectiveness of RLS with the GIP kernel on four drug-target interaction networks used in previous studies. The proposed algorithm achieves area under the precision-recall curve (AUPR) up to 92.7, significantly improving over results of state-of-the-art methods. Moreover, we show that using also kernels based on chemical and genomic information further increases accuracy, with a neat improvement on small datasets. These results substantiate the relevance of the network topology (in the form of interaction profiles) as source of information for predicting drug-target interactions. Software and Supplementary Material are available at http://cs.ru.nl/~tvanlaarhoven/drugtarget2011/. tvanlaarhoven@cs.ru.nl; elenam@cs.ru.nl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. [Interactions of food and drug metabolism].

    PubMed

    Delzenne, N M; Verbeeck, R K

    2001-01-01

    The nutritional state, and/or the ingestion of specific nutrients, is/are able to modify drug disposition, by interfering with drug absorption, distribution, storage, and metabolism. Recent data report that nutrients interfere with drug metabolism either by modifying key enzymes of phase I (cytochromeP450 dependent mixed function oxidase) and II (glucuronosyl, sulfonyl- ... transferases), or by modulating coenzymes availability (NADPH, UDPglucuronic acid...). Food components involved in drug metabolism modifications are either macro-nutrients (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, ethanol), micronutriments (vitamins, minerals), or phytochemicals. Drug-nutrients interactions may be beneficials, and thus could constitute, i.e. a way to improve drug therapeutic index, or generate adverse effects.

  19. 78 FR 36194 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Investigational New Drug Applications for Minimally...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... New Drug Applications for Minimally Manipulated, Unrelated Allogeneic Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood..., Unrelated Allogeneic Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood Intended for Hematopoietic and Immunologic... Allogeneic Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood Intended for Hematopoietic Reconstitution for Specified Indications...

  20. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Patel, Mitesh; Paturi, Durga K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Complete delineation of the HIV-1 life cycle has resulted in the development of several antiretroviral drugs. Twenty-five therapeutic agents belonging to five different classes are currently available for the treatment of HIV-1 infections. Advent of triple combination antiretroviral therapy has significantly lowered the mortality rate in HIV patients. However, fungal infections still represent major opportunistic diseases in immunocompromised patients worldwide. Areas covered Antiretroviral drugs that target enzymes and/or proteins indispensable for viral replication are discussed in this article. Fungal infections, causative organisms, epidemiology and preferred treatment modalities are also outlined. Finally, observed/predicted drug-drug interactions between antiretrovirals and antifungals are summarized along with clinical recommendations. Expert opinion Concomitant use of amphotericin B and tenofovir must be closely monitored for renal functioning. Due to relatively weak interactive potential with the CYP450 system, fluconazole is the preferred antifungal drug. High itraconazole doses (> 200 mg/day) are not advised in patients receiving booster protease inhibitor (PI) regimen. Posaconazole is contraindicated in combination with either efavirenz or fosamprenavir. Moreover, voriconazole is contraindicated with high-dose ritonavir-boosted PI. Echino-candins may aid in overcoming the limitations of existing antifungal therapy. An increasing number of documented or predicted drug-drug interactions and therapeutic drug monitoring may aid in the management of HIV-associated opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:24521092

  1. Enterprise-wide drug-drug interaction alerting system.

    PubMed

    Greim, Julie A; Shek, Caroline; Jones, Linda; Macauley, Robert; Paterno, Marilyn; Blumenfeld, Barry H; Kuperman, Gilad

    2003-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) 1999 report To Err is Human: Building a safer Health System, "medical errors kill some 44,000-98,0001 people in U.S. hospitals each year. Partners HealthCare System (PHS) is a large integrated delivery network in Boston, MA, which has as a goal improving patient care by preventing adverse drug events (ADE) and reducing medication errors enterprise-wide. PHS has developed a drug-drug Interaction (DDI) detection feature, for the suite of clinical applications currently used by its two major teaching institutions, Brigham & Women's Hospital (BWH) and Mass General Hospital (MGH). The following clinical applications will be using this drug-drug interaction feature: NICU Order Entry (OE) at BWH, MGH OE for pediatrics and adults, the Partners outpatient medical record, The LMR, and BICS OE at BWH.

  2. Clinical Drug-Drug Interaction Evaluations to Inform Drug Use and Enable Drug Access.

    PubMed

    Rekić, Dinko; Reynolds, Kellie S; Zhao, Ping; Zhang, Lei; Yoshida, Kenta; Sachar, Madhav; Piquette Miller, Micheline; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Zineh, Issam

    2017-09-01

    Clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs) can occur when multiple drugs are taken by the same patient. Significant DDIs can result in clinical toxicity or treatment failure. Therefore, DDI assessment is an integral part of drug development and the benefit-risk assessment of new therapies. Regulatory agencies including the Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency, and the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency of Japan have made recommendations in their DDI guidance documents on various methodologies (in vitro, in silico, and clinical) to assess DDI potential and inform patient management strategies. This commentary focuses on clinical DDI evaluation for the purpose of drug development and regulatory evaluation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Prediction of transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions using endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Fromm, M F

    2012-11-01

    Therapy with two or more drugs is more the rule than the exception, particularly in aging societies. Drug-drug interactions are frequently undesirable and may lead to increased toxicity and mortality. Inhibition of transporters is one major mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions. The myriad of potential drug combinations makes it very challenging to predict drug-drug interactions. This Commentary discusses potential advantages and limitations of endogenous compounds for predicting transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

  4. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  5. An Oral Contraceptive Drug Interaction Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradstreet, Thomas E.; Panebianco, Deborah L.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on a two treatment, two period, two treatment sequence crossover drug interaction study of a new drug and a standard oral contraceptive therapy. Both normal theory and distribution-free statistical analyses are provided along with a notable amount of graphical insight into the dataset. For one of the variables, the decision on…

  6. [Pharmacokinetic interactions of telaprevir with other drugs].

    PubMed

    Berenguer Berenguer, Juan; González-García, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Telaprevir is a new direct-acting antiviral drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is both a substrate and an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes. With the introduction of this new drug, assessment of drug-drug interactions has become a key factor in the evaluation of patients under treatment for HCV infection. During the treatment of this infection, many patients require other drugs to mitigate the adverse effects of anti-HCV drugs and to control other comorbidities. Moreover, most patients coinfected with HIV and HCV require antiretroviral therapy during treatment for HCV. Physicians should therefore be familiar with the pharmacokinetic properties of direct-acting antivirals for HCV treatment and their potential drug-drug interactions. The present article reviews the available information to date on the interactions of telaprevir with other drugs and provides recommendations for daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Participatory design for drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Almerares, Alfredo; Stanziola, Enrique; Risk, Marcelo; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of decision support systems, in the point of care, to alert drug-drug interactions has been shown to improve quality of care. Still, the use of these systems has not been as expected, it is believed, because of the difficulties in their knowledge databases; errors in the generation of the alerts and the lack of a suitable design. This study expands on the development of alerts using participatory design techniques based on user centered design process. This work was undertaken in three stages (inquiry, participatory design and usability testing) it showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction in the system.

  8. Clustering drug-drug interaction networks with energy model layouts: community analysis and drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Udrescu, Lucreţia; Sbârcea, Laura; Topîrceanu, Alexandru; Iovanovici, Alexandru; Kurunczi, Ludovic; Bogdan, Paul; Udrescu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing drug-drug interactions may unravel previously unknown drug action patterns, leading to the development of new drug discovery tools. We present a new approach to analyzing drug-drug interaction networks, based on clustering and topological community detection techniques that are specific to complex network science. Our methodology uncovers functional drug categories along with the intricate relationships between them. Using modularity-based and energy-model layout community detection algorithms, we link the network clusters to 9 relevant pharmacological properties. Out of the 1141 drugs from the DrugBank 4.1 database, our extensive literature survey and cross-checking with other databases such as Drugs.com, RxList, and DrugBank 4.3 confirm the predicted properties for 85% of the drugs. As such, we argue that network analysis offers a high-level grasp on a wide area of pharmacological aspects, indicating possible unaccounted interactions and missing pharmacological properties that can lead to drug repositioning for the 15% drugs which seem to be inconsistent with the predicted property. Also, by using network centralities, we can rank drugs according to their interaction potential for both simple and complex multi-pathology therapies. Moreover, our clustering approach can be extended for applications such as analyzing drug-target interactions or phenotyping patients in personalized medicine applications. PMID:27599720

  9. Minimizing the risk of chemically reactive metabolite formation of new drug candidates: implications for preclinical drug design.

    PubMed

    Brink, Andreas; Pähler, Axel; Funk, Christoph; Schuler, Franz; Schadt, Simone

    2016-11-27

    Many pharmaceutical companies aim to reduce reactive metabolite formation by chemical modification at early stages of drug discovery. A practice often applied is the detection of stable trapping products of electrophilic intermediates with nucleophilic trapping reagents to guide rational structure-based drug design. This contribution delineates this strategy to minimize the potential for reactive metabolite formation of clinical candidates during preclinical drug optimization, exemplified by the experience at Roche over the past decade. For the majority of research programs it was possible to proceed with compounds optimized for reduced covalent binding potential. Such optimized candidates are expected to have a higher likelihood of succeeding throughout the development processes, resulting in safer drugs.

  10. Drug-Drug Interactions and Diagnostics for Drug Users With HIV and HIV/HCV Coinfections: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Jag H; Talal, Andrew H; Morse, Gene

    2017-03-01

    Substance use and pharmacologic treatment of co-occurring infections such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are associated with many adverse consequences including pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The National Institute on Drug Abuse sponsored a 2-day conference on DDIs at which clinicians/scientists from government, academia, and the pharmaceutical industry presented the most current research findings to formulate a comprehensive overview of DDIs. Specific topics discussed included drug metabolism; drug interactions between medications used in the treatment of HIV, HCV, and substance use disorders; intrahepatic concentrations and methods of assessment of drugs in liver disease of varying etiologies and degrees of impairment; and minimally invasive sampling techniques for the assessment of intrahepatic drug concentrations, viral replication, and changes in gene expression in response to treatment. Finally, the speakers identified research targets and priorities on DDIs. Areas of emphasis included development of diagnostic assays for drug concentration assessment in different organs, an enhanced understanding of factors responsible for alterations in drug metabolism and excretion, and establishment of clinical trials and work groups to study DDIs. Our long-term objective is to broaden investigation in the field of DDIs in substance users. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. [Fruit and berries--interactions with drugs].

    PubMed

    Molden, Espen; Spigset, Olav

    2007-12-13

    Diet is one of many factors that could alter the pharmacokinetics of drugs. Several fruits and berries have recently been shown to contain agents that affect drug-metabolizing enzymes. Grapefruit is the most well-known example, but also Sevillian orange, pomelo and star fruit contain agents that inhibit cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), which is the most important enzyme in drug metabolism. The present article reviews published information on potential interactions between drugs and fruits/berries, with main focus on inhibition and induction of metabolizing enzymes.

  12. Can vaccines interact with drug metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Clementi, Emilio; Capuano, Annalisa; Radice, Sonia

    2015-02-01

    Vaccines are safe and efficacious in reducing the burden of several serious infections affecting children and adults. Due to their efficacy, vaccines are often administered in patients with chronic diseases, likely to be under poly-therapy. Because of several case reports indicating changes in drug metabolism after vaccination, the hypothesis of an interaction between vaccines and specific drugs has been put forward. These interactions are conceivably of great concern, especially in patients treated with molecules characterised by a narrow therapeutic index. Herein, we review and systematise the available evidence on vaccine-drug interactions. The picture that emerges indicates that reduction in the activity of specific CYPs following vaccination may occur, most likely via interferon γ overproduction, and for specific drugs such as anticonvulsivant and theophylline may have significant clinical relevance. Clinical interaction between vaccines and drugs that are metabolised by cytochromes uninfluenced by INFγ levels, such as warfarin, are instead unlikely to happen. Further studies are however needed to gain a complete picture of vaccine-drug interactions and define their relevance in terms of possible negative clinical impact.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions with Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Meenakshi R; Penzak, Scott R

    2017-08-01

    Panax ginseng is widely used as an adaptogen throughout the world. The major active constituents of P. ginseng are ginsenosides. Most naturally occurring ginsenosides are deglycosylated by colonic bacteria to intestinal metabolites. Ginsenosides along with these metabolites are widely accepted as being responsible for the pharmacologic activity and drug interaction potential of ginseng. Numerous preclinical studies have assessed the influence of various ginseng components on cytochrome P450 (CYP), glucuronidation, and drug transport activity. Results from these investigations have been largely inconclusive due to the use of different ginseng products and variations in methodology between studies. Drug interaction studies in humans have been conflicting and have largely yielded negative results or results that suggest only a weak interaction. One study using a midazolam probe found weak CYP3A induction and another using a fexofenadine probe found weak P-gp inhibition. Despite several case reports indicating a drug interaction between warfarin and P. ginseng, pharmacokinetic studies involving these agents in combination have failed to find significant pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions. To this end, drug interactions involving P. ginseng appear to be rare; however, close clinical monitoring is still suggested for patients taking warfarin or CYP3A or P-gp substrates with narrow therapeutic indices.

  14. Clinical drugs that interact with St. John's wort and implication in drug development.

    PubMed

    Di, Yuan Ming; Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie Changli; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-01-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) is one of the most commonly used herbal antidepressants for the treatment of minor to moderate depression. A major safety concern about SJW is its ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and/or clinical response of a variety of clinically important drugs that have distinctive chemical structure, mechanism of action and metabolic pathways. This review highlights and updates the knowledge on clinical interactions of prescribed drugs with SJW and the implication in drug development. A number of clinically significant interactions of SJW have been identified with conventional drugs, including anticancer agents (imatinib and irinotecan), anti-HIV agents (e.g. indinavir, lamivudine and nevirapine), anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. ibuprofen and fexofenadine), antimicrobial agents (e.g. erythromycin and voriconazole), cardiovascular drugs (e.g. digoxin, ivabradine, warfarin, verapamil, nifedipine and talinolol), central nervous system agents (e.g. amitriptyline, buspirone, phenytoin, methadone, midazolam, alprazolam, and sertraline), hypoglycaemic agents (e.g. tolbutamide and gliclazide), immuno-modulating agents (e.g. cyclosporine and tacrolimus), oral contraceptives, proton pump inhibitor (e.g. omeprazole), respiratory system agent (e.g. theophylline), statins (e.g. atorvastatin and pravastatin). Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may play a role in the interactions of drugs with SJW. For pharmacokinetic changes of drugs by SJW, induction of cytochrome P450s (e.g. CYP2C9 and 3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are considered the major mechanism. Thus, it is not a surprise that many drugs that interact with SJW are substrates of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and P-gp. A comprehensive understanding of clinical drugs that interact with SJW has important implications in drug development. New drugs may be designed to minimize interactions with SJW; and new SJW formulations may be designed to avoid drug interactions. Further clinical and

  15. Food-drug interactions: grapefruit juice.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, Camelia Harapu; Cuciureanu, Magdalena; Vlase, L; Cuciureanu, Rodica

    2011-01-01

    Food-drug interactions are increasingly recognized as important clinical events which may change significantly the bioavailability of oral administrated drugs. Grapefruit juice (GFJ) demonstrated multiple interactions with drugs leading to loss of the therapeutic effects or increased side-effects. GFJ decreases pre-systemic metabolism through a) competitive or mechanism-based inhibition of gut wall CYP3A4 isoenzymes and b) P-glycoprotein (P-gp), c) multidrug resistance protein-2 (MRP2) or d) organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) inhibition. Although, GFJ presents high amounts of flavonoids (e.g. naringin, naringenin), furanocoumarins (e.g. 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin, bergamottin) are the main chemicals involved in the pharmacokinetic interactions. As compounds of GFJ show additive or synergistic effects, all the major furanocoumarins are necessary for the maximal inhibitory effect. Also, related citrus fruits (sweeties, pummelo and sour orange) or various plants containing furanocoumarins may present pharmacological interactions, yet to be discovered.

  16. Clinically significant drug interactions with newer antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Trifirò, Gianluca; Caraci, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    After the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), other newer antidepressants with different mechanisms of action have been introduced in clinical practice. Because antidepressants are commonly prescribed in combination with other medications used to treat co-morbid psychiatric or somatic disorders, they are likely to be involved in clinically significant drug interactions. This review examines the drug interaction profiles of the following newer antidepressants: escitalopram, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran, mirtazapine, reboxetine, bupropion, agomelatine and vilazodone. In general, by virtue of a more selective mechanism of action and receptor profile, newer antidepressants carry a relatively low risk for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, at least as compared with first-generation antidepressants, i.e. monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). On the other hand, they are susceptible to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. All new antidepressants are extensively metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes, and therefore may be the target of metabolically based drug interactions. Concomitant administration of inhibitors or inducers of the CYP isoenzymes involved in the biotransformation of specific antidepressants may cause changes in their plasma concentrations. However, due to their relatively wide margin of safety, the consequences of such kinetic modifications are usually not clinically relevant. Conversely, some newer antidepressants may cause pharmacokinetic interactions through their ability to inhibit specific CYPs. With regard to this, duloxetine and bupropion are moderate inhibitors of CYP2D6. Therefore, potentially harmful drug interactions may occur when they are coadministered with substrates of these isoforms, especially compounds with a narrow therapeutic index. The other new antidepressants are only weak inhibitors or are not inhibitors of CYP isoforms at

  17. Important drug interactions in patients with rheumatic disorders: interactions of glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants and antimalarial drugs.

    PubMed

    Hromadkova, L; Soukup, T; Vlcek, J

    2012-08-01

    Despite the fact that biological treatments are very promising, classical immunosuppressants, antimalarial drugs and glucocorticosteroids are still very important and widely used in practice. Although drug interactions can have fatal consequences, few studies have reviewed drug interactions of these classical drugs used in rheumatology, and very few guidelines are available on this subject. Therefore, this report summarizes important interactions of immunosuppressants, antimalarial drugs and glucocorticosteroids with drugs commonly used in internal medicine. In the present study, more than 300 interactions were retrieved from the Micromedex ® database. The selection was reduced to the interactions rated as moderate, major or contraindicated. The selected interactions were further checked against PubMed ®, MEDLINE ®, InfoPharm Compendium of Drug Interactions and Summaries of Product Characteristics. For each interaction, its nature, mechanism, onset and clinical severity were indicated, documentation quality was rated and recommendations for clinical practice were formulated. Twenty significant interactions that we rated as moderate, severe and very severe were identified. Interacting drugs were warfarin, fluoroquinolones, azole antifungals, co-trimoxazole, proton pump inhibitors, amiodarone, cholestyramine, activated carbon, allopurinol, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, statins, digoxin, iron, aluminium and magnesium salts, and hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic agents.

  18. Drug interactions with phytotherapeutics in oncology.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, Walter Emil; Carls, Alexandra

    2014-03-01

    Because 30 to 70% of tumour patients use complementary and alternative medicines; herb-drug combinations are particularly frequent in this population. Some of these combinations can critically alter exposure of anti-neoplastic and palliative treatment. This review summarises pharmacokinetic drug interactions caused by the herbal products most frequently used by tumour patients (garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, echinacea and St John's wort [SJW]). Herb-drug interactions, in general, and some interactions in particular (e.g., transporters, Phase II metabolism enzymes) are still poorly investigated and are difficult to evaluate because mixtures are administered with variable and often unspecified amounts of ingredients. Current evidence suggests that garlic and ginkgo can be safely co-administered, whereas CYP2C9 substrates (e.g., warfarin) should be monitored closely when ginseng therapy is started. Echinacea can induce drug metabolism mediated by CYP3A, but most likely relevant when administered with substances with a narrow therapeutic index or low oral bioavailability. The most relevant herbal perpetrator drug is SJW, which has substantial impact on CYP3A4- and CYP2C9-mediated metabolism and P-glycoprotein-mediated transport. This may lower exposure of co-administered drugs by up to 70%. Such an interaction is expected to occur with most of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, but current evidence is limited.

  19. Mechanism of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Warfarin and Statins.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abdul Naveed; Bohnert, Tonika; Williams, David A; Gan, Lawrence L; LeDuc, Barbara W

    2016-06-01

    The anticoagulant drug warfarin and the lipid-lowering statin drugs are commonly co-administered to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between these drugs have been recognized through case studies for many years, but the biochemical mechanisms causing these interactions have not been explained fully. Previous theories include kinetic alterations in cytochrome P-450-mediated drug metabolism or disturbances of drug-protein binding, leading to anticoagulant activity of warfarin; however, neither the enantioselective effects on warfarin metabolism nor the potential disruption of drug transporter function have been well investigated. This study investigated the etiology of the DDIs between warfarin and statins. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed and validated to quantify racemic warfarin, 6 of its hydroxylated metabolites, and pure enantiomers of warfarin; these methods were applied to study the role of different absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties, leading to DDIs. Plasma protein binding displacement of warfarin was performed in the presence of statins using equilibrium dialysis method. Substrate kinetics of warfarin and pure enantiomers were performed with human liver microsomes to determine the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) for the formation of all 6 hydroxywarfarin metabolites, inhibition of warfarin metabolism in the presence of statins, was determined. Uptake transport studies of warfarin were performed using overexpressing HEK cell lines and efflux transport using human adenocarcinoma colonic cell line cells. Fluvastatin significantly displaced plasma protein binding of warfarin and pure enantiomers; no other statin resulted in significant displacement of warfarin. All the statins that inhibited the formation of 10-hydroxywarfarin, atorvastatin, pitavastatin, and simvastatin were highly potent compared to other statins; in contrast, only fluvastatin

  20. QSAR Modeling and Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Alexey V; Varlamova, Ekaterina V; Lagunin, Alexey A; Dmitriev, Alexander V; Muratov, Eugene N; Fourches, Denis; Kuz'min, Victor E; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Tropsha, Alexander; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-02-01

    Severe adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are the fourth leading cause of fatality in the U.S. with more than 100,000 deaths per year. As up to 30% of all ADRs are believed to be caused by drug-drug interactions (DDIs), typically mediated by cytochrome P450s, possibilities to predict DDIs from existing knowledge are important. We collected data from public sources on 1485, 2628, 4371, and 27,966 possible DDIs mediated by four cytochrome P450 isoforms 1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4 for 55, 73, 94, and 237 drugs, respectively. For each of these data sets, we developed and validated QSAR models for the prediction of DDIs. As a unique feature of our approach, the interacting drug pairs were represented as binary chemical mixtures in a 1:1 ratio. We used two types of chemical descriptors: quantitative neighborhoods of atoms (QNA) and simplex descriptors. Radial basis functions with self-consistent regression (RBF-SCR) and random forest (RF) were utilized to build QSAR models predicting the likelihood of DDIs for any pair of drug molecules. Our models showed balanced accuracy of 72-79% for the external test sets with a coverage of 81.36-100% when a conservative threshold for the model's applicability domain was applied. We generated virtually all possible binary combinations of marketed drugs and employed our models to identify drug pairs predicted to be instances of DDI. More than 4500 of these predicted DDIs that were not found in our training sets were confirmed by data from the DrugBank database.

  1. Interactions between recreational drugs and antiretroviral agents.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Tony; Tseng, Alice Lin-In

    2002-10-01

    To summarize existing data regarding potential interactions between recreational drugs and drugs commonly used in the management of HIV-positive patients. Information was obtained via a MEDLINE search (1966-August 2002) using the MeSH headings human immunodeficiency virus, drug interactions, cytochrome P450, medication names commonly prescribed for the management of HIV and related opportunistic infections, and names of commonly used recreational drugs. Abstracts of national and international conferences, review articles, textbooks, and references of all articles were also reviewed. Literature on pharmacokinetic interactions was considered for inclusion. Pertinent information was selected and summarized for discussion. In the absence of specific data, prediction of potential clinically significant interactions was based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. All protease inhibitors (PIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are substrates and potent inhibitors or inducers of the cytochrome P450 system. Many classes of recreational drugs, including benzodiazepines, amphetamines, and opioids, are also metabolized by the liver and can potentially interact with antiretrovirals. Controlled interaction studies are often not available, but clinically significant interactions have been observed in a number of case reports. Overdoses secondary to interactions between the "rave" drugs methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) or gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and PIs have been reported. PIs, particularly ritonavir, may also inhibit metabolism of amphetamines, ketamine, lysergic acid diethylmide (LSD), and phencyclidine (PCP). Case series and pharmacokinetic studies suggest that nevirapine and efavirenz induce methadone metabolism, which may lead to symptoms of opiate withdrawal. A similar interaction may exist between methadone and the PIs ritonavir and nelfinavir, although the data are less consistent. Opiate metabolism can be inhibited or induced by

  2. Evaluation of resources for analyzing drug interactions*†

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Risha I.; Beckett, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research sought to evaluate seven drug information resources, specifically designed for analyzing drug interactions for scope, completeness, and ease of use, and determine the consistency of content among the seven resources. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted where 100 drug-drug and drug-dietary supplement interactions were analyzed using 7 drug information resources: Lexicomp Interactions module, Micromedex Drug Interactions, Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report, Facts & Comparisons eAnswers, Stockley's Drug Interactions (10th edition), Drug Interactions Analysis and Management (2014), and Drug Interaction Facts (2015). The interaction sample was developed based on published resources and peer input. Two independent reviewers gathered data for each interaction from each of the 7 resources using a common form. Results Eighty-two drug-drug and 18 drug-dietary supplement interactions were analyzed. Scope scores were higher for Lexicomp Interactions (97.0%), Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report (97.0%), and Micromedex Drug Interactions (93.0%) compared to all other resources (p<0.05 for each comparison). Overall completeness scores were higher for Micromedex Drug Interactions (median 5, interquartile range [IQR] 4 to 5) compared to all other resources (p<0.01 for each comparison) and were higher for Lexicomp Interactions (median 4, IQR 4 to 5), Facts & Comparisons eAnswers (median 4, IQR 4 to 5), and Drug Interaction Facts (4, IQR 4 to 5) compared to all other resources, except Micromedex (p<0.05 for each comparison). Ease of use, in terms of time to locate information and time to gather information, was similar among resources. Consistency score was higher for Micromedex (69.9%) compared to all other resources (p<0.05 for each comparison). Conclusions Clinical Pharmacology Drug Interaction Report, Lexicomp Interactions, and Micromedex Drug Interactions scored highest in scope. Micromedex Drug Interactions and Lexicomp

  3. [Potential interactions between drugs and dietary supplements].

    PubMed

    Farghali, Hassan; Kameníková, Ludmila; Hodis, Jiří; Kutinová Canová, Nikolina

    2014-01-01

    Purified active plant constituents were isolated and assessed for their pharmacological activities that constitute a basis of modern drug development. The situation with herbal supplements is different because the extract or dried herb or mixture of herbs contains several substances beside the beneficial one(s) that might produce drug interaction with the conventional medicine(s). Most patients are misinformed and believe that anything "natural" must be safe. This article is focusing on plant-based substances referred as dietary supplements (DS). Examples of reported drug interactions and contraindications associated with DS with two case studies are presented. As supplements are typically not prescribed, many doctors seem to have no interest in drug-DS interactions since a typical medical history of the patients does not include any questions about self-prescribed remedies of this nature. Rather, patients are left alone when they are tempted to try this or that DS and tend to rely on advice from friends, or on material they read on internet. A better quality control, compliance, public awareness and healthcare professionals vigilance for potential interactions are needed. It is of utmost importance to appreciate the impact of supplements on different stages of pharmacokinetics, especially on drug absorption and metabolism.

  4. Drug–drug interactions with imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Récoché, Isabelle; Rousseau, Vanessa; Bourrel, Robert; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Chebane, Leila; Despas, Fabien; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many patients treated with imatinib, used in cancer treatment, are using several other drugs that could interact with imatinib. Our aim was to study all the drug–drug interactions (DDIs) observed in patients treated with imatinib. We performed 2 observational studies, between the 1st January 2012 and the 31st August 2015 in the Midi-Pyrénées area (South Western France), using the French health insurance reimbursement database and then the French Pharmacovigilance Database (FPVD). A total of 544 patients received at least 1 reimbursement for imatinib. Among them, 486 (89.3%) had at least 1 drug that could potentially interact with imatinib. Paracetamol was the most frequent drug involved (77.4%). Proton pump inhibitors, dexamethasone and levothyroxine, were found in >10% of patients. In the FPVD, among a total of 25 reports of ADRs with imatinib recorded in the Midi-Pyrénées area, 10 (40%) had potential DDIs with imatinib. Imatinib was most frequently prescribed by hospital physicians and drugs interacting with imatinib, by general practitioners. Our study showed that at least 40% of the patients treated with imatinib were at risk of DDIs and that all prescribers must be cautious with DDIs in patients treated with imatinib. During imatinib treatment, we particularly recommend to limit the dose of paracetamol at 1300 mg per day, to avoid the use of dexamethasone, and to double the dose of levothyroxine. PMID:27749579

  5. Drug-drug, drug-dietary supplement, and drug-citrus fruit and other food interactions: what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiew-Mei; Lesko, Lawrence J

    2004-06-01

    Serious drug-drug interactions have contributed to recent U.S. market withdrawals and also recent nonapprovals of a few new molecular entities. Many of these interactions involved the inhibition or induction of metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting in altered systemic exposure and adverse drug reactions or loss of efficacy. In addition to drug-drug interactions, drug-dietary supplement and drug-citrus fruit interactions, among others, could also cause adverse drug reactions or loss of efficacy and are important issues to consider in the evaluation of new drug candidates. This commentary reviews (1). the current understanding of the mechanistic basis of these interactions, (2). issues to consider in the interpretation of study results, and (3). recent labeling examples to illustrate the translation of study results to information useful for patients and health care providers.

  6. Common Herbal Dietary Supplement-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Asher, Gary N; Corbett, Amanda H; Hawke, Roy L

    2017-07-15

    Nearly 25% of U.S. adults report concurrently taking a prescription medication with a dietary supplement. Some supplements, such as St. John's wort and goldenseal, are known to cause clinically important drug interactions and should be avoided by most patients receiving any pharmacologic therapy. However, many other supplements are predicted to cause interactions based only on in vitro studies that have not been confirmed or have been refuted in human clinical trials. Some supplements may cause interactions with a few medications but are likely to be safe with other medications (e.g., curcumin, echinacea, garlic, Asian ginseng, green tea extract, kava kava). Some supplements have a low likelihood of drug interactions and, with certain caveats, can safely be taken with most medications (e.g., black cohosh, cranberry, ginkgo, milk thistle, American ginseng, saw palmetto, valerian). Clinicians should consult reliable dietary supplement resources, or clinical pharmacists or pharmacologists, to help assess the safety of specific herbal supplement-drug combinations. Because most patients do not disclose supplement use to clinicians, the most important strategy for detecting herb-drug interactions is to develop a trusting relationship that encourages patients to discuss their dietary supplement use.

  7. Collagen interactions: Drug design and delivery.

    PubMed

    An, Bo; Lin, Yu-Shan; Brodsky, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Collagen is a major component in a wide range of drug delivery systems and biomaterial applications. Its basic physical and structural properties, together with its low immunogenicity and natural turnover, are keys to its biocompatibility and effectiveness. In addition to its material properties, the collagen triple-helix interacts with a large number of molecules that trigger biological events. Collagen interactions with cell surface receptors regulate many cellular processes, while interactions with other ECM components are critical for matrix structure and remodeling. Collagen also interacts with enzymes involved in its biosynthesis and degradation, including matrix metalloproteinases. Over the past decade, much information has been gained about the nature and specificity of collagen interactions with its partners. These studies have defined collagen sequences responsible for binding and the high-resolution structures of triple-helical peptides bound to its natural binding partners. Strategies to target collagen interactions are already being developed, including the use of monoclonal antibodies to interfere with collagen fibril formation and the use of triple-helical peptides to direct liposomes to melanoma cells. The molecular information about collagen interactions will further serve as a foundation for computational studies to design small molecules that can interfere with specific interactions or target tumor cells. Intelligent control of collagen biological interactions within a material context will expand the effectiveness of collagen-based drug delivery.

  8. Mechanisms and Consequences of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, David J

    2017-03-01

    Medications used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections present a special challenge with respect to the management of potential and actual drug-drug interactions (DDIs). The HIV and HCV treatments may interact with each other, and also interact with drugs of abuse and/or with medications used to treat substance abuse. Possible mechanisms of these DDIs generally include induction or inhibition of activity/expression of human cytochromes P450, glucuronosyl transferases, or energy-dependent transport proteins. These DDIs can be complex and time-dependent in nature. Because time and resources available for new drug development are necessarily limited, not all potential DDIs can be evaluated via clinical pharmacokinetic studies in the course of development of HIV, HCV, and substance abuse treatments. Strategies are needed to refine existing in vitro models and screening techniques to allow more efficient targeting of resources to those clinical studies having the highest impact in terms of enhancing medication effectiveness and patient safety.

  9. Prescription of Prophylactic Antiemetic Drugs for Patients Receiving Chemotherapy With Minimal and Low Emetic Risk.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Ayako; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Higashi, Takahiro

    2017-03-01

    The use of antiemetic drugs for patients receiving chemotherapy with low or minimal emetic risk has been recognized as a growing concern for health care costs and patients' welfare. Relatively few studies have examined antiemetic prophylaxis or treatment of emesis associated with chemotherapy with lower emetic risk. To describe the pattern in Japan of overprescribing prophylactic antiemetic drugs to patients who have received intravenous chemotherapy with minimal or low emetic risk. This secondary analysis of a health insurance claims database linked with the hospital-based cancer registry of 122 designated cancer care hospitals covered the period from September 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012. Data were included from patients who (1) were diagnosed with breast, lung, colorectal, stomach, cervical, or prostate cancer; (2) were 20 years or older at the time of the diagnosis; and (3) received intravenous chemotherapy with minimal or low emetic risk. The data from patients with advanced stage cancer (stage IV) were excluded. Data were analyzed from March 20, 2014, to June 30, 2016. The percentage of chemotherapy administration involving patients prescribed prophylactic antiemetic drugs, namely, a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist, serotonin receptor antagonist, and/or dexamethasone, was calculated. The costs of potentially unnecessary antiemetic drugs were estimated using the National Health Insurance drug price list for 2011. A total of 8545 patients (5886 women [68.9%] and 2659 men [31.1%]; mean [SD] age, 61.9 [12.8] years) undergoing 73 577 administrations of chemotherapy with minimal emetic risk (2464 patients; 22 619 administrations) or low emetic risk (6081 patients; 50 958 administrations) were identified. Of these, patients who received 24 373 administrations of chemotherapy with a low emetic risk (47.8%) and 633 administrations of chemotherapy with a minimal emetic risk (2.8%) were prescribed serotonin receptor antagonists and dexamethasone. Outpatients

  10. Engineering genetic circuit interactions within and between synthetic minimal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamala, Katarzyna P.; Martin-Alarcon, Daniel A.; Guthrie-Honea, Katriona R.; Boyden, Edward S.

    2017-05-01

    Genetic circuits and reaction cascades are of great importance for synthetic biology, biochemistry and bioengineering. An open question is how to maximize the modularity of their design to enable the integration of different reaction networks and to optimize their scalability and flexibility. One option is encapsulation within liposomes, which enables chemical reactions to proceed in well-isolated environments. Here we adapt liposome encapsulation to enable the modular, controlled compartmentalization of genetic circuits and cascades. We demonstrate that it is possible to engineer genetic circuit-containing synthetic minimal cells (synells) to contain multiple-part genetic cascades, and that these cascades can be controlled by external signals as well as inter-liposomal communication without crosstalk. We also show that liposomes that contain different cascades can be fused in a controlled way so that the products of incompatible reactions can be brought together. Synells thus enable a more modular creation of synthetic biology cascades, an essential step towards their ultimate programmability.

  11. MDR- and CYP3A4-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2006-09-01

    , and sparfloxacin are potent inhibitors of P-gp-mediated efflux of 14C erythromycin and (3)H cyclosporin. Simultaneous administration of fluoroquinolones and macrolides could minimize the efflux and metabolism of both of the drugs. Effects of erythromycin and ketoconazole on carbamazepine metabolism were examined. Formation of 10,11-epoxy carbamazepine, a major CBZ metabolite, was significantly inhibited by these agents. Therefore, drug efflux proteins (P-gp, MRPs) and metabolizing enzyme (CYP450) are major factors in drug interactions. Overlapping substrate specificities of these proteins result in complex and sometimes perplexing pharmacokinetic profiles of multidrug regimens. Drug-drug interactions with PIs and other coadministered agents for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive population have been discussed in light of efflux transporters and metabolizing enzymes. This article provides an insight into low and variable oral bioavailability and related complications leading to loss of therapeutic activity of MDR and CYP 450 substrates.

  12. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions for Drug Repositioning Only Based on Genomic Expression Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kejian; Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shufeng; Wan, Chunling; Qin, Shengying; Li, Can; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2013-01-01

    Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI). However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap). Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1) some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2) in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects. PMID:24244130

  13. [Terbinafine : Relevant drug interactions and their management].

    PubMed

    Dürrbeck, A; Nenoff, P

    2016-09-01

    The allylamine terbinafine is the probably most frequently prescribed systemic antifungal agent in Germany for the treatment of dermatomycoses and onychomycoses. According to the German drug law, terbinafine is approved for patients who are 18 years and older; however, this antifungal agent is increasingly used off-label for treatment of onychomycoses and tinea capitis in children. Terbinafine is associated with only a few interactions with other drugs, which is why terbinafine can generally be used without problems in older and multimorbid patients. Nevertheless, some potential interactions of terbinafine with certain drug substances are known, including substances of the group of antidepressants/antipsychotics and some cardiovascular drugs. Decisive for the relevance of interactions is-along with the therapeutic index of the substrate and the possible alternative degradation pathways-the genetically determined type of metabolism. When combining terbinafine with tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin/noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors, the clinical response and potential side effects must be monitored. Problematic is the use of terbinafine with simultaneous treatment with tamoxifen. The administration of potent CYP2D6 inhibitors leads to a diminished efficacy of tamoxifen because one of its most important active metabolites-endoxifen-is not sufficiently available. Therefore, combination of tamoxifen and terbinafine should be avoided. In conclusion, the number of substances which are able to cause clinically relevant interactions in case of simultaneously administration with terbinafine is clear and should be manageable in the dermatological office with adequate monitoring.

  14. Making Transporter Models for Drug-Drug Interaction Prediction Mobile.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Clark, Alex M; Wright, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    The past decade has seen increased numbers of studies publishing ligand-based computational models for drug transporters. Although they generally use small experimental data sets, these models can provide insights into structure-activity relationships for the transporter. In addition, such models have helped to identify new compounds as substrates or inhibitors of transporters of interest. We recently proposed that many transporters are promiscuous and may require profiling of new chemical entities against multiple substrates for a specific transporter. Furthermore, it should be noted that virtually all of the published ligand-based transporter models are only accessible to those involved in creating them and, consequently, are rarely shared effectively. One way to surmount this is to make models shareable or more accessible. The development of mobile apps that can access such models is highlighted here. These apps can be used to predict ligand interactions with transporters using Bayesian algorithms. We used recently published transporter data sets (MATE1, MATE2K, OCT2, OCTN2, ASBT, and NTCP) to build preliminary models in a commercial tool and in open software that can deliver the model in a mobile app. In addition, several transporter data sets extracted from the ChEMBL database were used to illustrate how such public data and models can be shared. Predicting drug-drug interactions for various transporters using computational models is potentially within reach of anyone with an iPhone or iPad. Such tools could help prioritize which substrates should be used for in vivo drug-drug interaction testing and enable open sharing of models.

  15. Clinical drug interactions: a holistic view.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Anu; Ahmad, A H; Kumar, Amit; Mahima; Verma, Amit Kumar; Chakraborty, Sandip; Dhama, Kuldeep

    2013-08-15

    Every time a drug is administered to the animal to treat an ailment, no matter whether it is acute or chronic manifestation, it usually goes together with some other prescription medicine, OTC (Over the counter) formulation, herbs or even food. All the xenobiotics such as drugs, toxins and food components as well as the endogenous compound that are formed in the animal body as a routine phenomenon exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect on the different physiological and biochemical processes going in the body. These effects may alter the normal metabolism and/or drug transport or its efficacy drastically and thus expose the man and animals to the risk of a potentially dangerous interaction. The present review discusses these potential reactions and their mechanisms that help in navigating the hazardous combinations of drugs with other medicines, food, herbs, vitamins and minerals with confidence.

  16. Data mining for potential adverse drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Felix; Drewe, Juergen

    2014-05-01

    Patients, in particular elderly ones, frequently receive more than one drug at a time. With each drug added to a regime, the number of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) increases by a power law. Early prediction of relevant interactions by computerized tools greatly aids clinicians and can guide their prescribing choices. In this article, we discuss different types of DDIs, on which levels they can arise and what efforts have been made in the past to detect and predict them. The emphasis is on data mining technology and network analysis, but overlaps with traditional pharmacovigilance are also discussed. Finally, we discuss strategies to focus and simplify mining efforts to get meaningful results with less effort. The necessary technology for detecting adverse DDIs exists and is quite refined, although it is more often implied in lower risk scenarios (such as syntactic analysis in web searches and online libraries). Data mining for DDIs, on the other hand, still requires a great deal of human intervention, not only to validate the results but also, more importantly, to separate the relevant from the spurious. The fields of network analysis and graph theory show great promise but have not yet shown much beyond descriptive analyses.

  17. Synergistic interactions between ampakines and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S A; Luu, N T; Herbst, T A; Knapp, R; Lutz, D; Arai, A; Rogers, G A; Lynch, G

    1999-04-01

    Tests were made for interactions between antipsychotic drugs and compounds that enhance synaptic currents mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptors ("ampakines"). Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs decreased methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats; the effects of near or even subthreshold doses of the antipsychotics were greatly enhanced by the ampakines. Interactions between the ampakine CX516 and low doses of different antipsychotics were generally additive and often synergistic. The ampakine did not exacerbate neuroleptic-induced catalepsy, indicating that the interaction between the different pharmacological classes was selective. These results suggest that positive modulators of cortical glutamatergic systems may be useful adjuncts in treating schizophrenia.

  18. Comparative drug pair screening across multiple glioblastoma cell lines reveals novel drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Linnéa; Kling, Teresia; Monsefi, Naser; Olsson, Maja; Hansson, Caroline; Baskaran, Sathishkumar; Lundgren, Bo; Martens, Ulf; Häggblad, Maria; Westermark, Bengt; Forsberg Nilsson, Karin; Uhrbom, Lene; Karlsson-Lindahl, Linda; Gerlee, Philip; Nelander, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults, and despite state-of-the-art treatment, survival remains poor and novel therapeutics are sorely needed. The aim of the present study was to identify new synergistic drug pairs for GBM. In addition, we aimed to explore differences in drug-drug interactions across multiple GBM-derived cell cultures and predict such differences by use of transcriptional biomarkers. Methods We performed a screen in which we quantified drug-drug interactions for 465 drug pairs in each of the 5 GBM cell lines U87MG, U343MG, U373MG, A172, and T98G. Selected interactions were further tested using isobole-based analysis and validated in 5 glioma-initiating cell cultures. Furthermore, drug interactions were predicted using microarray-based transcriptional profiling in combination with statistical modeling. Results Of the 5 × 465 drug pairs, we could define a subset of drug pairs with strong interaction in both standard cell lines and glioma-initiating cell cultures. In particular, a subset of pairs involving the pharmaceutical compounds rimcazole, sertraline, pterostilbene, and gefitinib showed a strong interaction in a majority of the cell cultures tested. Statistical modeling of microarray and interaction data using sparse canonical correlation analysis revealed several predictive biomarkers, which we propose could be of importance in regulating drug pair responses. Conclusion We identify novel candidate drug pairs for GBM and suggest possibilities to prospectively use transcriptional biomarkers to predict drug interactions in individual cases. PMID:24101737

  19. Anticoagulant Medicine: Potential for Drug-Food Interactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Anticoagulants and Drug-Food Interactions Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... care provider before making the change. Anticoagulants and Medicine There are many medicines that can interact with ...

  20. Reaction phenotyping to assess victim drug-drug interaction risks.

    PubMed

    Di, Li

    2017-08-18

    Reaction phenotyping provides critical information regarding the fraction metabolized (fm) of drug candidates. It has become increasingly important in drug discovery and development as it can be used to assess victim drug-drug interaction potential, guide structural modification to reduce fm, inform clinical study design, predict individual variability in pharmacokinetics, and evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms. Areas covered: The currently available in vitro and in vivo methods for reaction phenotyping are summarized along with their advantages, limitations and timings for application during the different stages of drug discovery and development. Challenges of reaction phenotyping for low clearance compounds, non-Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, extrahepatic contribution and atypical kinetics are highlighted and various approaches are discussed. Expert opinion: Certain areas of reaction phenotyping remain challenging with the current state of the science. In order to better define fm in this challenging space, there needs to be future advances in selective inhibitors and specific substrate reactions for non-CYP enzymes, availability of high quality and low cost recombinant enzymes, tissue distribution and in vitro-in vivo correlation, scaling factors for extrahepatic enzymes and the next generation of low clearance tools.

  1. Minimal model for synchronization induced by hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Bian; Jiang, Hongyuan; Gagnon, David A.; Breuer, Kenneth S.; Powers, Thomas R.

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the observed coordination of nearby beating cilia, we use a scale model experiment to show that hydrodynamic interactions can cause synchronization between rotating paddles driven at constant torque in a very viscous fluid. Synchronization is only observed when the shafts supporting the paddles have some flexibility. The phase difference in the synchronized state depends on the symmetry of the paddles. We use the method of regularized Stokeslets to model the paddles and find excellent agreement with the experimental observations. We also use a simple analytic theory based on far-field approximations to derive scaling laws for the synchronization time as a function of paddle separation.

  2. Frovatriptan: a review of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Buchan, P; Wade, A; Ward, C; Oliver, S D; Stewart, A J; Freestone, S

    2002-04-01

    To investigate the potential for interactions involving drugs likely to be coadministered with frovatriptan. Frovatriptan is a new 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1B/1D) agonist. Preclinical data suggest that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacological profile of frovatriptan may differ from that of the currently available triptans. The potential for interactions between frovatriptan and other drugs was investigated using in vitro methods, studies in healthy volunteers, and retrospective analysis of data from phase I trials. In vitro, frovatriptan was principally metabolized by cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 1A2 but was found not to be an inhibitor or inducer of this or other CYP isoenzymes. Frovatriptan was only a weak inhibitor of monoamine oxidase at very high concentrations in vitro and was not a substrate for this enzyme (unlike some other triptans). Coadministration with moclobemide, at doses known to inhibit monoamine oxidase-A, did not affect the pharmacokinetics of frovatriptan. Binding to plasma proteins was low (15%), and binding to erythrocytes was moderate (60%) and unlikely to be a source of interaction with other drugs. The pharmacokinetics of frovatriptan were not affected by moderate alcohol intake. There were slight increases in area under the curve and maximum concentration on concomitant administration with the combined oral contraceptives, propranolol, and fluvoxamine; and slight decreases in these parameters on concomitant administration with ergotamine and in tobacco smokers; these findings were considered to have no clinical significance in view of frovatriptan's large therapeutic index (well tolerated at doses ranging from 2.5 to 40 mg). These effects can be attributed primarily to modification of CYP1A2 activity but their impact is limited, probably due to frovatriptan also undergoing renal clearance and the likely role of blood cell binding in controlling the amount of unbound drug available for elimination. Because it has no inhibitory or inducing effect

  3. Choice of Initial Antiepileptic Drug for Older Veterans: Possible Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions With Existing Medications

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Mary Jo V.; VanCott, Anne C.; Steinman, Michael A.; Mortensen, Eric M.; Amuan, Megan E.; Wang, Chen-Pin; Knoefel, Janice E.; Berlowitz, Dan R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Identify clinically-meaningful potential drug-drug interactions with antiepileptic drugs (AED-PDI), the AEDs and co-administered drugs commonly associated with AED-PDI, and characteristics of patients with increased likelihood of AED-PDI exposure. Design Five-year retrospective cohort study of veterans with new-onset epilepsy. Setting National VA and Medicare databases. Participants Veterans age 66 years and older with a new diagnosis of epilepsy between October 1, 1999-September 30, 2004 (N=9,682). Measurements We restricted AED-PDI to clinically-meaningful potential drug interactions identified by prior literature review. AED-PDI were identified using participants' date of initial AED prescription and overlapping concomitant medications. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with AED-PDI including demographic characteristics, chronic disease states and diagnostic setting. Results AED-PDI exposure was found in 45.5% (4,406/9,682); phenytoin, a drug with many potential drug interactions, was the most commonly prescribed AED. Cardiovascular drugs, lipid-lowering medications and psychotropic agents were the most commonly co-administered AED-PDI medications. Individuals at higher likelihood of AED-PDI exposure had 1) hypertension (OR=1.46, 99% CI 1.24-1.82), 2) hypercholesterolemia (OR=1.40, 99% CI 1.24-1.57) and 3) were diagnosed in emergency or primary care vs. Neurology settings (emergency OR: 1.30 99% CI=1.08-1.58; primary care OR: 1.29 99% CI 1.12-1.49). Conclusion Exposure to AED-PDI was substantial, but less common in epilepsy patients diagnosed in a neurology setting. Because potential outcomes associated with AED-PDI include stroke and myocardial infarction in a population already at elevated risk, clinicians should closely monitor blood pressure, coagulation, and lipid measures to minimize adverse effects of AED-PDI. Interventions to reduce AED-PDI may improve patient outcomes. PMID:20398114

  4. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions involving Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Unger, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extracts (GLEs) are popular herbal remedies for the treatment of Alzheimer's dementia, tinnitus, vertigo and peripheral arterial disease. As GLEs are taken regularly by older people who are likely to also use multiple other drugs for the treatment of, e.g. hypertension, diabetes, rheumatism or heart failure, potential herb-drug interactions are of interest. Preclinical studies of high doses/concentrations of GLEs of varying quality and standardization hinted at both an inhibition and induction of metabolic enzymes and transporters. However, in humans, positive in vitro-findings could not be replicated in vivo. At maximum recommended doses of 240 mg/day, a clinically relevant interaction potential of the standardized GLE EGb 761 could not be shown. GLE doses higher than the recommended ones led to a weak induction of the CYP2C19-mediated omeprazole 5-hydroxylation, and a weak inhibition of the CYP3A4-mediated midazolam 1'-hydroxylation, respectively. Also, the regular intake of a poorly characterized GLE at a dose of 360 mg/day slightly increased the bioavailability of talinolol, a substrate of P-glycoprotein and various organic anion-transporting polypeptides. Thus, regarding pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions, the intake of the standardized GLE, EGb 761, together with synthetic drugs appears to be safe as long as daily doses up to 240 mg are consumed. If this applies to other extracts prepared according to the European Pharmacopoeia remains uncertain. Also, a relevant potential for drug interactions cannot be excluded for poorly standardized GLEs used in many food supplements.

  5. Potential intravenous drug interactions in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Maiara Benevides; Mesquita, Maria Gefé da Rosa; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição; Paes, Graciele Oroski

    2017-07-20

    To analyze potential intravenous drug interactions, and their level of severity associated with the administration of these drugs based on the prescriptions of an intensive care unit. Quantitative study, with aretrospective exploratory design, and descriptive statistical analysis of the ICU prescriptions of a teaching hospital from March to June 2014. The sample consisted of 319 prescriptions and subsamples of 50 prescriptions. The mean number of drugs per patient was 9.3 records, and a higher probability of drug interaction inherent to polypharmacy was evidenced. The study identified severe drug interactions, such as concomitant administration of Tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs (e.g., Metoclopramide and Fluconazole), increasing the risk of seizures due to their epileptogenic actions, as well as the simultaneous use of Ranitidine-Fentanyl®, which can lead to respiratory depression. A previous mapping of prescriptions enables the characterization of the drug therapy, contributing to prevent potential drug interactions and their clinical consequences. Analisar as potenciais interações medicamentosas intravenosas e seu grau de severidade associadas à administração desses medicamentos a partir das prescrições do Centro de Terapia Intensiva. Estudo quantitativo, tipologia retrospectiva exploratória, com análise estatística descritiva das prescrições medicamentosas do Centro de Terapia Intensiva de um Hospital Universitário, no período de março-junho/2014. A amostra foi composta de 319 prescrições e subamostras de 50 prescrições. Constatou-se que a média de medicamentos por paciente foi de 9,3 registros, e evidenciou-se maior probabilidade para ocorrência de interação medicamentosa inerente à polifarmácia. O estudo identificou interações medicamentosas graves, como a administração concomitante de Tramadol com medicamentos inibidores seletivos da recaptação da serotonina, (exemplo: Metoclopramida e Fluconazol

  6. Protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynska, Malgorzata; Ottmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is becoming increasingly important in drug discovery and chemical biology. While a few years ago this 'target class' was deemed to be largely undruggable an impressing number of publications and success stories now show that targeting PPIs with small, drug-like molecules indeed is a feasible approach. Here, we summarize the current state of small-molecule inhibition and stabilization of PPIs and review the active molecules from a structural and medicinal chemistry angle, especially focusing on the key examples of iNOS, LFA-1 and 14-3-3.

  7. Analysis of adverse drug reactions using drug and drug target interactions and graph-based methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Fang; Xiao, Ke-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ting; Chiu, Chung-Cheng; Soo, Von-Wun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to integrate knowledge about drugs, drug targets, and topological methods. The goals were to build a system facilitating the study of adverse drug events, to make it easier to find possible explanations, and to group similar drug-drug interaction cases in the adverse drug reaction reports from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We developed a system that analyses adverse drug reaction (ADR) cases reported by the FDA. The system contains four modules. First, we integrate drug and drug target databases that provide information related to adverse drug reactions. Second, we classify drug and drug targets according to anatomical therapeutic chemical classification (ATC) and drug target ontology (DTO). Third, we build drug target networks based on drug and drug target databases. Finally, we apply topological analysis to reveal drug interaction complexity for each ADR case reported by the FDA. We picked 1952 ADR cases from the years 2005-2006. Our dataset consisted of 1952 cases, of which 1471 cases involved ADR targets, 845 cases involved absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) targets, and 507 cases involved some drugs acting on the same targets, namely, common targets (CTs). We then investigated the cases involving ADR targets, ADME targets, and CTs using the ATC system and DTO. In the cases that led to death, the average number of common targets (NCTs) was 0.879 and the average of average clustering coefficient (ACC) was 0.067. In cases that did not lead to death, the average NCTs was 0.551, and the average of ACC was 0.039. We implemented a system that can find possible explanations and cluster similar ADR cases reported by the FDA. We found that the average of ACC and the average NCTs in cases leading to death are higher than in cases not leading to death, suggesting that the interactions in cases leading to death are generally more complicated than in cases not leading to death. This indicates that our system

  8. Assessment tool for pharmacy drug-drug interaction software.

    PubMed

    Warholak, Terri L; Hines, Lisa E; Saverno, Kim R; Grizzle, Amy J; Malone, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    To assess the performance of pharmacy clinical decision support (CDS) systems for drug-drug interaction (DDI) detection and to identify approaches for improving the ability to recognize important DDIs. Pharmacists rely on CDS systems to assist in the identification of DDIs, and research suggests that these systems perform suboptimally. The software evaluation tool described here may be used in all pharmacy settings that use electronic decision support to detect potential DDIs, including large and small community chain pharmacies, community independent pharmacies, hospital pharmacies, and governmental facility pharmacies. A tool is provided to determine the ability of pharmacy CDS systems to identify established DDIs. It can be adapted to evaluate potential DDIs that reflect local practice patterns and patient safety priorities. Beyond assessing software performance, going through the evaluation processes creates the opportunity to evaluate inadequacies in policies, procedures, workflow, and training of all pharmacy staff relating to pharmacy information systems and DDIs. The DDI evaluation tool can be used to assess pharmacy information systems' ability to recognize relevant DDIs. Suggestions for improvement include determining whether the software allows for customization, creating standard policies for handling specific interactions, and ensuring that drug knowledge database updates occur frequently.

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug interactions in patients receiving statins.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-02-01

    Elderly patients commonly receive statin drugs for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Elderly patients also commonly receive antidepressant drugs, usually selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), for the treatment of depression, anxiety, or other conditions. SSRIs are associated with many pharmacokinetic drug interactions related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. There is concern that drugs that inhibit statin metabolism can trigger statin adverse effects, especially myopathy (which can be potentially serious, if rhabdomyolysis occurs). However, a detailed literature review of statin metabolism and of SSRI effects on CYP enzymes suggests that escitalopram, citalopram, and paroxetine are almost certain to be safe with all statins, and rosuvastatin, pitavastatin, and pravastatin are almost certain to be safe with all SSRIs. Even though other SSRI-statin combinations may theoretically be associated with risks, the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction is likely to be below the threshold for clinical significance. Risk, if at all, lies in combining fluvoxamine with atorvastatin, simvastatin, or lovastatin, and even this risk can be minimized by using lower statin doses and monitoring the patient.

  10. Antiplatelet drug interactions with proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-aspirin antiplatelet agents (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) are commonly prescribed for the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In addition, combination therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is often recommended to attenuate gastrointestinal bleeding risk, particularly during dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin. Importantly, a pharmacological interaction between clopidogrel and some PPIs has been proposed based on mutual CYP450-dependent metabolism, but available evidence is inconsistent. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the currently approved antiplatelet agents and PPIs, including their metabolic pathways. Additionally, the CYP450 isoenzyme at the center of the drug interaction, CYP2C19, is described in detail, and the available evidence on both the potential pharmacological interaction and influence on clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Expert opinion Although concomitant DAPT and PPI use reduces clopidogrel active metabolite levels and ex vivo-measured platelet inhibition, the influence of the drug interaction on clinical outcomes has been conflicting and largely reported from non-randomized observational studies. Despite this inconsistency, a clinically important interaction cannot be definitively excluded, particularly among patient subgroups with higher overall cardiovascular risk and potentially among CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele carriers. PMID:24205916

  11. On global minimizers of repulsive–attractive power-law interaction energies

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, José Antonio; Chipot, Michel; Huang, Yanghong

    2014-01-01

    We consider the minimization of the repulsive–attractive power-law interaction energies that occur in many biological and physical situations. We show the existence of global minimizers in the discrete setting and obtain bounds for their supports independently of the number of Dirac deltas in a certain range of exponents. These global discrete minimizers correspond to the stable spatial profiles of flock patterns in swarming models. Global minimizers of the continuum problem are obtained by compactness. We also illustrate our results through numerical simulations. PMID:25288810

  12. Prolonged Drug-Drug Interaction between Terbinafine and Perphenazine.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min

    2012-12-01

    I report here an elderly woman receiving perphenazine together with terbinafine. After 1 week of terbinafine treatment she experienced extrapyramidal symptoms and, in particular, akathisia. Her symptoms did not disappear for 6 weeks, and so at 2 weeks prior to this most recent admission she had stopped taking terbinafine. However, these symptoms persisted for 3 weeks after discontinuing terbinafine. It is well known that terbinafine inhibits CYP2D6 and that perphenazine is metabolized mainly by CYP2D6. Thus, when terbinafine and perphenazine are coadministrated, the subsequent increase in the concentration of perphenazine may induce extrapyramidal symptoms. Thus, terbinafine therapy may be associated with the induction and persistence of extrapyramidal symptoms, including akathisia. This case report emphasizes the importance of monitoring drug-drug interactions in patients undergoing terbinafine and perphenazine therapy.

  13. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%.

  14. Drug-Drug Interaction Extraction via Convolutional Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) extraction as a typical relation extraction task in natural language processing (NLP) has always attracted great attention. Most state-of-the-art DDI extraction systems are based on support vector machines (SVM) with a large number of manually defined features. Recently, convolutional neural networks (CNN), a robust machine learning method which almost does not need manually defined features, has exhibited great potential for many NLP tasks. It is worth employing CNN for DDI extraction, which has never been investigated. We proposed a CNN-based method for DDI extraction. Experiments conducted on the 2013 DDIExtraction challenge corpus demonstrate that CNN is a good choice for DDI extraction. The CNN-based DDI extraction method achieves an F-score of 69.75%, which outperforms the existing best performing method by 2.75%. PMID:26941831

  15. Minimal T-wave representation and its use in the assessment of drug arrhythmogenicity.

    PubMed

    Shakibfar, Saeed; Graff, Claus; Kanters, Jørgen K; Nielsen, Jimmi; Schmidt, Samuel; Struijk, Johannes J

    2017-05-01

    Recently, numerous models and techniques have been developed for analyzing and extracting features from the T wave which could be used as biomarkers for drug-induced abnormalities. The majority of these techniques and algorithms use features that determine readily apparent characteristics of the T wave, such as duration, area, amplitude, and slopes. In the present work the T wave was down-sampled to a minimal rate, such that a good reconstruction was still possible. The entire T wave was then used as a feature vector to assess drug-induced repolarization effects. The ability of the samples or combinations of samples obtained from the minimal T-wave representation to correctly classify a group of subjects before and after receiving d,l-sotalol 160 mg and 320 mg was evaluated using a linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The results showed that a combination of eight samples from the minimal T-wave representation can be used to identify normal from abnormal repolarization significantly better compared to the heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc). It was further indicated that the interval from the peak of the T wave to the end of the T wave (Tpe) becomes relatively shorter after IKr inhibition by d,l-sotalol and that the most pronounced repolarization changes were present in the ascending segment of the minimal T-wave representation. The minimal T-wave representation can potentially be used as a new tool to identify normal from abnormal repolarization in drug safety studies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A pilot study on the impact of known drug-drug interactions in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ussai, Silvia; Petelin, Riccardo; Giordano, Antonio; Malinconico, Mario; Cirillo, Donatella; Pentimalli, Francesca

    2015-08-25

    When a patient concomitantly uses two or more drugs, a drug-drug interaction (DDI) can possibly occur, potentially leading to an increased or decreased clinical effect of a given treatment. Cancer patients are at high risk of such interactions because they commonly receive multiple medications. Moreover, most cancer patients are elderly and require additional medications for comorbidities. Aim of this preliminary observational study was to evaluate the incidence of well known and established DDIs in a cohort of cancer outpatients undergoing multiple treatments. Anamnestic and clinical data were collected for 64 adult patients in the ambulatory setting with malignant solid tumors who were receiving systemic anticancer treatment. Patients also declared all drugs prescribed by other specialists or self-taken in the previous 2 weeks. DDIs were divided into two different groups: 'neoplastic DDIs' (NDDIs), involving antitumoral drugs, and 'not neoplastic DDIs' (nDDIs), involving all other classes of drugs. The severity of DDIs was classified as major, moderate and minor, according to the 'Institute for Pharmacological Research Mario Negri' definition. About 34 % of cancer outpatients within our cohort were prescribed/assumed interacting drug combinations. The most frequent major NDDIs involved the anticoagulant warfarin (33 % of total NDDIs) that, in association with tamoxifen, or capecitabine and paclitaxel, increased the risk of haemorrhage. About 60 % of nDDIs involved acetylsalicylic acid. Overall, 16 % of DDIs were related to an A-level strength of recommendation to be avoided. The lack of effective communication among specialists and patients might have a role in determining therapeutic errors. Our pilot study, although limited by a small cohort size, highlights the urgent need of implementing the clinical management of cancer outpatients with new strategies to prevent or minimize potential harmful DDIs.

  17. Clinical pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and drug-drug interaction of carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengping; Yang, Jinfu; Kirk, Christopher; Fang, Ying; Alsina, Melissa; Badros, Ashraf; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos; Wong, Alvin; Woo, Tina; Bomba, Darrin; Li, Jin; Infante, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Carfilzomib, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, has a favorable safety profile and significant antitumor activity in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM). Here we summarize the clinical pharmacokinetics (PK), metabolism, and drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of carfilzomib. The PK of carfilzomib, infused over 2-10 minutes, was evaluated in patients with solid tumors or MM. Metabolites of carfilzomib were characterized in patient plasma and urine samples. In vitro drug metabolism and DDI studies were conducted in human liver microsomes and hepatocytes. A clinical DDI study was conducted in patients with solid tumors to evaluate the effect of carfilzomib on CYP3A activity. Plasma concentrations of carfilzomib declined rapidly and in a biphasic manner after intravenous administration. The systemic half-life was short and the systemic clearance rate was higher than hepatic blood flow. Carfilzomib was cleared largely extrahepatically via peptidase cleavage and epoxide hydrolysis. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism played a minor role, suggesting that coadministration of P450 inhibitors or inducers is unlikely to change its PK profile. Carfilzomib showed direct and time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A in human liver microsome preparations and exposure to carfilzomib resulted in reductions in CYP3A and 1A2 gene expression in cultured human hepatocytes. However, administration of carfilzomib did not affect the PK of midazolam in patients with solid tumors, and there were no safety signals indicative of potential drug interactions. We conclude that the rapid systemic clearance and short half-life of carfilzomib limit clinically significant DDI.

  18. Tacrolimus in pancreas transplant: a focus on toxicity, diabetogenic effect and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Erika B

    2014-11-01

    With further reduction in surgical complications and improvement in immunosuppressive protocols, pancreas transplant offers excellent outcomes for patients with diabetes. However, long-term survival of pancreas allograft is affected not only by rejection but also by immunosuppressive regimen toxicity. This article reviews the existing literature and knowledge of tacrolimus toxicity and focuses on its diabetogenic effect after pancreas transplant. Some clinically relevant drug-drug interactions with glucocorticoids and sirolimus are also highlighted. This review also summarizes the diabetogenic mechanisms of tacrolimus, the alternatives to minimize these effects, and the main differential diagnosis of hyperglycemia after pancreas transplant. Tacrolimus is a potent calcineurin inhibitor, an important pathway that regulates pancreatic development. Tacrolimus can induce β-cell apoptosis, decrease insulin exocytosis and reduce insulin gene transcription, which ultimately lead to impaired functional β-cell mass after pancreas transplant. Furthermore, insulin resistance can exacerbate the diabetogenic effect of tacrolimus due to inhibition of insulin gene transcription and β-cell proliferation. It is important to critically analyze the results of clinical studies and investigate new immunosuppressive drugs and/or novel drug combinations. It is equally important to comprehend and interpret experimental data. Therefore, minimization of side effects, based on safe approaches, can prolong pancreas allograft survival.

  19. Degradable Magnetic Composites for Minimally Invasive Interventions: Device Fabrication, Targeted Drug Delivery, and Cytotoxicity Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian; Hoop, Marcus; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J; Hierold, Christofer

    2016-01-20

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a functional, degradable polymer matrix based on poly(ethylene glycol) are combined to enable fully degradable magnetic microdevices for minimally invasive biomedical applications. A bioinspired helical microrobot platform mimicking Escherichia coli bacteria is fabricated and actuated using weak rotating magnetic fields. Locomotion based on corkscrew propulsion, targeted drug delivery, and low-degradation-product cytotoxicity are demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Evaluation of drug interactions with nanofibrillar cellulose.

    PubMed

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hellman, Maarit; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-11-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has recently gotten wide attention in various research areas and it has also been studied as excipient in formulation of the pharmaceutical dosage forms. Here, we have evaluated the interactions between NFC and the model drugs of different structural characteristics (size, charge, etc.). The series of permeation studies were utilized to evaluate the ability of the drugs in solution to diffuse through the thin, porous, dry NFC films. An incubation method was used to determine capacity of binding of chosen model drugs to NFC as well as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to study thermodynamics of the binding process. A genetically engineered fusion protein carrying double cellulose binding domain was used as a positive control since its affinity and capacity of binding for NFC have already been reported. The permeation studies revealed the size dependent diffusion rate of the model drugs through the NFC films. The results of both binding and ITC studies showed that the studied drugs bind to the NFC material and indicated the pH dependence of the binding and electrostatic forces as the main mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Drug interaction microcomputer software evaluation: Drug Master 89.

    PubMed

    Poirier, T I; Giudici, R A

    1989-12-01

    Drug Master 89 was evaluated using general and specific criteria. The installation process, ease of learning, and ease of use were rated excellent. The technical support, scope of coverage, and overall clinical performance were rated good. The quality of the clinical documentation and frequency of updates were fair, while the quality of the user documentation was poor. The program is valuable to the clinical dietician because of the comprehensiveness of its dietary and food interactions data base. For the practicing pharmacist, it performs reasonably well but other available programs are better values.

  2. Renal drug transporters and their significance in drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Wang, Joanne

    2016-09-01

    The kidney is a vital organ for the elimination of therapeutic drugs and their metabolites. Renal drug transporters, which are primarily located in the renal proximal tubules, play an important role in tubular secretion and reabsorption of drug molecules in the kidney. Tubular secretion is characterized by high clearance capacities, broad substrate specificities, and distinct charge selectivity for organic cations and anions. In the past two decades, substantial progress has been made in understanding the roles of transporters in drug disposition, efficacy, toxicity and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). In the kidney, several transporters are involved in renal handling of organic cation (OC) and organic anion (OA) drugs. These transporters are increasingly recognized as the target for clinically significant DDIs. This review focuses on the functional characteristics of major human renal drug transporters and their involvement in clinically significant DDIs.

  3. Drug-drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Rao, P S S; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse.

  4. Predicting Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Signaling Propagation Interference on Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyunghyun; Kim, Docyong; Ha, Suhyun; Lee, Doheon

    2015-01-01

    As pharmacodynamic drug-drug interactions (PD DDIs) could lead to severe adverse effects in patients, it is important to identify potential PD DDIs in drug development. The signaling starting from drug targets is propagated through protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. PD DDIs could occur by close interference on the same targets or within the same pathways as well as distant interference through cross-talking pathways. However, most of the previous approaches have considered only close interference by measuring distances between drug targets or comparing target neighbors. We have applied a random walk with restart algorithm to simulate signaling propagation from drug targets in order to capture the possibility of their distant interference. Cross validation with DrugBank and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG shows that the proposed method outperforms the previous methods significantly. We also provide a web service with which PD DDIs for drug pairs can be analyzed at http://biosoft.kaist.ac.kr/targetrw. PMID:26469276

  5. Drug interactions in dermatology: what the dermatologist should know.

    PubMed

    Coondoo, Arijit; Chattopadhyay, Chandan

    2013-07-01

    A drug interaction is a process by which a drug or any other substance interacts with another drug and affects its activity by increasing or decreasing its effect, causing a side effect or producing a new effect unrelated to the effect of either. Interactions may be of various types-drug-drug interactions, drug-food interactions, drug-medical condition interactions, or drug-herb interactions. Interactions may occur by single or multiple mechanisms. They may occur in vivo or in vitro (pharmaceutical reactions). In vivo interactions may be further subdivided into pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic reactions. Topical drug interactions which may be agonistic or antagonistic may occur between two drugs applied topically or between a topical and a systemic drug. Topical drug-food interaction (for example, grape fruit juice and cyclosporine) and drug-disease interactions (for example, topical corticosteroid and aloe vera) may also occur. It is important for the dermatologist to be aware of such interactions to avoid complications of therapy in day-to-day practice.

  6. Interactions between drugs and occupied receptors.

    PubMed

    Tallarida, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    This review has 2 parts. Part I deals with isobolographic procedures that are traditionally applied to the joint action of agonists that individually produce overtly similar effects. Special attention is directed to newer computational procedures that apply to agonists with dissimilar concentration-effect curves. These newer procedures are consistent with the isobolographic methods introduced and used by Loewe, however, the present communications provides the needed graphical and mathematical detail. A major aim is distinguishing super and sub-addictive interactions from those that are simply additive. The detection and measurement of an interaction is an important step in exploring drug mechanism and is also important clinically. Part II discusses a new use of isoboles that is applicable to a single drug or chemical whose effect is mediated by 2 or more receptor subtypes. This application produces a metric that characterizes the interaction between the receptor subtypes. The expansion of traditional isobolographic theory to this multi-receptor situation follows from the newer approaches for 2-drug combination analysis in Part I. This topic leads naturally to a re-examination of competitive antagonism and the classic Schild plot. In particular, it is shown here that the Schild plot in the multi-receptor case is not necessarily linear with unit slope. Both parts of this review emphasize the quantitative aspects rather than the many drugs that have been analyzed with isobolographic methods. The mathematical exposition is rather elementary and is further aided by several graphs. An appendix is included for the reader interested in the mathematical details.

  7. Drug interactions at the blood-brain barrier: fact or fantasy?

    PubMed Central

    Eyal, Sara; Hsiao, Peng; Unadkat, Jashvant D.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the therapeutic and adverse outcomes of drug interactions at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). These include altered efficacy of drugs used in the treatment of CNS disorders, such as AIDS dementia and malignant tumors, and enhanced neurotoxicity of drugs that normally penetrate poorly into the brain. BBB- and BCSFB-mediated interactions are possible because these interfaces are not only passive anatomical barriers, but are also dynamic in that they express a variety of influx and efflux transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes. Based on studies in rodents, it has been widely postulated that efflux transporters play an important role at the human BBB in terms of drug delivery. Furthermore, it is assumed that chemical inhibition of transporters or their genetic ablation in rodents is predictive of the magnitude of interaction to be expected at the human BBB. However, studies in humans challenge this well-established paradigm and claim that such drug interactions will be lesser in magnitude but yet may be clinically significant. This review focuses on current known mechanisms of drug interactions at the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and the potential impact of such interactions in humans. We also explore whether such drug interactions can be predicted from preclinical studies. Defining the mechanisms and the impact of drug-drug interactions at the BBB is important for improving efficacy of drugs used in the treatment of CNS disorders while minimizing their toxicity as well as minimizing neurotoxicity of non-CNS drugs. PMID:19393264

  8. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  9. Drug interactions with cisapride: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Michalets, E L; Williams, C R

    2000-07-01

    Cisapride, a prokinetic agent, has been used for the treatment of a number of gastrointestinal disorders, particularly gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in adults and children. Since 1993, 341 cases of ventricular arrhythmias, including 80 deaths, have been reported to the US Food and Drug Administration. Marketing of the drug has now been discontinued in the US; however, it is still available under a limited-access protocol. Knowledge of the risk factors for cisapride-associated arrhythmias will be essential for its continued use in those patients who meet the eligibility criteria. This review summarises the published literature on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of cisapride with concomitantly administered drugs, providing clinicians with practical recommendations for avoiding these potentially fatal events. Pharmacokinetic interactions with cisapride involve inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, the primary mode of elimination of cisapride, thereby increasing plasma concentrations of the drug. The macrolide antibacterials clarithromycin, erythromycin and troleandomycin are inhibitors of CYP3A4 and should not be used in conjunction with cisapride. Azithromycin is an alternative. Similarly, azole antifungal agents such as fluconazole, itraconazole and ketoconazole are CYP3A4 inhibitors and their concomitant use with cisapride should be avoided. Of the antidepressants nefazodone and fluvoxamine should be avoided with cisapride. Data with fluoxetine is controversial, we favour the avoidance of its use. Citalopram, paroxetine and sertraline are alternatives. The HIV protease inhibitors amprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir and saquinavir inhibit CYP3A4. Clinical experience with cisapride is lacking but avoidance with all protease inhibitors is recommended, although saquinavir is thought to have clinically insignificant effects on CYP3A4. Delavirdine is also a CYP3A4 inhibitor and should be avoided with cisapride. We also recommend

  10. Interactions between magnesium and psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Nechifor, Mihai

    2008-06-01

    Psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, antimanic drugs, antipsychotics, analgesic opioids, and others) are among the most frequently used medicines. Between these drugs and magnesium there are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Erythrocyte magnesium is decreased in patients with severe major depression (MD) vs normal subjects (44 +/- 2.7 mg/L in MD group vs 59.1 +/- 3.2 mg/L in control group, p < 0.01). Therapy with sertraline, 150 mg/day p.o. -21 days or with amitryptiline 3 x 25 mg/day p.o. 28 days increases significantly erythrocyte concentration of magnesium (56.9 +/- 5.22 mg/L after sertraline vs 44 +/- 2.7 mg/L before sertraline, p < 0.01). In patients with acute paranoid schizophrenia, erythrocyte magnesium concentration is decreased vs healthy subjects. Haloperidol, 8 mg/day, p.o. for 21 days or risperidone, 6 mg/day p.o. for 21 days have increased significantly erythrocyte magnesium concentration (46.21 +/- 3.1 mg/L before haloperidol and 54.6 +/- 2.7 mg/L after haloperidol, p < 0.05). Antimanic drugs (mood stabilizers) as carbamazepine, 600 mg/day, p.o., 4 weeks and sodium valproate, 900 mg/day p.o., 4 weeks, increased significantly magnesium in patients with bipolar disorder type I. Increased magnesium status positively correlated with enhancement of the clinical state. The existent data sustain the idea that an increase of erythrocyte magnesium is involved in the mechanism of action of some psychotropic drugs. Magnesium supply decreased the intensity of morphine-induced physical drug dependence. In heroin addicts, the plasma magnesium concentration is decreased.

  11. Alterations of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug–drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ghalib, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Imran; Goel, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Background Drug interactions in oncology are common place and largely ignored as we tolerate high thresholds of ‘toxic’ drug responses in these patients. However, in the era of ‘targeted’ or seemingly ‘less toxic’ therapy, these interactions are more commonly flagged and contribute significantly towards poor ‘quality of life’ and medical fatalities. Objective This review and opinion article focuses on alteration of chemotherapeutic pharmacokinetic profiles by drug interactions in the setting of polypharmacy. The assumption is that the drugs, with changes in their pharmacokinetics, will contribute towards changes in their pharmacodynamics. Methods The examples cited for such drug–drug interactions are culled from published literature with an emphasis on those interactions that have been well characterized at the molecular level. Results Although very few drug interaction studies have been performed on approved oncology based drugs, it is clear that drugs whose pharmacokinetics profiles are closely related to their pharmacodynamics will indeed result in clinically important drug interactions. Some newer mechanisms are described that involve interactions at the level of gene transcription, whereby, drug metabolism is significantly altered. However, for any given drug interaction, there does not seem to be a comprehensive model describing interactions. Conclusions Mechanisms based drug interactions are plentiful in oncology; however, there is an absolute lack of a comprehensive model that would predict drug–drug interactions. PMID:19239394

  12. [Drug interactions and clinical relevance: it all began with cheese].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Norte, Juan Antonio

    2012-04-01

    In a drug interaction, the effects of one drug can be increased or decreased or a quite new effect produced by the previous, concurrent or subsequent administration of another substance, including prescription and nonprescription drugs, food, tobacco or alcohol. The effect of the interaction can be desirable, inconsequential, or adverse. The increasing number of drugs available and the increasing use of multidrug therapeutic regimens enhance the potential for drug interactions. However, in clinical practice, most interactions are not significant or rarely of significance. It is when the interaction leads to adverse consequences that it comes to the attention of the patient and physician. Interactions may occur by pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamics mechanisms. Pharmacokinetic interactions represent the modification of one substance (the interacting substance) on the ADME processes of absorption, distribution, metabolism or excretion of a drug (the index drug). Subsequently, it may lead to changes in the concentration of the index drug at the receptor sites. Drug interactions with a pharmacodynamic basis involve actions on the same receptor or physiological systems through either synergism or antagonism. Many drug interactions can be predicted if the pharmacodynamics effects, pharmacokinetic properties and mechanisms of action of the interacting agents are known. The most obvious interactions are those producing altered pharmacokinetic of drugs with a low therapeutic index (oral anticoagulants, antidiabetic drugs, digoxin, benzodiazepines and immunosuppressant and cytotoxic drugs).

  13. Measurement of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions with minimal dependence on neutrino energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.-G.; Pickering, L.; Dolan, S.; Barr, G.; Coplowe, D.; Uchida, Y.; Wark, D.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Yuan, T.

    2016-07-01

    We present a phenomenological study of nuclear effects in neutrino charged-current interactions, using transverse kinematic imbalances in exclusive measurements. Novel observables with minimal dependence on neutrino energy are proposed to study quasielastic scattering and especially resonance production. They should be able to provide direct constraints on nuclear effects in neutrino- and antineutrino-nucleus interactions.

  14. Drug interactions with tobacco smoking. An update.

    PubMed

    Zevin, S; Benowitz, N L

    1999-06-01

    Cigarette smoking remains highly prevalent in most countries. It can affect drug therapy by both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. Enzymes induced by tobacco smoking may also increase the risk of cancer by enhancing the metabolic activation of carcinogens. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tobacco smoke are believed to be responsible for the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, CYP1A2 and possibly CYP2E1, CYP1A1 is primarily an extrahepatic enzyme found in lung and placenta. There are genetic polymorphisms in the inducibility of CYP1A1, with some evidence that high inducibility is more common in patients with lung cancer. CYP1A2 is a hepatic enzyme responsible for the metabolism of a number of drugs and activation of some procarcinogens. Caffeine demethylation, using blood clearance or urine metabolite data, has been used as an in vivo marker of CYP1A2 activity, clearly demonstrating an effect of cigarette smoking, CYP2E1 metabolises a number of drugs as well as activating some carcinogens. Our laboratory has found in an intraindividual study that cigarette smoking significantly enhances CYP2E1 activity as measured by the clearance of chlorzoxazone. In animal studies, nicotine induces the activity of several enzymes, including CYP2E1, CYP2A1/2A2 and CYP2B1/2B2, in the brain, but whether this effect is clinically significant is unknown. Similarly, although inhibitory effects of the smoke constituents carbon monoxide and cadmium on CYP enzymes have been observed in vitro and in animal studies, the relevance of this inhibition to humans has not yet been established. The mechanism involved in most interactions between cigarette smoking and drugs involves the induction of metabolism. Drugs for which induced metabolism because of cigarette smoking may have clinical consequence include theophylline, caffeine, tacrine, imipramine, haloperidol, pentazocine, propranolol, flecainide and estradiol. Cigarette smoking results in faster clearance of heparin

  15. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L; Tepper, Naomi K; Gaffield, Mary E

    2017-04-24

    To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Systematic review of the published literature. We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices.

  16. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Kavita; Stuart, Gretchen S.; Robinson, Jennifer; Gray, Andrew L.; Tepper, Naomi K.; Gaffield, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To summarize published evidence on drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals. Design: Systematic review of the published literature. Methods: We searched PubMed, POPLINE, and EMBASE for peer-reviewed publications of studies (in any language) from inception to 21 September 2015. We included studies of women using hormonal contraceptives and antiretrovirals concurrently. Outcomes of interest were effectiveness of either therapy, toxicity, or pharmacokinetics. We used standard abstraction forms to summarize and assess strengths and weaknesses. Results: Fifty reports from 46 studies were included. Most antiretrovirals whether used for therapy or prevention, have limited interactions with hormonal contraceptive methods, with the exception of efavirenz. Although depot medroxyprogesterone acetate is not affected, limited data on implants and combined oral contraceptive pills suggest that efavirenz-containing combination antiretroviral therapy may compromise contraceptive effectiveness of these methods. However, implants remain very effective despite such drug interactions. Antiretroviral plasma concentrations and effectiveness are generally not affected by hormonal contraceptives. Conclusion: Women taking antiretrovirals, for treatment or prevention, should not be denied access to the full range of hormonal contraceptive options, but should be counseled on the expected rates of unplanned pregnancy associated with all contraceptive methods, in order to make their own informed choices. PMID:28060009

  17. [Food-drug interactions: an underestimated risk].

    PubMed

    Sönnichsen, A C; Donner-Banzhoff, N; Baum, E

    2005-11-03

    With only few exceptions, administration of medicaments should, in principle, be independent of food intake (at least half an hour before or two hours after eating). This ensures uniform and assessable bioavailability. However, it also entails the risk that the patient is more likely to forget to take medication postponed to 2 hours after a meal, than when it is directly coupled to a meal. Certain foodstuffs or food constituents, such as, for example, grapefruit, Seville orange juice, red wine, alcoholic drinks in general, or large quantities of caffeine and garlic should be avoided during drug treatment. In addition, specific interactions with certain drugs must also be taken into account (e.g. MAO inhibitors and tyramine, curamine and vitamin K).

  18. Drug and dietary interactions of warfarin and novel oral anticoagulants: an update.

    PubMed

    Nutescu, Edith; Chuatrisorn, Ittiporn; Hellenbart, Erika

    2011-04-01

    Clinicians and patients around the world have been intrigued by the concept of developing an oral anticoagulant with a broad therapeutic window and few drug and dietary interactions that can be administered at fixed doses with no or minimal monitoring. The recently approved oral direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, along with the emerging oral anti-factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban, have been developed to address many of the shortcomings of warfarin therapy. As warfarin is associated with extensive food and drug interactions, there is also a need to consider such interactions with the new oral anticoagulants. While to date few drug and dietary interactions have been reported with the new oral anticoagulants, it is still early in their development and clinical use cycle. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles will have to be closely accounted for when determining the likelihood of a potential drug interaction prior to therapy initiation. As the list of drugs and supplements that interact with warfarin is continuously expanding, and the knowledge on drug interactions with the novel oral anticoagulants is still in its infancy, clinicians need to be vigilant when initiating any of these agents or when any changes in the patient's medication profile occur and perform a close screening for potential drug and dietary interactions. The objective of this paper is to give an update on drug and dietary interactions with warfarin and the novel oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban.

  19. Drug-drug interactions among elderly patients hospitalized for drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Juurlink, David N; Mamdani, Muhammad; Kopp, Alexander; Laupacis, Andreas; Redelmeier, Donald A

    2003-04-02

    Drug-drug interactions are a preventable cause of morbidity and mortality, yet their consequences in the community are not well characterized. To determine whether elderly patients admitted to hospital with specific drug toxicities were likely to have been prescribed an interacting drug in the week prior to admission. Three population-based, nested case-control studies. Ontario, Canada, from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2000. All Ontario residents aged 66 years or older treated with glyburide, digoxin, or an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. Case patients were those admitted to hospital for drug-related toxicity. Prescription records of cases were compared with those of controls (matched on age, sex, use of the same medication, and presence or absence of renal disease) for receipt of interacting medications (co-trimoxazole with glyburide, clarithromycin with digoxin, and potassium-sparing diuretics with ACE inhibitors). Odds ratio for association between hospital admission for drug toxicity (hypoglycemia, digoxin toxicity, or hyperkalemia, respectively) and use of an interacting medication in the preceding week, adjusted for diagnoses, receipt of other medications, the number of prescription drugs, and the number of hospital admissions in the year preceding the index date. During the 7-year study period, 909 elderly patients receiving glyburide were admitted with a diagnosis of hypoglycemia. In the primary analysis, those patients admitted for hypoglycemia were more than 6 times as likely to have been treated with co-trimoxazole in the previous week (adjusted odds ratio, 6.6; 95% confidence interval, 4.5-9.7). Patients admitted with digoxin toxicity (n = 1051) were about 12 times more likely to have been treated with clarithromycin (adjusted odds ratio, 11.7; 95% confidence interval, 7.5-18.2) in the previous week, and patients treated with ACE inhibitors admitted with a diagnosis of hyperkalemia (n = 523) were about 20 times more likely to have

  20. A Model for Predicting the Interindividual Variability of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tod, M; Bourguignon, L; Bleyzac, N; Goutelle, S

    2017-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are frequently characterized and quantified by an AUC ratio (Rauc). The typical value of the AUC ratio in case of cytochrome-mediated interactions may be predicted by several approaches, based on in vitro or in vivo data. Prediction of the interindividual variability of Rauc would help to anticipate more completely the consequences of a drug-drug interaction. We propose and evaluate a simple approach for predicting the standard deviation (sd) of Ln(Rauc), a metric close to the interindividual coefficient of variation of Rauc. First, a model was derived to link sd(Ln Rauc) with the substrate fraction metabolized by each cytochrome and the potency of the interactors, in case of induction or inhibition. Second, the parameters involved in these equations were estimated by a Bayesian hierarchical model, using the data from 56 interaction studies retrieved from the literature. Third, the model was evaluated by several metrics based on the fold prediction error (PE) of sd(Ln Rauc). The median PE was 0.998 (the ideal value is 1) and the interquartile range was 0.96-1.03. The PE was in the acceptable interval (0.5 to 2) in 52 cases out of 56. Fourth, a surface plot of sd(Ln Rauc) as a function of the characteristics of the substrate and the interactor has been built. The minimal value of sd(Ln Rauc) was about 0.08 (obtained for Rauc = 1) while the maximal value, 0.7, was obtained for interactions involving highly metabolized substrates with strong interactors.

  1. Comparative analysis of three drug-drug interaction screening systems against probable clinically relevant drug-drug interactions: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Muhič, Neža; Mrhar, Ales; Brvar, Miran

    2017-07-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening systems report potential DDIs. This study aimed to find the prevalence of probable DDI-related adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and compare the clinical usefulness of different DDI screening systems to prevent or warn against these ADRs. A prospective cohort study was conducted in patients urgently admitted to medical departments. Potential DDIs were checked using Complete Drug Interaction®, Lexicomp® Online™, and Drug Interaction Checker®. The study team identified the patients with probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs on admission, the causality of which was assessed using the Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of screening systems to prevent or warn against probable DDI-related ADRs were evaluated. Overall, 50 probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs were found in 37 out of 795 included patients taking at least two drugs, most common of them were bleeding, hyperkalemia, digitalis toxicity, and hypotension. Complete Drug Interaction showed the best sensitivity (0.76) for actual DDI-related ADRs, followed by Lexicomp Online (0.50), and Drug Interaction Checker (0.40). Complete Drug Interaction and Drug Interaction Checker had positive predictive values of 0.07; Lexicomp Online had 0.04. We found no difference in specificity and negative predictive values among these systems. DDI screening systems differ significantly in their ability to detect probable clinically relevant DDI-related ADRs in terms of sensitivity and positive predictive value.

  2. Inferring Cuisine - Drug Interactions Using the Linked Data Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovik, Milos; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Trajanov, Dimitar; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2015-01-01

    Food - drug interactions are well studied, however much less is known about cuisine - drug interactions. Non-native cuisines are becoming increasingly more popular as they are available in (almost) all regions in the world. Here we address the problem of how known negative food - drug interactions are spread in different cuisines. We show that different drug categories have different distribution of the negative effects in different parts of the world. The effects certain ingredients have on different drug categories and in different cuisines are also analyzed. This analysis is aimed towards stressing out the importance of cuisine - drug interactions for patients which are being administered drugs with known negative food interactions. A patient being under a treatment with one such drug should be advised not only about the possible negative food - drug interactions, but also about the cuisines that could be avoided from the patient's diet. PMID:25792182

  3. Inferring cuisine--drug interactions using the linked data approach.

    PubMed

    Jovanovik, Milos; Bogojeska, Aleksandra; Trajanov, Dimitar; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2015-03-20

    Food - drug interactions are well studied, however much less is known about cuisine - drug interactions. Non-native cuisines are becoming increasingly more popular as they are available in (almost) all regions in the world. Here we address the problem of how known negative food - drug interactions are spread in different cuisines. We show that different drug categories have different distribution of the negative effects in different parts of the world. The effects certain ingredients have on different drug categories and in different cuisines are also analyzed. This analysis is aimed towards stressing out the importance of cuisine - drug interactions for patients which are being administered drugs with known negative food interactions. A patient being under a treatment with one such drug should be advised not only about the possible negative food - drug interactions, but also about the cuisines that could be avoided from the patient's diet.

  4. [Interactions between herbal medicines and drugs].

    PubMed

    Tůmová, L

    2000-07-01

    At present the use of medicaments of plant origin is on the increase. It is therefore necessary to take into consideration that there exist known as well as potential interactions between the medicament of the medicinal plant. The problematic plants include Echinacea, Allium cepa, Gingko biloba, Panax ginseng, as well as Hypericum perforatum, Valeriana officinalis, or Glycyrrhiza glabra. Its use should be limited, or completely excluded in the cases of simultaneous therapy with, e.g., warfarin, hepatotoxically acting medicaments, MAOI inhibitors, phenelzin sulphate, or phenytoin, as they may decrease of completely eliminate the therapeutic effect of the administered drugs, or they may cause a toxic damage to the organism.

  5. mTOR inhibitors in pancreas transplant: adverse effects and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Silva, Gabriel; Ivani de Paula, Mayara; Rangel, Érika B

    2017-04-01

    Patient and pancreas allograft survival improved following reductions in surgical complications, tighter donor selection and optimization in immunosuppressive protocols. However, long-term survival of pancreas allografts is adversely affected by rejection and immunosuppressive regimen toxicity. Areas covered: This article reviews the existing literature and knowledge of mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORi). Some clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are highlighted. We summarize the nephrotoxic and diabetogenic mechanisms of mTORi after pancreas transplant, the alternatives to minimize these effects, and report on other adverse events. Expert opinion: Calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based regimens remain the mainstay treatment after pancreas-kidney transplant. However, long-term use of CNIs may be associated with nephrotoxicity. Switching from CNIs to mTORi (sirolimus/SRL and everolimus/EVR) may preserve kidney function, mainly EVR conversion. However, mTORi promote an imbalance of mTOR signaling during long-term follow-up and may ultimately contribute to proteinuria and hyperglycemia. These drugs disrupt autophagy, inhibit cell proliferation, and downregulate VEGF. Therefore, it is important to comprehend and interpret the experimental data. It is equally important to critically analyze clinical studies. Of importance, minimization of side effects, based on safe approaches, can prolong kidney allograft survival. Additional randomized-controlled studies are required to assess the impact of mTORi on pancreas allograft survival.

  6. Scattering States of HULTHÉN Interaction in Minimal Length Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanabadi, H.; Zarrinkamar, S.; Maghsoodi, E.

    2013-05-01

    We first revisit the nonrelativistic minimal length quantum mechanics and reveal an interesting symmetry of the problem. In fact, we will show that the cumbersome problem can be cast into the ordinary Schrödinger equation with a new effective potential. Next, as a typical example, we show the minimal length Schrödinger equation in the presence of a nonminimal Hulthén vector interaction. The transmission and reflection coefficients are reported as well.

  7. Impact insertion of transfer-molded microneedle for localized and minimally invasive ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Lee, Kang Ju; Seo, Il Ho; Lee, Ji Yong; Lee, Sang-Mok; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2015-07-10

    It has been challenging for microneedles to deliver drugs effectively to thin tissues with little background support such as the cornea. Herein, we designed a microneedle pen system, a single microneedle with a spring-loaded microneedle applicator to provide impact insertion. To firmly attach solid microneedles with 140 μm in height at the end of macro-scale applicators, a transfer molding process was employed. The fabricated microneedle pens were then applied to mouse corneas. The microneedle pens successfully delivered rhodamine dye deep enough to reach the stromal layer of the cornea with small entry only about 1000 μm(2). When compared with syringes or 30 G needle tips, microneedle pens could achieve more localized and minimally invasive delivery without any chances of perforation. To investigate the efficacy of microneedle pens as a way of drug delivery, sunitinib malate proven to inhibit in vitro angiogenesis, was delivered to suture-induced angiogenesis model. When compared with delivery by a 30 G needle tip dipped with sunitinib malate, only delivery by microneedle pens could effectively inhibit corneal neovascularization in vivo. Microneedle pens could effectively deliver drugs to thin tissues without impairing merits of using microneedles: localized and minimally invasive delivery.

  8. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors

    PubMed Central

    Bogetti-Salazar, Michele; González-González, Cesar; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe) (n=64) and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent) (n=117). Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. RESULTS: A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5%) and 124 women (68.5%) with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1%) patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81%) were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%), clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%), and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%). Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population. PMID:26872079

  9. Severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Bogetti-Salazar, Michele; González-González, Cesar; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Rosas-Carrasco, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    To identify the main severe potential drug-drug interactions in older adults with dementia and to examine the factors associated with these interactions. This was a cross-sectional study. The enrolled patients were selected from six geriatrics clinics of tertiary care hospitals across Mexico City. The patients had received a clinical diagnosis of dementia based on the current standards and were further divided into the following two groups: those with severe drug-drug interactions (contraindicated/severe) (n=64) and those with non-severe drug-drug interactions (moderate/minor/absent) (n=117). Additional socio-demographic, clinical and caregiver data were included. Potential drug-drug interactions were identified using Micromedex Drug Reax 2.0® database. A total of 181 patients were enrolled, including 57 men (31.5%) and 124 women (68.5%) with a mean age of 80.11±8.28 years. One hundred and seven (59.1%) patients in our population had potential drug-drug interactions, of which 64 (59.81%) were severe/contraindicated. The main severe potential drug-drug interactions were caused by the combinations citalopram/anti-platelet (11.6%), clopidogrel/omeprazole (6.1%), and clopidogrel/aspirin (5.5%). Depression, the use of a higher number of medications, dementia severity and caregiver burden were the most significant factors associated with severe potential drug-drug interactions. Older people with dementia experience many severe potential drug-drug interactions. Anti-depressants, antiplatelets, anti-psychotics and omeprazole were the drugs most commonly involved in these interactions. Despite their frequent use, anti-dementia drugs were not involved in severe potential drug-drug interactions. The number and type of medications taken, dementia severity and depression in patients in addition to caregiver burden should be considered to avoid possible drug interactions in this population.

  10. Herb-Drug Interactions of Commonly Used Chinese Medicinal Herbs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrinder; Zhao, Kaicun

    2017-01-01

    With more and more popular use of traditional herbal medicines, in particular Chinese herbal medicines, herb-drug interactions have become a more and more important safety issue in the clinical applications of the conventional drugs. Researches in this area are increasing very rapidly. Herb-drug interactions are complicated due to the fact that multiple chemical components are involved, and these compounds may possess diverse pharmacological activities. Interactions can be in both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Abundant studies focused on pharmacokinetic interactions of herbs and drugs. Herbs may affect the behavior of the concomitantly used drugs by changing their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. Studies on pharmacodynamics interactions of herbs and drugs are still very limited. Herb-drug interactions are potentially causing changes in drug levels and drug activities and leading to either therapeutic failure or toxicities. Sometime it can be fatal. The exposures to drugs, lacking of knowledge in the potential adverse herb-drug interactions, will put big risk to patients' safety in medical services. On the contrary, some interactions may be therapeutically beneficial. It may be used to help develop new therapeutic strategies in the future. This chapter is trying to review the development in the area of herb-drug interactions based on the recently published research findings. Information on the potential interactions among the commonly used Chinese medicinal herbs and conventional drugs is summarized in this chapter. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinically important drug-drug interactions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dhabali, A A H; Awang, R; Zyoud, S H

    2012-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) cause considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide and may lead to hospital admission. Sophisticated computerized drug information and monitoring systems, more recently established in many of the emerging economies, including Malaysia, are capturing useful information on prescribing. Our aim is to report on an investigation of potentially serious DDIs, using a university primary care-based system capturing prescription records from its primary care services. We retrospectively collected data from two academic years over 20 months from computerized databases at the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) from users of the USM primary care services. Three hundred and eighty-six DDI events were observed in a cohort of 208 exposed patients from a total of 23,733 patients, representing a 2-year period prevalence of 876·4 per 100,000 patients. Of the 208 exposed patients, 138 (66·3%) were exposed to one DDI event, 29 (13·9%) to two DDI events, 15 (7·2%) to three DDI events, 6 (2·9%) to four DDI events and 20 (9·6%) to more than five DDI events. Overall, an increasing mean number of episodes of DDIs was noted among exposed patients within the age category ≥70 years (P=0·01), an increasing trend in the number of medications prescribed (P<0·001) and an increasing trend in the number of long-term therapeutic groups (P<0·001). We describe the prevalence of clinically important DDIs in an emerging economy setting and identify the more common potentially serious DDIs. In line with the observations in developed economies, a higher number of episodes of DDIs were seen in patients aged ≥70 years and with more medications prescribed. The easiest method to reduce the frequency of DDIs is to reduce the number of medications prescribed. Therapeutic alternatives should be selected cautiously. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Drug-drug Interaction Discovery Using Abstraction Networks for "National Drug File - Reference Terminology" Chemical Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Christopher; Zheng, Ling; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Zakharchenko, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is a large and complex drug terminology. NDF-RT provides important information about clinical drugs, e.g., their chemical ingredients, mechanisms of action, dosage form and physiological effects. Within NDF-RT such information is represented using tens of thousands of roles. It is difficult to comprehend large, complex terminologies like NDF-RT. In previous studies, we introduced abstraction networks to summarize the content and structure of terminologies. In this paper, we introduce the Ingredient Abstraction Network to summarize NDF-RT's Chemical Ingredients and their associated drugs. Additionally, we introduce the Aggregate Ingredient Abstraction Network, for controlling the granularity of summarization provided by the Ingredient Abstraction Network. The Ingredient Abstraction Network is used to support the discovery of new candidate drug-drug interactions (DDIs) not appearing in First Databank, Inc.'s DDI knowledgebase.

  13. [Adverse effects and interactions of phytotherapeutic drugs].

    PubMed

    Iten, F; Reichling, J; Saller, R

    2002-06-01

    The significantly increased sales figures many phytopharmaceuticals have achieved during the last years prove the confidence that a great part of the population has in herbal remedies. This is primarily due to the wide-spread opinion that herbal remedies are free from side-effects. The long tradition and presumed 'natural' origin are no guarantee for safety in the treatment with herbal remedies. Even if a large proportion of the undesirable events is traceable to falsifications, impurities and lacking quality controls, herbal drugs with controlled quality should not be generally classified as harmless. In the meantime it has been possible to prove the presence of active substances with toxic and cancerogenic properties in various phytopharmaceuticals. Interactions with other drugs have been documented in a number of notes, where phytopharmaceuticals could influence the blood plasma level of various drugs, presumably by activating or inhibiting the cytochrom-P450-system. At present, especially data about adverse effects during long-term administration of herbal remedies are under-represented. Particularly because of their presumed harmlessness they often are prescribed in the case of chronic diseases and then taken over a longer period of time. The frequency of undesirable effects of phytopharmaceuticals is remarkably low, even if the present lack of data about side-effects is considered.

  14. Mechanisms of ethanol-drug-nutrition interactions.

    PubMed

    Lieber, C S

    1994-01-01

    Mechanisms of the toxicologic manifestations of ethanol abuse are reviewed. Hepatotoxicity of ethanol results from alcohol dehydrogenase-mediated excessive hepatic generation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and acetaldehyde. It is now recognized that acetaldehyde is also produced by an accessory (but inducible) pathway, the microsomal ethanol-oxidizing system, which involves a specific cytochrome P450. It generates oxygen radicals and activates many xenobiotics to toxic metabolites, thereby explaining the increased vulnerability of heavy drinkers to industrial solvents, anesthetics, commonly used drugs, over-the-counter medications and carcinogens. The contribution of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase to the first pass metabolism of ethanol and alcohol-drug interactions is now recognized. Alcohol also alters the degradation of key nutrients, thereby promoting deficiencies as well as toxic interactions with vitamin A and beta-carotene. Conversely, nutritional deficits may affect the toxicity of ethanol and acetaldehyde, as illustrated by the depletion in glutathione, ameliorated by S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Other supernutrients include polyenylphosphatidylcholine, shown to correct the alcohol-induced hepatic phosphatidylcholine depletion and to prevent alcoholic cirrhosis in non-human primates. Thus, a better understanding of the pathology induced by ethanol has now generated improved prospects for therapy.

  15. Optimal design method to minimize users' thinking mapping load in human-machine interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqun; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The discrepancy between human cognition and machine requirements/behaviors usually results in serious mental thinking mapping loads or even disasters in product operating. It is important to help people avoid human-machine interaction confusions and difficulties in today's mental work mastered society. Improving the usability of a product and minimizing user's thinking mapping and interpreting load in human-machine interactions. An optimal human-machine interface design method is introduced, which is based on the purpose of minimizing the mental load in thinking mapping process between users' intentions and affordance of product interface states. By analyzing the users' thinking mapping problem, an operating action model is constructed. According to human natural instincts and acquired knowledge, an expected ideal design with minimized thinking loads is uniquely determined at first. Then, creative alternatives, in terms of the way human obtains operational information, are provided as digital interface states datasets. In the last, using the cluster analysis method, an optimum solution is picked out from alternatives, by calculating the distances between two datasets. Considering multiple factors to minimize users' thinking mapping loads, a solution nearest to the ideal value is found in the human-car interaction design case. The clustering results show its effectiveness in finding an optimum solution to the mental load minimizing problems in human-machine interaction design.

  16. Physicians' responses to computerized drug interaction alerts with password overrides.

    PubMed

    Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Sakushima, Ken; Endoh, Akira; Umeki, Reona; Oki, Hiromitsu; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2015-08-28

    Although evidence has suggested that computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems may reduce the occurrence of drug-drug interactions, the numerous reminders and alerts generated by such systems could represent an excessive burden for clinicians, resulting in a high override rate of not only unimportant, but also important alerts. We analyzed physicians' responses to alerts of relative contraindications and contraindications for coadministration in a computerized drug-drug interaction alert system at Hokkaido University Hospital. In this system, the physician must enter a password to override an alert and continue an order. All of the drug-drug interaction alerts generated between December 2011 and November 2012 at Hokkaido University Hospital were included in this study. The system generated a total of 170 alerts of relative contraindications and contraindication for coadministration; 59 (34.7 %) of the corresponding orders were cancelled after the alert was accepted, and 111 (65.3 %) were overridden. The most frequent contraindication alert was for the combination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and fibrates. No incidents involving drug-drug interactions were reported among patients who were prescribed contraindicated drug pairs after an override. Although computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems that require password overrides appear useful for promoting medication safety, having to enter passwords to override alerts may represent an excessive burden for the prescribing physician. Therefore, both patient safety and physicians' workloads should be taken into consideration in future designs of computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems.

  17. Five dimensional spherically symmetric minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Brans-Dicke theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Raju, P.; Sobhanbabu, K.

    2016-04-01

    Five dimensional spherically symmetric space-time filled with two minimally interacting fields; matter and holographic dark energy components is investigated in a scalar tensor theory of gravitation proposed by Brans and Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961). To obtain a determinate solution of the highly non-linear field equations we have used (i) a relation between metric potentials and (ii) an equation of state which represents disordered radiation in five dimensional universe. The solution obtained represents a minimally interacting and radiating holographic dark energy model in five dimensional universe. Some physical and Kinematical properties of the model are, also, studied.

  18. ABC multidrug transporters: target for modulation of drug pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Béatrice; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Nine proteins of the ABC superfamily (P-glycoprotein, 7 MRPs and BCRP) are involved in multidrug transport. Being localised at the surface of endothelial or epithelial cells, they expel drugs back to the external medium (if located at the apical side [P-glycoprotein, BCRP, MRP2, MRP4 in the kidney]) or to the blood (if located at the basolateral side [MRP1, MRP3, MRP4, MRP5]), modulating thereby their absorption, distribution, and elimination. In the CNS, most transporters are oriented to expel drugs to the blood. Transporters also cooperate with Phase I/Phase II metabolism enzymes by eliminating drug metabolites. Their major features are (i) their capacity to recognize drugs belonging to unrelated pharmacological classes, and (ii) their redundancy, a single molecule being possibly substrate for different transporters. This ensures an efficient protection of the body against invasion by xenobiotics. Competition for transport is now characterized as a mechanism of interaction between co-administered drugs, one molecule limiting the transport of the other, potentially affecting bioavailability, distribution, and/or elimination. Again, this mechanism reinforces drug interactions mediated by cytochrome P450 inhibition, as many substrates of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A4 are common. Induction of the expression of genes coding for MDR transporters is another mechanism of drug interaction, which could affect all drug substrates of the up-regulated transporter. Overexpression of MDR transporters confers resistance to anticancer agents and other therapies. All together, these data justify why studying drug active transport should be part of the evaluation of new drugs, as recently recommended by the FDA.

  19. Minimizing repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk in drug development and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Attila S; Nattel, Stanley

    2010-03-26

    electrocardiographic intervals (particularly QT) and cardiac rhythm are often needed, both prior to drug approval and after successful introduction on the market (postmarketing surveillance). The successful avoidance of proarrhythmic complications is a shared responsibility of the innovative pharmaceutical industry, regulatory authorities, partners in the clinical drug development phase and practicing physicians. This paper reviews the principal forms of proarrhythmia and the methods that can be used to minimize the risk of proarrhythmia in drug development and clinical practice, with particular emphasis on the most common and problematic form, acquired LQTS.

  20. Predicting potential drug-drug interactions by integrating chemical, biological, phenotypic and network data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Liu, Feng; Luo, Fei; Tian, Gang; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-01-05

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major concerns in drug discovery. Accurate prediction of potential DDIs can help to reduce unexpected interactions in the entire lifecycle of drugs, and are important for the drug safety surveillance. Since many DDIs are not detected or observed in clinical trials, this work is aimed to predict unobserved or undetected DDIs. In this paper, we collect a variety of drug data that may influence drug-drug interactions, i.e., drug substructure data, drug target data, drug enzyme data, drug transporter data, drug pathway data, drug indication data, drug side effect data, drug off side effect data and known drug-drug interactions. We adopt three representative methods: the neighbor recommender method, the random walk method and the matrix perturbation method to build prediction models based on different data. Thus, we evaluate the usefulness of different information sources for the DDI prediction. Further, we present flexible frames of integrating different models with suitable ensemble rules, including weighted average ensemble rule and classifier ensemble rule, and develop ensemble models to achieve better performances. The experiments demonstrate that different data sources provide diverse information, and the DDI network based on known DDIs is one of most important information for DDI prediction. The ensemble methods can produce better performances than individual methods, and outperform existing state-of-the-art methods. The datasets and source codes are available at https://github.com/zw9977129/drug-drug-interaction/ .

  1. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chin Chiat; Ong, Charlene Li Ching; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah; Wong, Tin Wui

    2008-02-01

    The effectiveness of an interactive mixture as a rapid drug delivery system is compared with that of a solid dispersion. The influences of drug load, particle size, and crystallinity of these test systems are investigated. The interactive mixtures and solid dispersions were prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 and hydrophobic nifedipine drug by means of physical mixing and melting methods, respectively. The formed products were subjected to drug particle size and crystallinity analyses, and dissolution tests. In comparison with the interactive mixtures, the solid dispersions with low drug load were more effective as a rapid drug delivery system, as the size of a given batch of drug particles was markedly reduced by the molten PEG 3350. The rate and extent of drug dissolution were mainly promoted by decreasing effective drug particle size. However, these were lower in the solid dispersions than in the interactive mixtures when a high load of fine drug particles was used as the starting material. This was attributed to drug coarsening during the preparation of the solid dispersion. Unlike solid dispersions, the interactive mixtures could accommodate a high load of fine drug particles without compromising its capacity to enhance the rate and extent of drug dissolution. The interactive mixture is appropriate for use to deliver a fine hydrophobic drug in a formulation requiring a high drug load.

  3. Drug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure. The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio. Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with

  4. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-10-18

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events.

  5. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events. PMID:18928560

  6. Potential food-drug interactions in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Judy K; Fox, Jodie R

    2012-04-01

    Medication administration at mealtimes may result in food-drug interactions. Older adults are especially at risk of food-drug interactions leading to adverse drug effects and subtherapeutic responses. Research on potential food-drug interactions is limited and dated. This study examined the frequency of potential food-drug interactions in long-term care. Forty-nine percent of drugs administered at mealtimes had potential for interaction, with cardiovascular medications given most frequently. The frequency of potential interactions makes this phenomenon critically important to review. Collaboration between nurses and pharmacists may identify optimal medication scheduling. Nurses can enhance care by identifying strategies to limit interactions through knowledge and creative, collaborative administration schedules.

  7. Drug interactions associated with HAART: focus on treatments for addiction and recreational drugs.

    PubMed

    Faragon, John J; Piliero, Peter J

    2003-09-01

    The advent of HAART has improved survival in patients infected with HIV; however, treatment is complicated by potential drug interactions. The risk of drug interactions is compounded by the use of additional therapies for comorbid conditions, such as substance abuse, and by the use of recreational drugs. HIV health care providers should be aware of the potential interaction of recreational drugs and addiction treatments with HAART because of the potential for significant adverse effects for their HIV-infected patients. This article provides a review of the literature on drug interactions among addiction therapies, recreational drugs, and HAART.

  8. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues.

  9. Interaction Patterns among Drug Dealers. Drug Abuse Information Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkyns, Robert L.; Hanneman, Gerhard J.

    Drug dealers are often popularly stereotyped as "pushers" who actively engage in enticing young people into the drug habit, but there have been no scientific studies of their behavior or their attitudes on drug abuse or public health. In an attempt to gain information about behavior characteristics and communication patterns of middle…

  10. Drug interaction studies on new drug applications: current situations and regulatory views in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Drug interaction studies on new drug applications (NDAs) for new molecular entities (NMEs) approved in Japan between 1997 and 2008 are examined in the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). The situations of drug interaction studies in NDAs have changed over the past 12 years, especially in metabolizing enzyme and transporter-based drug interactions. Materials and approaches to study drug-metabolizing enzyme-based drug interactions have improved, and become more rational based on mechanistic theory and new technologies. On the basis of incremental evidence of transporter roles in human pharmacokinetics, transporter-based drug interactions have been increasingly studied during drug development and submitted in recent NDAs. Some recently approved NMEs include transporter-based drug interaction information in their package inserts (PIs). The regulatory document "Methods of Drug Interaction Studies," in addition to recent advances in science and technology, has also contributed to plan and evaluation of drug interaction studies in recent new drug development. This review summarizes current situations and further discussion points on drug interaction studies in NDAs in Japan.

  11. Can drug resistance in epilepsy be minimized? Challenging commonly held beliefs.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Emilio

    2005-09-01

    Until more efficacious antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) that can tackle the challenge of drug-refractory epilepsy are developed, the best way to minimize inadequate seizure control is to exploit at best available treatments. There are however, discrepancies between commonly held opinions on several aspects of drug therapy, and the body of scientific evidence which exists to support them. This article highlights a few examples, discussing evidence that, contrary to common belief, (i) a significant proportion of patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy respond to concentrations of AEDs below the "therapeutic range" quoted in the literature; (ii) only a small group of patients unresponsive to low to moderate AED dosages become seizure-free after increasing dosage up to the limit of tolerability; (iii) knowledge of mechanisms of AED action can aid in the rational use of AEDs in the clinic; (iv) monitoring serum levels of new generation AEDs can be usefully exploited to improve management, and (v) at least in a subgroup of patients, successful epilepsy surgery cannot be regarded as curative, because seizure control may be dependent upon continuation of AED therapy. It is hoped that increased awareness of these issues could eventually contribute not only to improved clinical outcome, but also to high quality studies in many areas where gaps in knowledge prevent application of truly evidence-based management.

  12. Systematic Prediction of Pharmacodynamic Drug-Drug Interactions through Protein-Protein-Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jialiang; Niu, Chaoqun; Green, Christopher D.; Yang, Lun; Mei, Hongkang; Han, Jing-Dong J.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a major challenge in drug development. Previous attempts have established formal approaches for pharmacokinetic (PK) DDIs, but there is not a feasible solution for pharmacodynamic (PD) DDIs because the endpoint is often a serious adverse event rather than a measurable change in drug concentration. Here, we developed a metric “S-score” that measures the strength of network connection between drug targets to predict PD DDIs. Utilizing known PD DDIs as golden standard positives (GSPs), we observed a significant correlation between S-score and the likelihood a PD DDI occurs. Our prediction was robust and surpassed existing methods as validated by two independent GSPs. Analysis of clinical side effect data suggested that the drugs having predicted DDIs have similar side effects. We further incorporated this clinical side effects evidence with S-score to increase the prediction specificity and sensitivity through a Bayesian probabilistic model. We have predicted 9,626 potential PD DDIs at the accuracy of 82% and the recall of 62%. Importantly, our algorithm provided opportunities for better understanding the potential molecular mechanisms or physiological effects underlying DDIs, as illustrated by the case studies. PMID:23555229

  13. Potential drug interactions in patients given antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Wendel Mombaque; Secoli, Silvia Regina; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate potential drug-drug interactions (PDDI) in patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted on 161 adults with HIV infection. Clinical, socio demographic, and antiretroviral treatment data were collected. To analyze the potential drug interactions, we used the software Micromedex(r). Statistical analysis was performed by binary logistic regression, with a p-value of ≤0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: of the participants, 52.2% were exposed to potential drug-drug interactions. In total, there were 218 potential drug-drug interactions, of which 79.8% occurred between drugs used for antiretroviral therapy. There was an association between the use of five or more medications and potential drug-drug interactions (p = 0.000) and between the time period of antiretroviral therapy being over six years and potential drug-drug interactions (p < 0.00). The clinical impact was prevalent sedation and cardiotoxicity. Conclusions: the PDDI identified in this study of moderate and higher severity are events that not only affect the therapeutic response leading to toxicity in the central nervous and cardiovascular systems, but also can interfere in tests used for detection of HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:27878224

  14. Antiretroviral Drug Interactions: Overview of Interactions Involving New and Investigational Agents and the Role of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring for Management

    PubMed Central

    Rathbun, R. Chris; Liedtke, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    Antiretrovirals are prone to drug-drug and drug-food interactions that can result in subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic concentrations. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other diseases are common due to shared metabolism through cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and transport by membrane proteins (e.g., p-glycoprotein, organic anion-transporting polypeptide). The clinical significance of antiretroviral drug interactions is reviewed, with a focus on new and investigational agents. An overview of the mechanistic basis for drug interactions and the effect of individual antiretrovirals on CYP450 and UGT isoforms are provided. Interactions between antiretrovirals and medications for other co-morbidities are summarized. The role of therapeutic drug monitoring in the detection and management of antiretroviral drug interactions is also briefly discussed. PMID:24309307

  15. Evaluation of drug-drug interactions with fesoterodine.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Bimal; Sachse, Richard; Wood, Nolan

    2009-06-01

    To assess drug-drug interactions of fesoterodine with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inhibitor (ketoconazole), inducer (rifampicin), and substrates (ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel). Effects of ketoconazole 200 mg twice daily and rifampicin 600 mg twice daily on fesoterodine 8 mg once daily were investigated in CYP2D6 extensive metabolizers (EMs) and poor metabolizers (PMs) based on 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT) pharmacokinetics (principal active fesoterodine metabolite and CYP3A4 substrate). Effects of fesoterodine 8 mg versus placebo once daily on ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel were investigated based on oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics and on pharmacodynamic effects on progesterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and estradiol plasma levels. Compared with fesoterodine alone, coadministration of fesoterodine with ketoconazole resulted in increases in mean 5-HMT maximum concentration in plasma (C(max); from 3.0 to 6.0 ng/mL in EMs and from 6.4 to 13.4 ng/mL in PMs) and mean area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC; from 38.2 to 88.3 ng h/mL in EMs and 88.3 to 217.2 ng h/mL in PMs). Coadministration of festerodine with rifampicin resulted in decreases in mean 5-HMT C(max) (from 5.2 to 1.5 ng/mL in EMs and from 6.8 to 1.9 ng/mL in PMs) and mean AUC (from 62.4 to 14.4 ng h/mL in EMs and from 87.8 to 19.6 ng h/mL in PMs). Fesoterodine did not affect oral contraceptive pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics or the suppression of ovulation. Fesoterodine dosage should not exceed 4 mg once daily when taken concomitantly with potent CYP3A4 inhibitors. Coadministration of CYP3A4 inducers with fesoterodine may produce subtherapeutic 5-HMT exposures. No dose adjustment is necessary for concomitant use of fesoterodine with oral contraceptives.

  16. An update on clinical drug interactions with the herbal antidepressant St. John's wort.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lai, Xinsheng

    2008-06-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) is one of the most commonly used herbal antidepressants for the treatment of minor to moderate depression. Limited clinical trials suggest that hypericum and standard antidepressants have similar beneficial effects, but current evidence regarding the antidepression effects of SJW extracts is inconsistent. A major safety concern about SJW is its ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and/or clinical response of a variety of clinically important drugs. This review highlights and updates the knowledge regarding drug interactions with SJW by a systematic review of all the available evidence, including worldwide published literature and spontaneous case reports. A number of clinically significant interactions of SJW have been identified with conventional drugs. These interactions often result in a decrease in the concentration or effect of the combined drug, most probably due to the induction of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and the key drug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by the major active constituents in SJW. SJW is a potent inducer of human CYP3A4 and P-gp in vitro and in vivo. In addition, pharmacodynamic interactions of SJW with some drugs (e.g. selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors) have been identified, which are associated with an increased risk of adverse reactions. Since potential interactions of SJW with conventional drugs is a major safety concern, it is important to minimize and avoid these interactions by taking appropriate approaches. These include systematic research to identify SJW-drug interaction; close therapeutic drug monitoring when SJW is combined with conventional drugs with a narrow therapeutic window; proper dose and regimen adjustment; patient education and communication between the patient and physician; design of new preparations of SJW without inducing ability of CYP3A4 and P-gp while retaining its bioactivity; and appropriate regulation in herbal safety and efficacy. Further clinical and

  17. Alcohol Prevention and School Students: Findings from an Australian 2-Year Trial of Integrated Harm Minimization School Drug Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midford, Richard; Ramsden, Robyn; Lester, Leanne; Cahill, Helen; Mitchell, Johanna; Foxcroft, David R.; Venning, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The Drug Education in Victorian Schools program provided integrated education about licit and illicit drugs, employed a harm minimization approach that incorporated participatory, critical thinking and skill-based teaching methods, and engaged parental influence through home activities. A cluster-randomized, controlled trial of the program was…

  18. Alcohol Prevention and School Students: Findings from an Australian 2-Year Trial of Integrated Harm Minimization School Drug Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midford, Richard; Ramsden, Robyn; Lester, Leanne; Cahill, Helen; Mitchell, Johanna; Foxcroft, David R.; Venning, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    The Drug Education in Victorian Schools program provided integrated education about licit and illicit drugs, employed a harm minimization approach that incorporated participatory, critical thinking and skill-based teaching methods, and engaged parental influence through home activities. A cluster-randomized, controlled trial of the program was…

  19. Drug disposition and drug-drug interaction data in 2013 FDA new drug applications: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingjing; Ritchie, Tasha K; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Ragueneau-Majlessi, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to perform a systematic review of drug metabolism, transport, pharmacokinetics, and DDI data available in the NDAs approved by the FDA in 2013, using the University of Washington Drug Interaction Database, and to highlight significant findings. Among 27 NMEs approved, 22 (81%) were well characterized with regard to drug metabolism, transport, or organ impairment, in accordance with the FDA drug interaction guidance (2012) and were fully analyzed in this review. In vitro, a majority of the NMEs were found to be substrates or inhibitors/inducers of at least one drug metabolizing enzyme or transporter. However, in vivo, only half (n = 11) showed clinically relevant drug interactions, with most related to the NMEs as victim drugs and CYP3A being the most affected enzyme. As perpetrators, the overall effects for NMEs were much less pronounced, compared with when they served as victims. In addition, the pharmacokinetic evaluation in patients with hepatic or renal impairment provided useful information for further understanding of the drugs' disposition.

  20. A novel approach to the prediction of drug-drug interactions in humans based on the serum incubation method.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Masato; Ishii, Yasuyuki

    2008-01-01

    A novel method for the prediction of drug-drug interaction has been established based on the in vitro metabolic stability in the "serum incubation method" using cryopreserved human hepatocytes suspended in 100% human serum. As a novel approach, the inhibitory effect of inhibitors on the metabolism of substrates during the first-pass elimination process in the liver (hepatic availability) and in the elimination process from the systemic circulation (hepatic clearance) were separately predicted with the anticipated inhibitor/substrate concentrations during absorption and in the systemic circulation, respectively. Ketoconazole strongly inhibited CYP3A4-mediated terfenadine metabolism in vitro, and the method predicted 6- to 37-fold increase of terfenadine AUC by the concomitant dosing of ketoconazole, which reasonably well agreed with the observed 13- to 59-fold increase of AUC in clinical studies. The CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of indinavir was also subject to the inhibition by ketoconazole in vitro at the lower indinavir concentration (2 microM), whereas no substantial inhibition was observed at 12 microM due to the saturation of indinavir metabolism. Predicted no interaction between ketoconazole and indinavir was consistent with the minimal increase (1.3-fold increase) of indinavir AUC by ketoconazole observed in clinical study. In addition, the method was applied to the CYP2D6-mediated desipramine-quinidine interaction: the predicted 6.4-fold increase of desipramine AUC by quinidine was consistent with the observed 6.7-fold increase of AUC in the clinical drug-drug interaction study. On the other hand, desipramine metabolism was little affected by ketoconazole in vitro, and consequently, it predicted no drug-drug interaction between desipramine and ketoconazole in humans, which agreed with the negligible interaction observed in clinical study. The accuracy of predictions for drug-drug interaction by the serum incubation method was evaluated by comparing the

  1. Quantitative bioassay to identify antimicrobial drugs through drug interaction fingerprint analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Zohar B.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2017-01-01

    Drug interaction analysis, which reports the extent to which the presence of one drug affects the efficacy of another, is a powerful tool to select potent combinatorial therapies and predict connectivity between cellular components. Combinatorial effects of drug pairs often vary even for drugs with similar mechanism of actions. Therefore, drug interaction fingerprinting may be harnessed to differentiate drug identities. We developed a method to analyze drug interactions for the application of identifying active pharmaceutical ingredients, an essential step to assess drug quality. We developed a novel approach towards the identification of active pharmaceutical ingredients by comparing drug interaction fingerprint similarity metrics such as correlation and Euclidean distance. To expedite this method, we used bioluminescent E. coli in a simplified checkerboard assay to generate unique drug interaction fingerprints of antimicrobial drugs. Of 30 antibiotics studied, 29 could be identified based on their drug interaction fingerprints. We present drug interaction fingerprint analysis as a cheap, sensitive and quantitative method towards substandard and counterfeit drug detection. PMID:28205640

  2. Quantitative bioassay to identify antimicrobial drugs through drug interaction fingerprint analysis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Zohar B; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2017-02-16

    Drug interaction analysis, which reports the extent to which the presence of one drug affects the efficacy of another, is a powerful tool to select potent combinatorial therapies and predict connectivity between cellular components. Combinatorial effects of drug pairs often vary even for drugs with similar mechanism of actions. Therefore, drug interaction fingerprinting may be harnessed to differentiate drug identities. We developed a method to analyze drug interactions for the application of identifying active pharmaceutical ingredients, an essential step to assess drug quality. We developed a novel approach towards the identification of active pharmaceutical ingredients by comparing drug interaction fingerprint similarity metrics such as correlation and Euclidean distance. To expedite this method, we used bioluminescent E. coli in a simplified checkerboard assay to generate unique drug interaction fingerprints of antimicrobial drugs. Of 30 antibiotics studied, 29 could be identified based on their drug interaction fingerprints. We present drug interaction fingerprint analysis as a cheap, sensitive and quantitative method towards substandard and counterfeit drug detection.

  3. Quantifying long-range correlations and 1/f patterns in a minimal experiment of social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bedia, Manuel G.; Aguilera, Miguel; Gómez, Tomás; Larrode, David G.; Seron, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers in social cognition have found the “perceptual crossing paradigm” to be both a theoretical and practical advance toward meeting particular challenges. This paradigm has been used to analyze the type of interactive processes that emerge in minimal interactions and it has allowed progress toward understanding of the principles of social cognition processes. In this paper, we analyze whether some critical aspects of these interactions could not have been observed by previous studies. We consider alternative indicators that could complete, or even lead us to rethink, the current interpretation of the results obtained from both experimental and simulated modeling in the fields of social interactions and minimal perceptual crossing. In particular, we discuss the possibility that previous experiments have been analytically constrained to a short-term dynamic type of player response. Additionally, we propose the possibility of considering these experiments from a more suitable framework based on the use and analysis of long-range correlations and fractal dynamics. We will also reveal evidence supporting the idea that social interactions are deployed along many scales of activity. Specifically, we propose that the fractal structure of the interactions could be a more adequate framework to understand the type of social interaction patterns generated in a social engagement. PMID:25429277

  4. Quantifying long-range correlations and 1/f patterns in a minimal experiment of social interaction.

    PubMed

    Bedia, Manuel G; Aguilera, Miguel; Gómez, Tomás; Larrode, David G; Seron, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers in social cognition have found the "perceptual crossing paradigm" to be both a theoretical and practical advance toward meeting particular challenges. This paradigm has been used to analyze the type of interactive processes that emerge in minimal interactions and it has allowed progress toward understanding of the principles of social cognition processes. In this paper, we analyze whether some critical aspects of these interactions could not have been observed by previous studies. We consider alternative indicators that could complete, or even lead us to rethink, the current interpretation of the results obtained from both experimental and simulated modeling in the fields of social interactions and minimal perceptual crossing. In particular, we discuss the possibility that previous experiments have been analytically constrained to a short-term dynamic type of player response. Additionally, we propose the possibility of considering these experiments from a more suitable framework based on the use and analysis of long-range correlations and fractal dynamics. We will also reveal evidence supporting the idea that social interactions are deployed along many scales of activity. Specifically, we propose that the fractal structure of the interactions could be a more adequate framework to understand the type of social interaction patterns generated in a social engagement.

  5. Influence of drugs on albumin and bilirubin interaction.

    PubMed

    Funato, M; Lee, Y; Onishi, S; Cashore, W J

    1989-02-01

    Twenty-eight drugs, including cephem antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents currently used or considered potentially useful in neonatal intensive care nurseries in Japan, were examined to determine their influence on albumin and bilirubin interaction by means of a glucose oxidase - peroxidase method, using an automated analyzer (Arrows) for unbound bilirubin (U.B.). The apparent binding constant for drugs to the high-affinity site on albumin (KD) was determined. Of cephem antibiotics, latamoxef sodium (LMOX) and cefazolin sodium (CEZ) were found to displace bilirubin from albumin (KD = 5.9 x 10(3) M-1 and 4.5 x 10(3) M-1, respectively) as strongly as Na salicylate (KD = 6.8 x 10(3) M-1). Mephenamate and indomethacin, which are used for medical closure of patent ductus arteriosus in premature infants, were also found to be stronger bilirubin displacers (KD = 1.3 x 10(5) M-1 and 1.2 x 10(5) M-1, respectively) than sulfisoxazole (KD = 1.6 x 10(4) M-1). Maximal displacement factors (MDF's) were also estimated in reference to protein binding (%) and effective serum concentration (M) of each drug in human adults. Of these drugs, mephenamate showed a higher risk of bilirubin displacement (MDF = 3.79) than sulfisoxazole (MDF = 2.58) and LMOX had a higher risk of displacement (MDF = 1.97) than Na salicylate (MDF = 1.85). On the other hand, indomethacin and CEZ showed minimal effects on displacement at therapeutic levels (MDF = 1.03 and 1.00, respectively). At therapeutic serum levels, mephenamate and LMOX may possess the potential for displacing bilirubin from albumin and increasing the risk of bilirubin encephalopathy, in a manner similar to sulfisoxazole.

  6. Residual Neurocognitive Features of Long-Term Ecstasy Users With Minimal Exposure to Other Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, John H.; Sherwood, Andrea R.; Hudson, James I.; Gruber, Staci; Kozin, David; Pope, Harrison G.

    2010-01-01

    Aims In field studies assessing cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users, there are several frequent confounding factors that might plausibly bias the findings toward an overestimate of ecstasy-induced neurocognitive toxicity. We designed an investigation seeking to minimize these possible sources of bias. Design We compared illicit ecstasy users and non-users while 1) excluding individuals with significant lifetime exposure to other illicit drugs or alcohol; 2) requiring that all participants be members of the “rave” subculture; and 3) testing all participants with breath, urine, and hair samples at the time of evaluation to exclude possible surreptitious substance use. We compared groups with adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family-of-origin variables, and childhood history of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We provide significance levels without correction for multiple comparisons. Setting Field study. Participants Fifty-two illicit ecstasy users and 59 non-users, age 18-45. Measurements Battery of 15 neuropsychological tests tapping a range of cognitive functions. Findings We found little evidence of decreased cognitive performance in ecstasy users, save for poorer strategic-self-regulation, possibly reflecting increased impulsivity. However this finding might have reflected a premorbid attribute of ecstasy users, rather than a residual neurotoxic effect of the drug. Conclusions In a study designed to minimize limitations found in many prior investigations, we failed to demonstrate marked residual cognitive effects in ecstasy users. This finding contrasts with many previous findings—including our own—and emphasizes the need for continued caution in interpreting field studies of cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users. PMID:21205042

  7. Residual neurocognitive features of long-term ecstasy users with minimal exposure to other drugs.

    PubMed

    Halpern, John H; Sherwood, Andrea R; Hudson, James I; Gruber, Staci; Kozin, David; Pope, Harrison G

    2011-04-01

    In field studies assessing cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users, there are several frequent confounding factors that might plausibly bias the findings toward an overestimate of ecstasy-induced neurocognitive toxicity. We designed an investigation seeking to minimize these possible sources of bias. We compared illicit ecstasy users and non-users while (1) excluding individuals with significant life-time exposure to other illicit drugs or alcohol; (2) requiring that all participants be members of the 'rave' subculture; and (3) testing all participants with breath, urine and hair samples at the time of evaluation to exclude possible surreptitious substance use. We compared groups with adjustment for age, gender, race/ethnicity, family-of-origin variables and childhood history of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. We provide significance levels without correction for multiple comparisons. Field study. Fifty-two illicit ecstasy users and 59 non-users, aged 18-45 years. Battery of 15 neuropsychological tests tapping a range of cognitive functions. We found little evidence of decreased cognitive performance in ecstasy users, save for poorer strategic self-regulation, possibly reflecting increased impulsivity. However, this finding might have reflected a pre-morbid attribute of ecstasy users, rather than a residual neurotoxic effect of the drug. In a study designed to minimize limitations found in many prior investigations, we failed to demonstrate marked residual cognitive effects in ecstasy users. This finding contrasts with many previous findings-including our own-and emphasizes the need for continued caution in interpreting field studies of cognitive function in illicit ecstasy users. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Updates on cytochrome P450-mediated cardiovascular drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy W M; Frishman, William H; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P (CYP) 450 is a superfamily of hemoproteins that play an important role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, fatty acids, and many medications. Many agents used for management of cardiovascular diseases are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of CYP450 enzymes.When two agents that are substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of CYP450 are administered together, drug interactions with significant clinical consequences may occur. This review discusses CYP450-mediated cardiovascular drug interactions as well as noncardiovascular drug interactions that produced significant cardiovascular side effects. The principles in predicting drug interactions are also discussed.

  9. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in patients with minimal symptoms: favourable outcomes in the absence of treatment.

    PubMed

    Loveday, M; Ramjee, A; Osburn, G; Master, I; Kabera, G; Brust, J C M; Padayatchi, N; Warren, R; Theron, G

    2017-05-01

    Referral hospital for drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in KwaZulu-Natal Province, South Africa. To review the clinical outcomes of patients (age  14 years) with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of DR-TB who had minimal symptoms and/or did not have chest radiographic evidence of active disease at referral. These patients were not started on treatment, but were enrolled in an observation programme with follow-up at 2, 6 and 12 months. Of 3345 referred patients diagnosed with DR-TB, 192 (6%) were enrolled in the observation programme. The median duration from initial sputum collection in primary care to examination at our hospital was 92 days (IQR 64-124). After 12 months, 120 (62%) patients were well, 36 (19%) were lost to follow-up, 30 (16%) had deteriorated and were started on second-line anti-tuberculosis treatment and 6 (3%) had died. Bilateral disease (OR 4.25, 95%CI 1.14-15.77, P = 0.030) and previous TB (OR 2.14, 95%CI 1.10-4.19, P = 0.026) were independent predictors of an unfavourable end result in a multivariate model. In our high-burden setting, most patients diagnosed with DR-TB who had minimal symptoms at referral remained well without treatment. Longitudinal observation, coupled with symptom checking and chest radiograph, is a viable strategy.

  10. Prediction of Drug Clearance and Drug-Drug Interactions in Microscale Cultures of Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Christine; Shi, Julianne; Moore, Amanda; Khetani, Salman R

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of in vivo hepatic drug clearance using in vitro assays is important to properly estimate clinical dosing regimens. Clearance of low-turnover compounds is especially difficult to predict using short-lived suspensions of unpooled primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and functionally declining PHH monolayers. Micropatterned cocultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 fibroblasts have been shown previously to display major liver functions for several weeks in vitro. In this study, we first characterized long-term activities of major cytochrome P450 enzymes in MPCCs created from unpooled cryopreserved PHH donors. MPCCs were then used to predict the clearance of 26 drugs that exhibit a wide range of turnover rates in vivo (0.05-19.5 ml/min per kilogram). MPCCs predicted 73, 92, and 96% of drug clearance values for all tested drugs within 2-fold, 3-fold, and 4-fold of in vivo values, respectively. There was good correlation (R(2) = 0.94, slope = 1.05) of predictions between the two PHH donors. On the other hand, suspension hepatocytes and conventional monolayers created from the same donor had significantly reduced predictive capacity (i.e., 30-50% clearance values within 4-fold of in vivo), and were not able to metabolize several drugs. Finally, we modulated drug clearance in MPCCs by inducing or inhibiting P450s. Rifampin-mediated CYP3A4 induction increased midazolam clearance by 73%, while CYP3A4 inhibition with ritonavir decreased midazolam clearance by 79%. Similarly, quinidine-mediated CYP2D6 inhibition reduced clearance of dextromethorphan and desipramine by 71 and 22%, respectively. In conclusion, MPCCs created using cryopreserved unpooled PHHs can be used for drug clearance predictions and to model drug-drug interactions.

  11. [Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions involving antiretroviral drugs in Buenos Aires, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Córdova, Ezequiel; Porteiro, Norma; Loiza, Eliana; Mingrone, Horacio

    2016-10-01

    Antiretroviral agents (ARVs) have a high potential for drug interactions. However, the prevalence and risk factors for clinically significant drug-drug interactions (CSDDIs) with ARVs from Latin American countries is unknown. To evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for CSDDIs in HIV outpatients attending at two centers in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Descriptive cross-sectional study (september to november 2012). HIV-1 infected patients under ARV treatment at the time of the study were randomly assessed for concomitant medication. CSDDIs were screened using the University of Liverpool Drug Interactions Program (www.hiv-druginteractions.org). A total of 217 patients were included. Male sex: 64% (CI 95: 57-70). Median age (IQR): 41 (36-48). Presence of comorbidities: 19%. ARV regimen: NNRTI-based: 48%, PI-based: 50% and NNRTI plus PI: 2%. Median of CD4 T-cell count (IQR): 402 cells/mL (235-588). Viral load < 50 copies/mL: 78%. Overall, 64% (CI 95: 57-70) of patients had > 1 co-medication of whom a 49% had at least one CSDDI. Two patients had a CSDDI between ARVs. The most frequent co-medications observed were antimicrobial (40%), cardiovascular (25%) and gastrointestinal agents (22%). In the multivariate analysis the number of co-medications and use of CNS agents were associated with the presence of CSDDIs. Co-medications and CSDDIs were common in our setting. In this context, training of HIV physicians in drug interactions is of major importance for adequate management of these patients.

  12. Seasonal species interactions minimize the impact of species turnover on the likelihood of community persistence.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Serguei; Rohr, Rudolf P; Fortuna, Miguel A; Selva, Nuria; Bascompte, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Many of the observed species interactions embedded in ecological communities are not permanent, but are characterized by temporal changes that are observed along with abiotic and biotic variations. While work has been done describing and quantifying these changes, little is known about their consequences for species coexistence. Here, we investigate the extent to which changes of species composition impact the likelihood of persistence of the predator-prey community in the highly seasonal Białowieza Primeval Forest (northeast Poland), and the extent to which seasonal changes of species interactions (predator diet) modulate the expected impact. This likelihood is estimated extending recent developments on the study of structural stability in ecological communities. We find that the observed species turnover strongly varies the likelihood of community persistence between summer and winter. Importantly, we demonstrate that the observed seasonal interaction changes minimize the variation in the likelihood of persistence associated with species turnover across the year. We find that these community dynamics can be explained as the coupling of individual species to their environment by minimizing both the variation in persistence conditions and the interaction changes between seasons. Our results provide a homeostatic explanation for seasonal species interactions and suggest that monitoring the association of interactions changes with the level of variation in community dynamics can provide a good indicator of the response of species to environmental pressures.

  13. Biophysical interactions with model lipid membranes: applications in drug discovery and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Stine, Andrew; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The transport of drugs or drug delivery systems across the cell membrane is a complex biological process, often difficult to understand because of its dynamic nature. In this regard, model lipid membranes, which mimic many aspects of cell-membrane lipids, have been very useful in helping investigators to discern the roles of lipids in cellular interactions. One can use drug-lipid interactions to predict pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, such as their transport, biodistribution, accumulation, and hence efficacy. These interactions can also be used to study the mechanisms of transport, based on the structure and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of drug molecules. In recent years, model lipid membranes have also been explored to understand their mechanisms of interactions with peptides, polymers, and nanocarriers. These interaction studies can be used to design and develop efficient drug delivery systems. Changes in the lipid composition of cells and tissue in certain disease conditions may alter biophysical interactions, which could be explored to develop target-specific drugs and drug delivery systems. In this review, we discuss different model membranes, drug-lipid interactions and their significance, studies of model membrane interactions with nanocarriers, and how biophysical interaction studies with lipid model membranes could play an important role in drug discovery and drug delivery. PMID:19432455

  14. [Herbal remedies: nephrotoxicity and drug interactions].

    PubMed

    Dugo, Mauro; Gatto, Renzo; Zagatti, Riccardo; Gatti, Pierluigi; Cascone, Carmelo

    2010-01-01

    The first reports of interstitial fibrosis leading to rapidly progressing chronic renal failure (CRF) in young women undergoing slimming treatment appeared at the beginning of the 1990s in Belgium. These slimming pills erroneously contained powdered roots of plants - picked in China - belonging to the Aristolochia instead of Stephania tetranda family. In the following years, after new cases had occurred worldwide, the term aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN) came into use. Despite numerous warnings from various post-marketing surveillance institutes, products containing aristolochic acid are still widely used by Asiatic herbal practitioners and easily available on the Internet, where they are marketed without being subject to any regulations. In 2002 the IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) conclusively recognized the urothelial carcinogenicity of aristolochic acid. Because of the globalization and the growing use of phytotherapy worldwide, nephrologists should take into account AAN as a possible cause of CRF. In addition to assessing the direct kidney toxicity caused by some products used in phytotherapy, the authors conclude that it is necessary to research more closely possible drug interactions and side effects of commonly used herbs such as Echinacea, Gingko biloba, St. John's wort, ginseng, and garlic, which patients consider to be natural, non-toxic and self-prescribed remedies and whose use they therefore seldom disclose to their doctors.

  15. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  16. Delamanid Coadministered with Antiretroviral Drugs or Antituberculosis Drugs Shows No Clinically Relevant Drug-Drug Interactions in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Charles; Petersen, Carolyn; Paccaly, Anne; Shoaf, Susan E.; Patil, Shiva; Geiter, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Delamanid is a medicinal product approved for treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Three studies were conducted to evaluate the potential drug-drug interactions between delamanid and antiretroviral drugs, including ritonavir, a strong inhibitor of CYP3A4, and selected anti-TB drugs, including rifampin, a strong inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP) isozymes. Multiple-dose studies were conducted in parallel groups of healthy subjects. Plasma samples were analyzed for delamanid, delamanid metabolite, and coadministered drug concentrations, and pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were determined. The magnitude of the interaction was assessed by the ratio of the geometric means and 90% confidence intervals. Coadministration of delamanid with tenofovir or efavirenz did not affect the PK characteristics of delamanid. Coadministration of Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) with delamanid resulted in an approximately 25% higher delamanid area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to the end of the dosing interval (AUCτ). Tenofovir, efavirenz, lopinavir, and ritonavir exposure were not affected by delamanid. Coadministration of delamanid with the TB drugs (ethambutol plus Rifater [rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid]) resulted in lower delamanid exposures (47 and 42% for the AUCτ and Cmax [maximum concentration of a drug in plasma] values, respectively), as well as decreased exposure of three primary metabolites (approximately 30 to 50% lower AUCτ values). Delamanid did not affect rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid exposure; the ethambutol AUCτ and Cmax values were about 25% higher with delamanid coadministration. The lack of clinically significant drug-drug interactions between delamanid and selected antiretroviral agents (including the strong CYP inhibitor ritonavir) and a combination of anti-TB drugs was demonstrated. Although there was a decrease in the delamanid concentrations when coadministered with ethambutol plus Rifater, this is likely related to

  17. USING SEMANTIC PREDICATIONS TO UNCOVER DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS IN CLINICAL DATA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Cairelli, Michael J.; Fiszman, Marcelo; Rosemblat, Graciela; Kilicoglu, Halil; Rindflesch, Thomas C.; Pakhomov, Serguei V.; Melton, Genevieve B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we report on potential drug-drug interactions between drugs occurring in patient clinical data. Results are based on relationships in SemMedDB, a database of structured knowledge extracted from all MEDLINE citations (titles and abstracts) using SemRep. The core of our methodology is to construct two potential drug-drug interaction schemas, based on relationships extracted from SemMedDB. In the first schema, Drug1 and Drug2 interact through Drug1’s effect on some gene, which in turn affects Drug2. In the second, Drug1 affects Gene1, while Drug2 affects Gene2. Gene1 and Gene2, together, then have an effect on some biological function. After checking each drug pair from the medication lists of each of 22 patients, we found 19 known and 62 unknown drug-drug interactions using both schemas. For example, our results suggest that the interaction of Lisinopril, an ACE inhibitor commonly prescribed for hypertension, and the antidepressant sertraline can potentially increase the likelihood and possibly the severity of psoriasis. We also assessed the relationships extracted by SemRep from a linguistic perspective and found that the precision of SemRep was 0.58 for 300 randomly selected sentences from MEDLINE. Our study demonstrates that the use of structured knowledge in the form of relationships from the biomedical literature can support the discovery of potential drug-drug interactions occurring in patient clinical data. Moreover, SemMedDB provides a good knowledge resource for expanding the range of drugs, genes, and biological functions considered as elements in various drug-drug interaction pathways. PMID:24448204

  18. Sculpting proteins interactively: continual energy minimization embedded in a graphical modeling system.

    PubMed

    Surles, M C; Richardson, J S; Richardson, D C; Brooks, F P

    1994-02-01

    We describe a new paradigm for modeling proteins in interactive computer graphics systems--continual maintenance of a physically valid representation, combined with direct user control and visualization. This is achieved by a fast algorithm for energy minimization, capable of real-time performance on all atoms of a small protein, plus graphically specified user tugs. The modeling system, called Sculpt, rigidly constrains bond lengths, bond angles, and planar groups (similar to existing interactive modeling programs), while it applies elastic restraints to minimize the potential energy due to torsions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions (similar to existing batch minimization programs), and user-specified springs. The graphical interface can show bad and/or favorable contacts, and individual energy terms can be turned on or off to determine their effects and interactions. Sculpt finds a local minimum of the total energy that satisfies all the constraints using an augmented Lagrange-multiplier method; calculation time increases only linearly with the number of atoms because the matrix of constraint gradients is sparse and banded. On a 100-MHz MIPS R4000 processor (Silicon Graphics Indigo), Sculpt achieves 11 updates per second on a 20-residue fragment and 2 updates per second on an 80-residue protein, using all atoms except non-H-bonding hydrogens, and without electrostatic interactions. Applications of Sculpt are described: to reverse the direction of bundle packing in a designed 4-helix bundle protein, to fold up a 2-stranded beta-ribbon into an approximate beta-barrel, and to design the sequence and conformation of a 30-residue peptide that mimics one partner of a protein subunit interaction. Computer models that are both interactive and physically realistic (within the limitations of a given force field) have 2 significant advantages: (1) they make feasible the modeling of very large changes (such as needed for de novo design), and

  19. Sculpting proteins interactively: continual energy minimization embedded in a graphical modeling system.

    PubMed Central

    Surles, M. C.; Richardson, J. S.; Richardson, D. C.; Brooks, F. P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a new paradigm for modeling proteins in interactive computer graphics systems--continual maintenance of a physically valid representation, combined with direct user control and visualization. This is achieved by a fast algorithm for energy minimization, capable of real-time performance on all atoms of a small protein, plus graphically specified user tugs. The modeling system, called Sculpt, rigidly constrains bond lengths, bond angles, and planar groups (similar to existing interactive modeling programs), while it applies elastic restraints to minimize the potential energy due to torsions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals and electrostatic interactions (similar to existing batch minimization programs), and user-specified springs. The graphical interface can show bad and/or favorable contacts, and individual energy terms can be turned on or off to determine their effects and interactions. Sculpt finds a local minimum of the total energy that satisfies all the constraints using an augmented Lagrange-multiplier method; calculation time increases only linearly with the number of atoms because the matrix of constraint gradients is sparse and banded. On a 100-MHz MIPS R4000 processor (Silicon Graphics Indigo), Sculpt achieves 11 updates per second on a 20-residue fragment and 2 updates per second on an 80-residue protein, using all atoms except non-H-bonding hydrogens, and without electrostatic interactions. Applications of Sculpt are described: to reverse the direction of bundle packing in a designed 4-helix bundle protein, to fold up a 2-stranded beta-ribbon into an approximate beta-barrel, and to design the sequence and conformation of a 30-residue peptide that mimics one partner of a protein subunit interaction. Computer models that are both interactive and physically realistic (within the limitations of a given force field) have 2 significant advantages: (1) they make feasible the modeling of very large changes (such as needed for de novo design), and

  20. Transporter-enzyme interactions: implications for predicting drug-drug interactions from in vitro data.

    PubMed

    Benet, L Z; Cummins, C L; Wu, C Y

    2003-10-01

    As discussed in earlier articles, predictions of in vivo drug-drug interactions from in vitro studies is a subject of high interest with obvious therapeutic as well as economic benefits. Up until now little attention has been given to the potential interplay between metabolic enzymes and transporters that could confound the in vivo-in vitro relationships. Drug efflux by intestinal P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is known to decrease the bioavailability of many CYP3A4 substrates. We have demonstrated that the interplay between P-gp and CYP3A4 at the apical intestinal membrane can increase the opportunity for drug metabolism by determining bidirectional extraction ratios across CYP3A4 transfected Caco-2 cells for two dual P-gp/CYP3A4 substrates, K77 (an experimental cysteine protease inhibitor) and sirolimus, as well as two negative control, CYP3A4 only substrates, midazolam and felodipine. Studies were carried out under control conditions, with a P-gp inhibitor (GG918) and with a dual inhibitor (cyclosporine). Measurement of intracellular concentration changes is an important component in calculating the extraction ratios. We hypothesize that the inverse orientation of P-gp and CYP3A4 in the liver will result in an opposite interactive effect in that organ. In vivo rat intestinal perfusion studies with K77 and rat liver perfusion studies with tacrolimus under control conditions and with inhibitors of CYP3A4 (troleandomycin), P-gp (GG918) and both CYP3A4/P-gp (cyclosporine) lend support to our hypotheses. These results serve as a template for predicting enzyme- transporter (both absorptive and efflux) interactions in the intestine and the liver.

  1. Five dimensional minimally interacting holographic dark energy model in Brans-Dicke theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, D. R. K.; Anitha, S.; Umadevi, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate five dimensional space-time filled with minimally interacting dark matter and holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke (Phys. Rev. 124:925, 1961) scalar-tensor theory of gravitation. The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained using (i) special law of variation for Hubble's parameter that yields constant value of deceleration parameter and (ii) a relation between metric potentials. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model are also discussed.

  2. Target mediated drug disposition with drug-drug interaction, Part II: competitive and uncompetitive cases.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gilbert; Jusko, William J; Schropp, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    We present competitive and uncompetitive drug-drug interaction (DDI) with target mediated drug disposition (TMDD) equations and investigate their pharmacokinetic DDI properties. For application of TMDD models, quasi-equilibrium (QE) or quasi-steady state (QSS) approximations are necessary to reduce the number of parameters. To realize those approximations of DDI TMDD models, we derive an ordinary differential equation (ODE) representation formulated in free concentration and free receptor variables. This ODE formulation can be straightforward implemented in typical PKPD software without solving any non-linear equation system arising from the QE or QSS approximation of the rapid binding assumptions. This manuscript is the second in a series to introduce and investigate DDI TMDD models and to apply the QE or QSS approximation.

  3. Drug utilization, prescription errors and potential drug-drug interactions: an experience in rural Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Rathish, Devarajan; Bahini, Sivaswamy; Sivakumar, Thanikai; Thiranagama, Thilani; Abarajithan, Tharmarajah; Wijerathne, Buddhika; Jayasumana, Channa; Siribaddana, Sisira

    2016-06-25

    Prescription writing is a process which transfers the therapeutic message from the prescriber to the patient through the pharmacist. Prescribing errors, drug duplication and potential drug-drug interactions (pDDI) in prescriptions lead to medication error. Assessment of the above was made in prescriptions dispensed at State Pharmaceutical Corporation (SPC), Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. A cross sectional study was conducted. Drugs were classified according to the WHO anatomical, therapeutic chemical classification system. A three point Likert scale, a checklist and Medscape online drug interaction checker were used to assess legibility, completeness and pDDIs respectively. Thousand prescriptions were collected. Majority were hand written (99.8 %) and from the private sector (73 %). The most frequently prescribed substance and subgroup were atorvastatin (4 %, n = 3668) and proton pump inhibitors (7 %, n = 3668) respectively. Out of the substances prescribed from the government and private sectors, 59 and 50 % respectively were available in the national list of essential medicines, Sri Lanka. Patients address (5 %), Sri Lanka Medical Council (SLMC) registration number (35 %), route (7 %), generic name (16 %), treatment symbol (48 %), diagnosis (41 %) and refill information (6 %) were seen in less than half of the prescriptions. Most were legible with effort (65 %) and illegibility was seen in 9 %. There was significant difference in omission and/or errors of generic name (P = 0.000), dose (P = 0.000), SLMC registration number (P = 0.000), and in evidence of pDDI (P = 0.009) with regards to the sector of prescribing. The commonest subgroup involved in duplication was non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (43 %; 56/130). There were 1376 potential drug interactions (466/887 prescriptions). Most common pair causing pDDI was aspirin with losartan (4 %, n = 1376). Atorvastatin was the most frequently prescribed substance

  4. Rxpert: An Intelligent Computer System For Drug Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayle, Brian G.; Dankel, Douglas D.

    1986-03-01

    Drug interactions have become very prevalent in modern medicine. With the increasing numbers of techniques for disease diagnosis and marketed medications for disease treatment, multiple drug patient care has become a customary practice. Consequently, the potential of harmful drug induced effects has become, and will continue to be, an enormous problem in providing patient care. A computer reference aid, knowledgeable about drug interactions, would be of great value to medical personnel in eliminating untoward drug effects in patient care. This research involved the development of such a system called RxPERT. RxPERT is an intelligent, easy to use, interactive computer system with expert level knowledge of drug interactions, implemented for use on an IBM-PC microcomputer. The microcomputer implementation allows the program to be highly accessible, and its information promptly retrievable for office as well as institutional settings. The system requires input of a patient history and patient drug requirements. Throughout the user/computer interactive session the user can review explanations of the possible interactions. Ultimately a listing of drug interactions and overall rating of the drug regimen instituted is displayed.

  5. A critical evaluation of drug interactions with Echinacea spp.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Camille; Spelman, Kevin

    2008-07-01

    Accurate information concerning drug-herb interactions is vital for both healthcare providers and patients. Unfortunately, many of the reviews on drug-herb interactions contain overstated or inaccurate information. To provide accurate information on drug-herb interactions healthcare providers must account for product verification, dosage, medicinal plant species, and plant part used. This critical review assessed the occurrence of drug interactions with one of the top selling botanical remedies, echinacea including Echinacea angustifolia, E. pallida, and E. purpurea. Only eight papers containing primary data relating to drug interactions were identified. Herbal remedies made from E. purpurea appear to have a low potential to generate cytochrome P450 (CYP 450) drug-herb interactions including CYP 450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and CYP 450 3A4 (CYP3A4). Currently there are no verifiable reports of drug-herb interactions with any echinacea product. However, further pharmacokinetic testing is necessary before conclusive statements can be made about echinacea drug-herb interactions. Given our findings, the estimated risk of taking echinacea products (1 in 100,000), the number of echinacea doses consumed yearly (> 10 million), the number of adverse events (< 100) and that the majority of use is short term, E. purpurea products (roots and/or aerial parts) do not appear to be a risk to consumers.

  6. Structure and thermodynamics of Drug-RNA aptamer interactions.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, J B; Dieckmann, T

    2013-04-01

    This mini-review will provide an overview on the recent studies of structure and thermodynamics of RNA aptamers that target drug molecules. These aptamers are studied to provide insight into RNA drug interactions. This interaction is important due to the many roles RNA plays in cell biology.

  7. An adverse drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa.

    PubMed

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Raman, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Drug interactions are known to play a significant role in the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) both in the community and in hospitals. Both the newer atypical antipsychotics and their more traditional counterparts are subject to drug - drug interactions amongst themselves, with other psychotropics, and with the agents used in the treatment of various physical ailments. The most common interactions encountered in clinical practice are pharmacodynamic in nature. It is well established that antipsychotic drugs reduce the efficacy of levodopa in parkinson's disease by blockade of dopamine receptors in the corpus striatum. The case reported here illustrates a common pharmacodynamic drug interaction of haloperidol with levodopa in a 60-year-old female patient.

  8. Drug interactions involving antiepileptic drugs: assessment of the consistency among three drug compendia and FDA-approved labels.

    PubMed

    Ekstein, Dana; Tirosh, Matanya; Eyal, Yonatan; Eyal, Sara

    2015-03-01

    Interactions of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) with other substances may lead to adverse effects and treatment failure. To avoid such interactions, clinicians often rely on drug interaction compendia. Our objective was to compare the concordance for twenty-two AEDs among three drug interaction compendia (Micromedex, Lexi-Interact, and Clinical Pharmacology) and the US Food and Drug Administration-approved product labels. For each AED, the overall concordance among data sources regarding existence of interactions and their classification was poor, with less than twenty percent of interactions listed in all four sources. Concordance among the three drug compendia decreased with the fraction of the drug excreted unchanged and was greater for established inducers of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes than for the drugs that are not inducers (R-square=0.83, P<0.01). For interactions classified as contraindications, major, and severe, concordance among the four data sources was, in most cases, less than 30%. Prescribers should be aware of the differences between drug interaction sources of information for both older AEDs and newer AEDs, in particular for those AEDs which are not involved in hepatic enzyme-mediated interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug-interactions. Critical considerations of the relevance of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of proton pump inhibitors in self medication].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug interactions are discussed in general, including mechanisms beyond the hepatic phase-I reactions, and especially for the example of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), preferentially omeprazole. Particular attention is paid to the use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs. The sequelae of pharmacokinetic drug interactions can be serious. However, only the evidence of clinical consequences will convert such an interaction from a laboratory finding into a possible adverse effect. Without this, interacting drugs can still be co-administered if the specific characteristics of the concerned drugs, quantitative aspects of the interaction, and especially severity and frequency of possible clinical correlates are taken into consideration. It is encouraging that the laboratory findings reported for the PPI--in vitro or ex vivo from volunteer studies--have hardly found equivalents in clinical consequences. As of today, this is also true of the widely discussed interaction with clopidogrel. Regarding the safety of use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs, it also needs to be emphasized that a sizable number of interactions reported for omeprazole and/or pantoprazole were observed at higher dose levels than the 20 mg licensed for self medication. In conjunction with the temporal limitation of PPI self-prescription (14 days), it can be expected that pharmacokinetic drug interactions will generally be no critical factor in the usage of PPI in self-medication. However clinically relevant interactions can occur, e.g. when PPI are combined with extracts from St. John's wort, methotrexat or some inhibitors of HIV-protease with pH-dependent absorption.

  10. Our knowledge of drug interactions with oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Seregély, G

    1989-01-01

    In the introduction the author points out the importance, mechanism and consequence of interactions between oral contraceptives and other drugs. The interactions between certain drugs with different pharmacological action and the contraceptive tablets which decrease or increase the contraceptive effect as well as the drugs whose effect may be influenced by the contraceptive tablets have been discussed. Cases in which only a few data refer to, or no clinical proof supports interaction, are also mentioned. According to interactions observed until present in women taking Anteovin, the recommended measures to be taken in these cases have been described. Finally it has been emphasized that the knowledge of interactions between drugs is just as important in family planning counselling as is when prescribing other drug treatments.

  11. Membrane–drug interactions studied using model membrane systems

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Jacqueline; Suhendro, Daniel K.; Zieleniecki, Julius L.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Köper, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The direct interaction of drugs with the cell membrane is often neglected when drug effects are studied. Systematic investigations are hindered by the complexity of the natural membrane and model membrane systems can offer a useful alternative. Here some examples are reviewed of how model membrane architectures including vesicles, Langmuir monolayers and solid supported membranes can be used to investigate the effects of drug molecules on the membrane structure, and how these interactions can translate into effects on embedded membrane proteins. PMID:26586998

  12. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-04-07

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  13. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S.; Panday, Prashant N.; Pranger, Arianna D.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.

    2011-01-01

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs. PMID:24309312

  14. Pharmacokinetic Drug Interactions of Antimicrobial Drugs: A Systematic Review on Oxazolidinones, Rifamycines, Macrolides, Fluoroquinolones, and Beta-Lactams.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Mathieu S; Panday, Prashant N; Pranger, Arianna D; Kosterink, Jos G W; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2011-11-18

    Like any other drug, antimicrobial drugs are prone to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. These drug interactions are a major concern in clinical practice as they may have an effect on efficacy and toxicity. This article provides an overview of all published pharmacokinetic studies on drug interactions of the commonly prescribed antimicrobial drugs oxazolidinones, rifamycines, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactams, focusing on systematic research. We describe drug-food and drug-drug interaction studies in humans, affecting antimicrobial drugs as well as concomitantly administered drugs. Since knowledge about mechanisms is of paramount importance for adequate management of drug interactions, the most plausible underlying mechanism of the drug interaction is provided when available. This overview can be used in daily practice to support the management of pharmacokinetic drug interactions of antimicrobial drugs.

  15. An eigenvalue transformation technique for predicting drug-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qifan; Xu, Xin; Li, Rong; Dong, Yongcheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Ziyan; Li, Yizhou; Li, Menglong

    2015-09-09

    The prediction of drug-target interactions is a key step in the drug discovery process, which serves to identify new drugs or novel targets for existing drugs. However, experimental methods for predicting drug-target interactions are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the in silico prediction of drug-target interactions has recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, we propose an eigenvalue transformation technique and apply this technique to two representative algorithms, the Regularized Least Squares classifier (RLS) and the semi-supervised link prediction classifier (SLP), that have been used to predict drug-target interaction. The results of computational experiments with these techniques show that algorithms including eigenvalue transformation achieved better performance on drug-target interaction prediction than did the original algorithms. These findings show that eigenvalue transformation is an efficient technique for improving the performance of methods for predicting drug-target interactions. We further show that, in theory, eigenvalue transformation can be viewed as a feature transformation on the kernel matrix. Accordingly, although we only apply this technique to two algorithms in the current study, eigenvalue transformation also has the potential to be applied to other algorithms based on kernels.

  16. An Elegan(t) Screen for Drug-Microbe Interactions.

    PubMed

    Vrbanac, Alison; Debelius, Justine W; Jiang, Lingjing; Morton, James T; Dorrestein, Pieter; Knight, Rob

    2017-05-10

    Microbes affect drug responses, but mechanisms remain elusive. Two papers in Cell exploit C. elegans to infer anticancer drug mechanisms. Through high-throughput screens of drug-microbe-host interactions, García-González et al. (2017) and Scott et al. (2017) determine that bacterial metabolism underpins fluoropyrimidine cytotoxicity, providing a paradigm for unraveling bacterial mechanisms in drug metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. iDrug-Target: predicting the interactions between drug compounds and target proteins in cellular networking via benchmark dataset optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Lin, Wei-Zhong; Liu, Zi; Cheng, Xiang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Information about the interactions of drug compounds with proteins in cellular networking is very important for drug development. Unfortunately, all the existing predictors for identifying drug-protein interactions were trained by a skewed benchmark data-set where the number of non-interactive drug-protein pairs is overwhelmingly larger than that of the interactive ones. Using this kind of highly unbalanced benchmark data-set to train predictors would lead to the outcome that many interactive drug-protein pairs might be mispredicted as non-interactive. Since the minority interactive pairs often contain the most important information for drug design, it is necessary to minimize this kind of misprediction. In this study, we adopted the neighborhood cleaning rule and synthetic minority over-sampling technique to treat the skewed benchmark datasets and balance the positive and negative subsets. The new benchmark datasets thus obtained are called the optimized benchmark datasets, based on which a new predictor called iDrug-Target was developed that contains four sub-predictors: iDrug-GPCR, iDrug-Chl, iDrug-Ezy, and iDrug-NR, specialized for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), ion channels, enzymes, and NR (nuclear receptors), respectively. Rigorous cross-validations on a set of experiment-confirmed datasets have indicated that these new predictors remarkably outperformed the existing ones for the same purpose. To maximize users' convenience, a public accessible Web server for iDrug-Target has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iDrug-Target/ , by which users can easily get their desired results. It has not escaped our notice that the aforementioned strategy can be widely used in many other areas as well.

  18. Management of drug-interaction alerts in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Indermitte, J; Beutler, M; Bruppacher, R; Meier, C R; Hersberger, K E

    2007-04-01

    Drug-interaction alert systems are commonly used in community pharmacies to identify potential drug-drug interactions. However, depending on the software default setting, pharmacists may override alerts because they are too numerous. We explored the handling of drug-interaction alerts by community pharmacies in Switzerland. Data were collected by 15 trained pharmacy students in 15 Swiss community pharmacies. The medication history and the drug-interaction alerts of 600 patients who had >or=2 drugs on prescription were assessed, and the pharmacists in charge were interviewed about their management of drug-interaction alerts. In the 15 pharmacies studied, the computer systems were programmed to flag only 'severe' drug interactions in four, 'severe or moderate' in six or 'severe, moderate or minor' in five pharmacies. The median frequency of drug-interaction alerts increased with decreasing default severity level from 0.5 to 40, respectively, to 76 per 40 patient visits and pharmacy. Because of these default settings, 277 (35 x 2%) of 787 potential drug-interaction alerts on new or repeated prescriptions were overridden by the computer systems. Only 256 (32 x 5%) of 787 potential drug interactions emerged from new prescriptions. The alert systems produced 656 alerts of which 146 were irrelevant because of multiple alerting of the same interaction or of drug combinations currently no longer taken. Of the 510 remaining relevant drug-interaction alerts, 289 (56 x 7%) were overridden by community pharmacists without any action taken. If the pharmacist took care of a patient's prescription him- or herself (as opposed to just controlling a prescription after a technician took care of the patient), fewer drug-interaction alerts were overridden by the pharmacist [Odds ratio (OR) 0 x 6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0 x 42-0 x 98; P=0 x 042). Technical overrides (by default settings) and pharmacists' overrides together accounted for 71 x 9% (566 of 787 potential drug

  19. Drug Interaction Alert Override Rates in the Meaningful Use Era

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, A.D.; Fletcher, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Interruptive drug interaction alerts may reduce adverse drug events and are required for Stage I Meaningful Use attestation. For the last decade override rates have been very high. Despite their widespread use in commercial EHR systems, previously described interventions to improve alert frequency and acceptance have not been well studied. Objectives (1) To measure override rates of inpatient medication alerts within a commercial clinical decision support system, and assess the impact of local customization efforts. (2) To compare override rates between drug-drug interaction and drug-allergy interaction alerts, between attending and resident physicians, and between public and academic hospitals. (3) To measure the correlation between physicians’ individual alert quantities and override rates as an indicator of potential alert fatigue. Methods We retrospectively analyzed physician responses to drug-drug and drug-allergy interaction alerts, as generated by a common decision support product in a large teaching hospital system. Results (1) Over four days, 461 different physicians entered 18,354 medication orders, resulting in 2,455 visible alerts; 2,280 alerts (93%) were overridden. (2) The drug-drug alert override rate was 95.1%, statistically higher than the rate for drug-allergy alerts (90.9%) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in override rates between attendings and residents, or between hospitals. (3) Physicians saw a mean of 1.3 alerts per day, and the number of alerts per physician was not significantly correlated with override rate (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.41). Conclusions Despite intensive efforts to improve a commercial drug interaction alert system and to reduce alerting, override rates remain as high as reported over a decade ago. Alert fatigue does not seem to contribute. The results suggest the need to fundamentally question the premises of drug interaction alert systems. PMID:25298818

  20. Epidemiology of Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions Among Pediatric Patients in ICUs of U.S. Children's Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dingwei; Feinstein, James A; Morrison, Wynne; Zuppa, Athena F; Feudtner, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Polypharmacy is common in hospitalized children in the United States and has been identified as a major risk factor for exposure to potential drug-drug interactions. Little is known about the characteristics and prevalence of exposure of pediatric patients to polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions in PICUs. Retrospective cohort study using the Pediatric Health Information System database. Forty-two freestanding children's hospitals throughout the United States. A total of 54,549 patients less than 18 years old cared for in PICUs in 2011. Patients in neonatal ICUs were not included. PICU patients were on average exposed to 10 distinct drugs each hospital day and to 20 drugs cumulatively during their hospitalization. Seventy-five percent of patients were exposed to greater than or equal to one potential drug-drug interaction regardless of severity level, 6% to greater than or equal to one contraindicated potential drug-drug interaction, 69% to greater than or equal to one major potential drug-drug interaction, 57% to greater than or equal to one moderate potential drug-drug interaction, 19% to greater than or equal to one minor potential drug-drug interaction. Potential drug-drug interaction exposures were significantly associated with specific diagnoses (p < 0.001), presence of complex chronic conditions (p < 0.001), increasing number of total distinct drugs used (p < 0.001), increasing length of stay in PICU (p < 0.001), and white race (p < 0.001). Many PICU patients are exposed to substantial polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions. Future research should identify the risk of adverse drug events following specific potential drug-drug interaction exposures, especially the risk of adverse drug events due to multiple potential drug-drug interaction exposures, and determine the probability and magnitude of the actual harm (if any) for each specific potential drug-drug interaction, especially for multiple potential drug-drug interaction exposures.

  1. Definition of a minimal munc18c domain that interacts with syntaxin 4.

    PubMed Central

    Grusovin, J; Stoichevska, V; Gough, K H; Nunan, K; Ward, C W; Macaulay, S L

    2000-01-01

    munc18c is a critical protein involved in trafficking events associated with syntaxin 4 and which also mediates inhibitory effects on vesicle docking and/or fusion. To investigate the domains of munc18c responsible for its interaction with syntaxin 4, fragments of munc18c were generated and their interaction with syntaxin 4 examined in vivo by the yeast two-hybrid assay. In vitro protein-protein interaction studies were then used to confirm that the interaction between the proteins was direct. Full-length munc18c(1-592), munc18c(1-139) and munc18c(1-225), but not munc18c(226-592), munc18c(1-100), munc18c(43-139) or munc18c(66-139), interacted with the cytoplasmic portion of syntaxin 4, Stx4(2-273), as assessed by yeast two-hybrid assay of growth on nutritionally deficient media and by beta-galactosidase reporter induction. The N-terminal predicted helix-a-helix-b-helix-c region of syntaxin 4, Stx4(29-157), failed to interact with full-length munc18c(1-592), indicating that a larger portion of syntaxin 4 is necessary for the interaction. The yeast two-hybrid results were confirmed by protein-protein interaction studies between Stx4(2-273) and glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins of munc18c. Full-length munc18c(1-592), munc18c(1-139) and munc18c(1-225) interacted with Stx4(2-273) whereas munc18c(1-100) did not, consistent with the yeast two-hybrid data. These data thus identify a region of munc18c between residues 1 and 139 as a minimal domain for its interaction with syntaxin 4. PMID:10970787

  2. Definition of a minimal munc18c domain that interacts with syntaxin 4.

    PubMed

    Grusovin, J; Stoichevska, V; Gough, K H; Nunan, K; Ward, C W; Macaulay, S L

    2000-09-15

    munc18c is a critical protein involved in trafficking events associated with syntaxin 4 and which also mediates inhibitory effects on vesicle docking and/or fusion. To investigate the domains of munc18c responsible for its interaction with syntaxin 4, fragments of munc18c were generated and their interaction with syntaxin 4 examined in vivo by the yeast two-hybrid assay. In vitro protein-protein interaction studies were then used to confirm that the interaction between the proteins was direct. Full-length munc18c(1-592), munc18c(1-139) and munc18c(1-225), but not munc18c(226-592), munc18c(1-100), munc18c(43-139) or munc18c(66-139), interacted with the cytoplasmic portion of syntaxin 4, Stx4(2-273), as assessed by yeast two-hybrid assay of growth on nutritionally deficient media and by beta-galactosidase reporter induction. The N-terminal predicted helix-a-helix-b-helix-c region of syntaxin 4, Stx4(29-157), failed to interact with full-length munc18c(1-592), indicating that a larger portion of syntaxin 4 is necessary for the interaction. The yeast two-hybrid results were confirmed by protein-protein interaction studies between Stx4(2-273) and glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins of munc18c. Full-length munc18c(1-592), munc18c(1-139) and munc18c(1-225) interacted with Stx4(2-273) whereas munc18c(1-100) did not, consistent with the yeast two-hybrid data. These data thus identify a region of munc18c between residues 1 and 139 as a minimal domain for its interaction with syntaxin 4.

  3. Pharmacokinetic interactions between herbal medicines and prescribed drugs: focus on drug metabolic enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qiang; Liu, Kexin

    2014-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been widely used for thousands of years, and now are gaining continued popularity worldwide as a complementary or alternative treatment for a variety of diseases, rehabilitation and health care. Since herbal medicines contain more than one pharmacologically active ingredient and are commonly used with many prescribed drugs, there are potential herb-drug interactions. A variety of reported herb-drug interactions are of pharmacokinetic origin, arising from the effects of herbal medicines on metabolic enzymes and/or transporters. Such an alteration in metabolism or transport can result in changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (e.g., induction or inhibition of metabolic enzymes, and modulation of uptake and efflux transporters), leading to changed pharmacokinetics of the concomitantly prescribed drugs. Pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions have more clinical significance as pharmacokinetic parameters such as the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) or the elimination half-life (t1/2) of the concomitant drug alter. This review summarizes the mechanism underlying herb-drug interactions and the approaches to identify the interactions, and discusses pharmacokinetic interactions of eight widely used herbal medicines (Ginkgo biloba, ginseng, garlic, black cohosh, Echinacea, milk thistle, kava, and St. John's wort) with conventional drugs, using various in vitro, animal in vivo, and clinical studies. The increasing understanding of pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions will make health care professionals and patients pay more attention to the potential interactions.

  4. Determinants of potential drug-drug interaction associated dispensing in community pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Becker, Matthijs L; Caspers, Peter W J; Kallewaard, Marjon; Bruinink, Riekert J; Kylstra, Nico B; Heisterkamp, Siem; de Valk, Vincent; van der Veen, André A; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    2007-04-01

    There are many drug-drug interactions (D-DI) of which some may cause severe adverse patient outcomes. Dispensing interacting drug combinations should be avoided when the risks are higher than the benefits. The objective of this study was to identify determinants of dispensing undesirable interacting drug combinations by community pharmacies in the Netherlands. A total of 256 Dutch community pharmacies were selected, based on the dispensing of 11 undesirable interacting drug combinations between January 1st, 2001 and October 31st, 2002. These pharmacies were sent a questionnaire by the Inspectorate for Health Care (IHC) concerning their process and structure characteristics. The number of times the 11 undesirable interacting drug combinations were dispensed. Two hundred and forty-six questionnaires (response rate 96.1%) were completed. Dispensing determinants were only found for the D-DI between macrolide antibiotics and digoxin but not for the other 10 D-DIs. Pharmacies using different medication surveillance systems differed in the dispensing of this interacting drug combination, and pharmacies, which were part of a health care centre dispensed this interacting drug combination more often. Medication surveillance in Dutch community pharmacies seems to be effective. Although for most D-DIs no determinants were found, process and structure characteristics may have consequences for the dispensing of undesirable interacting drug combinations.

  5. Discovering drug-drug interactions: a text-mining and reasoning approach based on properties of drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tari, Luis; Anwar, Saadat; Liang, Shanshan; Cai, James; Baral, Chitta

    2010-09-15

    Identifying drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a critical process in drug administration and drug development. Clinical support tools often provide comprehensive lists of DDIs, but they usually lack the supporting scientific evidences and different tools can return inconsistent results. In this article, we propose a novel approach that integrates text mining and automated reasoning to derive DDIs. Through the extraction of various facts of drug metabolism, not only the DDIs that are explicitly mentioned in text can be extracted but also the potential interactions that can be inferred by reasoning. Our approach was able to find several potential DDIs that are not present in DrugBank. We manually evaluated these interactions based on their supporting evidences, and our analysis revealed that 81.3% of these interactions are determined to be correct. This suggests that our approach can uncover potential DDIs with scientific evidences explaining the mechanism of the interactions.

  6. Cartilage-targeting drug delivery: can electrostatic interactions help?

    PubMed

    Bajpayee, Ambika G; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2017-03-01

    Current intra-articular drug delivery methods do not guarantee sufficient drug penetration into cartilage tissue to reach cell and matrix targets at the concentrations necessary to elicit the desired biological response. Here, we provide our perspective on the utilization of charge-charge (electrostatic) interactions to enhance drug penetration and transport into cartilage, and to enable sustained binding of drugs within the tissue's highly negatively charged extracellular matrix. By coupling drugs to positively charged nanocarriers that have optimal size and charge, cartilage can be converted from a drug barrier into a drug reservoir for sustained intra-tissue delivery. Alternatively, a wide variety of drugs themselves can be made cartilage-penetrating by functionalizing them with specialized positively charged protein domains. Finally, we emphasize that appropriate animal models, with cartilage thickness similar to that of humans, must be used for the study of drug transport and retention in cartilage.

  7. An in vitro transcription assay for probing drug-DNA interactions at individual drug sites.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D R; Cullinane, C M; Crothers, D M

    1998-08-01

    An in vitro transcription assay of drug-DNA interactions has been described and is based largely on the stable lac UV5-initiated transcription complex. This system utilizes a synchronized population of radiolabeled nascent RNA 10 nucleotides long. Reaction of this initiated transcription complex with drug and subsequent elongation of the nascent RNA by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, reveals blockages at drug binding sites. From these blockages it is possible to obtain four features of the drug-DNA interaction: the sequence of preferred drug binding sites, the relative drug occupancy at each binding site, the drug dissociation rate at each site, and the probability of drug-induced termination of transcription at each site. The unidirectional transcription assay has been extended to a two-promoter, counter-directed system, which yields a bidirectional transcription footprint of drug sites.

  8. Interaction of amphiphilic drugs with human and bovine serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd. Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-ud-Din

    2012-11-01

    To know the interaction of amphiphilic drugs nortriptyline hydrochloride (NOT) and promazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), techniques of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies are used. The binding affinity is more in case of PMZ with both the serum albumins. The quenching rate constant (kq) values suggest a static quenching process for all the drug-serum albumin interactions. The UV-visible results show that the change in protein conformation of PMZ-serum albumin interactions are more prominent as compared to NOT-serum albumin interactions. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with the drugs. The increment in %α-helical structure is slightly more for drug-BSA complexes as compared to drug-HSA complexes.

  9. Interaction of amphiphilic drugs with human and bovine serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-Ud-Din

    2012-11-01

    To know the interaction of amphiphilic drugs nortriptyline hydrochloride (NOT) and promazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), techniques of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies are used. The binding affinity is more in case of PMZ with both the serum albumins. The quenching rate constant (k(q)) values suggest a static quenching process for all the drug-serum albumin interactions. The UV-visible results show that the change in protein conformation of PMZ-serum albumin interactions are more prominent as compared to NOT-serum albumin interactions. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with the drugs. The increment in %α-helical structure is slightly more for drug-BSA complexes as compared to drug-HSA complexes.

  10. Rational drug discovery of HCV helicase inhibitor: Improved docking accuracy with multiple seedings of Autodock Vina and in situ minimization.

    PubMed

    Lim, SeeKhai; Othman, Rozana; Yusof, Rohana; Heh, ChoonHan

    2016-11-30

    Hepatitis C is a significant cause for end-stage liver diseases and liver transplantation which affects approximate 3% of the global populations. Despite the present of several direct antiviral agents in the treatment of hepatitis C, the standard treatment for HCV is accompanied by several drawbacks such as adverse side effects, high pricing of medications and the rapid emerging rate of resistant HCV variants. To discover potential inhibitors for HCV helicase through an optimized in silico approach. In this study, a homology model (HCV Genotype 3 helicase) was used as the target and screened through a benzopyran-based virtual library. Multiple-seedings of Autodock Vina and in situ minimizations were to account the non-deterministic nature of Autodock Vina search algorithm and binding site flexibility respectively. ADME/T and interaction analysis were also done on the top hits via FAFDRUG3 web server and Discovery Studio 4.5. We developed an improved flow for virtual screening through implementing multiple-seeding screening approach and in situ minimization in the study. With the new docking protocol, the redocked standards have shown better RMSD value in reference to their native conformations. 10 benzopyran-liked compounds with satisfactory physicochemical properties were discovered to be a potential inhibitor of HCV helicase. ZINC38649350 was identified as the most potential inhibitor. 10 potential HCV helicase inhibitors were discovered via a new docking optimization protocol with better docking accuracy. These findings could contribute to the discovery of novel HCV antivirals and serves as an alternative approach of in silico rational drug discovery.

  11. Biology of PXR: role in drug-hormone interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Dai, Shu; Guo, Yan; Xie, Wen; Zhai, Yonggong

    2014-01-01

    Hormonal homeostasis is essential for a variety of physiological and pathological processes. Elimination and detoxification of xenobiotics, such as drugs introduced into the human body, could disrupt the balance of hormones due to the induction of drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and transporters. Pregnane X receptor (PXR, NR1I2) functions as a master xenobiotic receptor involved in drug metabolism and drug-drug interactions by its coordinated transcriptional regulation of phase I and phase II DMEs and transporters. Recently, increasing evidences indicate that PXR can also mediate the endocrine disruptor function and thus impact the integrity of the endocrine system. This review focuses primarily on the recent advances in our understanding of the function of PXR in glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, androgen and estrogen homeostasis. The elucidation of PXR-mediated drug-hormone interactions might have important therapeutic implications in dealing with hormone-dependent diseases and safety assessment of drugs. PMID:26417296

  12. Kinetics membrane disruption due to drug interactions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Nussio, Matthew R; Sykes, Matthew J; Miners, John O; Shapter, Joseph G

    2009-01-20

    Drug-membrane interactions assume considerable importance in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism. Here, we present the interaction of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) with supported phospholipid bilayers. It was demonstrated that CPZ binds rapidly to phospholipid bilayers, disturbing the molecular ordering of the phospholipids. These interactions were observed to follow first order kinetics, with an activation energy of approximately 420 kJ mol(-1). Time-dependent membrane disruption was also observed for the interaction with CPZ, such that holes appeared in the phospholipid bilayer after the interaction of CPZ. For this process of membrane disruption, "lag-burst" kinetics was demonstrated.

  13. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient’s age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical–pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  14. Herb-drug interactions: challenges and opportunities for improved predictions.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Scott J; Argikar, Aneesh A; Lin, Yvonne S; Nagar, Swati; Paine, Mary F

    2014-03-01

    Supported by a usage history that predates written records and the perception that "natural" ensures safety, herbal products have increasingly been incorporated into Western health care. Consumers often self-administer these products concomitantly with conventional medications without informing their health care provider(s). Such herb-drug combinations can produce untoward effects when the herbal product perturbs the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or transporters. Despite increasing recognition of these types of herb-drug interactions, a standard system for interaction prediction and evaluation is nonexistent. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying herb-drug interactions remain an understudied area of pharmacotherapy. Evaluation of herbal product interaction liability is challenging due to variability in herbal product composition, uncertainty of the causative constituents, and often scant knowledge of causative constituent pharmacokinetics. These limitations are confounded further by the varying perspectives concerning herbal product regulation. Systematic evaluation of herbal product drug interaction liability, as is routine for new drugs under development, necessitates identifying individual constituents from herbal products and characterizing the interaction potential of such constituents. Integration of this information into in silico models that estimate the pharmacokinetics of individual constituents should facilitate prospective identification of herb-drug interactions. These concepts are highlighted with the exemplar herbal products milk thistle and resveratrol. Implementation of this methodology should help provide definitive information to both consumers and clinicians about the risk of adding herbal products to conventional pharmacotherapeutic regimens.

  15. Herb–Drug Interactions: Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Scott J.; Argikar, Aneesh A.; Lin, Yvonne S.; Nagar, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Supported by a usage history that predates written records and the perception that “natural” ensures safety, herbal products have increasingly been incorporated into Western health care. Consumers often self-administer these products concomitantly with conventional medications without informing their health care provider(s). Such herb–drug combinations can produce untoward effects when the herbal product perturbs the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and/or transporters. Despite increasing recognition of these types of herb–drug interactions, a standard system for interaction prediction and evaluation is nonexistent. Consequently, the mechanisms underlying herb–drug interactions remain an understudied area of pharmacotherapy. Evaluation of herbal product interaction liability is challenging due to variability in herbal product composition, uncertainty of the causative constituents, and often scant knowledge of causative constituent pharmacokinetics. These limitations are confounded further by the varying perspectives concerning herbal product regulation. Systematic evaluation of herbal product drug interaction liability, as is routine for new drugs under development, necessitates identifying individual constituents from herbal products and characterizing the interaction potential of such constituents. Integration of this information into in silico models that estimate the pharmacokinetics of individual constituents should facilitate prospective identification of herb–drug interactions. These concepts are highlighted with the exemplar herbal products milk thistle and resveratrol. Implementation of this methodology should help provide definitive information to both consumers and clinicians about the risk of adding herbal products to conventional pharmacotherapeutic regimens. PMID:24335390

  16. Evaluation of drug-drug interaction screening software combined with pharmacist intervention.

    PubMed

    Moura, Cristiano S; Prado, Nília M; Belo, Najara O; Acurcio, Francisco A

    2012-08-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDI) in hospitalized patients are highly prevalent and an important source of adverse drug reactions. DI computerized screening system can prevent the occurrence of some of these events. To evaluate the impact of drug-drug interaction (DDI) screening software combined with active intervention in preventing drug interactions. The study was conducted at General Hospital of Vitória da Conquista (HGVC), Brazil. A quasi-experimental study was used to evaluate the impact of IM-Pharma, a locally developed drug-drug interaction screening system, coupled with pharmacist intervention on adverse drug events in the hospital setting. The proportion of patients co-prescribed two interacting drugs were measured in two phases, prior the implementation of IM-Pharma and during the intervention period. DDI rates per 100 patient days were calculated before and after implementation. Risk ratios were estimated by Poisson regression models. A total of 6,834 instances of drug-drug interactions were identified; there was an average of 3.3 DDIs per patient in phase one and 2.5 in phase two, a reduction of 24 % (P = 0.03). There was a 71 % reduction in high-severity drug-drug interaction (P < 0.01). The risk for all DDIs decreased 50 % after the implementation of IM-Pharma (P < 0.01), and for those with high-severity, the reduction was 81 % (P < 0.01). The performance of IM-Pharma combined with pharmacist intervention was positive with an expressive reduction in the risk of DDIs.

  17. Drug-drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors: a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Roelof W F; van Gelder, Teun; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Jansman, Frank G A

    2014-07-01

    In the past decade, many tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have been introduced in oncology and haemato-oncology. Because this new class of drugs is extensively used, serious drug-drug interactions are an increasing risk. In this Review, we give a comprehensive overview of known or suspected drug-drug interactions between tyrosine-kinase inhibitors and other drugs. We discuss all haemato-oncological and oncological tyrosine-kinase inhibitors that had been approved by Aug 1, 2013, by the US Food and Drug Administration or the European Medicines Agency. Various clinically relevant drug interactions with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors have been identified. Most interactions concern altered bioavailability due to altered stomach pH, metabolism by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes, and prolongation of the QTc interval. To guarantee the safe use of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, a drugs review for each patient is needed. This Review provides specific recommendations to guide haemato-oncologists, oncologists, and clinical pharmacists, through the process of managing drug-drug interactions during treatment with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors in daily clinical practice.

  18. Minimizing the injury potential of deploying airbag interactions with car occupants.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Harold J; Prasad, Priya; Dalmotas, Dainius

    2013-11-01

    Minimizing the injury potential of the interactions between deploying airbags and car occupants is the major issue with the design of airbag systems. This concern was identified in 1964 by Carl Clark when he presented the results of human volunteer and dummy testing of the "Airstop" system that was being developed for aircraft. The following is a chronological summary of the actions taken by the car manufacturers, airbag suppliers, SAE and ISO task groups, research institutes and universities, and consumer and government groups to address this issue.

  19. Pediatric Minimal Knowledge and Skills: The First Step in Developing a Curriculum in Alcohol and Other Drugs for Pediatricians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adger, Hoover; And Others

    Based on an initial group of consensus statements developed at the Annenburg Center for Health Science Conference in November 1985, this resource manual for alcohol and other drug abuse education specifies minimum knowledge and skills levels for pediatric physicians. A first section details minimal knowledge and skills in alcohol and other drug…

  20. Herbal product–drug interactions mediated by induction

    PubMed Central

    Tirona, Rommel G; Bailey, David G

    2006-01-01

    Despite their common use, it is not widely recognized that herbal medicines can alter the efficacy of coadministered prescription drugs. Constituents in herbs interact with nuclear receptors to enhance metabolizing enzyme and/or transporter activity leading to reduced drug concentrations. Although St John’s wort was the first and most frequently reported source of induction-style herb–drug interactions, this knowledge has not yet changed its current availability. This type of interaction is likely to be relevant to other herbal products. Caregivers need to be aware of the issues and options for therapeutic management. PMID:16722828

  1. Initial Drug Dissolution from Amorphous Solid Dispersions Controlled by Polymer Dissolution and Drug-Polymer Interaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuejie; Wang, Shujing; Wang, Shan; Liu, Chengyu; Su, Ching; Hageman, Michael; Hussain, Munir; Haskell, Roy; Stefanski, Kevin; Qian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    To identify the key formulation factors controlling the initial drug and polymer dissolution rates from an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD). Ketoconazole (KTZ) ASDs using PVP, PVP-VA, HMPC, or HPMC-AS as polymeric matrix were prepared. For each drug-polymer system, two types of formulations with the same composition were prepared: 1. Spray dried dispersion (SDD) that is homogenous at molecular level, 2. Physical blend of SDD (80% drug loading) and pure polymer (SDD-PB) that is homogenous only at powder level. Flory-Huggins interaction parameters (χ) between KTZ and the four polymers were obtained by Flory-Huggins model fitting. Solution (13)C NMR and FT-IR were conducted to investigate the specific drug-polymer interaction in the solution and solid state, respectively. Intrinsic dissolution of both the drug and the polymer from ASDs were studied using a Higuchi style intrinsic dissolution apparatus. PXRD and confocal Raman microscopy were used to confirm the absence of drug crystallinity on the tablet surface before and after dissolution study. In solid state, KTZ is completely miscible with PVP, PVP-VA, or HPMC-AS, demonstrated by the negative χ values of -0.36, -0.46, -1.68, respectively; while is poorly miscible with HPMC shown by a positive χ value of 0.23. According to solution (13)C NMR and FT-IR studies, KTZ interacts with HPMC-AS strongly through H-bonding and dipole induced interaction; with PVPs and PVP-VA moderately through dipole-induced interactions; and with HPMC weakly without detectable attractive interaction. Furthermore, the "apparent" strength of drug-polymer interaction, measured by the extent of peak shift on NMR or FT-IR spectra, increases with the increasing number of interacting drug-polymer pairs. For ASDs with the presence of considerable drug-polymer interactions, such as KTZ/PVPs, KTZ/PVP-VA, or KTZ /HPMC-AS systems, drug released at the same rate as the polymer when intimate drug-polymer mixing was ensured (i.e., the SDD systems

  2. MDMA: interactions with other psychoactive drugs.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wael M Y; Ben Hamida, Sami; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; de Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira; Jones, Byron C

    2011-10-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is one of the most widely abused illegal drugs. Some users self-report euphoria and an increased perception and feeling of closeness to others. When taken in warm environments, MDMA users may develop acute complications with potential fatal consequences. In rodents, MDMA increases locomotor activity and, depending on ambient temperature, may produce a dose-dependent, potentially lethal hyperthermia. Like most other recreational drugs, MDMA is frequently taken in combination with other substances including tobacco, EtOH, marijuana, amphetamines, cocaine and, caffeine. Although polydrug use is very common, the understanding of the effects of this multiple substance use, as well as the analysis of consequences of different drug-drug associations, received rather little attention. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current knowledge about the changes on MDMA-related behavior, pharmacology, and neurotoxicity associated with co-consumption of other drugs of abuse and psychoactive agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Using Linked Data for Mining Drug-Drug Interactions in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard C.; Chute, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    By nature, healthcare data is highly complex and voluminous. While on one hand, it provides unprecedented opportunities to identify hidden and unknown relationships between patients and treatment outcomes, or drugs and allergic reactions for given individuals, representing and querying large network datasets poses significant technical challenges. In this research, we study the use of Semantic Web and Linked Data technologies for identifying drug-drug interaction (DDI) information from publicly available resources, and determining if such interactions were observed using real patient data. Specifically, we apply Linked Data principles and technologies for representing patient data from electronic health records (EHRs) at Mayo Clinic as Resource Description Framework (RDF), and identify potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) for widely prescribed cardiovascular and gastroenterology drugs. Our results from the proof-of-concept study demonstrate the potential of applying such a methodology to study patient health outcomes as well as enabling genome-guided drug therapies and treatment interventions. PMID:23920643

  4. Using linked data for mining drug-drug interactions in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard C; Chute, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    By nature, healthcare data is highly complex and voluminous. While on one hand, it provides unprecedented opportunities to identify hidden and unknown relationships between patients and treatment outcomes, or drugs and allergic reactions for given individuals, representing and querying large network datasets poses significant technical challenges. In this research, we study the use of Semantic Web and Linked Data technologies for identifying drug-drug interaction (DDI) information from publicly available resources, and determining if such interactions were observed using real patient data. Specifically, we apply Linked Data principles and technologies for representing patient data from electronic health records (EHRs) at Mayo Clinic as Resource Description Framework (RDF), and identify potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) for widely prescribed cardiovascular and gastroenterology drugs. Our results from the proof-of-concept study demonstrate the potential of applying such a methodology to study patient health outcomes as well as enabling genome-guided drug therapies and treatment interventions.

  5. Exploiting large-scale drug-protein interaction information for computational drug repurposing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite increased investment in pharmaceutical research and development, fewer and fewer new drugs are entering the marketplace. This has prompted studies in repurposing existing drugs for use against diseases with unmet medical needs. A popular approach is to develop a classification model based on drugs with and without a desired therapeutic effect. For this approach to be statistically sound, it requires a large number of drugs in both classes. However, given few or no approved drugs for the diseases of highest medical urgency and interest, different strategies need to be investigated. Results We developed a computational method termed “drug-protein interaction-based repurposing” (DPIR) that is potentially applicable to diseases with very few approved drugs. The method, based on genome-wide drug-protein interaction information and Bayesian statistics, first identifies drug-protein interactions associated with a desired therapeutic effect. Then, it uses key drug-protein interactions to score other drugs for their potential to have the same therapeutic effect. Conclusions Detailed cross-validation studies using United States Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for hypertension, human immunodeficiency virus, and malaria indicated that DPIR provides robust predictions. It achieves high levels of enrichment of drugs approved for a disease even with models developed based on a single drug known to treat the disease. Analysis of our model predictions also indicated that the method is potentially useful for understanding molecular mechanisms of drug action and for identifying protein targets that may potentiate the desired therapeutic effects of other drugs (combination therapies). PMID:24950817

  6. Predicting drug-target interactions using restricted Boltzmann machines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: In silico prediction of drug-target interactions plays an important role toward identifying and developing new uses of existing or abandoned drugs. Network-based approaches have recently become a popular tool for discovering new drug-target interactions (DTIs). Unfortunately, most of these network-based approaches can only predict binary interactions between drugs and targets, and information about different types of interactions has not been well exploited for DTI prediction in previous studies. On the other hand, incorporating additional information about drug-target relationships or drug modes of action can improve prediction of DTIs. Furthermore, the predicted types of DTIs can broaden our understanding about the molecular basis of drug action. Results: We propose a first machine learning approach to integrate multiple types of DTIs and predict unknown drug-target relationships or drug modes of action. We cast the new DTI prediction problem into a two-layer graphical model, called restricted Boltzmann machine, and apply a practical learning algorithm to train our model and make predictions. Tests on two public databases show that our restricted Boltzmann machine model can effectively capture the latent features of a DTI network and achieve excellent performance on predicting different types of DTIs, with the area under precision-recall curve up to 89.6. In addition, we demonstrate that integrating multiple types of DTIs can significantly outperform other predictions either by simply mixing multiple types of interactions without distinction or using only a single interaction type. Further tests show that our approach can infer a high fraction of novel DTIs that has been validated by known experiments in the literature or other databases. These results indicate that our approach can have highly practical relevance to DTI prediction and drug repositioning, and hence advance the drug discovery process. Availability: Software and datasets are available

  7. Data-driven prediction of drug effects and interactions.

    PubMed

    Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Ye, Patrick P; Daneshjou, Roxana; Altman, Russ B

    2012-03-14

    Adverse drug events remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Many adverse events are not detected during clinical trials before a drug receives approval for use in the clinic. Fortunately, as part of postmarketing surveillance, regulatory agencies and other institutions maintain large collections of adverse event reports, and these databases present an opportunity to study drug effects from patient population data. However, confounding factors such as concomitant medications, patient demographics, patient medical histories, and reasons for prescribing a drug often are uncharacterized in spontaneous reporting systems, and these omissions can limit the use of quantitative signal detection methods used in the analysis of such data. Here, we present an adaptive data-driven approach for correcting these factors in cases for which the covariates are unknown or unmeasured and combine this approach with existing methods to improve analyses of drug effects using three test data sets. We also present a comprehensive database of drug effects (Offsides) and a database of drug-drug interaction side effects (Twosides). To demonstrate the biological use of these new resources, we used them to identify drug targets, predict drug indications, and discover drug class interactions. We then corroborated 47 (P < 0.0001) of the drug class interactions using an independent analysis of electronic medical records. Our analysis suggests that combined treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and thiazides is associated with significantly increased incidence of prolonged QT intervals. We conclude that confounding effects from covariates in observational clinical data can be controlled in data analyses and thus improve the detection and prediction of adverse drug effects and interactions.

  8. Herb–drug interactions: Review and assessment of report reliability

    PubMed Central

    Fugh-Berman, Adriane; Ernst, E

    2001-01-01

    Aims The aim of this systematic review was to assess the published clinical evidence on interactions between herbal and conventional drugs. Methods Four electronic databases were searched for case reports, case series or clinical trials of such interactions. The data were extracted and validated using a scoring system for interaction probability. Results One hundred and eight cases of suspected interactions were found. 68.5% were classified as ‘unable to be evaluated’, 13% as ‘well-documented’ and 18.5% as ‘possible’ interactions. Warfarin was the most common drug (18 cases) and St John's wort the most common herb (54 cases) involved. Conclusion Herb–drug interactions undoubtedly do occur and may put individuals at risk. However our present knowledge is incomplete and more research is urgently needed. PMID:11736868

  9. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 2)

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Phopin, Kamonrat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    To date, a number of significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by various phytochemicals. Among the most noteworthy are those involving St. John's wort and drugs metabolized by human CYP3A4 enzyme. This review article is the continued work from our previous article (Part 1) published in this journal (Wanwimolruk and Prachayasittikul, 2014[ref:133]). This article extends the scope of the review to six more herbs and updates information on herbal drug interactions. These include black cohosh, ginseng, grape seed extract, green tea, kava, saw palmetto and some important Chinese medicines are also presented. Even though there have been many studies to determine the effects of herbs and herbal medicines on the activity of CYP, most of them were in vitro and in animal studies. Therefore, the studies are limited in predicting the clinical relevance of herbal drug interactions. It appeared that the majority of the herbal medicines have no clear effects on most of the CYPs examined. For example, the existing clinical trial data imply that black cohosh, ginseng and saw palmetto are unlikely to affect the pharmacokinetics of conventional drugs metabolized by human CYPs. For grape seed extract and green tea, adverse herbal drug interactions are unlikely when they are concomitantly taken with prescription drugs that are CYP substrates. Although there were few clinical studies on potential CYP-mediated interactions produced by kava, present data suggest that kava supplements have the ability to inhibit CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 significantly. Therefore, caution should be taken when patients take kava with CYP1A2 or CYP2E1 substrate drugs as it may enhance their therapeutic and adverse effects. Despite the long use of traditional Chinese herbal medicines, little is known about the potential drug interactions with these herbs. Many popularly used Chinese medicines have been shown in vitro to significantly change the

  10. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Wylie, C. Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions—drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors—pyrimethamine and cycloguanil—across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary “forks in the road” that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  11. Low potential for interactions between melagatran/ximelagatran and other drugs, food, or alcohol.

    PubMed

    Wolzt, Michael; Sarich, Troy S; Eriksson, Ulf G

    2005-08-01

    Vitamin K antagonists including warfarin are associated with numerous interactions with other drugs and foods. In clinical practice, this complicates the task of maintaining plasma levels of warfarin within a narrow therapeutic window and so maximizing protection against thromboembolic events while minimizing the risk of complications, particularly bleeding. In contrast, ximelagatran has a low potential for pharmacokinetic drug:drug and food interactions. There is no significant metabolism of melagatran, and the main route of elimination of melagatran is renal excretion that appears to occur via glomerular filtration. Most importantly, cytochrome P450 isoenzymes that mediate many drug:drug interactions are not involved in the biotransformation of ximelagatran to melagatran. No significant pharmacokinetic interactions have been observed when oral ximelagatran is administered with a range of agents, including diclofenac, diazepam, nifedipine, digoxin, atorvastatin, or amiodarone. The low potential for drug:drug interactions with ximelagatran is also supported by an analysis of the pharmacokinetic data from clinical studies in patients with atrial fibrillation receiving long-term treatment with oral ximelagatran. Increases of mean melagatran area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration ( Cmax) of up to approximately 80% have been observed when ximelagatran is co-administered with the macrolide antibiotics erythromycin or azithromycin, and the mechanism for this interaction is currently under investigation. The bioavailability of melagatran is not altered by co-administration with food or alcohol. The melagatran-induced prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), an ex vivo coagulation time assay used as a measure of thrombin inhibition, is not altered by other drugs [including digoxin, atorvastatin, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), and amiodarone], food, or alcohol. The effect of melagatran on capillary bleeding time, which is prolonged as a

  12. Temporal trends in minimally invasive myomectomy before and after the US Food and Drug Administration recommendation against electric morcellation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nigel; Frankel, William C; Hutchinson, Anne P; Patel, Hency H; Mostisser, Cheri; Elias, Rony T

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the temporal trends in minimally invasive myomectomy at one reproductive medicine center before and after the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendation against electric morcellation. A retrospective chart review was undertaken of patients undergoing minimally invasive myomectomy between April 1, 2012, and April 30, 2016, at a center in New York. Temporal trends in laparoscopic myomectomy (LM), robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy (RAM), and laparoscopically assisted myomectomy (LAM), and intraoperative and postoperative outcomes before and after the April 2014 recommendation were compared. Minimally invasive myomectomy was performed in 73 patients. No difference was noted in the rates of minimally invasive myomectomy 2 years before (35/74 [47.3%]) and after (38/79 [48.1%]) the FDA's recommendation. The ratio of abdominal to minimally invasive myomectomy remained relatively constant before (68/59=1.15) and during the study period (80/73=1.10). There was a significant decrease in LM and RAM and a corresponding rise in LAM immediately after the recommendation (P<0.001). The rates of minimally invasive myomectomy before and after the FDA's recommendation did not differ, indicating that technical modifications to laparoscopic technique can allow surgeons to offer minimally invasive myomectomy to patients with symptomatic leiomyomas. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Drug-drug Interactions in the Regional Hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Driton; Tahiri, Zejdush; Bara, Petrit; Hudhra, Klejda; Malaj, Ledian; Jucja, Besnik; Bozalia, Adnan; Burazeri, Genc

    2014-08-01

    Our aim was to assess the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the adult population of transitional Kosovo. A cross-sectional study was conducted including a representative sample of 1921 patients aged ≥18 years (mean age: 57.8±11.2 years; 50.3% women; overall response: 96%) from the regional hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo, during 2011-2013. Potential drug-drug-interactions were assessed and clinical data as well as demographic and socioeconomic information were collected. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the correlates of drug-drug interactions. Upon multivariable adjustment for all the demographic and socioeconomic factors as well as the clinical characteristics, drug-drug interactions were positively and significantly related to older age (OR=2.1, 95%CI=1.3-2.8), a lower educational attainment (OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.1-1.9), a longer hospitalization period (OR=2.7, 95%CI=2.1-3.6), presence of three groups of diseases [infectious diseases (OR=1.7, 95%CI=1.3-2.4), cardiovascular diseases (OR=1.8, 95%CI=1.4-2.6), respiratory diseases (OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.2-2.5)], presence of comorbid conditions (OR=3.2, 95%CI=2.3-4.4) and an intake of at least four drugs (OR=5.9, 95%CI=4.6-7.1). Our study provides important evidence on the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the hospitalized patients in the regional hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo. Findings from our study should raise the awareness of decision-makers and policy makers about the prevalence and determinants of drug-drug interactions in the adult population of post-war Kosovo.

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of Drug-drug Interactions in the Regional Hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Driton; Tahiri, Zejdush; Bara, Petrit; Hudhra, Klejda; Malaj, Ledian; Jucja, Besnik; Bozalia, Adnan; Burazeri, Genc

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Our aim was to assess the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the adult population of transitional Kosovo. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted including a representative sample of 1921 patients aged ≥18 years (mean age: 57.8±11.2 years; 50.3% women; overall response: 96%) from the regional hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo, during 2011-2013. Potential drug-drug-interactions were assessed and clinical data as well as demographic and socioeconomic information were collected. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the correlates of drug-drug interactions. Results: Upon multivariable adjustment for all the demographic and socioeconomic factors as well as the clinical characteristics, drug-drug interactions were positively and significantly related to older age (OR=2.1, 95%CI=1.3-2.8), a lower educational attainment (OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.1-1.9), a longer hospitalization period (OR=2.7, 95%CI=2.1-3.6), presence of three groups of diseases [infectious diseases (OR=1.7, 95%CI=1.3-2.4), cardiovascular diseases (OR=1.8, 95%CI=1.4-2.6), respiratory diseases (OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.2-2.5)], presence of comorbid conditions (OR=3.2, 95%CI=2.3-4.4) and an intake of at least four drugs (OR=5.9, 95%CI=4.6-7.1). Conclusions: Our study provides important evidence on the prevalence and socioeconomic and clinical correlates of drug-drug interactions among the hospitalized patients in the regional hospital of Gjilan, Kosovo. Findings from our study should raise the awareness of decision-makers and policy makers about the prevalence and determinants of drug-drug interactions in the adult population of post-war Kosovo. PMID:25395892

  15. Vaccine-Drug Interactions: Cytokines, Cytochromes, and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Perrotta, Cristiana; Clementi, Emilio; Radice, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to reduce the risk of vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Vaccines are often administered in patients with chronic diseases who are likely to be treated with several drugs. A growing number of clinical observations have indicated the possibility of interactions between vaccines and drugs, leading to changes in drug metabolism after vaccination. These interactions represent a significant concern because of the increasing use of vaccines in older patients who are likely to be treated with several drugs. Because of the possible implications of adverse reactions in terms of public health, several studies were performed to verify the risk posed by these interactions and to clarify the biologic mechanisms that drive these events. Of the several mechanisms proposed to be at the basis of vaccine-drug interactions, the most convincing evidence suggests a role of inflammatory cytokines on the regulation of specific cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Differences in the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of these drugs could explain these contrasting results and provide important insights to fully understand the clinical importance of these events. Further studies are required to verify whether vaccine-drug interactions may occur in other clinical settings, especially the ones for which patients are required to be vaccinated against specific diseases.

  16. Emerging role of drug interaction studies in drug development: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, C L

    2001-01-01

    Significant scientific advancements in the last decade have armed researchers with tools to assess drug metabolism and the effects of drugs on metabolic pathways; however, most of this research has focused on cytochrome P450 isozymes. Early delineation of this information aids in the prediction of potential drug-drug interactions, which may ultimately determine whether a compound is pursued in the drug development process. The recent withdrawals of medications such as terfenadine, astemizole, cisapride, and mibefradil from the market demonstrate the relevance of this a priori approach--the risk of drug interactions was largely unrecognized prior to their approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Drug interaction studies for new drug applications (NDAs) field between 1987 and 1991 were largely in vivo studies with potential coadministered drugs, whereas for NDAs field between 1992 and 1997, the majority of studies involved metabolic mechanisms and in vitro methodology. Despite current limitations in the extrapolation of in vitro drug metabolism data to the in vivo environment, in vitro studies remain the mainstay of initial evaluations in this area primarily because of the high throughput nature of these investigations and the reduced cost compared with in vivo studies. The FDA has published several guidance documents in the area of drug metabolism and drug interaction studies in drug development with suggestions for in vitro as well as in vivo approaches to these investigations. Current and future research will likely focus on in vitro models for cytochrome P450 induction, Phase II metabolism, and drug transporters, and include validation and extrapolation of these approaches in vivo.

  17. Bedaquiline: a review of human pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, R P G; Dannemann, B; Hoetelmans, R M W

    2014-09-01

    Bedaquiline has recently been approved for the treatment of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) as part of combination therapy in adults. It is metabolized primarily by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4) to a less-active N-monodesmethyl metabolite. Phase I and Phase II studies in healthy subjects and patients with drug-susceptible or multidrug-resistant TB have assessed the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction profile of bedaquiline. Potential interactions have been assessed between bedaquiline and first- and second-line anti-TB drugs (rifampicin, rifapentine, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, kanamycin, ofloxacin and cycloserine), commonly used antiretroviral agents (lopinavir/ritonavir, nevirapine and efavirenz) and a potent CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole). This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic profile of bedaquiline as well as the results of the drug-drug interaction studies.

  18. Integrating risk minimization planning throughout the clinical development and commercialization lifecycle: an opinion on how drug development could be improved.

    PubMed

    Morrato, Elaine H; Smith, Meredith Y

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical risk minimization programs are now an established requirement in the regulatory landscape. However, pharmaceutical companies have been slow to recognize and embrace the significant potential these programs offer in terms of enhancing trust with health care professionals and patients, and for providing a mechanism for bringing products to the market that might not otherwise have been approved. Pitfalls of the current drug development process include risk minimization programs that are not data driven; missed opportunities to incorporate pragmatic methods and market-based insights, outmoded tools and data sources, lack of rapid evaluative learning to support timely adaption, lack of systematic approaches for patient engagement, and questions on staffing and organizational infrastructure. We propose better integration of risk minimization with clinical drug development and commercialization work streams throughout the product lifecycle. We articulate a vision and propose broad adoption of organizational models for incorporating risk minimization expertise into the drug development process. Three organizational models are discussed and compared: outsource/external vendor, embedded risk management specialist model, and Center of Excellence.

  19. Integrating risk minimization planning throughout the clinical development and commercialization lifecycle: an opinion on how drug development could be improved

    PubMed Central

    Morrato, Elaine H; Smith, Meredith Y

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical risk minimization programs are now an established requirement in the regulatory landscape. However, pharmaceutical companies have been slow to recognize and embrace the significant potential these programs offer in terms of enhancing trust with health care professionals and patients, and for providing a mechanism for bringing products to the market that might not otherwise have been approved. Pitfalls of the current drug development process include risk minimization programs that are not data driven; missed opportunities to incorporate pragmatic methods and market-based insights, outmoded tools and data sources, lack of rapid evaluative learning to support timely adaption, lack of systematic approaches for patient engagement, and questions on staffing and organizational infrastructure. We propose better integration of risk minimization with clinical drug development and commercialization work streams throughout the product lifecycle. We articulate a vision and propose broad adoption of organizational models for incorporating risk minimization expertise into the drug development process. Three organizational models are discussed and compared: outsource/external vendor, embedded risk management specialist model, and Center of Excellence. PMID:25750537

  20. Predicting drug-target interactions using probabilistic matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Cobanoglu, Murat Can; Liu, Chang; Hu, Feizhuo; Oltvai, Zoltán N; Bahar, Ivet

    2013-12-23

    Quantitative analysis of known drug-target interactions emerged in recent years as a useful approach for drug repurposing and assessing side effects. In the present study, we present a method that uses probabilistic matrix factorization (PMF) for this purpose, which is particularly useful for analyzing large interaction networks. DrugBank drugs clustered based on PMF latent variables show phenotypic similarity even in the absence of 3D shape similarity. Benchmarking computations show that the method outperforms those recently introduced provided that the input data set of known interactions is sufficiently large--which is the case for enzymes and ion channels, but not for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors. Runs performed on DrugBank after hiding 70% of known interactions show that, on average, 88 of the top 100 predictions hit the hidden interactions. De novo predictions permit us to identify new potential interactions. Drug-target pairs implicated in neurobiological disorders are overrepresented among de novo predictions.

  1. Clinically relevant drug–drug interactions in oncology

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Howard L

    1998-01-01

    Although anticancer agents are one of the most toxic classes of medication prescribed today, there is relatively little information available about clinically relevant drug–drug interactions. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions have been described, including alterations in absorption, catabolism, and excretion. For example, an increased bioavailability of 6-mercaptopurine has been observed when combined with either allopurinol or methotrexate, leading to increased toxicity in some patients. Induction of etoposide or teniposide clearance by anticonvulsants has also been described, resulting in a lower systemic exposure and risk for lower anticancer activity. Alterations in elimination of methotrexate has been observed with probenecid, presumably through competition for renal secretion. There are also several examples of pharmacodynamic interactions. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid results in more efficient inhibition of thymidylate synthase, a finding which is now utilized routinely in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Improvements in the in vitro and early clinical testing now allow a relatively high degree of prediction of potential clinical drug interactions, prior to observations of untoward drug effects. In conclusion, drug interactions among commonly used anticancer agents have been identified. Their clinical significance can have more impact than many other classes of medications due to the narrow therapeutic index of antineoplastic agents and the potential for lethal side-effects. It is only through prospective, preclinical and early clinical evaluation that the presence of clinically significant drug interactions can be identified and the information used to provide better therapy for this significant health problem. PMID:9663808

  2. Transdermal patch drug delivery interactions with exercise.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems, such as the transdermal patch, continue to be a popular and convenient way to administer medications. There are currently several medications that use a transdermal patch drug delivery system. This article describes the potential untoward side effects of increased drug absorption through the use of a transdermal patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events. Four studies have been reported that demonstrate a significant increase in the plasma concentration of nitroglycerin when individuals exercise compared with rest. Likewise, several case reports and two studies have been conducted that demonstrate nicotine toxicity and increased plasma nicotine while wearing a nicotine patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events compared with rest. Healthcare providers, trainers and coaches should be aware of proper transdermal patch use, especially while exercising, in order to provide needed information to their respective patients and athletes to avoid potential untoward side effects. Particular caution should be given to individuals who participate in an extreme sporting event of long duration. Further research that includes more medications is needed in this area.

  3. Evaluation of Tissue Interactions with Mechanical Elements of a Transscleral Drug Delivery Device

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sarah J.; Chan, Robison V. Paul; Keegan, Mark; Andreoli, Christopher M.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Miller, Joan W.; Gragoudas, Evangelos S.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work was to evaluate tissue-device interactions due to implantation of a mechanically operated drug delivery system onto the posterior sclera. Two test devices were designed and fabricated to model elements of the drug delivery device—one containing a free-spinning ball bearing and the other encasing two articulating gears. Openings in the base of test devices modeled ports for drug passage from device to sclera. Porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) membranes were attached to half of the gear devices to minimize tissue ingrowth through these ports. Test devices were sutured onto rabbit eyes for 10 weeks. Tissue-device interactions were evaluated histologically and mechanically after removal to determine effects on device function and changes in surrounding tissue. Test devices were generally well-tolerated during residence in the animal. All devices encouraged fibrous tissue formation between the sclera and the device, fibrous tissue encapsulation and invasion around the device, and inflammation of the conjunctiva. Gear devices encouraged significantly greater inflammation in all cases and a larger rate of tissue ingrowth. PTFE membranes prevented tissue invasion through the covered drug ports, though tissue migrated in through other smaller openings. The torque required to turn the mechanical elements increased over 1000 times for gear devices, but only on the order of 100 times for membrane-covered gear devices and less than 100 times for ball bearing devices. Maintaining a lower device profile, minimizing microscale motion on the eye surface and covering drug ports with a porous membrane may minimize inflammation, decreasing the risk of damage to surrounding tissues and minimizing disruption of device operation. PMID:24300189

  4. Evaluation of tissue interactions with mechanical elements of a transscleral drug delivery device.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarah J; Chan, Robison V Paul; Keegan, Mark; Andreoli, Christopher M; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Miller, Joan W; Gragoudas, Evangelos S

    2012-03-12

    The goal of this work was to evaluate tissue-device interactions due to implantation of a mechanically operated drug delivery system onto the posterior sclera. Two test devices were designed and fabricated to model elements of the drug delivery device-one containing a free-spinning ball bearing and the other encasing two articulating gears. Openings in the base of test devices modeled ports for drug passage from device to sclera. Porous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) membranes were attached to half of the gear devices to minimize tissue ingrowth through these ports. Test devices were sutured onto rabbit eyes for 10 weeks. Tissue-device interactions were evaluated histologically and mechanically after removal to determine effects on device function and changes in surrounding tissue. Test devices were generally well-tolerated during residence in the animal. All devices encouraged fibrous tissue formation between the sclera and the device, fibrous tissue encapsulation and invasion around the device, and inflammation of the conjunctiva. Gear devices encouraged significantly greater inflammation in all cases and a larger rate of tissue ingrowth. PTFE membranes prevented tissue invasion through the covered drug ports, though tissue migrated in through other smaller openings. The torque required to turn the mechanical elements increased over 1000 times for gear devices, but only on the order of 100 times for membrane-covered gear devices and less than 100 times for ball bearing devices. Maintaining a lower device profile, minimizing microscale motion on the eye surface and covering drug ports with a porous membrane may minimize inflammation, decreasing the risk of damage to surrounding tissues and minimizing disruption of device operation.

  5. Interactive association of drugs binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Hong

    2014-02-27

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is an abundant plasma protein, which attracts great interest in the pharmaceutical industry since it can bind a remarkable variety of drugs impacting their delivery and efficacy and ultimately altering the drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Additionally, HSA is widely used in clinical settings as a drug delivery system due to its potential for improving targeting while decreasing the side effects of drugs. It is thus of great importance from the viewpoint of pharmaceutical sciences to clarify the structure, function, and properties of HSA-drug complexes. This review will succinctly outline the properties of binding site of drugs in IIA subdomain within the structure of HSA. We will also give an overview on the binding characterization of interactive association of drugs to human serum albumin that may potentially lead to significant clinical applications.

  6. Toward more realistic drug-target interaction predictions.

    PubMed

    Pahikkala, Tapio; Airola, Antti; Pietilä, Sami; Shakyawar, Sushil; Szwajda, Agnieszka; Tang, Jing; Aittokallio, Tero

    2015-03-01

    A number of supervised machine learning models have recently been introduced for the prediction of drug-target interactions based on chemical structure and genomic sequence information. Although these models could offer improved means for many network pharmacology applications, such as repositioning of drugs for new therapeutic uses, the prediction models are often being constructed and evaluated under overly simplified settings that do not reflect the real-life problem in practical applications. Using quantitative drug-target bioactivity assays for kinase inhibitors, as well as a popular benchmarking data set of binary drug-target interactions for enzyme, ion channel, nuclear receptor and G protein-coupled receptor targets, we illustrate here the effects of four factors that may lead to dramatic differences in the prediction results: (i) problem formulation (standard binary classification or more realistic regression formulation), (ii) evaluation data set (drug and target families in the application use case), (iii) evaluation procedure (simple or nested cross-validation) and (iv) experimental setting (whether training and test sets share common drugs and targets, only drugs or targets or neither). Each of these factors should be taken into consideration to avoid reporting overoptimistic drug-target interaction prediction results. We also suggest guidelines on how to make the supervised drug-target interaction prediction studies more realistic in terms of such model formulations and evaluation setups that better address the inherent complexity of the prediction task in the practical applications, as well as novel benchmarking data sets that capture the continuous nature of the drug-target interactions for kinase inhibitors. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Developing a Molecular Roadmap of Drug-Food Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map. PMID:25668218

  8. Developing a molecular roadmap of drug-food interactions.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper; Ni, Yueqiong; Panagiotou, Gianni; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map.

  9. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profiles of proton pump inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, Ralph-Steven; Blume, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders, often over the long term, which raises the potential for clinically significant drug interactions in patients receiving concomitant medications. These drug-drug interactions have been previously reviewed. However, the current knowledge is likely to have advanced, so a thorough review of the literature published since 2006 was conducted. This identified new studies of drug interactions that are modulated by gastric pH. These studies showed the effect of a PPI-induced increase in intragastric pH on mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics, which were characterised by a decrease in the maximum exposure and availability of mycophenolic acid, at least at early time points. Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. New data for the more recently marketed dexlansoprazole suggest it has no impact on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam, phenytoin, theophylline and warfarin. The CYP2C19-mediated interaction that seems to exist between clopidogrel and omeprazole or esomeprazole has been shown to be clinically important in research published since the 2006 review; this effect is not seen as a class effect of PPIs. Finally, data suggest that coadministration of PPIs with methotrexate may affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics, although the mechanism of interaction is not well understood. As was shown in the previous review, individual PPIs differ in their propensities to interact with other drugs and the extent to which their interaction profiles have been defined. The interaction profiles of omeprazole and pantoprazole sodium (pantoprazole-Na) have been studied most extensively. Several studies have shown that omeprazole carries a considerable potential for drug interactions because of its high affinity for CYP2C19 and moderate affinity for CYP3A4. In contrast, pantoprazole-Na appears to have

  10. High-Throughput Cytochrome P450 Cocktail Inhibition Assay for Assessing Drug-Drug and Drug-Botanical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nikolic, Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Detection of drug-drug interactions is essential during the early stages of drug discovery and development, and the understanding of drug-botanical interactions is important for the safe use of botanical dietary supplements. Among the different forms of drug interactions that are known, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is the most common cause of drug-drug or drug-botanical interactions. Therefore, a rapid and comprehensive mass spectrometry–based in vitro high-throughput P450 cocktail inhibition assay was developed that uses 10 substrates simultaneously against nine CYP isoforms. Including probe substrates for CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and two probes targeting different binding sites of CYP3A4/5, this cocktail simultaneously assesses at least as many P450 enzymes as previous assays while remaining among the fastest due to short incubation times and rapid analysis using ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated using known inhibitors of each P450 enzyme and then shown to be useful not only for single-compound testing but also for the evaluation of potential drug-botanical interactions using the botanical dietary supplement licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) as an example. PMID:26285764

  11. High-Throughput Cytochrome P450 Cocktail Inhibition Assay for Assessing Drug-Drug and Drug-Botanical Interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    Detection of drug-drug interactions is essential during the early stages of drug discovery and development, and the understanding of drug-botanical interactions is important for the safe use of botanical dietary supplements. Among the different forms of drug interactions that are known, inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes is the most common cause of drug-drug or drug-botanical interactions. Therefore, a rapid and comprehensive mass spectrometry-based in vitro high-throughput P450 cocktail inhibition assay was developed that uses 10 substrates simultaneously against nine CYP isoforms. Including probe substrates for CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and two probes targeting different binding sites of CYP3A4/5, this cocktail simultaneously assesses at least as many P450 enzymes as previous assays while remaining among the fastest due to short incubation times and rapid analysis using ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The method was validated using known inhibitors of each P450 enzyme and then shown to be useful not only for single-compound testing but also for the evaluation of potential drug-botanical interactions using the botanical dietary supplement licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) as an example. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Drug-target interaction prediction from PSSM based evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The labor-intensive and expensive experimental process of drug-target interaction prediction has motivated many researchers to focus on in silico prediction, which leads to the helpful information in supporting the experimental interaction data. Therefore, they have proposed several computational approaches for discovering new drug-target interactions. Several learning-based methods have been increasingly developed which can be categorized into two main groups: similarity-based and feature-based. In this paper, we firstly use the bi-gram features extracted from the Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) of proteins in predicting drug-target interactions. Our results demonstrate the high-confidence prediction ability of the Bigram-PSSM model in terms of several performance indicators specifically for enzymes and ion channels. Moreover, we investigate the impact of negative selection strategy on the performance of the prediction, which is not widely taken into account in the other relevant studies. This is important, as the number of non-interacting drug-target pairs are usually extremely large in comparison with the number of interacting ones in existing drug-target interaction data. An interesting observation is that different levels of performance reduction have been attained for four datasets when we change the sampling method from the random sampling to the balanced sampling.

  13. Herb–drug interactions: an overview of systematic reviews

    PubMed Central

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of this overview of systematic reviews (SRs) is to evaluate critically the evidence regarding interactions between herbal medicinal products (HMPs) and synthetic drugs. METHODS Four electronic databases were searched to identify relevant SRs. RESULTS Forty‐six SRs of 46 different HMPs met our inclusion criteria. The vast majority of SRs were of poor methodological quality. The majority of these HMPs were not associated with severe herb–drug interactions. Serious herb–drug interactions were noted for Hypericum perforatum and Viscum album. The most severe interactions resulted in transplant rejection, delayed emergence from anaesthesia, cardiovascular collapse, renal and liver toxicity, cardiotoxicity, bradycardia, hypovolaemic shock, inflammatory reactions with organ fibrosis and death. Moderately severe interactions were noted for Ginkgo biloba, Panax ginseng, Piper methysticum, Serenoa repens and Camellia sinensis. The most commonly interacting drugs were antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. CONCLUSION The majority of the HMPs evaluated in SRs were not associated with drug interactions with serious consequences. However, the poor quality and the scarcity of the primary data prevent firm conclusions. PMID:22670731

  14. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  15. Unravelling the complex drug-drug interactions of the cardiovascular drugs, verapamil and digoxin, with P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ledwitch, Kaitlyn V; Barnes, Robert W; Roberts, Arthur G

    2016-01-28

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and associated toxicity from cardiovascular drugs represents a major problem for effective co-administration of cardiovascular therapeutics. A significant amount of drug toxicity from DDIs occurs because of drug interactions and multiple cardiovascular drug binding to the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp), which is particularly problematic for cardiovascular drugs because of their relatively low therapeutic indexes. The calcium channel antagonist, verapamil and the cardiac glycoside, digoxin, exhibit DDIs with Pgp through non-competitive inhibition of digoxin transport, which leads to elevated digoxin plasma concentrations and digoxin toxicity. In the present study, verapamil-induced ATPase activation kinetics were biphasic implying at least two verapamil-binding sites on Pgp, whereas monophasic digoxin activation of Pgp-coupled ATPase kinetics suggested a single digoxin-binding site. Using intrinsic protein fluorescence and the saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR techniques to probe drug-Pgp interactions, verapamil was found to have little effect on digoxin-Pgp interactions at low concentrations of verapamil, which is consistent with simultaneous binding of the drugs and non-competitive inhibition. Higher concentrations of verapamil caused significant disruption of digoxin-Pgp interactions that suggested overlapping and competing drug-binding sites. These interactions correlated to drug-induced conformational changes deduced from acrylamide quenching of Pgp tryptophan fluorescence. Also, Pgp-coupled ATPase activity kinetics measured with a range of verapamil and digoxin concentrations fit well to a DDI model encompassing non-competitive and competitive inhibition of digoxin by verapamil. The results and previous transport studies were combined into a comprehensive model of verapamil-digoxin DDIs encompassing drug binding, ATP hydrolysis, transport and conformational changes.

  16. Potential risks resulting from fruit/vegetable-drug interactions: effects on drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Martínez-Arismendi, José Luis; Orozco-Bustos, Danae; Reyes-Esparza, Jorge; Torres, Eliseo; Burchiel, Scott W

    2011-05-01

    It has been well established that complex mixtures of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables can be beneficial for human health. Moreover, it is becoming increasingly apparent that phytochemicals can influence the pharmacological activity of drugs by modifying their absorption characteristics through interactions with drug transporters as well as drug-metabolizing enzyme systems. Such effects are more likely to occur in the intestine and liver, where high concentrations of phytochemicals may occur. Alterations in cytochrome P450 and other enzyme activities may influence the fate of drugs subject to extensive first-pass metabolism. Although numerous studies of nutrient-drug interactions have been published and systematic reviews and meta-analyses of these studies are available, no generalizations on the effect of nutrient-drug interactions on drug bioavailability are currently available. Several publications have highlighted the unintended consequences of the combined use of nutrients and drugs. Many phytochemicals have been shown to have pharmacokinetic interactions with drugs. The present review is limited to commonly consumed fruits and vegetables with significant beneficial effects as nutrients and components in folk medicine. Here, we discuss the phytochemistry and pharmacokinetic interactions of the following fruit and vegetables: grapefruit, orange, tangerine, grapes, cranberry, pomegranate, mango, guava, black raspberry, black mulberry, apple, broccoli, cauliflower, watercress, spinach, tomato, carrot, and avocado. We conclude that our knowledge of the potential risk of nutrient-drug interactions is still limited. Therefore, efforts to elucidate potential risks resulting from food-drug interactions should be intensified in order to prevent undesired and harmful clinical consequences. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Clopidogrel-Paclitaxel Drug-Drug Interaction: A Pharmacoepidemiologic Study.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, K; Mau-Sørensen, M; Stage, T B; Jørgensen, T L; Hassel, R E; Steffensen, K D; Pedersen, J W; Milo, Mlh; Poulsen, S H; Pottegård, A; Hallas, J; Brøsen, K; Bergmann, T K

    2017-09-01

    Paclitaxel is mainly eliminated by CYP2C8 in the liver. CYP2C8 is strongly inhibited by the clopidogrel metabolite acyl-β-D-glucuronide. To determine if this interaction has clinical relevance, we identified 48 patients treated with clopidogrel and paclitaxel using databases and a prescription register. Peripheral sensory neuropathy was retrospectively evaluated from medical charts and compared to that of 88 age- and sex-matched controls treated with paclitaxel and low-dose aspirin. By a cumulative dose of 1,500 mg paclitaxel, 35% of the patients had developed severe neuropathy. The overall hazard ratio between clopidogrel use and severe paclitaxel neuropathy was 1.7 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-3.0). Among those receiving a high-dose paclitaxel regimen, the hazard ratio was 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-4.5). Our study indicates that clopidogrel is associated with a clinically relevant increased risk of neuropathy in patients treated with high-dose paclitaxel. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Vitamin E-drug interactions: molecular basis and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Podszun, Maren; Frank, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E (α-, β-, γ- and δ-tocopherol and -tocotrienol) is an essential factor in the human diet and regularly taken as a dietary supplement by many people, who act under the assumption that it may be good for their health and can do no harm. With the publication of meta-analyses reporting increased mortality in persons taking vitamin E supplements, the safety of the micronutrient was questioned and interactions with prescription drugs were suggested as one potentially underlying mechanism. Here, we review the evidence in the scientific literature for adverse vitamin E-drug interactions and discuss the potential of each of the eight vitamin E congeners to alter the activity of drugs. In summary, there is no evidence from animal models or randomised controlled human trials to suggest that the intake of tocopherols and tocotrienols at nutritionally relevant doses may cause adverse nutrient-drug interactions. Consumption of high-dose vitamin E supplements ( ≥  300 mg/d), however, may lead to interactions with the drugs aspirin, warfarin, tamoxifen and cyclosporine A that may alter their activities. For the majority of drugs, however, interactions with vitamin E, even at high doses, have not been observed and are thus unlikely.

  19. Prediction of cancer drugs by chemical-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Huang, Guohua; Li, Hai-Peng; Feng, Kai-Yan; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer, which is a leading cause of death worldwide, places a big burden on health-care system. In this study, an order-prediction model was built to predict a series of cancer drug indications based on chemical-chemical interactions. According to the confidence scores of their interactions, the order from the most likely cancer to the least one was obtained for each query drug. The 1(st) order prediction accuracy of the training dataset was 55.93%, evaluated by Jackknife test, while it was 55.56% and 59.09% on a validation test dataset and an independent test dataset, respectively. The proposed method outperformed a popular method based on molecular descriptors. Moreover, it was verified that some drugs were effective to the 'wrong' predicted indications, indicating that some 'wrong' drug indications were actually correct indications. Encouraged by the promising results, the method may become a useful tool to the prediction of drugs indications.

  20. Drug interactions between prescribed and over-the-counter medication.

    PubMed

    Honig, P K; Gillespie, B K

    1995-11-01

    The use and availability of over-the-counter (OTC) medication is increasing. Although regulatory agencies take care to assure than nonprescription medications are safe and effective, these drugs still have the potential to have clinically significant interactions with prescription medicines. The major classes of OTC medication to be considered in this light include antacids, histamine H2 receptor antagonists, NSAIDs, cough and cold preparations and the antiasthma products. Healthcare providers and patients/consumers should be educated regarding possible drug interactions, patient drug regimens should be simplified where possible, and all therapeutic failures and adverse reactions should be investigated with regard to the potential contribution of OTC drug products. Regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical manufacturers should ensure that nonprescription drug labelling is complete and intelligible to meet these objectives. Consideration should be given to improving the postmarketing surveillance of OTC medications.

  1. Clinically relevant pharmacokinetic herb-drug interactions in antiretroviral therapy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In t...

  2. Food-drug interactions: Putting evidence into practice.

    PubMed

    Nicoteri, Jo Ann L

    2016-02-18

    Food-drug interactions occur more often than thought. This manuscript describes the most common interactions the NP may encounter in primary care practice. A thorough and detailed health history and dietary recall are essential for identifying potential problems when prescribing or evaluating medication efficacy. Prevention and education are vital.

  3. Recommendations to improve the usability of drug-drug interaction clinical decision support alerts.

    PubMed

    Payne, Thomas H; Hines, Lisa E; Chan, Raymond C; Hartman, Seth; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Russ, Alissa L; Chaffee, Bruce W; Hartman, Christian; Tamis, Victoria; Galbreth, Brian; Glassman, Peter A; Phansalkar, Shobha; van der Sijs, Heleen; Gephart, Sheila M; Mann, Gordon; Strasberg, Howard R; Grizzle, Amy J; Brown, Mary; Kuperman, Gilad J; Steiner, Chris; Sullins, Amanda; Ryan, Hugh; Wittie, Michael A; Malone, Daniel C

    2015-11-01

    To establish preferred strategies for presenting drug-drug interaction (DDI) clinical decision support alerts. A DDI Clinical Decision Support Conference Series included a workgroup consisting of 24 clinical, usability, and informatics experts representing academia, health information technology (IT) vendors, healthcare organizations, and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT. Workgroup members met via web-based meetings 12 times from January 2013 to February 2014, and two in-person meetings to reach consensus on recommendations to improve decision support for DDIs. We addressed three key questions: (1) what, how, where, and when do we display DDI decision support? (2) should presentation of DDI decision support vary by clinicians? and (3) how should effectiveness of DDI decision support be measured? Our recommendations include the consistent use of terminology, visual cues, minimal text, formatting, content, and reporting standards to facilitate usability. All clinicians involved in the medication use process should be able to view DDI alerts and actions by other clinicians. Override rates are common but may not be a good measure of effectiveness. Seven core elements should be included with DDI decision support. DDI information should be presented to all clinicians. Finally, in their current form, override rates have limited capability to evaluate alert effectiveness. DDI clinical decision support alerts need major improvements. We provide recommendations for healthcare organizations and IT vendors to improve the clinician interface of DDI alerts, with the aim of reducing alert fatigue and improving patient safety. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Potential drug interactions with dietary and herbal supplements during hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ilana; Attias, Samuel; Ben-Arye, Eran; Goldstein, Lee; Schiff, Elad

    2017-04-01

    Dietary and herbal supplements (DHS) are widely used in the general population, including during hospitalization. Yet, their potential interactions with prescription drugs have seldom been delineated among inpatients. We aimed to evaluate potentially dangerous interactions of DHS with prescribed medications among inpatients. This was a cross-sectional prospective study involving a cohort of patients hospitalized in 12 departments of a public academic medical center (Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel) from 2009 to 2014. DHS users were determined via a questionnaire. The Natural Medicine database was used to search for potential DHS-drug interactions for identified DHS, and the clinical significance was evaluated using Lexi-interact online interaction analysis. Medical files were assessed for documentation of DHS use. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to characterize potential risk factors for DHS-drug interactions. Of 927 patients consenting to answer the questionnaire, 458 (49 %) reported DHS use. Of these, 215 (47 %) had at least one potential interaction during hospitalization (759 interactions). Of these interactions, 116 (15 %) were potentially clinically significant. Older age [OR = 1.02 (1.01-1.04), p = 0.002], males [OR = 2.11 (1.35-3.29), p = 0.001] and increased number of used DHS [OR = 4.28 (2.28-8.03), p < 0.001] or drugs [OR = 1.95 (1.17-3.26), p = 0.011] were associated with potential interactions in DHS users. Physicians documented only 16.5 % of DHS involved in these interactions in patients' medical files. In conclusion, a substantial number of inpatients use DHS with potential interactions with concomitant medications. Medical staff should be aware of this, question patients on DHS usage and check for such interactions.

  5. Mechanical properties and biological interaction of aortic clamps: are these all minimally invasive?

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Giacomo; Pucci, Angela; Matteucci, Marco; Varone, Egidio; Romano, Simone Lorenzo; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Glauber, Mattia

    2013-01-01

    Although specifically designed aortic clamps are mainstay of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, so far, no comparative reports about their mechanical properties and interaction with the aortic wall have been reported. In this study, the generated force in the clamps' jaws and the biological response of the aorta after clamping are evaluated. The jaw force of five commercially available clamps [Geister, Cygnet, Cardiovision (CV) 195.10, CV 195.40, and CV 195.83] was assessed by clamping a 2.2-mm compression load cell with a dedicated computer universal serial bus interface at the proximal, the middle, and the distal site from the fulcrum. Biological response of the aortic wall was assessed in five minipigs (weight, 38-40 kg) that underwent thoracic aorta clamping and leakage point test. Immunohistochemistry and morphometric analysis were carried out for each aortic segment tested. Force generation pattern is peculiar of each clamp, being higher in the proximal and the middle portion and lower in the distal part. One clamp (Cygnet) exhibited homogeneous maximal force generation at all three sites. All clamps exhibited peculiar crushing artifacts. A variable degree of endothelial layer disruption occurred in all clamping tests; three clamps (CV 195.10, Cygnet, and Geister) had the lower amount of intact endothelium. The clamping force was not associated with the degree of endothelial disruption (P value was not significant). The choice of a clamp that is not only minimally invasive in design but also least traumatic will help avoid complications of aortic manipulation.

  6. Potential drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among ambulatory cancer patients: a prevalence study using an advanced screening method.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Roelof W F; Swart, Eleonora L; Boom, Frits A; Schuitenmaker, Martin S; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2010-12-13

    The pharmacotherapeutic treatment of patients with cancer is generally associated with multiple side-effects. Drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions between anti-cancer drugs or interactions with medication to treat comorbidity can reinforce or intensify side-effects.The aim of the present study is to gain more insight into the prevalence of drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions among patients being treated in the outpatient day care departments for oncology and hematological illnesses. For the first time the prevalence of drug interactions with OTC-drugs in cancer patients will be studied. Possible risk factors for the occurrence of these drug-related problems will also be studied. A multicenter cross-sectional observational study of the epidemiology of drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions is performed among all oncology and hemato-oncology patients treated with systemic anti-cancer drugs at the oncology and hematology outpatient day care department of the VU University medical center and the Zaans Medical Center. In this article the prevalence of potential drug interactions in outpatient day-care patients treated with anti-cancer agents is studied using a novel more extensive screening method. If this study shows a high prevalence of drug interactions clinical pharmacists and oncologists must collaborate to develop a pharmaceutical screening programme, including an automated electronic warning system, to support drug prescribing for ambulatory cancer patient. This programme could minimize the occurrence of drug related problems such as drug interactions and duplicate prescriptions, thereby increasing quality of life. This study is registered, number NTR2238.

  7. Drug–drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. Areas covered This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. Expert opinion We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse. PMID:25539046

  8. A practical approach to minimize the interaction of dietary vitamin K with warfarin.

    PubMed

    Chang, C-H; Wang, Y-W; Yeh Liu, P-Y; Kao Yang, Y-H

    2014-02-01

    The many interactions between warfarin and other drugs and foods generate great challenges for clinicians and patients in maintaining stable anitcoagulation. Interactions due to variable vitamin K content of different dietary items influence the therapy of nearly all patients on warfarin. Unfortunately, there is no widely acceptable, patient-friendly strategy for managing such interactions. In this contribution, we propose a practical approach to managing this troublesome interaction, consisting of 'maintaining constant weekly dietary vitamin K intake scores'. Twenty-three vitamin K-rich vegetables commonly seen in Taiwanese meals were identified and classified into seven score grades according to their relative vitamin K content per serving. The scores were based on published vitamin K content of different foods. The vitamin K score was equivalent to 5 points for spinach and garland chrysanthemum per bowel, followed by (baby) bok choy, amaranth, arden lettuce (4 points); leaf mustard, edible rape, sweet potato leaf, bai cai and Chinese leek (3 points); and okra and Chinese celery (0·5 points). This classification can be used to guide patients in recording their weekly vitamin K scores with a view to maintaining it when on warfarin. We suggest a novel approach to patient counselling on warfarin to maintain consistent dietary vitamin K intake and achieve a more stable anticoagulation response. A prospective randomized controlled trial to validate this pragmatic approach would be useful. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Design considerations to minimize the impact of drug absorption in polymer-based organ-on-a-chip platforms.

    PubMed

    Shirure, V S; George, S C

    2017-02-14

    Biocompatible polymers, such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), are the materials of choice for creating organ-on-a-chip microfluidic platforms. Desirable qualities include ease of fabrication, optical clarity, and hydrophobicity, the latter of which facilitates oxygen transport to encased cells. An emerging and important application of organ-on-a-chip technology is drug discovery; however, a potential issue for polymer-based microfluidic devices has been highlighted by recent studies with PDMS, which have demonstrated absorption (and thus loss) of hydrophobic drugs into PDMS under certain experimental conditions. Absorption of drug in the polymer can also lead to undesirable transfer of drug between adjacent microfluidic lines. Given the benefits of polymers, it is essential to develop a comprehensive understanding of drug absorption. In this study, we considered convection, dissolution, and diffusion of a drug within a polymer-based microfluidic device to characterize the dynamics of drug loss in a quantitative manner. We solved Fick's 2nd law of diffusion (unsteady diffusion-convection) by finite element analysis in COMSOL®, and experimentally validated the numerical model for loss of three hydrophobic molecules (rhodamine B, cyanine NHS ester, and paclitaxel) in PDMS. Drug loss, as well as the unintended mixing of drugs by adjacent microfluidic channels, depends strongly on platform design parameters, experimental conditions, and the physico-chemical properties of the drug, and can be captured in a simple quantitate relationship that employs four scalable dimensionless numbers. This simple quantitative framework can be used in the design of a wide range of polymer-based microfluidic devices to minimize the impact of drug absorption.

  10. A Single Kernel-Based Approach to Extract Drug-Drug Interactions from Biomedical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijia; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian; Li, Yanpeng

    2012-01-01

    When one drug influences the level or activity of another drug this is known as a drug-drug interaction (DDI). Knowledge of such interactions is crucial for patient safety. However, the volume and content of published biomedical literature on drug interactions is expanding rapidly, making it increasingly difficult for DDIs database curators to detect and collate DDIs information manually. In this paper, we propose a single kernel-based approach to extract DDIs from biomedical literature. This novel kernel-based approach can effectively make full use of syntactic structural information of the dependency graph. In particular, our approach can efficiently represent both single subgraph topological information and the relation of two subgraphs in the dependency graph. Experimental evaluations showed that our single kernel-based approach can achieve state-of-the-art performance on the publicly available DDI corpus without exploiting multiple kernels or additional domain resources. PMID:23133662

  11. Drug-drug interactions between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and antiviral protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Benoit; Drouot, Sylvain; Barrail-Tran, Aurélie; Taburet, Anne-Marie

    2013-10-01

    The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are a class of drugs also known as statins. These drugs are effective and widely prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Seven statins are currently available: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin. Although these drugs are generally well tolerated, skeletal muscle abnormalities from myalgia to severe lethal rhabdomyolysis can occur. Factors that increase statin concentrations such as drug-drug interactions can increase the risk of these adverse events. Drug-drug interactions are dependent on statins' pharmacokinetic profile: simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin are metabolized through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A, while the metabolism of the other statins is independent of this CYP. All statins are substrate of organic anion transporter polypeptide 1B1, an uptake transporter expressed in hepatocyte membrane that may also explain some drug-drug interactions. Many HIV-infected patients have dyslipidemia and comorbidities that may require statin treatment. HIV-protease inhibitors (HIV PIs) are part of recommended antiretroviral treatment in combination with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors. All HIV PIs except nelfinavir are coadministered with a low dose of ritonavir, a potent CYP3A inhibitor to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Cobicistat is a new potent CYP3A inhibitor that is combined with elvitegravir and will be combined with HIV-PIs in the future. The HCV-PIs boceprevir and telaprevir are both, to different extents, inhibitors of CYP3A. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic properties of statins and PIs with emphasis on their metabolic pathways explaining clinically important drug-drug interactions. Simvastatin and lovastatin metabolized through CYP3A have the highest potency for drug-drug interaction with potent CYP3A inhibitors such as ritonavir- or cobicistat-boosted HIV-PI or the

  12. Pharmacovigilance of herb-drug interactions among preoperative patients.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Eugenia; Pugi, Alessandra; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Maggini, Valentina; Gori, Luigi; Mugelli, Alessandro; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Vannacci, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Center of the University of Florence conducted a survey across 3 hospitals in Tuscany (Empoli, Florence, and Prato) on a sample population consisting of 478 patients admitted to the hospital for a preoperative assessment before surgical intervention. The aim of the study was to assess the concomitant use of herbal remedies (HRs) and prescribed medications and to evaluate the most important potential interactions. Almost 50% of the patients surveyed-238 of 478 (49.8 %)-used at least 1 HR. Among them, 55 (23.1%) were actually exposed to at least 1 potential interaction. In particular, 42 participants had an HR-drug interaction and 17 participants had a dietary supplement drug interaction. A large percentage of patients undergoing surgery take HRs that could potentially interact with drugs administered perioperatively. Antihypertensive, antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and central nervous system (CNS) agents were the main products involved. The use of HRs is not devoid of risks and adverse effects due to potential interactions that may be serious or even lifethreatening. HR-drug interactions should be deeply investigated, especially in high-risk patient populations. Health care professionals should pay close attention and always investigate the consumption of HRs among their patients.

  13. Quality of drug interaction alerts in prescribing and dispensing software.

    PubMed

    Sweidan, Michelle; Reeve, James F; Brien, Jo-anne E; Jayasuriya, Pradeep; Martin, Jennifer H; Vernon, Graeme M

    2009-03-02

    To investigate the quality of drug interaction decision support in selected prescribing and dispensing software systems, and to compare this information with that found in a range of reference sources. A comparative study, conducted between June 2006 and February 2007, of the support provided for making decisions about 20 major and 20 minor drug interactions in six prescribing and three dispensing software systems used in primary care in Australia. Five electronic reference sources were evaluated for comparison. Sensitivity, specificity and quality of information; for major interactions: whether information on clinical effects, timeframe and pharmacological mechanism was included, whether management advice was helpful, and succinctness. Six of the nine software systems had a sensitivity rate > or = 90%, detecting most of the major interactions. Only 3/9 systems had a specificity rate of > or = 80%, with other systems providing inappropriate or unhelpful alerts for many minor interactions. Only 2/9 systems provided adequate information about clinical effects for more than half the major drug interactions, and 1/9 provided useful management advice for more than half of these. The reference sources had high sensitivity and in general provided more comprehensive clinical information than the software systems. Drug interaction decision support in commonly used prescribing and dispensing software has significant shortcomings.

  14. Drug interactions involving aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Miners, J O

    1989-11-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is metabolically converted to salicyclic acid by the action of carboxylesterases. Although metabolic drug interactions involving aspirin are theoretically possible, there appear to have been no studies to date which have shown conclusively that aspirin hydrolysis is altered by coadministered drugs. However, a number of treatments are known to affect the rate or extent of aspirin absorption, including activated charcoal, antacids, cholestyramine and metoclopramide. Caffeine and metoprolol have been reported to increase peak salicylic acid concentration following aspirin administration, and coadministration of dipyridamole and aspirin results in higher plasma aspirin concentrations. The mechanism(s) responsible for these latter observations remains unknown. Salicylic acid is extensively bound to plasma albumin, and many of the reported drug interactions involve displacement of the coadministered drug from plasma protein. Protein binding displacement appears to be the basis of salicylic acid interactions with diclofenac, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, isoxicam, ketoprofen, naproxen, phenytoin and tolmetin. Following displacement of these agents increased clearance of total drug occurs, and consequently the plasma concentration of total drug decreases. Although generally not measured, unbound concentration of the interacting drug should not be markedly altered. Salicylic acid also increases total plasma clearance of fenoprofen but, unlike the interactions with the other propionic acid non-steroidals, plasma protein binding displacement does not appear to be involved. Induction of fenoprofen metabolism is a possibility, although there is no firm evidence from other studies that salicylate is able to induce the metabolism of coadministered drugs. Since salicylic acid is extensively metabolised, it is not surprising that it is able to inhibit the metabolism of certain coadministered drugs and chemicals, an effect which has been reported for

  15. Drug Hypersensitivity: How Drugs Stimulate T Cells via Pharmacological Interaction with Immune Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J; Adam, Jacqueline; Watkins, Stephen; Wuillemin, Natascha; Yun, James; Yerly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Small chemicals like drugs tend to bind to proteins via noncovalent bonds, e.g. hydrogen bonds, salt bridges or electrostatic interactions. Some chemicals interact with other molecules than the actual target ligand, representing so-called 'off-target' activities of drugs. Such interactions are a main cause of adverse side effects to drugs and are normally classified as predictable type A reactions. Detailed analysis of drug-induced immune reactions revealed that off-target activities also affect immune receptors, such as highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or T cell receptors (TCR). Such drug interactions with immune receptors may lead to T cell stimulation, resulting in clinical symptoms of delayed-type hypersensitivity. They are assigned the 'pharmacological interaction with immune receptors' (p-i) concept. Analysis of p-i has revealed that drugs bind preferentially or exclusively to distinct HLA molecules (p-i HLA) or to distinct TCR (p-i TCR). P-i reactions differ from 'conventional' off-target drug reactions as the outcome is not due to the effect on the drug-modified cells themselves, but is the consequence of reactive T cells. Hence, the complex and diverse clinical manifestations of delayed-type hypersensitivity are caused by the functional heterogeneity of T cells. In the abacavir model of p-i HLA, the drug binding to HLA may result in alteration of the presenting peptides. More importantly, the drug binding to HLA generates a drug-modified HLA, which stimulates T cells directly, like an allo-HLA. In the sulfamethoxazole model of p-i TCR, responsive T cells likely require costimulation for full T cell activation. These findings may explain the similarity of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to graft-versus-host disease, and how systemic viral infections increase the risk of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.

  16. Interaction of Antipsychotic Drugs with Sucrase, Kinetics and Structural Study.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Narges; Dehganpour, Helia; Ghavanini, Nava; Mollasalehi, Hamidreza; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2017-01-01

    In patients with the Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID), who lack intestinal sucrase-isomaltase enzyme, a suspension of yeast sucrase is applied as a drug to compensate the enzyme deficiency. While antipsychotic drugs are used for the treatment of schizophrenia, administering multiple drugs at the same time may counteract each other. In this study, the interaction between trifluoperazine and haloperidol as antipsychotic drugs on oral drug yeast sucrase was investigated. In this regard, the kinetic parameters of enzyme were determined in the presence or absence of the drugs. The kinetic parameters of the drugs such as Ki and IC50 were also calculated. Lineweaver - Burk plot was used to reveal the type of inhibition. The results showed that both drugs could reduce sucrase activity and decrease the Vmax of the enzyme by non-competitive inhibition. The IC50 and Ki values of the drugs were determined to be 0.7 and 0.068 mM and 0.45 and 0.063 mM for haloperidol and trifluoperazine, respectively. The results suggested that trifluoperazine binds to the enzyme with higher affinity than haloperidol. Fluorescence measurement was used for conformational investigations of the drugs and sucrase interaction. It was shown that the drugs bind to free enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex which are accompanied with hyperchromicity. This suggests that tryptophan residues of the enzyme transferred to hydrophobic medium after binding of the drugs to the enzyme. The finding of this research revealed that both trifluoperazine and haloperidol could inhibit sucrase in non-competitive manner. The kinetic parameters and conformational changes due to binding of trifluoperazine to the enzyme were different from that of haloperidol. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Drug interactions with HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins): the importance of CYP enzymes, transporters and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Pertti J

    2010-03-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) can cause skeletal muscle toxicity; the risk of toxicity is elevated by drug interactions and pharmacogenetic factors that increase the concentration of statins in the plasma. Statins are substrates for several membrane transporters that may mediate drug interactions. Inhibitors of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 can decrease the hepatic uptake of many statins, as well as the therapeutic index of these agents. Potent inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A4 can significantly increase the plasma concentrations of the active forms of simvastatin, lovastatin and atorvastatin. Fluvastatin, which is metabolized by CYP2C9, is less prone to pharmacokinetic interactions, while pravastatin, rosuvastatin and pitavastatin are not susceptible to any CYP inhibition. An understanding of the mechanisms of statin interactions will help to minimize drug interactions and to develop statins that are less prone to adverse interactions.

  18. [Drug interactions in the elderly with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Hendrychová, T; Vlček, J

    2012-04-01

    The elderly with diabetes mellitus are usually treated with many types of drugs. This, together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes connected with aging, can lead to an occurrence of drug interactions. They are often manifested as hypoglycaemia, decompensation of diabetes or an increase of frequency of adverse effects of drugs used together. It is important to pay an attention especially to hypoglycaemia, which brings many risks in the elderly. An article is focused on probable drug interactions when combination of various antidiabetics, antidiabetics with antihypertensives or hypolipidemics is used. Despite ACE-inhibitors and beta-blockers can influence the compensation of diabetics, their use is not contraindicated in these patients, because of their huge benefit in the prevention of cardiovascular events. An article brings an overview of antidiabetics metabolised by means of the system of cytochrome P 450 and resulting drug interactions with inhibitors and inductors of these enzymes. These drug interactions are not usually important in clinical practice and it is possible to prevent them with careful monitoring of glycaemia, instruction of patients and alternatively modification of the doses of hypoglycaemic medication after a termination of the treatment of responsible inductor or inhibitor.

  19. Soft Interaction in Liposome Nanocarriers for Therapeutic Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Domenico; Calandra, Pietro; Barreca, Davide; Magazù, Salvatore; Kiselev, Mikhail A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of smart nanocarriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs has experienced considerable expansion in recent decades, with the development of new medicines devoted to cancer treatment. In this respect a wide range of strategies can be developed by employing liposome nanocarriers with desired physico-chemical properties that, by exploiting a combination of a number of suitable soft interactions, can facilitate the transit through the biological barriers from the point of administration up to the site of drug action. As a result, the materials engineer has generated through the bottom up approach a variety of supramolecular nanocarriers for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics which have revealed beneficial developments for stabilizing drug compounds, overcoming impediments to cellular and tissue uptake, and improving biodistribution of therapeutic compounds to target sites. Herein we present recent advances in liposome drug delivery by analyzing the main structural features of liposome nanocarriers which strongly influence their interaction in solution. More specifically, we will focus on the analysis of the relevant soft interactions involved in drug delivery processes which are responsible of main behaviour of soft nanocarriers in complex physiological fluids. Investigation of the interaction between liposomes at the molecular level can be considered an important platform for the modeling of the molecular recognition processes occurring between cells. Some relevant strategies to overcome the biological barriers during the drug delivery of the nanocarriers are presented which outline the main structure-properties relationships as well as their advantages (and drawbacks) in therapeutic and biomedical applications. PMID:28335253

  20. DRUG-DRUG INTERACTION PROFILES OF MEDICATION REGIMENS EXTRACTED FROM A DE-IDENTIFIED ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Restrepo, Nicole A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    With age, the number of prescribed medications increases and subsequently raises the risk for adverse drug-drug interactions. These adverse effects lower quality of life and increase health care costs. Quantifying the potential burden of adverse effects before prescribing medications can be a valuable contribution to health care. This study evaluated medication lists extracted from a subset of the Vanderbilt de-identified electronic medical record system. Reported drugs were cross-referenced with the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes DRUG database to identify known drug-drug interactions. On average, a medication regimen contained 6.58 medications and 2.68 drug-drug interactions. Here, we quantify the burden of potential adverse events from drug-drug interactions through drug-drug interaction profiles and include a number of alternative medications as provided by the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. PMID:27570646

  1. Similarity-based modeling in large-scale prediction of drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Uriarte, Eugenio; Santana, Lourdes; Lorberbaum, Tal; Hripcsak, George; Friedman, Carol; Tatonetti, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are a major cause of adverse drug effects and a public health concern, as they increase hospital care expenses and reduce patients’ quality of life. DDI detection is, therefore, an important objective in patient safety, one whose pursuit affects drug development and pharmacovigilance. In this article, we describe a protocol applicable on a large scale to predict novel DDIs based on similarity of drug interaction candidates to drugs involved in established DDIs. the method integrates a reference standard database of known DDIs with drug similarity information extracted from different sources, such as 2D and 3D molecular structure, interaction profile, target and side-effect similarities. the method is interpretable in that it generates drug interaction candidates that are traceable to pharmacological or clinical effects. We describe a protocol with applications in patient safety and preclinical toxicity screening. the time frame to implement this protocol is 5–7 h, with additional time potentially necessary, depending on the complexity of the reference standard DDI database and the similarity measures implemented. PMID:25122524

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions with ethanol (alcohol).

    PubMed

    Chan, Lingtak-Neander; Anderson, Gail D

    2014-12-01

    Ethanol (alcohol) is one of the most widely used legal drugs in the world. Ethanol is metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 drug-metabolizing enzyme that is also responsible for the biotransformation of xenobiotics and fatty acids. Drugs that inhibit ADH or CYP2E1 are the most likely theoretical compounds that would lead to a clinically significant pharmacokinetic interaction with ethanol, which include only a limited number of drugs. Acute ethanol primarily alters the pharmacokinetics of other drugs by changing the rate and extent of absorption, with more limited effects on clearance. Both acute and chronic ethanol use can cause transient changes to many physiologic responses in different organ systems such as hypotension and impairment of motor and cognitive functions, resulting in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions. Evaluating drug interactions with long-term use of ethanol is uniquely challenging. Specifically, it is difficult to distinguish between the effects of long-term ethanol use on liver pathology and chronic malnutrition. Ethanol-induced liver disease results in decreased activity of hepatic metabolic enzymes and changes in protein binding. Clinical studies that include patients with chronic alcohol use may be evaluating the effects of mild cirrhosis on liver metabolism, and not just ethanol itself. The definition of chronic alcohol use is very inconsistent, which greatly affects the quality of the data and clinical application of the results. Our study of the literature has shown that a significantly higher volume of clinical studies have focused on the pharmacokinetic interactions of ethanol and other drugs. The data on pharmacodynamic interactions are more limited and future research addressing pharmacodynamic interactions with ethanol, especially regarding the non-central nervous system effects, is much needed.

  3. Potential drug interactions with statins: Estonian register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Daisy; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In Estonia, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are widely used to modify lipid levels but there are no current data on additional medicines prescribed alongside the statins. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential clinically relevant interactions at a national level among an outpatient population treated with statins between January and June 2008, based on the prescription database of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. This retrospective prevalence study included 203,646 outpatients aged 50 years or older, of whom 29,367 received statin therapy. The study analysed individuals who had used at least one prescription medicine for a minimum of 7 days concomitantly with statins. Potential drug interactions were analysed using Epocrates online, Stockley’s Drug Interactions, and the drug interaction database developed in Estonia. Statins metabolised by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme were prescribed to 64% of all statin users. Medicines known to have potentially clinically significant interactions with statins were prescribed to 4.6% of patients. The drugs prescribed concomitantly most often with simvastatin were warfarin (5.7%) and amiodarone (3.9%), whereas digoxin (1.2%) and ethinylestradiol (2%) were prescribed with atorvastatin. Potential interactions were not detected in the treatment regimens of rosuvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin users. PMID:28352703

  4. Social interaction and drug attitude effectiveness in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Kang; Lin, Wen-Kuo; Lung, For-Wey

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between dosage of paliperidone and drug attitude, and also clarify the factors associated with drug attitude, using Intention-to-Treat (ITT) analysis. Three hundred thirty-one patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, who prescribed paliperidone between April 2008 and April 2009, from 10 hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. By structural equation modeling, inpatient/outpatient status associated with occupation status, sex, and score on the Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGIS) Scale. The score on the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) Scale associated with occupation status, inpatient/outpatient status, and the score on the CGIS Scale. The scores on the DAI-10 associated with the score on the PSP Scale and age. Good drug attitude and medication adherence significantly related to good social interaction. We should enhance the drug attitude and medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia who have poor social interaction to improve the outcome of schizophrenia.

  5. Contrast media: interactions with other drugs and clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Morcos, Sameh K; Thomsen, Henrik S; Exley, C M

    2005-07-01

    Many patients with multiple medical problems who are receiving a variety of drugs are investigated with imaging techniques which require intravascular contrast media. The Contrast Media Safety Committee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology therefore decided to review the literature and to draw up simple guidelines on interactions between contrast media and other drugs. An extensive literature search was carried out and summarized in a report. Based on the available information, simple guidelines have been drawn up. The report and guidelines were discussed at the 11th European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Santiago de Compostela. Contrast media may interact with other drugs, and may interfere with isotope studies and biochemical measurements. Awareness of the patient drug history is important to avoid potential hazards. Simple guidelines are presented.

  6. A Semiparametric Response Surface Model for Assessing Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Maiying; Lee, J. Jack

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY When multiple drugs are administered simultaneously, investigators are often interested in assessing whether the drug combinations are synergistic, additive, or antagonistic. Existing response surface models are not adequate to capture the complex patterns of drug interactions. We propose a two-component semiparametric response surface model with a parametric function to describe the additive effect of a combination dose and a nonparametric function to capture the departure from the additive effect. The nonparametric function is estimated using the technique developed in thin plate splines, and the pointwise bootstrap confidence interval for this function is constructed. The proposed semiparametric model offers an effective way of formulating the additive effect while allowing the flexibility of modeling a departure from additivity. Example and simulations are given to illustrate that the proposed model provides an excellent estimation for different patterns of interactions between two drugs. PMID:17900314

  7. [Clinical relevance of drug interactions between nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives].

    PubMed

    Villa, Juan; Cano, Alejandra; Franco, David; Monsalve, Mauricio; Hincapié, Jaime; Amariles, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    To establish the clinical relevance of drug interactions between nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antihypertensives, based on the interaction severity and probability of occurrence. Systematic review. A PubMed/Medline search was made using the MeSH terms: NSAIDs, Antihypertensive drugs, and Drug interactions. Articles between 2002 and 2012, human studies, in Spanish and English and full text access were included. Found articles were included and some of the references used in this works. Studies with in vitro methods, effects on ocular hypertension and those who do not consider the interaction NSAIDs, antihypertensives were excluded. For the selection of the papers included three independent reviewers were involved. We used a tool for data extraction and for assess of the interaction clinical relevance. Nineteen of 50 papers found were included. There were identified 21 interactions with pharmacodynamic mechanism, classified by their clinical relevance in level-2 high risk (76.2%) and level-3 medium risk (23.8%). In addition, evidence of 16 combinations of no interaction were found. Some NSAIDs may attenuate the effectiveness of antihypertensive drugs when used concurrently, especially with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, beta blockers and angiotensin receptorsii blockers. There was no evidence of effect modification of calcium channel antagonists, especially dihydropyridine, by concurrent use of NSAIDs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Update on clinically significant drug interactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Vincent P

    2006-04-01

    Although there are thousands of drug interactions (DIs) listed in computers and manuals, only about 10% are clinically significant. Equally disturbing is these systems fail to detect up to one third of all dangerous DIs. This update on clinically significant DIs is current through September 2005 and discusses systemic drugs important to dermatologists. In addition, 4 aspects of DIs are discussed that are helpful in replacing rote memory with a step-by-step, logical approach based on scientific evidence.

  9. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes.

  10. Efficiently mining Adverse Event Reporting System for multiple drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yang; Albin, Aaron; Ren, Kaiyu; Zhang, Pengyue; Etter, Jonathan P.; Lin, Simon; Li, Lang

    2014-01-01

    Efficiently mining multiple drug interactions and reactions from Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) is a challenging problem which has not been sufficiently addressed by existing methods. To tackle this challenge, we propose a FCI-fliter approach which leverages the efforts of UMLS mapping, frequent closed itemset mining, and uninformative association identification and removal. By applying our method on AERS, we identified a large number of multiple drug interactions with reactions. By statistical analysis, we found most of the identified associations have very small p-values which suggest that they are statistically significant. Further analysis on the results shows that many multiple drug interactions and reactions are clinically interesting, and suggests that our method may be further improved with the combination of external knowledge. PMID:25717411

  11. Communication growth in minimally verbal children with ASD: The importance of interaction.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Charlotte; Shih, Wendy; Kaiser, Ann; Landa, Rebecca; Kasari, Connie

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about language development in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) who remain minimally verbal past age 5. While there is evidence that children can develop language after age 5, we lack detailed information. Studies of this population generally focus on discrete language skills without addressing broader social-communication abilities. As communication and social deficits are both inherent to ASD, an examination of not only what language skills are acquired, but how those skills are used in interactions is relevant. Research in typical development has examined how communication interchanges (unbroken back-and-forth exchanges around a unified purpose) develop, which can be used as a framework for studying minimally verbal children. This study examined the interchange use by 55 children with ASD over the course of a 6-month play and engagement-based communication intervention. Half of the children received intervention sessions that also incorporated a speech-generating device (SGD). Interchanges were coded by: frequency, length, function, and initiator (child or adult). Results indicated that children initiated a large proportion of interchanges and this proportion increased over time. The average length and number of interchanges increased over time, with children in the SGD group showing even greater growth. Finally, children's total number of interchanges at baseline was positively associated with their spoken language gains over the course of intervention. This study supports the crucial relationship between social engagement and expressive language development, and highlights the need to include sustained communication interchanges as a target for intervention with this population. Autism Res 2016, 9: 1093-1102. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Drug Target Protein-Protein Interaction Networks: A Systematic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanghe; Wang, Qi; Wang, Tengjiao

    2017-01-01

    The identification and validation of drug targets are crucial in biomedical research and many studies have been conducted on analyzing drug target features for getting a better understanding on principles of their mechanisms. But most of them are based on either strong biological hypotheses or the chemical and physical properties of those targets separately. In this paper, we investigated three main ways to understand the functional biomolecules based on the topological features of drug targets. There are no significant differences between targets and common proteins in the protein-protein interactions network, indicating the drug targets are neither hub proteins which are dominant nor the bridge proteins. According to some special topological structures of the drug targets, there are significant differences between known targets and other proteins. Furthermore, the drug targets mainly belong to three typical communities based on their modularity. These topological features are helpful to understand how the drug targets work in the PPI network. Particularly, it is an alternative way to predict potential targets or extract nontargets to test a new drug target efficiently and economically. By this way, a drug target's homologue set containing 102 potential target proteins is predicted in the paper.

  13. Herbal medication: potential for adverse interactions with analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Abebe, W

    2002-12-01

    The use of herbal supplements in the US has increased dramatically in recent years. These products are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with the same scrutiny as conventional drugs. Patients who use herbal supplements often do so in conjunction with conventional drugs. This article is a review of potential adverse interactions between some of the commonly used herbal supplements and analgesic drugs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly aspirin, have the potential to interact with herbal supplements that are known to possess antiplatelet activity (ginkgo, garlic, ginger, bilberry, dong quai, feverfew, ginseng, turmeric, meadowsweet and willow), with those containing coumarin (chamomile, motherworth, horse chestnut, fenugreek and red clover) and with tamarind, enhancing the risk of bleeding. Acetaminophen may also interact with ginkgo and possibly with at least some of the above herbs to increase the risk of bleeding. Further, the incidences of hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity may be augmented by acetaminophen when concomitantly used with the potentially hepatotoxic herbs Echinacea and kava, and with herbs containing salicylate (willow, meadowsweet), respectively. The concomitant use of opioid analgesics with the sedative herbal supplements, valerian, kava and chamomile, may lead to increased central nervous system (CNS) depression. The analgesic effect of opioids may also be inhibited by ginseng. It is suggested that health-care professionals should be more aware of the potential adverse interactions between herbal supplements and analgesic drugs, and take appropriate precautionary measures to avoid their possible occurrences. However, as most of the interaction information available is based on individual case reports, animal studies and in vitro data, further research is needed to confirm and assess the clinical significance of these potential interactions.

  14. Computational Drug Target Screening through Protein Interaction Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Quezada, Elías; Uriarte, Eugenio; Costanzi, Stefano; Borges, Fernanda; Viña, Dolores; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    The development of computational methods to discover novel drug-target interactions on a large scale is of great interest. We propose a new method for virtual screening based on protein interaction profile similarity to discover new targets for molecules, including existing drugs. We calculated Target Interaction Profile Fingerprints (TIPFs) based on ChEMBL database to evaluate drug similarity and generated new putative compound-target candidates from the non-intersecting targets in each pair of compounds. A set of drugs was further studied in monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) enzyme through molecular docking and experimental assays. The drug ethoxzolamide and the natural compound piperlongumine, present in Piper longum L, showed hMAO-B activity with IC50 values of 25 and 65 μM respectively. Five candidates, including lapatinib, SB-202190, RO-316233, GW786460X and indirubin-3′-monoxime were tested against human COX-1. Compounds SB-202190 and RO-316233 showed a IC50 in hCOX-1 of 24 and 25 μM respectively (similar range as potent inhibitors such as diclofenac and indomethacin in the same experimental conditions). Lapatinib and indirubin-3′-monoxime showed moderate hCOX-1 activity (19.5% and 28% of enzyme inhibition at 25 μM respectively). Our modeling constitutes a multi-target predictor for large scale virtual screening with potential in lead discovery, repositioning and drug safety. PMID:27845365

  15. Interactions between drugs and drug-nutrient in enteral nutrition: a review based on evidences.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Silva, Renata; Rita Carvalho Garbi Novaes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Enteral nutrition (EN) provides calories, macronutrients and micronutrients in adequate quantity and quality to meet the patient's needs. Some drugs when crushed and diluted may have their properties altered, including the reduction of bioavailability causing the reduction of the serum concentration of the drug; tube obstruction; drug-drug interaction or drug-nutrient interaction. The study was conducted through review of submitted articles in the databases of the Virtual Health Library (VHL): MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, USA), Lilacs (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) PUBMED - NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) and COCHRANE. For this survey, 42 articles were identified during database searching. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 08 articles were selected, obtained from the MEDLINE and Lilacs. Some interactions were found such as the aluminium hydroxide and lactulose with the enteral nutrition, which may result in a precipitation and reduction of drug bioavailability. Mineral oil will alter the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and reduces the tube light. Others results were found as phenytoin, warfarin, captopril and furosemide with enteral nutrition may reduce the maximum serum concentration. Drug interactions are more common in day-to-day activities than health professionals may suppose. Knowledge on the matter may also assist in reducing cases of obstruction of tubes, through which enteral nutrition and medications are administered. Thus, the multidisciplinary team, acting together, may have more beneficial effects to the patient. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. The rising tide of polypharmacy and drug-drug interactions: population database analysis 1995-2010.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Bruce; Makubate, Boikanyo; Hernandez-Santiago, Virginia; Dreischulte, Tobias

    2015-04-07

    The escalating use of prescribed drugs has increasingly raised concerns about polypharmacy. This study aims to examine changes in rates of polypharmacy and potentially serious drug-drug interactions in a stable geographical population between 1995 and 2010. This is a repeated cross-sectional analysis of community-dispensed prescribing data for all 310,000 adults resident in the Tayside region of Scotland in 1995 and 2010. The number of drug classes dispensed and the number of potentially serious drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in the previous 84 days were calculated, and age-sex standardised rates in 1995 and 2010 compared. Patient characteristics associated with receipt of ≥ 10 drugs and with the presence of one or more DDIs were examined using multilevel logistic regression to account for clustering of patients within primary care practices. Between 1995 and 2010, the proportion of adults dispensed ≥ 5 drugs doubled to 20.8%, and the proportion dispensed ≥ 10 tripled to 5.8%. Receipt of ≥ 10 drugs was strongly associated with increasing age (20-29 years, 0.3%; ≥ 80 years, 24.0%; adjusted OR, 118.3; 95% CI, 99.5-140.7) but was also independently more common in people living in more deprived areas (adjusted OR most vs. least deprived quintile, 2.36; 95% CI, 2.22-2.51), and in people resident in a care home (adjusted OR, 2.88; 95% CI, 2.65-3.13). The proportion with potentially serious drug-drug interactions more than doubled to 13% of adults in 2010, and the number of drugs dispensed was the characteristic most strongly associated with this (10.9% if dispensed 2-4 drugs vs. 80.8% if dispensed ≥ 15 drugs; adjusted OR, 26.8; 95% CI 24.5-29.3). Drug regimens are increasingly complex and potentially harmful, and people with polypharmacy need regular review and prescribing optimisation. Research is needed to better understand the impact of multiple interacting drugs as used in real-world practice and to evaluate the effect of medicine optimisation

  17. A review of drug-drug interactions in older HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chary, Aarthi; Nguyen, Nancy N; Maiton, Kimberly; Holodniy, Mark

    2017-09-19

    The number of older HIV-infected people is growing due to increasing life expectancies resulting from the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Both HIV and aging increase the risk of other comorbidities, such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and some malignancies, leading to greater challenges in managing HIV with other conditions. This results in complex medication regimens with the potential for significant drug-drug interactions and increased morbidity and mortality. Area covered: We review the metabolic pathways of ART and other medications used to treat medical co-morbidities, highlight potential areas of concern for drug-drug interactions, and where feasible, suggest alternative approaches for treating these conditions as suggested from national guidelines or articles published in the English language. Expert commentary: There is limited evidence-based data on ART drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the older HIV-infected population. Choosing and maintaining effective ART regimens for older adults requires consideration of side effect profile, individual comorbidities, interactions with concurrent prescriptions and non-prescription medications and supplements, dietary patterns with respect to dosing, pill burden and ease of dosing, cost and affordability, patient preferences, social situation, and ART resistance history. Practitioners must remain vigilant for potential drug interactions and intervene when there is a potential for harm.

  18. Prevalence of the Prescription of Potentially Interacting Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tragni, Elena; Casula, Manuela; Pieri, Vasco; Favato, Giampiero; Marcobelli, Alberico; Trotta, Maria Giovanna; Catapano, Alberico Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The use of multiple medications is becoming more common, with a correspondingly increased risk of untoward effects and drug-related morbidity and mortality. We aimed at estimating the prevalence of prescription of relevant potentially interacting drugs and at evaluating possible predictors of potentially interacting drug exposure. We retrospectively analyzed data on prescriptions dispensed from January 2004 to August 2005 to individuals of two Italian regions with a population of almost 2.1 million individuals. We identified 27 pairs of potentially interacting drugs by examining clinical relevance, documentation, and volume of use in Italy. Subjects who received at least one prescription of both drugs were selected. Co-prescribing denotes “two prescriptions in the same day”, and concomitant medication “the prescription of two drugs with overlapping coverage”. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the predictors of potential Drug-Drug Interaction (pDDIs). 957,553 subjects (45.3% of study population) were exposed to at least one of the drugs/classes of the 27 pairs. Overall, pDDIs occurred 2,465,819 times. The highest rates of concomitant prescription and of co-prescription were for ACE inhibitors+NSAIDs (6,253 and 4,621/100,000 plan participants). Considering concomitance, the male/female ratio was <1 in 17/27 pairs (from 0.31 for NSAIDs-ASA+SSRI to 0.74 for omeprazole+clopidogrel). The mean age was lowest for methotrexate pairs (+omeprazole, 59.9 years; +NSAIDs-ASA, 59.1 years) and highest for digoxin+verapamil (75.4 years). In 13/27 pairs, the mean ages were ≥70 years. On average, subjects involved in pDDIs received ≥10 drugs. The odds of exposure were more frequently higher for age ≥65 years, males, and those taking a large number of drugs. A substantial number of clinically important pDDIs were observed, particularly among warfarin users. Awareness of the most prevalent pDDIs could help practitioners in preventing concomitant use

  19. Potential food-drug interactions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masuko, Kayo; Tohma, Shigeto; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2013-04-01

    Various medications are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Food-drug interactions may occur with concomitant ingestion of particular food. For example, methotrexate (MTX), the anchor drug in the therapeutic strategy against RA, is an antifolate agent. Excessive presence or absence of dietary folic acid may regulate MTX metabolism, possibly leading to unexpected adverse reactions. In this review, we focus on MTX, isoniazide and calcineurin inhibitors, and the implications of potential food-drug reactions in rheumatology, suggesting the important role of nutritional evaluations in RA patients.

  20. Drug interaction networks: an introduction to translational and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Azuaje, Francisco

    2013-03-15

    This article introduces fundamental concepts to guide the analysis and interpretation of drug-target interaction networks. An overview of the generation and integration of interaction networks is followed by key strategies for extracting biologically meaningful information. The article highlights how this information can enable novel translational and clinically motivated applications. Important advances for the discovery of new treatments and for the detection of adverse drug effects are discussed. Examples of applications and findings originating from cardiovascular research are presented. The review ends with a discussion of crucial challenges and opportunities.

  1. Evaluation of linear classifiers on articles containing pharmacokinetic evidence of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kolchinsky, A; Lourenço, A; Li, L; Rocha, L M

    2013-01-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. DDI research includes the study of different aspects of drug interactions, from in vitro pharmacology, which deals with drug interaction mechanisms, to pharmaco-epidemiology, which investigates the effects of DDI on drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. Biomedical literature mining can aid both kinds of approaches by extracting relevant DDI signals from either the published literature or large clinical databases. However, though drug interaction is an ideal area for translational research, the inclusion of literature mining methodologies in DDI workflows is still very preliminary. One area that can benefit from literature mining is the automatic identification of a large number of potential DDIs, whose pharmacological mechanisms and clinical significance can then be studied via in vitro pharmacology and in populo pharmaco-epidemiology. We implemented a set of classifiers for identifying published articles relevant to experimental pharmacokinetic DDI evidence. These documents are important for identifying causal mechanisms behind putative drug-drug interactions, an important step in the extraction of large numbers of potential DDIs. We evaluate performance of several linear classifiers on PubMed abstracts, under different feature transformation and dimensionality reduction methods. In addition, we investigate the performance benefits of including various publicly-available named entity recognition features, as well as a set of internally-developed pharmacokinetic dictionaries. We found that several classifiers performed well in distinguishing relevant and irrelevant abstracts. We found that the combination of unigram and bigram textual features gave better performance than unigram features alone, and also that normalization transforms that adjusted for feature frequency and document length improved classification. For some classifiers, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA), proper

  2. Acaricide, fungicide and drug interactions in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Reed M; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D; Ellis, Marion D

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an important role. Evidence of non-transivity, year-to-year variation

  3. Acaricide, Fungicide and Drug Interactions in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Reed M.; Dahlgren, Lizette; Siegfried, Blair D.; Ellis, Marion D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical analysis shows that honey bees (Apis mellifera) and hive products contain many pesticides derived from various sources. The most abundant pesticides are acaricides applied by beekeepers to control Varroa destructor. Beekeepers also apply antimicrobial drugs to control bacterial and microsporidial diseases. Fungicides may enter the hive when applied to nearby flowering crops. Acaricides, antimicrobial drugs and fungicides are not highly toxic to bees alone, but in combination there is potential for heightened toxicity due to interactive effects. Methodology/Principal Findings Laboratory bioassays based on mortality rates in adult worker bees demonstrated interactive effects among acaricides, as well as between acaricides and antimicrobial drugs and between acaricides and fungicides. Toxicity of the acaricide tau-fluvalinate increased in combination with other acaricides and most other compounds tested (15 of 17) while amitraz toxicity was mostly unchanged (1 of 15). The sterol biosynthesis inhibiting (SBI) fungicide prochloraz elevated the toxicity of the acaricides tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos and fenpyroximate, likely through inhibition of detoxicative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activity. Four other SBI fungicides increased the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate in a dose-dependent manner, although possible evidence of P450 induction was observed at the lowest fungicide doses. Non-transitive interactions between some acaricides were observed. Sublethal amitraz pre-treatment increased the toxicity of the three P450-detoxified acaricides, but amitraz toxicity was not changed by sublethal treatment with the same three acaricides. A two-fold change in the toxicity of tau-fluvalinate was observed between years, suggesting a possible change in the genetic composition of the bees tested. Conclusions/Significance Interactions with acaricides in honey bees are similar to drug interactions in other animals in that P450-mediated detoxication appears to play an

  4. Assessment of potential drug-drug interactions and its associated factors in the hospitalized cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Khan, Muhammad Yasir Ghani; Azhar, Saira; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Khan, Tahir M

    2016-03-01

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) may result in the alteration of therapeutic response. Sometimes they may increase the untoward effects of many drugs. Hospitalized cardiac patients need more attention regarding drug-drug interactions due to complexity of their disease and therapeutic regimen. This research was performed to find out types, prevalence and association between various predictors of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in the Department of Cardiology and to report common interactions. This study was performed in the hospitalized cardiac patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Patient charts of 2342 patients were assessed for pDDIs using Micromedex® Drug Information. Logistic regression was applied to find predictors of pDDIs. The main outcome measure in the study was the association of the potential drug-drug interactions with various factors such as age, gender, polypharmacy, and hospital stay of the patients. We identified 53 interacting-combinations that were present in total 5109 pDDIs with median number of 02 pDDIs per patient. Overall, 91.6% patients had at least one pDDI; 86.3% were having at least one major pDDI, and 84.5% patients had at least one moderate pDDI. Among 5109 identified pDDIs, most were of moderate (55%) or major severity (45%); established (24.2%), theoretical (18.8%) or probable (57%) type of scientific evidence. Top 10 common pDDIs included 3 major and 7 moderate interactions. Results obtained by multivariate logistic regression revealed a significant association of the occurrence of pDDIs in patient with age of 60 years or more (p < 0.001), hospital stay of 7 days or longer (p < 0.001) and taking 7 or more drugs (p < 0.001). We found a high prevalence for pDDIs in the Department of Cardiology, most of which were of moderate severity. Older patients, patients with longer hospital stay and with elevated number of prescribed drugs were at higher risk of pDDIs.

  5. Concomitant therapy in people with epilepsy: potential drug-drug interactions and patient awareness.

    PubMed

    Eyal, Sara; Rasaby, Sivan; Ekstein, Dana

    2014-02-01

    People with epilepsy (PWE) may use prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs for the treatment of concomitant diseases. Combinations of these drugs, as well as dietary supplements, with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may lead to reduced control of seizures and of coexisting medical conditions and increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The aims of this study were to obtain comprehensive lists of medications, dietary supplements, botanicals, and specific food components used by adult PWE and to evaluate the potential for interactions involving AEDs and patients' awareness of such potential interactions. We conducted a prospective, questionnaire-based study of PWE attending the Hadassah-Hebrew University Epilepsy Clinic over a period of 7months. The questionnaire interview included the listing of medications, medicinal herbs, dietary supplements, and specific food components consumed and the knowledge of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and it was conducted by a pharmacist. Drug-drug interactions were analyzed via the Micromedex online database. Out of 179 patients who attended the clinic over the study period, we interviewed 73 PWE, of which 71 were included in our final analysis. The mean number of AEDs consumed per subject was 1.7 (SD: 0.8, range: 1-4). Forty (56%) subjects were also treated with other prescription and/or OTC medications, and thirty-four (48%) took dietary supplements. Drug families most prone to DDIs involving AEDs included antipsychotic agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and statins. Two-thirds of study participants (67%) knew that DDIs may lead to ADRs, but only half (56%) were aware of the potential for reduced seizure control. Only 44% always reported treatment with AEDs to medical professionals. This study provides for the first time a comprehensive picture of prescription and OTC drugs and food supplements used by PWE. Despite a considerable potential for DDIs involving AEDs, patient awareness is limited

  6. Minimizing anticholinergic drug prescribing in older hospitalized patients: a full audit cycle

    PubMed Central

    Soiza, Roy L; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Anticholinergic drugs are associated with poor outcomes in older patients but no specific intervention strategies aimed at reducing anticholinergic drug exposure have been described. Objectives: To identify whether a consultant-led medication review targeting anticholinergics would reduce anticholinergic drug exposure [number of anticholinergic drugs and Anticholinergic Risk Scale (ARS) score]. Methods: The first phase of the audit included 70 consecutive admissions (mean age 84 years, 53 women). ARS score was calculated on admission and after initial consultant review. Re-audit was undertaken on another 70 consecutive admissions (mean age 83 years, 43 women) after introducing a system of informing the responsible consultant of the ARS score at their first review. Results: Drugs with anticholinergic effects (n = 53) were prescribed preadmission to 45/140 (32%) of patients. Consultant geriatrician review reduced ARS scores (p = 0.01), especially following the introduction of the information system (p = 0.002). In the first arm of the audit, 51 (73%) patients had ARS of 0 after a consultant’s review compared with 47 (67%) patients on admission, whilst 67 (96%) patients had ARS of 2 or less after a consultant’s review compared with 63 (90%) patients on admission. In the second arm of the audit, 59 (84%) patients had ARS of 0 after a consultant’s review compared with 48 (69%) patients on admission, whilst 70 (100%) patients had ARS of 2 or less after a consultant’s review compared with 69 (99%) patients on admission. Anticholinergic drugs were either stopped, or their dose reduced, in 35% of patients in the first arm of the audit and in 73% of patients in the re-audit (odds ratio 5.0, 95% confidence interval 1.4–17.8). Conclusion: Consultant-led medication review (standard practice) was effective at reducing anticholinergic drug exposure in the acute setting. A system of alerting clinicians to patients prescribed anticholinergic medications

  7. Pharmacogenetics of drug-drug interaction and drug-drug-gene interaction: a systematic review on CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Muh Akbar; Setiawan, Didik; Hak, Eelko; Wilffert, Bob

    2017-05-01

    Currently, most guidelines on drug-drug interaction (DDI) neither consider the potential effect of genetic polymorphism in the strength of the interaction nor do they account for the complex interaction caused by the combination of DDI and drug-gene interaction (DGI) where there are multiple biotransformation pathways, which is referred to as drug-drug-gene interaction (DDGI). In this systematic review, we report the impact of pharmacogenetics on DDI and DDGI in which three major drug-metabolizing enzymes - CYP2C9, CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 - are central. We observed that several DDI and DDGI are highly gene-dependent, leading to a different magnitude of interaction. Precision drug therapy should take pharmacogenetics into account when drug interactions in clinical practice are expected.

  8. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy).

  9. Validation of a transparent decision model to rate drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple databases provide ratings of drug-drug interactions. The ratings are often based on different criteria and lack background information on the decision making process. User acceptance of rating systems could be improved by providing a transparent decision path for each category. Methods We rated 200 randomly selected potential drug-drug interactions by a transparent decision model developed by our team. The cases were generated from ward round observations and physicians’ queries from an outpatient setting. We compared our ratings to those assigned by a senior clinical pharmacologist and by a standard interaction database, and thus validated the model. Results The decision model rated consistently with the standard database and the pharmacologist in 94 and 156 cases, respectively. In two cases the model decision required correction. Following removal of systematic model construction differences, the DM was fully consistent with other rating systems. Conclusion The decision model reproducibly rates interactions and elucidates systematic differences. We propose to supply validated decision paths alongside the interaction rating to improve comprehensibility and to enable physicians to interpret the ratings in a clinical context. PMID:22950884

  10. Pharmacokinetic Interactions between Drugs and Botanical Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Alyssa A; van Breemen, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The use of botanical dietary supplements has grown steadily over the last 20 years despite incomplete information regarding active constituents, mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety. An important but underinvestigated safety concern is the potential for popular botanical dietary supplements to interfere with the absorption, transport, and/or metabolism of pharmaceutical agents. Clinical trials of drug-botanical interactions are the gold standard and are usually carried out only when indicated by unexpected consumer side effects or, preferably, by predictive preclinical studies. For example, phase 1 clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies and clinical case reports that St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) induces CYP3A4/CYP3A5. However, clinical studies of most botanicals that were predicted to interact with drugs have shown no clinically significant effects. For example, clinical trials did not substantiate preclinical predictions that milk thistle (Silybum marianum) would inhibit CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and/or CYP3A4. Here, we highlight discrepancies between preclinical and clinical data concerning drug-botanical interactions and critically evaluate why some preclinical models perform better than others in predicting the potential for drug-botanical interactions. Gaps in knowledge are also highlighted for the potential of some popular botanical dietary supplements to interact with therapeutic agents with respect to absorption, transport, and metabolism.

  11. Drug release from hydroethanolic gels. Effect of drug's lipophilicity (logP), polymer-drug interactions and solvent lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Prashant D; Luu, Dewitt; Ye, Rose; Buchta, Richard

    2010-08-30

    We demonstrate drug release properties from hydroethanolic formulations as a function of the drug's lipophilicity (logP), solvent lipophilicity and drug-polymer interactions, for the first time. A hydrophilic polymer, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC), provides the non-Fickian slower release of the lipophilic drug, lidocaine (logP=2.6) and the burst (Fickian) release of hydrophilic drug, lidocaine hydrochloride (logPdrugs helps predict the drug release properties. Hydrophobic Eudragit polymers provided the burst release of lidocaine. However, the cationic hydrophobic polymer (Eudragit E100) retained more lidocaine (approximately 50%) topically than other hydrophobic polymers: Eudragit S100 (anionic) and Eudragit RLPO (cationic copolymer with quaternary ammonium group) ( approximately 25% lidocaine retention) which release lidocaine systematically. Thus, minute changes in functional groups of hydrophobic polymers help tune the lidocaine release topically or systemically. An interaction between HPC and lidocaine as determined by FTIR helps the non-Fickian slower lidocaine release from HPC formulations. However, no interactions between lidocaine and hydrophobic Eudragit polymers explain the Fickian burst release of lidocaine from their formulations. A lipophilic solvent, isostearyl alcohol which when replacing ethanol by 30%, slows the release rate and enhances the topical adsorption of lidocaine. Thus, solvent lipophilicity also modulates drug release properties.

  12. How the Probability and Potential Clinical Significance of Pharmacokinetically Mediated Drug-Drug Interactions Are Assessed in Drug Development: Desvenlafaxine as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Alice I.; Preskorn, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The avoidance of adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is a high priority in terms of both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the individual prescriber. With this perspective in mind, this article illustrates the process for assessing the risk of a drug (example here being desvenlafaxine) causing or being the victim of DDIs, in accordance with FDA guidance. Data Sources/Study Selection: DDI studies for the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine conducted by the sponsor and published since 2009 are used as examples of the systematic way that the FDA requires drug developers to assess whether their new drug is either capable of causing clinically meaningful DDIs or being the victim of such DDIs. In total, 8 open-label studies tested the effects of steady-state treatment with desvenlafaxine (50–400 mg/d) on the pharmacokinetics of cytochrome (CYP) 2D6 and/or CYP 3A4 substrate drugs, or the effect of CYP 3A4 inhibition on desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics. The potential for DDIs mediated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter was assessed in in vitro studies using Caco-2 monolayers. Data Extraction: Changes in area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC; CYP studies) and efflux (P-gp studies) were reviewed for potential DDIs in accordance with FDA criteria. Results: Desvenlafaxine coadministration had minimal effect on CYP 2D6 and/or 3A4 substrates per FDA criteria. Changes in AUC indicated either no interaction (90% confidence intervals for the ratio of AUC geometric least-squares means [GM] within 80%–125%) or weak inhibition (AUC GM ratio 125% to < 200%). Coadministration with ketoconazole resulted in a weak interaction with desvenlafaxine (AUC GM ratio of 143%). Desvenlafaxine was not a substrate (efflux ratio < 2) or inhibitor (50% inhibitory drug concentration values > 250 μM) of P-gp. Conclusions: A 2-step process based on FDA guidance can be used first to determine whether a pharmacokinetically mediated

  13. iNR-Drug: predicting the interaction of drugs with nuclear receptors in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue-Nong; Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-03-19

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are closely associated with various major diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, and osteoporosis. Therefore, NRs have become a frequent target for drug development. During the process of developing drugs against these diseases by targeting NRs, we are often facing a problem: Given a NR and chemical compound, can we identify whether they are really in interaction with each other in a cell? To address this problem, a predictor called "iNR-Drug" was developed. In the predictor, the drug compound concerned was formulated by a 256-D (dimensional) vector derived from its molecular fingerprint, and the NR by a 500-D vector formed by incorporating its sequential evolution information and physicochemical features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition, and the prediction engine was operated by the SVM (support vector machine) algorithm. Compared with the existing prediction methods in this area, iNR-Drug not only can yield a higher success rate, but is also featured by a user-friendly web-server established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-Drug/, which is particularly useful for most experimental scientists to obtain their desired data in a timely manner. It is anticipated that the iNR-Drug server may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the current approach may be easily extended to study the interactions of drug with other targets as well.

  14. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Background Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Objective Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Methods Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. Results One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). Conclusions The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive

  15. Busulfan and metronidazole: an often forgotten but significant drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Gulbis, Alison M; Culotta, Kirk S; Jones, Roy B; Andersson, Borje S

    2011-07-01

    To report the case of a clinically significant drug interaction between intravenous busulfan and oral metronidazole observed through busulfan therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). A 7-year-old boy with a history of myelodysplasia that progressed to acute myeloid leukemia received busulfan with therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), clofarabine, and thiotepa as a pretransplant conditioning regimen for a cord blood transplant. The patient received metronidazole the day after a busulfan test dose of 0.5 mg/kg was administered. On the day of the first busulfan therapeutic dose, TDM was performed and the clearance of busulfan was significantly decreased by 46%. After 2 doses of busulfan therapy, the course area under the curve was exceeded, requiring discontinuation of busulfan. Metronidazole is not known to affect glutathione or the glutathione S-transferase A1 (GSTA1) enzyme system or cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4. Busulfan is a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in pretransplant conditioning regimens in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies. Busulfan metabolism is best described by hepatic conjugation to glutathione by GSTA1, although some CYP-dependent pathways have been described. Currently there is 1 publication describing the drug interaction between oral busulfan and oral metronidazole, in which concomitant use of metronidazole resulted in higher busulfan trough concentrations and higher risk of veno-occlusive disease. Our case represents a possible drug interaction based on the Horn Drug Interaction Probability Scale. Though the mechanistic basis for this interaction is unknown, the risks and benefits of using metronidazole during and in close proximity to busulfan should be carefully considered and therapeutic alternatives to metronidazole should be used when appropriate.

  16. Deformable three-dimensional model architecture for interactive augmented reality in minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, Anant S; Wu, Jungle Chi-Hsiang; Liu, Kai-Che; Wu, Hurng-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    Surgical procedures have undergone considerable advancement during the last few decades. More recently, the availability of some imaging methods intraoperatively has added a new dimension to minimally invasive techniques. Augmented reality in surgery has been a topic of intense interest and research. Augmented reality involves usage of computer vision algorithms on video from endoscopic cameras or cameras mounted in the operating room to provide the surgeon additional information that he or she otherwise would have to recognize intuitively. One of the techniques combines a virtual preoperative model of the patient with the endoscope camera using natural or artificial landmarks to provide an augmented reality view in the operating room. The authors' approach is to provide this with the least number of changes to the operating room. Software architecture is presented to provide interactive adjustment in the registration of a three-dimensional (3D) model and endoscope video. Augmented reality including adrenalectomy, ureteropelvic junction obstruction, and retrocaval ureter and pancreas was used to perform 12 surgeries. The general feedback from the surgeons has been very positive not only in terms of deciding the positions for inserting points but also in knowing the least change in anatomy. The approach involves providing a deformable 3D model architecture and its application to the operating room. A 3D model with a deformable structure is needed to show the shape change of soft tissue during the surgery. The software architecture to provide interactive adjustment in registration of the 3D model and endoscope video with adjustability of every 3D model is presented.

  17. Roles of rifampicin in drug-drug interactions: underlying molecular mechanisms involving the nuclear pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Raymond, Kenneth

    2006-02-15

    Rifampicin, an important drug in the treatment of tuberculosis, is used extensively despite its broad effects on drug-drug interactions, creating serious problems. The clinical importance of such interactions includes autoinduction leading to suboptimal or failed treatment. The concomitantly administered effects of rifampicin on other drugs can result in their altered metabolism or transportation that are metabolised by cytochromes P450 or transported by p-glycoprotein in the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This review paper summarises recent findings with emphases on the molecular mechanisms used to explain these broad drug-drug interactions. In general, rifampicin can act on a pattern: rifampicin activates the nuclear pregnane X receptor that in turn affects cytochromes P450, glucuronosyltransferases and p-glycoprotein activities. This pattern of action may explain many of the rifampicin inducing drug-drug interactions. However, effects through other mechanisms have also been reported and these make any explanation of such drug-drug interactions more complex.

  18. Minimal Diversity of Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains, South Africa1

    PubMed Central

    Brust, James C.M.; Moodley, Prashini; Weissman, Darren; Heo, Moonseong; Ning, Yuming; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Sturm, A. Willem; Shah, N. Sarita

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug- (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) are commonly associated with Beijing strains. However, in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, which has among the highest incidence and mortality for MDR and XDR TB, data suggest that non-Beijing strains are driving the epidemic. We conducted a retrospective study to characterize the strain prevalence among drug-susceptible, MDR, and XDR TB cases and determine associations between strain type and survival. Among 297 isolates from 2005–2006, 49 spoligotype patterns were found. Predominant strains were Beijing (ST1) among drug-susceptible isolates (27%), S/Quebec (ST34) in MDR TB (34%) and LAM4/KZN (ST60) in XDR TB (89%). More than 90% of patients were HIV co-infected. MDR TB and XDR TB were independently associated with mortality, but TB strain type was not. We conclude that, although Beijing strain was common among drug-susceptible TB, other strains predominated among MDR TB and XDR TB cases. Drug-resistance was a stronger predictor of survival than strain type. PMID:24565645

  19. A high-performance approach to minimizing interactions between inbound and outbound signals in helmet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Ayhan, Bulent; Kwan, Chiman; Sands, O. S.

    2012-06-01

    NASA is developing a new generation of audio system for astronauts. The idea is to use directional speakers and microphone arrays. However, since the helmet environment is very reverberant, the inbound signals in the directional speaker may still enter the outbound path (microphone array), resulting in an annoying positive feedback loop. To improve the communication quality between astronauts, it is necessary to develop a digital filtering system to minimize the interactions between inbound and outbound signals. In this paper, we will present the following results. First, we set up experiments under three scenarios: office, bowl, and helmet. Experiments were then performed. Second, 3 adaptive filters known as normalized least mean square (NLMS), affine projection (AP), and recursive least square (RLS) were applied to the experimental data. We also developed a new frequency domain adaptive filter called FDAFSS (frequency domain adaptive filter (FDAF) with spectral subtraction (SS)), which is a combination of FDAF and SS. FDAFSS was compared with LMS, AP, RLS, FDAF, and SS filters and FDAFSS yielded better performance in terms of perceptual speech quality (PESQ). Moreover, FDAFSS is fast and can yield uniform convergence across different frequency bands.

  20. Deciphering interactions between the gut microbiota and the immune system via microbial cultivation and minimal microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Thomas; Gomes-Neto, João Carlos; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E

    2017-09-01

    The community of microorganisms in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, referred to as the gut microbiota, influences host physiology and immunity. The last decade of microbiome research has provided significant advancements for the field and highlighted the importance of gut microbes to states of both health and disease. Novel molecular techniques have unraveled the tremendous diversity of intestinal symbionts that potentially influence the host, many proof-of-concept studies have demonstrated causative roles of gut microbial communities in various pathologies, and microbiome-based approaches are beginning to be implemented in the clinic for diagnostic purposes or for personalized treatments. However, several challenges for the field remain: purely descriptive reports outnumbering mechanistic studies and slow translation of experimental results obtained in animal models into the clinics. Moreover, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding how gut microbes, including novel species that have yet to be identified, impact host immune responses. The sheer complexity of the gut microbial ecosystem makes it difficult, in part, to fully understand the microbiota-host networks that regulate immunity. In the present manuscript, we review key findings on the interactions between gut microbiota members and the immune system. Because culturing microbes allows performing functional studies, we have emphasized the impact of specific taxa or communities thereof. We also highlight underlying molecular mechanisms and discuss opportunities to implement minimal microbiome-based strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Assessing the Potential for Drug-Nanoparticle Surface Interactions To Improve Drug Penetration into the Skin.

    PubMed

    Cai, X J; Woods, A; Mesquida, P; Jones, S A

    2016-04-04

    There is continued debate as to how nanomaterials enhance the passive diffusion of drugs through the skin. This study examined if drug-nanoparticle surface interactions, which occurred during topical application, had the capability to enhance percutaneous penetration. Atomic force microscopy force adhesion measurements were used to demonstrate that a model drug, tetracaine, strongly adsorbed to the surface of a negatively charged carboxyl-modified polystyrene nanoparticle (NanoPSCOOH) through both its methyl and amine functionalities (up to a 6- and 16-fold greater adhesion force respectively compared with the CH3-CH3 control). These drug-particle adhesion forces were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) to values that were lower than the CH3-CH3 control measurements when tetracaine interacted with a silica nanoparticle (NanoSiO2). This reduction in adhesion was attributed to the lower surface charge of the NanoSiO2 (ca. -23 mV) compared to the NanoPSCOOH (ca. -40 mV), which diminished the electrostatic interactions between positive amine of tetracaine and the negative particle. Mixing NanoPSCOOH with tetracaine on the skin retarded percutaneous drug penetration compared to the control (tetracaine saturated solution without nanoparticles), but the NanoSiO2, which still adsorbed the tetracaine, produced a 3.6-fold enhancement in percutaneous penetration compared to the same control. These data demonstrated the capability of moderate nanoparticle surface interactions that occurred within the application vehicle to promote drug percutaneous penetration.

  2. Drug-drug Interaction Discovery Using Abstraction Networks for “National Drug File – Reference Terminology” Chemical Ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Christopher; Zheng, Ling; Gu, Huanying; Perl, Yehoshua; Geller, James; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Zakharchenko, Aleksandr

    2015-01-01

    The National Drug File – Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is a large and complex drug terminology. NDF-RT provides important information about clinical drugs, e.g., their chemical ingredients, mechanisms of action, dosage form and physiological effects. Within NDF-RT such information is represented using tens of thousands of roles. It is difficult to comprehend large, complex terminologies like NDF-RT. In previous studies, we introduced abstraction networks to summarize the content and structure of terminologies. In this paper, we introduce the Ingredient Abstraction Network to summarize NDF-RT’s Chemical Ingredients and their associated drugs. Additionally, we introduce the Aggregate Ingredient Abstraction Network, for controlling the granularity of summarization provided by the Ingredient Abstraction Network. The Ingredient Abstraction Network is used to support the discovery of new candidate drug-drug interactions (DDIs) not appearing in First Databank, Inc.’s DDI knowledgebase. PMID:26958234

  3. [Identifying potential drug interactions in chronic kidney disease patients].

    PubMed

    Marquito, Alessandra Batista; Fernandes, Natália Maria da Silva; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; de Paula, Rogério Baumgratz

    2014-01-01

    Drug interactions (DIs) are common in clinical practice and are directly related to factors such as polypharmacy, aging, hepatic metabolism and decreased renal function. Individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often require multiple classes of drugs being at important risk for the development of DIs. Identify potential interactions among drugs prescribed to patients with CKD on conservative treatment, and factors associated with their occurrence. Observational cross-sectional study, with analysis of 558 prescriptions. Potential DIs were identified by the database MICROMEDEX®, software that provides an internationally known pharmacopoeia. There was a predominance of males (54.7%), seniors (69.4%), stage 3 CKD (47.5%), overweight and obese patients (66.7%). The most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (68.5%) and diabetes mellitus (31.9%). Potential DIs were detected in 74.9% of prescriptions. Among the 1364 DIs diagnosed, 5 (0.4%) were contraindicated and 229 (16.8%) of greater severity, which need immediate intervention. Interactions of moderate and low severity were identified in 1049 (76.9%) and 81 (5.9%) prescriptions, respectively. The probability of one DI increased by 2.5 times for each additional drug (CI = 2.18 to 3.03). Obesity, hypertension, diabetes as well as advanced stage of CKD were risk factors strongly associated with DI occurrence. Drug associations in individuals with CKD were related to high prevalence of serious DIs, especially in the later stages of the disease.

  4. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-02-21

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies.

  5. Human enterovirus 71 protein interaction network prompts antiviral drug repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lu; Li, Kang; Jin, Chaozhi; Wang, Jian; Li, Qingjun; Zhang, Qiling; Cheng, Qiyue; Yang, Jing; Bo, Xiaochen; Wang, Shengqi

    2017-01-01

    As a predominant cause of human hand, foot, and mouth disease, enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection may lead to serious diseases and result in severe consequences that threaten public health and cause widespread panic. Although the systematic identification of physical interactions between viral proteins and host proteins provides initial information for the recognition of the cellular mechanism involved in viral infection and the development of new therapies, EV71-host protein interactions have not been explored. Here, we identified interactions between EV71 proteins and host cellular proteins and confirmed the functional relationships of EV71-interacting proteins (EIPs) with virus proliferation and infection by integrating a human protein interaction network and by functional annotation. We found that most EIPs had known interactions with other viruses. We also predicted ATP6V0C as a broad-spectrum essential host factor and validated its essentiality for EV71 infection in vitro. EIPs and their interacting proteins were more likely to be targets of anti-inflammatory and neurological drugs, indicating their potential to serve as host-oriented antiviral targets. Thus, we used a connectivity map to find drugs that inhibited EIP expression. We predicted tanespimycin as a candidate and demonstrated its antiviral efficiency in vitro. These findings provide the first systematic identification of EV71-host protein interactions, an analysis of EIP protein characteristics and a demonstration of their value in developing host-oriented antiviral therapies. PMID:28220872

  6. Role of biotransformation studies in minimizing metabolism-related liabilities in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yue-Zhong; Johnson, Benjamin M; Yang, Tian J

    2008-01-01

    Metabolism-related liabilities continue to be a major cause of attrition for drug candidates in clinical development. Such problems may arise from the bioactivation of the parent compound to a reactive metabolite capable of modifying biological materials covalently or engaging in redox-cycling reactions leading to the formation of other toxicants. Alternatively, they may result from the formation of a major metabolite with systemic exposure and adverse pharmacological activity. To avert such problems, biotransformation studies are becoming increasingly important in guiding the refinement of a lead series during drug discovery and in characterizing lead candidates prior to clinical evaluation. This article provides an overview of the methods that are used to uncover metabolism-related liabilities in a pre-clinical setting and offers suggestions for reducing such liabilities via the modification of structural features that are used commonly in drug-like molecules.

  7. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 1: drugs interacting with receptors.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 18 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease-modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs, whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. The review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  8. Cognitive enhancers (nootropics). Part 2: drugs interacting with enzymes.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Muhs, Andreas; Pfeifer, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive enhancers (nootropics) are drugs to treat cognition deficits in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, stroke, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or aging. Cognition refers to a capacity for information processing, applying knowledge, and changing preferences. It involves memory, attention, executive functions, perception, language, and psychomotor functions. The term nootropics was coined in 1972 when memory enhancing properties of piracetam were observed in clinical trials. In the meantime, hundreds of drugs have been evaluated in clinical trials or in preclinical experiments. To classify the compounds, a concept is proposed assigning drugs to 19 categories according to their mechanism(s) of action, in particular drugs interacting with receptors, enzymes, ion channels, nerve growth factors, re-uptake transporters, antioxidants, metal chelators, and disease modifying drugs meaning small molecules, vaccines, and monoclonal antibodies interacting with amyloid-β and tau. For drugs whose mechanism of action is not known, they are either classified according to structure, e.g., peptides, or their origin, e.g., natural products. This review covers the evolution of research in this field over the last 25 years.

  9. Venetoclax (ABT-199) Might Act as a Perpetrator in Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Johanna; Gajek, Thomas; Köhler, Bruno Christian; Haefeli, Walter Emil

    2016-02-24

    Venetoclax (ABT-199) represents a specific B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) inhibitor that is currently under development for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. So far, there is no published information on its interaction potential with important drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, or its efficacy in multidrug resistant (MDR) cells. We therefore scrutinized its drug-drug interaction potential in vitro. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) was quantified by commercial kits. Inhibition of drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs)) was evaluated by the use of fluorescent probe substrates. Induction of drug transporters and drug metabolizing enzymes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The efficacy of venetoclax in MDR cells lines was evaluated with proliferation assays. Venetoclax moderately inhibited P-gp, BCRP, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19, whereas CYP2B6 activity was increased. Venetoclax induced the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, UGT1A3, and UGT1A9. In contrast, expression of ABCB1 was suppressed, which might revert tumor resistance towards antineoplastic P-gp substrates. P-gp over-expression led to reduced antiproliferative effects of venetoclax. Effective concentrations for inhibition and induction lay in the range of maximum plasma concentrations of venetoclax, indicating that it might act as a perpetrator drug in pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions.

  10. Studies on pharmacokinetic drug interaction potential of vinpocetine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Vinpocetine, a semi-synthetic derivative of vincamine, is a popular dietary supplement used for the treatment of several central nervous system related disorders. Despite its wide use, no pharmacokinetic drug interaction studies are reported in literature. Due to increasing use of dietar...

  11. Drug interactions with vortioxetine, a new multimodal antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Spina, Edoardo; Santoro, Vincenza

    2015-01-01

    This article summarized the available knowledge on clinically relevant drug interactions of vortioxetine, a new antidepressant with a “multimodal” serotonergic mechanism of action, recently approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder. Although information is still limited and mainly based on studies performed in healthy volunteers, vortioxetine appears to have a favorable drug interaction profile. Concerning the potential for pharmacokinetic drug interactions, vortioxetine has little to no effect on various cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms and therefore is not expected to markedly affect plasma concentrations of other medications metabolized by these enzymes. This is a major advantage when compared to other antidepressants which are known to inhibit the activity of one or more CYP isoforms. On the other hand, dosage adjustments may be required when vortioxetine is coadministered with strong CYP2D6 inhibitors or broad-spectrum CYP inducers. Vortioxetine carries a relatively low risk for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, at least as compared to first-generation antidepressants. Like other antidepressants enhancing serotonergic activity, vortioxetine is associated with a potential risk of serotonin syndrome when used in combination with other serotonergic agents. Based on all available clinical data, vortioxetine has no increased risk of serotonin syndrome when used without other serotoninergic agents and at therapeutic doses.

  12. iNR-Drug: Predicting the Interaction of Drugs with Nuclear Receptors in Cellular Networking

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue-Nong; Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are closely associated with various major diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory disease, and osteoporosis. Therefore, NRs have become a frequent target for drug development. During the process of developing drugs against these diseases by targeting NRs, we are often facing a problem: Given a NR and chemical compound, can we identify whether they are really in interaction with each other in a cell? To address this problem, a predictor called “iNR-Drug” was developed. In the predictor, the drug compound concerned was formulated by a 256-D (dimensional) vector derived from its molecular fingerprint, and the NR by a 500-D vector formed by incorporating its sequential evolution information and physicochemical features into the general form of pseudo amino acid composition, and the prediction engine was operated by the SVM (support vector machine) algorithm. Compared with the existing prediction methods in this area, iNR-Drug not only can yield a higher success rate, but is also featured by a user-friendly web-server established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iNR-Drug/, which is particularly useful for most experimental scientists to obtain their desired data in a timely manner. It is anticipated that the iNR-Drug server may become a useful high throughput tool for both basic research and drug development, and that the current approach may be easily extended to study the interactions of drug with other targets as well. PMID:24651462

  13. Cassia auriculata: Aspects of Safety Pharmacology and Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Amrutesh S.; Halade, Ganesh; Kumar, Sandeep; Mogre, Ranjan; Apte, Kishori; Vaidya, Ashok D. B.; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    Safety pharmacology studies help in identifying preclinical adverse drug reactions. We carried out routine safety pharmacology with focus on cardiovascular variables and pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction studies on rats fed with standardized traditional hydro-alcoholic extract and technology-based supercritical extract of Cassia auriculata for 12 weeks. Our studies indicate that both these extracts are pharmacologically safe and did not show any significant adverse reactions at the tested doses. The traditional hydro-alcoholic extract did not show any significant effect on pharmacokinetics; however, the technology-based supercritical extract caused a significant reduction in absorption of metformin. Our results indicate the need to include pharmacokinetic herb-drug interaction studies as evidence for safety especially for technology-based extracts. PMID:21785642

  14. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions in liver disease: An update

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Pietro; De Martin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition and induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes are the most frequent and dangerous drug-drug interactions. They are an important cause of serious adverse events that have often resulted in early termination of drug development or withdrawal of drugs from the market. Management of such interactions by dose adjustment in clinical practice is extremely difficult because of the wide interindividual variability in their magnitude. This review examines the genetic, physiological, and environmental factors responsible for this variability, focusing on an important but so far neglected cause of variability, liver functional status. Clinical studies have shown that liver disease causes a reduction in the magnitude of interactions due to enzyme inhibition, which is proportional to the degree of liver function impairment. The effect of liver dysfunction varies quantitatively according to the nature, reversible or irreversible, of the inhibitory interaction. The magnitude of reversible inhibition is more drastically reduced and virtually vanishes in patients with advanced hepatocellular insufficiency. Two mechanisms, in order of importance, are responsible for this reduction: decreased hepatic uptake of the inhibitory drug and reduced enzyme expression. The extent of irreversible inhibitory interactions is only partially reduced, as it is only influenced by the decreased expression of the inhibited enzyme. Thus, for appropriate clinical management of inhibitory drug interactions, both the liver functional status and the mechanism of inhibition must be taken into consideration. Although the inducibility of drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver disease has long been studied, very conflicting results have been obtained, mainly because of methodological differences. Taken together, the results of early animal and human studies indicated that enzyme induction is substantially preserved in compensated liver cirrhosis, whereas no definitive conclusion as to whether it is

  15. Tricyclic antidepressant pharmacology and therapeutic drug interactions updated

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, P K

    2007-01-01

    New data on the pharmacology of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), their affinities for human cloned CNS receptors and their cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition profiles, allow improved deductions concerning their effects and interactions and indicate which of the TCAs are the most useful. The relative toxicity of TCAs continues to be more precisely defined, as do TCA interactions with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). TCA interactions with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) have been, historically, an uncertain and difficult question, but are now well understood, although this is not reflected in the literature. The data indicate that nortriptyline and desipramine have the most pharmacologically desirable characteristics as noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), and as drugs with few interactions that are also safe when coadministered with either MAOIs or SSRIs. Clomipramine is the only available antidepressant drug that has good evidence of clinically relevant serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (SNRI). These data assist drug selection for monotherapy and combination therapy and predict reliably how and why pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions occur. In comparison, two newer drugs proposed to have SNRI properties, duloxetine and venlafaxine, may have insufficient NRI potency to be effective SNRIs. Combinations such as sertraline and nortriptyline may therefore offer advantages over drugs like venlafaxine that have fixed ratios of SRI/NRI effects that are not ideal. However, no TCA/SSRI combination is sufficiently safe to be universally applicable without expert knowledge. Standard texts (e.g. the British National Formulary) and treatment guidelines would benefit by taking account of these new data and understandings. PMID:17471183

  16. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S.; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  17. Drug interactions evaluation: an integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Reynolds, Kellie S; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2010-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a "Drug Development and Drug Interactions" website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  18. Competitive and Synergistic Interactions between Polymer Micelles, Drugs, and Cyclodextrins: The Importance of Drug Solubilization Locus.

    PubMed

    Valero, Margarita; Castiglione, Franca; Mele, Andrea; da Silva, Marcelo A; Grillo, Isabelle; González-Gaitano, Gustavo; Dreiss, Cécile A

    2016-12-13

    Polymeric micelles, in particular PEO-PPO-based Pluronic, have emerged as promising drug carriers, while cyclodextrins (CD), cyclic oligosaccharides with an apolar cavity, have long been used for their capacity to form inclusion complexes with drugs. Dimethylated β-cyclodextrin (DIMEB) has the capacity to fully breakup F127 Pluronic micelles, while this effect is substantially hindered if drugs are loaded within the micellar aggregates. Four drugs were studied at physiological temperature: lidocaine (LD), pentobarbital sodium salt (PB), sodium naproxen (NP), and sodium salicylate (SAL); higher temperatures shift the equilibrium toward higher drug partitioning and lower drug/CD binding compared to 25 °C ( Valero, M.; Dreiss, C. A. Growth, Shrinking, and Breaking of Pluronic Micelles in the Presence of Drugs and/or β-Cyclodextrin, a Study by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering and Fluorescence Spectroscopy . Langmuir 2010 , 26 , 10561 - 10571 ). The impact of drugs on micellar structure was characterized by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), while their solubilization locus was revealed by 2D NOESY NMR. UV and fluorescence spectroscopy, Dynamic and Static Light Scattering were employed to measure a range of micellar properties and drug:CD interactions: binding constant, drug partitioning within the micelles, critical micellar concentration of the loaded micelles, aggregation number (Nagg). Critically, time-resolved SANS (TR-SANS) reveal that micellar breakup in the presence of drugs is substantially slower (100s of seconds) than for the free micelles (<100 ms) ( Valero, M.; Grillo, I.; Dreiss, C. A. Rupture of Pluronic Micelles by Di-Methylated β-Cyclodextrin Is Not Due to Polypseudorotaxane Formation . J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 1273 - 1281 ). These results combined together give new insights into the mechanisms of protection of the drugs against CD-induced micellar breakup. The outcomes are practical guidelines to improve the design of drug delivery systems

  19. Predict drug-protein interaction in cellular networking.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Min, Jian-Liang; Wang, Pu; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Involved with many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative, inflammatory and respiratory disorders, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are the most frequent targets for drug development: over 50% of all prescription drugs currently on the market are actually acting by targeting GPCRs directly or indirectly. Found in every living thing and nearly all cells, ion channels play crucial roles for many vital functions in life, such as heartbeat, sensory transduction, and central nervous system response. Their dysfunction may have significant impact to human health, and hence ion channels are deemed as "the next GPCRs". To develop GPCR-targeting or ion-channel-targeting drugs, the first important step is to identify the interactions between potential drug compounds with the two kinds of protein receptors in the cellular networking. In this minireview, we are to introduce two predictors. One is called iGPCR-Drug accessible at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iGPCR-Drug/; the other called iCDI-PseFpt at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iCDI-PseFpt. The former is for identifying the interactions of drug compounds with GPCRs; while the latter for that with ion channels. In both predictors, the drug compound was formulated by the two-dimensional molecular fingerprint, and the protein receptor by the pseudo amino acid composition generated with the grey model theory, while the operation engine was the fuzzy K-nearest neighbor algorithm. For the convenience of most experimental pharmaceutical and medical scientists, a step-bystep guide is provided on how to use each of the two web-servers to get the desired results without the need to follow the complicated mathematics involved originally for their establishment.

  20. Possible Drug-Herb Interaction between Herbal Supplement Containing Horsetail ( Equisetum arvense) and Antiretroviral Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Ezequiel; Morganti, Laura; Rodriguez, Claudia

    The use of alternative medicines, including herbs, is common among HIV-positive patients, even in those on antiretroviral treatment. Equisetum arvense, known as "horsetail," is mainly used for its diuretic properties. There are limited data about the pharmacological properties of this compound and the potential drug-herb interactions. The authors report 2 cases in which a possible drug-herb interaction may have led to virological breakthrough in patients who were maintained on the same regimen for many years, including lamivudine (3TC)/zidovudine (ZDV)/efavirenz (EFV) and emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir (TDF)/EFV, respectively. Therefore, a drug-herb interaction may be expected when these agents are taken concurrently. Until additional data are available, the authors advise clinicians to avoid this combination when possible.

  1. Interaction networks: from protein functions to drug discovery. A review.

    PubMed

    Chautard, E; Thierry-Mieg, N; Ricard-Blum, S

    2009-06-01

    Most genes, proteins and other components carry out their functions within a complex network of interactions and a single molecule can affect a wide range of other cell components. A global, integrative, approach has been developed for several years, including protein-protein interaction networks (interactomes). In this review, we describe the high-throughput methods used to identify new interactions and to build large interaction datasets. The minimum information required for reporting a molecular interaction experiment (MIMIx) has been defined as a standard for storing data in publicly available interaction databases. Several examples of interaction networks from molecular machines (proteasome) or organelles (phagosome, mitochondrion) to whole organisms (viruses, bacteria, yeast, fly, and worm) are given and attempts to cover the entire human interaction network are discussed. The methods used to perform the topological analysis of interaction networks and to extract biological information from them are presented. These investigations have provided clues on protein functions, signalling and metabolic pathways, and physiological processes, unraveled the molecular basis of some diseases (cancer, infectious diseases), and will be very useful to identify new therapeutic targets and for drug discovery. A major challenge is now to integrate data from different sources (interactome, transcriptome, phenome, localization) to switch from static to dynamic interaction networks. The merging of a viral interactome and the human interactome has been used to simulate viral infection, paving the way for future studies aiming at providing molecular basis of human diseases.

  2. Dolutegravir plasma concentrations according to companion antiretroviral drug: unwanted drug interaction or desirable boosting effect?

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Dario; Minisci, Davide; Cozzi, Valeria; Riva, Agostino; Meraviglia, Paola; Clementi, Emilio; Galli, Massimo; Gervasoni, Cristina

    2016-12-23

    Studies in healthy volunteers have shown that the recently approved HIV integrase inhibitor dolutegravir has limited drug-to-drug interaction profile. Here we carried out a pharmacokinetic survey in HIV-infected patients given dolutegravir as part of their antiretroviral therapy. Dolutegravir plasma trough concentrations were measured in 78 HIV-infected patients given the drug in combination with a protease inhibitor, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or abacavir/lamivudine. Drug concentrations were assessed by high performance liquid chromatography method with UV-detection. All patients were given dolutegravir at 50 mg once daily, with median trough drug concentrations of 1,096 (664-2,356) ng/ml (interindividual coefficient of variation: 85.3%). Patients given dolutegravir with atazanavir had significantly higher drug concentrations compared with those given darunavir, rilpivirine or abacavir/lamivudine (2,399 [1,929-4,070] versus 738 [552-1,048], 603 [432-1,373] or 1,045 [856-1,115] ng/ml; P<0.001 for all comparisons). By multivariate analyses, only companion antiretroviral drug resulted in significant association with dolutegravir plasma trough concentrations (P=0.012). Atazanavir coadministration significantly inhibited dolutegravir metabolism, ultimately resulting in a two- to fourfold increase in drug disposition compared with other antiretroviral drugs. This boosting effect of atazanavir could be used to optimize dolutegravir dosing in particular clinical settings.

  3. Usability of mobile technology to screen for drug-drug interactions in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Lalitha; Diamantidis, Clarissa J; Prakash, Divya; Zuckerman, Marni; Weir, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for adverse safety events related to reduced renal function and polypharmacy. Health information technology tools have a precautionary role in improving safety in patients with kidney transplants who are at risk of drug-drug interactions. Usability testing of a drug-drug interaction inquiry system on a convenience sample of kidney transplant patients and their family members was conducted between January and April 2013 by a single interviewer. Each participant was provided with 35 tasks to complete on a cell phone with a manual keypad. The tasks were classified according to how it was completed: easily completed, noncritical error, or critical error (where a participant was unable to complete the given task without intervention by the interviewer). The final task was timed using a stop watch. Out of a total of 16 volunteers, 15 completed the testing. The median time to complete the final task was 4 min (range: 2-9). In a cumulative total of 525 tasks, 33 critical errors were noted. Twelve participants had one or more critical errors. The most frequent critical errors were related to typing and spelling mistakes. Twelve out 15 participants were able to complete the final task without any critical errors. Understanding transplant patients' preference in technology use and adapting applications to a variety of technological portals will ensure the most effective use of targeted interventions in patient safety, particularly when applied to preventing drug-drug interactions. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q.; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  5. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Andes, David; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  6. Electrostimulated Release of Neutral Drugs from Polythiophene Nanoparticles: Smart Regulation of Drug-Polymer Interactions.

    PubMed

    Puiggalí-Jou, Anna; Micheletti, Paolo; Estrany, Francesc; Del Valle, Luis J; Alemán, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanoparticles are loaded with curcumin and piperine by in situ emulsion polymerization using dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid both as a stabilizer and a doping agent. The loaded drugs affect the morphology, size, and colloidal stability of the nanoparticles. Furthermore, kinetics studies of nonstimulated drug release have evidenced that polymer···drug interactions are stronger for curcumin than for piperine. This observation suggests that drug delivery systems based on combination of the former drug with PEDOT are much appropriated to show an externally tailored release profile. This is demonstrated by comparing the release profiles obtained in presence and absence of electrical stimulus. Results indicate that controlled and time-programmed release of curcumin is achieved in a physiological medium by applying a negative voltage of -1.25 V to loaded PEDOT nanoparticles. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Resolving anaphoras for the extraction of drug-drug interactions in pharmacological documents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-drug interactions are frequently reported in the increasing amount of biomedical literature. Information Extraction (IE) techniques have been devised as a useful instrument to manage this knowledge. Nevertheless, IE at the sentence level has a limited effect because of the frequent references to previous entities in the discourse, a phenomenon known as 'anaphora'. DrugNerAR, a drug anaphora resolution system is presented to address the problem of co-referring expressions in pharmacological literature. This development is part of a larger and innovative study about automatic drug-drug interaction extraction. Methods The system uses a set of linguistic rules drawn by Centering Theory over the analysis provided by a biomedical syntactic parser. Semantic information provided by the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) is also integrated in order to improve the recognition and the resolution of nominal drug anaphors. Besides, a corpus has been developed in order to analyze the phenomena and evaluate the current approach. Each possible case of anaphoric expression was looked into to determine the most effective way of resolution. Results An F-score of 0.76 in anaphora resolution was achieved, outperforming significantly the baseline by almost 73%. This ad-hoc reference line was developed to check the results as there is no previous work on anaphora resolution in pharmalogical documents. The obtained results resemble those found in related-semantic domains. Conclusions The present approach shows very promising results in the challenge of accounting for anaphoric expressions in pharmacological texts. DrugNerAr obtains similar results to other approaches dealing with anaphora resolution in the biomedical domain, but, unlike these approaches, it focuses on documents reflecting drug interactions. The Centering Theory has proved being effective at the selection of antecedents in anaphora resolution. A key component in the success of this framework is the

  8. The Effect of CYP2D6 Drug-Drug Interactions on Hydrocodone Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Andrew A.; Heard, Kennon J.; Campbell, Jenny; Hamamura, D.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The hepatic cytochrome 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a saturable enzyme responsible for metabolism of approximately 25% of known pharmaceuticals. CYP interactions can alter the efficacy of prescribed medications. Hydrocodone is largely dependent on CYP2D6 metabolism for analgesia, ondansetron is inactivated by CYP2D6, and oxycodone analgesia is largely independent of CYP2D6. The objective was to determine if CYP2D6 medication co-ingestion decreases the effectiveness of hydrocodone. Methods This was a prospective observational study conducted in an academic U.S. emergency department (ED). Subjects were included if they had self-reported pain or nausea; and were excluded if they were unable to speak English, were less than 18 years of age, had liver or renal failure, or carried diagnoses of chronic pain or cyclic vomiting. Detailed drug ingestion histories for the preceding 48 hours prior to the ED visit were obtained. The patient's pain and nausea were quantified using a 100-millimeter visual analogue scale (VAS) at baseline prior to drug administration and following doses of hydrocodone, oxycodone, or ondansetron. We used a mixed model with random subject effect to determine the interaction between CYP2D6 drug ingestion and study drug effectiveness. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated to compare clinically significant VAS changes between CYP2D6 users and non-users. Results Two hundred fifty (49.8%) of the 502 subjects enrolled had taken at least one CYP2D6 substrate, inhibitor, or inducing pharmaceutical, supplement, or illicit drug in the 48 hours prior to ED presentation. CYP2D6-drug users were one third as likely to respond to hydrocodone (OR 0.33, 95% CI = 0.1 to 0.8), and more than three times as likely as non-users to respond to ondansetron (OR 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3 to 9.1). There was no significant difference in oxycodone effectiveness between CYP2D6 users and non-users (OR 0.53, 95% CI = 0.3 to 1.1). Conclusions CYP2D6 drug-drug interactions appear to change

  9. Label Propagation Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions Based on Clinical Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2015-07-21

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) is an important topic for public health, and thus attracts attention from both academia and industry. Here we hypothesize that clinical side effects (SEs) provide a human phenotypic profile and can be translated into the development of computational models for predicting adverse DDIs. We propose an integrative label propagation framework to predict DDIs by integrating SEs extracted from package inserts of prescription drugs, SEs extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, and chemical structures from PubChem. Experimental results based on hold-out validation demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. In addition, the new algorithm also ranked drug information sources based on their contributions to the prediction, thus not only confirming that SEs are important features for DDI prediction but also paving the way for building more reliable DDI prediction models by prioritizing multiple data sources. By applying the proposed algorithm to 1,626 small-molecule drugs which have one or more SE profiles, we obtained 145,068 predicted DDIs. The predicted DDIs will help clinicians to avoid hazardous drug interactions in their prescriptions and will aid pharmaceutical companies to design large-scale clinical trial by assessing potentially hazardous drug combinations. All data sets and predicted DDIs are available at http://astro.temple.edu/~tua87106/ddi.html.

  10. The interaction of encapsulated pharmaceutical drugs with a silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Morais, Everton C; Correa, Gabriel G; Brambilla, Rodrigo; Radtke, Claudio; Baibich, Ione Maluf; dos Santos, João Henrique Z

    2013-03-01

    A series of seven drugs, namely, fluoxetine, gentamicin, lidocaine, morphine, nifedipine, paracetamol and tetracycline, were encapsulated. The encapsulated systems were characterized using a series of complementary techniques: Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffusive reflectance spectroscopy in the UV-vis region (DRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). According to the DRS spectra, most of the encapsulated systems showed a band shift of the maximum absorption when compared with the corresponding bare pharmaceutical. Additionally, after encapsulation, the drugs exhibited infrared band shifts toward higher wavenumbers, which in turn provided insight into potential sites for interaction with the silica framework. The amine group showed a band shift in the spectra of almost all the drugs (except nifedipine and tetracycline). This finding indicates the possibility of a hydrogen bonding interaction between the drug and the silica via electron donation from the amine group to the silica framework. XPS confirmed this interaction between the pharmaceuticals and the silica through the amine group. A correlation was observed between the textural characteristics of the solids and the spectroscopic data, suggesting that the amine groups from the pharmaceuticals were more perturbed upon encapsulation.

  11. Prediction of Cancer Drugs by Chemical-Chemical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Peng; Feng, Kai-Yan; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Cancer, which is a leading cause of death worldwide, places a big burden on health-care system. In this study, an order-prediction model was built to predict a series of cancer drug indications based on chemical-chemical interactions. According to the confidence scores of their interactions, the order from the most likely cancer to the least one was obtained for each query drug. The 1st order prediction accuracy of the training dataset was 55.93%, evaluated by Jackknife test, while it was 55.56% and 59.09% on a validation test dataset and an independent test dataset, respectively. The proposed method outperformed a popular method based on molecular descriptors. Moreover, it was verified that some drugs were effective to the ‘wrong’ predicted indications, indicating that some ‘wrong’ drug indications were actually correct indications. Encouraged by the promising results, the method may become a useful tool to the prediction of drugs indications. PMID:24498372

  12. Interaction of Approved Drugs with Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2A.

    PubMed

    Danish, Azeem; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E

    2017-04-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) and its recently approved derivative brivaracetam are anti-epileptic drugs with a unique mechanism of action. The synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) was previously identified as their main target. In the current study, we tested a collection of 500 approved drugs for interaction with the human SV2A protein expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Competition binding studies were performed using cell lysates with high SV2A expression and [(3) H]brivaracetam as a radioligand. A hit rate of 3% was obtained, defined as compounds that inhibited radioligand binding by more than 90% at a screening concentration of 20 μM. Subsequent concentration-inhibition curves revealed the antihistaminic prodrug loratadine (Ki  = 1.16 μM) and the antimalarial drug quinine (Ki  = 2.03 μM) to be the most potent SV2A protein ligands of the investigated drug library. Both compounds were similarly potent as LEV (Ki  = 1.74 μM), providing structurally novel scaffolds for SV2A ligands. A pharmacophore model was established, which indicated steric and electronic conformities of brivaracetam with the new SV2A ligands, and preliminary structure-activity relationships were determined. The anti-convulsive effects of the natural product quinine may - at least in part - be explained by interaction with SV2A. Loratadine and quinine represent new lead structures for anti-epileptic drug development.

  13. Drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions in polypharmacy among older adults: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria Cristina Soares; Oliveira, Cesar de

    2016-09-01

    to identify and summarize studies examining both drug-drug interactions (DDI) and adverse drug reactions (ADR) in older adults polymedicated. an integrative review of studies published from January 2008 to December 2013, according to inclusion and exclusion criteria, in MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were performed. forty-seven full-text studies including 14,624,492 older adults (≥ 60 years) were analyzed: 24 (51.1%) concerning ADR, 14 (29.8%) DDI, and 9 studies (19.1%) investigating both DDI and ADR. We found a variety of methodological designs. The reviewed studies reinforced that polypharmacy is a multifactorial process, and predictors and inappropriate prescribing are associated with negative health outcomes, as increasing the frequency and types of ADRs and DDIs involving different drug classes, moreover, some studies show the most successful interventions to optimize prescribing. DDI and ADR among older adults continue to be a significant issue in the worldwide. The findings from the studies included in this integrative review, added to the previous reviews, can contribute to the improvement of advanced practices in geriatric nursing, to promote the safety of older patients in polypharmacy. However, more research is needed to elucidate gaps. identificar e sintetizar estudos que examinam as interações medicamentosas (IM) e reações adversas a medicamentos (RAM) em idosos polimedicados. revisão integrativa de estudos publicados de janeiro de 2008 a dezembro de 2013, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão, nas bases de dados eletrônicas MEDLINE e EMBASE. foram analisados 47 estudos de texto completo, incluindo 14,624,492 idosos (≥ 60 anos): 24 (51,1%) sobre RAM, 14 (29,8%) sobre IM e 9 estudos (19,1%) que investigaram tanto IM como RAM. Encontramos uma variedade de desenhos metodológicos. Os estudos revisados reforçaram que a polifarmácia é um processo multifatorial, e os preditores e a prescrição inadequada estão associados a

  14. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Zhang, Jian; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1) chemical interaction between drugs, (2) protein interactions between drugs' targets, and (3) target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations. PMID:24083237

  15. Relating drug–protein interaction network with drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Sayaka; Pauwels, Edouard; Stoven, Véronique; Goto, Susumu; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying the emergence and underlying mechanisms of drug side effects is a challenging task in the drug development process. This underscores the importance of system–wide approaches for linking different scales of drug actions; namely drug-protein interactions (molecular scale) and side effects (phenotypic scale) toward side effect prediction for uncharacterized drugs. Results: We performed a large-scale analysis to extract correlated sets of targeted proteins and side effects, based on the co-occurrence of drugs in protein-binding profiles and side effect profiles, using sparse canonical correlation analysis. The analysis of 658 drugs with the two profiles for 1368 proteins and 1339 side effects led to the extraction of 80 correlated sets. Enrichment analyses using KEGG and Gene Ontology showed that most of the correlated sets were significantly enriched with proteins that are involved in the same biological pathways, even if their molecular functions are different. This allowed for a biologically relevant interpretation regarding the relationship between drug–targeted proteins and side effects. The extracted side effects can be regarded as possible phenotypic outcomes by drugs targeting the proteins that appear in the same correlated set. The proposed method is expected to be useful for predicting potential side effects of new drug candidate compounds based on their protein-binding profiles. Supplementary information: Datasets and all results are available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/supp/smizutan/target-effect/. Availability: Software is available at the above supplementary website. Contact: yamanishi@bioreg.kyushu-u.ac.jp, or goto@kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp PMID:22962476

  16. Hypericum perforatum: pharmacokinetic, mechanism of action, tolerability, and clinical drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Russo, Emilio; Scicchitano, Francesca; Whalley, Benjamin J; Mazzitello, Carmela; Ciriaco, Miriam; Esposito, Stefania; Patanè, Marinella; Upton, Roy; Pugliese, Michela; Chimirri, Serafina; Mammì, Maria; Palleria, Caterina; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2014-05-01

    Hypericum perforatum (HP) belongs to the Hypericaceae family and is one of the oldest used and most extensively investigated medicinal herbs. The medicinal form comprises the leaves and flowering tops of which the primary ingredients of interest are naphthodianthrones, xanthones, flavonoids, phloroglucinols (e.g. hyperforin), and hypericin. Although several constituents elicit pharmacological effects that are consistent with HP's antidepressant activity, no single mechanism of action underlying these effects has thus far been found. Various clinical trials have shown that HP has a comparable antidepressant efficacy as some currently used antidepressant drugs in the treatment of mild/moderate depression. Interestingly, low-hyperforin-content preparations are effective in the treatment of depression. Moreover, HP is also used to treat certain forms of anxiety. However, HP can induce various cytochrome P450s isozymes and/or P-glycoprotein, of which many drugs are substrates and which are the main origin of HP-drug interactions. Here, we analyse the existing evidence describing the clinical consequence of HP-drug interactions. Although some of the reported interactions are based on findings from in vitro studies, the clinical importance of which remain to be demonstrated, others are based on case reports where causality can, in some cases, be determined to reveal clinically significant interactions that suggest caution, consideration, and disclosure of potential interactions prior to informed use of HP.

  17. Identification and Mechanistic Investigation of Drug-Drug Interactions Associated With Myopathy: A Translational Approach.

    PubMed

    Han, X; Quinney, S K; Wang, Z; Zhang, P; Duke, J; Desta, Z; Elmendorf, J S; Flockhart, D A; Li, L

    2015-09-01

    Myopathy is a group of muscle diseases that can be induced or exacerbated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We sought to identify clinically important myopathic DDIs and elucidate their underlying mechanisms. Five DDIs were found to increase the risk of myopathy based on analysis of observational data from the Indiana Network of Patient Care. Loratadine interacted with simvastatin (relative risk 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.39, 2.06]), alprazolam (1.50, 2.31), ropinirole (2.06, 5.00), and omeprazole (1.15, 1.38). Promethazine interacted with tegaserod (1.94, 4.64). In vitro investigation showed that these DDIs were unlikely to result from inhibition of drug metabolism by CYP450 enzymes or from inhibition of hepatic uptake via the membrane transporter OATP1B1/1B3. However, we did observe in vitro synergistic myotoxicity of simvastatin and desloratadine, suggesting a role in loratadine-simvastatin interaction. This interaction was epidemiologically confirmed (odds ratio 95% CI = [2.02, 3.65]) using the data from the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System. © 2015 The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  18. Protein Charge and Mass Contribute to the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interactions in a Minimal Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Hong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2013-01-01

    We constructed and simulated a ‘minimal proteome’ model using Langevin dynamics. It contains 206 essential protein types which were compiled from the literature. For comparison, we generated six proteomes with randomized concentrations. We found that the net charges and molecular weights of the proteins in the minimal genome are not random. The net charge of a protein decreases linearly with molecular weight, with small proteins being mostly positively charged and large proteins negatively charged. The protein copy numbers in the minimal genome have the tendency to maximize the number of protein-protein interactions in the network. Negatively charged proteins which tend to have larger sizes can provide large collision cross-section allowing them to interact with other proteins; on the other hand, the smaller positively charged proteins could have higher diffusion speed and are more likely to collide with other proteins. Proteomes with random charge/mass populations form less stable clusters than those with experimental protein copy numbers. Our study suggests that ‘proper’ populations of negatively and positively charged proteins are important for maintaining a protein-protein interaction network in a proteome. It is interesting to note that the minimal genome model based on the charge and mass of E. Coli may have a larger protein-protein interaction network than that based on the lower organism M. pneumoniae. PMID:23420643

  19. Potential drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Paula; Kopittke, Luciane

    2015-06-01

    Adverse drug-drug interactions (DDI) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in susceptible populations. Cancer patients are a population at high risk for DDI especially because they commonly receive several drugs concomitantly. The knowledge about the most common interactions between drugs used in oncology inpatients is essential to reduce drug-related problems and increase the safety and efficacy of the therapy. To assess the frequency of potential DDI throughout the hospital stay of cancer patients undergoing systemic chemotherapy, describe their epidemiology, and identify risk factors for major DDI. Setting An oncology-hematology inpatient unit of a public hospital in southern Brazil. Drug prescriptions were prospectively reviewed throughout the hospital stay of patients admitted for systemic chemotherapy. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regression were used for data analysis. Potential DDI and their characteristics. The cohort consisted of 113 patients, who used a mean of 8.9 ± 2.7 drugs/day. All patients had at least one potential DDI (median, 7.0/patient; 25th-75th percentile, 3.5-12.0), and 46 % of the patients had at least one DDI classified as major, i.e. that it may result in death, hospitalization, permanent injury, or therapeutic failure. Only 13.7 % of all interactions involved antineoplastic agents, identified in 62.8 % of patients. Most interactions were of moderate severity, 6.4 % were major, and 8.5 % had a recommendation for therapy modification. Multivariate analysis revealed mean number of drugs prescribed [relative risk (RR) for each additional drug: 1.12; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.17; P < 0.01] and age ≥60 years (RR 1.48; 95 % CI 1.03-2.14; P < 0.01) as independent risk factors for major DDI. Potential DDI were highly frequent in this cohort. Older age and number of drugs prescribed were more likely to lead to major interactions. Prospective surveillance is required to detect adverse DDI, aiming primarily at reducing the

  20. Screening drug-target interactions with positive-unlabeled learning.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lihong; Zhu, Wen; Liao, Bo; Duan, Yu; Chen, Min; Chen, Yi; Yang, Jialiang

    2017-08-14

    Identifying drug-target interaction (DTI) candidates is crucial for drug repositioning. However, usually only positive DTIs are deposited in known databases, which challenges computational methods to predict novel DTIs due to the lack of negative samples. To overcome this dilemma, researchers usually randomly select negative samples from unlabeled drug-target pairs, which introduces a lot of false-positives. In this study, a negative sample extraction method named NDTISE is first developed to screen strong negative DTI examples based on positive-unlabeled learning. A novel DTI screening framework, PUDTI, is then designed to infer new drug repositioning candidates by integrating NDTISE, probabilities that remaining ambiguous samples belong to the positive and negative classes, and an SVM-based optimization model. We investigated the effectiveness of NDTISE on a DTI data provided by NCPIS. NDTISE is much better than random selection and slightly outperforms NCPIS. We then compared PUDTI with 6 state-of-the-art methods on 4 classes of DTI datasets from human enzymes, ion channels, GPCRs and nuclear receptors. PUDTI achieved the highest AUC among the 7 methods on all 4 datasets. Finally, we validated a few top predicted DTIs through mining independent drug databases and literatures. In conclusion, PUDTI provides an effective pre-filtering method for new drug design.

  1. Gut microbiota-mediated drug interactions between lovastatin and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-Hyoung; Kim, In Sook; Van Le, Thi Kim; Jung, Il-Hoon; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Orally administered drugs may be metabolized by intestinal microbial enzymes before absorption into the blood. Accordingly, coadministration of drugs affecting the metabolic activities of gut microbes (e.g., antibiotics) may lead to drug-drug interactions (DDI). In this study, gut microbiota-mediated DDI were investigated by studying the pharmacokinetics of lovastatin in antibiotic-treated rats. Incubation of lovastatin with human and rat fecalase preparations produced four metabolites, M1 (demethylbutyryl metabolite), M4 (hydroxylated metabolite), M8 (the active hydroxy acid metabolite), and M9 (hydroxylated M8), indicating involvement of the gut microbiota in lovastatin metabolism. The plasma concentration-time profiles of M8 were compared after oral administration of lovastatin to control rats or those treated with either ampicillin (100 mg/kg) or an antibiotic mixture consisting of cefadroxil (150 mg/kg), oxytetracycline (300 mg/kg), and erythromycin (300 mg/kg). Pharmacokinetic analyses indicated that systemic exposure to M8 was significantly lower in antibiotic-treated rats compared with controls. In addition, fecal M8 formation decreased by 58.3 and 59.9% in the ampicillin- and antibiotic mixture-treated rats, respectively. These results suggested that antibiotic intake may reduce the biotransformation of orally administered drugs by gut microbiota and that the subsequent impact on microbiota metabolism could result in altered systemic concentrations of either the intact drug and/or its metabolite(s). Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Stress, alcohol and drug interaction: an update of human research

    PubMed Central

    Uhart, Magdalena; Wand, Gary S.

    2008-01-01

    A challenging question that continues unanswered in the field of addiction is why some individuals are more vulnerable to substance use disorders than others. Numerous risk factors for alcohol and other drugs of abuse, including exposure to various forms of stress, have been identified in clinical studies. However, the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie this relationship remain unclear. Critical neurotransmitters, hormones and neurobiological sites have been recognized, which may provide the substrates that convey individual differences in vulnerability to addiction. With the advent of more sophisticated measures of brain function in humans, such as functional imaging technology, the mechanisms and neural pathways involved in the interactions between drugs of abuse, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system and stress systems are beginning to be characterized. This review provides a neuroadaptive perspective regarding the role of the hormonal and brain stress systems in drug addiction with a focus on the changes that occur during the transition from occasional drug use to drug dependence. We also review factors that contribute to different levels of hormonal/brain stress activation, which has implications for understanding individual vulnerability to drug dependence. Ultimately, these efforts may improve our chances of designing treatment strategies that target addiction at the core of the disorder. PMID:18855803

  3. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  4. Drug metabolism and liver disease: a drug-gene-environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Nathalie K; Branch, Robert A

    2017-02-01

    Despite the central role of the liver in drug metabolism, surprisingly there is lack of certainty in anticipating the extent of modification of the clearance of a given drug in a given patient. The intent of this review is to provide a conceptual framework in considering the impact of liver disease on drug disposition and reciprocally the impact of drug disposition on liver disease. It is proposed that improved understanding of the situation is gained by considering the issue as a special example of a drug-gene-environment interaction. This requires an integration of knowledge of the drug's properties, knowledge of the gene products involved in its metabolism, and knowledge of the pathophysiology of its disposition. This will enhance the level of predictability of drug disposition and toxicity for a drug of interest in an individual patient. It is our contention that advances in pharmacology, pharmacogenomics, and hepatology, together with concerted interests in the academic, regulatory, and pharmaceutical industry communities provide an ideal immediate environment to move from a qualitative reactive approach to quantitative proactive approach in individualizing patient therapy in liver disease.

  5. Interaction of Drug or Food with Drug Transporters in Intestine and Liver.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-01-01

    Oral bioavailability (F) is determined as fraction of the drug dose absorbed through the gastrointestinal membranes (Fa), the unmetabolized fraction of the absorbed dose that passes through the gut into the portal blood (Fg), and the hepatic first pass availability (Fh), namely F is expressed as the product of Fa, Fg and Fh (F = Fa.Fg.Fh). Current evidence suggests that transporter proteins play a role in intestinal absorption and hepatobiliary clearance of drugs. Among those transporters, this review will focus on PEPT1 and OATP2B1 as influx transporter and p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and BCRP as efflux transporter in intestinal epithelial cells, and on OATP1B1 and 1B3 as influx transporter and MRP2 as efflux transporter in hepatocytes, respectively, because drug-drug (DDI) and -food (DFI) interactions on these transporter are considered to affect bioavailability of their substrate drugs. DDI and DFI may reduce systemic exposure to drug by blocking influx transporters in intestine, but increase it by modulating influx and efflux transporters in liver and efflux transporters in intestines. Namely, drug disposition and efficacy are likely affected by DDI and DFI, resulting in treatment failures or increase in adverse effect. Therefore, it is of significantly importance to understand precise mechanism of DDI and DFI. This review will present information about transporter-based DDI and DFI in the processes of intestinal absorption and hepatic clearance of drugs, and discuss about their clinical implication.

  6. Clinically significant drug interactions with antacids: an update.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ryuichi; Echizen, Hirotoshi

    2011-10-01

    One may consider that drug-drug interactions (DDIs) associated with antacids is an obsolete topic because they are prescribed less frequently by medical professionals due to the advent of drugs that more effectively suppress gastric acidity (i.e. histamine H(2)-receptor antagonists [H2RAs] and proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]). Nevertheless, the use of antacids by ambulant patients may be ever increasing, because they are freely available as over-the-counter (OTC) drugs. Antacids consisting of weak basic substances coupled with polyvalent cations may alter the rate and/or the extent of absorption of concomitantly administered drugs via different mechanisms. Polyvalent cations in antacid formulations may form insoluble chelate complexes with drugs and substantially reduce their bioavailability. Clinical studies demonstrated that two classes of antibacterials (tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones) are susceptible to clinically relevant DDIs with antacids through this mechanism. Countermeasures against this type of DDI include spacing out the dosing interval - taking antacid either 4 hours before or 2 hours after administration of these antibacterials. Bisphosphonates may be susceptible to DDIs with antacids by the same mechanism, as described in the prescription information of most bisphosphonates, but no quantitative data about the DDIs are available. For drugs with solubility critically dependent on pH, neutralization of gastric fluid by antacids may alter the dissolution of these drugs and the rate and/or extent of their absorption. However, the magnitude of DDIs elicited by antacids through this mechanism is less than that produced by H2RAs or PPIs; therefore, the clinical relevance of such DDIs is often obscure. Magnesium ions contained in some antacid formulas may increase gastric emptying, thereby accelerating the rate of absorption of some drugs. However, the clinical relevance of this is unclear in most cases because the difference in plasma drug concentration

  7. Drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives and psychotropic drugs: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Berry-Bibee, Erin N; Kim, Myong-Jin; Simmons, Katharine B; Tepper, Naomi K; Riley, Halley E M; Pagano, H Pamela; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2016-12-01

    To examine whether the co-administration of hormonal contraceptives (HC) and psychotropic drugs commonly used to treat anxiety and/or depression results in safety or efficacy concerns for either drug. We searched PubMed and Cochrane libraries for clinical or pharmacokinetic (PK) studies that examined co-administration of any HC with psychotropic drugs [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), oral benzodiazepines, bupropion, mirtazapine, trazadone, buspirone, hydroxyzine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or atypical antipsychotics] in reproductive aged women. Of 555 articles identified, 22 articles (18 studies) met inclusion criteria. We identified 5 studies on SSRIs, four on TCAs, one on bupropion, three on atypical antipsychotics and five on oral benzodiazepines. No articles met inclusion criteria for SNRIs, mirtazapine, trazadone, buspirone, hydroxyzine or MAOIs. Overall, clinical studies did not demonstrate differences in unintended pregnancy rates when HCs were administered with and without psychotropic drugs or in psychotropic drug treatment outcomes when psychotropic drugs were administered with and without HCs. PK studies did not demonstrate changes in drug exposure related to contraceptive safety, contraceptive effectiveness or psychotropic drug effectiveness for most classes of psychotropic drugs. However, limited PK data raise concern for HCs increasing systemic exposure of amitriptyline and imipramine (both TCAs), theoretically posing safety concerns. Limited quality and quantity evidence on use of psychotropic drugs and HCs suggests low concern for clinically significant interactions, though no data exist specifically for non-oral formulations of HC. Given the high frequency of use for both HCs and psychotropic drugs among reproductive-age women in the US, this review highlights a need for further research in this area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc

  8. Assessment of Drug-Drug Interactions among Renal Failure Patients of Nephrology Ward in a South Indian Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rama, Mylapuram; Viswanathan, Gayathri; Acharya, Leelavathi D; Attur, R P; Reddy, P N; Raghavan, S V

    2012-01-01

    Polypharmacy is common in drug prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients. A study of the prescription patterns of drugs with potential interactions would be of interest to prevent drug related adverse events. A prospective observational study of six months (Dec 2009-May 2010) was carried out among the chronic kidney disease patients admitted to the nephrology ward of a South Indian tertiary care hospital. The pattern and rates of drug-drug interactions seen in the prescriptions of these patients was studied. Among the 205 prescriptions included, a total of 474 interactions were reported, making 2.7 interactions per prescription with incidence rates of 76.09%. Around 19.62% of interactions were of major severity. Most common interactions were found between ascorbic acid and cyanocobalamine (12.45%), clonidine and metoprolol (3.80%) respectively. Hypo or hypertension (31.65%), decreased drug efficacy (29.11%) and hypo or hyperglycemia (14.14%), were the most commonly reported clinical outcomes of the drug interactions. Cardiovascular drugs (calcium channel blockers and beta blockers; 52%) constitute the major class of drugs involved in interactions. As most of the interactions had a delayed onset, long term follow-up is essential to predict the clinically significant outcomes of these interactions. Hence, drug interactions are commonly seen in the prescriptions of chronic kidney disease patients which can lead to serious adverse events if not detected early. Need for collaboration with a clinical pharmacist and electronic surveillance, which are absent in developing countries like India, is emphatic.

  9. Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Macitentan: Prediction of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    PubMed

    de Kanter, Ruben; Sidharta, Patricia N; Delahaye, Stéphane; Gnerre, Carmela; Segrestaa, Jerome; Buchmann, Stephan; Kohl, Christopher; Treiber, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Macitentan is a novel dual endothelin receptor antagonist for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). It is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes, mainly CYP3A4, to its active metabolite ACT-132577. A physiological-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed by combining observations from clinical studies and physicochemical parameters as well as absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion parameters determined in vitro. The model predicted the observed pharmacokinetics of macitentan and its active metabolite ACT-132577 after single and multiple dosing. It performed well in recovering the observed effect of the CYP3A4 inhibitors ketoconazole and cyclosporine, and the CYP3A4 inducer rifampicin, as well as in predicting interactions with S-warfarin and sildenafil. The model was robust enough to allow prospective predictions of macitentan-drug combinations not studied, including an alternative dosing regimen of ketoconazole and nine other CYP3A4-interacting drugs. Among these were the HIV drugs ritonavir and saquinavir, which were included because HIV infection is a known risk factor for the development of PAH. This example of the application of PBPK modeling to predict drug-drug interactions was used to support the labeling of macitentan (Opsumit).

  10. Idiosyncratic Drug-Induced Liver Injury: Is Drug-Cytokine Interaction the Linchpin?

    PubMed

    Roth, Robert A; Maiuri, Ashley R; Ganey, Patricia E

    2017-02-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury continues to be a human health problem in part because drugs that cause these reactions are not identified in current preclinical testing and because progress in prevention is hampered by incomplete knowledge of mechanisms that underlie these adverse responses. Several hypotheses involving adaptive immune responses, inflammatory stress, inability to adapt to stress, and multiple, concurrent factors have been proposed. Yet much remains unknown about how drugs interact with the liver to effect death of hepatocytes. Evidence supporting hypotheses implicating adaptive or innate immune responses in afflicted patients has begun to emerge and is bolstered by results obtained in experimental animal models and in vitro systems. A commonality in adaptive and innate immunity is the production of cytokines, including interferon-γ (IFNγ). IFNγ initiates cell signaling pathways that culminate in cell death or inhibition of proliferative repair. Tumor necrosis factor-α, another cytokine prominent in immune responses, can also promote cell death. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor-α interacts with IFNγ, leading to enhanced cellular responses to each cytokine. In this short review, we propose that the interaction of drugs with these cytokines contributes to idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury, and mechanisms by which this could occur are discussed. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Predicting drugs side effects based on chemical-chemical interactions and protein-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine.

  12. Predicting Drugs Side Effects Based on Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Protein-Chemical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine. PMID:24078917

  13. Modeling Drug-Carrier Interaction in the Drug Release from Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Like; An, Lingling; Wu, Xiaoyi

    2011-01-01

    Numerous nanocarriers of various compositions and geometries have been developed for the delivery and release of therapeutic and imaging agents. Due to the high specific surface areas of nanocarriers, different mechanisms such as ion pairing and hydrophobic interaction need to be explored for achieving sustained release. Recently, we developed a three-parameter model that considers reversible drug-carrier interaction and first-order drug release from liposomes. A closed-form analytical solution was obtained. Here, we further explore the ability of the model to capture the release of bioactive molecules such as drugs and growth factors from various nanocarriers. A parameter study demonstrates that the model is capable of resembling major categories of drug release kinetics. We further fit the model to 60 sets of experimental data from various drug release systems, including nanoparticles, hollow particles, fibers, and hollow fibers. Additionally, bootstrapping is used to evaluate the accuracy of parameter determination and validate the model in selected cases. The simplicity and universality of the model and the clear physical meanings of each model parameter render the model useful for the design and development of new drug delivery systems. PMID:21845225

  14. Drug-drug interaction studies: regulatory guidance and an industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Chu, Xiaoyan; Gibson, Christopher; Cui, Donghui; Yee, Ka Lai; Ballard, Jeanine; Cabalu, Tamara; Hochman, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have issued new guidance for industry on drug interaction studies, which outline comprehensive recommendations on a broad range of in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential. This paper aims to provide an overview of these new recommendations and an in-depth scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding some of the recommended approaches in emerging areas, particularly, transporters and complex DDIs. We present a number of theoretical considerations and several case examples to demonstrate complexities in applying (1) the proposed transporter decision trees and associated criteria for studying a broad spectrum of transporters to derive actionable information and (2) the recommended model-based approaches at an early stage of drug development to prospectively predict DDIs involving time-dependent inhibition and mixed inhibition/induction of drug metabolizing enzymes. We hope to convey the need for conducting DDI studies on a case-by-case basis using a holistic scientifically based interrogative approach and to communicate the need for additional research to fill in knowledge gaps in these areas where the science is rapidly evolving to better ensure the safety and efficacy of new therapeutic agents.

  15. Adverse events caused by potential drug-drug interactions in an intensive care unit of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alvim, Mariana Macedo; da Silva, Lidiane Ayres; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves; Silvério, Marcelo Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of potential drug-drug interactions in an intensive care unit of a hospital, focusing on antimicrobial drugs. Methods This cross-sectional study analyzed electronic prescriptions of patients admitted to the intensive care unit of a teaching hospital between January 1 and March 31, 2014 and assessed potential drug-drug interactions associated with antimicrobial drugs. Antimicrobial drug consumption levels were expressed in daily doses per 100 patient-days. The search and classification of the interactions were based on the Micromedex® system. Results The daily prescriptions of 82 patients were analyzed, totaling 656 prescriptions. Antimicrobial drugs represented 25% of all prescription drugs, with meropenem, vancomycin and ceftriaxone being the most prescribed medications. According to the approach of daily dose per 100 patient-days, the most commonly used antimicrobial drugs were cefepime, meropenem, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. The mean number of interactions per patient was 2.6. Among the interactions, 51% were classified as contraindicated or significantly severe. Highly significant interactions (clinical value 1 and 2) were observed with a prevalence of 98%. Conclusion The current study demonstrated that antimicrobial drugs are frequently prescribed in intensive care units and present a very high number of potential drug-drug interactions, with most of them being considered highly significant. PMID:26761473

  16. Diabetes in the elderly: drug use and the risk of drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Prado, Maria Aparecida Medeiros Barros do; Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2016-11-01

    This study sought to outline the sociodemographic and health profile of elderly persons with reported diabetes, to assess the knowledge and practices regarding treatment options and describe the use of medications and potential risks for drug interactions (DI) in this subgroup. In 2008,a cross-sectional study was conducted of 1,517 elderly citizens in Campinas in which the prevalence of diabetes was estimated and its associations assessed using the Rao-Scott test (p < 0,05).The potential drug interactions were evaluated using the Micromedex® database. Diabetes prevalence was 21.7%, without significant difference between the sexes. A higher percentage of elderly diabetics was found aged over 70, with less schooling, per capita family income of less than 1 minimum wage and no occupational activity. The average drug intake was 3.9 in the previous 3 days. Possible interactions were identified in 413 cases and 53.1%, 7.8% and 7.2% of the subjects presented moderate, minor and serious risk of DI, respectively. The importance of adopting a healthy diet and physical activity for weight reduction, disease and complication control is stressed. The need for attention to the potential for drug interactions and the use of inappropriate medications among the elderly is highlighted.

  17. Interactions between modern and Chinese medicinal drugs: a general review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K F; Leung, K S; Leung, P C

    2003-01-01

    While the use of health food and over-the-counter drugs for health promotion and adjuvant therapy is becoming increasingly popular, the concern about adverse effects is mounting. The possible adverse effects that may arise from drug interactions between these herbal preparations and standard modem therapy are equally worrying. Herbal toxicity and adverse effects are well documented in classical Chinese medicinal volumes. Interactions between herbal preparations and standard modem therapy are known. Extensive work needs to be done before useful guidelines can be established. However, based on available reports and clinical observations, some commonly used herbs and Chinese medicines have already demonstrated the need for special attention when used together with modern therapy. This paper analyzes the important material already available, and would serve as a preliminary checklist for patients who are taking herbal preparations, while at the same time receiving treatment from modern medicine.

  18. Quantitative structure-interaction relationship analysis of 1,4-dihydropyridine drugs in concomitant administration with grapefruit juice.

    PubMed

    Uesawa, Y; Mohri, K

    2012-03-01

    Quantitative structure-interaction relationship (QSIR) analyses of 1,4-dihydropyridine drugs were performed on grapefruit juice interaction potentials to characterize the interaction and evaluate drugs not yet tested in clinical research. AUC ratios of drugs with and without grapefruit juice ingestion were estimated as grapefruit juice interaction potentials from clinical studies on dihydropyridine drugs such as amlodipine, azelnidipine, benidipine, cilnidipine, felodipine, manidipine, nicardipine, nifedipine, nimodipine, nisoldipine, and pranidipine. The minimal energy conformation in each dihydropyridine drug was searched for using Merck Molecular Force Field (MMFFaq), and then geometry optimization was performed by density-functional-theory (DFT) calculation (B3LYP/6-31G**). The geometric, electronic, and physicochemical features including molecular size, dipole moment, total energy, HOMO/LUMO energies, and logP values were then obtained. Dragon descriptors were also calculated by optimized 3D-structures. The relation between the potentials and over 1000 of the molecular properties was investigated using statistical techniques including partial least squares analysis with genetic algorithm (GA-PLS) to a variable subset selection. Some PLS regression equations including logP values and dragon descriptors as explanatory variables were constructed in which the maximal contribution coefficient was 94%. These models could be applied to estimate the interaction potentials of other dihydropyridine drugs that have gone unreported in interactions with drugs such as aranidipine, barnidipine, clevidipine, lemildipine, lercanidipine, niguldipine, niludipine, and nilvadipine. In the assessment of major dihydropyridines, amlodipine was found to be the safest drug to avoid interactions among the drugs investigated in the present study.

  19. Minimizing Cardiovascular Adverse Effects of Atypical Antipsychotic Drugs in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Shankar, Gollapudi S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of atypical antipsychotic agents has rapidly increased in the United States and worldwide in the last decade. Nonetheless, many health care practitioners do not appreciate the significance of the cardiovascular side effects that may be associated with their use and the means to minimize them. Thus, atypical antipsychotic medications can cause cardiovascular side effects such as arrhythmias and deviations in blood pressure. In rare cases, they may also cause congestive heart failure, myocarditis, and sudden death. Patients with schizophrenia have a higher risk of cardiovascular mortality than healthy individuals, possibly because of excessive smoking, the underlying disorder itself, or a combination of both factors. Increased awareness of these potential complications can allow pharmacists and physicians to better manage and monitor high risk patients. Accurate assessments are very important to avoid medications from being given to patients inappropriately. Additionally, monitoring patients regularly via blood draws and checking blood pressure, heart rate, and electrocardiogram can help catch any clinical problems and prevent further complications. Finally, patient and family-member education, which pharmacists in particular can play key roles in, is central for the management and prevention of side effects, which is known to reflect positively on morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:24649390

  20. An antibiotic protocol to minimize emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Espíndola, Aquino L.; Girardi, Daniel; Penna, T. J. P.; Bauch, Chris T.; Troca Cabella, Brenno C.; Martinez, Alexandre Souto

    2014-04-01

    A within-host model of the spread of tuberculosis is proposed here where the emergence of drug resistance and bacterial dormancy are simultaneously combined. We consider both sensitive and resistant strains of tuberculosis pathogens as well as a dormant state of these bacteria. The dynamics of the within-host system is modeled by a set of coupled differential equations which are numerically solved to find a relation between the within-host bacterial populations and the host health states. The values of the parameters were taken from the current literature when available; a sensitivity analysis was performed for the others. Antibiotic treatment for standard, intermittent and oscillating intermittent protocols is analyzed for different conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillating protocol is the most effective one, that would imply a lower treatment cost.

  1. Pharmacokinetic Herb-Drug Interactions: Insight into Mechanisms and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Oga, Enoche F; Sekine, Shuichi; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Herbal medicines are currently in high demand, and their popularity is steadily increasing. Because of their perceived effectiveness, fewer side effects and relatively low cost, they are being used for the management of numerous medical conditions. However, they are capable of affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of coadministered conventional drugs. These interactions are particularly of clinically relevance when metabolizing enzymes and xenobiotic transporters, which are responsible for the fate of many drugs, are induced or inhibited, sometimes resulting in unexpected outcomes. This article discusses the general use of herbal medicines in the management of several ailments, their concurrent use with conventional therapy, mechanisms underlying herb-drug interactions (HDIs) as well as the drawbacks of herbal remedy use. The authors also suggest means of surveillance and safety monitoring of herbal medicines. Contrary to popular belief that "herbal medicines are totally safe," we are of the view that they are capable of causing significant toxic effects and altered pharmaceutical outcomes when coadministered with conventional medicines. Due to the paucity of information as well as sometimes conflicting reports on HDIs, much more research in this field is needed. The authors further suggest the need to standardize and better regulate herbal medicines in order to ensure their safety and efficacy when used alone or in combination with conventional drugs.

  2. Herb-drug interactions. Interactions between saw palmetto and prescription medications.

    PubMed

    Bressler, Rubin

    2005-11-01

    Patients over age 50 typically present with one chronic disease per decade. Each chronic disease typically requires long-term drug therapy, meaning most older patients require several drugs to maintain health. Simultaneously, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased in the United States in the last 20 years, reaching 36% in 2002; herbal medicine use accounts for approximately 22% of all CAM use. Older adults often add herbal medicines to prescription medications, yet do not always inform their physicians. The drug metabolizing enzyme systems process all compounds foreign to the body, including prescription and herbal medications. Therefore use of both medicinals simultaneously has a potential for adverse interactions. This review, which discusses saw palmetto, is the last in a series covering the documented interactions among the top 5 efficacious herbal medicines and prescription drugs.

  3. Polypharmacy and dentistry: I. Introduction and interactions with local anaesthetics and sedative drugs.

    PubMed

    Meechan, J G

    2002-09-01

    This series of two papers considers the effects of drug interactions in dentistry. In this first paper, the principles of drug interactions will be described. In addition, interactions with drugs used in local anaesthesia and sedation will be discussed. The second paper will concentrate on interactions with analgesics and antimicrobials prescribed in dental practice.

  4. A Successful Model and Visual Design for Creating Context-Aware Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jon D.; Bolchini, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the potential harm of a drug-drug interaction (DDI) requires knowledge of a patient’s relevant co-morbidities and risk factors. Current DDI alerts lack such patient-specific contextual data. In this paper, we present an efficient model for integrating pertinent patient data into DDI alerts. This framework is designed to be interoperable across multiple drug knowledge bases and clinical information systems. To evaluate the model, we generated a set of contextual DDI data using our local drug knowledge base then conducted an evaluation study of a prototype contextual alert design. The alert received favorable ratings from study subjects, who agreed it was an improvement over traditional alerts and was likely to support clinical management and save physician time. This framework may ultimately help reduce alert fatigue through the dynamic display of DDI alerts based on patient risk. PMID:22195086

  5. CREDO: a protein-ligand interaction database for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, Adrian; Blundell, Tom

    2009-02-01

    Harnessing data from the growing number of protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank is an important task in drug discovery. In order to benefit from the abundance of three-dimensional structures, structural data must be integrated with sequence as well as chemical data and the protein-small molecule interactions characterized structurally at the inter-atomic level. In this study, we present CREDO, a new publicly available database of protein-ligand interactions, which represents contacts as structural interaction fingerprints, implements novel features and is completely scriptable through its application programming interface. Features of CREDO include implementation of molecular shape descriptors with ultrafast shape recognition, fragmentation of ligands in the Protein Data Bank, sequence-to-structure mapping and the identification of approved drugs. Selected analyses of these key features are presented to highlight a range of potential applications of CREDO. The CREDO dataset has been released into the public domain together with the application programming interface under a Creative Commons license at http://www-cryst.bioc.cam.ac.uk/credo. We believe that the free availability and numerous features of CREDO database will be useful not only for commercial but also for academia-driven drug discovery programmes.

  6. Drug-Drug Interactions with the NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor Simeprevir.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk-Mahadevan, Sivi; Snoeys, Jan; Peeters, Monika; Beumont-Mauviel, Maria; Simion, Alexandru

    2016-02-01

    Simeprevir is an NS3/4A protease inhibitor approved for the treatment of hepatitis C infection, as a component of combination therapy. Simeprevir is metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, primarily CYP3A, and is a substrate for several drug transporters, including the organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs). It is susceptible to metabolic drug-drug interactions with drugs that are moderate or strong CYP3A inhibitors (e.g. ritonavir and erythromycin) or CYP3A inducers (e.g. rifampin and efavirenz); coadministration of these drugs may increase or decrease plasma concentrations of simeprevir, respectively, and should be avoided. Clinical studies have shown that simeprevir is a mild inhibitor of CYP1A2 and intestinal CYP3A but does not inhibit hepatic CYP3A. The effects of simeprevir on these enzymes are of clinical relevance only for narrow-therapeutic-index drugs that are metabolized solely by these enzymes (e.g. oral midazolam). Simeprevir does not have a clinically relevant effect on the pharmacokinetics of rilpivirine, tacrolimus, oral contraceptives and several other drugs metabolized by CYP enzymes. Simeprevir is a substrate and inhibitor of the transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and OATP1B1/3. Cyclosporine is an inhibitor of OATP1B1/3, BCRP and P-gp, and a mild inhibitor of CYP3A; cyclosporine causes a significant increase in simeprevir plasma concentrations, and coadministration is not recommended. Clinical studies have demonstrated increases in coadministered drug concentrations for drugs that are substrates of the OATP1B1/3, BRCP (e.g. rosuvastatin) and P-gp (e.g. digoxin) transporters; these drugs should be administered with dose titration and or/close monitoring.

  7. Mining clinical text for signals of adverse drug-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Srinivasan V; Harpaz, Rave; LePendu, Paea; Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Shah, Nigam H

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Electronic health records (EHRs) are increasingly being used to complement the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and to enable active pharmacovigilance. Over 30% of all adverse drug reactions are caused by drug–drug interactions (DDIs) and result in significant morbidity every year, making their early identification vital. We present an approach for identifying DDI signals directly from the textual portion of EHRs. Methods We recognize mentions of drug and event concepts from over 50 million clinical notes from two sites to create a timeline of concept mentions for each patient. We then use adjusted disproportionality ratios to identify significant drug–drug–event associations among 1165 drugs and 14 adverse events. To validate our results, we evaluate our performance on a gold standard of 1698 DDIs curated from existing knowledge bases, as well as with signaling DDI associations directly from FAERS using established methods. Results Our method achieves good performance, as measured by our gold standard (area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve >80%), on two independent EHR datasets and the performance is comparable to that of signaling DDIs from FAERS. We demonstrate the utility of our method for early detection of DDIs and for identifying alternatives for risky drug combinations. Finally, we publish a first of its kind database of population event rates among patients on drug combinations based on an EHR corpus. Conclusions It is feasible to identify DDI signals and estimate the rate of adverse events among patients on drug combinations, directly from clinical text; this could have utility in prioritizing drug interaction surveillance as well as in clinical decision support. PMID:24158091

  8. Consensus recommendations for systematic evaluation of drug-drug interaction evidence for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Scheife, Richard T; Hines, Lisa E; Boyce, Richard D; Chung, Sophie P; Momper, Jeremiah D; Sommer, Christine D; Abernethy, Darrell R; Horn, John R; Sklar, Stephen J; Wong, Samantha K; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary L; Grizzle, Amy J; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A; Malone, Daniel C

    2015-02-01

    Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. The aim of this study was to provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence for DDIs from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents. A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 18 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar 12 times from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. We developed expert consensus answers to the following three key questions. (i) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence? (ii) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs? (iii) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug compendia and clinical decision support systems in which these recommendations are implemented should be able to provide higher-quality information about DDIs.

  9. Interaction of surface-active drugs in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Rukhadze, Marina D; Alexishvili, Maka M; Gonashvili, Maia V; Sebiskveradze, Maya V

    2005-03-01

    The interaction of chlorpromazine and promethazine in vivo has been investigated. The drugs were administered to the rabbit orally as a single dose (100 mg of each drug) as well as simultaneously with an interval of 15 min. The presence of multiple peaks at the separate administration of promethazine and chlorpromazine on the one hand, and increase of number of peaks, symbathic character of kinetic curves of mentioned drugs and its prolonged appearance in the systemic circulation of the blood by simultaneous administration on the other hand, may be explained by the intensive presystem metabolism and surface-activity ability of these drugs, and by the periodic 'lassitude' of liver for their capture and elimination (either presystem or systemic). The micelle formation from these drugs in the gastro-intestinal tract and formation of the mixed micelles on simultaneous administration were also taken into consideration. Chlorpromazine is more strongly captured by the liver at its first pass through it than promethazine, from comparison of pharmacokinetics of these drugs administered separately. Therefore, chlorpromazine on simultaneous administration occupies the sites of the liver which were covered by promethazine at single dose, thereby substituting promethazine and promoting its transferral into the systemic blood circulation. This results in a large increase in promethazine content in blood, additional peaks appear and the presence of promethazine in the blood is prolonged. The influence of chlorpromazine on the kinetics of promethazine is especially obvious when chlorpromazine enters the organism first and more easily occupies those sites in the liver which participate in the capture and elimination of both drugs. Concerning influence of promethazine on the kinetics of chlorpromazine, promethazine reinforces in some way the ability of liver to capture chlorpromazine, thereby intensifying the presystem metabolism of chlorpromazine and inhibiting its own metabolism

  10. Use of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to simulate drug-drug interactions between antineoplastic and antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Moltó, José; Rajoli, Rajith; Back, David; Valle, Marta; Miranda, Cristina; Owen, Andrew; Clotet, Bonaventura; Siccardi, Marco

    2017-03-01

    Co-administration of antineoplastics with ART is challenging due to potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, trials specifically assessing such DDIs are lacking. Our objective was to simulate DDIs between the antineoplastics erlotinib and gefitinib with key antiretroviral drugs and to predict dose adjustments using a physiologically based pharmaco