Science.gov

Sample records for minimum crystal size

  1. The minimum crystal size needed for a complete diffraction data set

    PubMed Central

    Holton, James M.; Frankel, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, classic intensity formulae were united with an empirical spot-fading model in order to calculate the diameter of a spherical crystal that will scatter the required number of photons per spot at a desired resolution over the radiation-damage-limited lifetime. The influences of molecular weight, solvent content, Wilson B factor, X-ray wavelength and attenuation on scattering power and dose were all included. Taking the net photon count in a spot as the only source of noise, a complete data set with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2 at 2 Å resolution was predicted to be attainable from a perfect lysozyme crystal sphere 1.2 µm in diameter and two different models of photoelectron escape reduced this to 0.5 or 0.34 µm. These represent 15-fold to 700-fold less scattering power than the smallest experimentally determined crystal size to date, but the gap was shown to be consistent with the background scattering level of the relevant experiment. These results suggest that reduction of background photons and diffraction spot size on the detector are the principal paths to improving crystallographic data quality beyond current limits. PMID:20382993

  2. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum sizes. 648.143 Section 648.143... Fishery § 648.143 Minimum sizes. (a) The minimum size for black sea bass is 11 inches (27.94 cm) total length for all vessels issued a moratorium permit under § 648.4 (a)(7) that fish for, possess, land...

  3. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Khalil, Mohammed M.; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom.

  4. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  5. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  6. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General... fish size requirements established in this section. Minimum Fish Sizes (Total Length/Tail Length)...

  7. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section 648... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. (a) Minimum length. The minimum length for surf clams is 4.75 inches (12.065 cm). (b) Determination of compliance. No more than...

  8. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 60622, Sept. 29, 2011. (a) Minimum length. The minimum length for surf clams is...

  9. 50 CFR 648.124 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.124 Section 648... Scup Fishery § 648.124 Minimum fish sizes. (a) The minimum size for scup is 9 inches (22.9 cm) TL for... charter boat, or more than five crew members if a party boat. (c) The minimum size applies to whole...

  10. 50 CFR 648.103 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Summer Flounder Fisheries § 648.103 Minimum fish sizes. (a) The minimum size for summer flounder is 14... § 648.107, the minimum size for summer flounder is 19.5 inch (49.53 cm) TL for all vessels that do...

  11. 50 CFR 648.162 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.162 Section 648... Atlantic Bluefish Fishery § 648.162 Minimum fish sizes. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 60639, Sept... minimum fish sizes are necessary to assure that the fishing mortality rate is not exceeded, or to...

  12. 50 CFR 648.162 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.162 Section 648... Atlantic Bluefish Fishery § 648.162 Minimum fish sizes. If the Council determines through its annual review or framework adjustment process that minimum fish sizes are necessary to assure that the...

  13. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General provisions. All monkfish caught by vessels issued a valid Federal monkfish permit must meet the minimum...

  14. 50 CFR 622.454 - Minimum size limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.454 Minimum size limit. (a) The minimum size limit for Caribbean spiny lobster is 3.5 inches (8.9 cm), carapace length. (b) A spiny lobster not... operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that spiny lobster on board are...

  15. 50 CFR 622.454 - Minimum size limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Lobster Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.454 Minimum size limit. (a) The minimum size limit for Caribbean spiny lobster is 3.5 inches (8.9 cm), carapace length. (b) A spiny lobster not... operator of a vessel that fishes in the EEZ is responsible for ensuring that spiny lobster on board are...

  16. 50 CFR 648.233 - Minimum Fish Sizes. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum Fish Sizes. 648.233 Section 648.233 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Spiny Dogfish Fishery § 648.233 Minimum Fish Sizes....

  17. 50 CFR 648.126 - Scup minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the... whole fish or any part of a fish found in possession, e.g., fillets. These minimum sizes may be...

  18. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... multiplied by 3. Fish fillets, or parts of fish, must have skin on while possessed on board a vessel and at the time of landing in order to meet minimum size requirements. “Skin on” means the entire portion of the skin normally attached to the portion of the fish or to fish parts possessed is still attached....

  19. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fish, with the exception of cheeks and livers, must have skin on while possessed on board a vessel and at the time of landing in order to meet minimum size requirements. “Skin on” means the entire portion of the skin normally attached to the portion of the fish or fish parts possessed. Monkfish tails...

  20. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... fish, with the exception of cheeks and livers, must have skin on while possessed on board a vessel and at the time of landing in order to meet minimum size requirements. “Skin on” means the entire portion of the skin normally attached to the portion of the fish or fish parts possessed. Monkfish tails...

  1. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... fish, with the exception of cheeks and livers, must have skin on while possessed on board a vessel and at the time of landing in order to meet minimum size requirements. “Skin on” means the entire portion of the skin normally attached to the portion of the fish or fish parts possessed. Monkfish tails...

  2. LDPC Codes with Minimum Distance Proportional to Block Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Jones, Christopher; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes characterized by minimum Hamming distances proportional to block sizes have been demonstrated. Like the codes mentioned in the immediately preceding article, the present codes are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. The previously mentioned codes have low decoding thresholds and reasonably low error floors. However, the minimum Hamming distances of those codes do not grow linearly with code-block sizes. Codes that have this minimum-distance property exhibit very low error floors. Examples of such codes include regular LDPC codes with variable degrees of at least 3. Unfortunately, the decoding thresholds of regular LDPC codes are high. Hence, there is a need for LDPC codes characterized by both low decoding thresholds and, in order to obtain acceptably low error floors, minimum Hamming distances that are proportional to code-block sizes. The present codes were developed to satisfy this need. The minimum Hamming distances of the present codes have been shown, through consideration of ensemble-average weight enumerators, to be proportional to code block sizes. As in the cases of irregular ensembles, the properties of these codes are sensitive to the proportion of degree-2 variable nodes. A code having too few such nodes tends to have an iterative decoding threshold that is far from the capacity threshold. A code having too many such nodes tends not to exhibit a minimum distance that is proportional to block size. Results of computational simulations have shown that the decoding thresholds of codes of the present type are lower than those of regular LDPC codes. Included in the simulations were a few examples from a family of codes characterized by rates ranging from low to high and by thresholds that adhere closely to their respective channel capacity thresholds; the simulation results from these examples showed that the codes in question have low

  3. Computer Modeling of Crystallization and Crystal Size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenta, R. V.

    2002-05-01

    The crystal size distribution of an igneous rock has been shown to be related to the crystallization kinetics. In order to better understand crystallization processes, the nucleation and growth of crystals in a closed system is modeled computationally and graphically. Units of volume analogous to unit cells are systematically attached to stationary crystal nuclei. The number of volume units attached to each crystal per growth stage is proportional to the crystal size insuring that crystal dimensional growth rates are constant regardless of their size. The number of new crystal nuclei per total system volume that form in each growth stage increases exponentially Cumulative crystal size distributions (CCSD) are determined for various stages of crystallization (30 percent, 60 pct, etc) from a database generated by the computer model, and each distribution is fit to an exponential function of the same form. Simulation results show that CCSD functions appear to fit the data reasonably well (R-square) with the greatest misfit at 100 pct crystallization. The crystal size distribution at each pct crystallization can be obtained from the derivative of the respective CCSD function. The log form of each crystal size distribution (CSD) is a linear function with negative slope. Results show that the slopes of the CSD functions at pcts crystallization up to 90 pct are parallel, but the slope at 100 pct crystallization differs from the others although still in approximate alignment. We suggest that real crystallization of igneous rocks may show this pattern. In the early stages of crystallization crystals are far apart and CSD's are ideal as predicted by theory based on growth of crystals in a brine. At advanced stages of crystallization growth collision boundaries develop between crystals. As contiguity increases crystals become blocked and inactive because they can no longer grow. As crystallization approaches 100 pct a significant number of inactive crystals exist resulting in

  4. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J

    2015-03-11

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  5. The best nanoparticle size distribution for minimum thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Minnich, Austin J.

    2015-01-01

    Which sizes of nanoparticles embedded in a crystalline solid yield the lowest thermal conductivity? Nanoparticles have long been demonstrated to reduce the thermal conductivity of crystals by scattering phonons, but most previous works assumed the nanoparticles to have a single size. Here, we use optimization methods to show that the best nanoparticle size distribution to scatter the broad thermal phonon spectrum is not a similarly broad distribution but rather several discrete peaks at well-chosen nanoparticle radii. For SiGe, the best size distribution yields a thermal conductivity below that of amorphous silicon. Further, we demonstrate that a simplified distribution yields nearly the same low thermal conductivity and can be readily fabricated. Our work provides important insights into how to manipulate the full spectrum of phonons and will guide the design of more efficient thermoelectric materials. PMID:25757414

  6. 50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the cod end...), stretched mesh. This minimum mesh size is required in at least the last 40 meshes forward of the cod...

  7. The elusive minimum viable population size for white sturgeon

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta; Lepla, Ken B.; Van Winkle, Webb; James, Mr Brad; McAdam, Dr Steve

    2010-01-01

    Biological conservation of sturgeon populations is a concern for many species. Those responsible for managing the white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and similar species are interested in identifying extinction thresholds to avoid. Two thresholds that exist in theory are the minimum viable population size (MVP) and minimum amount of suitable habitat. In this paper, we present both model and empirical estimates of these thresholds. We modified a population viability analysis (PVA) model for white sturgeon to include two new Allee mechanisms. Despite this, PVA-based MVP estimates were unrealistically low compared with empirical estimates unless opportunities for spawning were assumed to be less frequent. PVA results revealed a trade-off between MVP and habitat thresholds; smaller populations persisted in longer river segments and vice versa. Our empirical analyses suggested (1) a MVP range based on population trends from 1,194 to 27,700 individuals, and (2) a MVP estimate of 4,000 individuals based on recruitment. Long-term historical population surveys are needed for more populations to pinpoint an MVP based on trends, whereas the available data were sufficient to estimate MVP based on recruitment. Beyond the MVP, we developed a hierarchical model for population status based on empirical data. Metapopulation support was the most important predictor of population health, followed by the length of free-flowing habitat, with habitat thresholds at 26 and 150 km. Together, these results suggest that habitat and connectivity are important determinants of population status that likely influence the site-specific MVP thresholds.

  8. "PowerUp"!: A Tool for Calculating Minimum Detectable Effect Sizes and Minimum Required Sample Sizes for Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Design Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Nianbo; Maynard, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This paper and the accompanying tool are intended to complement existing supports for conducting power analysis tools by offering a tool based on the framework of Minimum Detectable Effect Sizes (MDES) formulae that can be used in determining sample size requirements and in estimating minimum detectable effect sizes for a range of individual- and…

  9. Crystal size distribution (CSD) in rocks and the kinetics and dynamics of crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, Katharine V.; Ferry, John M.

    1988-08-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) measured in metamorphic rocks yield quantitative information about crystal nucleation and growth rates, growth times, and the degree of overstepping ( ΔT) of reactions during metamorphism. CSDs are described through use of a population density function n=dN/dL, where N is the cumulative number of crystals per unit volume and L is a linear crystal size. Plots of ln ( n) vs. L for olivine+pyroxene and magnetite in high-temperature (1000° C) basalt hornfelses from the Isle of Skye define linear arrays, indicating continuous nucleation and growth of crystals during metamorphism. Using the slope and intercept of these linear plots in conjunction with growth rate estimates we infer minimum mineral growth times of less than 100 years at ΔT<10° C, and nucleation rates between 10-4 and 10-1/cm3/s. Garnet and magnetite in regionally metamorphosed pelitic schists from south-central Maine have CSDs which are bell-shaped. We interpret this form to be the result of two processes: 1) initial continuous nucleation and growth of crystals, and 2) later loss of small crystals due to annealing. The large crystals in regional metamorphic rocks retain the original size frequency distribution and may be used to obtain quantitative information on the original conditions of crystal nucleation and growth. The extent of annealing increases with increasing metamorphic grade and could be used to estimate the duration of annealing conditions if the value of a rate constant were known. Finally, the different forms of crystal size distributions directly reflect differences in the thermal histories of regional vs. contact metamorphosed rocks: because contact metamorphism involves high temperatures for short durations, resulting CSDs are linear and unaffected by annealing, similar to those produced by crystallization from a melt; because regional metamorphism involves prolonged cooling from high temperatures, primary linear CSDs are later modified by annealing

  10. 48 CFR 52.247-61 - F.o.b. Origin-Minimum Size of Shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. Origin-Minimum Size... Clauses 52.247-61 F.o.b. Origin—Minimum Size of Shipments. As prescribed in 47.305-16(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when volume rates may apply: F.o.b. Origin—Minimum Size...

  11. 48 CFR 52.247-61 - F.o.b. Origin-Minimum Size of Shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. Origin-Minimum Size... Clauses 52.247-61 F.o.b. Origin—Minimum Size of Shipments. As prescribed in 47.305-16(c), insert the following clause in solicitations and contracts when volume rates may apply: F.o.b. Origin—Minimum Size...

  12. AN EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF MINIMUM MAPPING UNIT SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land-cover (LC) maps derived from remotely sensed data are often presented using a minimum mapping unit (MMU). The choice of a MMU that is appropriate for the projected use of a classification is important. The objective of this experiment was to determine the optimal MMU of a L...

  13. Gauging the Nearness and Size of Cycle Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1997-02-01

    By definition, the conventional onset for the start of a sunspot cycle is the time when smoothed sunspot number (i.e., the 12-month moving average) has decreased to its minimum value (called minimum amplitude) prior to the rise to its maximum value (called maximum amplitude) for the given sunspot cycle. On the basis (if the modern era sunspot cycles 10-22 and on the presumption that cycle 22 is a short-period cycle having a cycle length of 120 to 126 months (the observed range of short-period modern era cycles), conventional onset for cycle 23 should not occur until sometime between September 1996 and March 1997, certainly between June 1996 and June 1997, based on the 95-percent confidence level deduced from the mean and standard deviation of period for the sample of six short-pei-iod modern era cycles. Also, because the first occurrence of a new cycle, high-latitude (greater than or equal to 25 degrees) spot has always preceded conventional onset of the new cycle by at least 3 months (for the data-available interval of cycles 12-22), conventional onset for cycle 23 is not expected until about August 1996 or later, based on the first occurrence of a new cycle 23, high-latitude spot during the decline of old cycle 22 in May 1996. Although much excitement for an earlier-occurring minimum (about March 1996) for cycle 23 was voiced earlier this year, the present study shows that this exuberance is unfounded. The decline of cycle 22 continues to favor cycle 23 minimum sometime during the latter portion of 1996 to the early portion of 1997.

  14. Requirements for Minimum Sample Size for Sensitivity and Specificity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Tassha Hilda

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity analysis is commonly used for screening and diagnostic tests. The main issue researchers face is to determine the sufficient sample sizes that are related with screening and diagnostic studies. Although the formula for sample size calculation is available but concerning majority of the researchers are not mathematicians or statisticians, hence, sample size calculation might not be easy for them. This review paper provides sample size tables with regards to sensitivity and specificity analysis. These tables were derived from formulation of sensitivity and specificity test using Power Analysis and Sample Size (PASS) software based on desired type I error, power and effect size. The approaches on how to use the tables were also discussed. PMID:27891446

  15. 50 CFR 622.208 - Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shrimp off Georgia and Florida. 622.208 Section 622.208 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND... CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Shrimp Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.208 Minimum mesh size applicable to rock shrimp off Georgia and Florida. (a) The minimum mesh size for the cod...

  16. What is the required minimum landscape size for dispersal studies?

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2007-11-01

    Among small animals dispersal parameters are mainly obtained by traditional methods using population studies of marked individuals. Dispersal studies may underestimate the rate and distance of dispersal, and be biased because of aggregated habitat patches and a small study area. The probability of observing long distance dispersal events decreases with distance travelled by the organisms. In this study a new approach is presented to solve this methodological problem. An extensive mark-release-recapture programme was performed in an area of 81 km(2) in southern Sweden. To estimate the required size of the study area for adequate dispersal measures we examined the effect of study area size on dispersal distance using empirical data and a repeated subsampling procedure. In 2003 and 2004, two species of diurnal burnet moths (Zygaenidae) were studied to explore dispersal patterns. The longest confirmed dispersal distance was 5600 m and in total 100 dispersal events were found between habitat patches for the two species. The estimated dispersal distance was strongly affected by the size of the study area and the number of marked individuals. For areas less than 10 km(2) most of the dispersal events were undetected. Realistic estimates of dispersal distance require a study area of at least 50 km(2). To obtain adequate measures of dispersal, the marked population should be large, preferably over 500 recaptured individuals. This result was evident for the mean moved distance, mean dispersal distance and maximum dispersal distance. In general, traditional dispersal studies are performed in small study areas and based on few individuals and should therefore be interpreted with care. Adequate dispersal measures for insects obtained by radio-tracking and genetic estimates (gene flow) is still a challenge for the future.

  17. Minimum Sample Size for Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha: A Monte-Carlo Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdugul, Halil

    2008-01-01

    The coefficient alpha is the most widely used measure of internal consistency for composite scores in the educational and psychological studies. However, due to the difficulties of data gathering in psychometric studies, the minimum sample size for the sample coefficient alpha has been frequently debated. There are various suggested minimum sample…

  18. Nanoscale size effects in crystallization of metallic glass nanorods.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sungwoo; Jung, Yeonwoong; Xie, Yujun; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan; Cha, Judy J

    2015-09-01

    Atomistic understanding of crystallization in solids is incomplete due to the lack of appropriate materials and direct experimental tools. Metallic glasses possess simple metallic bonds and slow crystallization kinetics, making them suitable to study crystallization. Here, we investigate crystallization of metallic glass-forming liquids by in-situ heating metallic glass nanorods inside a transmission electron microscope. We unveil that the crystallization kinetics is affected by the nanorod diameter. With decreasing diameters, crystallization temperature decreases initially, exhibiting a minimum at a certain diameter, and then rapidly increases below that. This unusual crystallization kinetics is a consequence of multiple competing factors: increase in apparent viscosity, reduced nucleation probability and enhanced heterogeneous nucleation. The first two are verified by slowed grain growth and scatter in crystallization temperature with decreasing diameters. Our findings provide insight into relevant length scales in crystallization of supercooled metallic glasses, thus offering accurate processing conditions for predictable metallic glass nanomolding.

  19. Determining size and dispersion of minimum viable populations for land management planning and species conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhl, John F.

    1984-03-01

    The concept of minimum populations of wildlife and plants has only recently been discussed in the literature. Population genetics has emerged as a basic underlying criterion for determining minimum population size. This paper presents a genetic framework and procedure for determining minimum viable population size and dispersion strategies in the context of multiple-use land management planning. A procedure is presented for determining minimum population size based on maintenance of genetic heterozygosity and reduction of inbreeding. A minimum effective population size ( N e ) of 50 breeding animals is taken from the literature as the minimum shortterm size to keep inbreeding below 1% per generation. Steps in the procedure adjust N e to account for variance in progeny number, unequal sex ratios, overlapping generations, population fluctuations, and period of habitat/population constraint. The result is an approximate census number that falls within a range of effective population size of 50 500 individuals. This population range defines the time range of short- to long-term population fitness and evolutionary potential. The length of the term is a relative function of the species generation time. Two population dispersion strategies are proposed: core population and dispersed population.

  20. Fundamental limitations of LIGA x-ray lithography : sidewall offset, slope and minimum feature size.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Stewart K.

    2004-01-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are used to examine photoelectron doses and their effect on the dimensions of features produced by deep x-ray lithography. New analytical models describing electron doses are presented and used to compute dose distributions for several feature geometries. The history of development and final feature dimensions are also computed, taking into account the dose field, dissolution kinetics based on measured development rates, and the transport of PMMA fragments away from the dissolution front. We find that sidewall offsets, sidewall slope and producible feature sizes all exhibit at least practical minima and that these minima represent fundamental limitations of the LIGA process. The minimum values under optimum conditions are insensitive to the synchrotron spectrum, but depend strongly on resist thickness. This dependence on thickness is well approximated by simple analytical expressions describing the minimum offset, minimum sidewall slope, minimum producible size of positive and negative features, maximum aspect ratio and minimum radius of inside and outside corners.

  1. Synthesis of SAPO-56 with controlled crystal size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting; Feng, Xuhui; Carreon, Maria L.; Carreon, Moises A.

    2017-03-01

    Herein, we present the hydrothermal synthesis of SAPO-56 crystals with relatively controlled crystal/particle size. The effects of water content, aluminum source, gel composition, stirring, crystallization temperature and time, as well as the incorporation of crystal growth inhibitors during synthesis were systematically investigated. The synthesized SAPO-56 crystals displayed BET surface areas as high as ˜630 m2 g-1 with relative narrow size distribution in the ˜5-60 μm range. Nitrogen BET surface areas in the 451 to 631 m2 g-1 range were observed. Decreasing the crystallization temperature from 220 to 210 °C helped to decrease the average SAPO-56 crystal size. Diluted gel compositions promoted the formation of smaller crystals. Crystal growth inhibitors were found to be helpful in reducing crystal size and narrow the size distribution. Specifically, ˜5 μm SAPO-56 crystals displaying narrow size distribution were synthesized employing aluminum-tri-sec-butoxide as Al source, high water content, and high stirring rates.

  2. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  3. On size-constrained minimum s–t cut problems and size-constrained dense subgraph problems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenbin; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Stallmann, Matthias F.; Hendrix, William; Ying, Weiqin

    2015-10-30

    In some application cases, the solutions of combinatorial optimization problems on graphs should satisfy an additional vertex size constraint. In this paper, we consider size-constrained minimum s–t cut problems and size-constrained dense subgraph problems. We introduce the minimum s–t cut with at-least-k vertices problem, the minimum s–t cut with at-most-k vertices problem, and the minimum s–t cut with exactly k vertices problem. We prove that they are NP-complete. Thus, they are not polynomially solvable unless P = NP. On the other hand, we also study the densest at-least-k-subgraph problem (DalkS) and the densest at-most-k-subgraph problem (DamkS) introduced by Andersen and Chellapilla [1]. We present a polynomial time algorithm for DalkS when k is bounded by some constant c. We also present two approximation algorithms for DamkS. In conclusion, the first approximation algorithm for DamkS has an approximation ratio of n-1/k-1, where n is the number of vertices in the input graph. The second approximation algorithm for DamkS has an approximation ratio of O (nδ), for some δ < 1/3.

  4. On size-constrained minimum s–t cut problems and size-constrained dense subgraph problems

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wenbin; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Stallmann, Matthias F.; ...

    2015-10-30

    In some application cases, the solutions of combinatorial optimization problems on graphs should satisfy an additional vertex size constraint. In this paper, we consider size-constrained minimum s–t cut problems and size-constrained dense subgraph problems. We introduce the minimum s–t cut with at-least-k vertices problem, the minimum s–t cut with at-most-k vertices problem, and the minimum s–t cut with exactly k vertices problem. We prove that they are NP-complete. Thus, they are not polynomially solvable unless P = NP. On the other hand, we also study the densest at-least-k-subgraph problem (DalkS) and the densest at-most-k-subgraph problem (DamkS) introduced by Andersen andmore » Chellapilla [1]. We present a polynomial time algorithm for DalkS when k is bounded by some constant c. We also present two approximation algorithms for DamkS. In conclusion, the first approximation algorithm for DamkS has an approximation ratio of n-1/k-1, where n is the number of vertices in the input graph. The second approximation algorithm for DamkS has an approximation ratio of O (nδ), for some δ < 1/3.« less

  5. The minimum-sized ideal reactor for continuous alcohol fermentation using immobilized microorganism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, T.; Shimizu, S.

    1982-12-01

    This article suggests various factors (e.g., alcoholproducing activity of the strain; alcohol toxicity; liquid backmixing) affecting the reduction of the fermentor size in alcohol fermentation using immobilized cells. Finds that the proper degree of liquid backmixing giving the minimum-sized fermentor depends on the magnitude of sugar concentration in feed. Uses a mathematical model which will serve for designing an optimal bioreactor.

  6. 43 CFR 3206.12 - What are the minimum and maximum lease sizes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What are the minimum and maximum lease sizes? 3206.12 Section 3206.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL...

  7. 50 CFR 648.75 - Shucking at sea and minimum surfclam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Shucking at sea and minimum surfclam size. 648.75 Section 648.75 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES...

  8. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Song, Junhua; Walker, David; Clark, Simon M.; Kalkan, Bora; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-04-01

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size.

  9. Analysis of submicron-sized niflumic acid crystals prepared by electrospray crystallization.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, Rita; Radacsi, Norbert; Szunyogh, Tímea; van der Heijden, Antoine E D M; Ter Horst, Joop H; Szabó-Révész, Piroska

    2013-03-25

    Interest in submicron-sized drug particles has emerged from both laboratory and industrial perspectives in the last decade. Production of crystals in the nano size scale offers a novel way to particles for drug formulation solving formulation problems of drugs with low solubility in class II of the Biopharmaceutical Classification System. In this work niflumic acid nanoparticles with a size range of 200-800nm were produced by the novel crystallization method, electrospray crystallization. Their properties were compared to those from evaporative and anti-solvent crystallizations, using the same organic solvent, acetone. There is a remarkable difference in the product crystal size depending on the applied methods. The size and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction. The structure of the samples was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. The particles produced using electrospray crystallization process were probably changing from amorphous to crystalline state after the procedure.

  10. Effect of Minimum Cell Sizes and Confidence Interval Sizes for Special Education Subgroups on School-Level AYP Determinations. Synthesis Report 61

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Mary Ann; Gong, Brian; Marion, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This study addresses three questions: First, considering the full group of students and the special education subgroup, what is the likely effect of minimum cell size and confidence interval size on school-level Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) determinations? Second, what effects do the changing minimum cell sizes have on inclusion of special…

  11. Minimum bar size for flexure testing of irradiated SiC/SiC composite

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.; Jones, R.H.

    1998-03-01

    This report covers material presented at the IEA/Jupiter Joint International Workshop on SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion structural Applications held in conjunction with ICFRM-8, Sendai, Japan, Oct. 23-24, 1997. The minimum bar size for 4-point flexure testing of SiC/SiC composite recommended by PNNL for irradiation effects studies is 30 {times} 6 {times} 2 mm{sup 3} with a span-to-depth ratio of 10/1.

  12. On-line monitoring of the crystallization process: relationship between crystal size and electrical impedance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanlin; Yao, Jun; Wang, Mi

    2016-07-01

    On-line monitoring of crystal size in the crystallization process is crucial to many pharmaceutical and fine-chemical industrial applications. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for the on-line monitoring of the cooling crystallization process of L-glutamic acid (LGA) using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The EIS method can be used to monitor the growth of crystal particles relying on the presence of an electrical double layer on the charged particle surface and the polarization of double layer under the excitation of alternating electrical field. The electrical impedance spectra and crystal size were measured on-line simultaneously by an impedance analyzer and focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM), respectively. The impedance spectra were analyzed using the equivalent circuit model and the equivalent circuit elements in the model can be obtained by fitting the experimental data. Two equivalent circuit elements, including capacitance (C 2) and resistance (R 2) from the dielectric polarization of the LGA solution and crystal particle/solution interface, are in relation with the crystal size. The mathematical relationship between the crystal size and the equivalent circuit elements can be obtained by a non-linear fitting method. The function can be used to predict the change of crystal size during the crystallization process.

  13. Skaergaard vs Sudbury: Solidification Times and Crystal Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.; Currier, R. M.; Jordon, E.

    2010-12-01

    The overall cooling time of a batch of magma is intimately reflected in the nature of the crystal sizes. The thinner are dikes and sills the finer grained are the crystals they display. And the spatial variations in crystal size and abundance record the spatial progression of solidification. Chilled margins are fine grained because of rapid solidification, and a progressive inward increase in crystal size is perfectly predictable by coupling a law of crystal growth with a suitable solidification front-based cooling model. When observed crystal sizes are much larger than predicted, as in finding phenocrysts near or in chilled margins, this is a clear indication of crystals grown and entrained prior to final emplacement and solidification. This is exactly the process exhibited by volcanics carrying swarms of large crystals. But in plutonic rocks there is frequent confusion over what crystal sizes to expect, especially when the pluton size and shape is poorly known, and there is often an unexpressed feeling that fine grained (i.e., non-phenocryst bearing) bodies almost regardless of size somehow cool fundamentally different than large bodies, especially layered intrusions. An invaluable standard state body to which to compare the crystal sizes of other large bodies is the Sudbury impact melt sheet. Formed in a few minutes, the 3km thick 200 km wide superheated melt sheet cooled and crystallized to produce a systematic and predictable internal variation in crystal size and abundance (Zieg & Marsh, 2002, JPet). Buried by 3km of fallback debris, the sheet took about 100,000 to solidify. The Skaergaard intrusion is of a similar thickness (3.4-4 km), but is much less extensive, being more like a thin-edged elliptical laccolith (Norton et. al., 1984, JGR) or a fault-bounded loaf of bread (7.75 x 10.55 x 3.7 km; Nielsen, 2004, JPet). In spite of its limited extent, the extent is large enough for solidification of the thickest parts time to approach that of an infinite sheet

  14. Size dependent compressibility of nano-ceria: Minimum near 33 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Song, Junhua; Chan, Siu-Wai; Walker, David; Clark, Simon M.; Kalkan, Bora

    2015-04-20

    We report the crystallite-size-dependency of the compressibility of nanoceria under hydrostatic pressure for a wide variety of crystallite diameters and comment on the size-based trends indicating an extremum near 33 nm. Uniform nano-crystals of ceria were synthesized by basic precipitation from cerium (III) nitrate. Size-control was achieved by adjusting mixing time and, for larger particles, a subsequent annealing temperature. The nano-crystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and standard ambient x-ray diffraction (XRD). Compressibility, or its reciprocal, bulk modulus, was measured with high-pressure XRD at LBL-ALS, using helium, neon, or argon as the pressure-transmitting medium for all samples. As crystallite size decreased below 100 nm, the bulk modulus first increased, and then decreased, achieving a maximum near a crystallite diameter of 33 nm. We review earlier work and examine several possible explanations for the peaking of bulk modulus at an intermediate crystallite size.

  15. Fictive temperature-independent density and minimum indentation size effect in calcium aluminosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T. M.; Tomozawa, M.

    2008-09-15

    Using the calcium aluminosilicate system a glass was developed that exhibits fictive temperature-independent density by creating an intermediate glass between normal and anomalous glasses. Normal glass, such as soda-lime silicate glass, exhibits decreasing density with increasing fictive temperature while anomalous glass, such as silica glass, exhibits increasing density with increasing fictive temperature. This intermediate glass composition was found to exhibit the minimum indentation size effect during indentation hardness testing. It appears that the indentation size effect is correlated with a deformation-induced fictive temperature increase, which is accompanied by a density change and hardness change in the vicinity of the indentation. It is suggested from these observations that indentation size effect originates from the energy required to create interfaces and defects such as shear bands, subsurface cracks, and point defects near the indenter-specimen boundary, which accompany the volume change.

  16. [Theory and practice of electrospray crystallization in particle size reduction].

    PubMed

    Szunyogh, Tímea; Ambrus, Rita; Szabóné Révész, Piroska

    2015-01-01

    Nowdays, one of the most challenges for the researchers is the formulation of poorly water soluble drugs. Reduction of particle size of active agents to submicron range could result in a faster dissolution rate and higher bioavailability. Integration as crystallization process is an often used particle size decreasing technique. The aim of this study was to show the theoretical background and practical application of the electros pray crystallization as an innovative particle size decreasing technique. Our model drug was the niflumic acid (NIF), which belongs to the BCS Class II. After the optimization of the process parameters, the physico-chemical properties of the samples were characterized. Particle size and shape were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crystalline state of NIF and the samples were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction. Physico-chemical properties were determined using dissolution test from simulated media. The electrospray crytallization resulted in particle size reduction but the aggregation of nanonized NIF crystals (NIF-nano) could not avoid without excipient. Aggregates with poor secondary forces are suitable for production of the interactive physical mixture. It was found that NIF-nano could be well distributed on the surface of the mannitol as carrier and the Poloxamer R protected the NIF-nano crystals (320 nm)from aggregation. Consequently, the physical mixture resulted in product with higher polarity, better wettability and faster dissolution rate of NIF as raw NIF or NIF-nano.

  17. Minimum-sized ideal reactor for continuous alcohol fermentation using immobilized microorganism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, T.; Shimizu, S.

    1982-12-01

    Recently, alcohol fermentation has gained considerable attention with the aim of lowering its production cost in the production processes of both fuel ethanol and alcoholic beverages. The over-all cost is a summation of costs of various subsystems such as raw material (sugar, starch, and cellulosic substances) treatment, fermentation process, and alcohol separation from water solutions; lowering the cost of the fermentation processes is very important in lowering the total cost. Several new techniques have been developed for economic continuous ethanol production, use of a continuous wine fermentor with no mechanical stirring, cell recycle combined with continuous removal of ethanol under vaccum, a technique involving a bed of yeast admixed with an inert carrier, and use of immobilized yeast reactors in packed-bed column and in a three-stage double conical fluidized-bed bioreactor. All these techniques lead to increases more or less, in reactor productivity, which in turn result in the reduction of the reactor size for a given production rate and a particular conversion. Since an improvement in the fermentation process often leads to a reduction of fermentor size and hence, a lowering of the initial construction cost, it is important to theoretically arrive at a solution to what is the minimum-size setup of ideal reactors from the viewpoint of liquid backmixing. In this short communication, the minimum-sized ideal reactor for continuous alcohol fermentation using immobilized cells will be specifically discussed on the basis of a mathematical model. The solution will serve for designing an optimal bioreactor. (Refs. 26).

  18. Metagenomic analysis of size-fractionated picoplankton in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sangita; Parris, Darren J; DeLong, Edward F; Stewart, Frank J

    2014-01-01

    Marine oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) support diverse microbial communities with roles in major elemental cycles. It is unclear how the taxonomic composition and metabolism of OMZ microorganisms vary between particle-associated and free-living size fractions. We used amplicon (16S rRNA gene) and shotgun metagenome sequencing to compare microbial communities from large (>1.6 μm) and small (0.2–1.6 μm) filter size fractions along a depth gradient in the OMZ off Chile. Despite steep vertical redox gradients, size fraction was a significantly stronger predictor of community composition compared to depth. Phylogenetic diversity showed contrasting patterns, decreasing towards the anoxic OMZ core in the small size fraction, but exhibiting maximal values at these depths within the larger size fraction. Fraction-specific distributions were evident for key OMZ taxa, including anammox planctomycetes, whose coding sequences were enriched up to threefold in the 0.2–1.6 μm community. Functional gene composition also differed between fractions, with the >1.6 μm community significantly enriched in genes mediating social interactions, including motility, adhesion, cell-to-cell transfer, antibiotic resistance and mobile element activity. Prokaryotic transposase genes were three to six fold more abundant in this fraction, comprising up to 2% of protein-coding sequences, suggesting that particle surfaces may act as hotbeds for transposition-based genome changes in marine microbes. Genes for nitric and nitrous oxide reduction were also more abundant (three to seven fold) in the larger size fraction, suggesting microniche partitioning of key denitrification steps. These results highlight an important role for surface attachment in shaping community metabolic potential and genome content in OMZ microorganisms. PMID:24030599

  19. Passive Rocket Diffuser Theory: A Re-Examination of Minimum Second Throat Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Second-throat diffusers serve to isolate rocket engines from the effects of ambient back pressure during testing without using active control systems. Among the most critical design parameters is the relative area of the diffuser throat to that of the nozzle throat. A smaller second throat is generally desirable because it decreases the stagnation-to-ambient pressure ratio the diffuser requires for nominal operation. There is a limit, however. Below a certain size, the second throat can cause pressure buildup within the diffuser and prevent it from reaching the start condition that protects the nozzle from side-load damage. This paper presents a method for improved estimation of the minimum second throat area which enables diffuser start. The new 3-zone model uses traditional quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow theory to approximate the structure of two distinct diffuser flow fields observed in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and combines them to provide a less-conservative estimate of the second throat size limit. It is unique among second throat sizing methods in that it accounts for all major conical nozzle and second throat diffuser design parameters within its limits of application. The performance of the 3-zone method is compared to the historical normal shock and force balance methods, and verified against a large number of CFD simulations at specific heat ratios of 1.4 and 1.25. Validation is left as future work, and the model is currently intended to function only as a first-order design tool.

  20. SSZ-13 Crystallization by Particle Attachment and Deterministic Pathways to Crystal Size Control.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjesh; Luo, Helen; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy; Rimer, Jeffrey D

    2015-10-14

    Many synthetic and natural crystalline materials are either known or postulated to grow via nonclassical pathways involving the initial self-assembly of precursors that serve as putative growth units for crystallization. Elucidating the pathway(s) by which precursors attach to crystal surfaces and structurally rearrange (postattachment) to incorporate into the underlying crystalline lattice is an active and expanding area of research comprising many unanswered fundamental questions. Here, we examine the crystallization of SSZ-13, which is an aluminosilicate zeolite that possesses exceptional physicochemical properties for applications in separations and catalysis (e.g., methanol upgrading to chemicals and the environmental remediation of NO(x)). We show that SSZ-13 grows by two concerted mechanisms: nonclassical growth involving the attachment of amorphous aluminosilicate particles to crystal surfaces and classical layer-by-layer growth via the incorporation of molecules to advancing steps on the crystal surface. A facile, commercially viable method of tailoring SSZ-13 crystal size and morphology is introduced wherein growth modifiers are used to mediate precursor aggregation and attachment to crystal surfaces. We demonstrate that small quantities of polymers can be used to tune crystal size over 3 orders of magnitude (0.1-20 μm), alter crystal shape, and introduce mesoporosity. Given the ubiquitous presence of amorphous precursors in a wide variety of microporous crystals, insight of the SSZ-13 growth mechanism may prove to be broadly applicable to other materials. Moreover, the ability to selectively tailor the physical properties of SSZ-13 crystals through molecular design offers new routes to optimize their performance in a wide range of commercial applications.

  1. Power law olivine crystal size distributions in lithospheric mantle xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Tarquini, S.

    2002-12-01

    Olivine crystal size distributions (CSDs) have been measured in three suites of spinel- and garnet-bearing harzburgites and lherzolites found as xenoliths in alkaline basalts from Canary Islands, Africa; Victoria Land, Antarctica; and Pali Aike, South America. The xenoliths derive from lithospheric mantle, from depths ranging from 80 to 20 km. Their textures vary from coarse to porphyroclastic and mosaic-porphyroclastic up to cataclastic. Data have been collected by processing digital images acquired optically from standard petrographic thin sections. The acquisition method is based on a high-resolution colour scanner that allows image capturing of a whole thin section. Image processing was performed using the VISILOG 5.2 package, resolving crystals larger than about 150 μm and applying stereological corrections based on the Schwartz-Saltykov algorithm. Taking account of truncation effects due to resolution limits and thin section size, all samples show scale invariance of crystal size distributions over almost three orders of magnitude (0.2-25 mm). Power law relations show fractal dimensions varying between 2.4 and 3.8, a range of values observed for distributions of fragment sizes in a variety of other geological contexts. A fragmentation model can reproduce the fractal dimensions around 2.6, which correspond to well-equilibrated granoblastic textures. Fractal dimensions >3 are typical of porphyroclastic and cataclastic samples. Slight bends in some linear arrays suggest selective tectonic crushing of crystals with size larger than 1 mm. The scale invariance shown by lithospheric mantle xenoliths in a variety of tectonic settings forms distant geographic regions, which indicate that this is a common characteristic of the upper mantle and should be taken into account in rheological models and evaluation of metasomatic models.

  2. Discrete plasticity in sub-10-nm-sized gold crystals

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Cao, Ajing; Weinberger, Christopher R.; Huang, Jian Yu; Du, Kui; Wang, Jianbo; Ma, Yanyun; Xia, Younan; Mao, Scott X.

    2010-01-01

    Although deformation processes in submicron-sized metallic crystals are well documented, the direct observation of deformation mechanisms in crystals with dimensions below the sub-10-nm range is currently lacking. Here, through in situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations, we show that (1) in sharp contrast to what happens in bulk materials, in which plasticity is mediated by dislocation emission from Frank-Read sources and multiplication, partial dislocations emitted from free surfaces dominate the deformation of gold (Au) nanocrystals; (2) the crystallographic orientation (Schmid factor) is not the only factor in determining the deformation mechanism of nanometre-sized Au; and (3) the Au nanocrystal exhibits a phase transformation from a face-centered cubic to a body-centered tetragonal structure after failure. These findings provide direct experimental evidence for the vast amount of theoretical modelling on the deformation mechanisms of nanomaterials that have appeared in recent years. PMID:21266994

  3. Direct observation of minimum-sized amyloid fibrils using solution NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Yuichi; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Lee, Young-Ho; Ikegami, Takahisa; Chatani, Eri; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    It is challenging to investigate the structure and dynamics of amyloid fibrils at the residue and atomic resolution because of their high molecular weight and heterogeneous properties. Here, we used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterize the conformation and flexibility of amyloid fibrils of β2-microglobulin (β2m), for which direct observation of solution NMR could not be made. Ultrasonication led to fragmentation producing a solution of minimum-sized fibrils with a molecular weight of around 6 MDa. In 1H-15N heteronuclear single-quantum correlation measurements, five signals, derived from N-terminal residues (i.e., Ile1, Gln2, Arg3, Thr4, and Lys6), were newly detected. Signal strength decreased with the distance from the N-terminal end. Capping experiments with the unlabeled β2m monomer indicated that the signals originated from molecules located inside the fibrils. Ultrasonication makes the residues with moderate flexibility observable by reducing size of the fibrils. Thus, solution NMR measurements of ultrasonicated fibrils will be promising for studying the structure and dynamics of fibrils. PMID:20936689

  4. On the relationship of minimum detectable contrast to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifang; Scott, Alexander, II; Allahverdian, Janet; Lee, Christina; Kightlinger, Blake; Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    CT dose optimization is typically guided by pixel noise or contrast-to-noise ratio that does not delineate low contrast details adequately. We utilized the statistically defined low contrast detectability to study its relationship to dose and lesion size in abdominal CT. A realistically shaped medium sized abdomen phantom was customized to contain a cylindrical void of 4 cm diameter. The void was filled with a low contrast (1% and 2%) insert containing six groups of cylindrical targets ranging from 1.2 mm to 7 mm in size. Helical CT scans were performed using a Siemens 64-slice mCT and a GE Discovery 750 HD at various doses. After the subtractions between adjacent slices, the uniform sections of the filtered backprojection reconstructed images were partitioned to matrices of square elements matching the sizes of the targets. It was verified that the mean values from all the elements in each matrix follow a Gaussian distribution. The minimum detectable contrast (MDC), quantified by the mean signal to background difference equal to the distribution’s standard deviation multiplied by 3.29, corresponding to 95% confidence level, was found to be related to the phantom specific dose and the element size by a power law (R^2  >  0.990). Independent readings on the 5 mm and 7 mm targets were compared to the measured contrast to the MDC ratios. The results showed that 93% of the cases were detectable when the measured contrast exceeds the MDC. The correlation of the MDC to the pixel noise and target size was also identified and the relationship was found to be the same for the scanners in the study. To quantify the impact of iterative reconstructions to the low contrast detectability, the noise structure was studied in a similar manner at different doses and with different ASIR blending fractions. The relationship of the dose to the blending fraction and low contrast detectability is presented.

  5. On the origin of size-dependent and size-independent crystal growth: Influence of advection and diffusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments were conducted using potassium alum and calcite crystals in aqueous solution under both non-stirred and stirred conditions to elucidate the mechanism for size-dependent (proportionate) and size-independent (constant) crystal growth. Growth by these two laws can be distinguished from each other because the relative size difference among crystals is maintained during proportionate growth, leading to a constant crystal size variance (??2) for a crystal size distribution (CSD) as the mean size increases. The absolute size difference among crystals is maintained during constant growth, resulting in a decrease in size variance. Results of these experiments show that for centimeter-sized alum crystals, proportionate growth occurs in stirred systems, whereas constant growth occurs in non-stirred systems. Accordingly, the mechanism for proportionate growth is hypothesized to be related to the supply of reactants to the crystal surface by advection, whereas constant growth is related to supply by diffusion. Paradoxically, micrometer-sized calcite crystals showed proportionate growth both in stirred and in non-stirred systems. Such growth presumably results from the effects of convection and Brownian motion, which promote an advective environment and hence proportionate growth for minute crystals in non-stirred systems, thereby indicating the importance of solution velocity relative to crystal size. Calcite crystals grown in gels, where fluid motion was minimized, showed evidence for constant, diffusion-controlled growth. Additional investigations of CSDs of naturally occurring crystals indicate that proportionate growth is by far the most common growth law, thereby suggesting that advection, rather than diffusion, is the dominant process for supplying reactants to crystal surfaces.

  6. An assessment of calcite crystal growth mechanisms based on crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kile, D.E.; Eberl, D.D.; Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth experiments were undertaken to test a recently proposed model that relates crystal growth mechanisms to the shapes of crystal size distributions (CSDs). According to this approach, CSDs for minerals have three basic shapes: (1) asymptotic, which is related to a crystal growth mechanism having constant-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; (2) lognormal, which results from decaying-rate nucleation accompanied by surface-controlled growth; and (3) a theoretical, universal, steady-state curve attributed to Ostwald ripening. In addition, there is a fourth crystal growth mechanism that does not have a specific CSD shape, but which preserves the relative shapes of previously formed CSDs. This mechanism is attributed to supply-controlled growth. All three shapes were produced experimentally in the calcite growth experiments by modifying nucleation conditions and solution concentrations. The asymptotic CSD formed when additional reactants were added stepwise to the surface of solutions that were supersaturated with respect to calcite (initial Ω = 20, where Ω = 1 represents saturation), thereby leading to the continuous nucleation and growth of calcite crystals. Lognormal CSDs resulted when reactants were added continuously below the solution surface, via a submerged tube, to similarly supersaturated solutions (initial Ω = 22 to 41), thereby leading to a single nucleation event followed by surface-controlled growth. The Ostwald CSD resulted when concentrated reactants were rapidly mixed, leading initially to high levels of supersaturation (Ω >100), and to the formation and subsequent dissolution of very small nuclei, thereby yielding CSDs having small crystal size variances. The three CSD shapes likely were produced early in the crystallization process, in the nanometer crystal size range, and preserved during subsequent growth. Preservation of the relative shapes of the CSDs indicates that a supply-controlled growth mechanism

  7. Impact of calcium on struvite crystal size, shape and purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Kristell S.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Hobbs, Phil; Parsons, Simon A.

    2005-10-01

    Struvite precipitation occurs spontaneously in wastewater treatment plants under conditions that are influenced by many factors including concentration of Mg 2+, NH 4+, and PO 43- ions, pH, temperature, and mixing energy. These parameters are often difficult to control and as a result struvite generates problems of scale deposits in areas such as pipes and recirculation pumps. At the same time, struvite is considered as a potentially marketable product as an alternative fertiliser. For those two reasons, it has become important to study the principles of struvite precipitation, and to assess the parameters controlling struvite crystallisation. In the present work, the influence of Ca 2+ ions on the precipitation of struvite was investigated in aqueous solutions containing Mg 2+, NH 4+, and PO 43- ions in a molar ratio 1:2:2 at room temperature and constant pH. Different laboratory experiments have been used to assess the effects of Ca 2+ ions on size, shape, and purity of the crystals formed. Tools used include particle size analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS). The experimental results showed that the presence of calcium in the media can affect significantly struvite crystal growth and the characteristics of the crystal produced.

  8. Next generation cooled long range thermal sights with minimum size, weight, and power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, R.; Ihle, T.; Wendler, J.; Rühlich, I.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Situational awareness and precise targeting at day, night and severe weather conditions are key elements for mission success in asymmetric warfare. To support these capabilities for the dismounted soldier, AIM has developed a family of stand-alone thermal weapon sights based on high performance cooled IR-modules which are used e.g. in the infantryman of the future program of the German army (IdZ). The design driver for these sights is a long ID range <1500m for the NATO standard target to cover the operational range of a platoon with the engagement range of .50 cal rifles, 40mm AGLs or for reconnaissance tasks. The most recent sight WBZG has just entered into serial production for the IdZ enhanced system of the German army with additional capabilities like a wireless data link to the soldier backbone computer. Minimum size, weight and power (SWaP) are most critical requirements for the dismounted soldiers' equipment and sometimes push a decision towards uncooled equipment with marginal performance referring to the outstanding challenges in current asymmetric warfare, e.g. the capability to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in adequate ranges. To provide the uncompromised e/o performance with SWaP parameters close to uncooled, AIM has developed a new thermal weapon sight based on high operating temperature (HOT) MCT MWIR FPAs together with a new low power single piston stirling cooler. In basic operation the sight is used as a clip-on in front of the rifle scope. An additional eyepiece for stand-alone targeting with e.g. AGLs or a biocular version for relaxed surveillance will be available. The paper will present details of the technologies applied for such long range cooled sights with size, weight and power close to uncooled.

  9. Study of flutter related computational procedures for minimum weight structural sizing of advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oconnell, R. F.; Hassig, H. J.; Radovcich, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results of a study of the development of flutter modules applicable to automated structural design of advanced aircraft configurations, such as a supersonic transport, are presented. Automated structural design is restricted to automated sizing of the elements of a given structural model. It includes a flutter optimization procedure; i.e., a procedure for arriving at a structure with minimum mass for satisfying flutter constraints. Methods of solving the flutter equation and computing the generalized aerodynamic force coefficients in the repetitive analysis environment of a flutter optimization procedure are studied, and recommended approaches are presented. Five approaches to flutter optimization are explained in detail and compared. An approach to flutter optimization incorporating some of the methods discussed is presented. Problems related to flutter optimization in a realistic design environment are discussed and an integrated approach to the entire flutter task is presented. Recommendations for further investigations are made. Results of numerical evaluations, applying the five methods of flutter optimization to the same design task, are presented.

  10. Multiscale sampling of plant diversity: Effects of minimum mapping unit size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Chong, G.W.; Kalkhan, M.A.; Schell, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    Only a small portion of any landscape can be sampled for vascular plant diversity because of constraints of cost (salaries, travel time between sites, etc.). Often, the investigator decides to reduce the cost of creating a vegetation map by increasing the minimum mapping unit (MMU), and/or by reducing the number of vegetation classes to be considered. Questions arise about what information is sacrificed when map resolution is decreased. We compared plant diversity patterns from vegetation maps made with 100-ha, 50-ha, 2-ha, and 0.02-ha MMUs in a 754-ha study area in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, United States, using four 0.025-ha and 21 0.1-ha multiscale vegetation plots. We developed and tested species-log(area) curves, correcting the curves for within-vegetation type heterogeneity with Jaccard's coefficients. Total species richness in the study area was estimated from vegetation maps at each resolution (MMU), based on the corrected species-area curves, total area of the vegetation type, and species overlap among vegetation types. With the 0.02-ha MMU, six vegetation types were recovered, resulting in an estimated 552 species (95% CI = 520-583 species) in the 754-ha study area (330 plant species were observed in the 25 plots). With the 2-ha MMU, five vegetation types were recognized, resulting in an estimated 473 species for the study area. With the 50-ha MMU, 439 plant species were estimated for the four vegetation types recognized in the study area. With the 100-ha MMU, only three vegetation types were recognized, resulting in an estimated 341 plant species for the study area. Locally rare species and keystone ecosystems (areas of high or unique plant diversity) were missed at the 2-ha, 50-ha, and 100-ha scales. To evaluate the effects of minimum mapping unit size requires: (1) an initial stratification of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and rare habitat types; and (2) an evaluation of within-type and between-type heterogeneity generated by environmental

  11. Investigation of the size effect for photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Xu, W.; Bai, J.; Chua, C. K.; Wei, J.; Li, Z.; Gao, Y.; Kim, D. H.; Zhou, K.

    2016-10-01

    Three types of photonic crystal (PC) thin films have been prepared for the investigation of their deformation behaviors by nanoindentation tests at the microscale and nanoscale. Each type of PC thin film was composed of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles with a uniform size. Another type of thin film was prepared by assembling nanoparticles with three different sizes. It was exciting to observe that the hardness and Young’s modulus were significantly improved (more than 15 times) in well-ordered PC thin films than disordered ones. Furthermore, size-dependent mechanical properties were observed for the three types of PCs. Such a size effect phenomenon can be attributed to the special polycrystalline material having a periodical face-centered cubic structure of PC thin films. Furthermore, the indentation size effect that shows that the indentation hardness decreases with an increasing indentation depth has also been observed for all four types of thin films. It is conjectured that the application of the PC structure to other functional materials may enhance their mechanical properties.

  12. Stability and minimum size of colloidal clusters on a liquid-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pergamenshchik, V. M.

    2012-02-01

    A vertical force applied to each of two colloids, trapped at a liquid-air interface, induces their logarithmic pairwise attraction. I recently showed [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.79.011407 79, 011407 (2009)] that in clusters of size R much larger than the capillary length λ, the attraction changes to that of a power law and is much stronger due to a many-body effect, and I derived two equations that describe the equilibrium coarse-grained meniscus profile and colloid density in such clusters. In this paper, this theory is shown also to describe small clusters with R≪ λ provided the number N of colloids therein is sufficiently large. An analytical solution for a small circular cluster with an arbitrary short-range power-law pairwise repulsion is found. The energy of a cluster is obtained as a function of its radius R and colloid number N. As in large clusters, the attraction force and energy universally scale with the distance L between colloids as L-3 and L-2, respectively, for any repulsion forces. The states of an equilibrium cluster, predicted by the theory, are shown to be stable with respect to small perturbations of the meniscus profile and colloid density. The minimum number of colloids in a circular cluster, which sustains the thermal motion, is estimated. For standard parameters, it can be very modest, e.g., in the range 20-200, which is in line with experimental findings on reversible clusterization on a liquid-air interface.

  13. 7 CFR 932.153 - Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for processed olives for limited uses. 932.153 Section 932.153 Agriculture Regulations of the..., Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.153 Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses. (a)...

  14. 7 CFR 932.153 - Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for processed olives for limited uses. 932.153 Section 932.153 Agriculture Regulations of the..., Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.153 Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses. (a)...

  15. 7 CFR 932.153 - Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... for processed olives for limited uses. 932.153 Section 932.153 Agriculture Regulations of the..., Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.153 Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses. (a)...

  16. 7 CFR 932.153 - Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... for processed olives for limited uses. 932.153 Section 932.153 Agriculture Regulations of the..., VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.153 Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses. (a)...

  17. 7 CFR 932.153 - Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... for processed olives for limited uses. 932.153 Section 932.153 Agriculture Regulations of the..., VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Rules and Regulations § 932.153 Establishment of minimum quality and size requirements for processed olives for limited uses. (a)...

  18. Crystal Size Distributions in Igneous rocks: Where are we now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M.

    2003-12-01

    Modern Crystal Size Distributions (CSD) studies started in 1988 and have expanded since then, albeit somewhat slowly. We have now measured CSDs in a variety of different compositions and for both plutonic and volcanic rocks. However, the subject still lags far behind chemical petrology and we need many more studies. CSD methodology has advanced considerably, both for 3D and 2D methods, but it is unfortunate that some 2D studies still do not use appropriate stereological conversions or publish their raw data. The nature of the lower size limit is very important, real or measurement artefact, but is not commonly stated. All this is especially important for comparing data with earlier studies. Individual CSDs of minerals are not always very informative. A much better approach is to look at suites of related CSDs. For instance, different minerals within a single sample, ensembles of related whole rock samples, comparison of late and early textures as preserved in oikocrysts, dykes or volcanic rocks. As more data become available it will be possible to compare usefully unrelated suites of rocks. Straight or nearly straight CSDs in volcanic rocks can be produced by steady-state crystallisation. If the growth rate is known then the residence time can be determined. In some rocks there is a good agreement with other chronometric techniques, but others show no such concordance. In the latter case another model may be more appropriate, such as textural coarsening. This model has been applied in some cases in inappropriate situations, which has cast doubt on the whole subject of CSDs. For plutonic rocks exponentially increasing undercooling can also produce straight CSDs. However, many CSDs are slightly curved and other models are possible, especially if no small crystals are present. Within ensembles of straight CSDs the slope and intercept are commonly correlated. This is mostly accounted for by closure and hence this correlation is not significant, although the variation

  19. Sizes and spatial relationships of crystals in granitic plutons: Exploring the crystallization gaps, heterogeneous nucleation, and mechanical clustering of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, V.; Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    Quantitative measurements on magmatic textures provide an important insight into nucleation and growth rates as well as mechanical effects such as crystal settling and melt extraction in magma reservoirs. Crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements and spatial analysis are routinely applied to dilute volcanic suspensions but comparable data on holocrystalline multiphase plutonic rocks are uncommon. We present quantitative description of CSDs and spatial relationships for all rock-forming minerals from an intrusive suite of the Fichtelgebirge/Smrčiny granite batholith in central Europe. This composite body represents two spatially unrelated chambers, consisting of peraluminous biotite, two-mica, and tourmaline-muscovite granites, crystallized as texturally diverse batches covering equigranular, serial porphyritic, and hiatal porphyritic fine- to coarse-grained types. All granite samples exhibit straight to concave-up CSDs in the natural log of population density vs. crystal size projection. Straight CSDs were only found in fine-grained biotite-rich granites representing early crystallizing roof facies of the batholith. For all other samples, the slope decreases from -65 to nearly 0 mm-1 as grain size increases. The curvature can result from superposition of two quasilinear segments. It cannot be produced by two separate crystallization events because the population of larger grains is about 10 times more abundant by volume than the fine one. Instead, we propose that the concave-up CSDs developed in situ, with enhanced nucleation and/or reduced growth rates during the final stage of solidification. Spatial analysis and measurements of contact relationships reveal significant clustering of crystals except near the roof of the batholith. The clustering index decreases to 0.6 for the smallest crystals (random = 1), Ripley's Ľ-function reaches 0.8 mm, and the clusters are mineral sensitive: pairs of like phases appear to be more clustered than the unlike pairs. The

  20. Growth of high quality bulk size single crystals of inverted solubility lithium sulphate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Silambarasan, A.; Rajesh, P. Ramasamy, P.

    2015-06-24

    The paper summarizes the processes of growing large lithium sulfate monohydrate (LSMH) single crystals. We have established a procedure to grow high quality bulk size single crystals of inverted solubility LSMH by a newly developed unidirectional crystallization technique called the Sankeranarayenan - Ramasamy (SR) method. The convective flow of crystal growth processes from solution and the conditions of growing crystals of various aspects were discussed. Good quality LSMH single crystal is grown of the size 20 mmX80 mm without cracks, localized-defects and inclusions. The as-grown crystals are suitable for piezoelectric and nonlinear optical applications.

  1. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2015-03-01

    Earth-based radar observation of Mercury's rotation vector combined with gravity observation by the MESSENGER spacecraft yield a measure of Mercury's moment of inertia and the amplitude of the 88-day libration of its silicate shell. These two geodetic constraints provide information on Mercury's interior structure, including the presence of a fluid core, the radius of the core-mantle boundary and the bulk densities of the core and mantle. In this work, we show how they further provide information on the size of the solid inner core and on the crystallization regime of the fluid core. If Mercury's fluid core is a Fe-FeS alloy with a sulfur concentration on the Fe-rich side of the eutectic, the largest inner core compatible with geodetic observations at the 1σ level is 1325 ± 250 km. Our results further suggest that the crystallization scenario that best fits the geodetic observations involves the formation of Fe-snow within the fluid core, and that this scenario is preferred for models with an iron-poor mantle composition. Consequently, Mercury's dynamo most likely operates in concert with snow formation. For an inner core larger than ∼650 km, snow formation extends to the inner core boundary. If a dynamo cannot be maintained by the dynamics of snow formation, or if such dynamo produces a magnetic field incompatible with observation, Mercury's inner core must then be smaller than 650 km.

  2. Coupled crystal orientation-size effects on the strength of nano crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Rui; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Zhou, Caizhi

    2016-01-01

    We study the combined effects of grain size and texture on the strength of nanocrystalline copper (Cu) and nickel (Ni) using a crystal-plasticity based mechanics model. Within the model, slip occurs in discrete slip events exclusively by individual dislocations emitted statistically from the grain boundaries. We show that a Hall-Petch relationship emerges in both initially texture and non-textured materials and our values are in agreement with experimental measurements from numerous studies. We find that the Hall-Petch slope increases with texture strength, indicating that preferred orientations intensify the enhancements in strength that accompany grain size reductions. These findings reveal that texture is too influential to be neglected when analyzing and engineering grain size effects for increasing nanomaterial strength. PMID:27185364

  3. 50 CFR 622.407 - Minimum size limits and other harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic § 622.407 Minimum... (c) of this section— (i) No person may possess a spiny lobster in or from the EEZ with a carapace length of 3.0 inches (7.62 cm) or less; and (ii) A spiny lobster, harvested in the EEZ by means...

  4. 50 CFR 622.407 - Minimum size limits and other harvest limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic § 622.407 Minimum... (c) of this section— (i) No person may possess a spiny lobster in or from the EEZ with a carapace length of 3.0 inches (7.62 cm) or less; and (ii) A spiny lobster, harvested in the EEZ by means...

  5. 43 CFR 3206.12 - What are the minimum and maximum lease sizes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... all lands available for leasing in the section, whichever is less. The largest lease we will issue is... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What are the minimum and maximum lease...) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL...

  6. Analysis of the Effect of Degree Correlation on the Size of Minimum Dominating Sets in Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Network controllability is an important topic in wide-ranging research fields. However, the relationship between controllability and network structure is poorly understood, although degree heterogeneity is known to determine the controllability. We focus on the size of a minimum dominating set (MDS), a measure of network controllability, and investigate the effect of degree-degree correlation, which is universally observed in real-world networks, on the size of an MDS. We show that disassortativity or negative degree-degree correlation reduces the size of an MDS using analytical treatments and numerical simulation, whereas positive correlations hardly affect the size of an MDS. This result suggests that disassortativity enhances network controllability. Furthermore, apart from the controllability issue, the developed techniques provide new ways of analyzing complex networks with degree-degree correlations. PMID:27327273

  7. Minimum size limits for yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, Wilbur L.; Nepszy, Stephen J.; Scholl, Russell L.

    1980-01-01

    During the 1960's yellow perch (Perca flavescens) of Lake Erie supported a commercial fishery that produced an average annual catch of 23 million pounds, as well as a modest sport fishery. Since 1969, the resource has seriously deteriorated. Commercial landings amounted to only 6 million pounds in 1976, and included proportionally more immature perch than in the 1960's. Moreover, no strong year classes were produced between 1965 and 1975. An interagency technical committee was appointed in 1975 by the Lake Erie Committee of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission to develop an interim management strategy that would provide for greater protection of perch in western Lake Erie, where declines have been the most severe. The committee first determined the age structure, growth and mortality rates, maturation schedule, and length-fecundity relationship for the population, and then applied Ricker-type equilibrium yield models to determine the effects of various minimum length limits on yield, production, average stock weight, potential egg deposition, and the Abrosov spawning frequency indicator (average number of spawning opportunities per female). The committee recommended increasing the minimum length limit of 5.0 inches to at least 8.5 inches. Theoretically, this change would increase the average stock weight by 36% and potential egg deposition by 44%, without significantly decreasing yield. Abrosov's spawning frequency indicator would rise from the existing 0.6 to about 1.2.

  8. Minimum radiation force target size for power measurements in focused ultrasonic fields with circular symmetry.

    PubMed

    Beissner, K

    2010-12-01

    The time-averaged ultrasonic power emitted by medical ultrasonic equipment is mostly measured using a radiation force balance, and the question of the necessary target size is of practical importance. The question is answered here by calculations based on a Rayleigh integral algorithm for fields from circular, focusing transducers. This case occurs particularly in the field of high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. The calculation yields the necessary size of an absorbing target so that the radiation force is 98% of that exerted on an absorber of infinite lateral size, and this as a function of the transducer-to-target distance, of the transducer radius in comparison with the wavelength and of the focus (half-)angle. Several distributions of the transducer vibration amplitude are considered. The Rayleigh integral strictly applies only to planar transducers, but among the amplitude distributions there is also one that allows the simulation of the spherically curved transducer type often found in practice.

  9. Hedge math: Theoretical limits on minimum stockpile size across nuclear hedging strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, Jarret Marshall; Roesler, Alexander W.

    2016-09-01

    In June 2013, the Department of Defense published a congressionally mandated, unclassified update on the U.S. Nuclear Employment Strategy. Among the many updates in this document are three key ground rules for guiding the sizing of the non-deployed U.S. nuclear stockpile. Furthermore, these ground rules form an important and objective set of criteria against which potential future stockpile hedging strategies can be evaluated.

  10. Minimum sample sizes for population genomics: an empirical study from an Amazonian plant species.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Alison G; Bemmels, Jordan B; Dick, Christopher W; Lohmann, Lúcia G

    2017-01-12

    High-throughput DNA sequencing facilitates the analysis of large portions of the genome in nonmodel organisms, ensuring high accuracy of population genetic parameters. However, empirical studies evaluating the appropriate sample size for these kinds of studies are still scarce. In this study, we use double-digest restriction-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq) to recover thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for two physically isolated populations of Amphirrhox longifolia (Violaceae), a nonmodel plant species for which no reference genome is available. We used resampling techniques to construct simulated populations with a random subset of individuals and SNPs to determine how many individuals and biallelic markers should be sampled for accurate estimates of intra- and interpopulation genetic diversity. We identified 3646 and 4900 polymorphic SNPs for the two populations of A. longifolia, respectively. Our simulations show that, overall, a sample size greater than eight individuals has little impact on estimates of genetic diversity within A. longifolia populations, when 1000 SNPs or higher are used. Our results also show that even at a very small sample size (i.e. two individuals), accurate estimates of FST can be obtained with a large number of SNPs (≥1500). These results highlight the potential of high-throughput genomic sequencing approaches to address questions related to evolutionary biology in nonmodel organisms. Furthermore, our findings also provide insights into the optimization of sampling strategies in the era of population genomics.

  11. [Factors which influence the size of calcium oxalat crystals during their formation from saturated solutions].

    PubMed

    Hartung, R; Leskovar, P

    1978-07-01

    The nucleation and growth of Ca-oxalate crystals from metastable and instable solutions was studied in some detail to find out the dependence of the crystal size on the absolute calcium resp. oxalate concentration, further on their molar ratio, on the presence resp. absence of crystal seeds, on the agitation resp. stagnation of the Ca-oxalate solution, on the duration of crystallization and on the renewing of the Ca-oxalate containing supernatant, thus simulating a prolonged (dietary) oxalate load in vivo. The most important findings are the clear inhibition of crystal growth at higher and very high calcium concentrations (in contrary to the unhindered crystal enlargement at high oxalate concentrations), further the eminent role of the oxalate in the formation of big crystals and crystal aggregates, as well as the substantial crystal enlargement at the persistent oxalate load.

  12. Minimum graft size calculated from preoperative recipient status in living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marubashi, Shigeru; Nagano, Hiroaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Wada, Hiroshi; Asaoka, Tadafumi; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Tomokuni, Akira; Umeshita, Koji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Small-for-size graft syndrome is an inevitable complication in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We hypothesized that graft weight (GW) measured after graft procurement is one of the variables predicting postoperative graft function. A total of 138 consecutive recipients of adult-to-adult LDLT between March 1999 and October 2014 were included in this study. We investigated the factors associated with small-for-size-associated graft loss (SAGL) to determine the GW required for each patient. Both preoperatively assessed and postoperatively obtained risk factors for SAGL were analyzed in univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Twelve (8.8%) of the transplant recipients had SAGL. In multivariate logistic regression analyses using preoperatively assessed variables, the preoperative Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (P < 0.001) and actual GW/recipient standard liver volume (SLV) ratio (P = 0.008) were independent predictors of SAGL. The recommended graft volume by preoperative computed tomography volumetry was calculated as SLV × (1.616 × MELD + 0.344)/100/0.85 (mL) [MELD ≥ 18.2], or SLV × 0.35 (mL) [MELD < 18.2]. The required allograft volume in LDLT can be determined by the preoperative MELD score of the recipient, and patients with higher MELD scores require larger grafts or deceased donor whole liver transplant to avoid SAGL. Liver Transplantation 22 599-606 2016 AASLD.

  13. Spatial Distribution and Minimum Sample Size for Overwintering Larvae of the Rice Stem Borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) in Paddy Fields.

    PubMed

    Arbab, A

    2014-10-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), feeds almost exclusively in paddy fields in most regions of the world. The study of its spatial distribution is fundamental for designing correct control strategies, improving sampling procedures, and adopting precise agricultural techniques. Field experiments were conducted during 2011 and 2012 to estimate the spatial distribution pattern of the overwintering larvae. Data were analyzed using five distribution indices and two regression models (Taylor and Iwao). All of the indices and Taylor's model indicated random spatial distribution pattern of the rice stem borer overwintering larvae. Iwao's patchiness regression was inappropriate for our data as shown by the non-homogeneity of variance, whereas Taylor's power law fitted the data well. The coefficients of Taylor's power law for a combined 2 years of data were a = -0.1118, b = 0.9202 ± 0.02, and r (2) = 96.81. Taylor's power law parameters were used to compute minimum sample size needed to estimate populations at three fixed precision levels, 5, 10, and 25% at 0.05 probabilities. Results based on this equation parameters suggesting that minimum sample sizes needed for a precision level of 0.25 were 74 and 20 rice stubble for rice stem borer larvae when the average larvae is near 0.10 and 0.20 larvae per rice stubble, respectively.

  14. Energy surface and minimum energy paths for Fréedericksz transitions in bistable cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. V.; Bessarab, P. F.; Aksenova, E. V.; Romanov, V. P.; Uzdin, V. M.

    2016-04-01

    The multidimensional energy surface of a cholesteric liquid crystal in a planar cell is investigated as a function of spherical coordinates determining the director orientation. Minima on the energy surface correspond to the stable states with particular director distribution. External electric and magnetic fields deform the energy surface and positions of minima. It can lead to the transitions between states, known as the Fréedericksz effect. Transitions can be continuous or discontinuous depending on parameters of the liquid crystal which determine an energy surface. In a case of discontinuous transition when a barrier between stable states is comparable with the thermal energy, the activation transitions may occur, and it leads to the modification of characteristics of the Fréedericksz effect with temperature without explicit temperature dependencies of liquid crystal parameters. A minimum energy path between stable states on the energy surface for the Fréedericksz transition is found using the geodesic nudged elastic band method. Knowledge of this path, which has maximal statistical weight among all other paths, gives the information about a barrier between stable states and configuration of director orientation during the transition. It also allows one to estimate the stability of states with respect to the thermal fluctuations and their lifetime when the system is close to the Fréedericksz transition.

  15. Dependence of Raman Spectral Intensity on Crystal Size in Organic Nano Energetics.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajen B; Stepanov, Victor; Qiu, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Raman spectra for various nitramine energetic compounds were investigated as a function of crystal size at the nanoscale regime. In the case of 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20), there was a linear relationship between intensity of Raman spectra and crystal size. Notably, the Raman modes between 120 cm(-1) and 220 cm(-1) were especially affected, and at the smallest crystal size, were completely eliminated. The Raman spectral intensity of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), like that of CL-20's, depended linearly on crystal size. The Raman spectral intensity of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), however, was not observably changed by crystal size. A non-nitramine explosive compound, 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5- trinitrobenzene (TATB), was also investigated. Its spectral intensity was also found to correlate linearly with crystal size, although substantially less so than that of HMX and CL-20. To explain the observed trends, it is hypothesized that disordered molecular arrangement, originating from the crystal surface, may be responsible. In particular, it appears that the thickness of the disordered surface layer is dependent on molecular characteristics, including size and conformational flexibility. Furthermore, as the mean crystal size decreases, the volume fraction of disordered molecules within a specimen increases, consequently, weakening the Raman intensity. These results could have practical benefit for allowing the facile monitoring of crystal size during manufacturing. Finally, these findings could lead to deep insights into the general structure of the surface of crystals.

  16. Effect of additives on size and shape of lithium carbonate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborga, P.; Brito, I.; Graber, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    Generally, properties such internal structure, shape, and size distribution influence the reactivity, fluidity and wettability of the crystals, and may be modified by the use of additives such as polyelectrolytes or surfactants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different additives on the size and morphology of lithium carbonate crystals obtained by reactive crystallization from solutions of LiCl and Na2CO3. The additives used were: polyethylenimine (PEI), polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly (4-styrenesulfonic acid), (P4SA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate (SDBS). Obtained crystals were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the crystal size distribution was determined by a size image analyzer, and the crystal structure were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the presence of PEI, PEG and P4SA, increased the length of the lithium carbonate particles. The presence of SDS decreases the crystals size. Using SDBS as additive, the crystals had a needle-like shape, Finally PAA allowed the production of Li2CO3 spherulites. Crystal structure of lithium carbonate did not change in the presence of the tested additives.

  17. On geological interpretations of crystal size distributions: Constant vs. proportionate growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Kile, D.E.; Drits, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    Geological interpretations of crystal size distributions (CSDs) depend on understanding the crystal growth laws that generated the distributions. Most descriptions of crystal growth, including a population-balance modeling equation that is widely used in petrology, assume that crystal growth rates at any particular time are identical for all crystals, and, therefore, independent of crystal size. This type of growth under constant conditions can be modeled by adding a constant length to the diameter of each crystal for each time step. This growth equation is unlikely to be correct for most mineral systems because it neither generates nor maintains the shapes of lognormal CSDs, which are among the most common types of CSDs observed in rocks. In an alternative approach, size-dependent (proportionate) growth is modeled approximately by multiplying the size of each crystal by a factor, an operation that maintains CSD shape and variance, and which is in accord with calcite growth experiments. The latter growth law can be obtained during supply controlled growth using a modified version of the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), an equation that simulates the reaction path followed by a CSD shape as mean size increases.

  18. Molecular tectonics: tubular crystals with controllable channel size and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Jin; Jouaiti, Abdelaziz; Pocic, David; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2010-01-07

    The combination of flexible neutral organic tectons based on two pyridines interconnected by a thioether or thioester type spacer with an inorganic ZnSiF(6) pillar leads to the formation of 2-D coordination networks and the packing of the latter generates crystals offering controllable tubular channels with imposed orientation along the pillar axis.

  19. A determination of the minimum sizes of representative volume elements for the prediction of cortical bone elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Grimal, Quentin; Raum, Kay; Gerisch, Alf; Laugier, Pascal

    2011-12-01

    At its highest level of microstructural organization-the mesoscale or millimeter scale-cortical bone exhibits a heterogeneous distribution of pores (Haversian canals, resorption cavities). Multi-scale mechanical models rely on the definition of a representative volume element (RVE). Analytical homogenization techniques are usually based on an idealized RVE microstructure, while finite element homogenization using high-resolution images is based on a realistic RVE of finite size. The objective of this paper was to quantify the size and content of possible cortical bone mesoscale RVEs. RVE size was defined as the minimum size: (1) for which the apparent (homogenized) stiffness tensor becomes independent of the applied boundary conditions or (2) for which the variance of elastic properties for a set of microstructure realizations is sufficiently small. The field of elastic coefficients and microstructure in RVEs was derived from one acoustic microscopy image of a human femur cortical bone sample with an overall porosity of 8.5%. The homogenized properties of RVEs were computed with a finite element technique. It was found that the size of the RVE representative of the overall tissue is about 1.5 mm. Smaller RVEs (~0.5 mm) can also be considered to estimate local mesoscopic properties that strongly depend on the local pores volume fraction. This result provides a sound basis for the application of homogenization techniques to model the heterogeneity of cortical microstructures. An application of the findings to estimate elastic properties in the case of a porosity gradient is briefly presented.

  20. Advancement of proprotor technology. Task 1: Design study summary. [aerodynamic concept of minimum size tilt proprotor research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A tilt-proprotor proof-of-concept aircraft design study has been conducted. The results are presented. The ojective of the contract is to advance the state of proprotor technology through design studies and full-scale wind-tunnel tests. The specific objective is to conduct preliminary design studies to define a minimum-size tilt-proprotor research aircraft that can perform proof-of-concept flight research. The aircraft that results from these studies is a twin-engine, high-wing aircraft with 25-foot, three-bladed tilt proprotors mounted on pylons at the wingtips. Each pylon houses a Pratt and Whitney PT6C-40 engine with a takeoff rating of 1150 horsepower. Empty weight is estimated at 6876 pounds. The normal gross weight is 9500 pounds, and the maximum gross weight is 12,400 pounds.

  1. Minimum X-ray source size for a lamppost corona in light-bending models for AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovciak, M.; Done, C.

    2015-07-01

    The `lamppost' model is often used to describe the X-ray source geometry in AGN, where an infinitesimal point source is located on the black hole spin axis. This is especially invoked for Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies, where an extremely broad iron line seen in episodes of low X-ray flux can be explained by extremely strong relativistic effects as the source approaches the black hole horizon. However, the source must also be large enough to intercept sufficient seed photons from the disc to make the hard X-ray Compton continuum which produces the observed iron line/reflected spectrum. This size scale also sets the minimum height of the corona in order that the source can fit above the event horizon. We calculate this using a fully relativistic ray tracing code, and apply to the most extreme NLS1, 1H0707-495. The inferred source size is too big for it to be at a height of less than one gravitational radius above the horizon.

  2. Selected crystallization of water as a function of size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; He, C.; Lian, J. S.; Jiang, Q.

    2006-04-01

    As the size of liquid water decreases, it freezes to cubic ice (I c) instead of ordinary hexagonal ice (I h). This occurrence is thermodynamically considered by determining their size and temperature dependent Gibbs free energies induced by solid-liquid interfacial free energy and solid-liquid interface stress. The obtained results are consistent with the known experimental and theoretical results. In addition, it is found that the melting temperatures of I c and I h are similar and the entropy difference of I h and I c is negligible.

  3. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Gârlea, Ioana C; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G A L; Lettinga, M Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Mulder, Bela M

    2016-06-29

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals.

  4. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro cytotoxicity of COM and COD crystals with various sizes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Ouyang, Jian-Ming; Liu, Ai-Jie; Ding, Yi-Ming; Gan, Qiong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals in urine often differ in size and crystal phase between healthy humans and patients with kidney stones. In this work, calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and dihydrate (COD) with sizes of about 50 nm, 100 nm, 1 μm, 3 μm, and 10 μm were prepared by varying reactant concentration, reaction temperature, solvent, mixing manner, and stirring speed. These crystals mainly had a smooth surface and no obvious pore structure, except COM-1 μm. In cell culture medium, the zeta potential of crystals became increasingly negative with increasing size, and the absolute value of zeta potential of COD was greater than the same-sized COM. Results of cell viability and PI staining assays showed that the order of injury degree in African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells caused by different sizes of COD was COD-50 nm>COD-100 nm>COD-1 μm>COD-3 μm>COD-10 μm, and that of different sizes of COM was COM-1 μm>COM-50~COM-100 nm>COM-3 μm>COM-10 μm. COM-1 μm presented the highest cytotoxicity in Vero cells, which was associated with its rougher surface, larger specific surface area (SBET), and larger pore volume. Overall, these findings indicated that the physical properties of crystals play an important role in their cytotoxicity.

  5. Director-Configurational Transitions around Microbubbles of Hydrostatically Regulated Size in Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völtz, C.; Maeda, Y.; Tabe, Y.; Yokoyama, H.

    2006-12-01

    A high-pressure technique is introduced which allows a continuous variation of the inclusion size in liquid crystal colloids. We use a nematic liquid crystal host into which micrometer-sized gas bubbles are injected. By applying hydrostatic pressures, the diameter of these gas bubbles can be continuously decreased via compression and absorption of gas into the host liquid crystal, so that the director configurations around a single bubble can be investigated as a function of the bubble size. The theoretically predicted transition from a hyperbolic hedgehog to a Saturn-ring configuration, on reduction of the particle size below a certain threshold, is confirmed to occur at the radius of a few micrometers.

  6. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Large-Size Monolayer MoSe2 Crystals on Molten Glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Tan, Sherman J R; Xu, Hai; Wu, Bo; Liu, Bo; Fu, Deyi; Fu, Wei; Geng, Dechao; Liu, Yanpeng; Liu, Wei; Tang, Wei; Li, Linjun; Zhou, Wu; Sum, Tze Chien; Loh, Kian Ping

    2017-01-25

    We report the fast growth of high-quality millimeter-size monolayer MoSe2 crystals on molten glass using an ambient pressure CVD system. We found that the isotropic surface of molten glass suppresses nucleation events and greatly improves the growth of large crystalline domains. Triangular monolayer MoSe2 crystals with sizes reaching ∼2.5 mm, and with a room-temperature carrier mobility up to ∼95 cm(2)/(V·s), can be synthesized in 5 min. The method can also be used to synthesize millimeter-size monolayer MoS2 crystals. Our results demonstrate that "liquid-state" glass is a highly promising substrate for the low-cost growth of high-quality large-size 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs).

  7. Crystallization of sodium chloride from a concentrated calcium chloride-potassium chloride-sodium chloride solution in a CMSMPR crystallizer: Observation of crystal size distribution and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung Sang

    Compared to overwhelming technical data available in other advanced technologies, knowledge about particle technology, especially in particle synthesis from a solution, is still poor due to the lack of available equipment to study crystallization phenomena in a crystallizer. Recent technical advances in particle size measurement such as Coulter counter and laser light scattering have made in/ex situ study of some of particle synthesis, i.e., growth, attrition, and aggregation, possible with simple systems. Even with these advancements in measurement technology, to grasp fully the crystallization phenomena requires further theoretical and technical advances in understanding such particle synthesis mechanisms. Therefore, it is the motive of this work to establish the general processing parameters and to produce rigorous experimental data with reliable performance and characterization that rigorously account for the crystallization phenomena of nucleation, growth, aggregation, and breakage including their variations with time and space in a controlled continuous mixed-suspension mixed-product removal (CMSMPR) crystallizer. This dissertation reports the results and achievements in the following areas: (1) experimental programs to support the development and validation of the phenomenological models and generation of laboratory data for the purpose of testing, refining, and validating the crystallization process, (2) development of laboratory well-mixed crystallizer system and experimental protocols to generate crystal size distribution (CSD) data, (3) the effects of feed solution concentration, crystallization temperature, feed flow rate, and mixing speed, as well as different types of mixers resulting in the evolution of CSDs with time from a concentrated brine solution, (4) with statistically designed experiments the effects of processing variables on the resultant particle structure and CSD at steady state were quantified and related to each of those operating

  8. On-line digital holographic measurement of size and shape of microparticles for crystallization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanam, Taslima; Darakis, Emmanouil; Rajendran, Arvind; Kariwala, Vinay; Asundi, Anand K.; Naughton, Thomas J.

    2008-09-01

    Crystallization is a widely used chemical process that finds applications in pharmaceutical industries. In an industrial crystallization process, it is not only important to produce pure crystals but also to control the shape and size of the crystals, as they affect the efficiency of downstream processes and the dissolution property of the drug. The effectiveness of control algorithms depend on the availability of on-line, real-time information about these critical properties. In this paper, we investigate the use of lens-less in-line digital holographic microscopy for size and shape measurements for crystallization processes. For this purpose, we use non-crystalline spherical microparticles and carbon fibers with known sizes present in a liquid suspension as test systems. We propose an algorithm to extract size and shape information for a population of microparticles from the experimentally recorded digital holograms. The measurements obtained from the proposed method show good agreement with the corresponding known size and shape of the particles.

  9. Deducing growth mechanisms for minerals from the shapes of crystal size distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    1998-01-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of natural and synthetic samples are observed to have several distinct and different shapes. We have simulated these CSDs using three simple equations: the Law of Proportionate Effect (LPE), a mass balance equation, and equations for Ostwald ripening. The following crystal growth mechanisms are simulated using these equations and their modifications: (1) continuous nucleation and growth in an open system, during which crystals nucleate at either a constant, decaying, or accelerating nucleation rate, and then grow according to the LPE; (2) surface-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with an essentially unlimited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (3) supply-controlled growth in an open system, during which crystals grow with a specified, limited supply of nutrients according to the LPE; (4) supply- or surface-controlled Ostwald ripening in a closed system, during which the relative rate of crystal dissolution and growth is controlled by differences in specific surface area and by diffusion rate; and (5) supply-controlled random ripening in a closed system, during which the rate of crystal dissolution and growth is random with respect to specific surface area. Each of these mechanisms affects the shapes of CSDs. For example, mechanism (1) above with a constant nucleation rate yields asymptotically-shaped CSDs for which the variance of the natural logarithms of the crystal sizes (??2) increases exponentially with the mean of the natural logarithms of the sizes (??). Mechanism (2) yields lognormally-shaped CSDs, for which ??2 increases linearly with ??, whereas mechanisms (3) and (5) do not change the shapes of CSDs, with ??2 remaining constant with increasing ??. During supply-controlled Ostwald ripening (4), initial lognormally-shaped CSDs become more symmetric, with ??2 decreasing with increasing ??. Thus, crystal growth mechanisms often can be deduced by noting trends in ?? versus ??2 of CSDs for

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Large-Sized Hexagonal WSe₂ Crystals on Dielectric Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyi; Liu, Bo; Liu, Yanpeng; Tang, Wei; Nai, Chang Tai; Li, Linjun; Zheng, Jian; Gao, Libo; Zheng, Yi; Shin, Hyun Suk; Jeong, Hu Young; Loh, Kian Ping

    2015-11-01

    High-quality large-sized hexagoal WSe2 crystals can be grown on dielectric substrates using atmospheric chemical vapor deposition in the presence of hydrogen gas. These hexagonal crystals (lateral width >160 um) have a carrier mobility of 100 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a photoresponsivity of ≈1100 mA W(-1), which is comparable to that of exfoliated flakes.

  11. Grain size control for CVD-grown single crystal mono- and bi-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhengtang

    2015-03-01

    By suppressing the nucleation density during Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) growth, we demonstrate that the large-size single crystal monolayer and bilayer graphene can be synthesized by this method. For single layer, single crystals with diameter up to 5.9 mm, have been successfully obtained by adjusting degree of oxidation during surface treatment step and hydrogen annealing duration during growth, thereby allow us to control nucleation density and consequently to control graphene grains sizes. For bilayer growth, our main strategy is to maximize the duration that is controlled by the absorption-diffusion mechanism. With this method, sub-millimeter size single crystal bilayer graphene is also obtained. Electron transport measurement on those produced graphene has shown carrier mobility that is comparable with that of mechanical exfoliated graphene, indicating the high quality of our graphene sample. This project is supported by the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong SAR (Project Number 623512 and DAG12EG05).

  12. A Theory of the von Weimarn Rules Governing the Average Size of Crystals Precipitated from a Supersaturated Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Douglas A.; Baird, James K.; Su, Ching-Hua

    2003-01-01

    More than 75 years ago, von Weimarn summarized his observations of the dependence of the average crystal size on the initial relative concentration supersaturation prevailing in a solution from which crystals were growing. Since then, his empirically derived rules have become part of the lore of crystal growth. The first of these rules asserts that the average crystal size measured at the end of a crystallization increases as the initial value of the relative supersaturation decreases. The second rule states that for a given crystallization time, the average crystal size passes through a maximum as a function of the initial relative supersaturation. Using a theory of nucleation and growth due to Buyevich and Mansurov, we calculate the average crystal size as a function of the initial relative supersaturation. We confirm the von Weimarn rules for the case where the nucleation rate is proportional to the third power or higher of the relative supersaturation.

  13. Effects of preferred orientation and crystal size on thermoelectric properties of sodium cobalt oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yin; Wang, Jun; Yaer, Xinba; Miao, Lei; Zhang, Boyu; Guo, Feng; Zhang, Shuai

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effect of crystal size and orientation effect on ZT, polycrystalline NaxCo2O4 materials were prepared by pressing layered crystals obtained in sol-gel (SG) synthesis, molten salt synthesis (MSS) with and without additional ball milling (BM) treatment and 1:1 molar ratio mixture (Mixture) of BM powder and MSS powders. We found that the orientation effect and crystal size for four samples follow Mixture < SG < BM < MSS and BM < Mixture < SG < MSS, respectively. Electrical conductivity was obviously enhanced in the highly orientated BM and MSS samples when compared with SG and Mixture. It appears that the crystal size plays a dominant role in thermal conductivity rather than Seebeck coefficient by controlling the phonon scattering at grain boundaries. Thermal conductivity for BM was significantly decreased in comparison to MSS, although both BM and MSS show comparable orientation effect. The maximum ZT value is developed to near 0.51 at 814K upon increasing the electrical resistivity and decreasing the thermal conductivity, which are mainly governed by the condition of crystal size and orientation effect.

  14. Size dependences of crystal structure and magnetic properties of DyMnO3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, T.; Terashita, N.; Hamamoto, K.; Deguchi, H.; Mito, M.; Morimoto, Y.; Konishi, K.; Kohno, A.

    2013-11-01

    We synthesized DyMnO3 nanoparticles with particle sizes of about 7.5-15.3 nm in the pores of mesoporous silica and investigated their crystal structure and magnetic properties. As the particle size decreased, the lattice constants of the DyMnO3 nanoparticles deviated from those of the bulk crystal, and the Jahn-Teller distortion in the nanoparticle systems decreased. In addition, the estimated lattice strain increased with decreasing particle size. The DyMnO3 nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior. The blocking temperature and the coercive field increased with decreasing particle size, and this behavior was contrary to the usual magnetic size effects. It is deduced that these unique size dependences of the magnetic properties for the DyMnO3 nanoparticles were derived from the changes in lattice constants and lattice strain. The anisotropic lattice deformation in the crystal structure of the nanoparticles induces an enhancement of the magnetic anisotropy, which results in the increase in blocking temperature and coercive field with decreasing particle size.

  15. Influence of the size and concentration of precursor on laser damage performance in KDP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yueliang; Zhao, Yuanan; Peng, Xiaocong; Hu, Guohang; Zhu, Meiping; Shao, Jianda

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced bulk damage in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) and its deuterated analog (DKDP) crystals for nanosecond pulses is caused by light-absorbing precursor defects, which are formed during crystal growth. However, current chemical analysis and spectroscopy techniques fail to identify the nature of the responsible precursor defects because of their "invisible" concentration and/or size. In this study, the aim was to explore a novel method for understanding laser-matter interactions with regard to physical parameters, such as size and concentration, affecting the ability of damage precursors to initiate damage. Laser-induced damage performance at 1064 nm of KDP crystals grown using filters of different pore sizes was investigated. By reducing the pore size of filters in continuous filtration growth, laser damage resistance was improved. Furthermore, a model based on a Gaussian distribution of precursor thresholds and heat transfer was developed to obtain a concentration and/or size distribution of the precursor defects. The results revealed that smaller size and/or lower concentration of precursor defects could lead to better damage resistance.

  16. Systematic classification of unseeded batch crystallization systems for achievable shape and size analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, David; Nagy, Zoltan K.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the current work is to develop a systematic classification scheme for crystallization systems considering simultaneous size and shape variations, and to study the effect of temperature profiles on the achievable final shape of crystals for various crystallization systems. A classification method is proposed based on the simultaneous consideration of the effect of temperature profiles on nucleation and growth rates of two different characteristic crystal dimensions. Hence the approach provides direct indication of the extent in which crystal shape may be controlled for a particular system class by manipulating the supersaturation. A multidimensional population balance model (PBM) was implemented for unseeded crystallization processes of four different compounds. The effect between the nucleation and growth mechanisms on the final aspect ratio (AR) was investigated and it was shown that for nucleation dominated systems the AR is independent of the supersaturation profile. The simulation results confirmed experimentally also show that most crystallization systems tend to achieve an equilibrium shape hence the variation in the aspect ratio that can be achieved by manipulating the supersaturation is limited, in particular when nucleation is also taken into account as a competing phenomenon.

  17. Sub-Volcanic Plumbing Systems Imaged Through Crystal Size Distributions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, O. E.; Blundy, J. D.; Rust, A.; Muir, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    The configuration of sub-volcanic magma storage regions exercises a fundamental control on eruptive style and hazard. Such regions can be imaged remotely, using seismic, geodetic or magnetotelluric methods, although these are far from routine and rarely unambiguous. The textures of erupted volcanic rocks, as quantified through crystal size distributions, provide space- and time-integrated information on the sub-volcanic plumbing systems, although these data are notoriously hard to deconvolve in terms of key parameters, such as conduit geometry, or magma ascent rates and storage times. Here we develop a numerical approach to textural interpretation, based on crystallisation kinetics and hydrodynamic flow, to image sub-volcanic plumbing systems with unprecedented detail. Using an example from Mount St. Helens volcano, USA, we show the potential of this simple and low-cost method, which can be readily generalised to any effusive magmatic system and provides a valuable complement to remote imaging techniques. As magma ascends, the competition between growth of preexisting crystals and nucleation of new crystals determines the crystal size distribution (CSD). If nucleation dominates, the CSD will be shifted to smaller crystal sizes. In steady state, CSD evolution is described by a linear hyperbolic equation with coefficients that depend on discharge rate, cross-section area of the conduit, crystal growth and nucleation rates. If crystal growth kinetics are known, from laboratory experiments, as a function of temperature, pressure and crystal content, it is possible to reconstruct the distribution of all parameters along the conduit including its cross-section area based simply on the measured of the CSD of eruptive products. From a CSD from a 1983 dome sample from Mt. St Helens volcano the model allows us to reconstruct dimensions of the conduit as a function of depth. The results reveal a clear transition to a magma chamber at depth of 12 km below the summit. Both the

  18. Background Sizes of the Solar and Interplanetary Active Phenomena Physical Characteristics in Conditions of the Deep and Prolonged Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, Vitaly

    The last phase of a minimum begun in May, 2005. Since January, 2009 the solar cycle 24 has begun, and its development goes normal rate, without surprises. In this minimum, side by side with the periods of very high flare activity (IX 2005 and XII 2006 -+5.5 and +6.6 years after a maximum) which on flare potential occupy 4 and 20 place among the most flare-active regions for the last 4 cycles . The Sun within 772 days (on February.2010) was sunspotless. Last three years of a minimum phase give the chance to estimate and analyse the solar active phenomena in the conditions of the lesser generation of solar magnetic fields. It has led to significant falling of an interplanetary magnetic field background level that has in turn predetermined 20

  19. SU-F-18C-01: Minimum Detectability Analysis for Comprehensive Sized Based Optimization of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Across CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, C; Chen, B; Samei, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work involved a comprehensive modeling of task-based performance of CT across a wide range of protocols. The approach was used for optimization and consistency of dose and image quality within a large multi-vendor clinical facility. Methods: 150 adult protocols from the Duke University Medical Center were grouped into sub-protocols with similar acquisition characteristics. A size based image quality phantom (Duke Mercury Phantom) was imaged using these sub-protocols for a range of clinically relevant doses on two CT manufacturer platforms (Siemens, GE). The images were analyzed to extract task-based image quality metrics such as the Task Transfer Function (TTF), Noise Power Spectrum, and Az based on designer nodule task functions. The data were analyzed in terms of the detectability of a lesion size/contrast as a function of dose, patient size, and protocol. A graphical user interface (GUI) was developed to predict image quality and dose to achieve a minimum level of detectability. Results: Image quality trends with variations in dose, patient size, and lesion contrast/size were evaluated and calculated data behaved as predicted. The GUI proved effective to predict the Az values representing radiologist confidence for a targeted lesion, patient size, and dose. As an example, an abdomen pelvis exam for the GE scanner, with a task size/contrast of 5-mm/50-HU, and an Az of 0.9 requires a dose of 4.0, 8.9, and 16.9 mGy for patient diameters of 25, 30, and 35 cm, respectively. For a constant patient diameter of 30 cm, the minimum detected lesion size at those dose levels would be 8.4, 5, and 3.9 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The designed CT protocol optimization platform can be used to evaluate minimum detectability across dose levels and patient diameters. The method can be used to improve individual protocols as well as to improve protocol consistency across CT scanners.

  20. Time-evolution of grain size distributions in random nucleation and growth crystallization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teran, Anthony V.; Bill, Andreas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2010-02-01

    We study the time dependence of the grain size distribution N(r,t) during crystallization of a d -dimensional solid. A partial differential equation, including a source term for nuclei and a growth law for grains, is solved analytically for any dimension d . We discuss solutions obtained for processes described by the Kolmogorov-Avrami-Mehl-Johnson model for random nucleation and growth (RNG). Nucleation and growth are set on the same footing, which leads to a time-dependent decay of both effective rates. We analyze in detail how model parameters, the dimensionality of the crystallization process, and time influence the shape of the distribution. The calculations show that the dynamics of the effective nucleation and effective growth rates play an essential role in determining the final form of the distribution obtained at full crystallization. We demonstrate that for one class of nucleation and growth rates, the distribution evolves in time into the logarithmic-normal (lognormal) form discussed earlier by Bergmann and Bill [J. Cryst. Growth 310, 3135 (2008)]. We also obtain an analytical expression for the finite maximal grain size at all times. The theory allows for the description of a variety of RNG crystallization processes in thin films and bulk materials. Expressions useful for experimental data analysis are presented for the grain size distribution and the moments in terms of fundamental and measurable parameters of the model.

  1. Finite particle size drives defect-mediated domain structures in strongly confined colloidal liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Gârlea, Ioana C.; Mulder, Pieter; Alvarado, José; Dammone, Oliver; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Lettinga, M. Pavlik; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Mulder, Bela M.

    2016-01-01

    When liquid crystals are confined to finite volumes, the competition between the surface anchoring imposed by the boundaries and the intrinsic orientational symmetry-breaking of these materials gives rise to a host of intriguing phenomena involving topological defect structures. For synthetic molecular mesogens, like the ones used in liquid-crystal displays, these defect structures are independent of the size of the molecules and well described by continuum theories. In contrast, colloidal systems such as carbon nanotubes and biopolymers have micron-sized lengths, so continuum descriptions are expected to break down under strong confinement conditions. Here, we show, by a combination of computer simulations and experiments with virus particles in tailor-made disk- and annulus-shaped microchambers, that strong confinement of colloidal liquid crystals leads to novel defect-stabilized symmetrical domain structures. These finite-size effects point to a potential for designing optically active microstructures, exploiting the as yet unexplored regime of highly confined liquid crystals. PMID:27353002

  2. A simple method for systematically controlling ZnO crystal size and growth orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Rong; Kerr, Lei L.

    2007-03-15

    We present a simple, easy and reproducible method to systematically control the dimension and shape evolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) as thin film on glass substrate by chemical bath deposition (CBD). The only varying factor to control crystal transformation is the molar ratio of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+}, R{sub m}, in the initial chemical solution. With the increase of R{sub m}, ZnO crystals transformed from long-and-slim hexagonal rods to fat-and-short hexagonal pyramids, and then to twinning hexagonal dots as observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Film crystallinity was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Chemical component analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that most cadmium was present in the residual solution instead of the developed film and the precipitate at the bottom of beaker. The mechanism of the cadmium effect, with different initial concentrations, on ZnO crystal transformation was tentatively addressed. We believe that cadmium influences the chelate ligands adsorption onto (0001-bar) plane of ZnO crystals, alters the crystal growth orientation, and thus directs the transformation of the size and shape of ZnO crystals.

  3. Elastic deformation of nanometer-sized metal crystals in graphitic shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L.; Rodríguez-Manzo, J. A.; Banhart, F.

    2006-12-01

    The elastic deformation of nanometer-sized metal crystals is achieved by encapsulating them in carbon nanotubes or carbon onions. Electron irradiation of these core-shell particles leads to high pressure in their center due to a shrinkage of the graphitic shells. Pressures in the range of 10-30GPa are found by measuring the decrease in lattice spacings in the encapsulated metal crystals. Hence, it is quantitatively shown how closed graphitic shells can be applied as compression cells on the nanoscale.

  4. Millimeter-size single-crystal graphene by suppressing evaporative loss of Cu during low pressure chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanshan; Ji, Hengxing; Chou, Harry; Li, Qiongyu; Li, Hongyang; Suk, Ji Won; Piner, Richard; Liao, Lei; Cai, Weiwei; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2013-04-11

    Millimeter-size single-crystal monolayer graphene is synthesized on polycrystalline Cu foil by a method that involves suppressing loss by evaporation of the Cu at high temperature under low pressure. This significantly diminishes the number of graphene domains, and large single crystal domains up to ∼2 mm in size are grown.

  5. Size-dependent and tunable crystallization of GeSbTe phase-change nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ten Brink, Gert H.; Palasantzas, George; Kooi, Bart J.

    2016-12-01

    Chalcogenide-based nanostructured phase-change materials (PCMs) are considered promising building blocks for non-volatile memory due to their high write and read speeds, high data-storage density, and low power consumption. Top-down fabrication of PCM nanoparticles (NPs), however, often results in damage and deterioration of their useful properties. Gas-phase condensation based on magnetron sputtering offers an attractive and straightforward solution to continuously down-scale the PCMs into sub-lithographic sizes. Here we unprecedentedly present the size dependence of crystallization for Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) NPs, whose production is currently highly challenging for chemical synthesis or top-down fabrication. Both amorphous and crystalline NPs have been produced with excellent size and composition control with average diameters varying between 8 and 17 nm. The size-dependent crystallization of these NPs was carefully analyzed through in-situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, where the crystallization temperatures (Tc) decrease when the NPs become smaller. Moreover, methane incorporation has been observed as an effective method to enhance the amorphous phase stability of the NPs. This work therefore elucidates that GST NPs synthesized by gas-phase condensation with tailored properties are promising alternatives in designing phase-change memories constrained by optical lithography limitations.

  6. Size-dependent and tunable crystallization of GeSbTe phase-change nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Ten Brink, Gert H; Palasantzas, George; Kooi, Bart J

    2016-12-20

    Chalcogenide-based nanostructured phase-change materials (PCMs) are considered promising building blocks for non-volatile memory due to their high write and read speeds, high data-storage density, and low power consumption. Top-down fabrication of PCM nanoparticles (NPs), however, often results in damage and deterioration of their useful properties. Gas-phase condensation based on magnetron sputtering offers an attractive and straightforward solution to continuously down-scale the PCMs into sub-lithographic sizes. Here we unprecedentedly present the size dependence of crystallization for Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) NPs, whose production is currently highly challenging for chemical synthesis or top-down fabrication. Both amorphous and crystalline NPs have been produced with excellent size and composition control with average diameters varying between 8 and 17 nm. The size-dependent crystallization of these NPs was carefully analyzed through in-situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, where the crystallization temperatures (Tc) decrease when the NPs become smaller. Moreover, methane incorporation has been observed as an effective method to enhance the amorphous phase stability of the NPs. This work therefore elucidates that GST NPs synthesized by gas-phase condensation with tailored properties are promising alternatives in designing phase-change memories constrained by optical lithography limitations.

  7. Size-dependent and tunable crystallization of GeSbTe phase-change nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; ten Brink, Gert H.; Palasantzas, George; Kooi, Bart J.

    2016-01-01

    Chalcogenide-based nanostructured phase-change materials (PCMs) are considered promising building blocks for non-volatile memory due to their high write and read speeds, high data-storage density, and low power consumption. Top-down fabrication of PCM nanoparticles (NPs), however, often results in damage and deterioration of their useful properties. Gas-phase condensation based on magnetron sputtering offers an attractive and straightforward solution to continuously down-scale the PCMs into sub-lithographic sizes. Here we unprecedentedly present the size dependence of crystallization for Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) NPs, whose production is currently highly challenging for chemical synthesis or top-down fabrication. Both amorphous and crystalline NPs have been produced with excellent size and composition control with average diameters varying between 8 and 17 nm. The size-dependent crystallization of these NPs was carefully analyzed through in-situ heating in a transmission electron microscope, where the crystallization temperatures (Tc) decrease when the NPs become smaller. Moreover, methane incorporation has been observed as an effective method to enhance the amorphous phase stability of the NPs. This work therefore elucidates that GST NPs synthesized by gas-phase condensation with tailored properties are promising alternatives in designing phase-change memories constrained by optical lithography limitations. PMID:27996054

  8. Rapid CVD growth of millimetre-sized single crystal graphene using a cold-wall reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miseikis, V.; Convertino, D.; Mishra, N.; Gemmi, M.; Mashoff, T.; Heun, S.; Haghighian, N.; Bisio, F.; Canepa, M.; Piazza, V.; Coletti, C.

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present a simple pathway to obtain large single-crystal graphene on copper (Cu) foils with high growth rates using a commercially available cold-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reactor. We show that graphene nucleation density is drastically reduced and crystal growth is accelerated when: (i) using ex situ oxidized foils; (ii) performing annealing in an inert atmosphere prior to growth; (iii) enclosing the foils to lower the precursor impingement flux during growth. Growth rates as high as 14.7 and 17.5 μm min-1 are obtained on flat and folded foils, respectively. Thus, single-crystal grains with lateral size of about 1 mm can be obtained in just 1 h. The samples are characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy as well as selected area electron diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction, which confirm the high quality and homogeneity of the films. The development of a process for the quick production of large grain graphene in a commonly used commercial CVD reactor is a significant step towards an increased accessibility to millimetre-sized graphene crystals.

  9. Enhanced gradient crystal-plasticity study of size effects in a β-titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiral, Murat; Nowag, Kai; Roy, Anish; Ghisleni, Rudy; Michler, Johann; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2017-04-01

    A calibrated model of enhanced strain-gradient crystal plasticity is proposed, which is shown to characterize adequate deformation behaviour of bcc single crystals of a β-Ti alloy (Ti-15-3-3-3). In this model, in addition to strain gradients evolving in the course of deformation, incipient strain gradients, related to a component’s surface-to-volume ratio, is accounted for. Predictive capabilities of the model in characterizing a size effect in an initial yield and a work-hardening rate in small-scale components is demonstrated. The characteristic length-scale, i.e. the component’s dimensions below which the size effect is observed, was found to depend on densities of polar and statistical dislocations and interaction between them.

  10. Crystal size of epidotes: A potentially exploitable geothermometer in geothermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Patrier, P.; Beaufort, D.; Touchard, G. ); Fouillac, A.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Crystal size of epidotes crystallized in quartz + epidote veins is used as the basis for a new geothermometer from the fossil geothermal field of Saint Martin (Lesser Antilles). The epidote-bearing alteration paragenesis is developed as far as 3 km from a quartz diorite pluton at temperatures of 220-350C. The length/width ratio of the epidote grains is constant for all the analyzed samples and suggests isotropic growth environments. However, the length and width of the grains vary exponentially with temperature. The obtained results offer new perspectives for simple grain-size geothermomentry but must be extended to other geologic environments to clarify the influence of different rock types.

  11. Effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the number of acetylsalicylic acid crystals produced under the supersaturated condition and the ability of controlling the final crystal size via primary nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Etsuko; Kato, Yumi; Hagisawa, Minoru; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2006-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of ultrasound irradiation on the number of crystals formed in an acetylsalicyclic acid crystallization process and to assess the controllability of the final product size via the number of primary nuclei. The number of crystals present after primary nucleation was counted and the relationship between the final product size and the number of crystals was examined. Additionally, the growing ASA crystals were observed, since ultrasound energy not only may control primary nucleation but may also the perfection of the crystal shape. At a high level of ultrasonic energy, ultrasound irradiation increased the average number of crystals, an effect that has been reported often; however, at a low level of ultrasonic energy it decreased the average number of crystals, and moreover, these opposing ultrasonic effects on the number of crystals interchanged at a specific energy threshold. These results reveal two novel phenomena—that there is an energy region where ultrasonic irradiation inhibits primary nucleation, and that a specific amount of ultrasonic energy is needed to activate primary nucleation. On the other hand, the final product size almost depended upon the number of primary nuclei, indicating that the final product size could be controlled via the number of crystals influenced by ultrasound irradiation. According to the photographs of crystals, they were not destroyed by the process. Therefore, it was proposed that ultrasound energy does not destroy the perfection of the crystal shape but only controls primary nucleation under the condition: both short irradiation time and low supersaturated condition.

  12. Key to enhance thermoelectric performance by controlling crystal size of strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Ye, Xinxin; Yaer, Xinba; Wu, Yin; Zhang, Boyu; Miao, Lei

    2015-09-01

    One-step molten salt synthesis process was introduced to fabricate nano to micrometer sized SrTiO3 powders in which effects of synthesis temperature, oxide-to-flux ratios and raw materials on the generation of SrTiO3 powders were examined. 100 nm or above sized pure SrTiO3 particles were obtained at relatively lower temperature of 900∘C. Micro-sized rhombohedral crystals with a maximum size of approximately 12 μm were obtained from SrCO3 or Sr(NO3)2 strontium source with 1:1 O/S ratio. Controlled crystal size and morphology of Nb-doped SrTiO3 particles are prepared by using this method to confirm the performance of thermoelectric properties. The Seebeck coefficient obtained is significantly high when compared with the reported data, and the high ratio of nano particles in the sample has a positive effect on the increase of Seebeck coefficient too, which is likely due to the energy filtering effect at large numbers of grain boundaries resulting from largely distributed structure.

  13. Crystallization Behavior of Amorphous Si3N4 and Particle Size Control of the Crystallized α-Si3N4.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yong-Kwon; Kim, Shin-A; Koo, Jae-Hong; Oh, Hyeon-Cheol; Chi, Eun-Ok; Hahn, Jee-Hyun; Park, Chan

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride powder prepared by low-temperature vapor-phase reaction was heat treated at various temperatures for different periods of time to examine the crystallization behavior. The effects of the heat-treatment temperature and duration on the degree of crystallization were investigated along with the effect of the heat-up rate on the particle size, and its distribution, of the crystallized α-phase silicon nitride powder. A phase transition from amorphous to α-phase occurred at a temperature above 1400 degrees C. The crystallization. process was completed after heat treatment at 1500 degrees C for 3 h or at 1550 degrees C for 1 h. The crystallization process starts at the surface of the amorphous particle: while the outer regions of the particle become crystalline, the inner part remains amorphous. The re-arrangement of the Si and N atoms on the surface of the amorphous particle leads to the formation of hexagonal crystals that are separated from the host amorphous particle. The particle size and size distribution can be controlled by varying the heat-treatment profile (namely, the heat-treatment temperature, heating rate, and heating duration at the specified temperature), which can be used to control the relative extent of the nucleation and growth. The completion of most of the nucleation process by lowering the heat-up rate can be used to achieve a singlet particle size distribution. Bimodal particle size distribution can be achieved by fast heat-up during the crystallization process.

  14. Formation of atmospheric halos and applicability of geometric optics for calculating single-scattering properties of hexagonal ice crystals: Impacts of aspect ratio and ice crystal size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.

    2015-11-01

    In order to determine the threshold sizes at which hexagonal ice crystals begin to form atmospheric halos (i.e., 22° and 46° halos) and the applicability of the conventional geometric optics method (GOM), the single-scattering properties (i.e., phase matrix, asymmetry parameter g, and extinction efficiency Qext) of randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals were calculated using the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA) and conventional GOM at a wavelength λ = 0.55 μm. For these calculations, a width (W) of up to 36 μm and a length (L) of up to 48 μm of hexagonal ice crystals with aspect ratios (AR=L/W) of 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 were used. Further, a halo ratio and power spillover index (Ψ) were used to quantify the intensity of 22° and 46° atmospheric halos as functions of sizes and ARs of hexagonal ice crystals. The phase matrixes, g, and Qext, calculated using ADDA and conventional GOM became closer as the crystal size increased for all six ARs. There was better agreement between ADDA and GOM simulations at smaller sizes for hexagonal crystals with compact shapes (e.g., AR=1.0) compared to that for crystals with either oblate (e.g., AR=0.1) or prolate (e.g., AR=4.0) shapes. The errors in the conventional GOM were ~1.2% (7.0%) for g (Qext) of hexagonal crystals with volume-equivalent-sphere size parameter (χveq) of 90 for all ARs, whereas they were ~0.8% (3.3%) for hexagonal crystals with χveq=100. It was shown that the lower size limit of the applicability of conventional GOM depends on particle shape. The 22° and 46° halos were produced at smaller crystal sizes and the intensity of a halo was more pronounced at a given size for crystals with a compact shape compared to those with more prolate or oblate shapes. The calculated 22° halo forming sizes of hexagonal crystals with AR=0.1 (0.25; 0.5; 1.0; 2.0; 4.0) were ~52 (60; 58; 49; 61; 77) for χveq: these halo forming sizes vary for different definitions of size parameter and were

  15. The Influence of Grain Size and Crystal Content on Rheology and Deformation of Pyroclastic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquereau-Lebti, P.; Robert, G.; Grunder, A. L.; Russell, K. J.

    2007-12-01

    Pyroclastic deposits undergo variable degrees of sintering, viscous deformation of particles and loss of pore space, which combine to produce the dramatic textural variations that define welded facies. We here investigate the effects of grain size and crystal content on the rheology and welding of pyroclastic material.Uniaxial deformation experiments were conducted using sintered cores of natural rhyolite ash under conditions consistent with welding. Experiments were done in the University of British Columbia Volcanology Deformation Rig (VDR). This apparatus is designed to run experiments relevant to volcanology, by supporting low-load, high temperature, deformation experiments (Quane et al., 2004). We ran experiments at constant displacement rate (2.5.10-6 m.s-1), under ambient water pressure ("Dry"), at temperatures of 850 and 900°C and to maximal strain of 50%. Grain-size effect was investigated using sintered cores from three different sieving fractions of Rattlesnake Tuff (RST, Eastern Oregon, USA) ash: fine ash (grain size < 0.6 mm), coarse ash (0.6 to 2mm) and row unsieved ash. The effect of crystal content was explored using cores of sintered unsieved RST ash, variably enriched in crystals of feldspars and quartz.Unsieved and fine ash cores suffered higher total porosity reduction than coarse ash cores during deformation experiments. For cores of unsieved ash, porosity loss is facilitated by mechanical compaction, which includes orientation and organisation of different size clasts to a compact assemblage, without any deformation of individual particles. Isolated porosity decreases faster than connected porosity in coarse and fine ash cores, whereas cores of raw ash mainly loose connected porosity. This is also consistent with mechanical compaction for cores of unsieved ash, in which isolated porosity of weakly deformed individual pumice clasts or glass shards is maintained. Increasing strain causes a reduction in porosity and correlates with increase in

  16. Mesoporous TiO2 single crystals: facile shape-, size-, and phase-controlled growth and efficient photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoli; Kuang, Qin; Yan, Keyou; Qiu, Yongcai; Qiu, Jianhang; Yang, Shihe

    2013-11-13

    In this work, we have succeeded in preparing rutile and anatase TiO2 mesoporous single crystals with diverse morphologies in a controllable fashion by a simple silica-templated hydrothermal method. A simple in-template crystal growth process was put forward, which involved heterogeneous crystal nucleation and oriented growth within the template, a sheer spectator, and an excluded volume, i.e., crystal growth by faithful negative replication of the silica template. A series of mesoporous single-crystal structures, including rutile mesoporous TiO2 nanorods with tunable sizes and anatase mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets with dominant {001} facets, have been synthesized to demonstrate the versatility of the strategy. The morphology, size, and phase of the TiO2 mesoporous single crystals can be tuned easily by varying the external conditions such as the hydrohalic acid condition, seed density, and temperature rather than by the silica template, which merely serves for faithful negative replication but without interfering in the crystallization process. To demonstrate the application value of such TiO2 mesoporous single crystals, photocatalytic activity was tested. The resultant TiO2 mesoporous single crystals exhibited remarkable photocatalytic performance on hydrogen evolution and degradation of methyl orange due to their increased surface area, single-crystal nature, and the exposure of reactive crystal facets coupled with the three-dimensionally connected mesoporous architecture. It was found that {110} facets of rutile mesoporous single crystals can be considered essentially as reductive sites with a key role in the photoreduction, while {001} facets of anatase mesoporous single crystals provided oxidation sites in the oxidative process. Such shape- and size-controlled rutile and anatase mesoporous TiO2 single crystals hold great promise for building energy conversion devices, and the simple solution-based hydrothermal method is extendable to the synthesis of other

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of high-quality large-sized MoS2 crystals on silicon dioxide substrates

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jianyi; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; ...

    2016-03-31

    Large-sized MoS2 crystals can be grown on SiO2/Si substrates via a two-stage chemical vapor deposition method. The maximum size of MoS2 crystals can be up to about 305 μm. The growth method can be used to grow other transition metal dichalcogenide crystals and lateral heterojunctions. Additionally, the electron mobility of the MoS2 crystals can reach ≈30 cm2 V–1 s–1, which is comparable to those of exfoliated flakes.

  18. Size-dependent energy in crystal plasticity and continuum dislocation models.

    PubMed

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj; Forest, Samuel; Jaric, Jovo P

    2015-03-08

    In the light of recent progress in coarsening the discrete dislocation mechanics, we consider two questions relevant for the development of a mesoscale, size-dependent plasticity: (i) can the phenomenological expression for size-dependent energy, as quadratic form of Nye's dislocation density tensor, be justified from the point of view of dislocation mechanics and under what conditions? (ii) how can physical or phenomenological expressions for size-dependent energy be computed from dislocation mechanics in the general case of elastically anisotropic crystal? The analysis based on material and slip system symmetries implies the negative answer to the first question. However, the coarsening method developed in response to the second question, and based on the physical interpretation of the size-dependent energy as the coarsening error in dislocation interaction energy, introduces additional symmetries. The result is that the equivalence between the phenomenological and the physical expressions is possible, but only if the multiplicity of characteristic lengths associated with different slip systems, is sacrificed. Finally, we discuss the consequences of the assumption that a single length scale governs the plasticity of a crystal, and note that the plastic dissipation at interfaces has a strong dependence on the length scale embedded in the energy expression.

  19. Discovery of superparamagnetism in sub-millimeter-sized magnetite porous single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-10-01

    In this work, sub-millimeter-sized magnetite porous single crystals were found to exhibit unique superparamagnetism rather than the known ferrimagnetism. This superparamagnetism was intimately related to the hydrothermal formation process, during which high lattice stress of ca. 6 GPa and large lattice strain of ca. - 1.21 ×10-2 would change the exchange constants of α, β, and ν to concurrently meet criterions of (i) ν1 =ν2 = β, (ii) α1 =α2 = α, and (iii) αβ = 1. These criterions, deduced from the molecular-field theory, were proposed to be the general transition conditions for any ferrimagnetic material exhibiting superparamagnetism when their size was beyond their superparamagnetic size limit.

  20. Evolution of genome size and chromosome number in the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea (Lentibulariaceae), with a new estimate of the minimum genome size in angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Andreas; Michael, Todd P.; Rivadavia, Fernando; Sousa, Aretuza; Wang, Wenqin; Temsch, Eva M.; Greilhuber, Johann; Müller, Kai F.; Heubl, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Some species of Genlisea possess ultrasmall nuclear genomes, the smallest known among angiosperms, and some have been found to have chromosomes of diminutive size, which may explain why chromosome numbers and karyotypes are not known for the majority of species of the genus. However, other members of the genus do not possess ultrasmall genomes, nor do most taxa studied in related genera of the family or order. This study therefore examined the evolution of genome sizes and chromosome numbers in Genlisea in a phylogenetic context. The correlations of genome size with chromosome number and size, with the phylogeny of the group and with growth forms and habitats were also examined. Methods Nuclear genome sizes were measured from cultivated plant material for a comprehensive sampling of taxa, including nearly half of all species of Genlisea and representing all major lineages. Flow cytometric measurements were conducted in parallel in two laboratories in order to compare the consistency of different methods and controls. Chromosome counts were performed for the majority of taxa, comparing different staining techniques for the ultrasmall chromosomes. Key Results Genome sizes of 15 taxa of Genlisea are presented and interpreted in a phylogenetic context. A high degree of congruence was found between genome size distribution and the major phylogenetic lineages. Ultrasmall genomes with 1C values of <100 Mbp were almost exclusively found in a derived lineage of South American species. The ancestral haploid chromosome number was inferred to be n = 8. Chromosome numbers in Genlisea ranged from 2n = 2x = 16 to 2n = 4x = 32. Ascendant dysploid series (2n = 36, 38) are documented for three derived taxa. The different ploidy levels corresponded to the two subgenera, but were not directly correlated to differences in genome size; the three different karyotype ranges mirrored the different sections of the genus. The smallest known plant genomes were not found in

  1. Critical Percolation Stresses of Random Frank-Read Sources in Micron-Sized Crystals of Superalloys (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    tendency for a saturation stress value, most likely because the experimental size-effect data does not include small enough sizes of micron-sized crystals...D, Gumbsch P, Kraft O, Scripta Mater 2008; 58:587. 7) Tang H, Schwarz KW, Espinosa HD, Acta Mater 2007; 55:1607. 8) Zhou C, Biner S, Lesar R

  2. Effect of γ-(Fe,Ni) crystal-size stabilization in Fe–Ni–B amorphous ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshenkov, M. V.; Glezer, A. M.; Korchuganova, O. A.; Aleev, A. A.; Shurygina, N. A.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of stabilizing crystal size in a melt-quenched amorphous Fe50Ni33B17 ribbon is described upon crystallization in a temperature range of 360-400°C. The shape, size, volume fraction, and volume density have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. The formation of an amorphous layer of the Fe50Ni29B21 compound was found by means of atomic-probe tomography at the boundary of the crystallite-amorphous phase. The stabilization of crystal sizes during annealing is due to the formation of a barrier amorphous layer that has a crystallization temperature that exceeds the crystallization temperature of the matrix amorphous alloy.

  3. Topologically evolved photonic crystals: breaking the world record in band gap size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Osama R.; El-Beltagy, Mohammed A.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2012-04-01

    Using topology optimization, a photonic crystal (PtC) unit cell can be designed to exhibit favorable electromagnetic wave propagation properties. Among these is the opening of a band gap (BG) with the largest possible ratio of width to midgap frequency. In this paper the aim is to maximize the relative size of the first and fourth relative BGs of two-dimensional (2D) PtCs with a square lattice configuration. In addition, we examine the effects of the degree of unit cell symmetry on the relative BG size and on the geometric traits of the optimized topologies. We use a specialized genetic algorithm (GA) for our search. The results show that the type of symmetry constraint imposed has a significant, and rather subtle, effect on the unit cell topology and BG size of the emerging optimal designs. In pursuit of record values of BG size, we report two low-symmetry unit cells as an outcome of our search efforts to date: one with a relative BG size of 46% for TE waves and the other with a relative BG size of 47% for TM waves.

  4. Grain size constraints on twin expansion in hexagonal close packed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arul Kumar, M.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2016-10-01

    Deformation twins are stress-induced transformed domains of lamellar shape that form when polycrystalline hexagonal close packed metals, like Mg, are strained. Several studies have reported that the propensity of deformation twinning reduces as grain size decreases. Here, we use a 3D crystal plasticity based micromechanics model to calculate the effect of grain size on the driving forces responsible for expanding twin lamellae. The calculations reveal that constraints from the neighboring grain where the grain boundary and twin lamella meet induce a stress reversal in the twin lamella. A pronounced grain size effect arises as reductions in grain size cause these stress-reversal fields from twin/grain boundary junctions to affect twin growth. We further show that the severity of this neighboring grain constraint depends on the crystallographic orientation and plastic response of the neighboring grain. We show that these stress-reversal fields from twin/grain boundary junctions will affect twin growth, below a critical parent grain size. These results reveal an unconventional yet influential role that grain size and grain neighbors can play on deformation twinning.

  5. Grain size constraints on twin expansion in hexagonal close packed crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Mariyappan Arul; Beyerlein, Irene Jane; Tome, Carlos N.

    2016-10-20

    Deformation twins are stress-induced transformed domains of lamellar shape that form when polycrystalline hexagonal close packed metals, like Mg, are strained. Several studies have reported that the propensity of deformation twinning reduces as grain size decreases. Here, we use a 3D crystal plasticity based micromechanics model to calculate the effect of grain size on the driving forces responsible for expanding twin lamellae. The calculations reveal that constraints from the neighboring grain where the grain boundary and twin lamella meet induce a stress reversal in the twin lamella. A pronounced grain size effect arises as reductions in grain size cause thesemore » stress-reversal fields from twin/grain boundary junctions to affect twin growth. We further show that the severity of this neighboring grain constraint depends on the crystallographic orientation and plastic response of the neighboring grain. We show that these stress-reversal fields from twin/grain boundary junctions will affect twin growth, below a critical parent grain size. Finally, these results reveal an unconventional yet influential role that grain size and grain neighbors can play on deformation twinning.« less

  6. Grain size constraints on twin expansion in hexagonal close packed crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Mariyappan Arul; Beyerlein, Irene Jane; Tome, Carlos N.

    2016-10-20

    Deformation twins are stress-induced transformed domains of lamellar shape that form when polycrystalline hexagonal close packed metals, like Mg, are strained. Several studies have reported that the propensity of deformation twinning reduces as grain size decreases. Here, we use a 3D crystal plasticity based micromechanics model to calculate the effect of grain size on the driving forces responsible for expanding twin lamellae. The calculations reveal that constraints from the neighboring grain where the grain boundary and twin lamella meet induce a stress reversal in the twin lamella. A pronounced grain size effect arises as reductions in grain size cause these stress-reversal fields from twin/grain boundary junctions to affect twin growth. We further show that the severity of this neighboring grain constraint depends on the crystallographic orientation and plastic response of the neighboring grain. We show that these stress-reversal fields from twin/grain boundary junctions will affect twin growth, below a critical parent grain size. Finally, these results reveal an unconventional yet influential role that grain size and grain neighbors can play on deformation twinning.

  7. Crystal Size Distribution of Periclase in Contact Metamorphic Marbles as Record of Fluid Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, T.; Baumgartner, L.; Foster, C. T.; Bowman, J.

    2007-12-01

    Crystal size distributions (CSD) of periclase in contact metamorphic marbles are combined with geochemical and petrologic information to deduce the controls that acted on the periclase forming reaction. Data are presented for two profiles in a dolomite xenolith in mafic intrusive rocks at the Cima Uzza, southern Adamello massif (Italy). Stable isotope data and the presence of a sharp periclase reaction front on hand specimen scale shows that the formation of periclase is the consequence of high temperature fluid infiltration. Stable isotope data show depletion for 13C and 18O in a narrow region (~40cm) near the igneous contact, whereas the periclase forming reaction front extends up to 4m into the host rock. The carbon and the oxygen front are located at the same place, which would require an X(CO2) of 0.5, if the isotope fronts are interpreted using a standard infiltration model, even if modelled as the side of a front. A similar amount of reaction progress, calculated from measured volume of periclase (corrected for retrograde brucite formation), was found over the entire profiles. Surprisingly, dolomite is still present as prograde leftovers in most samples demonstrating that reaction did not go to completion. The median grain size of periclase crystals remains constant over both profiles. Nevertheless, CSD\\'{ } s flatten systematically, reflecting a larger proportion of bigger grains with increasing distance from the contact. We interpret variations in grain sizes to be the result of changing reaction affinities along an infiltration front flattened (dispersed) by diffusion/dispersion and kinetics. A numerical model is presented, based on the textural analyses and geochemistry data from the field, describing the dynamic nucleation and crystallization of periclase in this infiltration driven system.

  8. Size effects in generalised continuum crystal plasticity for two-phase laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, N. M.; Gaubert, A.; Forest, S.; Busso, E. P.; Gallerneau, F.; Kruch, S.

    2010-11-01

    The solutions of a boundary value problem are explored for various classes of generalised crystal plasticity models including Cosserat, strain gradient and micromorphic crystal plasticity. The considered microstructure consists of a two-phase laminate containing a purely elastic and an elasto-plastic phase undergoing single or double slip. The local distributions of plastic slip, lattice rotation and stresses are derived when the microstructure is subjected to simple shear. The arising size effects are characterised by the overall extra back stress component resulting from the action of higher order stresses, a characteristic length lc describing the size-dependent domain of material response, and by the corresponding scaling law ln as a function of microstructural length scale, l. Explicit relations for these quantities are derived and compared for the different models. The conditions at the interface between the elastic and elasto-plastic phases are shown to play a major role in the solution. A range of material parameters is shown to exist for which the Cosserat and micromorphic approaches exhibit the same behaviour. The models display in general significantly different asymptotic regimes for small microstructural length scales. Scaling power laws with the exponent continuously ranging from 0 to -2 are obtained depending on the values of the material parameters. The unusual exponent value -2 is obtained for the strain gradient plasticity model, denoted " curl Hp" in this work. These results provide guidelines for the identification of higher order material parameters of crystal plasticity models from experimental data, such as precipitate size effects in precipitate strengthened alloys.

  9. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-08

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow.

  10. Quantum size effect in Pb(100) films: Critical role of crystal band structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C. M.; Chou, M. Y.

    2007-05-01

    We report first-principles calculations of Pb(100) films up to 22 monolayers to study variations in the surface energy and work function as a function of film thickness. An even-odd oscillation is found in these two quantities, while a jelliumlike model for this s-p metal predicts a periodicity of about three monolayers. This unexpected result is explained by considering a coherent superposition of contributions from quantum-well states centered at both the Γ¯ and Mmacr points in the two-dimensional Brillouin zone, demonstrating the importance of crystal band structure in studying the quantum size effect in metal thin films.

  11. Size-fraction partitioning of community gene transcription and nitrogen metabolism in a marine oxygen minimum zone

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sangita; Bristow, Laura A; Larsen, Morten; Sarode, Neha; Thamdrup, Bo; Stewart, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic composition of marine microbial communities varies at the microscale between particle-associated (PA; >1.6 μm) and free-living (FL; 0.2–1.6 μm) niches. It remains unclear, however, how metabolic activities differ between PA and FL fractions. We combined rate measurements with metatranscriptomics to quantify PA and FL microbial activity in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, focusing on dissimilatory processes of the nitrogen (N) cycle. Bacterial gene counts were 8- to 15-fold higher in the FL compared with the PA fraction. However, rates of all measured N cycle processes, excluding ammonia oxidation, declined significantly following particle (>1.6 μm) removal. Without particles, rates of nitrate reduction to nitrite (1.5–9.4nMNd−1) fell to zero and N2 production by denitrification (0.5–1.7nMNd−1) and anammox (0.3–1.9nMNd−1) declined by 53–85%. The proportional representation of major microbial taxa and N cycle gene transcripts in metatranscriptomes followed fraction-specific trends. Transcripts encoding nitrate reductase were uniform among PA and FL fractions, whereas anammox-associated transcripts were proportionately enriched up to 15-fold in the FL fraction. In contrast, transcripts encoding enzymes for N2O and N2 production by denitrification were enriched up to 28-fold in PA samples. These patterns suggest that the majority of N cycle activity, excluding N2O and N2 production by denitrification, is confined to a FL majority that is critically dependent on access to particles, likely as a source of organic carbon and inorganic N. Variable particle distributions may drive heterogeneity in N cycle activity and gene expression in OMZs. PMID:25848875

  12. Impact of feature-size dependent etching on the optical properties of photonic crystal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Berrier, A.; Anand, S.; Ferrini, R.; Talneau, A.; Houdre, R.

    2008-05-01

    Feature size dependence in Ar/Cl{sub 2} chemically assisted ion beam etching of InP-based photonic crystals (PhCs) and its influence on the optical properties of PhC devices operating in the band gap are investigated. The analysis of the measured quality factors, the determined mirror reflectivities, and losses of one-dimensional Fabry-Perot cavities clearly demonstrates the importance of feature-size dependent etching. The optical properties show a dramatic improvement up to a hole depth of about 3.5 {mu}m that is primarily due to a significant reduction in extrinsic losses. However, beyond this hole depth, the improvement is at a lower rate, which suggests that extrinsic losses, although present, are not dominant.

  13. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; ...

    2015-04-29

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.

  14. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; Hofmann, F.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Vine, D. J.; Abbey, B.

    2015-01-01

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources. PMID:26798804

  15. High-efficiency space-based software radio architectures & algorithms (a minimum size, weight, and power TeraOps processor)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, Mark Edward; Baker, Zachary K; Stettler, Matthew W; Pigue, Michael J; Schmierer, Eric N; Power, John F; Graham, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos has recently completed the latest in a series of Reconfigurable Software Radios, which incorporates several key innovations in both hardware design and algorithms. Due to our focus on satellite applications, each design must extract the best size, weight, and power performance possible from the ensemble of Commodity Off-the-Shelf (COTS) parts available at the time of design. In this case we have achieved 1 TeraOps/second signal processing on a 1920 Megabit/second datastream, while using only 53 Watts mains power, 5.5 kg, and 3 liters. This processing capability enables very advanced algorithms such as our wideband RF compression scheme to operate remotely, allowing network bandwidth constrained applications to deliver previously unattainable performance.

  16. Crystal size distributions of plagioclase in lavas from the July-August 2001 Mount Etna eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Perinelli, Cristina; Armienti, Pietro; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-08-01

    During the 2001 eruption of Mount Etna, two independent vent systems simultaneously erupted two different lavas. The Upper Vents system (UV), opened between 3100 and 2650 m a.s.l., emitted products that are markedly porphyritic and rich in plagioclase, while the Lower Vents system (LV), opened at 2100 and 2550 m a.s.l., emitted products that are sparsely porphyritic with scarce plagioclase. In this study, the crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase were measured for a series of 14 samples collected from all the main flows of the 2001 eruption. The coefficient of R 2 determination was used to evaluate the goodness of fit of linear models to the CSDs, and the results are represented as a grid of R 2 values by using a numerical code developed ad hoc. R 2 diagrams suggest that the 2001 products can be separated into two main groups with slightly different characteristics: plagioclase CSDs from the UVs can be modeled by three straight lines with different slopes while the plagioclase CSDs from the LVs are largely concave. We have interpreted the CSDs of the UVs as representing three different populations of plagioclases: (i) the large phenocrysts (type I), which started to crystallize at lower cooling rate in a deep reservoir from 13 to 8 months before eruption onset; (ii) the phenocrysts (type II), which crystallized largely during continuous degassing in a shallow reservoir; and (iii) the microlites, which crystallized during magma ascent immediately prior to the eruption. The plagioclase CSD curves for the LVs lava are interpreted to reflect strong and rapid changes in undercooling induced by strong and sudden degassing.

  17. Ambiguity of structure determination from a minimum of diffraction intensities.

    PubMed

    Al-Asadi, Ahmed; Leggas, Dimitri; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2014-07-01

    Although the ambiguity of the crystal structures determined directly from diffraction intensities has been historically recognized, it is not well understood in quantitative terms. Bernstein's theorem has recently been used to obtain the number of one-dimensional crystal structures of equal point atoms, given a minimum set of diffraction intensities. By a similar approach, the number of two- and three-dimensional crystal structures that can be determined from a minimum intensity data set is estimated herein. The ambiguity of structure determination from the algebraic minimum of data increases at least exponentially fast with the increasing structure size. Substituting lower-resolution intensities by higher-resolution ones in the minimum data set has little or no effect on this ambiguity if the number of such substitutions is relatively small.

  18. Influence of pH, particle size and crystal form on dissolution behaviour of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, M-L; Rasmussen, P E; Chénier, M; Gardner, H D

    2017-01-01

    Solubility is a critical component of physicochemical characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and an important parameter in their risk assessments. Standard testing methodologies are needed to estimate the dissolution behaviour and biodurability (half-life) of ENMs in biological fluids. The effect of pH, particle size and crystal form on dissolution behaviour of zinc metal, ZnO and TiO2 was investigated using a simple 2 h solubility assay at body temperature (37 °C) and two pH conditions (1.5 and 7) to approximately frame the pH range found in human body fluids. Time series dissolution experiments were then conducted to determine rate constants and half-lives. Dissolution characteristics of investigated ENMs were compared with those of their bulk analogues for both pH conditions. Two crystal forms of TiO2 were considered: anatase and rutile. For all compounds studied, and at both pH conditions, the short solubility assays and the time series experiments consistently showed that biodurability of the bulk analogues was equal to or greater than biodurability of the corresponding nanomaterials. The results showed that particle size and crystal form of inorganic ENMs were important properties that influenced dissolution behaviour and biodurability. All ENMs and bulk analogues displayed significantly higher solubility at low pH than at neutral pH. In the context of classification and read-across approaches, the pH of the dissolution medium was the key parameter. The main implication is that pH and temperature should be specified in solubility testing when evaluating ENM dissolution in human body fluids, even for preliminary (tier 1) screening.

  19. User's Guide to Galoper: A Program for Simulating the Shapes of Crystal Size Distributions from Growth Mechanisms - and Associated Programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, Dennis D.; Drits, V.A.; Srodon, J.

    2000-01-01

    GALOPER is a computer program that simulates the shapes of crystal size distributions (CSDs) from crystal growth mechanisms. This manual describes how to use the program. The theory for the program's operation has been described previously (Eberl, Drits, and Srodon, 1998). CSDs that can be simulated using GALOPER include those that result from growth mechanisms operating in the open system, such as constant-rate nucleation and growth, nucleation with a decaying nucleation rate and growth, surface-controlled growth, supply-controlled growth, and constant-rate and random growth; and those that result from mechanisms operating in the closed system such as Ostwald ripening, random ripening, and crystal coalescence. In addition, CSDs for two types weathering reactions can be simulated. The operation of associated programs also is described, including two statistical programs used for comparing calculated with measured CSDs, a program used for calculating lognormal CSDs, and a program for arranging measured crystal sizes into size groupings (bins).

  20. Crystal Size Distribution of Quartz Grains: A Means for Interpreting Igneous Textures in Dikes and Other Intrusive Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. J.; Candela, P. A.; Piccoli, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    Crystal size distribution analysis was applied to quartz crystals in intrusive igneous rocks in an attempt to describe quantitatively the degree to which the size distribution of the intrusive samples differs from that of extrusive rocks unaffected by near-solidus and sub-solidus recrystallization, grain boundary migration, and annealing. The samples include a seriate dike (width scale ~2 meters) found within the Courtright Shear Zone in the central Sierra Nevada (California), and three hypabyssal, Mesozoic-age plutons within the Great Basin (Nevada) including: the McCoy Pluton, granodiorite which exhibits a medium to coarse-grained hypidiomorphic texture; the Mill Canyon Stock, characterized by a hypidiomorphic-granular texture and which plots near the boundary between granite and granodiorite on a Streckeisen diagram; and the Trenton Canyon Pluton, which is a medium-grained hypidiomorphic-granular to slightly porphyritic granodiorite (Ratajeski, K., M.S. Thesis, Univ. MD, 1995). Crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis can be used to analyze quantitatively the texture of an igneous rock to derive information about the kinetics of crystallization. We used a batch crystallization formalism to model the crystallization kinetics of the intrusive rocks. In previous studies, CSD plots associated with extrusive samples have regularly exhibited a power-law crystal size distribution. In an attempt to determine the extent to which the CSD plots associated with intrusive samples approximate the CSD trends found for extrusive rocks, we measured the longest apparent diameters of quartz crystals in each sample for CSD analysis. Quartz was chosen for analysis because its aspect ratio approached unity. Therefore, the quartz grains can be approximated as a sphere in three dimensions, allowing for a simple area-to-volume conversion and minimizing stereological problems. Using the conductive heat transfer equation (dc = (κ t)1/2) applied to a dike with a cooling length of 1 meter

  1. Influence of particle aspect ratio on the midinfrared extinction spectra of wavelength-sized ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Benz, Stefan; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Leisner, Thomas

    2007-12-20

    We have used the T-matrix method and the discrete dipole approximation to compute the midinfrared extinction cross-sections (4500-800 cm(-1)) of randomly oriented circular ice cylinders for aspect ratios extending up to 10 for oblate and down to 1/6 for prolate particle shapes. Equal-volume sphere diameters ranged from 0.1 to 10 microm for both particle classes. A high degree of particle asphericity provokes a strong distortion of the spectral habitus compared to the extinction spectrum of compactly shaped ice crystals with an aspect ratio around 1. The magnitude and the sign (increase or diminution) of the shape-related changes in both the absorption and the scattering cross-sections crucially depend on the particle size and the values for the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index. When increasing the particle asphericity for a given equal-volume sphere diameter, the values for the overall extinction cross-sections may change in opposite directions for different parts of the spectrum. We have applied our calculations to the analysis of recent expansion cooling experiments on the formation of cirrus clouds, performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of 210 K. Depending on the nature of the seed particles and the temperature and relative humidity characteristics during the expansion, ice crystals of various shapes and aspect ratios could be produced. For a particular expansion experiment, using Illite mineral dust particles coated with a layer of secondary organic matter as seed aerosol, we have clearly detected the spectral signatures characteristic of strongly aspherical ice crystal habits in the recorded infrared extinction spectra. We demonstrate that the number size distributions and total number concentrations of the ice particles that were generated in this expansion run can only be accurately derived from the recorded infrared spectra when employing aspect ratios as high as

  2. Radiation damage in protein crystals is reduced with a micron-sized X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Sanishvili, Ruslan; Yoder, Derek W; Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Xu, Shenglan; Vogt, Stefan; Stepanov, Sergey; Makarov, Oleg A; Corcoran, Stephen; Benn, Richard; Nagarajan, Venugopalan; Smith, Janet L; Fischetti, Robert F

    2011-04-12

    Radiation damage is a major limitation in crystallography of biological macromolecules, even for cryocooled samples, and is particularly acute in microdiffraction. For the X-ray energies most commonly used for protein crystallography at synchrotron sources, photoelectrons are the predominant source of radiation damage. If the beam size is small relative to the photoelectron path length, then the photoelectron may escape the beam footprint, resulting in less damage in the illuminated volume. Thus, it may be possible to exploit this phenomenon to reduce radiation-induced damage during data measurement for techniques such as diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging that use X-rays to probe both crystalline and noncrystalline biological samples. In a systematic and direct experimental demonstration of reduced radiation damage in protein crystals with small beams, damage was measured as a function of micron-sized X-ray beams of decreasing dimensions. The damage rate normalized for dose was reduced by a factor of three from the largest (15.6 μm) to the smallest (0.84 μm) X-ray beam used. Radiation-induced damage to protein crystals was also mapped parallel and perpendicular to the polarization direction of an incident 1-μm X-ray beam. Damage was greatest at the beam center and decreased monotonically to zero at a distance of about 4 μm, establishing the range of photoelectrons. The observed damage is less anisotropic than photoelectron emission probability, consistent with photoelectron trajectory simulations. These experimental results provide the basis for data collection protocols to mitigate with micron-sized X-ray beams the effects of radiation damage.

  3. Oriented attachment by enantioselective facet recognition in millimeter-sized gypsum crystals.

    PubMed

    Viedma, Cristóbal; Cuccia, Louis A; McTaggart, Alicia; Kahr, Bart; Martin, Alexander T; McBride, J Michael; Cintas, Pedro

    2016-09-22

    Crystal growth by oriented attachment involves the spontaneous self-assembly of adjoining crystals with common crystallographic orientations. Herein, we report the oriented attachment of gypsum crystals on agitation to form stereoselective mesoscale aggregates.

  4. The origin of felsic microgranitoid enclaves: Insights from plagioclase crystal size distributions and thermodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Adriana; Pereira, Giovanna de Souza; Janasi, Valdecir de Assis; Higgins, Michael; Polo, Liza Angelica; Juriaans, Orlando Stanley; Ribeiro, Bruno Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Magma mixing is widely recognized in contemporary petrology as one of the primary igneous processes. Microgranitoid enclaves (MEs) are considered to be remnants of such mixing processes, and the term has a well-established genetic implication. However, microgranitoid enclaves span a wide range of compositions, and felsic varieties are also frequently reported. Nd-Sr isotope and textural data from felsic microgranitoid enclaves (FMEs), mafic microgranitoid enclaves (MMEs) and host granites from the Salto pluton, Itu Granitic Province, show that the cm-sized MMEs are dioritic, have medium-grained igneous textures and xenocrysts of alkali feldspar and quartz. The FMEs are cm- to meter-sized, have spheric shapes, show corrugated contacts with the host granites, and have resorbed feldspars and deformed quartz crystals interpreted as xenocrysts set in a fine-grained groundmass. Compared to the host granites, both MME and FME samples have increased FeO, MgO, TiO2, P2O5 and Zr contents, but their Sr and Nd isotope signatures are identical: FME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7088-0.7063, εNdi = - 10.0 to - 10.2; MME 87Sr/86Sri = 0.7070, εNdi = - 10.5; host granite 87Sr/86Sri 0.7056-0.7060, εNdi = - 10.2 to - 10.3. These indicate that the enclaves derive from a similar source, although the melts from which they formed were probably hotter and chemically more primitive than their host granites. Crystal size distributions (CSDs) of plagioclase in samples drilled from rinds and cores of three FMEs show that the rind samples are systematically finer-grained than the samples from the cores, which indicates that the FMEs cooled inwards and contradict interpretations that the FMEs are autoliths. Thermal modeling suggests that a slightly more primitive, hotter magma would be thermally equilibrated with an evolved resident melt within weeks after mixing/mingling. Upon thermal equilibrium, the FMEs would have an increased crystal cargo, and the resulting touching framework would impart a solid

  5. Effect of the Inhomogeneity of Ice Crystals on Retrieving Ice Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Particle Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Yu; Minnis, Patrick; Hu, Yong X.; Kattawar, George W.; Yang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Spherical or spheroidal air bubbles are generally trapped in the formation of rapidly growing ice crystals. In this study the single-scattering properties of inhomogeneous ice crystals containing air bubbles are investigated. Specifically, a computational model based on an improved geometric-optics method (IGOM) has been developed to simulate the scattering of light by randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals containing spherical or spheroidal air bubbles. A combination of the ray-tracing technique and the Monte Carlo method is used. The effect of the air bubbles within ice crystals is to smooth the phase functions, diminish the 22deg and 46deg halo peaks, and substantially reduce the backscatter relative to bubble-free particles. These features vary with the number, sizes, locations and shapes of the air bubbles within ice crystals. Moreover, the asymmetry factors of inhomogeneous ice crystals decrease as the volume of air bubbles increases. Cloud reflectance lookup tables were generated at wavelengths 0.65 m and 2.13 m with different air-bubble conditions to examine the impact of the bubbles on retrieving ice cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. The reflectances simulated for inhomogeneous ice crystals are slightly larger than those computed for homogenous ice crystals at a wavelength of 0.65 microns. Thus, the retrieved cloud optical thicknesses are reduced by employing inhomogeneous ice cloud models. At a wavelength of 2.13 microns, including air bubbles in ice cloud models may also increase the reflectance. This effect implies that the retrieved effective particle sizes for inhomogeneous ice crystals are larger than those retrieved for homogeneous ice crystals, particularly, in the case of large air bubbles.

  6. Synthesis of Large-Sized Single-Crystal Hexagonal Boron Nitride Domains on Nickel Foils by Ion Beam Sputtering Deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haolin; Zhang, Xingwang; Liu, Heng; Yin, Zhigang; Meng, Junhua; Xia, Jing; Meng, Xiang-Min; Wu, Jinliang; You, Jingbi

    2015-12-22

    Large-sized single-crystal h-BN domains with a lateral size up to 100 μm are synthesized on Ni foils by ion-beam sputtering deposition. The nucleation density of h-BN is dramatically decreased by reducing the concentrations of both active sites and species on the Ni surface through a brief in situ pretreatment of the substrate and optimization of the growth parameters, enabling the growth of large-sized domains.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on large size square-lattice photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Pibin; Li, Zhongyang; Yuan, Sheng; Yao, Jianquan; Lu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on large size square-lattice photonic crystal fiber has been designed and simulated by finite element method. The square-lattice airholes are first coated with a calcium fluoride layer to provide mode confinement, then a nanoscale gold layer is deposited to excite the plasmon mode, and finally, the sample is infiltrated into the holes. The numerical results reveal that the resonance properties are easily affected by many parameters. The refractive index resolution of corresponding sensor can reach 4.3 × 10-6 RIU when the optimum parameters are set as the radius of curvature of the airhole r = 2 μm, the thickness of the core struts c = 200 nm, the auxiliary dielectric layer s = 1 μm, and the gold film d = 40 nm. In addition, the effective area and nonlinear coefficient are calculated.

  8. CrystalMoM: a tool for modeling the evolution of Crystals Size Distributions in magmas with the Method of Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Landi, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that nucleation and growth of crystals play a fundamental role in controlling magma ascent dynamics and eruptive behavior. Size- and shape-distribution of crystal populations can affect mixture viscosity, causing, potentially, transitions between effusive and explosive eruptions. Furthermore, volcanic samples are usually characterized in terms of Crystal Size Distribution (CSD), which provide a valuable insight into the physical processes that led to the observed distributions. For example, a large average size can be representative of a slow magma ascent, and a bimodal CSD may indicate two events of nucleation, determined by two degassing events within the conduit. The Method of Moments (MoM), well established in the field of chemical engineering, represents a mesoscopic modeling approach that rigorously tracks the polydispersity by considering the evolution in time and space of integral parameters characterizing the distribution, the moments, by solving their transport differential-integral equations. One important advantage of this approach is that the moments of the distribution correspond to quantities that have meaningful physical interpretations and are directly measurable in natural eruptive products, as well as in experimental samples. For example, when the CSD is defined by the number of particles of size D per unit volume of the magmatic mixture, the zeroth moment gives the total number of crystals, the third moment gives the crystal volume fraction in the magmatic mixture and ratios between successive moments provide different ways to evaluate average crystal length. Tracking these quantities, instead of volume fraction only, will allow using, for example, more accurate viscosity models in numerical code for magma ascent. Here we adopted, for the first time, a quadrature based method of moments to track the temporal evolution of CSD in a magmatic mixture and we verified and calibrated the model again experimental data. We also show how

  9. Particle size studies to reveal crystallization mechanisms of the metal organic framework HKUST-1 during sonochemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Mitchell R; Senthilnathan, Sethuraman; Balzer, Christopher J; Shan, Bohan; Chen, Liang; Mu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Systematic studies of key operating parameters for the sonochemical synthesis of the metal organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1(also called CuBTC) were performed including reaction time, reactor volume, sonication amplitude, sonication tip size, solvent composition, and reactant concentrations analyzed through SEM particle size analysis. Trends in the particle size and size distributions show reproducible control of average particle sizes between 1 and 4μm. These results along with complementary studies in sonofragmentation and temperature control were conducted to compare these results to kinetic crystal growth models found in literature to develop a plausible hypothetical mechanism for ultrasound-assisted growth of metal-organic-frameworks composed of a competitive mechanism including constructive solid-on-solid (SOS) crystal growth and a deconstructive sonofragmentation.

  10. The influence of detector size relative to field size in small-field photon-beam dosimetry using synthetic diamond crystals as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, N.; Nam, T. L.

    2015-08-01

    The choice of a detector for small-field dosimetry remains a challenge due to the size/volume effect of detectors in small fields. Aimed at selecting a suitable crystal type and detector size for small-field dosimetry, this study investigates the relationship between detector and field size by analysing output factors (OFs) measured with a Diode E (reference detector), a Farmer chamber and synthetic diamond detectors of various types and sizes in the dosimetry of a 6 MV photon beam with small fields between 0.3×0.3 cm2 and 10×10 cm2. The examined diamond sensors included two HPHT samples (HP1 and HP2) and six polycrystalline CVD specimens of optical grade (OG) and detector grade (DG) qualities with sizes between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Each diamond was encapsulated in a tissue-equivalent probe housing which can hold crystals of various dimensions up to 1.0×1.0×0.1 cm3 and has different exposure geometries ('edge-on' and 'flat-on') for impinging radiation. The HPHT samples were found to show an overall better performance compared to the CVD crystals with the 'edge-on' orientation being a preferred geometry for OF measurement especially for very small fields. For instance, down to a 0.4×0.4 cm2 field a maximum deviation of 1.9% was observed between the OFs measured with Diode E and HP2 in the 'edge-on' orientation compared to a 4.6% deviation in the 'flat-on' geometry. It was observed that for fields below 4×4 cm2, the dose deviation between the OFs measured with the detectors and Diode E increase with increasing detector size. It was estimated from an established relationship between the dose deviation and the ratio of detector size to field size for the detectors that the dose deviation probably due to the volume averaging effect would be >3% when the detector size is >3/4 of the field size. A sensitivity value of 223 nC Gy-1 mm-3 was determined in a 0.5×0.5 cm2 field with HP2 compared to a value of 159.2 nC Gy-1 mm-3 obtained with the diode. The results of this

  11. Gypsum crystal size distribution in four continuous flow stirred slurry boric acid reactors in series compared with the batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakal, G. Ö.; Eroğlu, İ.; Özkar, S.

    2006-04-01

    Colemanite, one of the important boron minerals, is dissolved in aqueous sulfuric acid to produce boric acid. In this reaction, gypsum is obtained as a by-product. Gypsum crystals are in the shape of thin needles. These crystals should be grown to an easily filterable size in order to increase the production yield and purity of boric acid. In this paper, the particle size distributions and the volume-weighted mean diameters of the gypsum crystals obtained in batch and continuous flow systems were compared. Experiments in both batch and continuous reactors were performed at a temperature of 85 °C, a stirring rate of 400 rpm, and the inlet CaO to SO42- molar ratio of 1.0 using colemanite mineral in particle size smaller than 150 μm. The average diameter of the gypsum crystals obtained at 3.5 h from the batch reactor was found to be 37-41 μm. This value for the continuous system at steady state was observed to change between 44-163 μm. The particle size of the gypsum crystals was found to increase with the residence time of the solid in the continuous system.

  12. On the size of the secondary electron cloud in crystals irradiated by hard X-ray photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Pikuz, Tatiana; Faenov, Anatoly; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Ozaki, Norimasa; Albertazzi, Bruno; Pikuz, Sergei; Inubushi, Yuichi; Yabashi, Makina; Tono, Kensuke; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-03-01

    A simple theoretical recipe is proposed to estimate the size of the secondary electron cloud, generated in matter by incoming hard X-ray photons. An exclusive response of the LiF crystal to deposited X-ray doses by proportional generation of secondary electrons, which cause creation of color centers density inside the crystal, provides a unique possibility to validate the theoretical predictions for the size of the electron cloud with submicron resolution. The radius of the electron cloud measured for 10.1 keV photons is in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  13. Crystallized nano-sized alpha-tricalcium phosphate from amorphous calcium phosphate: microstructure, cementation and cell response.

    PubMed

    Vecbiskena, Linda; Gross, Karlis Agris; Riekstina, Una; Yang, Thomas Chung-Kuang

    2015-04-17

    New insight on the conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to nano-sized alpha tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) provides a faster pathway to calcium phosphate bone cements. In this work, synthesized ACP powders were treated with either water or ethanol, dried, crystallized between 700 and 800 °C, and then cooled at different cooling rates. Particle size was measured in a scanning electron microscope, but crystallite size calculated by Rietveld analysis. Phase composition and bonding in the crystallized powder was assessed by x-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that 50 nm sized α-TCP formed after crystallization of lyophilized powders. Water treated ACP retained an unstable state that may allow ordering to nanoapatite, and further transition to β-TCP after crystallization and subsequent decomposition. Powders treated with ethanol, favoured the formation of pure α-TCP. Faster cooling limited the growth of β-TCP. Both the initial contact with water and the cooling rate after crystallization dictated β-TCP formation. Nano-sized α-TCP reacted faster with water to an apatite bone cement than conventionally prepared α-TCP. Water treated and freeze-dried powders showed faster apatite cement formation compared to ethanol treated powders. Good biocompatibility was found in pure α-TCP nanoparticles made from ethanol treatment and with a larger crystallite size. This is the first report of pure α-TCP nanoparticles with a reactivity that has not required additional milling to cause cementation.

  14. Repeated growth and bubbling transfer of graphene with millimetre-size single-crystal grains using platinum

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Libo; Ren, Wencai; Xu, Huilong; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhenxing; Ma, Teng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Bao, Xinhe; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Large single-crystal graphene is highly desired and important for the applications of graphene in electronics, as grain boundaries between graphene grains markedly degrade its quality and properties. Here we report the growth of millimetre-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene and graphene films joined from such grains on Pt by ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition. We report a bubbling method to transfer these single graphene grains and graphene films to arbitrary substrate, which is nondestructive not only to graphene, but also to the Pt substrates. The Pt substrates can be repeatedly used for graphene growth. The graphene shows high crystal quality with the reported lowest wrinkle height of 0.8 nm and a carrier mobility of greater than 7,100 cm2 V−1 s−1 under ambient conditions. The repeatable growth of graphene with large single-crystal grains on Pt and its nondestructive transfer may enable various applications. PMID:22426220

  15. Influence of particle size and tunable interactions on isotropic-nematic transition of block copolymer single crystal platelet suspensions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunbo; Huang, Haiying; Ma, Cungui; He, Tianbai; Zhang, Fajun

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the influence of the particle size and the tunable lateral interactions on the isotropic-nematic (I-N) phase transition of a plate-like colloidal system. The particles are single crystals of a block copolymer PS-b-PLLA (BCSC) prepared using a self-seeding procedure. These lozenge shape crystals have a uniform thickness and a narrowly distributed lateral size. The equilibrium phase behavior and I-N phase transition have been characterized using crossed polarizers at the room temperature. A nematic phase exists for all systems with size ranging from 700 to 4000 nm. For smaller crystals (<1200 nm), the I-N phase transition follows a process of slow sedimentation and subsequent macroscopic phase separation, resulting in a highly oriented nematic phase with a sharp I-N interface. For larger crystals (≥1200 nm), the I-N phase transition follows a process of nucleation and subsequent sedimentation, resulting in a random orientation of crystals in the nematic phase and a rough I-N interface. The I-N transition occurs at a very low volume fraction (<0.2%) for all systems, which is at least one order of magnitude lower than the theoretical prediction (2-7%). However, addition of a small amount of ethanol into the solution, the I-N transition can be significantly suppressed. These results demonstrate the existence of a lateral attraction between crystals, which is due to the polar attraction between the uncovered PLLA crystalline domains. Polar ethanol molecules can adsorb to the PLLA crystalline surface and screen the attraction. The attraction exhibits highly orientation-dependent. To further demonstrate this highly directional attraction, we have prepared two composite single crystal suspensions with PLLA homopolymer, which have a much wider open angle for the polar attraction. Indeed, the resulting liquid crystalline phases show much less horizontal ordering.

  16. Size effects on plasticity and fatigue microstructure evolution in FCC single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Awady, Jaafar Abbas

    In aircraft structures and engines, fatigue damage is manifest in the progressive emergence of distributed surface cracks near locations of high stress concentrations. At the present time, reliable methods for prediction of fatigue crack initiation are not available, because the phenomenon starts at the atomic scale. Initiation of fatigue cracks is associated with the formation of Persistent slip bands (PSBs), which start at certain critical conditions inside metals with specific microstructure dimensions. The main objective of this research is to develop predictive computational capabilities for plasticity and fatigue damage evolution in finite volumes. In that attempt, a dislocation dynamics model that incorporates the influence of free and internal interfaces on dislocation motion is presented. The model is based on a self-consistent formulation of 3-D Parametric Dislocation Dynamics (PDD) with the Boundary Element method (BEM) to describe dislocation motion, and hence microscopic plastic flow in finite volumes. The developed computer models are bench-marked by detailed comparisons with the experimental data, developed at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Lab (WP-AFRL), by three dimensional large scale simulations of compression loading on micro-scale samples of FCC single crystals. These simulation results provide an understanding of plastic deformation of micron-size single crystals. The plastic flow characteristics as well as the stress-strain behavior of simulated micropillars are shown to be in general agreement with experimental observations. New size scaling aspects of plastic flow and work-hardening are identified through the use of these simulations. The flow strength versus the diameter of the micropillar follows a power law with an exponent equal to -0.69. A stronger correlation is observed between the flow strength and the average length of activated dislocation sources. This relationship is again a power law, with an exponent -0.85. Simulation results

  17. ESTIMATING THE STRENGTH OF SINGLE-ENDED DISLOCATION SOURCES IN MICROMETER-SIZED SINGLE CRYSTALS

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S I; Dimiduk, D M; Tang, M; Parthasarathy, T A; Uchic, M D; Woodward, C

    2007-05-03

    A recent study indicated that the behavior of single-ended dislocation sources contributes to the flow strength of micrometer-scale crystals. In this study 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations of micrometer-sized volumes are used to calculate the effects of anisotropy of dislocation line tension (increasing Poisson's ratio, {nu}) on the strength of single-ended dislocation sources and, to compare them with the strength of double-ended sources of equal length. This is done by directly modeling their plastic response within a 1 micron cubed FCC Ni single crystal using DDS. In general, double-ended sources are stronger than single-ended sources of an equal length and exhibit no significant effects from truncating the long-range elastic fields at this scale. The double-ended source strength increases with Poisson ratio ({nu}), exhibiting an increase of about 50% at u = 0.38 (value for Ni) as compared to the value at {nu} = 0. Independent of dislocation line direction, for {nu} greater than 0.20, the strengths of single-ended sources depend upon the sense of the stress applied. The value for {alpha}, in the expression for strength, {tau} = {alpha}(L){micro}b/L is shown to vary from 0.4 to 0.84 depending upon the character of the dislocation and the direction of operation of the source at {nu} corresponding to that of Ni, 0.38 and a length of 933b. By varying the lengths of the sources from 933b to 233b, it was shown that the scaling of the strength of single-ended and double-ended sources with their length both follow a ln(L/b)/(L/b) dependence. Surface image stresses are shown to have little effect on the critical stress of single-ended sources at a length of {approx}250b or greater. The relationship between these findings and a recent statistical model for the hardening of small volumes is also discussed.

  18. Highly crystallized nanometer-sized zeolite a with large Cs adsorption capability for the decontamination of water.

    PubMed

    Torad, Nagy L; Naito, Masanobu; Tatami, Junichi; Endo, Akira; Leo, Sin-Yen; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Wu, Kevin C-W; Wakihara, Toru; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2014-03-01

    Nanometer-sized zeolite A with a large cesium (Cs) uptake capability is prepared through a simple post-milling recrystallization method. This method is suitable for producing nanometer-sized zeolite in large scale, as additional organic compounds are not needed to control zeolite nucleation and crystal growth. Herein, we perform a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) study to evaluate the uptake ability of Cs ions by zeolite, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. In comparison to micrometer-sized zeolite A, nanometer-sized zeolite A can rapidly accommodate a larger amount of Cs ions into the zeolite crystal structure, owing to its high external surface area. Nanometer-sized zeolite is a promising candidate for the removal of radioactive Cs ions from polluted water. Our QCM study on Cs adsorption uptake behavior provides the information of adsorption kinetics (e.g., adsorption amounts and rates). This technique is applicable to other zeolites, which will be highly valuable for further consideration of radioactive Cs removal in the future.

  19. Nonlocal superelastic model of size-dependent hardening and dissipation in single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lei; Rimoli, Julian J; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A; Radovitzky, Raul

    2011-02-25

    We propose a nonlocal continuum model to describe the size-dependent superelastic effect observed in recent experiments of single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys. The model introduces two length scales, one in the free energy and one in the dissipation, which account for the size-dependent hardening and dissipation in the loading and unloading response of micro- and nanopillars subject to compression tests. The information provided by the model suggests that the size dependence observed in the dissipation is likely to be associated with a nonuniform evolution of the distribution of the austenitic and martensitic phases during the loading cycle.

  20. Large-scale fabrication of wafer-size colloidal crystals, macroporous polymers and nanocomposites by spin-coating.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; McFarland, Michael J

    2004-10-27

    This paper reports a simple spin-coating technique for rapidly fabricating three types of technologically important materials--colloidal crystal, macroporous polymer, and polymeric nanocomposite, each with high crystalline qualities and wafer-scale sizes. Dispersion of monodisperse silica colloids in triacrylate monomers is spin-coated onto a variety of substrates. Shear-induced ordering and subsequent polymerization lead to the formation of three-dimensionally (3D) ordered colloidal crystals trapped inside a polymer matrix. The thickness of as-synthesized colloidal crystal-polymer nanocomposite is highly uniform and can be controlled simply by changing the spin speed and time. Selective removal of the polymer matrix and silica spheres lead to the formation of large-area colloidal crystals and macroporous polymers, respectively. The wafer-scale process is compatible with standard semiconductor microfabrication, as multiple micrometer-sized patterns can be created simultaneously for potential device applications. Normal-incidence transmission spectra in the visible and near-infrared regions show distinct peaks due to Bragg diffraction from 3D ordered structures. The spin-coating process opens a new route to the fundamental studies of shear-induced crystallization, melting and relaxation.

  1. Surface phase separation, dewetting feature size, and crystal morphology in thin films of polystyrene/poly(ε-caprolactone) blend.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; He, Zhoukun; Li, Yuhan; Chen, Feng; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qing; Deng, Hua; Fu, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Thin films of polystyrene (PS)/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blends were prepared by spin-coating and characterized by tapping mode force microscopy (AFM). Effects of the relative concentration of PS in polymer solution on the surface phase separation and dewetting feature size of the blend films were systematically studied. Due to the coupling of phase separation, dewetting, and crystallization of the blend films with the evaporation of solvent during spin-coating, different size of PS islands decorated with various PCL crystal structures including spherulite-like, flat-on individual lamellae, and flat-on dendritic crystal were obtained in the blend films by changing the film composition. The average distance of PS islands was shown to increase with the relative concentration of PS in casting solution. For a given ratio of PS/PCL, the feature size of PS appeared to increase linearly with the square of PS concentration while the PCL concentration only determined the crystal morphology of the blend films with no influence on the upper PS domain features. This is explained in terms of vertical phase separation and spinodal dewetting of the PS rich layer from the underlying PCL rich layer, leading to the upper PS dewetting process and the underlying PCL crystalline process to be mutually independent.

  2. Size-controlled anatase titania single crystals with octahedron-like morphology for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Jia-Wei; Lan, Chi-Ming; Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Hui-Ping; Huang, Wei-Kai; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2012-12-21

    A simple hydrothermal method with titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) as a precursor and triethanolamine (TEOA) as a chelating agent enabled growth in the presence of a base (diethylamine, DEA) of anatase titania nanocrystals (HD1-HD5) of controlled size. DEA played a key role to expedite this growth, for which a biphasic crystal growth mechanism is proposed. The produced single crystals of titania show octahedron-like morphology with sizes in a broad range of 30-400 nm; a typical, extra large, octahedral single crystal (HD5) of length 410 nm and width 260 nm was obtained after repeating a sequential hydrothermal treatment using HD3 and then HD4 as a seed crystal. The nanocrystals of size ~30 nm (HD1) and ~300 nm (HD5) served as active layer and scattering layer, respectively, to fabricate N719-sensitized solar cells. These HD devices showed greater V(OC) than devices of conventional nanoparticle (NP) type; the overall device performance of HD attained an efficiency of 10.2% power conversion at a total film thickness of 28 μm, which is superior to that of a NP-based reference device (η = 9.6%) optimized at a total film thickness of 18-20 μm. According to results obtained from transient photoelectric and charge extraction measurements, this superior performance of HD devices relative to their NP counterparts is due to the more rapid electron transport and greater TiO(2) potential.

  3. Liquid crystal size selection of large-size graphene oxide for size-dependent N-doping and oxygen reduction catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Ji Eun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lim, Joonwon; Hwang, Jin Ok; Shim, Jongwon; Oh, Jung Jae; Yun, Taeyeong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-09-23

    Graphene oxide (GO) is aqueous-dispersible oxygenated graphene, which shows colloidal discotic liquid crystallinity. Many properties of GO-based materials, including electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, are limited by the small flake size of GO. Unfortunately, typical sonochemical exfoliation of GO from graphite generally leads to a broad size and shape distribution. Here, we introduce a facile size selection of large-size GO exploiting liquid crystallinity and investigate the size-dependent N-doping and oxygen reduction catalysis. In the biphasic GO dispersion where both isotropic and liquid crystalline phases are equilibrated, large-size GO flakes (>20 μm) are spontaneously concentrated within the liquid crystalline phase. N-Doping and reduction of the size-selected GO exhibit that N-dopant type is highly dependent on GO flake size. Large-size GO demonstrates quaternary dominant N-doping and the lowest onset potential (-0.08 V) for oxygen reduction catalysis, signifying that quaternary N-dopants serve as principal catalytic sites in N-doped graphene.

  4. Effect of dislocation pile-up on size-dependent yield strength in finite single-crystal micro-samples

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Bo; Shibutani, Yoji; Zhang, Xu; Shang, Fulin

    2015-07-07

    Recent research has explained that the steeply increasing yield strength in metals depends on decreasing sample size. In this work, we derive a statistical physical model of the yield strength of finite single-crystal micro-pillars that depends on single-ended dislocation pile-up inside the micro-pillars. We show that this size effect can be explained almost completely by considering the stochastic lengths of the dislocation source and the dislocation pile-up length in the single-crystal micro-pillars. The Hall–Petch-type relation holds even in a microscale single-crystal, which is characterized by its dislocation source lengths. Our quantitative conclusions suggest that the number of dislocation sources and pile-ups are significant factors for the size effect. They also indicate that starvation of dislocation sources is another reason for the size effect. Moreover, we investigated the explicit relationship between the stacking fault energy and the dislocation “pile-up” effect inside the sample: materials with low stacking fault energy exhibit an obvious dislocation pile-up effect. Our proposed physical model predicts a sample strength that agrees well with experimental data, and our model can give a more precise prediction than the current single arm source model, especially for materials with low stacking fault energy.

  5. Size control and vacuum-ultraviolet fluorescence of nanosized KMgF3 single crystals prepared using femtosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Sotaro; Yanagihara, Masahiro; Asaka, Toru; Ono, Shingo; Nagami, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa; Yokota, Yuui; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We fabricated nanosized KMgF3 single crystals via a dry pulsed laser ablation process using femtosecond laser pulses. The sizes, shapes, and crystallographic properties of the crystals were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Almost all of the particles were spherical with diameters of less than 100 nm, and they were not highly agglomerated. Selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution TEM analyses showed that the particles were single crystals. Particle diameter was controlled within a wide range by adjusting the Ar ambient gas pressure. Under low gas pressures (1 and 10 Pa), relatively small particles (primarily 10 nm or less) were observed with a high number density. With increasing pressure, the mean diameter increased and the number density drastically decreased. Vacuum-ultraviolet cathodoluminescence was observed at 140–230 nm with blue shift and broadening of spectrum. PMID:27877915

  6. Size control and vacuum-ultraviolet fluorescence of nanosized KMgF3 single crystals prepared using femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Sotaro; Yanagihara, Masahiro; Asaka, Toru; Ono, Shingo; Nagami, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa; Yokota, Yuui; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated nanosized KMgF3 single crystals via a dry pulsed laser ablation process using femtosecond laser pulses. The sizes, shapes, and crystallographic properties of the crystals were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Almost all of the particles were spherical with diameters of less than 100 nm, and they were not highly agglomerated. Selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution TEM analyses showed that the particles were single crystals. Particle diameter was controlled within a wide range by adjusting the Ar ambient gas pressure. Under low gas pressures (1 and 10 Pa), relatively small particles (primarily 10 nm or less) were observed with a high number density. With increasing pressure, the mean diameter increased and the number density drastically decreased. Vacuum-ultraviolet cathodoluminescence was observed at 140-230 nm with blue shift and broadening of spectrum.

  7. Growth of large size diamond single crystals by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition: Recent achievements and remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallaire, Alexandre; Achard, Jocelyn; Silva, François; Brinza, Ovidiu; Gicquel, Alix

    2013-02-01

    Diamond is a material with outstanding properties making it particularly suited for high added-value applications such as optical windows, power electronics, radiation detection, quantum information, bio-sensing and many others. Tremendous progresses in its synthesis by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition have allowed obtaining single crystal optical-grade material with thicknesses of up to a few millimetres. However the requirements in terms of size, purity and crystalline quality are getting more and more difficult to achieve with respect to the forecasted applications, thus pushing the synthesis method to its scientific and technological limits. In this paper, after a short description of the operating principles of the growth technique, the challenges of increasing crystal dimensions both laterally and vertically, decreasing and controlling point and extended defects as well as modulating crystal conductivity by an efficient doping will be detailed before offering some insights into ways to overcome them.

  8. Polycrystalline silicon films with nanometer-sized dense fine grains formed by flash-lamp-induced crystallization.

    PubMed

    Ohdaira, Keisuke; Ishii, Shohei; Tomura, Naohito; Matsumura, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Flash lamp annealing (FLA) with millisecond-order pulse duration can crystallize microm-order-thick a-Si films on glass substrates through explosive crystallization (EC), and flash-lamp-crystallized (FLC) poly-Si films consist of densely-packed nanometer-sized fine grains. We investigate the impact of the hydrogen concentration and the defect density of precursor a-Si films on crystallization mechanism and the microstructures of FLC poly-Si films, by comparing chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) and sputtered precursor a-Si films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation reveals that FLC poly-Si films with similar periodic microstructures are formed by the FLA of the two kinds of precursor films, meaning no significant influence of hydrogen atoms and defect density on crystallization mechanism. This high flexibility of the properties of precursor a-Si films would contribute to a wide process window to reproducibly form FLC poly-Si films with the particular periodic microstructures.

  9. Synthesis of nanoparticles in a flame aerosol reactor with independent and strict control of their size, crystal phase and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingkun; Chen, Da-Ren; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-07-01

    A flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) was developed to synthesize nanoparticles with desired properties (crystal phase and size) that could be independently controlled. The methodology was demonstrated for TiO2 nanoparticles, and this is the first time that large sets of samples with the same size but different crystal phases (six different ratios of anatase to rutile in this work) were synthesized. The degree of TiO2 nanoparticle agglomeration was determined by comparing the primary particle size distribution measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to the mobility-based particle size distribution measured by online scanning mobility particle spectrometry (SMPS). By controlling the flame aerosol reactor conditions, both spherical unagglomerated particles and highly agglomerated particles were produced. To produce monodisperse nanoparticles, a high throughput multi-stage differential mobility analyser (MDMA) was used in series with the flame aerosol reactor. Nearly monodisperse nanoparticles (geometric standard deviation less than 1.05) could be collected in sufficient mass quantities (of the order of 10 mg) in reasonable time (1 h) that could be used in other studies such as determination of functionality or biological effects as a function of size.

  10. Nondestructive evaluation of crystallized-particle size in lactose-powder by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Satoshi; Hatakeyama, Sakura; Imai, Yoh; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    Transmission-type terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to evaluate crystallized lactose particle of size below 30 μm, which is far too small compared to the wavelength of incident terahertz (THz)-wave. The THz-absorption spectrum of lactose is successfully deconvoluted by Lorentzian to two spectra with peaks at 17.1 cm-1 (0.53 THz) and 45.6 cm-1 (1.37 THz) derived from α-lactose monohydrate, and a spectrum at 39.7 cm-1 (1.19 THz) from anhydrous β-lactose after removal of the broad-band spectrum by polynomial cubic function. Lactose is mainly crystallized into α-lactose monohydrate from the supersaturated solution at room temperature with a small amount of anhydrous β-lactose below 4%. The absorption feature is dependent on the crystallized particle size and the integrated intensity ratio of the two absorptions due to α-lactose monohydrate is correlated in linear for the size.

  11. Size-dependent phase stability of a molecular nanocrystal: a proxy for investigating the early stages of crystallization.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Dirk; Anwar, Jamshed

    2011-09-26

    We make the link between the size-dependent phase stability of a nanocrystal and the phase-transition behavior of emerging crystallites during the earliest stages of crystallization, by using the former as a proxy for the latter. We outline an extension of the classical nucleation theory to describe crystal nucleation and subsequent transformations of competing polymorphic phases that characterize Ostwald's rule of stages. The theoretical framework reveals that the relative stability of the competing phases is a function of cluster size, which in turn varies with time, and therefore explains the complex transformation behavior observed for some systems. We investigated the stability of a nanocrystal of dl-norleucine by means of molecular simulation as a proxy for post-nucleation phase-transformation behavior in emerging crystallites. The simulations reveal that, for nanocrystals, the surface energy of the transition state of a transformation can dominate the barrier to phase change, thus causing metastable phases to be stabilized, not because they are thermodynamically stable, but rather due to kinetic hindering. Therefore, in the context of the earliest stages of crystal growth, not only does phase stability vary as a function of cluster size, and hence time, but thermodynamically feasible transformations are also prone to kinetic hindering.

  12. Solar Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Mathews, John; Manross, Kevin

    1995-12-01

    Calcium K plage, H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored daily on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The plage and sunspot area have been measured by image processing. The purpose of the project is to investigate the degree of correlation between plage area and solar irradiance. The plage variation shows the expected variation produced by solar rotation and the longer secular changes produced by the solar cycle. The H alpha and sunspot plage area reached a minimum in about late 1994 or early 1995. This is in agreement with the K2 spectral index obtained daily from Sacramento Peak Observatory. The Calcium K plage area minimum seems delayed with respect to the others mentioned above. The minimum of the K line plage area is projected to come within the last few months of 1995.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of high-quality large-sized MoS2 crystals on silicon dioxide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianyi; Tang, Wei; Tian, Bingbing; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Xiaoxu; Liu, Yanpeng; Ren, Tianhua; Liu, Wei; Geng, Dechao; Jeong, Hu Young; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Zhou, Wu; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-03-31

    Large-sized MoS2 crystals can be grown on SiO2/Si substrates via a two-stage chemical vapor deposition method. The maximum size of MoS2 crystals can be up to about 305 μm. The growth method can be used to grow other transition metal dichalcogenide crystals and lateral heterojunctions. Additionally, the electron mobility of the MoS2 crystals can reach ≈30 cm2 V–1 s–1, which is comparable to those of exfoliated flakes.

  14. Lactose particle engineering: Influence of ultrasound and anti-solvent on crystal habit and particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougoulos, E.; Marziano, I.; Miller, P. R.

    2010-11-01

    This study focuses on ultrasound-assisted anti-solvent crystallization of lactose, expanding on previous studies and presenting, for the first time, the results of large scale implementation of sonocrystallization for lactose. The results further clarify the interplay between solution chemistry - namely the role of β-lactose - and crystallization, representing a step forward in the fine tuning of lactose properties for pharmaceutical manufacturing applications. Batches manufactured at laboratory and pilot scales were extensively characterised, including an approach for the quantification of β-lactose in α-lactose based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), which is described here.

  15. Crystal Structures and Phase Sequences of Metallocenium Salts with Fluorinated Anions: Effects of Molecular Size and Symmetry on Phase Transitions to Ionic Plastic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Tomoyuki; Funasako, Yusuke; Ishida, Mai; Saruta, Shingo; Kosone, Takashi; Kitazawa, Takafumi

    2016-10-24

    Sandwich compounds often exhibit various phase transitions, including those to plastic phases. To elucidate the general features of the phase transitions in metallocenium salts, the thermal properties and crystal structures of [Fe(C5 Me5 )2 ]X ([1]X), [Co(C5 Me5 )2 ]X ([2]X), and [Fe(C5 Me4 H)2 ]X ([3]X) have been investigated, where the counter anions (X) are Tf2 N (=(CF3 SO2 )2 N(-) ), OTf (=CF3 SO3(-) ), PF6 , and BF4 . The Tf2 N salts commonly undergo phase transitions from an ordered phase at low temperatures to an anion-disordered phase, followed by a plastic phase and finally melt at high temperatures. All these salts exhibit a phase transition to a plastic phase, and the transition temperature generally decreases with decreasing cation size and increasing anion size. The crystal structures of these salts comprise an alternating arrangement of cations and anions. About half of these salts exhibit phase transitions at low temperatures, which are mostly correlated with the order-disorder of the anion.

  16. Derivation of Physical and Optical Properties of Midlatitude Cirrus Ice Crystals for a Size-Resolved Cloud Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by approx. 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from approx. 0:05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  17. Size/morphology induced tunable luminescence in upconversion crystals: ultra-strong single-band emission and underlying mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Zeng, Songshan; Yu, Jingfang; Ji, Xiaoming; Zeng, Huidan; Xin, Shuangyu; Wang, Yuhua; Sun, Luyi

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we present a two-step method to controllably synthesize novel and highly efficient upconversion materials, Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nano/micro-crystals, and investigate their size/morphology induced tunable upconversion properties. In addition to the common phenomenon aroused by a surface quenching effect, direct experimental evidence for the regulation of phonon modes is obtained in nanoparticles. The findings in this work advance the existing mechanisms for the general explanation of size/morphology induced upconversion features. Because of the adjustment of phonon energy and density as well as the surface quenching effect, the biocompatible Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nanoparticles exhibit an ultra-strong single-band red upconversion, rendering them promising for biomedical applications.In this work, we present a two-step method to controllably synthesize novel and highly efficient upconversion materials, Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nano/micro-crystals, and investigate their size/morphology induced tunable upconversion properties. In addition to the common phenomenon aroused by a surface quenching effect, direct experimental evidence for the regulation of phonon modes is obtained in nanoparticles. The findings in this work advance the existing mechanisms for the general explanation of size/morphology induced upconversion features. Because of the adjustment of phonon energy and density as well as the surface quenching effect, the biocompatible Lu5O4F7:Er3+,Yb3+ nanoparticles exhibit an ultra-strong single-band red upconversion, rendering them promising for biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Crystal structure analysis, UV-Vis absorption spectra, SEM micrographs, surface micro-structure investigation, biocompatibility of Lu5O4F7: Er3+, Yb3+, as well as morphology and upconversion properties of the control sample NaYF4: Er3+, Yb3+. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01008j

  18. Effect of Gravity Level on the Particle Shape and Size During Zeolite Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Hong-Wei; Ilebusi, Olusegun J.; Sacco, Albert, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A microscopic diffusion model is developed to represent solute transport in the boundary layer of a growing zeolite crystal. This model is used to describe the effect of gravity on particle shape and solute distribution. Particle dynamics and crystal growth kinetics serve as the boundary conditions of flow and convection-diffusion equations. A statistical rate theory is used to obtain the rate of solute transport across the growing interface, which is expressed in terms of concentration and velocity of solute species. Microgravity can significantly decrease the solute velocity across the growing interface compared to its earth-based counterpart. The extent of this reduction highly depends on solute diffusion constant in solution. Under gravity, the flow towards the crystal enhances solute transport rate across the growing interface while the flow away from crystals reduces this rate, suggesting a non-uniform growth rate and thus an elliptic final shape. However, microgravity can significantly reduce the influence of flow and obtain a final product with perfect spherical shape. The model predictions compare favorably with the data of space experiment of zeolites grown in space.

  19. A Review of ETS Differential Item Functioning Assessment Procedures: Flagging Rules, Minimum Sample Size Requirements, and Criterion Refinement. Research Report. ETS RR-12-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a key component in the evaluation of the fairness and validity of educational tests. The goal of this project was to review the status of ETS DIF analysis procedures, focusing on three aspects: (a) the nature and stringency of the statistical rules used to flag items, (b) the minimum sample size…

  20. Sensitivity of Cirrus Bidirectional Reflectance at MODIS Bands to Vertical Inhomogeneity of Ice Crystal Habits and Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P.; Gao, B.-C.; Baum, B. A.; Wiscombe, W.; Hu, Y.; Nasiri, S. L.; Soulen, P. F.; Heymsfield, A. J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Miloshevich, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    A common assumption in satellite imager-based cirrus retrieval algorithms is that the radiative properties of a cirrus cloud may be represented by those associated with a specific ice crystal shape (or habit) and a single particle size distribution. However, observations of cirrus clouds have shown that the shapes and sizes of ice crystals may vary substantially with height within the clouds. In this study we investigate the sensitivity of the top-of-atmosphere bidirectional reflectances at two MODIS bands centered at 0.65 micron and 2.11 micron to the cirrus models assumed to be either a single homogeneous layer or three distinct but contiguous, layers. First, we define the single- and three-layer cirrus cloud models with respect to ice crystal habit and size distribution on the basis of in situ replicator data acquired during the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE-II), held in Kansas during the fall of 1991. Subsequently, fundamental light scattering and radiative transfer theory is employed to determine the single scattering and the bulk radiative properties of the cirrus cloud. Regarding the radiative transfer computations, we present a discrete form of the adding/doubling principle by introducing a direct transmission function, which is computationally straightforward and efficient an improvement over previous methods. For the 0.65 micron band, at which absorption by ice is negligible, there is little difference between the bidirectional reflectances calculated for the one- and three-layer cirrus models, suggesting that the vertical inhomogeneity effect is relatively unimportant. At the 2.11 micron band, the bidirectional reflectances computed for both optically thin (tau = 1) and thick (tau = 10) cirrus clouds show significant differences between the results for the one- and three-layer models. The reflectances computed for the three-layer cirrus model are substantially larger than those computed for the single-layer cirrus. Finally, we find that cloud

  1. Crystallographic anisotropy of the resistivity size effect in single crystal tungsten nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dooho; Moneck, Matthew; Liu, Xuan; Oh, Soong Ju; Kagan, Cherie R.; Coffey, Kevin R.; Barmak, Katayun

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates an anisotropic increase in resistivity with decreasing width in single crystal tungsten (W) nanowires having a height of 21 nm. Nanowire-widths were in the range of 15–451 nm, with the anisotropy observed for widths below 50 nm. The longitudinal directions of the nanowires coincided with the <100>, <110> and <111> orientations of the body centered cubic phase of W. The resistivity increase was observed to be minimized for the <111>-oriented single crystal nanowires, exhibiting a factor of two lower increase in resistivity at a width of ~15 nm, relative to the thin film resistivity (i.e., an infinitely wide wire). The observed anisotropy is attributed to crystallographic anisotropy of the Fermi velocity and the resultant anisotropy of the electron mean free path in W, and underscores the critical role of crystallographic orientation in nanoscale metallic conduction. PMID:24005230

  2. Crystallographic anisotropy of the resistivity size effect in single crystal tungsten nanowires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dooho; Moneck, Matthew; Liu, Xuan; Oh, Soong Ju; Kagan, Cherie R; Coffey, Kevin R; Barmak, Katayun

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates an anisotropic increase in resistivity with decreasing width in single crystal tungsten (W) nanowires having a height of 21 nm. Nanowire-widths were in the range of 15-451 nm, with the anisotropy observed for widths below 50 nm. The longitudinal directions of the nanowires coincided with the <100>, <110> and <111> orientations of the body centered cubic phase of W. The resistivity increase was observed to be minimized for the <111>-oriented single crystal nanowires, exhibiting a factor of two lower increase in resistivity at a width of ~15 nm, relative to the thin film resistivity (i.e., an infinitely wide wire). The observed anisotropy is attributed to crystallographic anisotropy of the Fermi velocity and the resultant anisotropy of the electron mean free path in W, and underscores the critical role of crystallographic orientation in nanoscale metallic conduction.

  3. Hydrothermal growth of nanometer- to micrometer-size anatase single crystals with exposed (001) facets and their ability to assist photodegradation of rhodamine B in water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ming; Tang, Mei-Lan

    2011-06-15

    Anatase single crystals with exposed (001) facets have been the focus of many researches in recent years. This paper reports the hydrothermal synthesis of (001)-exposed anatase single crystals through reactions of Ti plates in aqueous HF solutions with mass concentrations of 0.15-0.80%, in an autoclave at 180°C for 2-12h. The size of the achieved anatase single crystals varied from 0.4 to 13.6 μm, exposing 15-49% (001) facets. The crystal size and the (001) fraction increased with increasing HF concentrations. For a prolonged reaction time, anatase crystals with larger sizes and reduced fractions of (001) facets were achieved. The activity of the anatase crystals to assist photodegradation of rhodamine B in water increased with decreasing sizes and increasing fractions of (001) facets. Selective erosion of the anatase single crystals along the high-energy (001) facets was noted, for the first time, which resulted in cone-shaped walls with a thickness ranging from several to hundreds of nanometers. The selective erosion contributed to the photocatalytic activity of the (001)-exposed anatase single crystals.

  4. Acoustical and optical investigations of the size effect in nematic-isotropic phase transition in liquid crystal microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimochkin, G. I.; Pasechnik, S. V.; Lukin, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    The absorption of ultrasound (at a frequency of 2.7 MHz) and the depolarized light transmission and scattering (at a wavelength of 630 nm) in liquid crystal (LC) emulsions have been studied during the nematic-isotropic (N-I) phase transition in LC droplets with radii ranging from 150 to 2300 nm. The obtained acoustical and optical data are used to determine the influence of the droplet size on characteristics of the N-I phase transition. It is shown that the acoustical and optical characteristics of LC emulsions have good prospects to be used for the investigation of phase transitions in submicron samples.

  5. Specific features of the spectral properties of a photonic crystal with a nanocomposite defect with allowance for the size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, S. Ya.; Pankin, P. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral properties of a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) with a structure defect (a layer of isotropic nanocomposite inserted between two multilayer dielectric mirrors) have been investigated. The nanocomposite consists of spherical gold nanoparticles dispersed in a transparent matrix; it is characterized by effective resonant permittivity. The dependence of the transmission and absorption spectra on the size and concentration of nanoparticles is analyzed. It is shown that the transmission spectrum contains, along with the band gap caused by Bragg diffraction of light, an additional nontransmission band due to the nanocomposite absorption near the resonant frequency.

  6. Variation of ice crystal size, shape, and asymmetry parameter in tops of tropical deep convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Cairns, Brian; Ackerman, Andrew S.

    2014-10-01

    The variation of ice crystal properties in the tops of deep convective clouds off the north coast of Australia is analyzed. Cloud optical thickness, ice effective radius, aspect ratio of ice crystal components, crystal distortion parameter and asymmetry parameter are simultaneously retrieved from combined measurements of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) satellite instruments. The data are divided into periods with alternating weak and strong convection. Mostly plate-like particle components with aspect ratios closer to unity and lower asymmetry parameters characterize strongly convective periods, while weakly convective periods generally show lower aspect ratios, relatively more column-like shapes and somewhat greater asymmetry parameters. Results for strongly convective periods show that, with increasing cloud top temperature, the distortion parameter generally decreases, while the asymmetry parameter and effective radius increase. For one of the strongly convective periods, the rate at which effective radii increase with cloud top temperature is more than double that of the other periods, while the temperature dependence of the other microphysical quantities for this period is substantially weaker. Atmospheric state analysis indicates that these differences are concurrent with differences in middle-to-upper tropospheric zonal wind shear. The observed variation of microphysical properties may have significant effects on the shortwave radiative fluxes and cloud absorption associated with deep convection. Additionally, MODIS collection 5 effective radii are estimated to be biased small with an artificially narrow range. Collection 6 products are expected to have less severe biases that depend on cloud top temperature and atmospheric conditions.

  7. Control of crystalline volume and nano crystal grain size in nanocrystalline silicon thin film deposited by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Thanh Tung; Chien Dang, Mau

    2014-11-01

    Application of the radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique was studied to fabricate amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon (a-Si and nc-Si) thin films for photovoltaic devices at substrate temperature of 200 °C. Amorphous-crystalline transition of silicon thin films in working conditions of PECVD system was shown as a function of deposition parameters, i.e., dilution ratio of silane (SiH4) in hydrogen, total gas pressure during deposition and RF excitation power density. The crystalline volume as well as grain size of nanocrystalline silicon films could be successfully controlled by tuning those deposition parameters. Micro Raman scattering spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) methods were used to characterize the structure and crystallization of the deposited silicon thin films. We could make nc-Si thin films with various crystalline volumes. Nc-Si grain size was also controlled and was in the range of 3-5 nm.

  8. Phase field modelling on the growth dynamics of double voids of different sizes during czochralski silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X. J.; Wang, J.

    2017-02-01

    To investigate their dynamics and interaction mechanisms, the growth process of the two voids with different sizes during Czochralski silicon crystal growth were simulated by use of an established phase field model and its corresponding program code. On the basis of the several phase field numerical simulation cases, the evolution laws of the double voids were acquired as follows: the phase field model is capable to simulate the growth process of double voids with different sizes; there are two modes of their growth, that is, either mutual integration or competitive growth; the exact moment of their fusion can be also captured, and it is τ of 7.078 (simulation time step of 14156) for the initial vacancy concentration of 0.02 and the initial space between two void centers of 44Δx.

  9. Control over the crystal phase, shape, size and aggregation of calcium carbonate via a L-aspartic acid inducing process.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hua; Ma, Wentao; Wang, Leilei; Wan, Peng; Hu, Jiming; Cao, Lianxin

    2004-08-01

    The acidic amino acid, such as aspartic acid (l-Asp), and glutamic acid are the primary active molecules of the glycoprotein on the organic/inorganic interface of biomineralized tissue. In this study, aspartic acid was used as the organic template in inducing the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate. With the analysis of X-ray diffraction we investigated the relationship between the l-Asp concentration and the precipitation phase crystal structure of calcium carbonate. SEM and TEM were employed in the analysis of the morphological characteristic of the precipitation and the aggregation of the nanoscale porous phase. In order to get the direct evidence of the interaction between Ca2+ and l-Asp, the technique of QCM was used in the investigation of the coordinate interaction of Ca2+/l-Asp. As the results have shown, l-Asp alone is adequate to switch the transformation between calcite and vaterite, and neither soluble organic additions nor metal ions are needed. Meanwhile, the morphology, size and aggregative way of the deposition are also mediated with change of l-Asp concentration. To interpret the cause of the hierarchic structure range from nanoscale to micron-scale and the formation of the porous spheres of vaterite, an assumption of limited-fusion was proposed from the view of the small biomolecules polarity that can control over the growth of the crystals and the aggregation of the micro crystals. The conclusion also provide a new material synthesize strategy.

  10. Toxicity of iron-based nanoparticles to green algae: Effects of particle size, crystal phase, oxidation state and environmental aging.

    PubMed

    Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Luqing; Yang, Kun; Zhu, Lizhong; Lin, Daohui

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing environmental application and discharge of iron-based nanoparticles (NPs), a comprehensive understanding of their fate and ecotoxicological effect in the aquatic environment is very urgent. In this study, toxicities of 4 zero-valent iron NPs (nZVI) of different sizes, 2 Fe2O3 NPs of different crystal phases, and 1 type of Fe3O4 NPs to a green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) were investigated, with a focus on the effects of particle size, crystal phase, oxidation state, and environmental aging. Results show that the algal growth inhibition of nZVI increased significantly with decreasing particle size; with similar particle sizes (20-30 nm), the algal growth inhibition decreased with oxidation of the NPs with an order of nZVI > Fe3O4 NPs > Fe2O3 NPs, and α-Fe2O3 NPs presented significantly higher toxicity than γ-Fe2O3 NPs. The NP-induced oxidative stress was the main toxic mechanism, which could explain the difference in algal toxicity of the NPs. The NP-cell heteroagglomeration and physical interactions also contributed to the nanotoxicity, whereas the effect of NP dissolution was negligible. The aging in distilled water and 3 surface water samples for 3 months increased surface oxidation of the iron-based NPs especially nZVI, which decreased the toxicity to algae. These findings will be helpful for the understanding of the fate and toxicity of iron-based NPs in the aquatic environment.

  11. A Linear Relationship between Crystal Size and Fragment Binding Time Observed Crystallographically: Implications for Fragment Library Screening Using Acoustic Droplet Ejection

    PubMed Central

    Birone, Claire; Brown, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neff, Sherry; Williams, Daniel; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M.; Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S.

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above), the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above), the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size. PMID:24988328

  12. A linear relationship between crystal size and fragment binding time observed crystallographically: implications for fragment library screening using acoustic droplet ejection.

    PubMed

    Cole, Krystal; Roessler, Christian G; Mulé, Elizabeth A; Benson-Xu, Emma J; Mullen, Jeffrey D; Le, Benjamin A; Tieman, Alanna M; Birone, Claire; Brown, Maria; Hernandez, Jesus; Neff, Sherry; Williams, Daniel; Allaire, Marc; Orville, Allen M; Sweet, Robert M; Soares, Alexei S

    2014-01-01

    High throughput screening technologies such as acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) greatly increase the rate at which X-ray diffraction data can be acquired from crystals. One promising high throughput screening application of ADE is to rapidly combine protein crystals with fragment libraries. In this approach, each fragment soaks into a protein crystal either directly on data collection media or on a moving conveyor belt which then delivers the crystals to the X-ray beam. By simultaneously handling multiple crystals combined with fragment specimens, these techniques relax the automounter duty-cycle bottleneck that currently prevents optimal exploitation of third generation synchrotrons. Two factors limit the speed and scope of projects that are suitable for fragment screening using techniques such as ADE. Firstly, in applications where the high throughput screening apparatus is located inside the X-ray station (such as the conveyor belt system described above), the speed of data acquisition is limited by the time required for each fragment to soak into its protein crystal. Secondly, in applications where crystals are combined with fragments directly on data acquisition media (including both of the ADE methods described above), the maximum time that fragments have to soak into crystals is limited by evaporative dehydration of the protein crystals during the fragment soak. Here we demonstrate that both of these problems can be minimized by using small crystals, because the soak time required for a fragment hit to attain high occupancy depends approximately linearly on crystal size.

  13. Aligned Growth of Millimeter-Size Hexagonal Boron Nitride Single-Crystal Domains on Epitaxial Nickel Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junhua; Zhang, Xingwang; Wang, Ye; Yin, Zhigang; Liu, Heng; Xia, Jing; Wang, Haolin; You, Jingbi; Jin, Peng; Wang, Denggui; Meng, Xiang-Min

    2017-03-07

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is gaining significant attention for many applications such as a dielectric layer or substrate for graphene-based devices. For these applications, synthesis of high-quality and large-area h-BN layers with few defects is strongly desirable. In this work, the aligned growth of millimeter-size single-crystal h-BN domains on epitaxial Ni (111)/sapphire substrates by ion beam sputtering deposition is demonstrated. Under the optimized growth conditions, single-crystal h-BN domains up to 0.6 mm in edge length are obtained, the largest reported to date. The formation of large-size h-BN domains results mainly from the reduced Ni-grain boundaries and the improved crystallinity of Ni film. Furthermore, the h-BN domains show well-aligned orientation and excellent dielectric properties. In addition, the sapphire substrates can be repeatedly used with almost no limit. This work provides an effective approach for synthesizing large-scale high-quality h-BN layers for electronic applications.

  14. Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program (update to automatic flight trajectory design, performance prediction, and vehicle sizing for support of Shuttle and Shuttle derived vehicles) engineering manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) program and its predecessors, the ROBOT and the RAGMOP programs, have had a long history of supporting MSFC in the simulation of space boosters for the purpose of performance evaluation. The ROBOT program was used in the simulation of the Saturn 1B and Saturn 5 vehicles in the 1960's and provided the first utilization of the minimum Hamiltonian (or min-H) methodology and the steepest ascent technique to solve the optimum trajectory problem. The advent of the Space Shuttle in the 1970's and its complex airplane design required a redesign of the trajectory simulation code since aerodynamic flight and controllability were required for proper simulation. The RAGMOP program was the first attempt to incorporate the complex equations of the Space Shuttle into an optimization tool by using an optimization method based on steepest ascent techniques (but without the min-H methodology). Development of the complex partial derivatives associated with the Space Shuttle configuration and using techniques from the RAGMOP program, the ROBOT program was redesigned to incorporate these additional complexities. This redesign created the MASTRE program, which was referred to as the Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Shuttle TRajectory Evaluation program at that time. Unique to this program were first-stage (or booster) nonlinear aerodynamics, upper-stage linear aerodynamics, engine control via moment balance, liquid and solid thrust forces, variable liquid throttling to maintain constant acceleration limits, and a total upgrade of the equations used in the forward and backward integration segments of the program. This modification of the MASTRE code has been used to simulate the new space vehicles associated with the National Launch Systems (NLS). Although not as complicated as the Space Shuttle, the simulation and analysis of the NLS vehicles required additional modifications to the MASTRE program in the areas of providing

  15. Colour Size Illusion on Liquid Crystal Displays and Design Guidelines for Bioinformatics Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Hyun Seung; Smith-Jackson, Tonya L.

    2011-01-01

    Although the influence of colour on size perception has been known for a century, there is only limited research on interventions that can reduce this effect. This study was therefore undertaken in order to identify appropriate interventions and propose design guidelines for information visualisation, especially in applications where size…

  16. Molecular tectonics: design of enantiomerically pure helical tubular crystals with controlled channel size and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Jin; Jouaiti, Abdelaziz; Grosshans, Philippe; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2011-07-21

    The combination of four enantiomerically pure organic tectons composed of a rigid chiral backbone bearing two terminal pyridyl coordinating sites with ZnSiF(6) behaving as an infinite pillar leads to the formation of tubular 2-D enantiomerically pure helical channels with controlled size and orientation.

  17. Characterization of synthetic nanocrystalline mackinawite: crystal structure, particle size, and specific surface area

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hoon Y.; Lee, Jun H.; Hayes, Kim F.

    2010-01-01

    Iron sulfide was synthesized by reacting aqueous solutions of sodium sulfide and ferrous chloride for 3 days. By X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), the resultant phase was determined to be primarily nanocrystalline mackinawite (space group: P4/nmm) with unit cell parameters a = b = 3.67 Å and c = 5.20 Å. Iron K-edge XAS analysis also indicated the dominance of mackinawite. Lattice expansion of synthetic mackinawite was observed along the c-axis relative to well-crystalline mackinawite. Compared with relatively short-aged phase, the mackinawite prepared here was composed of larger crystallites with less elongated lattice spacings. The direct observation of lattice fringes by HR-TEM verified the applicability of Bragg diffraction in determining the lattice parameters of nanocrystalline mackinawite from XRPD patterns. Estimated particle size and external specific surface area (SSAext) of nanocrystalline mackinawite varied significantly with the methods used. The use of Scherrer equation for measuring crystallite size based on XRPD patterns is limited by uncertainty of the Scherrer constant (K) due to the presence of polydisperse particles. The presence of polycrystalline particles may also lead to inaccurate particle size estimation by Scherrer equation, given that crystallite and particle sizes are not equivalent. The TEM observation yielded the smallest SSAext of 103 m2/g. This measurement was not representative of dispersed particles due to particle aggregation from drying during sample preparation. In contrast, EGME method and PCS measurement yielded higher SSAext (276–345 m2/g by EGME and 424 ± 130 m2/g by PCS). These were in reasonable agreement with those previously measured by the methods insensitive to particle aggregation. PMID:21085620

  18. Minimum Hamiltonian ascent trajectory evaluation (MASTRE) program (update to automatic flight trajectory design, performance prediction, and vehicle sizing for support of shuttle and shuttle derived vehicles) users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, J. T.; Borchers, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Documentation for the User Interface Program for the Minimum Hamiltonian Ascent Trajectory Evaluation (MASTRE) is provided. The User Interface Program is a separate software package designed to ease the user input requirements when using the MASTRE Trajectory Program. This document supplements documentation on the MASTRE Program that consists of the MASTRE Engineering Manual and the MASTRE Programmers Guide. The User Interface Program provides a series of menus and tables using the VAX Screen Management Guideline (SMG) software. These menus and tables allow the user to modify the MASTRE Program input without the need for learning the various program dependent mnemonics. In addition, the User Interface Program allows the user to modify and/or review additional input Namelist and data files, to build and review command files, to formulate and calculate mass properties related data, and to have a plotting capability.

  19. Seebeck Coefficient Measurements on Micron-Size Single-Crystal Zinc Germanium Nitride Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, J. S.; Colvin, J. R.; Quayle, P. C.; Peshek, T. J.; Kash, K.

    2016-06-01

    II-IV-nitride compounds are tetrahedrally bonded, heterovalent ternary semiconductors that have recently garnered attention for their potential technological applications. These materials are derived from the parent III-nitride compounds; ZnGeN2 is the II-IV-nitride analogue to the III-nitride GaN. Very little is known about the transport properties of ZnGeN2. In this work, we present Seebeck coefficient ( S) data on 3-micron-diameter, 70-micron-long, single-crystal ZnGeN2 rods, employing a novel measurement approach. The measurements of S show that the majority free carriers are electrons, and imply that the carrier gas is degenerate. Within a single-band model for the conduction band, a carrier concentration of order 1019 cm-3 was estimated for a measured S = -90 μV/K. Together with electrical transport measurements, a lower limit for the electron mobility is estimated to be ˜20 cm2/V-s. A discussion of this material as a thermoelectric is presented. The background level of free electrons in this unintentionally doped ZnGeN2 is very near the predicted optimum value for maximum thermoelectric performance.

  20. Light-induced size changes in BiFeO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundys, B.; Viret, M.; Colson, D.; Kundys, D. O.

    2010-10-01

    Multifunctional oxides are promising materials because of their fundamental physical properties as well as their potential in applications. Among these materials, multiferroics exhibiting ferroelectricity and magnetism are good candidates for spin electronic applications using the magnetoelectric effect, which couples magnetism and ferroelecticity. Furthermore, because ferroelectrics are insulators with a reasonable bandgap, photons can efficiently interact with electrons leading to photoconduction or photovoltaic effects. However, until now, coupling of light with mechanical degrees of freedom has been elusive, although ferroelasticity is a well-known property of these materials. Here, we report on the observation, for the first time, of a substantial visible-light-induced change in the dimensions of BiFeO3 crystals at room temperature. The relative light-induced photostrictive effect is of the order of 10-5 with response times below 0.1 s. It depends on the polarization of incident light as well as applied magnetic fields. This opens the perspective of combining mechanical, magnetic, electric and optical functionalities in future generations of remote switchable devices.

  1. Size and number density of precrystalline aggregates in lysozyme crystallization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shinpei; Ito, Kohzo; Hayakawa, Reinosuke; Ataka, Mitsuo

    1999-12-01

    Using dynamic light scattering, we investigated supersaturated aqueous solutions of hen egg white lysozyme. We could observe the formation of aggregates only in solutions, from which crystals grew within a few days. The aggregates were grouped into smaller "units" and larger "clusters." The units consisted of a few molecules, whereas the clusters grew from about 100 nm to 1 μm. At the beginning of aggregation, the number density of the units decreased, while that of the clusters increased. At this stage, unit-cluster aggregation proceeded. At the next stage, the number density of the units became constant, while that of the clusters began to decrease, which means that the units stopped aggregating and cluster-cluster aggregation started. The aggregation mechanism for the clusters fit well with the diffusion limited cluster aggregation model, but this model alone could not explain that the aggregates separated into two groups, corresponding to units and clusters, and that the units stopped aggregating during the aggregation process. We find that the observed aggregation process has several similarities to the liquid-liquid phase separation process, which occurs metastably in protein solution. Furthermore, using both models for diffusion limited aggregation and the liquid-liquid phase separation together, we could naturally explain the process of the cluster formation.

  2. Size-Controlled 3D Colloidal Crystals Formed in an Aqueous Suspension of Polystyrene/Polyglycidol Microspheres with Covalently Bound l-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Gosecka, Monika; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Basinska, Teresa; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2016-12-06

    Stable three-dimensional colloidal crystals were fabricated in an aqueous suspension of Tris buffer at pH > 8. The basic building blocks of the crystals were submicron-sized polystyrene-polyglycidol core-shell particles (Dn(SEM) = 270 ± 18 nm) with covalently bound 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA). The growth of the crystals was triggered by a thermodynamically favorable arrangement of particles leading to their close packing and by the formation of covalent cross-links between the individual particles. Under alkaline conditions, molecules of l-DOPA are oxidized, which allows their participation in cross-linking, necessary for the stabilization of the formed colloidal crystals. The average size of the fabricated colloidal crystals is determined by their weight, density of the suspending medium, and the energy of their Brownian motion. Crystals generated during the suspension of particles fall down after reaching the critical weight. Therefore, crystals of similar dimensions are deposited at the bottom of the vessel. The described system is the first example of the formation of stable colloidal crystals in a suspension.

  3. Anatase-TiO2 Nanomaterials: Morphological/Size Dependence of the Crystallization and Phase Behavior Phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garcia,M.; Wang, X.; Belver, C.; Hanson, J.; Rodriguez, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticulated TiO{sub 2} materials with anatase structure were synthesized by using a microemulsion method. Three different syntheses with varying surfactant-to-water molar ratio ({omega}) were used to obtain amorphous solid precipitates at room temperature. The structural characteristics of these solid precursors were studied by using X-ray absorption structure (X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and Raman spectroscopies, which showed that all lack 3D (tridimensional) order but contain a different degree of 2D-confined connectivity. While heating such solid precursors under dry air, marked differences appeared in the phase behavior; the onset temperature for anatase crystallization increases ca. 150 {sup o}C while the {omega} parameter decreases and only one of the samples shows the anatase-to-rutile transformation below 900 {sup o}C. In all cases, the crystallization of the anatase structure does not follow a traditional nucleation and growth mechanism and its analysis using the Avrami formalism gives conclusive evidence of a surface nucleation-dominated process. This appears as a distinctive feature of anatase-TiO{sub 2} nanomaterials, far from the corresponding behavior of microsized or bulk materials. After nucleation, the grain growth of anatase nanoparticles was found to follow the kinetic equation D{sup 2}-D{sub 0}{sup 2} = k{sub 0} exp(-E{sub a}/RT), where the activation energy is a function of several structural properties of the solid materials mainly related to the hydration characteristics of the surface layer. A combined in situ X-ray diffraction/Raman/infrared study aimed to unveil the physical basis of the phase behavior and to interpret key variables allowing control of the crystallization mechanism and morphological properties, particularly primary particle size, in the nanometer regime.

  4. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung -Chieh; Chen, Chih -Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-04-21

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirm that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Lastly, our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature-and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials.

  5. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung -Chieh; ...

    2016-04-21

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirmmore » that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Lastly, our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature-and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials.« less

  6. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirm that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature- and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials. PMID:27098114

  7. Size-dependent phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite microplate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dehui; Wang, Gongming; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Yen; Wu, Hao; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite has attracted considerable recent interest for solution processable solar cells and other optoelectronic applications. The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition in perovskite can significantly alter its optical, electrical properties and impact the corresponding applications. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the size-dependent orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition using a combined temperature-dependent optical, electrical transport and transmission electron microscopy study. Our studies of individual perovskite microplates with variable thicknesses demonstrate that the phase transition temperature decreases with reducing microplate thickness. The sudden decrease of mobility around phase transition temperature and the presence of hysteresis loops in the temperature-dependent mobility confirm that the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal phase transition is a first-order phase transition. Our findings offer significant fundamental insight on the temperature- and size-dependent structural, optical and charge transport properties of perovskite materials, and can greatly impact future exploration of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices from these materials.

  8. Organized assemblies of colloids formed at the poles of micrometer-sized droplets of liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S; de Pablo, Juan J; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2014-11-28

    We report on the formation of organized assemblies of 1 μm-in-diameter colloids (polystyrene (PS)) at the poles of water-dispersed droplets (diameters 7-20 μm) of nematic liquid crystal (LC). For 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl droplets decorated with two to five PS colloids, we found 32 distinct arrangements of the colloids to form at the boojums of bipolar droplet configurations. Significantly, all but one of these configurations (a ring comprised of five PS colloids) could be mapped onto a local (non-close packed) hexagonal lattice. To provide insight into the origin of the hexagonal lattice, we investigated planar aqueous-LC interfaces, and found that organized assemblies of PS colloids did not form at these interfaces. Experiments involving the addition of salts revealed that a repulsive interaction of electrostatic origin prevented formation of assemblies at planar interfaces, and that regions of high splay near the poles of the LC droplets generated cohesive interactions between colloids that could overcome the repulsion. Support for this interpretation was obtained from a model that included (i) a long-range attraction between adsorbed colloids and the boojum due to the increasing rate of strain (splay) of LC near the boojum (splay attraction), (ii) an attractive inter-colloid interaction that reflects the quadrupolar symmetry of the strain in the LC around the colloids, and (iii) electrostatic repulsion between colloids. The model predicts that electrostatic repulsion between colloids can lead to a ∼1000kBT energy barrier at planar interfaces of LC films, and that the repulsive interaction can be overcome by splay attraction of the colloids to the boojums of the LC droplets. Overall, the results reported in this paper advance our understanding of the directed assembly of colloids at interfaces of LC droplets.

  9. Stability of DNA-linked nanoparticle crystals: Effect of number of strands, core size, and rigidity of strand attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovan-Merhar, Olivia; Lara, Fernando Vargas; Starr, Francis W.

    2011-06-01

    Three-dimensional ordered lattices of nanoparticles (NPs) linked by DNA have potential applications in novel devices and materials, but most experimental attempts to form crystals result in amorphous packing. Here we use a coarse-grained computational model to address three factors that impact the stability of bcc and fcc crystals formed by DNA-linked NPs : (i) the number of attached strands to the NP surface, (ii) the size of the NP core, and (iii) the rigidity of the strand attachment. We find that allowing mobility in the attachment of DNA strands to the core NP can very slightly increase or decrease melting temperature TM. Larger changes to TM result from increasing the number of strands, which increases TM, or by increasing the core NP diameter, which decreases TM. Both results are consistent with experimental findings. Moreover, we show that the behavior of TM can be quantitatively described by the model introduced previously [F. Vargas Lara and F. W. Starr, Soft Matter, 7, 2085 (2011)], 10.1039/c0sm00989j.

  10. A fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography-based thermostability assay to identify membrane protein expression and crystallization conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Hibbs, Ryan E.; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimization of membrane protein stability under different solution conditions is essential for obtaining crystals that diffract to high resolution. Traditional methods that evaluate protein stability require large amounts of material, and are therefore ill-suited for medium- to high-throughput screening of membrane proteins. Here we present a rapid and efficient fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography-based thermostability assay (FSEC-TS). In this method, the target protein is fused to GFP. Heated protein samples, treated with a panel of additives, are then analyzed by FSEC. FSEC-TS allows one to evaluate the thermostability of nanogram to microgram amounts of the target protein under a variety of conditions without purification. We applied this method to the Danio rerio P2X4 receptor and Caenorhabditis elegans GluCl to screen ligands, ions and lipids, including newly designed cholesterol derivatives. In the case of GluCl, the screening results were used to obtain crystals of the receptor in the presence of lipids. PMID:22884106

  11. GV /m Single-Cycle Terahertz Fields from a Laser-Driven Large-Size Partitioned Organic Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicario, Carlo; Monoszlai, Balazs; Hauri, Christoph P.

    2014-05-01

    We report on compact and efficient laser-based THz generation in the terahertz frequency gap (1-10 THz). The radiation is generated by optical rectification of a midinfrared laser in a large-size, partitioned nonlinear organic crystal assembly. This enables up-scaling of presently field-limited tabletop THz sources to GV /m electric and several tesla magnetic field at millijoule pulse energy. In agreement with simulations, the THz beam properties at focus are shown to be not deteriorated by the discontinuity of the emitter surface. The high laser-to-THz energy conversion efficiency exceeds the Manley-Rowe limit and is explained by a cascaded χ(2) process in the organic crystals accompanied by a significant redshift of the pump spectrum. The scheme provides a compact, tabletop THz source for single-cycle transients at field strength equivalent or even higher to linear accelerator and FEL-based THz sources. This opens an avenue toward novel nonlinear THz applications.

  12. Search for global-minimum geometries of medium-sized germanium clusters. II. Motif-based low-lying clusters Ge21-Ge29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S.; Zeng, X. C.

    2006-05-01

    We performed a constrained search for the geometries of low-lying neutral germanium clusters GeN in the size range of 21⩽N⩽29. The basin-hopping global optimization method is employed for the search. The potential-energy surface is computed based on the plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory. A new series of low-lying clusters is found on the basis of several generic structural motifs identified previously for silicon clusters [S. Yoo and X. C. Zeng, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 054304 (2006)] as well as for smaller-sized germanium clusters [S. Bulusu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 164305 (2005)]. Among the generic motifs examined, we found that two motifs stand out in producing most low-lying clusters, namely, the six/nine motif, a puckered-hexagonal-ring Ge6 unit attached to a tricapped trigonal prism Ge9, and the six/ten motif, a puckered-hexagonal-ring Ge6 unit attached to a bicapped antiprism Ge10. The low-lying clusters obtained are all prolate in shape and their energies are appreciably lower than the near-spherical low-energy clusters. This result is consistent with the ion-mobility measurement in that medium-sized germanium clusters detected are all prolate in shape until the size N ˜65.

  13. Effects of ternary mixed crystal and size on optical phonons in wurtzite nitride core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Guan, J. Y.; Zhang, S. F.; Ban, S. L.; Qu, Y.

    2014-04-21

    Within the framework of dielectric continuum and Loudon's uniaxial crystal models, existence conditions dependent on components and frequencies for optical phonons in wurtzite nitride core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) are discussed to obtain dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of optical phonons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN CSNWs. The results show that there may be four types of optical phonons in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN CSNWs for a given ternary mixed crystal (TMC) component due to the phonon dispersion anisotropy. This property is analogous to wurtzite planar heterojunctions. Among the optical phonons, there are two types of quasi-confined optical (QCO) phonons (named, respectively, as QCO-A and QCO-B), one type of interface (IF) phonons and propagating (PR) phonons existing in certain component and frequency domains while the dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of same type of optical phonons vary with components. Furthermore, the size effect on optical phonons in CSNWs is also discussed. The dispersion relations of IF and QCO-A are independent of the boundary location of CSNWs. Meanwhile, dispersion relations and electrostatic potentials of QCO-B and PR phonons vary obviously with size, especially, when the ratio of a core radius to a shell radius is small, and dispersion relation curves of PR phonons appear to be close to each other, whereas, this phenomenon disappears when the ratio becomes large. Based on our conclusions, one can further discuss photoelectric properties in nitride CSNWs consisting of TMCs associated with optical phonons.

  14. Not Seeing the Forest for the Trees: Size of the Minimum Spanning Trees (MSTs) Forest and Branch Significance in MST-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Andreia Sofia; Monteiro, Pedro T.; Carriço, João A; Ramirez, Mário; Francisco, Alexandre P.

    2015-01-01

    Trees, including minimum spanning trees (MSTs), are commonly used in phylogenetic studies. But, for the research community, it may be unclear that the presented tree is just a hypothesis, chosen from among many possible alternatives. In this scenario, it is important to quantify our confidence in both the trees and the branches/edges included in such trees. In this paper, we address this problem for MSTs by introducing a new edge betweenness metric for undirected and weighted graphs. This spanning edge betweenness metric is defined as the fraction of equivalent MSTs where a given edge is present. The metric provides a per edge statistic that is similar to that of the bootstrap approach frequently used in phylogenetics to support the grouping of taxa. We provide methods for the exact computation of this metric based on the well known Kirchhoff’s matrix tree theorem. Moreover, we implement and make available a module for the PHYLOViZ software and evaluate the proposed metric concerning both effectiveness and computational performance. Analysis of trees generated using multilocus sequence typing data (MLST) and the goeBURST algorithm revealed that the space of possible MSTs in real data sets is extremely large. Selection of the edge to be represented using bootstrap could lead to unreliable results since alternative edges are present in the same fraction of equivalent MSTs. The choice of the MST to be presented, results from criteria implemented in the algorithm that must be based in biologically plausible models. PMID:25799056

  15. A Monte-Carlo simulation analysis for evaluating the severity distribution functions (SDFs) calibration methodology and determining the minimum sample-size requirements.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mohammadali; Reddy Geedipally, Srinivas; Lord, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Severity distribution functions (SDFs) are used in highway safety to estimate the severity of crashes and conduct different types of safety evaluations and analyses. Developing a new SDF is a difficult task and demands significant time and resources. To simplify the process, the Highway Safety Manual (HSM) has started to document SDF models for different types of facilities. As such, SDF models have recently been introduced for freeway and ramps in HSM addendum. However, since these functions or models are fitted and validated using data from a few selected number of states, they are required to be calibrated to the local conditions when applied to a new jurisdiction. The HSM provides a methodology to calibrate the models through a scalar calibration factor. However, the proposed methodology to calibrate SDFs was never validated through research. Furthermore, there are no concrete guidelines to select a reliable sample size. Using extensive simulation, this paper documents an analysis that examined the bias between the 'true' and 'estimated' calibration factors. It was indicated that as the value of the true calibration factor deviates further away from '1', more bias is observed between the 'true' and 'estimated' calibration factors. In addition, simulation studies were performed to determine the calibration sample size for various conditions. It was found that, as the average of the coefficient of variation (CV) of the 'KAB' and 'C' crashes increases, the analyst needs to collect a larger sample size to calibrate SDF models. Taking this observation into account, sample-size guidelines are proposed based on the average CV of crash severities that are used for the calibration process.

  16. Dependence on Crystal Size of the Nanoscale Chemical Phase Distribution and Fracture in LixFePO₄.

    PubMed

    Yu, Young-Sang; Kim, Chunjoong; Shapiro, David A; Farmand, Maryam; Qian, Danna; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Kilcoyne, A L David; Celestre, Rich; Marchesini, Stefano; Joseph, John; Denes, Peter; Warwick, Tony; Strobridge, Fiona C; Grey, Clare P; Padmore, Howard; Meng, Ying Shirley; Kostecki, Robert; Cabana, Jordi

    2015-07-08

    The performance of battery electrode materials is strongly affected by inefficiencies in utilization kinetics and cycle life as well as size effects. Observations of phase transformations in these materials with high chemical and spatial resolution can elucidate the relationship between chemical processes and mechanical degradation. Soft X-ray ptychographic microscopy combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron microscopy creates a powerful suite of tools that we use to assess the chemical and morphological changes in lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) micro- and nanocrystals that occur upon delithiation. All sizes of partly delithiated crystals were found to contain two phases with a complex correlation between crystallographic orientation and phase distribution. However, the lattice mismatch between LiFePO4 and FePO4 led to severe fracturing on microcrystals, whereas no mechanical damage was observed in nanoplates, indicating that mechanics are a principal driver in the outstanding electrode performance of LiFePO4 nanoparticles. These results demonstrate the importance of engineering the active electrode material in next generation electrical energy storage systems, which will achieve theoretical limits of energy density and extended stability. This work establishes soft X-ray ptychographic chemical imaging as an essential tool to build comprehensive relationships between mechanics and chemistry that guide this engineering design.

  17. Growing Larger Crystals for Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality has been a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. With the advent of advanced X-ray sources and methods the question of size has rapidly dwindled, almost to the point where if one can see the crystal then it was big enough. Quality is another issue, and major national and commercial efforts were established to take advantage of the microgravity environment in an effort to obtain higher quality crystals. Studies of the macromolecule crystallization process were carried out in many labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. While technological improvements are resulting in a diminishing of the minimum crystal size required, neutron diffraction structural studies still require considerably larger crystals, by several orders of magnitude, than X-ray studies. From a crystal growth physics perspective there is no reason why these 'large' crystals cannot be obtained: the question is generally more one of supply than limitations mechanism. This talk will discuss our laboratory s current model for macromolecule crystal growth, with highlights pertaining to the growth of crystals suitable for neutron diffraction studies.

  18. Crystallization of aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles: nucleation rates, dependence on size, and dependence on the ammonium-to-sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Riffell, Jenna L; Bertram, Allan K

    2006-07-06

    Using an electrodynamic balance, we determined the relative humidity (RH) at which aqueous inorganic-malonic acid particles crystallized, with ammonium sulfate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)), letovicite ((NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2)), or ammonium bisulfate (NH(4)HSO(4)) as the inorganic component. The results for (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles and (NH(4))(3)H(SO(4))(2)-malonic acid particles show that malonic acid decreases the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by less than 7% RH when the dry malonic acid mole fraction is less than 0.25. At a dry malonic acid mole fraction of about 0.5, the presence of malonic acid can decrease the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles by up to 35% RH. For the NH(4)HSO(4)-malonic acid particles, the presence of malonic acid does not significantly modify the crystallization RH of the inorganic particles for the entire range of dry malonic acid mole fractions studied; in all cases, either the particles did not crystallize or the crystallization RH was close to 0% RH. Size dependent measurements show that the crystallization RH of aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles is not a strong function of particle volume. However, for aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles (with dry malonic acid mole fraction = 0.36), the crystallization RH is a stronger function of particle volume, with the crystallization RH decreasing by 6 +/- 3% RH when the particle volume decreases by an order of magnitude. To our knowledge, these are the first size dependent measurements of the crystallization RH of atmospherically relevant inorganic-organic particles. These results suggest that for certain organic mole fractions the particle size and observation time need to be considered when extrapolating laboratory crystallization results to atmospheric scenarios. For aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4) particles, the homogeneous nucleation rate data are a strong function of RH, but for aqueous (NH(4))(2)SO(4)-malonic acid particles (with dry organic mole fraction = 0

  19. Evaluation of minimum coverage size and orbital accuracy at different orbital regimes for one order of magnitude reduction of the catastrophic collision risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Krag, Holger

    2015-03-01

    One of the main objectives of Space Surveillance and Tracking (SST) systems is to support space collision avoidance activities. This collision avoidance capability aims to significantly reduce the catastrophic collision risk of space objects. In particular, for the case of the future European SST, the objective is translated into a risk reduction of one order of magnitude whilst keeping a low number of false alarm events. In order to translate this aim into system requirements, an evaluation of the current catastrophic collision risk for different orbital regimes is addressed. The reduction of such risk depends on the amount of catalogued objects (coverage) and the knowledge of the associated orbits in the catalogue (accuracy). This paper presents an analysis of the impact of those two aspects in the capability to reduce the catastrophic collision risk at some orbital regimes. A reliable collision avoidance support depends on the accuracy of the predicted miss-events. The assessment of possible conjunctions is normally done by computing the estimated miss-distances between objects (which is compared with a defined distance threshold) or by computing the associated collision risk (which is compared with the corresponding accepted collision probability level). This second method is normally recommended because it takes into account the reliability of the orbits and allows reducing false alarm events. The collision risk depends on the estimated miss-distance, the object sizes and the accuracy of the two orbits at the time of event. This accuracy depends on the error of the orbits at the orbit determination epoch and the error derived from the propagation from that epoch up to the time of event. The modified DRAMA ARES (Domínguez-González et al., 2012, 2013a,b; Gelhaus et al., 2014) provides information on the expected number of encounters for a given mission and year. It also provides information on the capacity to reduce the risk of collision by means of avoidance

  20. Determination of particle and crystal size distribution from turbidity spectrum of TiO2 pigments by means of T-matrix.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalava, J.-P.; Taavitsainen, V.-M.; Haario, H.; Lamberg, L.

    1998-09-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of particle and crystal size distributions of rutile titanium dioxide pigments. This is based on a rigorous model for the turbidity (light extinction) spectra of rutile particles in dilute water suspension. The inversion of the rigorous model leads to an ill-posed problem and to a semi-rigorous method, in which the constraints of the solution have been determined empirically. The pigment particles are approximated as spheroids and a two-dimensional size distribution of particle width and ratio of length and width is calculated. Most of the particles are single crystals but a small amount is in aggregate form. A method to separate the distributions of aggregates and single crystals is proposed. The extinction cross section values for spheroids, needed in the model, are calculated by the T-matrix method. A comparison of the crystal size results with the values determined by transmission electron microscopy shows a very good accuracy for mean values of both the volume equivalent size and for the width, whereas the results for the means of the length/width ratio are much less accurate.

  1. Effect of hydraulic retention time and seed material on phosphorus recovery and crystal size from urine in an air-agitated reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Zhengyi; Wang, Jinzhi; Wen, Guoqi

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recovery from urine is affected by various parameters. This study evaluates the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and seed material on P recovery and crystal size in an air-agitated reactor. Results show that ortho-phosphate removal and struvite recovery efficiencies were 96.3% and 89.5%, and 97.1% and 93.0%, after five runs of HRTs of 1 and 2 h, respectively. Low loss of crystals from effluent urine solutions indicates high struvite recovery efficiency and is correlated with the structure and design of the reactor. The average particle size decreased from 40.0 to 31.7 μm as the HRT increased from 1 to 2 h. The two types of seed materials (zeolite and molecular sieve) did not affect the ortho-phosphate removal efficiency but affected the struvite crystal size. In particular, multi-stage addition of zeolites increased the average crystal size from 33.7 to 57.0 μm.

  2. Correction: Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2015-02-01

    Correction for `Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials' by Miguel Muñoz Rojo et al., Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 7858-7865.

  3. A model predicting the evolution of ice particle size spectra and radiative properties of cirrus clouds. Part 2: Dependence of absorption and extinction on ice crystal morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David L.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    1994-01-01

    This study builds upon the microphysical modeling described in Part 1 by deriving formulations for the extinction and absorption coefficients in terms of the size distribution parameters predicted from the micro-physical model. The optical depth and single scatter albedo of a cirrus cloud can then be determined, which, along with the asymmetry parameter, are the input parameters needed by cloud radiation models. Through the use of anomalous diffraction theory, analytical expressions were developed describing the absorption and extinction coefficients and the single scatter albedo as functions of size distribution parameters, ice crystal shapes (or habits), wavelength, and refractive index. The extinction coefficient was formulated in terms of the projected area of the size distribution, while the absorption coefficient was formulated in terms of both the projected area and mass of the size distribution. These properties were formulated as explicit functions of ice crystal geometry and were not based on an 'effective radius.' Based on simulations of the second cirrus case study described in Part 1, absorption coefficients predicted in the near infrared for hexagonal columns and rosettes were up to 47% and 71% lower, respectively, than absorption coefficients predicted by using equivalent area spheres. This resulted in single scatter albedos in the near-infrared that were considerably greater than those predicted by the equivalent area sphere method. Reflectances in this region should therefore be underestimated using the equivalent area sphere approach. Cloud optical depth was found to depend on ice crystal habit. When the simulated cirrus cloud contained only bullet rosettes, the optical depth was 142% greater than when the cloud contained only hexagonal columns. This increase produced a doubling in cloud albedo. In the near-infrared (IR), the single scatter albedo also exhibited a significant dependence on ice crystal habit. More research is needed on the

  4. Controlling morphology and crystallite size of Cu(In0.7Ga0.3)Se2 nano-crystals synthesized using a heating-up method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Hsiang; Hsiang, Hsing-I.; Chia, Chih-Ta; Yen, Fu-Su

    2013-12-01

    CuIn0.7Ga0.3Se2(CIGS) nano-crystals were successfully synthesized via a heating-up process. The non-coordinating solvent (1-octadecene) and selenium/cations ratio effects on the crystalline phase and crystallite size of CIGS nano-crystallites were investigated. It was observed that the CIGS nano-crystallite morphology changed from sheet into spherical shape as the amount of 1-octadecene addition was increased. CIGS nano-crystals were obtained in 9-20 nm sizes as the selenium/cations ratio increased. These results suggest that the monomer reactivity in the solution can be adjusted by changing the solvent type and selenium/cations ratio, hence affecting the crystallite size and distribution.

  5. Eruption of Deep Mushy Magma from the Searchlight Magma System, Southern Nevada (USA): a Crystal Size Distribution and Geochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazar, D.; Miller, J.; Miller, C.; Dodge, M.; Hodge, K.; Faulds, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Miocene Searchlight pluton and overlying volcanic rocks are exposed in the Eldorado Mountains of southern Nevada within the Colorado River Extensional Corridor. Steep tilting of the pluton and its cover provides an exceptional opportunity to study the magmatic plumbing system from bottom to top, including possible eruptions of magma from the Searchlight magma system. The pluton is approximately 10 km thick and divided into three compositionally distinct units that solidified in monotonic fashion: a 2 km thick upper fine-grained quartz monzonite (solidification front), a 6 km thick lower, more mafic quartz monzonite (cumulate), and a 2 km thick middle granite (extracted melt) [ref]. In addition, near E-W-striking rhyolite and trachydacite porphyry dikes intrude the upper quartz monzonite unit (but not the lower or middle units), and identical trachydacite porphyries (locally > 45 vol. % crystals) occur as irregular pods and masses in the roof area. The trachydacite porphyries superficially resemble trachydacite lavas in part of the overlying volcanic section. Ion probe zircon ages are identical within error for the upper unit, the lower unit, and the trachydacite dikes and pods (206Pb/238U age for samples of each ranging from 16.6±0.3 Ma to 16.9±0.2 Ma 2σ). Ages for the middle granite unit and rhyolite dikes are consistently younger (15.8-16.0 Ma). Crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis on plagioclase has been undertaken on samples from the upper Searchlight and overlying volcanic rocks in order to establish and corroborate linkages between the volcanic and intrusive units and to better understand the growth and solidification history of the Searchlight magma system. The CSD's for the intermediate porphyry dikes and pods that intrude upper Searchlight pluton are identical to trachydacite lava flows and domes erupted onto Proterozoic gneiss and earlier lava flows that comprise the roof of the pluton. The CSD's for these rocks are distinctly concave up and

  6. Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for 2.7 μm emissions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiguang; Fan, Jintai; Jiang, Benxue; Mao, Xiaojian; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals were obtained by direct liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of SrF2 powders and precursor glass powders at 820 °C for 15 min. The appearance and microstructural evolution of the SrF2 crystals in the resulting glass ceramics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy. The SrF2 crystals are ~15 μm in size and are uniformly distributed throughout the fluorophosphate glass matrix. The glass ceramics achieve an average transmittance of 75% in the visible region and more than 85% in the near-IR region. The high transmittance of the glass ceramics results from matching the refractive index of the SrF2 with that of the precursor glass. Energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and photoluminescence lifetimes verified the incorporation of Er3+ into the micron-sized SrF2 crystals. Intense 2.7 μm emissions due to the 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition were observed upon excitation at 980 nm using a laser diode. The maximum value of the emission cross section of Er3+ around 2.7 μm is more than 1.2 × 10−20 cm2, which indicates the potential of using transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for efficient 2.7 μm lasers and amplifiers. PMID:27430595

  7. Er(3+)-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for 2.7 μm emissions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiguang; Fan, Jintai; Jiang, Benxue; Mao, Xiaojian; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Long

    2016-07-19

    Er(3+)-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals were obtained by direct liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of SrF2 powders and precursor glass powders at 820 °C for 15 min. The appearance and microstructural evolution of the SrF2 crystals in the resulting glass ceramics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy. The SrF2 crystals are ~15 μm in size and are uniformly distributed throughout the fluorophosphate glass matrix. The glass ceramics achieve an average transmittance of 75% in the visible region and more than 85% in the near-IR region. The high transmittance of the glass ceramics results from matching the refractive index of the SrF2 with that of the precursor glass. Energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and photoluminescence lifetimes verified the incorporation of Er(3+) into the micron-sized SrF2 crystals. Intense 2.7 μm emissions due to the (4)I11/2 → (4)I13/2 transition were observed upon excitation at 980 nm using a laser diode. The maximum value of the emission cross section of Er(3+) around 2.7 μm is more than 1.2 × 10(-20) cm(2), which indicates the potential of using transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for efficient 2.7 μm lasers and amplifiers.

  8. Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for 2.7 μm emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yiguang; Fan, Jintai; Jiang, Benxue; Mao, Xiaojian; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Yinsheng; Dai, Shixun; Zhang, Long

    2016-07-01

    Er3+-doped transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals were obtained by direct liquid-phase sintering of a mixture of SrF2 powders and precursor glass powders at 820 °C for 15 min. The appearance and microstructural evolution of the SrF2 crystals in the resulting glass ceramics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission microscopy. The SrF2 crystals are ~15 μm in size and are uniformly distributed throughout the fluorophosphate glass matrix. The glass ceramics achieve an average transmittance of 75% in the visible region and more than 85% in the near-IR region. The high transmittance of the glass ceramics results from matching the refractive index of the SrF2 with that of the precursor glass. Energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra, and photoluminescence lifetimes verified the incorporation of Er3+ into the micron-sized SrF2 crystals. Intense 2.7 μm emissions due to the 4I11/2 → 4I13/2 transition were observed upon excitation at 980 nm using a laser diode. The maximum value of the emission cross section of Er3+ around 2.7 μm is more than 1.2 × 10‑20 cm2, which indicates the potential of using transparent glass ceramics containing micron-sized SrF2 crystals for efficient 2.7 μm lasers and amplifiers.

  9. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... exceeded and the landings have exceeded the recreational harvest limit, the exact amount of the landings... been exceeded and the overage has not been accommodated through landings-based AMs, then the exact... Federal measures so no differential effects occur to Federal permit holders....

  10. Size dependence of discrete change in magnetization in single crystal of chiral magnet Cr1/3NbS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, K.; Mito, M.; Kousaka, Y.; Akimitsu, J.; Kishine, J.; Togawa, Y.; Inoue, K.

    2016-10-01

    The single crystal of a chiral magnet Cr1/3NbS2 exhibits discrete changes in magnetization (M) in response to changes in magnetic field (H) triggered by the formation of a chiral soliton lattice (CSL). In order to provide evidence of this phenomenon, the study of the size effect is indispensable. We investigated the effects of size on this phenomenon by the use of two single crystals, (A) and (B), whose crystal sizes along the c-axis were 110 μm and 60 μm, respectively. First, in (A), the large jumps of M observed in the process of decreasing H exhibited inconsistent features, whereas the largest and second-largest jumps in (B) exhibited reproducibility for both the value of H and the magnitude of the M jumps. This confirms that these large jumps do not originate from the Barkhausen effect, as this effect would result in M jumps appearing at random values of H. When the system size of a sample becomes smaller, the features of the Barkhausen effect are suppressed. Second, as for the successive jumps observed in the H region where the rapid change in M is entirely seen for both the samples, the number of observed M jumps for (B) is more than that for (A). Indeed, the number of the domain wall due to the 2π-soliton in the CSL increases, as the c-axis length of the single crystal increases. However, a series of M jumps must appear in a limited H region below the critical field of the order of 2 kOe. The greater the number of M jumps, the more difficult the detection of the M jump will be in the H resolution of the present setup. Thus, the effects of size on the M jumps observed in the present setup can be understood within the framework of the CSL formation.

  11. Polarized spectral properties and potential application of large-size Nd3+:Ba3Gd2(BO3)4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, S. F.; Lv, S. Z.; Zhu, Z. J.; Wang, Y.; You, Z. Y.; Li, J. F.; Xu, J. L.; Wang, H. Y.; Tu, C. Y.

    2014-06-01

    The Nd3+-doped Ba3Gd2(BO3)4 crystal with high optical quality and large size is reported in this paper. The growing processes and characteristics of Nd3+:Ba3Gd2(BO3)4 crystal are discussed. The absorption and luminescence spectra of Nd3+ in Ba3Gd2(BO3)4 crystal were measured at room temperature. The luminescence decay curve in correspondence with the 4F3/2 →4I11/2 transition centered at 1062 nm was also measured. The JO intensity parameters Ωt (t = 2,4,6) were calculated to be Ω2 = 1.263, Ω4 = 2.496, Ω6 = 3.606. The radiative lifetime τr and fluorescence lifetime τf are 317.771 and 115 μs respectively, and the fluorescence quantum efficiency is 37.1%.

  12. Effect of Antifreeze Peptide Pretreatment on Ice Crystal Size, Drip Loss, Texture, and Volatile Compounds of Frozen Carrots.

    PubMed

    Kong, Charles H Z; Hamid, Nazimah; Liu, Tingting; Sarojini, Vijayalekshmi

    2016-06-01

    Ice crystal formation is of primary concern to the frozen food industry. In this study, the effects of antifreeze peptides (AFPs) on ice crystal formation were assessed in carrot during freezing and thawing. Three synthetic analogues based on naturally occurring antifreeze peptides were used in this study. The AFPs exhibited modification of ice crystal morphology, confirming their antifreeze activity in vitro. The ability of the synthetic AFPs to minimize drip loss and preserve color, structure, texture, and volatiles of frozen carrot was evaluated using the techniques of SEM, GC-MS, and texture analysis. The results prove the potential of these AFPs to preserve the above characteristics in frozen carrot samples.

  13. Influence of Domain Size on the Scaling Effects in Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 Ferroelectric Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dabin; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Li, Zhenrong; Xu, Zhuo; Shrout, Thomas R

    2011-06-01

    The property degradation observed in thin Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PMN-PT) crystals is believed to relate to large domains and subsequent clamping induced by surface-boundary. In this work, the properties were investigated as function of domain size, using controlled poling. The degraded piezoelectric and dielectric properties of thin PMN-PT were found to increase significantly, by decreasing domain size. Furthermore, the fine domain structure was found to be stable at 3kV/cm after 7.0×10(5) negative-pulse cycles, hence, enabling PMN-PT crystals for high-frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasound-transducers.

  14. Purification of molybdenum oxide, growth and characterization of medium size zinc molybdate crystals for the LUMINEU program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlegel, V. N.; Berge, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Chapellier, M.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Danevich, F. A.; Decourt, R.; Degoda, V. Ya.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gros, M.; Herve, S.; Ivanov, I. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kogut, Ya. P.; Koskas, F.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Nasonov, S. G.; Navick, X. F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Rodrigues, M.; Strazzer, O.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    The LUMINEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals operated as scintillating bolometers. Growth of high quality radiopure crystals is a complex task, since there are no commercially available molybdenum compounds with the required levels of purity and radioactive contamination. This paper discusses approaches to purify molybdenum and synthesize compound for high quality radiopure ZnMoO4 crystal growth. A combination of a double sublimation (with addition of zinc molybdate) with subsequent recrystallization in aqueous solutions (using zinc molybdate as a collector) was used. Zinc molybdate crystals up to 1.5 kg were grown by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique, their optical, luminescent, diamagnetic, thermal and bolometric properties were tested.

  15. Finite-size scaling investigation of the liquid-liquid critical point in ST2 water and its stability with respect to crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesselring, T. A.; Lascaris, E.; Franzese, G.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Herrmann, H. J.; Stanley, H. E.

    2013-06-01

    The liquid-liquid critical point scenario of water hypothesizes the existence of two metastable liquid phases—low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL)—deep within the supercooled region. The hypothesis originates from computer simulations of the ST2 water model, but the stability of the LDL phase with respect to the crystal is still being debated. We simulate supercooled ST2 water at constant pressure, constant temperature, and constant number of molecules N for N ⩽ 729 and times up to 1 μs. We observe clear differences between the two liquids, both structural and dynamical. Using several methods, including finite-size scaling, we confirm the presence of a liquid-liquid phase transition ending in a critical point. We find that the LDL is stable with respect to the crystal in 98% of our runs (we perform 372 runs for LDL or LDL-like states), and in 100% of our runs for the two largest system sizes (N = 512 and 729, for which we perform 136 runs for LDL or LDL-like states). In all these runs, tiny crystallites grow and then melt within 1 μs. Only for N ⩽ 343 we observe six events (over 236 runs for LDL or LDL-like states) of spontaneous crystallization after crystallites reach an estimated critical size of about 70 ± 10 molecules.

  16. Effect of zinc-borate glass addition on the thermal properties of the cordierite/Al2O3 composites containing nano-sized spinel crystal.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sinae; Kang, Seunggu

    2013-11-01

    Low-melting zinc-borate glass was added to the cordierite/Al2O3 composite in order to improve the sintering facility of Al2O3 and formation of nano-sized spinel crystal of high thermal conductivity. Increasing the ZnO/B2O3 ratio in the zinc-borate glass increased the ZnAl2O4 spinel and decreased the Al4B2O9 crystal peak intensities in X-ray diffraction pattern. The XRD peak intensities of the ZnAl2O4 spinel and Al4B2O9 crystals in the specimen containing 10 wt% zinc-borate glass (10G series) are higher than that of the specimen containing 5 wt% zinc-borate glass (5G series). The microstructures of most 10G series specimens had the flower-shaped crystal which was composed of 50 nm wide and 250 nm long needle-like crystals and identified as ZnAl2O4 spinel phase. The thermal conductivity of the 10G series specimen was higher than that of the 5G series in any ZnO/B2O3 ratio due to the formation of plenty of nano-sized ZnAl2O4 spinel of high thermal conductivity. Particularly, the thermal conductivity of the cordierite/Al2O3 composite containing 10 wt% zinc-borate glass of ZnO/B2O3 weight ratio = 1.5 was 3.8 W/Km which is much higher than that of the published value (3.0 W/Km).

  17. Synthesis and characterization of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with controllable crystal size by a simple MWCNT template method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ju Hyung; Zhang, Xiao Hui; Kim, Jae Deuk; Park, Hoon Mo; Lee, Sang Bok; Yi, Jin Woo; Jung, Seung Il

    2012-12-15

    Highly crystalline phase-pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were produced by performing a simple calcinations process in air of the TiO{sub 2} coated MWCNTs composite material prepared by an in situ sol-gel method. A homogeneous thin coating layer of TiO{sub 2} on the surface of MWCNTs is firstly obtained. Calcination in ambient air at appropriate temperatures is performed to transform phase of TiO{sub 2} into anatase and remove MWCNTs simultaneously, resulting in pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. Both end tips of the nanotubes are observed to be closed, probably due to covering up MWCNTs with TiO{sub 2} particles. The crystallization of anatase phase was formed upon 350 Degree-Sign C, and MWCNTs are completely oxidized between 500 and 650 Degree-Sign C, leaving anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with an average crystal size increasing from about 8 to 24 nm as the temperature rises. Moreover, the tubular structure was found to collapse after calcinations at 700 Degree-Sign C. - Graphical abstract: TGA analysis and TEM images of the samples after calcinations in air at different temperatures: (a) before calcinations, (b) 350 Degree-Sign C, (c) 500 Degree-Sign C, and (d) 650 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly crystalline and stable phase-pure anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were produced by a simply MWCNT template method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A homogeneous thin coating layer of TiO{sub 2} on the surface of MWCNTs could be obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small crystal size of anatase is formed at lower temperatures and higher temperatures cause significant increase of crystal size from 8 to 24 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convex closed tip structure of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes is formed owing to the good coating of TiO{sub 2}.

  18. Multiple plagioclase crystal populations identified by crystal size distribution and in situ chemical data: Implications for timescales of magma chamber processes associated with the 1915 eruption of Lassen Peak, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salisbury, M.J.; Bohrson, W.A.; Clynne, M.A.; Ramos, F.C.; Hoskin, P.

    2008-01-01

    Products of the 1915 Lassen Peak eruption reveal evidence for a magma recharge-magma mixing event that may have catalyzed the eruption and from which four compositional members were identified: light dacite, black dacite, andesitic inclusion, and dark andesite. Crystal size distribution, textural, and in situ chemical (major and trace element and Sr isotope) data for plagioclase from these compositional products define three crystal populations that have distinct origins: phenocrysts (long axis > 0??5 mm) that typically have core An contents between 34 and 36 mol %, microphenocrysts (long axis between 0??1 and 0??5 mm) that have core An contents of 66-69, and microlites (long axis < 0??1 mm) with variable An core contents from 64 to 52. Phenocrysts are interpreted to form in an isolated dacitic magma chamber that experienced slow cooling. Based on textural, compositional, and isotopic data for the magma represented by the dacitic component, magma recharge was not an important process until just prior to the 1915 eruption. Average residence times for phenocrysts are in the range of centuries to millennia. Microphenocrysts formed in a hybrid layer that resulted from mixing between end-member reservoir dacite and recharge magma of basaltic andesite composition. High thermal contrast between the two end-member magmas led to relatively high degrees of undercooling, which resulted in faster crystal growth rates and acicular and swallowtail crystal habits. Some plagioclase phenocrysts from the dacitic chamber were incorporated into the hybrid layer and underwent dissolution-precipitation, seen in both crystal textures and rim compositions. Average microphenocryst residence times are of the order of months. Microlites may have formed in response to decompression and/ or syn-eruptive degassing as magma ascended from the chamber through the volcanic conduit. Chemical distinctions in plagioclase microlite An contents reveal that melt of the dark andesite was more mafic than

  19. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Um, Junshik; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Lawson, R. Paul

    2016-06-01

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette masses are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5-2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by ˜ 0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from ˜ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.

  20. Derivation of physical and optical properties of mid-latitude cirrus ice crystals for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model

    DOE PAGES

    Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; ...

    2016-06-10

    Single-crystal images collected in mid-latitude cirrus are analyzed to provide internally consistent ice physical and optical properties for a size-resolved cloud microphysics model, including single-particle mass, projected area, fall speed, capacitance, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter. Using measurements gathered during two flights through a widespread synoptic cirrus shield, bullet rosettes are found to be the dominant identifiable habit among ice crystals with maximum dimension (Dmax) greater than 100 µm. Properties are therefore first derived for bullet rosettes based on measurements of arm lengths and widths, then for aggregates of bullet rosettes and for unclassified (irregular) crystals. Derived bullet rosette massesmore » are substantially greater than reported in existing literature, whereas measured projected areas are similar or lesser, resulting in factors of 1.5–2 greater fall speeds, and, in the limit of large Dmax, near-infrared single-scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (g) greater by  ∼  0.2 and 0.05, respectively. A model that includes commonly imaged side plane growth on bullet rosettes exhibits relatively little difference in microphysical and optical properties aside from  ∼ 0.05 increase in mid-visible g primarily attributable to plate aspect ratio. In parcel simulations, ice size distribution, and g are sensitive to assumed ice properties.« less

  1. The investigations of nanoclusters and micron-sized periodic structures created at the surface of the crystal and amorphous silica by resonant CO2 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedgalieva, A. F.; Bondar, A. M.; Svedov, I. M.; Kononov, M. A.; Laptev, V. B.; Novikova, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    The creation of nanoclasters and micrometer sized periodical structures at the surface of silica (crystal quartz and fused quartz) by action of pulsed CO2 laser radiation (pulse energy of 1 J, pulse time of 70 ns) have been investigated. The laser action on the surface of samples lead to appearance of two kind of structures - periodical micron-sized structures with the period length close to wave length of CO2 laser irradiation and nanoclusters with size close to 50-100 nanometers. This creation connects with the intensive ablation of matter at the maxima of standing waves which are a results of the interference of falling and surfaces waves. This connects with the resonant absorption of infrared laser radiation by silicate minerals.

  2. Size and chain length effects on structural behaviors of biphenylcyclohexane-based liquid crystal nanoclusters by a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ming-Liang; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chang, Chun-Yi; Huang, Wei-Lin

    2012-06-01

    Size and chain length effects on structural behaviors of liquid crystal nanoclusters were examined by a coarse-grained model and the configurational-bias Monte Carlo (CBMC) simulation. The nanoclusters investigated in this study are composed of the biphenylcyclohexane-based BCH5H liquid crystal molecule and its derivatives. Results of the study show that the average energy decreases (i.e., more negative) as the cluster size (i.e., the number of molecules) increases. With the increasing cluster size, the equilibrium conformation of the nanocluster changes gradually from a pipe-like structure (for the smaller systems) to a ball-like cluster (for the larger systems). The order parameter of the system reduces with the transition of the equilibrium conformation. Regarding the chain length effect, the pipe-like equilibrium conformation (for the smaller systems) was observed more close to a pipe as the length of the tail alkyl chain of the derivatives extended. However, due to the flexibility of the tail alkyl chain, the pipe conformation of the system deflects slightly about its cyclohexyl group as the tail extends further.

  3. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  4. Effect of particle size and particle size distribution on physical characteristics, morphology and crystal structure of explosively compacted high-T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotsis, I.; Enisz, M.; Oravetz, D.; Szalay, A.

    1995-01-01

    A superconductor, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na)2Cu3O(x)/F(y) and a composite of composition Y(Ba,K,Na)2Cu3O(x)/F(y) + Ag, with changing K, Na and F content but a constant silver content (Ag = 10 mass%) was prepared using a single heat treatment. the resulting material was ground in a corundum lined mill, separated to particle size fractions of 0-40 micron, 0-63 micron and 63-900 micron and explosively compacted, using an explosive pressure of 10(exp 4) MPa and a subsequent heat treatment. Best results were obtained with the 63-900 micron fraction of composition Y(Ba(1.95) K(0.01)Cu3O(x)F(0),(05)/Ag: porosity less than 0.01 cu cm/g and current density 2800 A/sq cm at 77K.

  5. Effect of HPC and Water Concentration on the Evolution of Size, Aggregation and Crystallization of Sol-gel Nano Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S.; Seal, S.; Vij, R.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2002-12-01

    Nano-sized zirconia (ZrO2) powder is synthesized using sol-gel technique involving hydrolysis and condensation of zirconium(IV) n-propoxide in an alcohol solution, utilizing hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) polymer as a steric stabilizer. It is demonstrated that ZrO2 nanoparticle size can be reduced using high R-value (defined as the ratio of molar concentrations of water and alkoxide). It is also shown that ZrO2 nanoparticle size can be reduced further by synthesizing these particles in the presence of HPC polymer. The agglomeration tendency of ZrO2 nanoparticles is demonstrated to decrease due to the steric hindrance created by the adsorbed polymer. The nanocrystallite size and their 'hard-aggregates' formation tendency are observed to affect the high temperature metastable tetragonal phase stabilization at room temperature within ZrO2 particles.

  6. Effect of particle size and particle size distribution on physical characteristics, morphology and crystal strucutre of explosively compacted high-Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kotsis, I.; Enisz, M.; Oravetz, D.

    1994-12-31

    A superconductor, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}/F{sub y} and a composite, of composition Y(Ba,K,Na){sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}/F{sub y}+Ag, with changing K, Na and F content, but a constant silver content (Ag=10 mass per cent) was prepared using a single heat treatment. The resulting material was ground in a corundum lined mill, separated to particle size fractions of 0-40 {mu}m, 0-63 {mu}m and 63-900 {mu}m and explosively compacted, using an explosive pressure of 10{sup 4} MPa and a subsequent heat treatment. Best results were obtained with the 63-900 {mu}m fraction of composition Y(Ba{sub 1,95}K{sub 0,01})Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}F{sub 0,05}/Ag: porosity <0.01 cm{sup 3}/g and current density 2800 A/cm{sup 2} at 77 K.

  7. Million-year melt-presence in monotonous intermediate magma for a volcanic-plutonic assemblage in the Central Andes: Contrasting histories of crystal-rich and crystal-poor super-sized silicic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Jason F.; de Silva, Shanaka; Schmitt, Axel K.; Economos, Rita; Sunagua, Mayel

    2017-01-01

    The melt-present lifetime of super-sized monotonous intermediate magmas that feed supereruptions and end life as granodioritic plutons is investigated using zircon chronochemistry. These data add to the ongoing discussion on magma assembly rates and have implications for how continental batholiths are built. Herein, we estimate ∼1.1 Ma of continuous melt presence before and after the climactic caldera-forming 2.89 ± 0.01 Ma (2σ error) Pastos Grandes Ignimbrite (PGI) supereruption (∼1500 km3 of magma) in the Andes of southwest Bolivia. Zircon crystallization in PGI pumice and lava from the faulted Southern Postcaldera Dome span ∼0.7 Ma prior to the climactic eruption and formation of the eponymous caldera, whereas younger, unfaulted Postcaldera Dome lavas (termed Northern and Middle) and a granodioritic plutonic clast within the products of a Pleistocene eruption indicate a further ∼0.4 Ma of post-climactic zircon crystallization. Bulk-rock compositions as well as zircon thermometry and geochemistry indicate the presence of homogeneous dacitic magma before and after the climactic eruption, but a trend to zircon crystallization at higher temperatures and from less evolved melts is seen for post-climactic zircon. We propose a model in which a large volume of crystal-rich dacite magma was maintained above solidus temperatures by periodic andesitic recharge that is chemically invisible in the erupted components. The climactic caldera-forming eruption vented the upper portions of the magma system zircon was saturated. Zircon in postcaldera lavas indicate that residual magma from this system remained locally viable for eruption at least for some time after the caldera-forming event. Subsequently, deeper "remnant" dacite magma previously outside the zone of zircon saturation rose to shallower levels to re-establish hydraulic and isostatic equilibrium where zircon crystallization commenced anew, and drove more resurgent volcanism and uplift. The same magma

  8. Application of infrared remote sensing to constrain in-situ estimates of ice crystal particle size during SPartICus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, S. J.; Garrett, T. J.

    2011-05-01

    In a prior paper (Cooper and Garrett, 2010), an infrared remote sensing technique was developed that quantifies the effective radius re of ice crystals in cirrus clouds. By accounting for a broad range of expected inversion uncertainties, this retrieval scheme isolates those radiometric signatures that can only occur if the cirrus has nominally "small" values of re below 20 μm. The method is applicable only for specific cloud and atmospheric conditions. However, it can be particularly useful in constraining in-situ estimates of cirrus cloud re obtained from aircraft. Recent studies suggest that airborne measurements may be compromised by the shattering of ice crystals on airborne instrument inlets, so robust, independent confirmation of these measurements is needed. Here, we expand the Cooper and Garrett (2010) retrieval scheme to identify ice clouds that are likely to have "large" values of re greater than 20 μm. Using MODIS observations, we then compare assessments of cirrus cloud re with in-situ measurements obtained during three test cases from the 2010 SpartICus campaign. In general, there is good agreement between retrievals and in-situ measurements for a "small" and "large" crystal case. For a more ambiguously "small" re case, the 2D-S cloud probe indicates values of re that are slightly larger than expected from infrared retrievals, possibly indicating a slight bias in the 2D-S results towards large particles. There is no evidence to support that an FSSP-100 with unmodified inlets produces measurements of re in cirrus that are strongly biased low, as has been claimed.

  9. Application of infrared remote sensing to constrain in-situ estimates of ice crystal particle size during SPartICus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, S. J.; Garrett, T. J.

    2011-08-01

    In a prior paper (Cooper and Garrett, 2010), an infrared remote sensing technique was developed that quantifies the effective radius re of ice crystals in cirrus clouds. By accounting for a broad range of expected inversion uncertainties, this retrieval scheme isolates those radiometric signatures that can only occur if the cirrus has nominally "small" values of re below 20 μm. The method is applicable only for specific cloud and atmospheric conditions. However, it can be particularly useful in constraining in-situ estimates of cirrus cloud re obtained from aircraft. Recent studies suggest that airborne measurements may be compromised by the shattering of ice crystals on airborne instrument inlets, so robust, independent confirmation of these measurements is needed. Here, we expand the Cooper and Garrett (2010) retrieval scheme to identify ice clouds that are likely to have "large" values of re greater than 20 μm. Using MODIS observations, we then compare assessments of cirrus cloud re with in-situ measurements obtained during three test cases from the 2010 SPartICus campaign. In general, there is good agreement between retrievals and in-situ measurements for a "small" and "large" crystal case. For a more ambiguously "small" re case, the 2D-S cloud probe indicates values of re that are slightly larger than expected from infrared retrievals, possibly indicating a slight bias in the 2D-S results towards large particles. For our test cases, there is no evidence to suggest that an FSSP-100 with unmodified inlets produces measurements of re in cirrus that are strongly biased low.

  10. Colloidal Synthesis of Quantum Confined Single Crystal CsPbBr3 Nanosheets with Lateral Size Control up to the Micrometer Range.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Javad; Dang, Zhiya; Bianchini, Paolo; Canale, Claudio; Stasio, Francesco Di; Brescia, Rosaria; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2016-06-15

    We report the nontemplated colloidal synthesis of single crystal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanosheets with lateral sizes up to a few micrometers and with thickness of just a few unit cells (i.e., below 5 nm), hence in the strong quantum confinement regime, by introducing short ligands (octanoic acid and octylamine) in the synthesis together with longer ones (oleic acid and oleylamine). The lateral size is tunable by varying the ratio of shorter ligands over longer ligands, while the thickness is mainly unaffected by this parameter and stays practically constant at 3 nm in all the syntheses conducted at short-to-long ligands volumetric ratio below 0.67. Beyond this ratio, control over the thickness is lost and a multimodal thickness distribution is observed.

  11. Colloidal Synthesis of Quantum Confined Single Crystal CsPbBr3 Nanosheets with Lateral Size Control up to the Micrometer Range

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the nontemplated colloidal synthesis of single crystal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanosheets with lateral sizes up to a few micrometers and with thickness of just a few unit cells (i.e., below 5 nm), hence in the strong quantum confinement regime, by introducing short ligands (octanoic acid and octylamine) in the synthesis together with longer ones (oleic acid and oleylamine). The lateral size is tunable by varying the ratio of shorter ligands over longer ligands, while the thickness is mainly unaffected by this parameter and stays practically constant at 3 nm in all the syntheses conducted at short-to-long ligands volumetric ratio below 0.67. Beyond this ratio, control over the thickness is lost and a multimodal thickness distribution is observed. PMID:27228475

  12. Effects of ternary mixed crystal and size on intersubband optical absorption in wurtzite InGaN/GaN core-shell nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. H.; Yang, S.; Feng, H. M.; Yang, L.; Qu, Y.; Ban, S. L.

    2015-07-01

    Based on the density matrix approach, the effects of ternary mixed crystal and size on intersubband optical absorption coefficients in InxGa1-xN/GaN core-shell nanowires (CSNWs) are investigated. The results show that the optical absorption can be modulated by In component x and the size of CSNWs, since the variation of electron states in these systems. It is found that photonic frequencies of resonant absorption and the absorption coefficient increase obviously when x increases or the radius of InGaN core reduces, while the half-width of the coefficient decreases as its peak becomes higher and sharper. A saturation phenomenon of optical absorption is also found when the incident light intensity exceeds a certain value. The theoretical results are expected to be helpful to develop CSNW optic devices.

  13. The effects of CeO{sub 2} addition on crystallization behavior and pore size in microporous calcium titanium phosphate glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Soleimani, F.; Rezvani, M.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► We prepare a phosphate glass ceramic in the system of CaO–TiO{sub 2}–P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and add 2 to 6 mol% CeO{sub 2} to it. We determine the optimum percentage of CeO{sub 2} addition. ► We study phase separation, suitable time and temperature for crystallization in the microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics utilizing DTA, SEM and XRD. ► We investigate on pore size utilizing BET and SEM techniques before and after CeO{sub 2} addition. ► CeO{sub 2} increases the pore size in the Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics. -- Abstract: In this research the effect of the addition of CeO{sub 2} to microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate glass ceramics was studied. Different molar percentages of CeO{sub 2} were added to three samples of a base glass whose composition was P{sub 2}O{sub 5} 30, CaO 45, TiO{sub 2} 25 (mol%). The first sample had 2 mol% CeO{sub 2}, the second sample had 4 mol% CeO{sub 2}, and the third sample had 6 mol% CeO{sub 2}. The fourth sample did not contain any CeO{sub 2}. The glass samples were melted and crystallized to bulk glass ceramics by a conventional method. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) was utilized to determine the appropriate nucleation and crystallization temperatures. Among the samples, the DTA curve of the sample which had 2 mol% CeO{sub 2} had the sharpest crystallization peak. Therefore, this sample was chosen to prepare the glass ceramics. Using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) it was found that in all samples β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} were the major phases. The β-Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} phase was dissolved away by soaking the glass ceramics in HCl, leaving a porous skeleton of CaTi{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}. CeO{sub 2} addition increased the glass transition temperature and decreased the crystallization time and temperature. It was shown that CeO{sub 2} addition resulted in an increase in the mean pore diameter while the specific surface area decreased

  14. Voltammogram spikes interpreted as envelopes of spikes resulting from electrode crystals of various sizes: Application to the UPD of Cu on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medved', Igor; Huckaby, Dale A.

    2003-06-01

    We study and explain shapes of voltammogram spikes, observed during underpotential deposition (UPD) on electrode surfaces, as averaged envelopes of mutually shifted spikes associated with first-order phase transitions that occur in crystalline domains of various sizes that are formed on the electrode surface. This concept, already used in our previous work for two-phase systems and symmetric voltammogram spike shapes, is here substantially generalized to systems with multiple-phase coexistence and asymmetric spike shapes, using the rigorous statistical mechanical techniques of Borgs and Kotecký. Rather than mere numerical plots, we extract explicit functions that accurately describe the spike shapes. For the sake of clarity, we present our analysis and apply our results to fit the voltammogram of the UPD of Cu on Au(111) in sulfuric acid medium. This voltammogram shows two distinct spikes with a broad foot region near the spike at higher potentials. As was done in earlier treatments, we explain each of the two spikes as a result of a first-order transition. Here, though, the spikes are obtained as envelopes of closely spaced spikes resulting from crystals of various sizes. In contrast to earlier studies, however, we also explain the foot region in the same way. The foot's shape, despite its large width and small height, can be equally well obtained as an envelope of shifted crystal spikes that are broader and smaller than those giving rise to the two distinct spikes. We achieve very good agreement with experiment.

  15. Measuring magnetisation reversal in micron-sized Nd2Fe14B single crystals by microbeam x-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Akira; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, T.; Lee, N.; Yamamoto, H.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetisation reversal of micron-sized Nd2Fe14B single crystals with magnetisation as weak as 10-9 emu (1 µm size) was studied. Single-crystal specimens (cylinders with diameter and height of 1 to 6 µm) were prepared by focused-ion beam so that both the magnetic easy and hard axes were included in the basal plane. Their magnetic hysteresis loops were measured when they were rotated with respect to the cylindrical axis by using microbeam hard-x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) under transmission geometry. It was found that coercivity is inversely proportional to the cosine of the angle between the magnetocrystalline easy axis and magnetic-field direction and that the magnetisation reversal is dominated by domain-wall pinning in two different modes. One is related to penetration of the reversed domain nucleated in a subsurface soft layer into the bulk hard phase, of which the hysteresis loops exhibit a single-stage abrupt jump in magnetization. The other mode is pinning of the walls within the bulk grain, of which the hysteresis loops exhibit a plateau. The multi-domain structure associated with the pinning was confirmed by XMCD mapping. The proposed method fills the gap between conventional bulk magnetic measurement and submicron-scale electrical-transport measurement for nanofabricated thin films and/or fine particles. It is expected to provide new insights into elemental magnetisation processes in micron-scale regions.

  16. Synthesis of submicrometer-sized titania spherical particles with a sol-gel method and their application to colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Mine, Eiichi; Hirose, Mitsuaki; Nagao, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Konno, Mikio

    2005-11-01

    A synthetic method for preparing submicrometer-sized titania particles is proposed, which is based on hydrolysis of titanium alkoxide with the use of a cosolvent and an amine catalyst for alkoxide hydrolysis. The preparation was performed with different amines of ammonia, methylamine (MA), and dimethylamine (DMA) in different solvents of ethanol/acetonitrile, ethanol/methanol, ethanol/acetone, ethanol/acetonitrile, and ethanol/formamide for 0.1-0.3 M water and 0.03 M titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) at temperatures of 10-50 degrees C. The use of the ethanol/acetonitrile solvent with MA was required for preparing monodispersed, spherical particles. The number average of the titania particle sizes and their coefficient of variation were varied from 143 to 551 nm and from 5.7 to 20.6%, respectively, with reaction temperature and concentrations of water and MA. Colloidal crystals of titania particles fabricated with a sedimentation method revealed reflection peaks attributed to Bragg's diffraction. Annealing at 100-1000 degrees C led to shrinkage and crystallization of titania particles followed by an increase in the refractive index of titania particles.

  17. Lung Injury Induced by TiO2 Nanoparticles Depends on Their Structural Features: Size, Shape, Crystal Phases, and Surface Coating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiangxue; Fan, Yubo

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, a variety of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are being produced. Nanotoxicology has become a hot topic in many fields, as researchers attempt to elucidate the potential adverse health effects of NPs. The biological activity of NPs strongly depends on physicochemical parameters but these are not routinely considered in toxicity screening, such as dose metrics. In this work, nanoscale titanium dioxide (TiO2), one of the most commonly produced and widely used NPs, is put forth as a representative. The correlation between the lung toxicity and pulmonary cell impairment related to TiO2 NPs and its unusual structural features, including size, shape, crystal phases, and surface coating, is reviewed in detail. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in pulmonary inflammation in response to the properties of TiO2 NPs is also briefly described. To fully understand the potential biological effects of NPs in toxicity screening, we highly recommend that the size, crystal phase, dispersion and agglomeration status, surface coating, and chemical composition should be most appropriately characterized. PMID:25479073

  18. Cryogenic nanoindentation size effect in [0 0 1]-oriented face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seok-Woo; Meza, Lucas; Greer, Julia R.

    2013-09-01

    Cryogenic nanoindentation experiments performed on [0 0 1]-oriented single crystalline Nb, W, Al, and Au in an in situ nanomechanical instrument with customized cryogenic testing capability revealed temperature dependence on nanoindentation size effect. The Nix-Gao model, commonly used to capture indentation size effect at room temperature, does not take into account thermal effects and hence is not able to explain these experimental results where both hardness at infinite indentation depth and characteristic material length scale were found to be strong functions of temperature. Physical attributes are critically examined in the framework of intrinsic lattice resistance and dislocation cross-slip probability.

  19. A novel copper (II) complex containing a tetradentate Schiff base: Synthesis, spectroscopy, crystal structure, DFT study, biological activity and preparation of its nano-sized metal oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohidiyan, Zeinab; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Khaleghi, Mouj; Mague, Joel T.

    2017-04-01

    A new nano-sized copper (II) complex, [Cu(L)] with a tetra dentate Schiff base ligand, 2-((E)-(2-(E-5- bromo-2-hydroxybezenylideneamino) methyl)-4-bromophenol [H2L] was prepared by the reaction between of Cu (CH3COO)2·2H2O and (H2L) ligand with the ratio of 1:1, at the present of triethylamine by sonochemical method. The structure of [Cu (L)] complex was determined by FT-IR, UV-Vis, FESEM and molar conductivity. The structure of [Cu (L)] complex was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The geometry of [Cu (L)] complex was optimized using density functional theory (DFT) method with the B3LYP/6-31(d) level of theory. The calculated bond lengths and bond angles are in good agreement with the X-ray data. This complex was used as a novel precursor for preparing of CuO nano particles by the thermal decomposition method. The antibacterial activities of [H2L] ligand, nano-sized [Cu (L)] complex and nano-sized CuO have been screened against various strains of bacteria. According to the results, nano-sized CuO can be considered as an appropriate antibiotic agent.

  20. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Phonon Spectra of Bulk and Nano-Sized MoS2 Layer Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaremko, Anatoliy Mikhailovich; Yukhymchuk, Volodymyr Oleksandrovych; Romanyuk, Yuriy Anatolijovych; Baran, Jan; Placidi, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of Raman scattering spectra (RS) for single-crystal MoS2 sample and atomically thin MoS2 sample consisting from one to few layers was performed in order to explain the change of MoS2 vibrations at transition from a monoatomic layer to a bulk crystal. Experiments have shown that changes of frequencies of the most intensive bands arising from the in-plane, {E}_{2 g}^1 , and out-of-plane, A 1 g , vibrations, as a function of number n of layers looks differently. Thus, the frequency of ω( A 1 g ) is increasing with growth of n, whereas the frequency of ω ({E}_{2 g}^1) is decreasing. Such a change of the ω ({E}_{2 g}^1) frequency was explained as the effect of "strong increase of the dielectric tensor when going from single layer to the bulk" sample. In the present work, we show that the reason of different dependences of frequencies can be related to both the van der Waals (vdW) interlayer interaction and the anharmonic interaction of noted fundamental vibrations with the corresponding combination tones (CT) of layer that manifests itself due to Fermi resonance in the layer. Overjumping of these phonon pairs ( s, s ') owing to interlayer interaction, tilde{V}({}_{s, s', q}^p) , to other layers at growth of number n, results in the change of frequencies for each interacting pair of A 1 g or {E}_{2 g}^1 symmetry. The alteration of pair frequencies depends on the ratio of constants tilde{V}({}_{s, s', q}^p) describing the interaction of studied states s and s '.

  1. Apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He age dispersion arising from analysis of variable grain sizes and broken crystals - examples from the Scottish Southern Uplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łuszczak, Katarzyna; Persano, Cristina; Stuart, Finlay; Brown, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    Apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He (AHe) thermochronometry is a powerful technique for deciphering denudation of the uppermost crust. However, the age dispersion of single grains from the same rock is typical, and this hampers establishing accurate thermal histories when low grain numbers are analysed. Dispersion arising from the analysis of broken crystal fragments[1] has been proposed as an important cause of age dispersion, along with grain size and radiation damage. A new tool, Helfrag[2], allows constraints to be placed on the low temperature history derived from the analysis of apatite crystal fragments. However, the age dispersion model has not been fully tested on natural samples yet. We have performed AHe analysis of multiple (n = 20-25) grains from four rock samples from the Scottish Southern Uplands, which were subjected to the same exhumation episodes, although, the amount of exhumation varied between the localities. This is evident from the range of AFT ages (˜60 to ˜200 Ma) and variable thermal histories showing either strong, moderate and no support for a rapid cooling event at ˜60 Ma. Different apatite size and fragment geometry were analysed in order to maximise age dispersion. In general, the age dispersion increases with increasing AFT age (from 47% to 127%), consistent with the prediction from the fragmentation model. Thermal histories obtained using Helfrag were compared with those obtained by standard codes based on the spherical approximation. In one case, the Helfrag model was capable of resolving the higher complexity of the thermal history of the rock, constraining several heating/cooling events that are not predicted by the standard models, but are in good agreement with the regional geology. In other cases, the thermal histories are similar for both Helfrag and standard models and the age predictions for the Helfrag are only slightly better than for standard model, implying that the grain size has the dominant role in generating the age dispersion

  2. Role of dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size on microbial inactivation of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Manoranjan; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Liying; Jacobson, Craig; Wang, Wei-Ning; Jones, Kristen; Goyal, Yogesh; Tang, Yinjie J.; Biswas, Pratim

    2011-10-01

    The properties of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were independently controlled in a flame aerosol reactor by varying the molar feed ratios of the precursors, and by optimizing temperature and time history in the flame. The effect of the physico-chemical properties (dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size) of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles on inactivation of Mycobacterium smegmatis (a model pathogenic bacterium) was investigated under three light conditions (complete dark, fluorescent light and UV light). The survival rate of M. smegmatis (in a minimal salt medium for 2 h) exposed to the NPs varied depending on the light irradiation conditions as well as the dopant concentrations. In dark conditions, pristine TiO2 showed insignificant microbial inactivation, but inactivation increased with increasing dopant concentration. Under fluorescent light illumination, no significant effect was observed for TiO2. However, when TiO2 was doped with copper, inactivation increased with dopant concentration, reaching more than 90% (>3 wt% dopant). Enhanced microbial inactivation by TiO2 NPs was observed only under UV light. When TiO2 NPs were doped with copper, their inactivation potential was promoted and the UV-resistant cells were reduced by over 99%. In addition, the microbial inactivation potential of NPs was also crystal-phase-and size-dependent under all three light conditions. A lower ratio of anatase phase and smaller sizes of Cu-doped TiO2 NPs resulted in decreased bacterial survival. The increased inactivation potential of doped TiO2 NPs is possibly due to both enhanced photocatalytic reactions and leached copper ions.

  3. Role of dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size on microbial inactivation of Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Manoranjan; Wu, Bing; Zhu, Liying; Jacobson, Craig; Wang, Wei-Ning; Jones, Kristen; Goyal, Yogesh; Tang, Yinjie J; Biswas, Pratim

    2011-10-14

    The properties of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) were independently controlled in a flame aerosol reactor by varying the molar feed ratios of the precursors, and by optimizing temperature and time history in the flame. The effect of the physico-chemical properties (dopant concentration, crystal phase and particle size) of Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles on inactivation of Mycobacterium smegmatis (a model pathogenic bacterium) was investigated under three light conditions (complete dark, fluorescent light and UV light). The survival rate of M. smegmatis (in a minimal salt medium for 2 h) exposed to the NPs varied depending on the light irradiation conditions as well as the dopant concentrations. In dark conditions, pristine TiO(2) showed insignificant microbial inactivation, but inactivation increased with increasing dopant concentration. Under fluorescent light illumination, no significant effect was observed for TiO(2). However, when TiO(2) was doped with copper, inactivation increased with dopant concentration, reaching more than 90% (>3 wt% dopant). Enhanced microbial inactivation by TiO(2) NPs was observed only under UV light. When TiO(2) NPs were doped with copper, their inactivation potential was promoted and the UV-resistant cells were reduced by over 99%. In addition, the microbial inactivation potential of NPs was also crystal-phase-and size-dependent under all three light conditions. A lower ratio of anatase phase and smaller sizes of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs resulted in decreased bacterial survival. The increased inactivation potential of doped TiO(2) NPs is possibly due to both enhanced photocatalytic reactions and leached copper ions.

  4. High coercivity sized controlled cobalt–gold core–shell nano-crystals prepared by reverse microemulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Bahmanrokh, Ghazaleh; Hashim, Mansor; Soltani, Nayereh; Ismail, Ismayadi; Vaziri, Parisa; Navaseri, Manizheh; Erfani, Maryam; Kanagesan, Samikannu

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Calculating the crystallinity percentage and percentage of phases presented in Co–Au core–shell nanoparticles. • Magnetic properties of four groups nanogarin: 5, 10, 15, 20 nm. • Single domain ferromagnetic materials with high coercivity at room temperature. • Intrinsic blocking temperature measured in zero field cooled-warmed (ZFC-W). - Abstract: Size-controlled cobalt–gold core–shell nanoparticles were synthesized via the reverse-micelle microemulsion method. In order to control the size of the nanoparticles, the nucleation and growth process were performed within a confined space by adjusting the water to surfactant ratio of reverse micelles solution during synthesis. The crystallinity percentage and percentage of phases presented in Co–Au core–shell nanoparticles were calculated using X-ray diffraction data. The results from transmission electron microscopy provide direct evidence for core–shell structure nanomaterials. Magnetic properties of the samples were investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The as-prepared samples showed significant coercivity at room temperature. The intrinsic blocking temperature was experimentally deduced from zero-field-cooled warmed (ZFC-W) curves by a simple method without employing an external magnetic field. The B-field dependence temperature data of Co–Au nanoparticles exhibited an intrinsic blocking temperature at 45 K. Annealing these samples at 400 °C caused an increase in particle size, crystallinity percentage and further enhanced their magnetic properties.

  5. Inhibited crystallization and its effect on conductivity in a nano-sized Fe oxide composite PEO solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Jaipal; Chu, Peter P.; Kumar, J. Siva; Rao, U. V. Subba

    Crystallinity and conductivity results for a new nanocomposite PEO:LiClO 4 with nano-sized Fe 3O 4 particles are presented in this paper. The DSC measurements have shown a decrease in the degree of crystallinity of PEO by the inclusion of LiClO 4 salt and further decrease with the addition of Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles. The nano-sized Fe 3O 4 surface has a Lewis acidic group capable of interaction with Lewis base centers of the polymer PEO chain in the nanocomposite electrolyte, resulting in decrease in PEO crystallinity and enhancement of miscibility in the presence of LiClO 4 salt. Annealed at 125 °C of the PEO:LiClO 4 electrolyte shows melting endotherm at 175 °C, but this endotherm is absent with the incorporation of nano-sized Fe oxide particles. This electrolyte system has a one and a half order of magnitude higher ionic conductivity compared to a standard PEO:LiClO 4 electrolyte. Optimized conductivity is found at a 10 wt.% Fe 3O 4 composition while above this concentration, the conductivity is decreased due to aggregation of a Fe 3O 4:Li rich phase.

  6. The crystal structure of paramagnetic copper(II) oxalate (CuC₂O₄): formation and thermal decomposition of randomly stacked anisotropic nano-sized crystallites.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Axel Nørlund; Lebech, Bente; Andersen, Niels Hessel; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2014-11-28

    Synthetic copper(II) oxalate, CuC2O4, was obtained in a precipitation reaction between a copper(II) solution and an aqueous solution of oxalic acid. The product was identified from its conventional X-ray powder patterns which match that of the copper mineral Moolooite reported to have the composition CuC2O4·0.44H2O. Time resolved in situ investigations of the thermal decomposition of copper(II) oxalate using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction showed that in air the compound converts to Cu2O at 215 °C and oxidizes to CuO at 345 °C. Thermo gravimetric analysis performed in an inert Ar-gas reveals that the material contains no crystal water and reduces to pure Cu at 295 °C. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in the temperature range from 2 K to 300 K show intriguing paramagnetic behaviour with no sign of magnetic order down to 2 K. A crystal structure investigation is made based on powder diffraction data using one neutron diffraction pattern obtained at 5 K (λ = 1.5949(1) Å) combined with one conventional and two synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns obtained at ambient temperature using λ = 1.54056, 1.0981 and λ = 0.50483(1) Å, respectively. Based on the X-ray synchrotron data the resulting crystal structure is described in the monoclinic space group P2₁/c (#14) in the P12₁/n1 setting with unit cell parameters a = 5.9598(1) Å, b = 5.6089(1) Å, c = 5.1138 (1) Å, β = 115.320(1)°. The composition is CuC2O4 with atomic coordinates determined by FullProf refinement of the neutron diffraction data. The crystal structure consists of a random stacking of CuC2O4 micro-crystallites where half the Cu-atoms are placed at (2a) and the other half at (2b) positions with the corresponding oxalate molecules centred around the corresponding (2b) and (2a) site positions, respectively. The diffraction patterns obtained for both kinds of radiation show considerable broadening of several Bragg peaks caused by highly anisotropic microstructural size and strain

  7. Measurement of the size of intracellular ice crystals in mouse oocytes using a melting point depression method and the influence of intracellular solute concentrations.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Critser, John K

    2009-12-01

    Characterization of intracellular ice formed during the cooling procedures of cells significantly benefits the development and optimization design of cryopreservation or cryosurgery techniques. In this study, we investigated the influence of the concentration of extracellular non-permeable and permeable solutes on the melting points of the intracellular ice in mouse oocytes using cryomicroscopy. The results showed that the melting points of the intracellular ice are always lower than the extracellular ice. Based on this observation and the Gibbs-Thomson relation, we established a physical model to calculate the size of intracellular ice crystals and described its relationship with the concentrations of intracellular permeating solutes and macromolecules. This model predicts that the increased concentration of macromolecules in cells, by increasing the extracellular non-permeating solute concentration, can significantly lower the required concentration of permeable solutes for intracellular vitrification. The prediction was tested through the cryomicroscopic observation of the co-existence of intracellular vitrification and extracellular crystallization during cooling at 100 degrees C/min when the extracellular solutions contain 5 molal (m) ethylene glycol and 0.3 to 0.6m NaCl.

  8. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  9. Influence of finite size and wetting on nematic and smectic phase behavior of liquid crystal confined to controlled-pore matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnjak, Zdravko; Kralj, Samo; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Žumer, Slobodan

    2004-11-01

    The high-resolution calorimetric study was carried out on octylcyanobiphenyl liquid crystal (LC) confined to various controlled-pore glass (CPG) matrices with silane-treated surface. The diameter of the voids cross section ranged between 23.7 and 395nm . The results are compared to those obtained previously on CPG voids nontreated with silane. We found a striking similarity between the shifts in the isotropic to nematic and nematic to smectic- A phase transition temperatures as a function of the void radius in which order parameter variations at the LC-void interface play the dominant role. Weaker temperature shifts are observed in silane-treated samples, where surface ordering tendency is larger. In nontreated samples, a finite-size scaling law in the maximum value of the heat capacity at the nematic to smectic- A transition was observed for void diameters larger than 20nm . In silane-treated samples, this behavior is considerably changed by surface wetting interactions.

  10. New developments in nanoparticle-liquid crystal composites: from magic-sized semiconductor nanoclusters to alignment pattern formation via nanoparticle stenciling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, Javad; Sawatzky, Ryan; Sharma, Anshul; Urbanski, Martin; Yu, Kui; Kitzerow, Heinz-S.; Hegmann, Torsten

    2012-03-01

    We here report on the alignment and electro-optic properties of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) either containing nanoscale particles as additives or featuring particles patterned on substrates. The investigated nematic LCs or LC dispersions are doped or in contact with magic-sized semiconductor CdSe nanocrystals (MSNCs) or silane- and alkylthiol monolayercapped gold nanoparticles. Three single-sized CdSe quantum dots capped with myristic acid exhibiting bright bandgap photoluminescence (PL) at λmax ~ 463 nm were tested as additives. Two of the quantum dots only vary in the amount of defects as indicated by different bandgap and deep trap PL. The third MSNC sample is compositionally different, doped with Zn. These MSNCs with almost identical sizes were doped at different concentrations (1-5 wt%) into the nematic phase of the 2-phenylpyrimidine-based LC1. Only the Zn-doped MSNCs showed the formation of birefringent stripes surrounded by areas of homeotropic alignment between plain glass slides at all concentrations as observed for many other nanoparticle-doped nematic LCs reported earlier by our group. In polyimide-coated glass slides favoring planar orientation of the nematic director, planar alignment was observed. Similarly, siloxane-coated gold nanoparticle additives with narrow size distribution, but larger size, show homeotropic alignment between plain glass and planar alignment in rubbed polyimide-coated cells. Surprisingly then, we succeeded in creating alignment patterns using smaller, ~2 nm alkylthiol-capped gold nanoparticles using a process called stenciling that allowed us to generate patterns of homeotropic alignment in a continuum of planar alignment of the nematic LC. Finally, electro-optic investigations on some of these samples revealed that only the Zn-doped magic-sized MSNCs significantly lower the dielectric anisotropy as well as the splay elastic constant of the nematic host, despite identical size and surface functionality of the three used

  11. Protein Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  12. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  13. Minimum Conflict Mainstreaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awen, Ed; And Others

    Computer technology is discussed as a tool for facilitating the implementation of the mainstreaming process. Minimum conflict mainstreaming/merging (MCM) is defined as an approach which utilizes computer technology to circumvent such structural obstacles to mainstreaming as transportation scheduling, screening and assignment of students, testing,…

  14. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  15. Unidirectional growth of large size urea doped L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate NLO organic crystal and investigations of its crystalline and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunil; Rao, K Ramachandra; Kar, S; Bartwal, K S

    2016-01-15

    Organic crystals of urea doped L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate have been grown by unidirectional solution growth technique. The crystal grown by this technique has high growth rate as compared to the crystals grown using conventional slow cooling method. This method is ideally suited to grow crystals along a specific direction. The growth process was monitored at regular intervals of time in a time-lapsed manner to estimate the growth rate and also monitor its quality visually. The grown crystal was subjected to different characterizations in order to confirm the phase of the grown crystal, its crystalline perfection and optical properties. The X-ray diffraction confirmed the phase of the crystal. The rocking curve recorded using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) technique reveals that the crystal grown using conventional slow cooling method has internal gain boundaries whereas that grown by unidirectional technique has high degree of crystalline perfection. The bonding environment present in the crystal was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy where vibrational frequencies of the different functional groups present were identified. The optical quality of the crystal was characterized using UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer and Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The nonlinear optical response of the crystal was measured using Kurtz-Perry method and found to be 1.4 times that of a KDP crystal.

  16. Unidirectional growth of large size urea doped L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate NLO organic crystal and investigations of its crystalline and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sunil; Ramachandra Rao, K.; Kar, S.; Bartwal, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Organic crystals of urea doped L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate have been grown by unidirectional solution growth technique. The crystal grown by this technique has high growth rate as compared to the crystals grown using conventional slow cooling method. This method is ideally suited to grow crystals along a specific direction. The growth process was monitored at regular intervals of time in a time-lapsed manner to estimate the growth rate and also monitor its quality visually. The grown crystal was subjected to different characterizations in order to confirm the phase of the grown crystal, its crystalline perfection and optical properties. The X-ray diffraction confirmed the phase of the crystal. The rocking curve recorded using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) technique reveals that the crystal grown using conventional slow cooling method has internal gain boundaries whereas that grown by unidirectional technique has high degree of crystalline perfection. The bonding environment present in the crystal was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy where vibrational frequencies of the different functional groups present were identified. The optical quality of the crystal was characterized using UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer and Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The nonlinear optical response of the crystal was measured using Kurtz-Perry method and found to be 1.4 times that of a KDP crystal.

  17. Influence of rare earth cation size on the crystal structure in rare earth silicates, Na2RESiO4(OH) (RE = Sc, Yb) and NaRESiO4 (RE = La, Yb)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latshaw, Allison M.; Wilkins, Branford O.; Chance, W. Michael; Smith, Mark D.; zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-01-01

    Crystals of Na2ScSiO4(OH) and Na2YbSiO4(OH) were synthesized at low temperatures using a sodium hydroxide based hydroflux, while crystals of NaLaSiO4 and NaYbSiO4 were grown at high temperatures using a sodium fluoride/sodium chloride eutectic flux. Both structure types were crystallized under reaction conditions that, when used for medium sized rare earths (RE = Pr, Nd, Sm - Tm) yield the Na5RE4X[SiO4]4 structure type, where X is OH in the hydroflux conditions and F in the eutectic flux conditions. Herein, we report the synthesis, structure, size effect, and magnetic properties of these compositions and introduce the new structure type of Na2RESiO4(OH), which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pca21, of NaLaSiO4, which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pna21, and of NaYbSiO4, which crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma, where both NaRESiO4 compounds have one silicon structural analog.

  18. Crystal-Size Effects on Carbon Dioxide Capture of a Covalently Alkylamine-Tethered Metal-Organic Framework Constructed by a One-Step Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Kyeong; Hyun, Sung-min; Lee, Jae Hwa; Kim, Tae Kyung; Moon, Dohyun; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), amine functionalization of their pore surfaces has been studied extensively. In general, amine-functionalized MOFs have been synthesized via post-synthetic modifications. Herein, we introduce a one-step construction of a MOF ([(NiLethylamine)(BPDC)] = MOFNH2; [NiLethylamine]2+ = [Ni(C12H32N8)]2+; BPDC2− = 4,4‘-biphenyldicarboxylate) possessing covalently tethered alkylamine groups without post-synthetic modification. Two-amine groups per metal centre were introduced by this method. MOFNH2 showed enhanced CO2 uptake at elevated temperatures, attributed to active chemical interactions between the amine groups and the CO2 molecules. Due to the narrow channels of MOFNH2, the accessibility to the channel of CO2 is the limiting factor in its sorption behaviour. In this context, only crystal size reduction of MOFNH2 led to much faster and greater CO2 uptake at low pressures. PMID:26757890

  19. Crystal-Size Effects on Carbon Dioxide Capture of a Covalently Alkylamine-Tethered Metal-Organic Framework Constructed by a One-Step Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun Kyeong; Hyun, Sung-Min; Lee, Jae Hwa; Kim, Tae Kyung; Moon, Dohyun; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), amine functionalization of their pore surfaces has been studied extensively. In general, amine-functionalized MOFs have been synthesized via post-synthetic modifications. Herein, we introduce a one-step construction of a MOF ([(NiLethylamine)(BPDC)] = MOFNH2 [NiLethylamine]2+ = [Ni(C12H32N8)]2+ BPDC2‑ = 4,4‘-biphenyldicarboxylate) possessing covalently tethered alkylamine groups without post-synthetic modification. Two-amine groups per metal centre were introduced by this method. MOFNH2 showed enhanced CO2 uptake at elevated temperatures, attributed to active chemical interactions between the amine groups and the CO2 molecules. Due to the narrow channels of MOFNH2, the accessibility to the channel of CO2 is the limiting factor in its sorption behaviour. In this context, only crystal size reduction of MOFNH2 led to much faster and greater CO2 uptake at low pressures.

  20. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  1. Menu Plans: Maximum Nutrition for Minimum Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that menu planning is the key to getting maximum nutrition in day care meals and snacks for minimum cost. Explores United States Department of Agriculture food pyramid guidelines for children and tips for planning menus and grocery shopping. Includes suggested meal patterns and portion sizes. (HTH)

  2. Design and synthesis of new type I bicontinuous cubic lyotropic liquid crystal monomers based on the gemini framework for molecular-size separation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesenauer, Brian R.

    The overall objective of this thesis research was the design and synthesis of new type I bicontinuous cubic (QI) phase-forming, gemini-shaped lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) monomers for the preparation of nanoporous polymer membrane materials. These new QI-phase LLC monomers were designed to overcome several shortcomings of previously developed QI-phase LLC monomers in the Gin research group that include expensive and difficult synthesis, poor film processibility, and limited blendability with additives. The first method for obtaining this objective was the synthesis of six homologues of a new gemini ammonium LLC monomer, two of which exhibit a QI phase with water. Both of these LLCs form a robust Q I phase such that a gel of these materials can be fully infused into a microporous support membrane and then cross-linked to maintain the LLC phase structure. The resulting QI-phase polymer film showed a uniform pore size of 0.86 nm in water nanofiltration and desalination experiments. This QI monomer platform is less costly and less rigorous to synthesize than previously synthesized phosphonium-based gemini QI LLC monomers. These new LLC monomers also have the ability to blend with the hydrophobic, commercially available cross-linkable elastomer vinyl-EPDM (v-EPDM) to form breathable composite barrier materials. In the appropriate composition, melt-infused gemini ammonium monomer/v-EPDM polymer membranes exhibit extremely high pure water vapor fluxes, and high rejection of toxic industrial chemical vapors. A new cross-linkable gemini LLC monomer based on charged imidazolium units was also developed that forms a QI phase with glycerol. This new LLC monomer can be solution-cast from MeOH and UV-irradiated to form cross-linked thin-film composite QI membranes with slightly larger effective pore size (0.96 nm) than the previous systems. A related goal of this thesis research was to develop methods for systematically tuning the effective pore size of nanoporous QI polymer

  3. Refinement of the deletion in 8q22.2-q22.3: the minimum deletion size at 8q22.3 related to intellectual disability and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Ohashi, Ikuko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Jun-ichi; Ida, Kazumi; Naruto, Takuya; Iai, Mizue; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2014-08-01

    Kuechler et al. [2011] reported five patients with interstitial deletions in 8q22.2-q22.3 who had intellectual disability, epilepsy, and dysmorphic features. We report on a new patient with the smallest overlapping de novo deletion in 8q22.3 and refined the phenotype. The proposita was an 8-year-old girl, who developed seizures at 10 months, and her epileptic seizure became severe and difficult to control with antiepileptic drugs. She also exhibited developmental delay and walked alone at 24 months. She was referred to us for evaluation for developmental delay and epilepsy at the age of 8 years. She had intellectual disability (IQ 37 at 7 years) and autistic behavior, and spoke two word sentences at 8 years. She had mild dysmorphic features, including telecanthus and thick vermilion of the lips. Array comparative genomic hybridization detected a 1.36 Mb deletion in 8q22.3 that encompassed RRM2B and NCALD, which encode the small subunit of p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase and neurocalcin delta in the neuronal calcium sensor family of calcium-binding proteins, respectively. The minimum overlapping region between the present and previously reported patients is considered to be a critical region for the phenotype of the deletion in 8q22.3. We suggest that the deletion in 8q22.3 may represent a clinically recognizable condition, which is characterized by intellectual disability and epilepsy.

  4. A comparison of six software packages for evaluation of solid lung nodules using semi-automated volumetry: what is the minimum increase in size to detect growth in repeated CT examinations.

    PubMed

    de Hoop, Bartjan; Gietema, Hester; van Ginneken, Bram; Zanen, Pieter; Groenewegen, Gerard; Prokop, Mathias

    2009-04-01

    We compared interexamination variability of CT lung nodule volumetry with six currently available semi-automated software packages to determine the minimum change needed to detect the growth of solid lung nodules. We had ethics committee approval. To simulate a follow-up examination with zero growth, we performed two low-dose unenhanced CT scans in 20 patients referred for pulmonary metastases. Between examinations, patients got off and on the table. Volumes of all pulmonary nodules were determined on both examinations using six nodule evaluation software packages. Variability (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval of the Bland-Altman plot) was calculated for nodules for which segmentation was visually rated as adequate. We evaluated 214 nodules (mean diameter 10.9 mm, range 3.3 mm-30.0 mm). Software packages provided adequate segmentation in 71% to 86% of nodules (p < 0.001). In case of adequate segmentation, variability in volumetry between scans ranged from 16.4% to 22.3% for the various software packages. Variability with five to six software packages was significantly less for nodules >or=8 mm in diameter (range 12.9%-17.1%) than for nodules <8 mm (range 18.5%-25.6%). Segmented volumes of each package were compared to each of the other packages. Systematic volume differences were detected in 11/15 comparisons. This hampers comparison of nodule volumes between software packages.

  5. Photonic crystal microring resonator for label-free biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lo, Stanley M; Hu, Shuren; Gaur, Girija; Kostoulas, Yiorgos; Weiss, Sharon M; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2017-03-20

    A label-free optical biosensor based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal microring resonator with enhanced light-matter interaction is demonstrated. More than a 2-fold improvement in volumetric and surface sensing sensitivity is achieved compared to conventional microring sensors. The experimental bulk detection sensitivity is ~248nm/RIU and label-free detection of DNA and proteins is reported at the nanomolar scale. With a minimum feature size greater than 100nm, the photonic crystal microring resonator biosensor can be fabricated with the same standard lithographic techniques used to mass fabricate conventional microring resonators.

  6. 7 CFR 51.1216 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Size § 51.1216 Size requirements. (a) The numerical count or a count-size based on equivalent tray pack size designations or the minimum diameter of the peaches packed in a... count, of peaches in any lot may be below the specified minimum size and not more than 15 percent may...

  7. 7 CFR 51.1216 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Size § 51.1216 Size requirements. (a) The numerical count or a count-size based on equivalent tray pack size designations or the minimum diameter of the peaches packed in a... count, of peaches in any lot may be below the specified minimum size and not more than 15 percent may...

  8. 7 CFR 51.1216 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Peaches Size § 51.1216 Size requirements. (a) The numerical count or a count-size based on equivalent tray pack size designations or the minimum diameter of the peaches packed in a... count, of peaches in any lot may be below the specified minimum size and not more than 15 percent may...

  9. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  10. Parameters Affecting I-V Hysteresis of CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Solar Cells: Effects of Perovskite Crystal Size and Mesoporous TiO2 Layer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Seon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2014-09-04

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells are studied using a time-dependent current response with stepwise sweeping of the bias voltage. Compared with the crystalline Si solar cell showing time-independent current at a given bias voltage, the perovskite solar cells exhibit time-dependent current response. The current increases with time and becomes steady at forward scan from short-circuit to open-circuit, whereas it is decayed and saturated with time at reverse scan from open-circuit to short-circuit. Time-dependent current response eventually leads to I-V hysteresis depending on the scan direction and the scan rate. Crystal size of CH3NH3PbI3 and the mesoporous TiO2 (mp-TiO2) film are found to influence I-V hysteresis, where the I-V hysteresis is alleviated as crystal size increases and in the presence of mp-TiO2. The capacitance observed at low frequency (0.1 to 1 Hz), associated with dipole polarization, tends to diminish as size of perovskite and mp-TiO2 layer thickness increases, which suggests that the origin of hysteresis correlates to the capacitive characteristic of CH3NH3PbI3 and the degree of hysteresis depends strongly on perovskite crystal size and mesoporous TiO2 layer.

  11. A Semiautomatic Protein Crystallization System with Preventing Evaporation of Drops and Surface Sensor of Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Niino, Ai; Ishizu, Takeshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2004-01-01

    We developed a simple, semiautomated protein crystallization system. The system performs crystallization-condition-screening experiments using commercial solution kits and crystallization plates. It is capable of dispensing a minimum of one microliter of protein solution into a protein well and a maximum of one milliliter of a mother liquor into a reservoir with high reproducibility using two syringes of different sizes. Several new instruments effective in preventing evaporation of solutions, a surface sensor of solutions, and a tube-holder box for solution kits are introduced.

  12. Design for Minimum Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Design for Minimum Risk (DFMR) is a term used by NASA programs as an expansion of the general hazard reduction process where if an identified hazard cannot be eliminated, the design is modified to reduce the associated mishap risk to an acceptable level. DFMR is a set of specific requirements to minimize risk. DFMR is not well understood and there are many misconceptions concerning the meaning and use. This paper will provide insight into the use of DFMR for space applications; it s comparison to other hazard mitigation strategies and examples of how the approach has been used in the past. It will also highlight documents used by NASA on various programs to determine DFMR.

  13. Granulation Properties in DOT Images from Solar Maximum to Minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzi, W.

    DOT granulation filtergrams in the G-Band from solar maximum to solar minimum (1999 to 2007) were investigated for changes of granulation properties like areas, perimeter, fractal dimension, cell sizes, and life times. Granules seem to become larger during solar minimum, whereas the distances between the granule centres stay constant. Nonetheless, the uncertainties are very high.

  14. Artistic Crystal Creations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In this inquiry-based, integrative art and science activity, Grade 5-8 students use multicolored Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) crystallizing solutions to reveal beautiful, cylindrical, 3-dimensional, needle-shaped structures. Through observations of the crystal art, students analyze factors that contribute to crystal size and formation, compare…

  15. Controlling morphology and crystallite size of Cu(In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3})Se{sub 2} nano-crystals synthesized using a heating-up method

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Wei-Hsiang; Hsiang, Hsing-I; Chia, Chih-Ta; Yen, Fu-Su

    2013-12-15

    CuIn{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}Se{sub 2}(CIGS) nano-crystals were successfully synthesized via a heating-up process. The non-coordinating solvent (1-octadecene) and selenium/cations ratio effects on the crystalline phase and crystallite size of CIGS nano-crystallites were investigated. It was observed that the CIGS nano-crystallite morphology changed from sheet into spherical shape as the amount of 1-octadecene addition was increased. CIGS nano-crystals were obtained in 9–20 nm sizes as the selenium/cations ratio increased. These results suggest that the monomer reactivity in the solution can be adjusted by changing the solvent type and selenium/cations ratio, hence affecting the crystallite size and distribution. - Graphical abstract: CuIn{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}Se{sub 2}(CIGS) nano-crystals were successfully synthesized via a heating-up process in this study. The super-saturation in the solution can be adjusted by changing the OLA/ODE ratio and selenium/cation ratio.

  16. Analysing the effect of crystal size and structure in highly efficient CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells by spatially resolved photo- and electroluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, S; Heinz, F D; Im, J-H; Veurman, W; Padilla, M; Schubert, M C; Würfel, U; Grätzel, M; Park, N-G; Hinsch, A

    2015-12-14

    CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells with a mesoporous TiO2 layer and spiro-MeOTAD as a hole transport layer (HTL) with three different CH3NH3I concentrations (0.032 M, 0.044 M and 0.063 M) were investigated. Strong variations in crystal size and morphology resulting in diversified cell efficiencies (9.2%, 16.9% and 12.3%, respectively) were observed. The physical origin of this behaviour was analysed by detailed characterization combining current-voltage curves with photo- and electroluminescence (PL and EL) imaging as well as light beam induced current measurements (LBIC). It was found that the most efficient cell shows the highest luminescence and the least efficient cell is most strongly limited by non-radiative recombination. Crystal size, morphology and distribution in the capping layer and in the porous scaffold strongly affect the non-radiative recombination. Moreover, the very non-uniform crystal structure with multiple facets, as evidenced by SEM images of the 0.032 M device, suggests the creation of a large number of grain boundaries and crystal dislocations. These defects give rise to increased trap-assisted non-radiative recombination as is confirmed by high-resolution μ-PL images. The different imaging techniques used in this study prove to be well-suited to spatially investigate and thus correlate the crystal morphology of the perovskite layer with the electrical and radiative properties of the solar cells and thus with their performance.

  17. Phantom characterization of applicators by liquid-crystal-plate dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Andreuccetti, D; Bini, M; Ignesti, A; Olmi, R; Vanni, R

    1991-01-01

    A method for the determination of the SAR distribution produced by an electromagnetic applicator for localized hyperthermia is described. The procedure for SAR evaluation consists of recording the time evolution of the temperature inside a polyacrylamide phantom by means of thermochromic liquid crystal sheets inserted in it. The technique allows a complete characterization of applicators in a very broad frequency range, using power levels of the order of those needed in real treatments. Criteria for the minimum phantom size and the maximum time duration of the characterization procedure are indicated, which allow a reliable determination of the effective field size and penetration depth of the applicator.

  18. RETRACTED: Size-controlled spherical polymer nanoparticles: synthesis with tandem acoustic emulsification followed by soap-free emulsion polymerization and one-step fabrication of colloidal crystal films of various colors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuki; Nakabayashi, Koji; Kojima, Maya; Atobe, Mahito

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a novel synthesis method for size-controlled polymer nanoparticles using soap-free emulsion polymerization. This new synthetic method involves sequential ultrasonic irradiation (20kHz→500kHz→1.6MHz→2.4MHz) for acoustic emulsification of a water-insoluble monomer such as methylmethacrylate (MMA) in an aqueous medium, followed by emulsion polymerization in the obtained solution without using any surfactants. The sequential ultrasonication (tandem acoustic emulsification) could provide a clear and stable emulsified solution containing monomer droplets with relatively narrow size distribution in the nanometer range. The subsequent polymerization in this solution yielded size-controlled polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanoparticles and monodisperse PMMA nanoparticles of different sizes. Furthermore, colloidal crystal films could be easily prepared from the as-polymerized nanoparticle solution using the fluidic-cell method. Moreover, we succeeded to modify the structural color of colloidal crystal films by the addition of a small amount of organic solvent to the as-polymerized nanoparticle solution for the fluidic-cell method.

  19. Laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2011-11-04

    Recent streams of laser studies on crystallization and crystal growth are summarized and reviewed. Femtosecond multiphoton excitation of solutions leads to their ablation at the focal point, inducing local bubble formation, shockwave propagation, and convection flow. This phenomenon, called "laser micro tsunami" makes it possible to trigger crystallization of molecules and proteins from their supersaturated solutions. Femtosecond laser ablation of a urea crystal in solution triggers the additional growth of a single daughter crystal. Intense continuous wave (CW) near infrared laser irradiation at the air/solution interface of heavy-water amino acid solutions results in trapping of the clusters and evolves to crystallization. A single crystal is always prepared in a spatially and temporally controlled manner, and the crystal polymorph of glycine depends on laser power, polarization, and solution concentration. Upon irradiation at the glass/solution interface, a millimeter-sized droplet is formed, and a single crystal is formed by shifting the irradiation position to the surface. Directional and selective crystal growth is also possible with laser trapping. Finally, characteristics of laser-induced crystallization and crystal growth are summarized.

  20. Unification of algorithms for minimum mode optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yi; Xiao, Penghao; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Minimum mode following algorithms are widely used for saddle point searching in chemical and material systems. Common to these algorithms is a component to find the minimum curvature mode of the second derivative, or Hessian matrix. Several methods, including Lanczos, dimer, Rayleigh-Ritz minimization, shifted power iteration, and locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate gradient, have been proposed for this purpose. Each of these methods finds the lowest curvature mode iteratively without calculating the Hessian matrix, since the full matrix calculation is prohibitively expensive in the high dimensional spaces of interest. Here we unify these iterative methods in the same theoretical framework using the concept of the Krylov subspace. The Lanczos method finds the lowest eigenvalue in a Krylov subspace of increasing size, while the other methods search in a smaller subspace spanned by the set of previous search directions. We show that these smaller subspaces are contained within the Krylov space for which the Lanczos method explicitly finds the lowest curvature mode, and hence the theoretical efficiency of the minimum mode finding methods are bounded by the Lanczos method. Numerical tests demonstrate that the dimer method combined with second-order optimizers approaches but does not exceed the efficiency of the Lanczos method for minimum mode optimization.

  1. Unification of algorithms for minimum mode optimization.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yi; Xiao, Penghao; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-01-28

    Minimum mode following algorithms are widely used for saddle point searching in chemical and material systems. Common to these algorithms is a component to find the minimum curvature mode of the second derivative, or Hessian matrix. Several methods, including Lanczos, dimer, Rayleigh-Ritz minimization, shifted power iteration, and locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate gradient, have been proposed for this purpose. Each of these methods finds the lowest curvature mode iteratively without calculating the Hessian matrix, since the full matrix calculation is prohibitively expensive in the high dimensional spaces of interest. Here we unify these iterative methods in the same theoretical framework using the concept of the Krylov subspace. The Lanczos method finds the lowest eigenvalue in a Krylov subspace of increasing size, while the other methods search in a smaller subspace spanned by the set of previous search directions. We show that these smaller subspaces are contained within the Krylov space for which the Lanczos method explicitly finds the lowest curvature mode, and hence the theoretical efficiency of the minimum mode finding methods are bounded by the Lanczos method. Numerical tests demonstrate that the dimer method combined with second-order optimizers approaches but does not exceed the efficiency of the Lanczos method for minimum mode optimization.

  2. 7 CFR 51.344 - Size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Size § 51.344 Size. (a) The minimum and maximum sizes or range... the apples determined by the smallest opening through which it will pass. Application of Standards...

  3. 7 CFR 51.344 - Size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Size § 51.344 Size. (a) The minimum and maximum sizes or range... the apples determined by the smallest opening through which it will pass. Application of Standards...

  4. 7 CFR 51.344 - Size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Grades of Apples for Processing Size § 51.344 Size. (a) The minimum and maximum sizes or range... the apples determined by the smallest opening through which it will pass. Application of Standards...

  5. 50 CFR 622.37 - Size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.37 Size limits. All size limits in this section are minimum size...

  6. 50 CFR 648.104 - Summer flounder minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management... possession, e.g., fillets, except that party and charter vessels possessing valid state permits...

  7. 50 CFR 648.124 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... following non-exempt species: Loligo squid; black sea bass; and silver hake (whiting). (b) Northern Gear... that are fishing for, or in possession of, the following non-exempt species: Loligo squid; black...

  8. 50 CFR 648.103 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... landings have exceeded the RHL, the exact poundage of the landings overage will be deducted, as soon as... accommodated through landing-based AMs, then the exact amount by which the sector ACL was exceeded, in pounds... and Federal measures so no differential effects occur on Federal permit holders....

  9. Minimum Sample Size Requirements for Mokken Scale Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straat, J. Hendrik; van der Ark, L. Andries; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    An automated item selection procedure in Mokken scale analysis partitions a set of items into one or more Mokken scales, if the data allow. Two algorithms are available that pursue the same goal of selecting Mokken scales of maximum length: Mokken's original automated item selection procedure (AISP) and a genetic algorithm (GA). Minimum…

  10. 46 CFR 111.60-4 - Minimum cable conductor size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... conductor must be #18 AWG (0.82 mm2) or larger except— (a) Each power and lighting cable conductor must be #14 AWG (2.10 mm2) or larger; and (b) Each thermocouple, pyrometer, or instrumentation cable conductor must be #22 AWG (0.33 mm2) or larger....

  11. 46 CFR 111.60-4 - Minimum cable conductor size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... conductor must be #18 AWG (0.82 mm2) or larger except— (a) Each power and lighting cable conductor must be #14 AWG (2.10 mm2) or larger; and (b) Each thermocouple, pyrometer, or instrumentation cable conductor must be #22 AWG (0.33 mm2) or larger....

  12. 46 CFR 111.60-4 - Minimum cable conductor size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... conductor must be #18 AWG (0.82 mm2) or larger except— (a) Each power and lighting cable conductor must be #14 AWG (2.10 mm2) or larger; and (b) Each thermocouple, pyrometer, or instrumentation cable conductor must be #22 AWG (0.33 mm2) or larger....

  13. 46 CFR 111.60-4 - Minimum cable conductor size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... conductor must be #18 AWG (0.82 mm2) or larger except— (a) Each power and lighting cable conductor must be #14 AWG (2.10 mm2) or larger; and (b) Each thermocouple, pyrometer, or instrumentation cable conductor must be #22 AWG (0.33 mm2) or larger....

  14. 46 CFR 111.60-4 - Minimum cable conductor size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... conductor must be #18 AWG (0.82 mm2) or larger except— (a) Each power and lighting cable conductor must be #14 AWG (2.10 mm2) or larger; and (b) Each thermocouple, pyrometer, or instrumentation cable conductor must be #22 AWG (0.33 mm2) or larger....

  15. Parameterization of ion channeling half-angles and minimum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2016-03-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates ion channeling half-angles and minimum yields in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different power functions of the arguments. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles, minimum yields, effects on half-angles and minimum yields of amorphous overlayers. The program can calculate these half-angles and minimum yields for axes and [h k l] planes up to (5 5 5). The program is open source and available at

  16. A molecular-sized tunnel-porous crystal with a ratchet gear structure and its one-way guest-molecule transportation property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Keisuke; Yasumoto, Tetsuaki; Manabe, Yousuke; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yamano, Akihito; Katagiri, Toshimasa

    2013-01-01

    An anisotropic tunnel microporous crystal was prepared. Active transportation of anthracene as a guest molecule in the anisotropic tunnels was observed. The direction of anthracene movement implies that the anisotropic tunnel did not work as a flap-check valve. The direction of the movement was consistent with that caused by a Brownian ratchet.An anisotropic tunnel microporous crystal was prepared. Active transportation of anthracene as a guest molecule in the anisotropic tunnels was observed. The direction of anthracene movement implies that the anisotropic tunnel did not work as a flap-check valve. The direction of the movement was consistent with that caused by a Brownian ratchet. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC reference numbers 837539 and 837540. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30880k

  17. Influence of grain size and Nd3+ concentration on the stimulated emission of LiLa1-xNdxP4O12 crystal powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azkargorta, J.; Marciniak, L.; Iparraguirre, I.; Balda, R.; Strek, W.; Barredo-Zuriarrain, M.; García-Revilla, S.; Fernández, J.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and neodymium concentration on the threshold and absolute slope efficiency of the stimulated emission of LiLa1-xNdxP4O12 (x = 0.1, 0.5, and 1) crystalline powders has been investigated by using a pulsed Ti-sapphire pumping. The absolute slope efficiencies are similar for the studied samples with x = 0.5 and 1 whereas the lowest threshold pump energy corresponds to the stoichiometric sample with an average grain size of around 20 μm. The grain size also affects the emitting surface of the random laser due to the reduction of the difussive length as grain size decreases. The experimental results show the importance of seeking the optimal grain size for a given material.

  18. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  19. Crystal growth of drug materials by spherical crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó-Révész, P.; Hasznos-Nezdei, M.; Farkas, B.; Göcző, H.; Pintye-Hódi, K.; Erős, I.

    2002-04-01

    One of the crystal growth processes is the production of crystal agglomerates by spherical crystallization. Agglomerates of drug materials were developed by means of non-typical (magnesium aspartate) and typical (acetylsalicylic acid) spherical crystallization techniques. The growth of particle size and the spherical form of the agglomerates resulted in formation of products with good bulk density, flow, compactibility and cohesivity properties. The crystal agglomerates were developed for direct capsule-filling and tablet-making.

  20. Thermal transport in phononic crystals and the observation of coherent phonon scattering at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Alaie, Seyedhamidreza; Goettler, Drew F; Su, Mehmet; Leseman, Zayd C; Reinke, Charles M; El-Kady, Ihab

    2015-06-24

    Large reductions in the thermal conductivity of thin silicon membranes have been demonstrated in various porous structures. However, the role of coherent boundary scattering in such structures has become a matter of some debate. Here we report on the first experimental observation of coherent phonon boundary scattering at room temperature in 2D phononic crystals formed by the introduction of air holes in a silicon matrix with minimum feature sizes >100 nm. To delaminate incoherent from coherent boundary scattering, phononic crystals with a fixed minimum feature size, differing only in unit cell geometry, were fabricated. A suspended island technique was used to measure the thermal conductivity. We introduce a hybrid thermal conductivity model that accounts for partially coherent and partially incoherent phonon boundary scattering. We observe excellent agreement between this model and experimental data, and the results suggest that significant room temperature coherent phonon boundary scattering occurs.

  1. Minimum length-maximum velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panes, Boris

    2012-03-01

    We study a framework where the hypothesis of a minimum length in space-time is complemented with the notion of reference frame invariance. It turns out natural to interpret the action of the obtained reference frame transformations in the context of doubly special relativity. As a consequence of this formalism we find interesting connections between the minimum length properties and the modified velocity-energy relation for ultra-relativistic particles. For example, we can predict the ratio between the minimum lengths in space and time using the results from OPERA on superluminal neutrinos.

  2. Primary and secondary fragmentation of crystal-bearing intermediate magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Thomas J.; McNamara, Keri; Eychenne, Julia; Rust, Alison C.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Scheu, Bettina; Edwards, Robyn

    2016-11-01

    Crystal-rich intermediate magmas are subjected to both primary and secondary fragmentation processes, each of which may produce texturally distinct tephra. Of particular interest for volcanic hazards is the extent to which each process contributes ash to volcanic plumes. One way to address this question is by fragmenting pyroclasts under controlled conditions. We fragmented pumice samples from Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat, by three methods: rapid decompression in a shock tube-like apparatus, impact by a falling piston, and milling in a ball mill. Grain size distributions of the products reveal that all three mechanisms produce fractal breakage patterns, and that the fractal dimension increases from a minimum of 2.1 for decompression fragmentation (primary fragmentation) to a maximum of 2.7 by repeated impact (secondary fragmentation). To assess the details of the fragmentation process, we quantified the shape, texture and components of constituent ash particles. Ash shape analysis shows that the axial ratio increases during milling and that particle convexity increases with repeated impacts. We also quantify the extent to which the matrix is separated from the crystals, which shows that secondary processes efficiently remove adhering matrix from crystals, particularly during milling (abrasion). Furthermore, measurements of crystal size distributions before (using x-ray computed tomography) and after (by componentry of individual grain size classes) decompression-driven fragmentation show not only that crystals influence particular size fractions across the total grain size distribution, but also that free crystals are smaller in the fragmented material than in the original pumice clast. Taken together, our results confirm previous work showing both the control of initial texture on the primary fragmentation process and the contributions of secondary processes to ash formation. Critically, however, our extension of previous analyses to characterisation

  3. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  4. 2013 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Video Gallery

    After an unusually cold summer in the northernmost latitudes, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual minimum summer extent for 2013 on Sept. 13, the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice ...

  5. Arctic Sea Ice Minimum, 2015

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the evolution of the Arctic sea ice cover from its wintertime maximum extent, which was reached on Feb. 25, 2015, and was the lowest on record, to its apparent yearly minimum, ...

  6. Nucleation and crystal growth in a suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres with bi-modal size distribution studied by time-resolved ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hornfeck, Wolfgang; Menke, Dirk; Forthaus, Martin; Subatzus, Sebastian; Franke, Markus; Schöpe, Hans-Joachim; Palberg, Thomas; Perlich, Jan; Herlach, Dieter

    2014-12-07

    A suspension of charged colloidal silica spheres exhibiting a bi-modal size distribution of particles, thereby mimicking a binary mixture, was studied using time-resolved ultra-small-angle synchrotron X-ray scattering (USAXS). The sample, consisting of particles of diameters d(A) = (104.7 ± 9.0) nm and d(B) = (88.1 ± 7.8) nm (d(A)/d(B) ≈ 1.2), and with an estimated composition A(0.6(1))B(0.4(1)), was studied with respect to its phase behaviour in dependance of particle number density and interaction, of which the latter was modulated by varying amounts of added base (NaOH). Moreover, its short-range order in the fluid state and its eventual solidification into a long-range ordered colloidal crystal were observed in situ, allowing the measurement of the associated kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth. Key parameters of the nucleation kinetics such as crystallinity, crystallite number density, and nucleation rate density were extracted from the time-resolved scattering curves. By this means an estimate on the interfacial energy for the interface between the icosahedral short-range ordered fluid and a body-centered cubic colloidal crystal was obtained, comparable to previously determined values for single-component colloidal systems.

  7. Shaping Crystals using Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacci, Jeremie; Mackiewicz, Kristian

    2016-11-01

    Electrophoresis is size and shape independent as stressed by Morrison in his seminal paper. Here we present an original approach to reshape colloidal crystals using an electric field as a carving tool.

  8. Decrease in thermal conductivity in polymeric P3HT nanowires by size-reduction induced by crystal orientation: new approaches towards thermal transport engineering of organic materials.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Martín, Jaime; Grauby, Stéphane; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Dilhaire, Stefan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2014-07-21

    To date, there is no experimental characterization of thermal conductivity of semiconductor polymeric individual nanowires embedded in a matrix. This work reports on scanning thermal microscopy measurements in a 3ω configuration to determine how the thermal conductivity of individual nanowires made of a model conjugated polymer (P3HT) is modified when decreasing their diameters. We observe a reduction of thermal conductivity, from λNW = 2.29 ± 0.15 W K(-1) m(-1) to λNW = 0.5 ± 0.24 W K(-1) m(-1), when the diameter of nanowires is reduced from 350 nm to 120 nm, which correlates with the polymer crystal orientation measured by WAXS. Through this work, the foundations for future polymer thermal transport engineering are presented.

  9. ACSB: A minimum performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lloyd Thomas; Kissick, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Amplitude companded sideband (ACSB) is a new modulation technique which uses a much smaller channel width than does conventional frequency modulation (FM). Among the requirements of a mobile communications system is adequate speech intelligibility. This paper explores this aspect of minimum required performance. First, the basic principles of ACSB are described, with emphasis on those features that affect speech quality. Second, the appropriate performance measures for ACSB are reviewed. Third, a subjective voice quality scoring method is used to determine the values of the performance measures that equate to the minimum level of intelligibility. It is assumed that the intelligibility of an FM system operating at 12 dB SINAD represents that minimum. It was determined that ACSB operating at 12 dB SINAD with an audio-to-pilot ratio of 10 dB provides approximately the same intelligibility as FM operating at 12 dB SINAD.

  10. The Maunder minimum: a revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, Nadezhda; Ponyavin, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    One of the most enigmatic features of the solar history in the past was the Maunder minimum (1645-1715). We estimated the daily nominal sunspot counts of each observer individually from 1610 to 1720. Simultaneous comparison of textual reports, tables, and sunspot drawings reveals a significant difference between them. Some observers (among whom were Jean Picard and Giovanni Domenico Cassini, both from the Royal Observatory in Paris) systematically made gaps in reports when others noticed sunspots. Philippe de La Hire announced only fewer sunspot groups compared with the other observers. We argue that different points of view of observers of the seventeenth-century on the origin of sunspots resulted in strong underestimation of sunspot groups. Our findings suggest that the Maunder minimum was an ordinary secular minimum with reduced but non-stopped solar cyclicity.

  11. Minimum length from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity.

    PubMed

    Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D H

    2004-11-19

    We derive fundamental limits on measurements of position, arising from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. First, we show that any primitive probe or target used in an experiment must be larger than the Planck length lP. This suggests a Planck-size minimum ball of uncertainty in any measurement. Next, we study interferometers (such as LIGO) whose precision is much finer than the size of any individual components and hence are not obviously limited by the minimum ball. Nevertheless, we deduce a fundamental limit on their accuracy of order lP. Our results imply a device independent limit on possible position measurements.

  12. Mechanical twinning in small quartz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughner, J. W.; Newnham, R. E.; Cross, L. E.

    1982-02-01

    Quartz is known to be ferrobielastic; that is, quartz crystals have domain states (Dauphiné twins) which differ in their elastic compliance values and which can be switched by an appropriately oriented stress. Polycrystalline quartz has also been reported (Tullis 1970) to show preferential orientation of these domains following application of large uniaxial stresses. These experiments were designed to study twinning of synthetic quartz “grains” (minimum size 0.07×0.07×0.02 cm) in specially-constructed composites and of grains in three natural quartz aggregates — a quartzite, a novaculite, and a jasper. Backreflection X-ray techniques were used to verify twinning in the composite grains, while special electroding and electrical detection allowed the twinning processes to be examined in “real time.” Small synthetic quartz crystals were found to behave identically to the massive samples previously studied. Electrical pulses due to the reversal of piezoelectric coefficient d 11 in twinned quartz were detected from quartzite and from the man-made composites. Novaculite also gave electrical pulses which were probably from twinning (evidenced by the correlation of expected and observed pulse sizes and shapes), while no pulses from the jaspers indicative of twinning were detected. Grain size distribution differences are considered the main structural reason for the different behaviors.

  13. Enhancing the Antibacterial Activity of Light-Activated Surfaces Containing Crystal Violet and ZnO Nanoparticles: Investigation of Nanoparticle Size, Capping Ligand, and Dopants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections pose a serious risk for patients, staff, and visitors and are a severe burden on the National Health Service, costing at least £1 billion annually. Antimicrobial surfaces significantly contribute toward reducing the incidence of infections as they prevent bacterial adhesion and cause bacterial cell death. Using a simple, easily upscalable swell–encapsulation–shrink method, novel antimicrobial surfaces have been developed by incorporating metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) and crystal violet (CV) dye into medical-grade polyurethane sheets. This study compares the bactericidal effects of polyurethane incorporating ZnO, Mg-doped ZnO, and MgO. All metal oxide NPs are well defined, with average diameters ranging from 2 to 18 nm. These materials demonstrate potent bactericidal activity when tested against clinically relevant bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Additionally, these composites are tested against an epidemic strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that is rife in hospitals throughout the UK. Furthermore, we have tested these materials using a low light intensity (∼500 lx), similar to that present in many clinical environments. The highest activity is achieved from polymer composites incorporating CV and ∼3 nm ZnO NPs, and the different performances of the metal oxides have been discussed. PMID:27840856

  14. Analysis of Crystallization Kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model for polymorphic crystallization (i.e., initial and final phases with identical compositions), which includes time-dependent nucleation and cluster-size-dependent growth rates, is developed and tested by fits to experimental data. Model calculations are used to assess the validity of two of the more common approaches for the analysis of crystallization data. The effects of particle size on transformation kinetics, important for the crystallization of many systems of limited dimension including thin films, fine powders, and nanoparticles, are examined.

  15. 75 FR 6151 - Minimum Capital

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... comment on a proposed rule to effect a provision of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and..., for rescinding such an increase and a time frame for review of such an increase. DATES: Comments on... effect the higher temporary minimum capital level, the Director must issue regulations setting...

  16. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school…

  17. General Requirements and Minimum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This publication provides the General Requirements and Minimum Standards developed by the National Court Reporters Association's Council on Approved Student Education (CASE). They are the same for all court reporter education programs, whether an institution is applying for approval for the first time or for a new grant of approval. The first…

  18. Ice crystal c-axis orientation and mean grain size measurements from the Dome Summit South ice core, Law Dome, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treverrow, Adam; Jun, Li; Jacka, Tim H.

    2016-06-01

    We present measurements of crystal c-axis orientations and mean grain area from the Dome Summit South (DSS) ice core drilled on Law Dome, East Antarctica. All measurements were made on location at the borehole site during drilling operations. The data are from 185 individual thin sections obtained between a depth of 117 m below the surface and the bottom of the DSS core at a depth of 1196 m. The median number of c-axis orientations recorded in each thin section was 100, with values ranging from 5 through to 111 orientations. The data from all 185 thin sections are provided in a single comma-separated value (csv) formatted file which contains the c-axis orientations in polar coordinates, depth information for each core section from which the data were obtained, the mean grain area calculated for each thin section and other data related to the drilling site. The data set is also available as a MATLAB™ structure array. Additionally, the c-axis orientation data from each of the 185 thin sections are summarized graphically in figures containing a Schmidt diagram, histogram of c-axis colatitudes and rose plot of c-axis azimuths. All these data are referenced by doi:10.4225/15/5669050CC1B3B and are available free of charge at https://data.antarctica.gov.au.<

  19. 50 CFR 622.436 - Size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (b) Parrotfishes. The minimum size limit for parrotfishes, except for redband parrotfish, in the St... length. See § 622.434(c) for the current prohibition on the harvest and possession of midnight parrotfish, blue parrotfish, or rainbow parrotfish. (c) Redband parrotfish. The minimum size limit for red...

  20. 50 CFR 622.436 - Size limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... (b) Parrotfishes. The minimum size limit for parrotfishes, except for redband parrotfish, in the St... length. See § 622.434(c) for the current prohibition on the harvest and possession of midnight parrotfish, blue parrotfish, or rainbow parrotfish. (c) Redband parrotfish. The minimum size limit for red...

  1. Crystallization Response of Hydrous Granitic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, D.; Morgan, G. B.; Evensen, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    Preconditioning of hydrous haplogranite liquid (200 MPa eutectic composition Ab38Or28Qz34) at 100° C above the liquidus temperature for 72 hr is sufficient to eliminate any vestiges of the initial structural states of vitreous or crystalline starting materials. Experimental crystallization of this composition in the presence of aqueous vapor begins by nucleation in the vapor space, following which crystal growth advances into supercooled melt. The minimum in nucleation delay (~ 200 hrs) and maximum in nucleation density and growth rate occur at liquidus undercooling (ΔT) of 200° C. Crystallization does not exceed 10% in experiments up to 600 hrs at any value of ΔT, and no crystallization occurs within 50° C of the liquidus up to 700 hrs. Though the melt composition is invariant (eutectic), and no compositional gradients are discernable by EMPA in quenched glasses, the crystallization response is sequential: at ΔT = 200° C, coarsely skeletal K-feldspar nucleates and grows first, followed by graphic to spherulitic quartz-sodic alkali feldspar intergrowths, and lastly in some experiments, monophase quartz blebs. Once formed, crystals or clusters tend not to grow larger, but rather, new centers of nucleation and growth appear. The result is a sequential history of uniform crystal texture (size and habit). At comparable ΔT, the nucleation delay decreases as the bulk composition is displaced (by choosing a composition) farther from the eutectic. At comparable ΔT, fluxes (P, F) serve to increase the nucleation delay and decrease the nucleation density but do not notably change either growth rates or crystal habits. Diffusion of alkalis through melt is rapid, such that any gradients in alkalis that should result from non-eutectic crystallization are erased in minutes or hours over distances of 5 mm and down to ΔT = 350° C, in the field of glass. These relations of undercooling (ΔT) to time (t) apply only to H2O-oversaturated systems. We do not have data for the

  2. Solar Effects on Climate and the Maunder Minimum: Minimum Certainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    2003-01-01

    The current state of our understanding of solar effects on climate is reviewed. As an example of the relevant issues, the climate during the Maunder Minimum is compared with current conditions in GCM simulations that include a full stratosphere and parameterized ozone response to solar spectral irradiance variability and trace gas changes. The GISS Global Climate/Middle Atmosphere Model coupled to a q-flux/mixed layer model is used for the simulations, which begin in 1500 and extend to the present. Experiments were made to investigate the effect of total versus spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes; spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes on the stratospheric ozone/climate response with both pre-industrial and present trace gases; and the impact on climate and stratospheric ozone of the preindustrial trace gases and aerosols by themselves. The results showed that: (1) the Maunder Minimum cooling relative to today was primarily associated with reduced anthropogenic radiative forcing, although the solar reduction added 40% to the overall cooling. There is no obvious distinguishing surface climate pattern between the two forcings. (2)The global and tropical response was greater than 1 C, in a model with a sensitivity of 1.2 C per W m-2. To reproduce recent low-end estimates would require a sensitivity 1/4 as large. (3) The global surface temperature change was similar when using the total and spectral irradiance prescriptions, although the tropical response was somewhat greater with the former, and the stratospheric response greater with the latter. (4) Most experiments produce a relative negative phase of the NAO/AO during the Maunder Minimum, with both solar and anthropogenic forcing equally capable, associated with the tropical cooling and relative poleward EP flux refraction. (5) A full stratosphere appeared to be necessary for the negative AO/NAO phase, as was the case with this model for global warming experiments, unless the cooling was very large

  3. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  4. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  5. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  6. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  7. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  8. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  9. A Few Good Crystals Please

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.

    1999-01-01

    Part of the challenge of macromolecular crystal growth for structure determination is obtaining an appropriate number of crystals with a crystal volume suitable for X-ray analysis. In this respect an understanding of the effect of solution conditions on macromolecule nucleation rates is advantageous. This study investigated the effects of solution conditions on the nucleation rate and final crystal size of two crystal systems; tetragonal lysozyme and glucose isomerase. Batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentration and incubated at set temperatures over one week. The number of crystals per well with their size and axial ratios were recorded and correlated with solution conditions. Duplicate experiments indicate the reproducibility of the technique. Results for each system showing the effect of supersaturation, incubation temperature and solution pH on nucleation rates will be presented and discussed. In the case of lysozyme, having optimized solution conditions to produce an appropriate number of crystals of a suitable size, a batch of crystals were prepared under exactly the same conditions. Fifty of these crystals were analyzed by x-ray techniques. The results indicate that even under the same crystallization conditions, a marked variation in crystal properties exists.

  10. Maximum Likelihood and Minimum Distance Applied to Univariate Mixture Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yuh-Yin Wu; Schafer, William D.

    This Monte-Carlo study compared modified Newton (NW), expectation-maximization algorithm (EM), and minimum Cramer-von Mises distance (MD), used to estimate parameters of univariate mixtures of two components. Data sets were fixed at size 160 and manipulated by mean separation, variance ratio, component proportion, and non-normality. Results…

  11. Minimum-Impact Camping in the Front Woods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Curt

    1994-01-01

    Minimum-impact camping techniques that can be applied to resident camp programs include controlling group size and behavior, designing camp sites, moving groups frequently, proper use of fires, proper disposal of food and human wastes, use of biodegradable soaps, and encouraging staff and camper awareness of impacts on the environment. (LP)

  12. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Chart / Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  13. Law of the Minimum paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I; Smirnova, Elena V; Tyukina, Tatiana A

    2011-09-01

    The "Law of the Minimum" states that growth is controlled by the scarcest resource (limiting factor). This concept was originally applied to plant or crop growth (Justus von Liebig, 1840, Salisbury, Plant physiology, 4th edn., Wadsworth, Belmont, 1992) and quantitatively supported by many experiments. Some generalizations based on more complicated "dose-response" curves were proposed. Violations of this law in natural and experimental ecosystems were also reported. We study models of adaptation in ensembles of similar organisms under load of environmental factors and prove that violation of Liebig's law follows from adaptation effects. If the fitness of an organism in a fixed environment satisfies the Law of the Minimum then adaptation equalizes the pressure of essential factors and, therefore, acts against the Liebig's law. This is the the Law of the Minimum paradox: if for a randomly chosen pair "organism-environment" the Law of the Minimum typically holds, then in a well-adapted system, we have to expect violations of this law.For the opposite interaction of factors (a synergistic system of factors which amplify each other), adaptation leads from factor equivalence to limitations by a smaller number of factors.For analysis of adaptation, we develop a system of models based on Selye's idea of the universal adaptation resource (adaptation energy). These models predict that under the load of an environmental factor a population separates into two groups (phases): a less correlated, well adapted group and a highly correlated group with a larger variance of attributes, which experiences problems with adaptation. Some empirical data are presented and evidences of interdisciplinary applications to econometrics are discussed.

  14. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  15. Thermal characterization of nanoscale phononic crystals using supercell lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Bruce L.; Hussein, Mahmoud I.

    2011-12-01

    The concept of a phononic crystal can in principle be realized at the nanoscale whenever the conditions for coherent phonon transport exist. Under such conditions, the dispersion characteristics of both the constitutive material lattice (defined by a primitive cell) and the phononic crystal lattice (defined by a supercell) contribute to the value of the thermal conductivity. It is therefore necessary in this emerging class of phononic materials to treat the lattice dynamics at both periodicity levels. Here we demonstrate the utility of using supercell lattice dynamics to investigate the thermal transport behavior of three-dimensional nanoscale phononic crystals formed from silicon and cubic voids of vacuum. The periodicity of the voids follows a simple cubic arrangement with a lattice constant that is around an order of magnitude larger than that of the bulk crystalline silicon primitive cell. We consider an atomic-scale supercell which incorporates all the details of the silicon atomic locations and the void geometry. For this supercell, we compute the phonon band structure and subsequently predict the thermal conductivity following the Callaway-Holland model. Our findings dictate that for an analysis based on supercell lattice dynamics to be representative of the properties of the underlying lattice model, a minimum supercell size is needed along with a minimum wave vector sampling resolution. Below these minimum values, a thermal conductivity prediction of a bulk material based on a supercell will not adequately recover the value obtained based on a primitive cell. Furthermore, our results show that for the relatively small voids and void spacings we consider (where boundary scattering is dominant), dispersion at the phononic crystal unit cell level plays a noticeable role in determining the thermal conductivity.

  16. Antibody and antigen contact residues define epitope and paratope size and structure.

    PubMed

    Stave, James W; Lindpaintner, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    A total of 111 Ag-Ab x-ray crystal structures of large protein Ag epitopes and paratopes were analyzed to inform the process of eliciting or selecting functional and therapeutic Abs. These analyses illustrate that Ab contact residues (CR) are distributed in three prominent CR regions (CRR) on L and H chains that overlap but do not coincide with Ab CDR. The number of Ag and Ab CRs per structure are overlapping and centered around 18 and 19, respectively. The CR span (CRS), a novel measure introduced in this article, is defined as the minimum contiguous amino acid sequence containing all CRs of an Ag or Ab and represents the size of a complete structural epitope or paratope, inclusive of CR and the minimum set of supporting residues required for proper conformation. The most frequent size of epitope CRS is 50-79 aa, which is similar in size to L (60-69) and H chain (70-79) CRS. The size distribution of epitope CRS analyzed in this study ranges from ~20 to 400 aa, similar to the distribution of independent protein domain sizes reported in the literature. Together, the number of CRs and the size of the CRS demonstrate that, on average, complete structural epitopes and paratopes are equal in size to each other and similar in size to intact protein domains. Thus, independent protein domains inclusive of biologically relevant sites represent the fundamental structural unit bound by, and useful for eliciting or selecting, functional and therapeutic Abs.

  17. On the Importance of Cycle Minimum in Sunspot Cycle Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of the minima between sunspot cycles are found to provide important information for predicting the amplitude and timing of the following cycle. For example, the time of the occurrence of sunspot minimum sets the length of the previous cycle, which is correlated by the amplitude-period effect to the amplitude of the next cycle, with cycles of shorter (longer) than average length usually being followed by cycles of larger (smaller) than average size (true for 16 of 21 sunspot cycles). Likewise, the size of the minimum at cycle onset is correlated with the size of the cycle's maximum amplitude, with cycles of larger (smaller) than average size minima usually being associated with larger (smaller) than average size maxima (true for 16 of 22 sunspot cycles). Also, it was found that the size of the previous cycle's minimum and maximum relates to the size of the following cycle's minimum and maximum with an even-odd cycle number dependency. The latter effect suggests that cycle 23 will have a minimum and maximum amplitude probably larger than average in size (in particular, minimum smoothed sunspot number Rm = 12.3 +/- 7.5 and maximum smoothed sunspot number RM = 198.8 +/- 36.5, at the 95-percent level of confidence), further suggesting (by the Waldmeier effect) that it will have a faster than average rise to maximum (fast-rising cycles have ascent durations of about 41 +/- 7 months). Thus, if, as expected, onset for cycle 23 will be December 1996 +/- 3 months, based on smoothed sunspot number, then the length of cycle 22 will be about 123 +/- 3 months, inferring that it is a short-period cycle and that cycle 23 maximum amplitude probably will be larger than average in size (from the amplitude-period effect), having an RM of about 133 +/- 39 (based on the usual +/- 30 percent spread that has been seen between observed and predicted values), with maximum amplitude occurrence likely sometime between July 1999 and October 2000.

  18. Crystal growth and morphology of the nano-sized hydroxyapatite powders synthesized from CaHPO 4·2H 2O and CaCO 3 by hydrolysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wei-Jen; Chen, Yung-Feng; Wang, Moo-Chin; Hon, Min-Hsiung

    2004-09-01

    The crystal growth and morphology of the nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HA) powders synthesized from dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O, DCPD) and CaCO3 have been investigated. The nano-sized HA powders were obtained using the hydrolysis of DCPD and CaCO3 with 2.5 M NaOH(aq) at 75°C for 1 h. The only product synthesized from DCPD is HA, and the crystallinity of the HA is improved with increasing annealing temperature. The XRD results show that when heated at 600°C for 4 h, the mixture of the HA and CaO is obtained with CaCO3 addition, having the Ca/P ratio of 1.67. However, when the mixture is heated at 800°C for 4 h, besides the HA and CaO, the NaCaPO4 phase also shows up.

  19. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Other Parents Stories of Hope Crystal meth Crystal meth Story of Hope by giovanni January 3, ... about my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting ...

  20. Crystal Meth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Home / Stories of Hope / Crystal meth Crystal meth Story Of Hope By giovanni January 3rd, 2013 ... my drug addiction having to deal with Crystal meth. I am now in recovery and fighting my ...

  1. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  2. The dependence of the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals on orientation average, particle shape, and wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, J.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Current methods of representing the bulk scattering properties of cirrus for numerical models and satellite retrieval algorithms require weighting the single-scattering properties of specific shapes and sizes of ice crystals by their observed concentrations. Thus, to determine the influence of cirrus on solar and infrared radiation, as required for climate studies, knowledge of the single-scattering properties of ice crystals is required. Except for a few large ice crystals, most ice crystals do not have preferred orientations. Thus, the corresponding single-scattering properties of ice crystals used for numerical models and remote sensing retrievals are typically calculated assuming random orientations. The Euler's angle, selected using a random number generator, has been exclusively used to determine crystals' orientation for such calculations. When more orientations are used to determine the mean scattering properties, the scattering properties are determined with higher accuracy. However, computational resources limit the number of orientations that can be used in these calculations. Past studies used several efficient orientation-averaging schemes (e.g., quasi-Monte-Carlo and optimal cubature on the sphere) for calculating light scattering properties. These studies mainly focused on small sizes and considered relatively simple shapes, such as spheres and sphere aggregates. Atmospheric ice crystals are non-spherical and their sizes are much larger than those studied previously. In this study, the minimum numbers of orientations needed to determine the single-scattering properties of four different realistically shaped atmospheric ice crystals (i.e., column, droxtal, Gaussian random sphere, and budding Bucky ball) with predefined accuracy levels are determined using the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA) ver. 1.0. The results of the calculations are also used to quantify how the scattering and absorption efficiency, the single-scattering albedo

  3. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure.

  4. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  5. Resistance minimum and heavy fermions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kondo

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of the resistance minimum in dilute magnetic alloys is explained in terms of the s-d interaction which takes account of scattering of the conduction electron off the magnetic impurities in metals. Some of the intermetallic compounds which involve rare earth elements or uranium show a very large electronic specific heat and remain non-magnetic even though they show a Curie-like susceptibility at higher temperatures. These phenomena are also explained based on the s-d interaction model. PMID:25792794

  6. Ceramic veneers with minimum preparation

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Reis, Rachelle; Santana, Lino; Romanini, Jose Carlos; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the possibility of improving dental esthetics with low-thickness glass ceramics without major tooth preparation for patients with small to moderate anterior dental wear and little discoloration. For this purpose, a carefully defined treatment planning and a good communication between the clinician and the dental technician helped to maximize enamel preservation, and offered a good treatment option. Moreover, besides restoring esthetics, the restorative treatment also improved the function of the anterior guidance. It can be concluded that the conservative use of minimum thickness ceramic laminate veneers may provide satisfactory esthetic outcomes while preserving the dental structure. PMID:24932126

  7. 7 CFR 51.3413 - Size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes for Processing 1 § 51.3413 Size. (a) The minimum size, maximum size or... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Size. 51.3413 Section 51.3413 Agriculture...

  8. 7 CFR 51.3413 - Size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes for Processing 1 § 51.3413 Size. (a) The minimum size, maximum size or... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Size. 51.3413 Section 51.3413 Agriculture...

  9. 7 CFR 51.3413 - Size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes for Processing 1 § 51.3413 Size. (a) The minimum size, maximum size or... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Size. 51.3413 Section 51.3413 Agriculture...

  10. Magma Pulsing and Internal Structure of the Torres del Paine Laccolith (Patagonia) Constrained by High Precision Zircon U-Pb Dating, and Thermal and Crystal Size Modeling of its Contact Aureole.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, L. P.; Bodner, R.; Leuthold, J.; Muntener, O.; Putlitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The shallow Torres del Paine Intrusive Complex (TPIC) belongs to a trench-parallel belt of igneous bodies in Southern Chile and Argentina. It is located in a transitional position between the Patagonia Batholith in the West, and the alkaline Cenozoic plateau lavas in the East. Volumetrically small amounts of magmatism started around 28 my ago in the Torres del Paine area. A second period occurred between 17-16 Ma, and igneous activity peaked with the TPIC 12.59-12.43 Ma ago. Finally, very minor magmatism occurred less than a million year ago. Intrusion depth, estimated based on contact metamorphic assemblages, decreased from ca. 10-12km at 17 Ma to ca. 3km at 12.5 Ma, the latter depth corresponding well with hornblende thermobarometry in mafic rocks and the water saturated granite solidus compositions observed. The TPIC is composed of a granitic laccolith emplaced over 90ka (1) in 3 several 100m thick sheets, forming an overall thickness of nearly 2 km. The granitic laccolith is under-plated by a ca. 400m thick mafic laccolith, built up over 50ka (2), constructed bottom up. Each sheet is itself composed of a multitude (>10) of metric to decametric pulses with mostly ductile contacts, resulting in outcrop patterns resembling braided stream sediments. Thermal modeling of the contact metamorphism, including heat of crystallization and the enthalpy of metamorphic reactions constrains the granite intrusion temperature to ca. 1000°C. Peak metamorphic temperatures suggest that intrusion of magma had to occur in a rapid succession of pulses, preferentially along the granite-host rock contact. Enthalpy released due to hydration of the biotite and feldspar of the immature sediments in the outer aureole contributed significantly to the far-field temperatures in the host-rock. Numerical crystal growth models matching the crystal size distribution indicate significant overstepping during onset of the contact metamorphic reactions. Nevertheless, sharp isogrades are predicted by

  11. Centrosymmetry vs noncentrosymmetry in La2Ga0.33SbS5 and Ce4GaSbS9 based on the interesting size effects of lanthanides: Syntheses, crystal structures, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Two new quaternary sulfides La2Ga0.33SbS5 and Ce4GaSbS9 have been prepared from stoichiometric elements at 1223 K in an evacuated silica tube. Interestingly, La2Ga0.33SbS5 crystallizes in the centrosymmetric structure, while Ce4GaSbS9 crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric structure, which show obvious size effects of lanthanides on the crystal structures of these two compounds. Ce4GaSbS9 belongs to RE4GaSbS9 (RE=Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd-Ho) structure type with a=13.8834(9) Å, b=14.3004(11) Å, c=14.4102(13) Å, V=2861.0(4) Å3. The structure features infinite chains of [Ga2Sb2S1110-]∞ propagating along a direction separated by Ce3+ cations and S2- anions. La2Ga0.33SbS5 adopts the family of La4FeSb2S10-related structure with a=7.5193(6) Å, c=13.4126(17) Å, V=758.35(13) Å3. Its structure is built up from the alternate stacking of La/Sb/S and La/Ga/S 2D building blocks. The La/Sb/S slabs consist of teeter-totter chains of Sb1S4 seesaws, which are connected via sharing the apexes of μ4-S1. Moreover, La1 is positionally disordered with Sb1 and stabilized in a bicapped trigonal prismatic coordination sphere. Between these La/Sb/S slabs, La2S8 square antiprisms are connected via edge-sharing into 2D building blocks, creating tetrahedral sites partially occupied by the Ga1 atoms. UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy study shows that the optical gap of La2Ga0.33SbS5 is about 1.76 eV.

  12. A GPU algorithm for minimum vertex cover problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toume, Kouta; Kinjo, Daiki; Nakamura, Morikazu

    2014-10-01

    The minimum vertex cover problem is one of the fundamental problems in graph theory and is known to be NP-hard. For data mining in large-scale structured systems, we proposes a GPU algorithm for the minimum vertex cover problem. The algorithm is designed to derive sufficient parallelism of the problem for the GPU architecture and also to arrange data on the device memory for efficient coalesced accessing. Through the experimental evaluation, we demonstrate that our GPU algorithm is quite faster than CPU programs and the speedup becomes much evident when the graph size is enlarged.

  13. Bioengineered magnetic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, O.; Sarua, A.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we report on the successful application of a protein crystallization technique to fabricate a three-dimensionally ordered array of magnetic nanoparticles, i.e. a novel type of metamaterial with unique magnetic properties. We utilize ferritin protein cages for the template-constrained growth of superparamagnetic nanoparticles of magnetite/maghemite Fe3O4-γ-Fe2O3 (magnetoferritin), followed by thorough nanoparticle bioprocessing and purification, and finally by protein crystallization. Protein crystallization is driven by the natural response of proteins to the supersaturation of the electrolyte, which leads to spontaneous nucleation and 3D crystal growth. Within a short period of time (hours to days) we were able to grow functional crystals on the meso-scale, with sizes of the order of tens, up to a few hundred micrometres. We present initial magnetic and Raman spectroscopy characterization results for the obtained 3D arrays of magnetic nanoparticles.

  14. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  15. Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Bellamy, Henry D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many ways of judging a good crystal. Which we use depends on the qualities we seek. For gemstones size, clarity and impurity levels (color) are paramount. For the semiconductor industry purity is probably the most important quality. For the structural crystallographer the primary desideratum is the somewhat more subtle concept of internal order. In this chapter we discuss the effect of internal order (or the lack of it) on the crystal's diffraction properties.

  16. Minimum cut and shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Cramer, Andrew; Walker, David M.

    2013-06-01

    We explore the efficacy of network optimisation theory for minimum cut to quantify the evolution of granular fabric and its functionality as a transmission medium in deforming dense granular media. Our focus here is on force transmission in a sheared assembly of polydisperse particles, in a biaxial compression test under constant confining pressure. The granular fabric is examined with respect to the material's force-bearing contact network over that regime when the material has reached its residual strength, and is deforming under a near constant volume in the presence of a fully developed shear band. The structural evolution of the fabric is quantitatively characterized using a representative weighted-directed network that is similarly evolving as the sample deforms. The edges or links, representing the interparticle contacts, are each weighted by the capacity of the contact to transmit force: a scalar that depends solely on the relative motion of the contacting grains. In the large strain failure regime, the minimum cut which represents the bottleneck in force transmission is found to lie in the persistent shear band. This study paves the way for the future analysis of flows and force transmission through an evolving contact network and, in turn, the characterisation of the relationship between the material's contact topology and its capacity to transmit forces through its contact network.

  17. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    SciTech Connect

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun; Odagaki, Takashi

    2014-06-28

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function.

  18. Solid phase stability of a double-minimum interaction potential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Ayumi; Yoshimori, Akira; Saiki, Masafumi; Matsui, Jun; Odagaki, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    We study phase stability of a system with double-minimum interaction potential in a wide range of parameters by a thermodynamic perturbation theory. The present double-minimum potential is the Lennard-Jones-Gauss potential, which has a Gaussian pocket as well as a standard Lennard-Jones minimum. As a function of the depth and position of the Gaussian pocket in the potential, we determine the coexistence pressure of crystals (fcc and bcc). We show that the fcc crystallizes even at zero pressure when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the first or third nearest neighbor site of the fcc crystal. The bcc crystal is more stable than the fcc crystal when the position of the Gaussian pocket is coincident with the second nearest neighbor sites of the bcc crystal. The stable crystal structure is determined by the position of the Gaussian pocket. These results show that we can control the stability of the solid phase by tuning the potential function.

  19. Protein Crystals Grown in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A collage of protein and virus crystals, many of which were grown on the U.S. Space Shuttle or Russian Space Station, Mir. The crystals include the proteins canavalin; mouse monoclonal antibody; a sweet protein, thaumatin; and a fungal protease. Viruses are represented here by crystals of turnip yellow mosaic virus and satellite tobacco mosaic virus. The crystals are photographed under polarized light (thus causing the colors) and range in size from a few hundred microns in edge length up to more than a millimeter. All the crystals are grown from aqueous solutions and are useful for X-ray diffraction analysis. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  20. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  1. The minimum mantle viscosity of an accreting earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooperman, S. A.

    1983-01-01

    The minimum mantle viscosity in an earth accreting from planetesimals is estimated. A plausible distribution of planetesimal sizes deposits enough energy to melt the outer nine-tenths of earth's mass; however, vigorous convection keeps temperatures near the solidus. Viscosity is significantly lower than prevails now. The temperature-dependent viscosity provides self-regulation so there is a continuing balance between accretional energy input and heat transfer out. This allows calculation of the minimum viscosity necessary to transfer out heat by a Nu/Ra-number relation. Typical viscosities are 0.1 to a million sq m/sec, lowest at mid-accretion when the mass growth rate is largest. Terrestrial planets are compared, and minimum iron descent times to central lithospheres are calculated.

  2. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  3. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  4. 78 FR 63873 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 543 RIN 3141-AA27 Minimum Internal Control Standards AGENCY... Commission (NIGC) amends its minimum internal control standards for Class II gaming under the Indian Gaming... NIGC published a final rule in the Federal Register called Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64...

  5. Minimum Competency Testing and the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    This brief overview of minimum competency testing and disabled high school students discusses: the inclusion or exclusion of handicapped students in minimum competency testing programs; approaches to accommodating the individual needs of handicapped students; and legal issues. Surveys of states that have mandated minimum competency tests indicate…

  6. 30 CFR 202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.53 Section 202.53 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide for minimum...

  7. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  8. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  9. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum bid....

  10. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  11. 7 CFR 4280.136 - Minimum retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum retention. 4280.136 Section 4280.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Efficiency Improvements Program Section B. Guaranteed Loans § 4280.136 Minimum retention. Minimum...

  12. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  13. Scanning electron microscope view of iron crystal growing on pyroxene crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope photograph of a four-micron size iron crystal growing on a pyroxene crystal (calcium-magnesium-iron silicate) from the Apollo 15 Hadley-Apennino lunar landing site. The well developed crystal faces indicate that the crystal was formed from a hot vapor as the rock was cooling.

  14. Minimum distance classification in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of minimum distance classification methods in remote sensing problems, such as crop species identification, is considered. Literature concerning both minimum distance classification problems and distance measures is reviewed. Experimental results are presented for several examples. The objective of these examples is to: (a) compare the sample classification accuracy of a minimum distance classifier, with the vector classification accuracy of a maximum likelihood classifier, and (b) compare the accuracy of a parametric minimum distance classifier with that of a nonparametric one. Results show the minimum distance classifier performance is 5% to 10% better than that of the maximum likelihood classifier. The nonparametric classifier is only slightly better than the parametric version.

  15. Comment on "Zircon thermometer reveals minimum melting conditions on earliest Earth" II.

    PubMed

    Nutman, Allen P

    2006-02-10

    Watson and Harrison (Reports, 6 May 2005, p. 841) interpreted low temperatures (approximately 700 degrees C) for Hadean zircons as evidence of the existence of wet, minimum-melting conditions within 200 million years of solar system formation. However, high-temperature melts (approximately 900 degrees C) are zircon-undersaturated and crystallize zircon only after substantial temperature drop during fractional crystallization. Zircon thermometry cannot distinguish between low- and high-temperature Hadean igneous sources.

  16. Crystal growth and annealing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Sparrow, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a secondary heater incorporated into a conventional crystal growth and annealing apparatus. The secondary heater supplies heat to minimize the temperature gradients in the crystal during the annealing process. The secondary heater can mount near the bottom of the crucible to effectively maintain appropriate temperature gradients.

  17. Growth Habits and Growth Rates of Snow Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. J.

    1993-04-01

    Equations are derived for the growth rates of snow crystals as they fall through the atmosphere in terms of the air temperature, supersaturation and their terminal velocities. The predicted maximum attainable diameters of regular hexagonal plates (0.84 mm), sector plates (ca. 2 mm) and stellar dendrites (3.5 mm) are in good agreement with observations based on Nakaya's large collection of snow crystal photographs. Mason et al. (Phil. Mag. 8, 505 (1963)) determined experimentally the average migration distance xB for water molecules diffusing across the basal surface of ice crystals as a function of temperature. These measurements of xB have now been supplemented by calculations of the corresponding quantity xp for the prism faces from measurements of the limiting c/a ratios of small growing crystals whose shape is largely determined by the values of both xp and xB.A theoretical treatment for the onset of dendritic growth leads to the result that a stationary thin regular hexagonal plate starts to sprout at the corners when its diameter dc exceeds 1.6 × 105 xp2/Dv, where Dv is the diffusion coefficient of water vapour in air. Plates grow in the temperature range -8 degrees C to -23 degrees C, for which dc ranges from 50 μ m at -15 degrees C to 670 μ m at -8 degrees C. For falling ventilated plates the corresponding values of dc are rather larger at 50 μ m and 940 μ m respectively, because the vapour concentration gradients around the crystal are enhanced. These latter values agree respectively with the observed minimum sizes of thin plates found at the centres of stellar dendritic crystals, and with the observed maximum size of regular plates. The observed maximum diameter (1.2 mm) of sector plates at the centre of dendritic crystals agrees well with calculations based on the assumption that these originate at about the -20 degrees C level and develop into dendrites only after falling below the -16 degrees C level. A mechanism, based on the interplay between

  18. Virtual Crystallizer

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T A; Dylla-Spears, R; Thorsness, C B

    2006-08-29

    Large dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are grown in large crystallizers to provide raw material for the manufacture of optical components for large laser systems. It is a challenge to grow crystal with sufficient mass and geometric properties to allow large optical plates to be cut from them. In addition, KDP has long been the canonical solution crystal for study of growth processes. To assist in the production of the crystals and the understanding of crystal growth phenomena, analysis of growth habits of large KDP crystals has been studied, small scale kinetic experiments have been performed, mass transfer rates in model systems have been measured, and computational-fluid-mechanics tools have been used to develop an engineering model of the crystal growth process. The model has been tested by looking at its ability to simulate the growth of nine KDP boules that all weighed more than 200 kg.

  19. Minimum cost criteria for SPS transportation to GEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelle, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The application of cost optimization to vehicle design is discussed relative to establishing ground rules for a minimum cost heavy cargo launch vehicle to transport the Satellite Power System to geosynchronous orbit. Criteria defined include: fully reusable; unmanned; technical simplicity; and operations simplicity. Graphs are presented depicting (1) the launch vehicle concept schematic, (2) the cost comparison, (3) the launch vehicle sizing, and (4) the specific transportation cost.

  20. Refinement of thermal imager minimum resolvable temperature difference calculating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Mykytenko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Calculating methods, which accurately predict minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD), are of significant interest for many years. The article deals with improvement the accuracy of determining the thermal imaging system MRTD by elaboration the visual perception model. We suggest MRTD calculating algorithm, which is based on a reliable approximation of the human visual system modulation transfer function (MTF) proposed by N. Nill. There was obtained a new expression for the bandwidth evaluation, which is independent of angular size of the Foucault bar target.

  1. 7 CFR 51.2113 - Size requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of range in count of whole almond kernels per ounce or in terms of minimum, or minimum and maximum diameter. When a range in count is specified, the whole kernels shall be fairly uniform in size, and the average count per ounce shall be within the range specified. Doubles and broken kernels shall not be...

  2. Exploratory Factor Analysis with Small Sample Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, J. C. F.; Dodou, D.; Wieringa, P. A.

    2009-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is generally regarded as a technique for large sample sizes ("N"), with N = 50 as a reasonable absolute minimum. This study offers a comprehensive overview of the conditions in which EFA can yield good quality results for "N" below 50. Simulations were carried out to estimate the minimum required "N" for different…

  3. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  4. Confined crystals of the smallest phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Giusca, Cristina E; Stolojan, Vlad; Sloan, Jeremy; Börrnert, Felix; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Sader, Kasim; Rümmeli, Mark H; Büchner, Bernd; Silva, S Ravi P

    2013-09-11

    The demand for high-density memory in tandem with limitations imposed by the minimum feature size of current storage devices has created a need for new materials that can store information in smaller volumes than currently possible. Successfully employed in commercial optical data storage products, phase-change materials, that can reversibly and rapidly change from an amorphous phase to a crystalline phase when subject to heating or cooling have been identified for the development of the next generation electronic memories. There are limitations to the miniaturization of these devices due to current synthesis and theoretical considerations that place a lower limit of 2 nm on the minimum bit size, below which the material does not transform in the structural phase. We show here that by using carbon nanotubes of less than 2 nm diameter as templates phase-change nanowires confined to their smallest conceivable scale are obtained. Contrary to previous experimental evidence and theoretical expectations, the nanowires are found to crystallize at this scale and display amorphous-to-crystalline phase changes, fulfilling an important prerequisite of a memory element. We show evidence for the smallest phase-change material, extending thus the size limit to explore phase-change memory devices at extreme scales.

  5. Structure, microstructure, and size dependent catalytic properties of nanostructured ruthenium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Dallas, Jean-Pierre; Villain, Sylvie; Kopia, Agnieszka; Gavarri, Jean-Raymond

    2008-05-15

    Nanostructured powders of ruthenium dioxide RuO{sub 2} were synthesized via a sol gel route involving acidic solutions with pH varying between 0.4 and 4.5. The RuO{sub 2} nanopowders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Rietveld refinement of mean crystal structure was performed on RuO{sub 2} nanopowders and crystallized standard RuO{sub 2} sample. Crystallite sizes measured from X-ray diffraction profiles and TEM analysis varied in the range of 4-10 nm, with a minimum of crystallite dimension for pH=1.5. A good agreement between crystallite sizes calculated from Williamson Hall approach of X-ray data and from direct TEM observations was obtained. The tetragonal crystal cell parameter (a) and cell volumes of nanostructured samples were characterized by values greater than the values of standard RuO{sub 2} sample. In addition, the [Ru-O{sub 6}] oxygen octahedrons of rutile structure also depended on crystal size. Catalytic conversion of methane by these RuO{sub 2} nanostructured catalysts was studied as a function of pH, catalytic interaction time, air methane composition, and catalysis temperature, by the way of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to homemade catalytic cell. The catalytic efficiency defined as FTIR absorption band intensities I(CO{sub 2}) was maximum for sample prepared at pH=1.5, and mainly correlated to crystallite dimensions. No significant catalytic effect was observed from sintered RuO{sub 2} samples. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized crystals of RuO{sub 2} prepared by sol gel route, at pH=0.4 and 1.5. Mean size values , respectively, 10 and 8 nm.

  6. Apoferritin crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Alexander Chernov, of the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) and based at Marshall Space Flight Center, is investigating why protein crystals grown in space are, in about 20 percent of cases, better-ordered than those grown on the ground. They are testing the idea that the amount of impurities trapped by space-grown crystals may be different than the amount trapped by crystals grown on Earth because convection is negligible in microgravity. The concentrations or impurities in many space-grown crystals turned out to be several times lower than that in the terrestrial ones, sometimes below the detection limit. The ground-based experiment also showed that the amount of impurities per unit volume of the crystals was usually higher than the amount per unit volume of the solution. This means that a growing crystal actually purifies the solution in its immediate vicinity. Here, an impurity depletion zone is created around apoferritin crystals grown in gel, imitating microgravity conditions.

  7. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  8. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  9. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  10. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order..., may establish, for any or all portions of the production area, minimum quantities below which...

  11. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Siobhan; Lumsden, Linda S.

    1994-01-01

    The items featured in this annotated bibliography touch on several aspects of the multifaceted class-size debate. Allen Odden reviews the literature and contends that class-size reduction should be used "sparingly and strategically." C. M. Achilles and colleagues examines two different class-size situations and find student test…

  12. Improved initial guess for minimum energy path calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Smidstrup, Søren; Pedersen, Andreas; Stokbro, Kurt

    2014-06-07

    A method is presented for generating a good initial guess of a transition path between given initial and final states of a system without evaluation of the energy. An objective function surface is constructed using an interpolation of pairwise distances at each discretization point along the path and the nudged elastic band method then used to find an optimal path on this image dependent pair potential (IDPP) surface. This provides an initial path for the more computationally intensive calculations of a minimum energy path on an energy surface obtained, for example, by ab initio or density functional theory. The optimal path on the IDPP surface is significantly closer to a minimum energy path than a linear interpolation of the Cartesian coordinates and, therefore, reduces the number of iterations needed to reach convergence and averts divergence in the electronic structure calculations when atoms are brought too close to each other in the initial path. The method is illustrated with three examples: (1) rotation of a methyl group in an ethane molecule, (2) an exchange of atoms in an island on a crystal surface, and (3) an exchange of two Si-atoms in amorphous silicon. In all three cases, the computational effort in finding the minimum energy path with DFT was reduced by a factor ranging from 50% to an order of magnitude by using an IDPP path as the initial path. The time required for parallel computations was reduced even more because of load imbalance when linear interpolation of Cartesian coordinates was used.

  13. Shaped Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatartchenko, Vitali A.

    Crystals of specified shape and size (shaped crystals) with controlled crystal growth (SCG) defect and impurity structure have to be grown for the successful development of modern engineering. Since the 1950s many hundreds of papers and patents concerned with shaped growth have been published. In this chapter, we do not try to enumerate the successful applications of shaped growth to different materials but rather to carry out a fundamental physical and mathematical analysis of shaping as well as the peculiarities of shaped crystal structures. Four main techniques, based on which the lateral surface can be shaped without contact with the container walls, are analyzed: the Czochralski technique (CZT), the Verneuil technique (VT), the floating zone technique (FZT), and technique of pulling from shaper (TPS). Modifications of these techniques are analyzed as well. In all these techniques the shape of the melt meniscus is controlled by surface tension forces, i.e., capillary forces, and here they are classified as capillary shaping techniques (CST). We look for conditions under which the crystal growth process in each CST is dynamically stable. Only in this case are all perturbations attenuated and a crystal of constant cross section shaping technique (CST) grown without any special regulation. The dynamic stability theory of the crystal growth process for all CST is developed on the basis of Lyapunov's dynamic stability theory. Lyapunov's equations for the crystal growth processes follow from fundamental laws. The results of the theory allow the choice of stable regimes for crystal growth by all CST as well as special designs of shapers in TPS. SCG experiments by CZT, VT, and FZT are discussed but the main consideration is given to TPS. Shapers not only allow crystal of very complicated cross section to be grown but provide a special distribution of impurities. A history of TPS is provided later in the chapter, because it can only be described after explanation of the

  14. Surface crystallization of a fluoride glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Doremus, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Growth of crystals on the surface of a Zr-Ba-La fluoride glass was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Small, dark crystal nucleated rapidly and grew to a size of about 10 microns; then they stopped growing, and wrinkled regions emerged, covering the entire crystal surface.

  15. Economic analysis of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Chung, A. M.; Yan, C. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Many advanced electronic technologies and devices for the 1980's are based on sophisticated compound single crystals, i.e. ceramic oxides and compound semiconductors. Space processing of these electronic crystals with maximum perfection, purity, and size is suggested. No ecomonic or technical justification was found for the growth of silicon single crystals for solid state electronic devices in space.

  16. Ultracompact nonreciprocal optical isolator based on guided resonance in a magneto-optical photonic crystal slab.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kejie; Yu, Zongfu; Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2011-11-01

    We design an ultracompact optical isolator with normal incident geometry that operates with a bandwidth that is substantial for a device of this size. For operation in a telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm, the thickness of the device is less than 1 μm and the device supports an operating bandwidth of 400 GHz over which the minimum contrast ratio exceeds 25 dB. Our design utilizes guided resonance in a photonic crystal slab to enhance magneto-optical effects, and exploits interference effects among multiple resonances to create desired transmission spectral line shapes.

  17. Taylor vortex effect on flocculation of hairy crystals of calcium lactate in anti-solvent crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sooyun; Lee, Choul-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2013-06-01

    A Taylor vortex flow was applied to inhibit the crystal flocculation of calcium lactate in anti-solvent crystallization. When using a conventional MSMPR crystallizer, hairy crystals of calcium lactate were formed and flocculated in the crystallizer. The whole suspension in the crystallizer then gelated and the solution trapped in the flocculated crystals was hardly removable from the gelated suspension. Thus, no purification of calcium lactate was achievable when using anti-solvent crystallization in the MSMPR crystallizer, regardless of a batch or continuous operating mode. In contrast, when using a Couette-Taylor (CT) crystallizer, short needle crystals (about 40 μm) were produced and their flocculation/entanglement was completely prevented. Due to the effective mixing of the Taylor vortex, a high supersaturation was induced in the inlet region of the CT crystallizer, thereby nucleating a high number of needle crystals. This then restricted any one-dimensional overgrowth of crystals, preventing the formation of hairy crystals. According to this mechanism, the mean crystal size was reduced when increasing the rotation speed of the CT crystallizer, the feed concentration, and flow rate. Moreover, the recovery ratio of calcium lactate crystals in the CT crystallizer was always greater than 83% and depended most significantly on the feed flow rate.

  18. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  19. Lysozyme Crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To the crystallographer, this may not be a diamond but it is just as priceless. A Lysozyme crystal grown in orbit looks great under a microscope, but the real test is X-ray crystallography. The colors are caused by polarizing filters. Proteins can form crystals generated by rows and columns of molecules that form up like soldiers on a parade ground. Shining X-rays through a crystal will produce a pattern of dots that can be decoded to reveal the arrangement of the atoms in the molecules making up the crystal. Like the troops in formation, uniformity and order are everything in X-ray crystallography. X-rays have much shorter wavelengths than visible light, so the best looking crystals under the microscope won't necessarily pass muster under the X-rays. In order to have crystals to use for X-ray diffraction studies, crystals need to be fairly large and well ordered. Scientists also need lots of crystals since exposure to air, the process of X-raying them, and other factors destroy them. Growing protein crystals in space has yielded striking results. Lysozyme's structure is well known and it has become a standard in many crystallization studies on Earth and in space.

  20. Construction of Protograph LDPC Codes with Linear Minimum Distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Jones, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    A construction method for protograph-based LDPC codes that simultaneously achieve low iterative decoding threshold and linear minimum distance is proposed. We start with a high-rate protograph LDPC code with variable node degrees of at least 3. Lower rate codes are obtained by splitting check nodes and connecting them by degree-2 nodes. This guarantees the linear minimum distance property for the lower-rate codes. Excluding checks connected to degree-1 nodes, we show that the number of degree-2 nodes should be at most one less than the number of checks for the protograph LDPC code to have linear minimum distance. Iterative decoding thresholds are obtained by using the reciprocal channel approximation. Thresholds are lowered by using either precoding or at least one very high-degree node in the base protograph. A family of high- to low-rate codes with minimum distance linearly increasing in block size and with capacity-approaching performance thresholds is presented. FPGA simulation results for a few example codes show that the proposed codes perform as predicted.

  1. Does the Current Minimum Validate (or Invalidate) Cycle Prediction Methods?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2010-01-01

    This deep, extended solar minimum and the slow start to Cycle 24 strongly suggest that Cycle 24 will be a small cycle. A wide array of solar cycle prediction techniques have been applied to predicting the amplitude of Cycle 24 with widely different results. Current conditions and new observations indicate that some highly regarded techniques now appear to have doubtful utility. Geomagnetic precursors have been reliable in the past and can be tested with 12 cycles of data. Of the three primary geomagnetic precursors only one (the minimum level of geomagnetic activity) suggests a small cycle. The Sun's polar field strength has also been used to successfully predict the last three cycles. The current weak polar fields are indicative of a small cycle. For the first time, dynamo models have been used to predict the size of a solar cycle but with opposite predictions depending on the model and the data assimilation. However, new measurements of the surface meridional flow indicate that the flow was substantially faster on the approach to Cycle 24 minimum than at Cycle 23 minimum. In both dynamo predictions a faster meridional flow should have given a shorter cycle 23 with stronger polar fields. This suggests that these dynamo models are not yet ready for solar cycle prediction.

  2. Minimum wafer thickness by rotated ingot ID wafering. [Inner Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The efficient utilization of materials is critical to certain device applications such as silicon for photovoltaics or diodes and gallium-gadolinium-garnet for memories. A variety of slicing techniques has been investigated to minimize wafer thickness and wafer kerf. This paper presents the results of analyses of ID wafering of rotated ingots based on predicted fracture behavior of the wafer as a result of forces during wafering and the properties of the device material. The analytical model indicated that the minimum wafer thickness is controlled by the depth of surface damage and the applied cantilever force. Both of these factors should be minimized. For silicon, a minimum thickness was found to be approximately 200 x 10 - 6th m for conventional sizes of rotated ingot wafering. Fractures through the thickness of the wafer rather than through the center supporting column were found to limit the minimum wafer thickness. The model suggested that the use of a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center supporting core and, with silicon, by using 111-line-type ingots could have potential for reducing minimum wafer thickness.

  3. Size-Dependent Elasticity of Nanocrystalline Titania

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Zhang, H; Dunphy-Guzman, K; Spagnoli, D; Kruger, M; Muthu, D; Kunz, M; Fakra, S; Hu, J; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron-based high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements indicate that compressibility, a fundamental materials property, can have a size-specific minimum value. The bulk modulus of nanocrystalline titania has a maximum at particle size of 15 nm. This can be explained by dislocation behavior because very high dislocation contents can be achieved when shear stress induced within nanoparticles counters the repulsion between dislocations. As particle size decreases, compression increasingly generates dislocation networks (hardened by overlap of strain fields) that shield intervening regions from external pressure. However, when particles become too small to sustain high dislocation concentrations, elastic stiffening declines. The compressibility has a minimum at intermediate sizes.

  4. Determining the Molecular Growth Mechanisms of Protein Crystal Faces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadarajah, Arunan; Li, Huayu; Pusey, Marc L.

    1999-01-01

    A high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) study had shown that the molecular packing on the tetragonal lysozyme (110) face corresponded to only one of two possible packing arrangements, suggesting that growth layers on this face were of bimolecular height. Theoretical analyses of the packing also indicated that growth of this face should proceed by the addition of growth units of at least tetramer size corresponding to the 43 helices in the crystal. In this study an AFM linescan technique was devised to measure the dimensions of individual growth units on protein crystal faces as they were being incorporated into the lattice. Images of individual growth events on the (110) face of tetragonal lysozyme crystals were observed, shown by jump discontinuities in the growth step in the linescan images as shown in the figure. The growth unit dimension in the scanned direction was obtained from these images. A large number of scans in two directions on the (110) face were performed and the distribution of lysozyme growth unit sizes were obtained. A variety of unit sizes corresponding to 43 helices, were shown to participate in the growth process, with the 43 tetramer being the minimum observed size. This technique represents a new application for AFM allowing time resolved studies of molecular process to be carried out.

  5. Unifying the crystallization behavior of hexagonal and square crystals with the phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Zheng, Chen; Jing, Zhang; Yongxin, Wang; Yanli, Lu

    2016-03-01

    By employing the phase-field-crystal models, the atomic crystallization process of hexagonal and square crystals is investigated with the emphasis on the growth mechanism and morphological change. A unified regime describing the crystallization behavior of both crystals is obtained with the thermodynamic driving force varying. By increasing the driving force, both crystals (in the steady-state) transform from a faceted polygon to an apex-bulged polygon, and then into a symmetric dendrite. For the faceted polygon, the interface advances by a layer-by-layer (LL) mode while for the apex-bulged polygonal and the dendritic crystals, it first adopts the LL mode and then transits into the multi-layer (ML) mode in the later stage. In particular, a shift of the nucleation sites from the face center to the area around the crystal tips is detected in the early growth stage of both crystals and is rationalized in terms of the relation between the crystal size and the driving force distribution. Finally, a parameter characterizing the complex shape change of square crystal is introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 54175378, 51474176, and 51274167), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7261), and the Doctoral Foundation Program of Ministry of China (Grant No. 20136102120021).

  6. Crystal growth and annealing for minimized residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing.

  7. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the...

  8. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  9. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  10. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  11. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  12. 14 CFR 205.5 - Minimum coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... or death of persons, including nonemployee cargo attendants, other than passengers, and for damage to... accident liability insurance coverage for bodily injury to or death of aircraft passengers, with minimum... death of aircraft passengers, with a minimum coverage of $75,000 for any one passenger and a total...

  13. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  14. 78 FR 11793 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Part 543 RIN 3141-AA27 Minimum Internal Control Standards AGENCY... (NIGC) proposes to amend its minimum internal control standards for Class II gaming under the Indian... Internal Control Standards. 64 FR 590. The rule added a new part to the Commission's...

  15. 30 CFR 202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.352 Section 202.352 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual...

  16. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  17. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  18. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  19. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  20. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  1. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  2. 24 CFR 280.35 - Minimum participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Minimum participation. 280.35 Section 280.35 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... Minimum participation. Except as provided in paragraph (a) or (b) of this section, the recipient may...

  3. Optimal shock isolation with minimum settling time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, W. D.; Lim, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how unique isolator forces and corresponding forces can be chosen by superimposing a minimum settling time onto the limiting performance of the shock isolation system. Basically, this means that the system which has reached the peak value of the performance index is settled to rest in minimum time.

  4. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  5. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.30 Minimum...

  6. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases...

  7. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  8. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  9. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  10. Formation of 2D photonic crystal bars by simultaneous photoelectrochemical etching of trenches and macropores in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Astrova, E. V. Fedulova, G. V.; Guschina, E. V.

    2010-12-15

    Joint electrochemical etching of deep macropores and trenches in n-Si (100) has been studied. After the substrate was removed, regions of a sample, bounded on all sides by a closed contour of through trenches, were extracted from the sample, with narrow bars of a 2D photonic crystal remaining. The influence exerted by the distance between pores and a trench and by the modes of etching and subsequent oxidation on the roughness of the side walls of the structures and also on the size and shape of pores near the trench is analyzed for the example of a photonic crystal with a square lattice of macropores. Conditions are found in which the lattice distortion of the photonic crystal is at a minimum and the side walls of the structure are the smoothest (root-mean-square roughness height {approx}60 nm).

  11. Approaching the Minimum Thermal Conductivity in Rhenium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Girard, S. N.; Meng, F.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Jin, S; Goodenough, J. B.; Zhou, J. S.; Shi, L

    2014-01-01

    Higher manganese silicides (HMS) made of earth-abundant and non-toxic elements are regarded as promising p-type thermoelectric materials because their complex crystal structure results in low lattice thermal conductivity. It is shown here that the already low thermal conductivity of HMS can be reduced further to approach the minimum thermal conductivity via partial substitu- tion of Mn with heavier rhenium (Re) to increase point defect scattering. The solubility limit of Re in the obtained RexMn1 xSi1.8 is determined to be about x = 0.18. Elemental inhomogeneity and the formation of ReSi1.75 inclusions with 50 200 nm size are found within the HMS matrix. It is found that the power factor does not change markedly at low Re content of x 0.04 before it drops considerably at higher Re contents. Compared to pure HMS, the reduced lattice thermal conductivity in RexMn1 xSi1.8 results in a 25% increase of the peak figure of merit ZT to reach 0.57 0.08 at 800 K for x = 0.04. The suppressed thermal conductivity in the pure RexMn1 xSi1.8 can enable further investigations of the ZT limit of this system by exploring different impurity doping strategies to optimize the carrier concentration and power factor.

  12. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  13. Engineering Crystal Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, Preshit; Kuvadia, Zubin B.; Doherty, Michael F.

    2013-07-01

    Crystallization is an important separation and particle formation technique in the manufacture of high-value-added products. During crystallization, many physicochemical characteristics of the substance are established. Such characteristics include crystal polymorph, shape and size, chemical purity and stability, reactivity, and electrical and magnetic properties. However, control over the physical form of crystalline materials has remained poor, due mainly to an inadequate understanding of the basic growth and dissolution mechanisms, as well as of the influence of impurities, additives, and solvents on the growth rate of individual crystal faces. Crystal growth is a surface-controlled phenomenon in which solute molecules are incorporated into surface lattice sites to yield the bulk long-range order that characterizes crystalline materials. In this article, we describe some recent advances in crystal morphology engineering, with a special focus on a new mechanistic model for spiral growth. These mechanistic ideas are simple enough that they can be made to work and accurate enough that they are useful.

  14. On dewetting of thin films due to crystallization (crystallization dewetting).

    PubMed

    Habibi, Mehran; Rahimzadeh, Amin; Eslamian, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    Drying and crystallization of a thin liquid film of an ionic or a similar solution can cause dewetting in the resulting thin solid film. This paper aims at investigating this type of dewetting, herein termed "crystallization dewetting", using PbI2 dissolved in organic solvents as the model solution. PbI2 solid films are usually used in X-ray detection and lead halide perovskite solar cells. In this work, PbI2 films are fabricated using spin coating and the effect of major parameters influencing the crystallization dewetting, including the type of the solvent, solution concentration, drying temperature, spin speed, as well as imposed vibration on the substrate are studied on dewetting, surface profile and coverage, using confocal scanning laser microscopy. Simplified hydrodynamic governing equations of crystallization in thin films are presented and using a mathematical representation of the process, it is phenomenologically demonstrated that crystallization dewetting occurs due to the absorption and consumption of the solution surrounding a growing crystal. Among the results, it is found that a low spin speed (high thickness), a high solution concentration and a low drying temperature promote crystal growth, and therefore crystallization dewetting. It is also shown that imposed vibration on the substrate can affect the crystal size and crystallization dewetting.

  15. Computational crystallization.

    PubMed

    Altan, Irem; Charbonneau, Patrick; Snell, Edward H

    2016-07-15

    Crystallization is a key step in macromolecular structure determination by crystallography. While a robust theoretical treatment of the process is available, due to the complexity of the system, the experimental process is still largely one of trial and error. In this article, efforts in the field are discussed together with a theoretical underpinning using a solubility phase diagram. Prior knowledge has been used to develop tools that computationally predict the crystallization outcome and define mutational approaches that enhance the likelihood of crystallization. For the most part these tools are based on binary outcomes (crystal or no crystal), and the full information contained in an assembly of crystallization screening experiments is lost. The potential of this additional information is illustrated by examples where new biological knowledge can be obtained and where a target can be sub-categorized to predict which class of reagents provides the crystallization driving force. Computational analysis of crystallization requires complete and correctly formatted data. While massive crystallization screening efforts are under way, the data available from many of these studies are sparse. The potential for this data and the steps needed to realize this potential are discussed.

  16. Photonic crystal enhanced cytokine immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Ganesh, Nikhil; Cunningham, Brian T

    2009-01-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces are demonstrated as a means for enhancing the detection sensitivity and resolution for assays that use a fluorescent tag to quantify the concentration of an analyte protein molecule in a liquid test sample. Computer modeling of the spatial distribution of resonantly coupled electromagnetic fields on the photonic crystal surface are used to estimate the magnitude of enhancement factor compared to performing the same fluorescent assay on a plain glass surface, and the photonic crystal structure is fabricated and tested to experimentally verify the performance using a sandwich immunoassay for the protein Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The demonstrated photonic crystal fabrication method utilizes a nanoreplica molding technique that allows for large-area inexpensive fabrication of the structure in a format that is compatible with confocal microarray laser scanners. The signal-to-noise ratio for fluorescent spots on the photonic crystal is increased by at least five-fold relative to the glass slide, allowing a TNF-alpha concentration of 1.6 pg/ml to be distinguished from noise on a photonic crystal surface. In addition, the minimum quantitative limit of detection on the photonic crystal surface is one-third the limit on the glass slide - a decrease from 18 pg/ml to 6 pg/ml. The increased performance of the immunoassay allows for more accurate quantitation of physiologically relevant concentrations of TNF-alpha in a protein microarray format that can be expanded to multiple cytokines.

  17. Factors affecting minimum push and pull forces of manual carts.

    PubMed

    Al-Eisawi, K W; Kerk, C J; Congleton, J J; Amendola, A A; Jenkins, O C; Gaines, W

    1999-06-01

    The minimum forces needed to manually push or pull a 4-wheel cart of differing weights with similar wheel sizes from a stationary state were measured on four floor materials under different conditions of wheel width, diameter, and orientation. Cart load was increased from 0 to 181.4 kg in increments of 36.3 kg. The floor materials were smooth concrete, tile, asphalt, and industrial carpet. Two wheel widths were tested: 25 and 38 mm. Wheel diameters were 51, 102, and 153 mm. Wheel orientation was tested at four levels: F0R0 (all four wheels aligned in the forward direction), F0R90 (the two front wheels, the wheels furthest from the cart handle, aligned in the forward direction and the two rear wheels, the wheels closest to the cart handle, aligned at 90 degrees to the forward direction), F90R0 (the two front wheels aligned at 90 degrees to the forward direction and the two rear wheels aligned in the forward direction), and F90R90 (all four wheels aligned at 90 degrees to the forward direction). Wheel width did not have a significant effect on the minimum push/pull forces. The minimum push/pull forces were linearly proportional to cart weight, and inversely proportional to wheel diameter. The coefficients of rolling friction were estimated as 2.2, 2.4, 3.3, and 4.5 mm for hard rubber wheels rolling on smooth concrete, tile, asphalt, and industrial carpet floors, respectively. The effect of wheel orientation was not consistent over the tested conditions, but, in general, the smallest minimum push/pull forces were measured with all four wheels aligned in the forward direction, whereas the largest minimum push/pull forces were measured when all four wheels were aligned at 90 degrees to the forward direction. There was no significant difference between the push and pull forces when all four wheels were aligned in the forward direction.

  18. Preliminary Proactive Sample Size Determination for Confirmatory Factor Analysis Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koran, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Proactive preliminary minimum sample size determination can be useful for the early planning stages of a latent variable modeling study to set a realistic scope, long before the model and population are finalized. This study examined existing methods and proposed a new method for proactive preliminary minimum sample size determination.

  19. Sample Sizes when Using Multiple Linear Regression for Prediction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knofczynski, Gregory T.; Mundfrom, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    When using multiple regression for prediction purposes, the issue of minimum required sample size often needs to be addressed. Using a Monte Carlo simulation, models with varying numbers of independent variables were examined and minimum sample sizes were determined for multiple scenarios at each number of independent variables. The scenarios…

  20. Effect of crystal habit on the dissolution behaviour of simvastatin crystals and its relationship to crystallization solvent properties.

    PubMed

    Bukovec, P; Benkic, P; Smrkolj, M; Vrecer, F

    2016-05-01

    Simvastatin crystals, having same crystal structure but different types of habits and hence different intrinsic dissolution rate, were prepared by recrystallization from solvents selected according to their polarity index. Scanning electron microscopy, laser diffraction, image analysis, X-ray powder diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were used to investigate the physicochemical characteristics of the prepared crystals. The isolated crystals exhibited different crystal habits but possessed the same internal crystal structure. In this study the comparative intrinsic dissolution behaviour of the simvastatin crystals with different types of habits was studied and explained by surface energy and correlated to different solvent systems that were used for crystallization. In our work we diminished the influence of all other physical parameters that could influence the dissolution rate, e.g. particle size, specific surface area and polymorphism in order to focus the study onto the impact of crystal shape itself on the dissolution rate of simvastatin crystals. Rod shaped crystals isolated from more hydrophilic solvent mixture dissolved faster than plate-like crystals obtained from solvent mixture with lower polarity index. We correlated this fact to the different growth rate of the individual faces which resulted in different relative size of the individual crystal faces exposed to the dissolution medium as well as the chemical nature of those faces which in turn influenced the wettability and subsequent dissolution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient.

  1. Testable scenario for relativity with minimum length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, G.

    2001-06-01

    I propose a general class of spacetimes whose structure is governed by observer-independent scales of both velocity (/c) and length (Planck length), and I observe that these spacetimes can naturally host a modification of FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction such that lengths which in their inertial rest frame are bigger than a ``minimum length'' are also bigger than the minimum length in all other inertial frames. With an analysis in leading order in the minimum length, I show that this is the case in a specific illustrative example of postulates for relativity with velocity and length observer-independent scales.

  2. An Investigation of Minimum Buy Policies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    Remaining are 2393 items for which we make a minimum buy . We also converted the quarterly data into a series of requisitions more appropriate for our...AO80 399 ARMY INVENTORY RESEARCH OFFICE PHILADELPHIA PA F/B 5/3 AN INVESTIGATION OF MINIMUM BUY POLICIES.(U) AUG 79 S FRAZZA. A J KAPLAN...UNCLASSIFIED IRO-269 NL EEEEEEEEE///EEEflfllflfflfllflf EN AD- FINAL REPORT F0 REPORt NO269 AN INVESTIGATION OF o MINIMUM BUY POLICIES l.5S ARMY U.S. CUSTOM

  3. Crystal Data

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 3 NIST Crystal Data (PC database for purchase)   NIST Crystal Data contains chemical, physical, and crystallographic information useful to characterize more than 237,671 inorganic and organic crystalline materials. The data include the standard cell parameters, cell volume, space group number and symbol, calculated density, chemical formula, chemical name, and classification by chemical type.

  4. Quickly Getting the Best Data from Your Macromolecular Crystals with a New Generation of Beamline Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Cipriani, Florent; Felisaz, Franck; Lavault, Bernard; Brockhauser, Sandor; Ravelli, Raimond; Launer, Ludovic

    2007-01-19

    While routine Macromolecular x-ray (MX) crystallography has relied on well established techniques for some years all the synchrotrons around the world are improving the throughput of their MX beamlines. Third generation synchrotrons provide small intense beams that make data collection of 5-10 microns sized crystals possible. The EMBL/ESRF MX Group in Grenoble has developed a new generation of instruments to easily collect data on 10 {mu}m size crystals in an automated environment. This work is part of the Grenoble automation program that enables FedEx like crystallography using fully automated data collection and web monitored experiments. Seven ESRF beamlines and the MRC BM14 ESRF/CRG beamline are currently equipped with these latest instruments. We describe here the main features of the MD2x diffractometer family and the SC3 sample changer robot. Although the SC3 was primarily designed to increase the throughput of MX beamlines, it has also been shown to be efficient in improving the quality of the data collected. Strategies in screening a large number of crystals, selecting the best, and collecting a full data set from several re-oriented micro-crystals can now be run with minimum time and effort. The MD2x and SC3 instruments are now commercialised by the company ACCEL GmbH.

  5. Multimode squeezing properties of a confocal optical parametric oscillator: Beyond the thin-crystal approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L.; Gigan, S.; Treps, N.; Maitre, A.; Fabre, C.; Gatti, A.

    2005-07-15

    Up to now, transverse quantum effects (usually labeled as 'quantum imaging' effects) which are generated by nonlinear devices inserted in resonant optical cavities have been calculated using the 'thin-crystal approximation', i.e., taking into account the effect of diffraction only inside the empty part of the cavity, and neglecting its effect in the nonlinear propagation inside the nonlinear crystal. We introduce in the present paper a theoretical method which is not restricted by this approximation. It allows us in particular to treat configurations closer to the actual experimental ones, where the crystal length is comparable to the Rayleigh length of the cavity mode. We use this method in the case of the confocal optical parametric oscillator, where the thin-crystal approximation predicts perfect squeezing on any area of the transverse plane, whatever its size and shape. We find that there exists in this case a 'coherence length' which gives the minimum size of a detector on which perfect squeezing can be observed, and which gives therefore a limit to the improvement of optical resolution that can be obtained using such devices.

  6. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  7. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser.

    PubMed

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-09-29

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M(2) reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the "photonic crystal microchip laser", a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation.

  8. Photonic Crystal Microchip Laser

    PubMed Central

    Gailevicius, Darius; Koliadenko, Volodymyr; Purlys, Vytautas; Peckus, Martynas; Taranenko, Victor; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2016-01-01

    The microchip lasers, being very compact and efficient sources of coherent light, suffer from one serious drawback: low spatial quality of the beam strongly reducing the brightness of emitted radiation. Attempts to improve the beam quality, such as pump-beam guiding, external feedback, either strongly reduce the emission power, or drastically increase the size and complexity of the lasers. Here it is proposed that specially designed photonic crystal in the cavity of a microchip laser, can significantly improve the beam quality. Experiments show that a microchip laser, due to spatial filtering functionality of intracavity photonic crystal, improves the beam quality factor M2 reducing it by a factor of 2, and increase the brightness of radiation by a factor of 3. This comprises a new kind of laser, the “photonic crystal microchip laser”, a very compact and efficient light source emitting high spatial quality high brightness radiation. PMID:27683066

  9. Gas permeation in a molecular crystal and space expansion.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Yuichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi

    2014-05-14

    A novel single-crystal membrane [Cu(II)2(4-F-bza)4(2-mpyz)]n (4-F-bza = 4-fluorobenzoate; 2-mpyz = 2-methylpyrazine) was synthesized and its identical permeability in any crystal direction in the correction for tortuosity proved that gas diffuses inside the channels without detour. H2 permeated by 1.18 × 10(-12) mol m m(-2) s(-1) Pa(-1) with a high selectivity (Fα: 23.5 for H2/CO and 48.0 for H2/CH4) through its 2D-channels having a minimum diameter of 2.6 Å, which is narrower than the Lennard-Jones diameter of H2 (2.827 Å), CO (3.690 Å), and CH4 (3.758 Å). The high rate of permeation was well explained by a modified Knudsen diffusion model based on the space expansion effect, which agrees with the observed permselectivity enhanced for smaller gases in considering the expansion of a channel resulting from the collision of gas molecules or atoms onto the channel wall. An analysis of single-crystal X-ray data showed the expansion order to be H2 > Ar > CH4, which was expected from the permeation analysis. The permselectivity of a porous solid depends on the elasticity of the pores as well as on the diameter of the vacant channel and the size of the target gas.

  10. Analysis of ice crystals occuring in the upper high levels of tropical mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delplanque, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    In 2010 several test flights were performed in tropical marine meso-scale convective systems at flight levels between 10.5 and 10.8 km. Ice crystals were observed with a high speed CDD camera (image pixel resolution: 15 μ m, time resolution 0.007 s) hereafter called the Airbus nephelometer. In-cloud observations were not restricted to the stratiform regions of the MCS but also convective cores were intensely sampled. High number concentrations of ice crystals (N > 1000 L-1) and IWC of more than 4 g.m-3 could be observed. The main objective of our study is the retrieval of the ice water mass from ice particle number distribution and crystal habits, both observed by the Airbus nephelometer. The shape of ice particles was supposed to correspond to the form of oblate spheroids. A statistical study of the aspect ratio of crystal images was performed comparing two different geometrical approaches for the aspect ratio of their semi axis. One uses the ratio of minimum to maximum length, the other is based on the aspect ratio which best fits the crystal image. Different regions of the MCS present different mean aspect ratios measured at small scale (200 m). Variations of the aspect ratio seem to be associated with different nucleation and growth histories for the crystals. For regions with 'young' ice crystals, an anti-correlation between the aspect ratio and ice number concentration was observed. This observation is compared with the results obtained from simple diffusional growth modeling. To better quantify the characteristics of high concentrations of small ice crystal MCS regions, we propose to use the size distribution of the mean aspect ratio (from 100 μ m to 1 mm), to distinguish quite different behaviors for 'young' and 'mature' convective regions.

  11. Can Solution Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    The formation of large protein crystals of "high quality" is considered a characteristic manifestation of microgravity. The physical processes that predict the formation of large, high quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of space are considered rooted in the existence of a "depletion zone" in the vicinity of crystal. Namely, it is considered reasonable that crystal quality suffers in earth-grown crystals as a result of the incorporation of large aggregates, micro-crystals and/or large molecular weight "impurities", processes which are aided by density driven convective flow or mixing at the crystal-liquid interface. Sedimentation and density driven convection produce unfavorable solution conditions in the vicinity of the crystal surface, which promotes rapid crystal growth to the detriment of crystal size and quality. In this effort, we shall further present the hypothesis that the solution supersaturatoin at the crystal surface determines the growth mechanism, or mode, by which protein crystals grow. It is further hypothesized that protein crystal quality is affected by the mechanism or mode of crystal growth. Hence the formation of a depletion zone in microgravity environment is beneficial due to inhibition of impurity incorporatoin as well as preventing a kinetic roughening transition. It should be noted that for many proteins the magnitude of neither protein crystal growth rates nor solution supersaturation are predictors of a kinetic roughening transition. That is, the kinetic roughening transition supersaturation must be dtermined for each individual protein.

  12. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the minimum induced drag of wings. The topics include: 1) The History of Spanload Development of the optimum spanload Winglets and their implications; 2) Horten Sailplanes; and 3) Flight Mechanics & Adverse yaw.

  13. Enforcement Related to Minimum Risk Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    If a product does not meet all the requirements of the minimum risk exemption, it must be registered unless eligible for some other exemption. Learn about enforcement actions EPA can take where unregistered products make pesticidal claims.

  14. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  15. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Europe (defined to mean the following countries: Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia..., Europe, Greenland, Canada, or Mexico, shall meet each applicable minimum requirement of the U.S. No....

  16. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition.

  17. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C.T.; Jian, L.K.; Luhmann, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23–24 transition. PMID:25685425

  18. Crystallization Behavior and Growing Process of Rutile Crystals in Ti-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wu; Zhang, Li; Li, Yuhai; Li, Xin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present work is to elucidate crystallization and growing process of rutile crystals in Ti-bearing blast furnace slag. The samples were taken from the liquid slag and quenched at once at elevated temperatures in order to analyze phase transaction of titanium and grain size of rutile crystals. Crystallization and growing kinetics of rutile crystals under elevated temperature conditions were calculated, and the crystallization process of rutile crystals under isothermal conditions was expressed by Avrami equation. The effects of experimental parameters, such as experimental temperatures, SiO2 addition, cooling rate, crystal seed addition and oxygen flow, were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the optimal conditions for rutile crystals to grow up were obtained. Distribution and movement state of rutile crystals in the slag were analyzed.

  19. Crystallization of struvite from metastable region with different types of seed crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Imtiaj; Schneider, Phil Andrew

    2005-05-01

    The main feature of this paper was to recognize struvite crystallization in the metastable region of supersaturation. Thermodynamic equilibria of struvite were simulated to identify the minimum struvite solubility limit, thereafter validated by existing thermodynamic modelling packages such as PHREEQC and the derived data from existing struvite solubility curve. Using laser light scattering detection, spontaneous nucleation was identified by the slow increase of pH in a supersaturated solution of struvite. The crystallization experiment, conducted close to the saturation region in metastable zone, initiated struvite growth. The conducted experiment showed that mother crystal (struvite) was more effective as seeds for struvite crystallization.

  20. Minimum Release of Tributyltin to Prevent Macrofouling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    identify by block number) The minimum release of tni-and dibutyltin has been determined for both barnacles and hydrozoans. The test method involved...prevented hydrozoans from attaching. No minimum release rate could be calculated for the dibutyltin because the flux rates were not high enoughi to achieve a...DATA FOR SETTLEMENT WITH TRI- AND DIBUTYLTIN ........................................... 13 FIGURES 1. Percent settlement of barnacles relative to