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Sample records for minkwan won joonhong

  1. Just Spraying Adult Mosquitoes Won't Curb Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Just Spraying Adult Mosquitoes Won't Curb Zika: Study Lab work suggests larvicide also needed to ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Female mosquitoes can transmit the Zika virus to their eggs and offspring, and this ...

  2. Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159955.html Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause 5-year ... important risk cognitively associated with the use of hormone therapy over at least five years," said lead researcher ...

  3. IVF Won't Raise Risk for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159959.html IVF Won't Raise Risk for Breast Cancer New findings should reassure the many women who ... a baby aren't at increased risk of breast cancer, according to Dutch researchers. Their study of more ...

  4. College Students Discount Money "Won" More than Money "Owed"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam; Terrell, Heather K.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence in the research literature indicates people may treat "won" money differently than they would their own money. The present study had a sample of 648 college students complete a delay-discounting task that involved the hypothetical monetary amounts of $1,000 or $100,000. Participants were asked repeatedly what amount they would accept…

  5. Zika Won't Pose Risks At the Olympics: Health Experts

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160250.html Zika Won't Pose Risks at the Olympics: Health ... Brazil won't trigger a global spread of Zika virus, with little risk of potentially infected competitors ...

  6. 47 CFR 24.712 - Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....712 Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... acquired in either the auction for frequency block C that began on December 18, 1995, or the reauction of... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses won for...

  7. 47 CFR 24.712 - Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....712 Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... acquired in either the auction for frequency block C that began on December 18, 1995, or the reauction of... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses won for...

  8. 47 CFR 24.712 - Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....712 Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... acquired in either the auction for frequency block C that began on December 18, 1995, or the reauction of... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses won for...

  9. 47 CFR 24.712 - Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....712 Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... acquired in either the auction for frequency block C that began on December 18, 1995, or the reauction of... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses won for...

  10. Climate science, character, and the "hard-won" consensus.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, Brent

    2012-06-01

    What makes a consensus among scientists credible and convincing? This paper introduces the notion of a "hard-won" consensus and uses examples from recent debates over climate change science to show that this heuristic standard for evaluating the quality of a consensus is widely shared. The extent to which a consensus is "hard won" can be understood to depend on the personal qualities of the participating experts; the article demonstrates the continuing utility of the norms of modern science introduced by Robert K. Merton by showing that individuals on both sides of the climate science debate rely intuitively on Mertonian ideas--interpreted in terms of character--to frame their arguments. PMID:23002583

  11. [The fate of the old Jejoong Won following the establishment of the new Jejoong Won (Severance Hospital)].

    PubMed

    Yeo, I S; Park, Y J; Lee, K l; Park, H W

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Allen, the first Protestant missionary in Korea, had an opportunity of saving the life of the queen's nephew shortly after his arrival in Korea in 1884. In gratitude the King established the Royal Korean Hospital (Jejoong Won), the first hospital in Korea, and appointed Dr. Allen in charge of the medical affairs of the hospital. After Dr. Allen's resignation from the mission, the work was successively carried on by Drs. JW Heron, RA Hardie, CC Vinton and OR Avison, the last of whom arrived in 1893. In 1894 the connection of the Hospital with the Korean Government was severed and the work taken over by the Northern Presbyterian Mission. Since then, it has been a distinctly mission institute. In 1900, while attending the Ecumenical Conference of Foreign Missions in Carnegie Hall, New York, Dr. Avison made the acquaintance of a philanthropist LH Severance, who made a gift of $10,000 for a new hospital. This building, the first modern hospital in Korea, was opened and dedicated in 1904. It was named the Severance Hospital. As the new hospital was built, the old hospital building was to be returned to the Korean Government according to the agreement made in 1894. On retaking the old hospital, the Korean Government paid $30,289.99 won for the renovation of the original building and new buildings established in the site during the period of Avison's entire charge of Jejoong Won. The old hospital building was used as an official residence for a diplomatic adviser Stevens, who was assassinated for his pro-Japan activities, and as a social club for Japanese officials. PMID:11624251

  12. How the web was won … by some.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Andy

    2011-09-01

    HILJ readers may have encountered the phrase library 2.0 which has polarised librarians, with some sceptical whether library 2.0 offers anything new. Others are confident that the convergence of service goals and ideas with emerging Web 2.0 technologies will lead to a new generation of library services. Andrew Tattersall's article, 'How the Web was Won', belongs in the latter camp. His thesis is that Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 have opened up a whole new world for exploration by information and library professionals. Although the Web has created problems for the modern day explorer, potentially there is a bright future for information professionals if they are to succeed in deploying the resources.

  13. How the web was won … by some.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Andy

    2011-09-01

    HILJ readers may have encountered the phrase library 2.0 which has polarised librarians, with some sceptical whether library 2.0 offers anything new. Others are confident that the convergence of service goals and ideas with emerging Web 2.0 technologies will lead to a new generation of library services. Andrew Tattersall's article, 'How the Web was Won', belongs in the latter camp. His thesis is that Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 have opened up a whole new world for exploration by information and library professionals. Although the Web has created problems for the modern day explorer, potentially there is a bright future for information professionals if they are to succeed in deploying the resources. PMID:21831222

  14. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reduced down payment for licenses won by small... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.811 Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses. Each winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of...

  15. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reduced down payment for licenses won by small... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.811 Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses. Each winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of...

  16. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reduced down payment for licenses won by small... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.811 Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses. Each winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of...

  17. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reduced down payment for licenses won by small... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.811 Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses. Each winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of...

  18. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reduced down payment for licenses won by small... Specialized Mobile Radio Service § 90.811 Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses. Each winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of...

  19. Probabilistic Discounting of Hypothetical Monetary Gains: University Students Differ in How They Discount "Won" and "Owed" Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested whether participants would discount "won" money differently than they would "owed" money in a probability-discounting task. Participants discounted $1000 or $100,000 that they had won in a sweepstakes or that was owed to them using the multiple-choice (Experiment 1) or fill-in-the-blank (Experiment 2) method of collecting…

  20. 47 CFR 27.604 - Limitation on licenses won at auction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limitation on licenses won at auction. 27.604 Section 27.604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Guard Band A and B Blocks (757-758/787-788 MHz and...

  1. 47 CFR 27.604 - Limitation on licenses won at auction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitation on licenses won at auction. 27.604 Section 27.604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Guard Band A and B Blocks (757-758/787-788 MHz and...

  2. Training vs. Education in Forming Won Buddhist "Kyomus" in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bokin

    2006-01-01

    An historically familiar tension in East Asian Buddhism between meditation and cultivation in broad learning has appeared in discussions and planning for preparing ministerial students in Won Buddhism. This paper reviews the history of preparation in this order, which was founded in 1916. While the alternatives of training based on practice and…

  3. The "Hollywoodization" of Education Reform in "Won't Back Down"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goering, Christian Z.; Witte, Shelbie; Jennings Davis, Jennifer; Ward, Peggy; Flammang, Brandon; Gerhardson, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    What happens when forces attempting to privatize education create and produce a Hollywood film with an education reform plot line? This essay explores "Won't Back Down" through cultural studies and progressive education lenses in an effort to unveil misrepresentations of education and education reform. Drawing on scholarship in these…

  4. Online Educators Won't Be Forced to Spy on Students, New Rules Say

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Distance educators won't have to become FBI-style investigators, installing cameras in the homes of online students and scanning fingerprints to ensure that people are who they say they are. At least not yet. The recently reauthorized Higher Education Opportunity Act requires accreditors to monitor steps colleges take to verify that an enrolled…

  5. Mechanical and optical characterization of tungsten oxynitride (W-O-N) nano-coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Oscar Roberto

    Aation and cation doping of transition metal oxides has recently gained attention as a viable option to design materials for application in solar energy conversion, photo-catalysis, transparent electrodes, photo-electrochemical cells, electrochromics and flat panel displays in optoelectronics. Specifically, nitrogen doped tungsten oxide (WO3) has gained much attention for its ability to facilitate optical property tuning while also demonstrating enhanced photo-catalytic and photochemical properties. The effect of nitrogen chemistry and mechanics on the optical and mechanical properties of tungsten oxynitride (W-O-N) nano-coatings is studied in detail in this work. The W-O-N coatings were deposited by direct current (DC) sputtering to a thickness of ˜100 nm and the structural, compositional, optical and mechanical properties were characterized in order to gain a deeper understanding of the effects of nitrogen incorporation and chemical composition. All the W-O-N coatings fabricated under variable nitrogen gas flow rate were amorphous. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements revealed that nitrogen incorporation is effective only for a nitrogen gas flow rates ?9 sccm. Optical characterization using ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) indicate that the nitrogen incorporation induced effects on the optical parameters is significant. The band gap (Eg) values decreased from ˜2.99 eV to ˜1.89 eV indicating a transition from insulating WO3 to metallic-like W-N phase. Nano-mechanical characterization using indentation revealed a corresponding change in mechanical properties; maximum values of 4.46 GPa and 98.5 GPa were noted for hardness and Young?s modulus, respectively. The results demonstrate a clear relationship between the mechanical, physical and optical properties of amorphous W-O-N nano-coatings. The correlation presented in this thesis could

  6. Professor Jin Yuan in ZOC Won the "Grand Challenge 2015 Young Scientist" Award.

    PubMed

    Seliman, Helen X

    2015-12-01

    Professor Yuan Jin from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center (ZOC) affiliated with Sun Yat-sen University has recently won the "Grand Challenge 2015 Young Scientist" award in "2015 Innovation Challenge Annual Meeting" held in Beijing. The meeting is organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People Republic of China (MOST), the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in the United States and the US Agency for International Development. The journal Eye Science (ES) is the official publication of ZOC, sponsored by Sun Yat-sen University. PMID:27214997

  7. Going beyond Won-Loss Record to Identify Competent Coaches: Development of the Coaching Success Questionnaire-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillham, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    Coaching success is often defined in terms of won-loss records. However, the effort to operationalize more comprehensive strategies for examining coaching success, particularly the development of self-report measures, dates back three decades (e.g., Smith, Smoll, & Curtis, 1979). This project for developing the Coaching Success Questionnaire-2…

  8. [Fournier's gangrene, a battle won. Traditional cures versus a polyhexanide solution].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cancio, M Concepción; Verdú Moresco, Aránzazu; Lorente Fernández, Gemma

    2008-11-01

    This article won the top place in the Third Prontosan Scientific Prize in 2008. Fournier's Gangrene is a rare process having an unknown origin which affects soft tissue in the genital and perirectal area. The authors describe the case of a 61 year old patient suffering from this disease, the recommended treatment by the Nurses' Consulting Office for Bed Sores, or Decubitus Ulcers, and Chronic Skin Ulcerations, and the patient's evolution. The medical team carried out a complete evaluation of this patient and his/her injury and took a sample to make a surface culture from. After this initial evaluation, the medical team's first recommendation was to apply treatment consisting of using polyhexanide combined with a calcic alginate dressing to control oozing; the objective of this treatment is to clean and decontaminate the wound and to provide the optimum conditions for a correct cicatrisation process in the least time possible. After 58 days undergoing treatment, the affected area did not show any sign nor symptom of infection and was practically finished with the cicatrisation process. The use of polyhexanide, in this case, proved to be the ideal therapeutic option to clean, decontaminate and maintain the conditions optimum for a correct cicatrisation of this wound.

  9. Nothing a hot bath won't cure: infection rates of amphibian chytrid fungus correlate negatively with water temperature under natural field settings.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Matthew J; Schlaepfer, Martin A

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis), from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10-50°C), including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75-100% in water <15°C, to less than 10% in water >30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications.There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them--Sylvia Plath, "The Bell Jar" (1963).

  10. Nothing a Hot Bath Won't Cure: Infection Rates of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Correlate Negatively with Water Temperature under Natural Field Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis), from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10–50°C), including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75–100% in water <15°C, to less than 10% in water >30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications. There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them - Sylvia Plath, “The Bell Jar” (1963). PMID:22205950

  11. Sara Won't Try.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosser, Sandra

    1996-01-01

    Presents a case study illustrating learned helplessness orientation in preschool children and how adult responses to a child's successes and failures directly influence a child's perception of his or her abilities. Suggests that teachers should compliment successes by highlighting the ability demonstrated and address failures with comments…

  12. Venezuelan oil field revival bids won

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-29

    This paper reports that four private sector companies or combines will operate inactive oil fields in Venezuela under state owned Petroleos de Venezuela's marginal field reactivation program. The award of operating contract to winning bidders marks the first time private companies will be allowed to produce crude oil in Venezuela since nationalization of the industry in 1976. Winning bidders have committed a total of $720 million in investments to the program during the 1990s. Current plans call for drilling 670 appraisals and development wells, conducting 250 workovers and well repairs, and conducting about 2,9000 line km of seismic surveys. Venezuela's energy ministry is targeting a production level of 90,000 b/d by the end of the decade from the reactivated fields.

  13. Bakke: Some Views. Both Sides Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Bertram

    1978-01-01

    Those on both sides of the Bakke case have escalated the rhetoric and predictions of doom if the Supreme Court failed to support their particular view. Now that the Court has spoken, in a way that upholds the tradition of the American promise, both sides must come together to make that promise a reality. (Author/MC)

  14. We Fought for Fairness and Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Maceo

    2015-01-01

    This chapter tells the story of how and why one student who received a ticket for being late to school joined the fight against policies that criminalize students in Los Angeles Unified School District.

  15. Ozone hole won`t worsen?

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1995-10-20

    The timing was fitting. Last week, the chemistry Nobel Prize went to the researchers who first linked chlorine-containing pollutants with stratospheric ozone loss. And last week brought the climax in the annual drama of Antarctic ozone destruction, which begins when the spring sun triggers the ozone-depleting reactions. Satellite and balloon observations showed that the ozone hole is about as deep and wide as ever. But new computer modeling of hole formation suggests that future holes will be no larger.

  16. How Zucchini Won Fifth-Grade Hearts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaliere, Denise

    1987-01-01

    A nutrition education program for grades K through 6 in Arizona is described, and essential elements of the program are given. Children learn about foods and the role of nutrients in health through gardening. (MT)

  17. A Problem That Won't Register.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    Physicians are running into trouble with meeting an EHR meaningful use objective that requires public health reporting. To fulfill the public health reporting objective, physicians must meet two of these three measures: active engagement with a public health agency to submit immunization data; active engagement with a public agency to submit syndromic surveillance data; and active engagement to submit data to a specialized registry.

  18. An Admissions Race that's Already Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mitchell L.

    2008-01-01

    The author recently spent a year and a half in the admissions office of a highly selective Eastern college as an ethnographer, seeking to understand just how admissions officers make their decisions. He accompanied them on recruitment trips to high schools and college fairs, helped manage their offices' relentless current of visitors and mail, and…

  19. Have Ability, Won't Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the sad state of affairs in academic recruitment and retention--of library upper management. Anyone who has taken part in searches for library directors or deans knows frustration first-hand. At times there may be more open leadership positions around the country than there are applicants for them (any applicants whatsoever,…

  20. Information Literacy: The Battle We Won That We Lost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Susanna M.

    2014-01-01

    As we continue to revise our formal definitions of "information literacy" and to hone our delivery of information literacy across higher education, have we failed to see that information literacy as a programmatic aim, for all of its successes to date, is no longer relevant? The essay charts how the institutionalization of information…

  1. Review Says Calcium Supplements Won't Harm the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NOF and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology. Getting calcium from foods such as milk, yogurt ... Erin Michos. She's the associate director of preventive cardiology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in ...

  2. I Won't Back down from Anyone!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeifer, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Routine life stressors can trigger anger and violence with children who have poor emotional regulation. This article describes "Response Ability Pathways" (RAP) strategies that equip youth in managing these daily challenges. The strategies require establishing steps to gain the young persons trust and providing alternative methods to…

  3. Why fat taxes won't make us thin.

    PubMed

    Cornelsen, Laura; Green, Rosemary; Dangour, Alan; Smith, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity has led policy-makers to consider health-related taxes to limit the consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages. Such taxes are currently already in place in countries in Europe (e.g. Hungary, France and Finland) and in various states in the USA. Although these taxes are possibly efficient in reducing by a small amount the consumption of targeted products if the tax is fully transmitted to the consumer, there is too little available evidence on what will be consumed instead and whether these food substitutions undermine the hoped-for health benefits of the tax. We also know very little on how the food supply side will respond and what overall impact this will have. Without a proper appreciation of the potential indirect impacts we do not know the overall impact of taxes foods on unhealthy foods and beverages and further that there is a very real possibility that they may not be beneficial for health after all. PMID:24854986

  4. Winning a Won Game: Caffeine Panacea for Obesity Syndemic

    PubMed Central

    Myslobodsky, M; Eldan, A

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decades, chronic sleep reduction and a concurrent development of obesity have been recognized as a common problem in the industrialized world. Among its numerous untoward effects, there is a possibility that insomnia is also a major contributor to obesity. This attribution poses a problem for caffeine, an inexpensive, “natural” agent that is purported to improve a number of conditions and is often indicated in a long-term pharmacotherapy in the context of weight management. The present study used the “common target” approach by exploring the tentative shared molecular networks of insomnia and adiposity. It discusses caffeine targets beyond those associated with adenosine signaling machinery, phosphodiesterases, and calcium release channels. Here, we provide a view suggesting that caffeine could exert some of its effects by acting on several signaling complexes composed of HIF-1α/VEGF/IL-8 along with NO, TNF-α, IL1, and GHRH, among others. Although the relevance of these targets to the reported therapeutic effects of caffeine has remained difficult to assess, the utilization of caffeine efficacies and potencies recommend its repurposing for development of novel therapeutic approaches. Among indications mentioned, are neuroprotective, nootropic, antioxidant, proliferative, anti-fibrotic, and anti-angiogenic that appear under a variety of dissimilar diagnostic labels comorbid with obesity. In the absence of safe and efficacious antiobesity agents, caffeine remains an attractive adjuvant. PMID:21119886

  5. Why Won't They Just Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbride, Dennis; Stensrud, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The gap (structural hole) between the manner in which rehabilitation agencies and business are structured, organized and managed has grown exponentially over the past 10-20 years. Three key changes have radically transformed American business: the globalization of financial capital and competition, the information technology revolution, and the…

  6. Pakistan and kidney trade: battles won, battles to come.

    PubMed

    Moazam, Farhat

    2013-11-01

    This essay provides a brief overview of the rise of organ trade in Pakistan towards the end of the last century and the concerted, collective struggle--of physicians and medical associations aided by the media, journalists, members of civil society, and senior judiciary--in pressuring the government to bring about and implement a national law criminalizing such practices opposed by an influential pro-organ trade lobby. It argues that among the most effective measures to prevent re-emergence of organ trafficking in the country is increasing ethical live donations and above all, establishing sustainable, public supported deceased donor programs. To do this, the transplant community must recognize that organ transplantation is not merely a donor-recipient-physician transaction but a complex issue in which decisions to donate an organ are influenced by indigenous values and belief systems about human illness, life and death. PMID:23203387

  7. Why Diversity for Diversity's Sake Won't Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delton, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Proponents of "diversity hiring" insist that faculty members of color have a different perspective on issues of race and ethnicity that will increase students' understanding of the multiracial, multicultural world they will inhabit in the 21st century. The mere presence of "diverse" faculty members will prepare students for workplace realities,…

  8. Pakistan and kidney trade: battles won, battles to come.

    PubMed

    Moazam, Farhat

    2013-11-01

    This essay provides a brief overview of the rise of organ trade in Pakistan towards the end of the last century and the concerted, collective struggle--of physicians and medical associations aided by the media, journalists, members of civil society, and senior judiciary--in pressuring the government to bring about and implement a national law criminalizing such practices opposed by an influential pro-organ trade lobby. It argues that among the most effective measures to prevent re-emergence of organ trafficking in the country is increasing ethical live donations and above all, establishing sustainable, public supported deceased donor programs. To do this, the transplant community must recognize that organ transplantation is not merely a donor-recipient-physician transaction but a complex issue in which decisions to donate an organ are influenced by indigenous values and belief systems about human illness, life and death.

  9. Why Won't Physicians Make Nursing Home Visits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Janet B.; Hewes, Helene T.

    1986-01-01

    Michigan physicians (N=930) were asked whether they made nursing home visits and if not, why not. A typology was developed to differentiate among various physician types based on reasons given. Six physician types were found, each identified with a different policy lever that could be used to encourage them to treat nursing home patients. (Author)

  10. Ignoring Rock Won't Make It Go Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarig, Emmett R.

    1970-01-01

    Since American youth have a strong preference for rock music, music educators should cater to this bias. Youth music is here to stay, and the educator's role will be best fulfilled by sharing rather than shunning it. (CK)

  11. Why fat taxes won't make us thin.

    PubMed

    Cornelsen, Laura; Green, Rosemary; Dangour, Alan; Smith, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity has led policy-makers to consider health-related taxes to limit the consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages. Such taxes are currently already in place in countries in Europe (e.g. Hungary, France and Finland) and in various states in the USA. Although these taxes are possibly efficient in reducing by a small amount the consumption of targeted products if the tax is fully transmitted to the consumer, there is too little available evidence on what will be consumed instead and whether these food substitutions undermine the hoped-for health benefits of the tax. We also know very little on how the food supply side will respond and what overall impact this will have. Without a proper appreciation of the potential indirect impacts we do not know the overall impact of taxes foods on unhealthy foods and beverages and further that there is a very real possibility that they may not be beneficial for health after all.

  12. Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... years detailing concerns about injured teen athletes abusing opioid painkillers prescribed by doctors and then moving on to use heroin. Dr. Wilson Compton, deputy director of the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, said he was "surprised" by the findings. He ...

  13. No We Won't! Teachers' Resistance to Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkovich, Izhak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Teachers' resistance to educational reform has been explored, with special attention given to the reasons driving opposition and the resistance practices employed inside school walls. These studies have not, however, examined the agenda setting strategy employed by teachers opposing new policy on the national level, nor has any extensive…

  14. From 1:1 to 1 to Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Don

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses on the emphasis of how 1:1 computing program transforms classroom and education experience for students. Moreover, the author stresses that with this type of program, they have created vision where the culture, curriculum, and chores were designed to meet the needs of the digital age students in terms of rigor…

  15. Faking It Won't Make It in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2004-01-01

    For years, educators and researchers have seen teachers at all grade levels attempt to upgrade their grasp of physics, chemistry, and biology, from basic theories to complex material. Now, the pressure on schools and instructors to improve science instruction is likely to intensify, with approaching federal requirements on states to test students…

  16. Wisdom won from illness: the psychoanalytic grasp of human being.

    PubMed

    Lear, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    From its inception psychoanalysis claimed not merely to be an effective therapy for psychological suffering, but to shed light on the human condition. But what kind of insight does psychoanalysis offer? This paper locates psychoanalysis in the western philosophical tradition, arguing that psychoanalysis provides not only theoretical wisdom about the human, but practical wisdom of a peculiar kind. The human mind, through its self-conscious understanding can be immediately and directly efficacious in shaping its own structure. PMID:24724744

  17. The Tests that Won't Go Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2009-01-01

    There is no doubt that in the past 10 years, school culture has become a testing culture. But all the "multiple measures" do not really lead one to achieve the three most often cited goals of testing: building proficiency in basic skills, closing achievement gaps, and fostering the top-notch knowledge and skills that students will need in a…

  18. "Honey, Won't You Please Stay Home?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Rose Marie

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the stress produced in a "reentry woman's" interpersonal relationships with her husband and family in terms of balance theory. She also offers suggestions as to how colleges might develop programs to help these women. (Author)

  19. How adaptive optics may have won the Cold War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    2013-05-01

    While there are many theories and studies concerning the end of the Cold War, circa 1990, I postulate that one of the contributors to the result was the development of adaptive optics. The emergence of directed energy weapons, specifically space-based and ground-based high energy lasers made practicable with adaptive optics, showed that a successful defense against inter-continental ballistic missiles was not only possible, but achievable in a reasonable period of time.

  20. Clinton won't defend HIV law; repeal proposed.

    PubMed

    1996-02-23

    President Bill Clinton signed into law a $256 billion defense authorization bill with a provision that forces the Pentagon to discharge all HIV-positive service members. Though Clinton opposes provision Section 567, he agreed to sign the bill because it was less restrictive than a bill he vetoed in December 1995. The administration regards the provision, introduced by Rep. Robert K. Dornan, R-CA, as unconstitutional and unwise, and will not defend it in court. Section 567 requires service members infected with HIV-1 to be discharged. Discharged service members are entitled to medical and dental care from the Veterans Affairs Department, but their dependents lose their government-funded health benefits. Defense Secretary William Perry opposes this provision, and will set in motion procedures to effectuate it immediately, thereby giving service members an opportunity to file suit immediately.

  1. Banning Weapons on Campuses: The Battle Is Far from Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLelland, Sandra J.; Frenkil, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Utah is the only state that prohibits its state institutions from barring guns on its campuses. The University of Utah fought that statutory requirement vigorously in court, but the interests of pro-gun groups prevailed. In 2006 the Supreme Court of Utah held that the university lacked the authority to issue firearms policies, including barring…

  2. Who Won the Debate in Women Education? Rousseau or Wollstonecraft?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu-Gyamfi, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum framework in the education of children became debatable during the enlightenment. Jean-Jacque Rousseau's treatise, "Emile," outlined an educational curriculum based on natural rights. Rousseau thought education should be based on espousing and exploring the natural abilities of a person. Therefore, since women have a natural…

  3. Oil and gas men who won't play dead

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsker, G.

    1982-06-01

    Stable prices and declining lease and drilling costs make this a good time to invest in the independent oil and gas business despite the current supply glut. Examples of successful entrepreneurs among the 3000 new producers who entered the business in the last two years will more than balance those undercapitalized firms that will fail. Most of the new companies prefer the limited partnership approach to financing, while tax sheltering is becoming less attractive. Learning the importance of avoiding debt financing, oilmen have turned to voluntary assessments and public stock offerings. Investors will profit because of tax losses in 1982, besides the fact that 65% of the domestic production is decontrolled gas and a proposed import tax on oil will stabilize domestic prices. 1 figure. (DCK)

  4. Children Who Won't Go to School (Separation Anxiety)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep have nightmares have exaggerated, unrealistic fears of animals, monster, burglars fear being alone in the dark, or have severe tantrums when forced to go to school Such symptoms and behaviors are common among children with separation anxiety disorder. ...

  5. Impotence Drugs Won't Raise Melanoma Risk, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... in these patients is likely due to more sun exposure To use the sharing features on this page, ... in some cases. In particular, they suggested that sun exposure may play a big role. The study was ...

  6. How Zucchini Won 5th-Grade Hearts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaliere, Denise

    1987-01-01

    Describes an innovative gardening/nutrition education program in Tucson, Arizona, public elementary schools--Meals for Millions "Sow and Grow"--where children in kindergarten to sixth grade invest time and "tender loving cultivation" into their own school vegetable gardens and learn to like foods--zucchini--that are good for them. (Author/BB)

  7. Library Thefts: A Problem that Won't Go Away.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the increasing rate of book losses in libraries and some ways to combat the problem. Topics covered include: who steals; what is being taken; how much is disappearing; results of loss; theft detection systems; effectiveness of detection systems; whether you should invest in a system; and mutilation, an unwanted by-product. (JPF)

  8. Fire Won't Wait--Plan Your Escape!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the importance of home fire escape drills, detailing fire safety plans. Early detection and warning (smoke detectors) coupled with well-rehearsed escape plans help prevent serious injury. Children need to be taught about fire safety beginning at a very early age. (SM)

  9. Why won't Polish women birth at home?

    PubMed

    Pendleton, John

    2015-09-01

    Polish women living in the United Kingdom (UK) are statistically more likely to have normal births than their British counterparts, yet anecdotally, do not choose to birth their babies at home. A medicalised approach to birth in their country of origin means women are unaware of the benefits of midwifery-led care, which they often perceive as sub-standard. Affordable travel means Polish women can access care in both countries and compounds the difficulties in acclimatising to UK maternity services. Online discussion groups and Internet forums represent an opportunity for midwives to engage with women to promote their services. This is increasingly important with rising numbers of both Polish migrants to the UK and Polish residents applying for British citizenship. PMID:26547999

  10. 2 Aspirin and Bedrest Won't Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scagliotta, Edward G.

    1983-01-01

    The author contends that falling barometric pressure hampers the flow of blood throughout the nervous system, thus encouraging maladaptive behavior in some neurologically impaired children. Among guidelines offered are to create a calm environment and to check the barometer frequently during the day. (CL)

  11. Donated Blood Won't Transmit Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... exceedingly rare," said Gomolin. He is chief of geriatric medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N. ... Hyde Park, NY; Irving Gomolin, M.D., chief, geriatric medicine, Winthrop-University Hospital, Mineola, N.Y.; June ...

  12. "A campaign won as a public issue will stay won": using cartoons and comics to fight national health care reform, 1940s and beyond.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-02-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption "Result of ObamaCare" to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word "socialism." The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform.

  13. "A campaign won as a public issue will stay won": using cartoons and comics to fight national health care reform, 1940s and beyond.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-02-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption "Result of ObamaCare" to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word "socialism." The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform. PMID:24328659

  14. "Don׳t" versus "won׳t": principles, mechanisms, and intention in action inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Brass, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide a theoretical analysis of the role of intentions in inhibition. We will first outline four dimensions along which inhibition can be categorized: intentionality, timing, specificity, and the nature of the to-be-inhibited action. Next, we relate the concept of inhibition to theories of intentional action. In particular, we integrate ideomotor theory with motor control theories that involve predictive forward modeling of the consequences of one׳s action, and evaluate how the dimensional classification of inhibition fits into such an integrative approach. Furthermore, we will outline testable predictions that derive from this novel hypothesis of ideomotor inhibition. We then discuss the viability of the ideomotor inhibition hypothesis and our classification in view of the available evidence on the neural mechanisms of action inhibition, indicating that sensorimotor and ideomotor inhibition engages largely overlapping networks with additional recruitment of dFMC for ideomotor inhibition.

  15. Have the Creationists Already Won? or The Teaching of Faux-Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firenze, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the perspectives of several biologists who believe that evolutionary theory is the key to an understanding of biology. Cites examples from textbooks and educational practices which support the theory that many students develop and maintain misconceptions about evolution due to instruction. Contains 53 references. (DDR)

  16. Oh, Won't You Stay? Predictors of Faculty Intent to Leave a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John F.; Healy, Richard; Sullivan, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Understanding and predicting faculty intent to leave is important to the development of improved conceptual frameworks of faculty success as well as the implementation of effective retention strategies for academic leaders and institutions that invest considerable resources in recruitment, institutional support, and compensation. This study…

  17. Waiting to be Won Over: Teachers Speak on the Profession, Unions, and Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffett, Ann; Farkas, Steve; Rothertham, Andrew J.; Silva, Elena

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of a survey of 1,010 K-12 public school teachers about their views on the teaching profession, teachers unions, and various reforms aimed at improving teacher quality. It reveals the challenges teachers see in their profession, including weak evaluation processes and a rigid tenure pay system; how teachers feel…

  18. Why Won't You Do What I Want? The Informative Failures of Children and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatham, Christopher H.; Yerys, Benjamin E.; Munakata, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    Computational models are powerful tools--too powerful, according to some. We argue that the idea that models can "do anything" is wrong, and we describe how their failures have been informative. We present new work showing surprising diversity in the effects of feedback on children's task-switching, such that some children perseverate despite this…

  19. [Words that won't fade off in the wind: identity and diagnosis in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Levín, Santiago A

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is to analyze the role of the word pronounced by members of the health staff as it is constitutive of identity in the patient recepting the word. How is identity constructed? How does the word spoken by a significant Other impinge on this process? In particular, what about the influence of words denoting medical diagnoses? Regarding such queries we also look, on a preliminary basis, at each of the two main currents in Western medicine (biomedicine and medical anthropology), to find out if and how it addresses the relation between the word as an element of identity and the same word as a therapeutic tool.

  20. Why Won't He Play with Me?: Facilitating Sibling Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Ling-Ling; McCabe, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Social and play skills are important developmental tasks for young children. Typically developing children learn appropriate social skills quite naturally and without specific intervention while interacting with other children in playful environments. Young children with disabilities, however, usually need social skills interventions, and these…

  1. On-the-job training won't cut it any more, experts say.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Today's case managers need far more than on-the-job training to understand the complexities of the job and all of the tasks they must do on a daily basis. The length and content of the training must be geared to individual case managers and take into account their knowledge, skill set and experience. New case managers should be able to pass competencies and should meet with the case manager director and the person doing the training at the end of the week to discuss how the training is going. Hospital case managers must develop their own case management training programs that are based on hospital procedures and policies, specific job descriptions, and goals of the department, some experts say. In many cases, rather than hiring an experienced case manager who may not fit well into your department, it's better to hire someone with the characteristics you are looking for and teach him or her case management.

  2. Intractable Headache - The Pain in Your Head that Just Won't Quit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  3. When Protein Crystallography Won't Show You the Membranes (446th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin

    2009-02-18

    High fever, stomach ache, coughing, sneezing, and fatigue -- these are all painful signs that you may have caught the flu virus. But how does your body actually 'catch' a virus? Somewhere along the way, the virus infected your body by penetrating the membranes, or surfaces, of some of your body's cells. And then it spreads. Cell membranes are permeable surfaces made of proteins and lipids that allow vital materials to enter and exit cells. Many proteins and cell structures are studied at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) using a procedure called protein crystallography. But they sometimes have unique characteristics that do not allow them to be easily studied using this widely adopted method. These characteristics make it difficult to understand the cell membrane structure and its ability to both welcome and refuse certain materials and viruses, such as the flu, on behalf of the cell's internal components. Yang will explain the protein crystallography procedure, the simple structure of the cell membrane, and the unusual characteristics of its proteins and lipids. He will also discuss a new, unique method being developed at the NSLS to study proteins and lipids within their native environment as they form the essential permeable surface of a cell membrane.

  4. Why Won't They Listen: Negotiating the Technological and Social Context for Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liuzzo, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather information to identify the obstacles and the impact an implementation of technology had in a middle school science classroom. This study explored a teaching environment where the teacher planned on using a variety of technology tools including laptops, probeware, hardware and software to promote scientific…

  5. When Nice Won't Suffice: Honest Discourse Is Key to Shifting School Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    The "culture of nice" is the underlying culture that inhibits a team of teachers from reaching a level of rigorous collaborative discourse where teachers are challenging each other's and their own thinking, beliefs, assumptions, and practice. This article discusses how honest discourse can be the key to shifting school culture. The act of…

  6. Why the war on drugs in sport will never be won.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron C T; Stewart, Bob

    2015-11-10

    Recent exposes of drug use in sports suggest that doping might be more problematic than doping-control test results reveal. A zero-tolerance (ZT) model, which aims to eliminate the use, has dominated the thinking of sport's policy makers over the last 15 years. In light of the limitations associated with ZT-based policy, we propose an alternative policy, one based on controlled use and harm reduction principles. We argue that substance control policies underpinned by harm reduction (HR) principles of social utility and public value will deliver superior social outcomes. First, a harm reduction approach better accommodates the competitive realities of sports and the impact of elite sports' emphasis on performance at all costs. Second, HR prioritises athlete welfare over sport and brand reputation. Finally, while appreciating the regulatory and risk management responsibilities of sports' governing bodies, the HR model offers greater space to the athlete's right to privacy, and right to personal autonomy.

  7. When Rights Just Won't Do: Ethical Considerations When Making Decisions for Severely Disabled Newborns.

    PubMed

    Hester, D Micah; Lew, Cheryl D; Swota, Alissa

    2016-01-01

    Children born with severe handicapping conditions, where survival and quality of survival is indeterminate, present special challenges for families and health-care professionals tasked with deciding the best courses of treatment and care. The case of Baby G presents an opportunity to compare the relative effectiveness of ethical versus rights theories in providing guidance about what obligations are owed to such children at bedside and how those obligations pertain to broader societal duties in a rights framework. We review common theories of determining the "best interests standard" of newborn decision-making and the priority of families to decide on behalf of their children. We then discuss what support the rights framework of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) might lend to the best implementation of clinical ethics decision-making. Finally, we conclude that the universal nature of rights theory does not provide the particular, specific guidance needed at the bedside of the critically ill infant. PMID:27157349

  8. "You Won't Remember Me": The Schoolboys of Barbiana Speak to Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Marvin

    2007-01-01

    In this volume in the "Between Teacher and Text Series", the author provides a contemporary interpretation of the 1967 text "Letter to a Teacher by the Schoolboys of Barbiana". The original text, a searing indictment of class bias in Italian schools, was released in English in 1970, and its ideas about education and socioeconomic class influenced…

  9. When Talking Won't Work: Implementing Experiential Group Activities with Addicted Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Hirshhorn, Meredith A.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional talk therapy, particularly cognitive behavioral techniques, are often ineffective when working with addicted clients for many reasons. By tapping into the power of the group modality, experiential activities can serve as a powerful facilitator of insight and behavior change. The authors provide a brief review of the literature followed…

  10. Between Teacher & Parent: Helping the Child Who Won't Join the Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodkin, Adele M.

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with the problem between the teacher and parent of a child who will not participate in group activities. Here, the author features the teacher's story as well as the parent's story. Some children take a long time to warm up to group play. Often, these are imaginative youngsters who are quite content to amuse themselves. They may…

  11. Small Changes Won't Assure Sustainability--but Reimagining Might

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdaway, Xarissa

    2008-01-01

    Almost every day, the author learns about new green buildings from press releases. One example is that of Arizona State University's new Biodesign Institute, a soaring, "uber"-chic, high-performance, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-certified center. However, the author maintains that such buildings are undoubtedly a step up from…

  12. Youth Work and Ethics: Why the "Professional Turn" Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Youth work is deemed to require a distinctive commitment to ethical behaviour from the adults involved. This is expressed in the requirements for the initial education of workers, in the subject benchmarks and national expectations for youth workers. A significant influence in this debate is Howard Sercombe. Sercombe seeks a substantive framework…

  13. "I Won't Write--But I'll Do Calligraphy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Peg; Duncan, Karen F.

    1980-01-01

    The article presents a technique for using calligraphy instruction to develop pride and skill in written expression with special students. Guidelines for the teacher cover materials needed, instructional procedures, and remedial advantages for students with handwriting problems. (SBH)

  14. Rheumatic disease in wartime: gouty generals in battles lost or won.

    PubMed

    Pinals, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    Leadership by a commander is an important determinant of military outcomes. This report describes 2 19th-century wars in which the commanding general was afflicted with severe, disabling gout. In the First Afghan War (1839-1942), the result was disastrous, but in the Spanish-American War (1898), subordinates ignored the general's orders and saved the day.

  15. "When the pain won't wane it's mainly in the brain".

    PubMed

    Pawl, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain syndromes either have no underlying organic explanation, or include patients whose chronic pain complaints (without focal deficits or significant radiographic findings) were not alleviated by surgery (in 80% of cases). Patients with chronic pain typically "turn off" members of the medical community; they are often "written off" as malingerers or psychiatric cases. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory often shows elevations on the hysteria and hypochondriasis scales; together these constitute somatization defined as patients converting emotional distress into bodily complaints. Depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorders are also often encountered. Secondary gain also plays a critical role in patients with chronic pain syndromes (e.g., includes avoiding onerous tasks/work, or rewards opioid-seeking behaviors). Tertiary gain pertains to the physicians' financial rewards for administering ineffective and repeated treatment of these patients, while validating for the patient that there is truly something organically wrong with them. Self-mutilation (part of Munchausen Syndrome/Fictitious Disorders) also brings these chronic pain patients to the attention of the medical community. They are also often involved in the legal system (e.g., workmen's compensation or tort action) that in the United States, unfortunately financially rewards "pain and suffering." The main purpose of this commentary is to reeducate spinal surgeons about the pitfalls of operating on patients with chronic pain syndromes in the absence of significant neurological deficits or radiographic findings, as such "last ditch surgery" invariably fails. PMID:23878768

  16. Middle management terminations: things HR probably won't tell you.

    PubMed

    Snuttjer, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Being a manager or director, you may have received training for how to prepare your subordinates for layoffs or terminations. But, would you be prepared if the employee being terminated were you? Termination practice rules for a manager are very different from the rules required for a staff employee. There are many things you can do ahead of time to help you respond to being terminated: Keep copies of important information at home. If you are terminated, you may be asked to go home without going back to your office for an extended time. If you are given time to consider options, you will do that from your home. Keep a copy of an updated resume on file. If you do not have internet, email or fax capabilities at your home, get them. Many companies offer ongoing education as a benefit option. Take advantage of it. Ongoing education will keep as many doors open as possible as you look for another job. Keep copies of summary plan descriptions of your benefits, especially your retirement plan. To be prepared for change, you should know the "street value" of the benefits that you require. Make sure you have an attorney you can trust. Find out how many years of experience in employment law he or she has. Also, make sure your current attorney would not have a conflict of interest in handling your case against your company. There are no set laws for severance benefits, but your company may have a policy based on the years of service and the level of management. Upon receipt of a severance agreement, you should have it reviewed by your attorney. You will be given a time frame within which to sign or to respond to the proposal. The company will offer the least amount they feel you will accept, and it is appropriate to negotiate the severance agreement. Termination is not the time to make amends for hard feelings that may have been created in the workplace. The advice, "Always be a little nicer than you have to be," will bear fruit when you are looking for a new job. Your reputation will precede you. Remember that your job does not define who you are. You are defined by the endless decisions you have made, actions you have taken, the relationships you have built and the values you have portrayed. Your job description may change, but you will not. If you have done your job in a way that you can be proud of, then you have been successful. Change can be difficult, but change is always easier if you are prepared. Job changes are not always within your control, but preparing to accept the change is something that managers can control.

  17. Applying the Helmholtz illusion to fashion: horizontal stripes won't make you look fatter.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Peter; Mikellidou, Kyriaki

    2011-01-01

    A square composed of horizontal lines appears taller and narrower than an identical square made up of vertical lines. Reporting this illusion, Hermann von Helmholtz noted that such illusions, in which filled space seems to be larger than unfilled space, were common in everyday life, adding the observation that ladies' frocks with horizontal stripes make the figure look taller. As this assertion runs counter to modern popular belief, we have investigated whether vertical or horizontal stripes on clothing should make the wearer appear taller or fatter. We find that a rectangle of vertical stripes needs to be extended by 7.1% vertically to match the height of a square of horizontal stripes and that a rectangle of horizontal stripes must be made 4.5% wider than a square of vertical stripes to match its perceived width. This illusion holds when the horizontal or vertical lines are on the dress of a line drawing of a woman. We have examined the claim that these effects apply only for 2-dimensional figures in an experiment with 3-D cylinders and find no support for the notion that horizontal lines would be 'fattening' on clothes. Significantly, the illusion persists when the horizontal or vertical lines are on pictures of a real half-body mannequin viewed stereoscopically. All the evidence supports Helmholtz's original assertion.

  18. 47 CFR 24.712 - Bidding credits for licenses won for frequency Block C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Block C. 24.712 Section 24.712 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Broadband PCS § 24... business, as defined in § 24.720(b)(1), or a consortium of small businesses may use a bidding credit...

  19. Gilded and gelded. Hard-won lessons from the PR wars.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dick

    2003-10-01

    A golden statue of a winged youth once perched on the roof of AT&T's old headquarters. But when AT&T lowered the 24-foot-high statue for regilding so that it could be placed in the company's new headquarters, the chairman was shocked to discover that the figure was anatomically correct. So he decreed that it also be gelded. The altered "Golden Boy" thus became a metaphor for AT&T's recent embattled history, and it serves as a cautionary symbol for all companies operating in today's brutal business environment, where perception can be as important as reality. While image consultants and executives work to gild a company's image, special interest groups and the media can geld a company with countless little cuts. The author, a former executive vice president of public relations for AT&T, provides an insider's view of some of the company's most painful public-relations scrapes. They include the collapse of two apparent CEO succession plans, AT&T's inability to meet heightened expectations after Mike Armstrong was appointed CEO, and the racially charged furor over a cartoon in an employee publication. The author offers four lessons: Don't become hypnotized by your own buzz; understand the way the business media think; address the needs of all your stakeholders; and be sensitive to the possible emotional resonance of what appear to be straightforward facts. To illustrate the final point, the author mentions AT&T's elimination of 40,000 jobs in 1996. Wall Street was impressed, but NBC's Tom Brokaw said the workforce reduction might signal "another long, anxious year for the American middle class." No rational argument from AT&T could overcome the layoffs' symbolic impact. Wounded but wiser after numerous public-relations battles, the company eventually learned to stop aggregating job-reduction information for the media. PMID:14521097

  20. "Why Won't You Just Read It?": Comic Books and Community in the 1950s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler-Kassner, Linda

    A study explored the debate over comic books and children in the 1950s, addressing the communication role of comic books in forming a new community of comic book fans during that period. Using E.C. (Educational Comics) comic books as a case study, the conventions of the comic books, correspondence between producers and consumers, and articles by…

  1. Why won't they listen: Negotiating the technological and social context for science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Anna M.

    The purpose of this study was to gather information to identify the obstacles and the impact an implementation of technology had in a middle school science classroom. This study explored a teaching environment where the teacher planned on using a variety of technology tools including laptops, probeware, hardware and software to promote scientific study. This study took place in two phases consisting of three consecutive years. In phase one the teacher reported great success. In phase two a shift in the school implementation created a significant impact on the learning taking place. This study identified the obstacles faced by a teacher providing an environment that combined her pedagogy with technology implementation. This teacher's pedagogy included research-based practices such a authentic problem-based learning, scientific inquiry, conceptual understanding of problem solving, connections to real-life situations and the use of metacognition in her practice. This study looked to determined if this implementation had an effect on student engagement and achievement; how the nature of technical and professional development impacted the implementation; and the barriers that were faced in creating a student-centered, technology rich approach to science. This qualitative study was conducted meeting the criteria of a case study of one teacher. The participant teacher's accounts of events through interviews were the primary source of data. In addition, multiple sources of information were also gathered. These included the teacher's reflective journal, student interviews, student focus groups, student artifacts, classroom observations, field notes, e-mail correspondences and students' test scores. This study proposes to contribute to the growing research evidence of implementation in the classroom and to identify specific obstacles that hinder success. The current state of education is calling for reform.

  2. "He Won't Get Anything out of This!" Intersections of Race, Disability, and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theoharis, George; Causton, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This case describes the leadership role and challenges in moving a school in a more inclusive direction for students with disabilities. Assistant Principal Mosier plays a key role and in that role meets Charles, sixth grader, who has been educated in self-contained special education. While 58% of the students at Reynolds are African American and…

  3. Tinnitus -- The Noise in Your Head that Won't Go Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Noise in Your Head that Won’t Go Away Almost everyone has experienced tinnitus—what’s commonly ... inner ear and the brain where things can go wrong to cause tinnitus. If we can understand ...

  4. EPA`s White Paper won`t ease everyone`s Title V headaches

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued a White Paper for Streamlined Development of a Part 70 Permit Application. The paper was developed in response to industry`s and permitting authorities` concerns that the current permitting process is costly and burdensome. The paper comes on the heels of a recent congressional debate over EPA cutbacks and intervention in the air program. This policy statement appears to be an attempt to keep Congress at bay while appeasing industry in the wake of numerous lawsuits which were filed after the original Part 70 regulations were issued. The White Paper acknowledges the lack of clarity in the original Part 70 permit program, and attempts to limit the scope and responsibility that sources have in preparing a complete Title 5 application. Unfortunately for many sources, states already have initiated their Title 5 programs and, in many cases, already have requested application submittals. It is unlikely that these states will be able to revise state laws, regulations and applications in time for sources to take advantage of the change in EPA`s position.

  5. The Humanities: Who Won the '90s in Scholarly Book Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberley, Stephen E., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data on prize-winning books during the 1990s from the American Historical Association, American Musicological Society, the College Art Association, and the Modern Language Association. Suggests that studying awards from the leading humanities scholarly associations can tell much about the disciplines, publishing industry, and library…

  6. Trading trash: why the U.S. won't sign on to the Basel convention.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C W

    1999-01-01

    Environmentalists worry that hazardous wastes produced in industrialized nations are being dumped in cash-starved developing countries--the countries with the least political or economic clout to resist and the fewest resources for managing these toxic imports. Imported waste can pose a serious threat to the health of human populations and ecosystems if not managed appropriately. In 1989, the international community initiated efforts to reduce the flow of hazardous wastes from industrialized countries to developing countries by drafting a treaty known as the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Wastes and their Disposal. The convention's mission is to strictly regulate the international transfer of hazardous wastes and to ensure that wastes are managed and disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. Although the United States supports the convention in theory, it remains the only industrialized country within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development yet to ratify it. However, legislation drafted by the Clinton administration that is soon to go before the 106th Congress could make the United States a party to the convention. PMID:10417374

  7. Gilded and gelded. Hard-won lessons from the PR wars.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dick

    2003-10-01

    A golden statue of a winged youth once perched on the roof of AT&T's old headquarters. But when AT&T lowered the 24-foot-high statue for regilding so that it could be placed in the company's new headquarters, the chairman was shocked to discover that the figure was anatomically correct. So he decreed that it also be gelded. The altered "Golden Boy" thus became a metaphor for AT&T's recent embattled history, and it serves as a cautionary symbol for all companies operating in today's brutal business environment, where perception can be as important as reality. While image consultants and executives work to gild a company's image, special interest groups and the media can geld a company with countless little cuts. The author, a former executive vice president of public relations for AT&T, provides an insider's view of some of the company's most painful public-relations scrapes. They include the collapse of two apparent CEO succession plans, AT&T's inability to meet heightened expectations after Mike Armstrong was appointed CEO, and the racially charged furor over a cartoon in an employee publication. The author offers four lessons: Don't become hypnotized by your own buzz; understand the way the business media think; address the needs of all your stakeholders; and be sensitive to the possible emotional resonance of what appear to be straightforward facts. To illustrate the final point, the author mentions AT&T's elimination of 40,000 jobs in 1996. Wall Street was impressed, but NBC's Tom Brokaw said the workforce reduction might signal "another long, anxious year for the American middle class." No rational argument from AT&T could overcome the layoffs' symbolic impact. Wounded but wiser after numerous public-relations battles, the company eventually learned to stop aggregating job-reduction information for the media.

  8. Induced Labor Won't Raise Autism Risk in Kids, Research Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... will not increase their child's risk of developing autism spectrum disorders," said senior researcher Dr. Brian Bateman. He's an ... induced labor and a greater risk for an autism spectrum disorder. This association disappeared, however, once they also considered ...

  9. America's uninsured. Rethinking the problem that won't go away.

    PubMed

    Thrall, Terese Hudson; Scalise, Dagmara

    2002-11-01

    Even as the number of uninsured Americans surpasses 41 million and continues to climb, the issue is not a front-burner concern with policy-makers, the public or even many providers. Why does this seeming apathy--and political paralysis--prevail and what will it take to galvanize health care stakeholders to action?

  10. Unmet Needs in LDL-C Lowering: When Statins Won't Do!

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, Stephan; Pavik-Mezzour, Ivana; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-08-01

    The use of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering medications has led to a significant reduction of cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. Statin therapy, one of the cornerstones for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD), has been demonstrated to be effective in lowering LDL-C levels and in reducing the risk for CVD and is generally well-tolerated. However, compliance with statins remains suboptimal. One of the main reasons is limitations by adverse events, notably myopathies, which can lead to non-compliance with the prescribed statin regimen. Reducing the burden of elevated LDL-C levels is critical in patients with CVD as well as in patients with very high baseline levels of LDL-C (e.g. patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia), as statin therapy is insufficient for optimally reducing LDL-C below target values. In this review, we discuss alternative treatment options after maximally tolerated doses of statin therapy, including ezetimibe, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. Difficult-to-treat patients may benefit from combination therapy with ezetimibe or a PCSK9 inhibitor (evolocumab or alirocumab, which are now available). Updates of treatment guidelines are needed to guide the management of patients who will best benefit from these new treatments. PMID:27456066

  11. Failing Our Kids: Why the Testing Craze Won't Fix Our Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swope, Kathy, Ed.; Miner, Barbara, Ed.

    This book presents more than 50 articles from parents, community activists, teachers, students, and researchers that analyze standardized tests and outline alternative ways to assess how well students are learning. The seven sections look at: (1) "The Testing Craze: An Overview," including "Why Standardized Tests Are Bad" (Terry Meier) and…

  12. Initial Opposition--Won't Portfolio Assessment Take Away Teacher Autonomy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Marcia

    Unacknowledged and untended opposition can lead the "resistance" to destroy even the best planned of portfolio systems. The greatest cause of initial resistance to portfolio assessment is the fear that teachers will lose their autonomy and/or authority in the classroom. Writing instructors need to ask themselves about issues of control and…

  13. When "t"-Tests or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Tests Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Fiona; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chan, Shun-Kai; Wade, Angie

    2010-01-01

    "t"-Tests are widely used by researchers to compare the average values of a numeric outcome between two groups. If there are doubts about the suitability of the data for the requirements of a "t"-test, most notably the distribution being non-normal, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test may be used instead. However, although often applied, both tests may…

  14. Joseph Erlanger (1874-1965): the cardiovascular investigator who won a Nobel Prize in neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S; Moynihan, John B

    2014-11-01

    Born in San Francisco in 1874 into the family of German immigrants in which he was the only one to proceed beyond elementary education, Joseph Erlanger graduated from the University of California (Berkeley) in 1894. He was about to enter the local Cooper Medical School when he was told that the new medical school in Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore) aimed to surpass all others, and there he graduated and was later coached for a career in academic life by William H Howell (1860-1945). In due course he held the Chairs of Physiology in the University of Wisconsin (Madison) and Washington University at St Louis, Missouri. He showed that the Bundle of His is indeed the functional link between the atria and the ventricles in the mammalian heart and that the Korotkoff sounds are produced by a 'breaker' phenomenon resulting from instability of the pulse wave in a partially occluded artery. With Herbert S Gasser (1888-1963) he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1944 for their work on action currents in peripheral nerve fibres. The history of science occupied him during his retirement. He died at St Louis in 1965. PMID:24585622

  15. Middle management terminations: things HR probably won't tell you.

    PubMed

    Snuttjer, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Being a manager or director, you may have received training for how to prepare your subordinates for layoffs or terminations. But, would you be prepared if the employee being terminated were you? Termination practice rules for a manager are very different from the rules required for a staff employee. There are many things you can do ahead of time to help you respond to being terminated: Keep copies of important information at home. If you are terminated, you may be asked to go home without going back to your office for an extended time. If you are given time to consider options, you will do that from your home. Keep a copy of an updated resume on file. If you do not have internet, email or fax capabilities at your home, get them. Many companies offer ongoing education as a benefit option. Take advantage of it. Ongoing education will keep as many doors open as possible as you look for another job. Keep copies of summary plan descriptions of your benefits, especially your retirement plan. To be prepared for change, you should know the "street value" of the benefits that you require. Make sure you have an attorney you can trust. Find out how many years of experience in employment law he or she has. Also, make sure your current attorney would not have a conflict of interest in handling your case against your company. There are no set laws for severance benefits, but your company may have a policy based on the years of service and the level of management. Upon receipt of a severance agreement, you should have it reviewed by your attorney. You will be given a time frame within which to sign or to respond to the proposal. The company will offer the least amount they feel you will accept, and it is appropriate to negotiate the severance agreement. Termination is not the time to make amends for hard feelings that may have been created in the workplace. The advice, "Always be a little nicer than you have to be," will bear fruit when you are looking for a new job. Your reputation will precede you. Remember that your job does not define who you are. You are defined by the endless decisions you have made, actions you have taken, the relationships you have built and the values you have portrayed. Your job description may change, but you will not. If you have done your job in a way that you can be proud of, then you have been successful. Change can be difficult, but change is always easier if you are prepared. Job changes are not always within your control, but preparing to accept the change is something that managers can control. PMID:12229056

  16. Hemophilia relief bill passes, but money won't arrive soon.

    PubMed

    1998-11-27

    The Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief Act, signed by President Clinton, authorized up to $750 million in compensation to hemophiliacs infected with HIV through 1987 from contaminated blood products. That amount represents an estimated $100,000 per hemophiliac or survivor. The money will hopefully be available in fiscal 2000, subject to Congress passing a specific appropriations bill.

  17. Build a Wind Tunnel that Won't Blow Your Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author gives basic information on constructing a wind tunnel that teachers can use for instructional activities with their students for many years to come. He illustrates and describes the procedure and materials that he developed in constructing his own wind tunnel. This information should be viewed as a guide. (Contains 1…

  18. The Battle for the History Books: Who Won the Cold War?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerson, Adam

    1990-01-01

    Discusses liberal and conservative foreign policy contributions to the end of the Cold War, as marked by the rapid liberalization of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. Emphasizes that the collapse of the Soviet empire occurred at the end of a decade of sustained conservative government in every major country of the Western world. (FMW)

  19. Misunderstanding Education: Why Increasing College Enrollments Can't and Won't Fix the Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The College Board has just published a "Wake-up Call to the American People and American Educators." In a report entitled "Coming to Our Senses," it argues that this "nation's dominant position in the world order is at great risk.... Across the globe, leaders have put their faith in education. They understand that economic growth rests largely on…

  20. How Superstition Won and Science Lost. Popularizing Science and Health in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, John C.

    This book studies the history of changing patterns in the dissemination, or popularization of scientific findings, to the general public since 1830. It focuses on three different areas of science: (1) health; (2) psychology; and (3) the natural sciences. The document explores the ways in which this process of popularization has deteriorated. It…

  1. Why the war on drugs in sport will never be won.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron C T; Stewart, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Recent exposes of drug use in sports suggest that doping might be more problematic than doping-control test results reveal. A zero-tolerance (ZT) model, which aims to eliminate the use, has dominated the thinking of sport's policy makers over the last 15 years. In light of the limitations associated with ZT-based policy, we propose an alternative policy, one based on controlled use and harm reduction principles. We argue that substance control policies underpinned by harm reduction (HR) principles of social utility and public value will deliver superior social outcomes. First, a harm reduction approach better accommodates the competitive realities of sports and the impact of elite sports' emphasis on performance at all costs. Second, HR prioritises athlete welfare over sport and brand reputation. Finally, while appreciating the regulatory and risk management responsibilities of sports' governing bodies, the HR model offers greater space to the athlete's right to privacy, and right to personal autonomy. PMID:26556215

  2. Diversity in academic medicine no. 2 history of battles lost and won.

    PubMed

    Strelnick, A Hal; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Nivet, Marc; Soto-Greene, Maria L

    2008-12-01

    Spurred by its rapidly changing demographics, the United States is striving to reduce and eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. To do so, it must overcome the legacy of individual, institutional, and structural racism and resolve conflicts in related political and social ideologies. This has moved the struggle over diversity in the health professions outside the laboratories and ivy-covered walls of academic medicine into the halls of Congress and chambers of the US Supreme Court. Although equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs began as legal remedies for distinct histories of legally sanctioned racial and gender discrimination, they also became effective means for increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities in higher education and the health professions. Beginning in the 1970s and continuing today, legal challenges to measures for realizing equal opportunity and leveling the playing field have reached the US Supreme Court and state-wide ballot initiatives. These historical challenges and successes are the subject of this article. Although the history is not exhaustive, it aims to provide an important context for the struggles of advocates to improve the representation of underrepresented minorities in medicine and reduce racial and ethnic health disparities. PMID:19021213

  3. Motivation in Childhood Autism: Can They or Won't They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Robert L.; Mentis, Michelle

    1985-01-01

    Research suggests that motivation of autistic children can be increased and that this may be a crucial variable in the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of their treatment gains. Discussion focuses on effects of failure on motivation, learned helplessness, shared control and increased success, and strategies for increasing exposure to…

  4. As cost of living grows, a 1% rise won't go far.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christine

    2016-01-20

    A pay rise of no more than 1% is what nurses in England can expect in the coming year. This - coupled with fewer automatic incremental pay increases year on year under the national pay system Agenda for Change and more links to performance - is in the health department's main evidence to the independent pay review body. PMID:26786418

  5. Malaysia family-planning centers strive to maintain gains won in 15-year period.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R

    1968-09-12

    Family planning in Malaysia is discussed. Family planning began in Malaysia about 15 years ago through the efforts of voluntary family Planning Associations in the various Malay states. In 1966 the Malaysian Parliament passed the National Family Planning Act setting up the National FAmily Planning Board to formulate policies and methods for the promotion and spread of family planning knowledge and practice on the grounds of health of mothers and children and welfare of the family. In 1967, the board set a target of 40,000 new acceptors of family planning and 90% of the target was reached. This represents 3% of the child-bearing married women aged 15-49. The target for 1968 of 65,000 new acceptors is being achieved. A survey of acceptors is to be carried out from December 1968 to April 1969 to ascertain how many women who accepted family planning continue to practice it. Malaysia's crude birth rate declined from 46.2 in 1957 to 37.3 in 1966 before the government program was instituted. Abortion attempts have been frequent. The main method of contraception used is oral contraceptives. According to a 1957 survey, 31% of the married women in the metropolitan areas and 2% of rural women were using contraception. Presently, in Malaysia there is a need to: 1) train personnel to provide services, 2) inform and motivate families to accept family planning, 3) continue a broad educational program, 4) reform Malaysia's antiquated abortion law, and 5) integrate family planning services more fully into the general health services of the country.

  6. Children Who Won't Go to School (Separation Anxiety). Facts for Families. Number 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Going to school is usually an exciting and enjoyable event for young children. However, for some it can cause intense fear or panic. Parents should be concerned if their child regularly complains about feeling sick or often asks to stay home from school with minor physical complaints. Not wanting to go to school may occur at any time, but is most…

  7. "We're Number One!" How a First-Year Principal Won South Carolina's "Finest" Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    Describes a number of specific projects undertaken by the new principal of an elementary school in Myrtle Beach (South Carolina) to build staff support and morale, student enthusiasm, and parent and community involvement. (PGD)

  8. Oh, Won't You Stay? Predictors of Faculty Intent to Leave a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John F.; Healy, Richard; Sullivan, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and predicting faculty intent to leave is important to the development of improved conceptual frameworks of faculty success as well as the implementation of effective retention strategies for academic leaders and institutions that invest considerable resources in recruitment, institutional support, and compensation. This study…

  9. At Yale, an Unlikely Champion for "The Building that Won't Go Away"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    It is most surprising that Yale University is spending $126-million to renovate and add to a 1963 Modernist building that almost everyone has hated for decades. Aside from that, the project's champion is a high-society architect whose own career refutes pretty much the whole Modernist design theology. This article talks about the renovation of…

  10. Can the War against Child Labour Be Won? Oslo Conference Says an Emphatic "Yes."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1997

    1997-01-01

    A conference on child labor sponsored by the International Labour Organization and UNICEF identified strategies for eliminating child labor and developing cooperative programs to assess the effects of child labor. (JOW)

  11. Who Won the Cold War? A Learning Packet for Secondary Level Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Univ., Lawrence. Center for Russian and East European Studies.

    Realizing that the Cold War is a topic that often is neglected as time runs short at the end of a school year, a group of University of Kansas (Lawrence) educators sought to create effective classroom materials for secondary/community college instructors to teach about the Cold War. The group's main goal was to create a flexible model that…

  12. "Blackwoods" Would; "PMLA" Won't; or How to Write a "PMLA" Article.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Steven H.

    The de facto signature style of the Modern Language Association's "PMLA" magazine not only bores many readers (contributing to the decline in MLA membership), but mandates rejection of any papers stylistically distinct from previous "PMLA" articles. In addition, to judge from several rejection letters, "PMLA" subject matter bias proscribes even…

  13. "Why won't my patients do what's good for them?" Motivational interviewing and treatment adherence.

    PubMed

    Zuckoff, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Limited adherence to healthy habits in adults at risk of lifestyle diseases, some of whom become candidates for bariatric surgery, has been paralleled by high rates of nonadherence to postbariatric surgery behavioral recommendations. This is a specific case of the more general problem of nonadherence to medical treatment of chronic conditions. An adequate understanding of the problem of nonadherence requires an understanding of the motivational factors that influence whether persons implement healthy behavior. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported counseling style for strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. It offers a model for understanding and intervening with nonadherence to behavioral recommendations that emphasizes the role of clinician communication in both increasing and inadvertently decreasing patient motivation. A conceptual account of patient motivation for healthy change, highlighting the centrality of resolution of patient ambivalence through targeted conversation, is illustrated by thought exercises for the reader and supplemented by references to empirical data. Recommendations for changes in clinical practice to improve patient adherence to behavioral recommendations are also offered.

  14. Have All Won and Must All Have Prizes? Revisiting Luborsky et al.'s Verdict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.

    1991-01-01

    Sees need for research examining differences among psychotherapy treatments to use model to narrow search for variables mediating between treatment type and outcome. Asserts that tests of treatment selection models that cut across narrow theoretical differences among psychotherapies and that operationalize definitions of patient types hold promise…

  15. Could Caldecott Have Won the Caldecott? Victorian Views on Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundin, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Provides a close description of the ways that Randolph Caldecott's work continues to compel admiration to show how classic texts that are selected and evaluated in the marketplace are the product of historical contingencies. Suggests that the choice of Caldecott as the name for the big prize in children's book illustration was and is fitting. (RS)

  16. Have all won and must all have prizes? Revisiting Luborsky et al.'s verdict.

    PubMed

    Beutler, L E

    1991-04-01

    Although most reviews of comparative psychotherapy literature have failed to find significant differences among treatments, it is premature to give up the search for differential effects. There are a large number of patient, therapist, and treatment variables that may mediate the effects of treatments. Given the enormity of the task of exploring potential interactions among the many patient, therapist, and psychotherapy types, a guiding model is needed by which to narrow our search for variables that mediate between treatment type and outcome. However, theoretical constructs that represent both patient and therapy variations frequently are poorly defined. Tests of treatment selection models that cut across narrow theoretical differences among psychotherapies and that operationalize definitions of patient types hold promise for revealing meaningful Patient x Therapist interaction effects in psychotherapy.

  17. Minister didn't say government won't support safe staffing bill.

    PubMed

    Clark, June

    2015-03-25

    I am afraid your report on the progress of the safe nurse staffing levels bill, 'Minimum staffing ratios failed to gain Welsh Government support' (News March 11) may give an unnecessarily pessimistic picture of the situation.

  18. Mission Organization: How One Program Tackled Their Parent Handbook and Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Early care and education center directors have a whole host of reasons for printing comprehensive and informative parent handbooks. The parents of the children who attend early care and education centers have their own set of expectations and needs for information contained in parent handbooks. When these sets of needs and expectations collide, it…

  19. From Oasis to Mirage: The Aquifers That Won't Replenish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Gary

    1995-01-01

    Tells the story of three fossil aquifers, in Saudi Arabia, Libya, and the United States, that are mined at nonrenewable rates for agricultural irrigation. Examines the consequences of a collision between rising consumption and falling groundwater supplies. Charts Libya's projected water needs compared to renewable supply, 1985-2030. (LZ)

  20. What you need to know about diving medicine but won't find in a textbook.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Gregory M

    2002-12-01

    The old adage that 'if a patient in your emergency department (ED) is wearing a wetsuit, fins and a mask, then he/she probably has a diving related illness' is one that should be remembered. This is an obvious statement that should not need stating; however, simple clues can be missed or disregarded. This article will address issues that may confront emergency physicians and for which there are few resources to find the answers. It aims to explain the reasons behind some of the advice given during consultation with a hyperbaric physician. The second aim is to bring emergency physicians up to date with new diving practices and how these may impact upon traditional diving injuries. To achieve these aims, this article is a compilation of answers to frequently asked or pertinent questions related to diving medicine. PMID:12534479

  1. Why It Won't Happen to Me: How Older Adolescents Make Personal Risk Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, John; Chirico, JoAnn

    This study sought to document optimistic bias among older adolescents in the context of numerous hazards. It was among the first studies to triangulate quantitative and qualitative measures to investigate how individuals make personal risk assessments within the optimistic bias literature. Results from a small-scale survey and follow-up interviews…

  2. Achieving the Essential Goals of Technical Writing--Role Playing Won't Do It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebeaux, Elizabeth

    1978-01-01

    Although role-playing is an effective way to create the atmosphere of "real" business situations, technical writing teachers should continue to concentrate primarily on student writing problems and the development of such composition skills as brevity and audience awareness. (RL)

  3. It All Depends on You: A Rural Music Educator Who Won't Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Ella

    2005-01-01

    Shickley Nebraska is an agricultural community where people have great pride in their school, community, and youth. With 98 percent of the students at the local high school college bound, the town motto is displayed on the brick "Welcome to Shickley" sign, and says "Welcome to Shickley, A Big Little Town." What makes rural music teachers special?…

  4. [Words that won't fade off in the wind: identity and diagnosis in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Levín, Santiago A

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is to analyze the role of the word pronounced by members of the health staff as it is constitutive of identity in the patient recepting the word. How is identity constructed? How does the word spoken by a significant Other impinge on this process? In particular, what about the influence of words denoting medical diagnoses? Regarding such queries we also look, on a preliminary basis, at each of the two main currents in Western medicine (biomedicine and medical anthropology), to find out if and how it addresses the relation between the word as an element of identity and the same word as a therapeutic tool. PMID:24251293

  5. When Boys Won't Be Boys: Discussing Gender with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Hannah; Katch, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In this Voices Inside Schools essay, Hannah Katch and Jane Katch reflect on gender roles and how they are enacted in the classroom. When Timothy, a student in Jane's kindergarten class, refuses to count himself as one of the boys during a math lesson, Jane begins a conversation about social constructions of gender with her daughter, Hannah.…

  6. Higher Education and the "American Dream": Why the Status Quo Won't Get Us There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    The community college represents the only form of universal access to education, and is thus purported to be the gateway to low-income and minority students' realization of the "American Dream." That dream is growing more and more elusive for a substantial number of people. Instead of breaking down ethnic and class barriers to economic and social…

  7. Diversity in academic medicine no. 2 history of battles lost and won.

    PubMed

    Strelnick, A Hal; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Nivet, Marc; Soto-Greene, Maria L

    2008-12-01

    Spurred by its rapidly changing demographics, the United States is striving to reduce and eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. To do so, it must overcome the legacy of individual, institutional, and structural racism and resolve conflicts in related political and social ideologies. This has moved the struggle over diversity in the health professions outside the laboratories and ivy-covered walls of academic medicine into the halls of Congress and chambers of the US Supreme Court. Although equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs began as legal remedies for distinct histories of legally sanctioned racial and gender discrimination, they also became effective means for increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities in higher education and the health professions. Beginning in the 1970s and continuing today, legal challenges to measures for realizing equal opportunity and leveling the playing field have reached the US Supreme Court and state-wide ballot initiatives. These historical challenges and successes are the subject of this article. Although the history is not exhaustive, it aims to provide an important context for the struggles of advocates to improve the representation of underrepresented minorities in medicine and reduce racial and ethnic health disparities.

  8. The Disruptive or ADHD Child: What to Do when Kids Won't Sit Still and Be Quiet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Mary N.

    2005-01-01

    Successful intervention for severely disruptive children is likely to require effort and collaboration among pediatric mental health specialists, parents, and school staff. Children with severe disruptive behavior disorders usually require follow-up with credentialed pediatric mental health specialists and may need special classrooms, schools, or…

  9. When continuous observations just won't do: developing accurate and efficient sampling strategies for the laying hen.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Courtney L; Siegford, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    Continuous observation is the most accurate way to determine animals' actual time budget and can provide a 'gold standard' representation of resource use, behavior frequency, and duration. Continuous observation is useful for capturing behaviors that are of short duration or occur infrequently. However, collecting continuous data is labor intensive and time consuming, making multiple individual or long-term data collection difficult. Six non-cage laying hens were video recorded for 15 h and behavioral data collected every 2 s were compared with data collected using scan sampling intervals of 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 min and subsamples of 2 second observations performed for 10 min every 30 min, 15 min every 1 h, 30 min every 1.5 h, and 15 min every 2 h. Three statistical approaches were used to provide a comprehensive analysis to examine the quality of the data obtained via different sampling methods. General linear mixed models identified how the time budget from the sampling techniques differed from continuous observation. Correlation analysis identified how strongly results from the sampling techniques were associated with those from continuous observation. Regression analysis identified how well the results from the sampling techniques were associated with those from continuous observation, changes in magnitude, and whether a sampling technique had bias. Static behaviors were well represented with scan and time sampling techniques, while dynamic behaviors were best represented with time sampling techniques. Methods for identifying an appropriate sampling strategy based upon the type of behavior of interest are outlined and results for non-caged laying hens are presented.

  10. When continuous observations just won't do: developing accurate and efficient sampling strategies for the laying hen.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Courtney L; Siegford, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    Continuous observation is the most accurate way to determine animals' actual time budget and can provide a 'gold standard' representation of resource use, behavior frequency, and duration. Continuous observation is useful for capturing behaviors that are of short duration or occur infrequently. However, collecting continuous data is labor intensive and time consuming, making multiple individual or long-term data collection difficult. Six non-cage laying hens were video recorded for 15 h and behavioral data collected every 2 s were compared with data collected using scan sampling intervals of 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 min and subsamples of 2 second observations performed for 10 min every 30 min, 15 min every 1 h, 30 min every 1.5 h, and 15 min every 2 h. Three statistical approaches were used to provide a comprehensive analysis to examine the quality of the data obtained via different sampling methods. General linear mixed models identified how the time budget from the sampling techniques differed from continuous observation. Correlation analysis identified how strongly results from the sampling techniques were associated with those from continuous observation. Regression analysis identified how well the results from the sampling techniques were associated with those from continuous observation, changes in magnitude, and whether a sampling technique had bias. Static behaviors were well represented with scan and time sampling techniques, while dynamic behaviors were best represented with time sampling techniques. Methods for identifying an appropriate sampling strategy based upon the type of behavior of interest are outlined and results for non-caged laying hens are presented. PMID:24269639

  11. Report from Oslo conference. Can the war against child labour be won? Oslo conference says an emphatic "yes".

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    Worldwide, about 250 million children work, often in exploitative and dangerous conditions. Child labor is most prevalent in the less developed countries, with 61% of the world's total child laborers being in Asia, 32% in Africa, and 7% in Latin America. The government of Norway, together with the International Labor Organization (ILO) and UNICEF, recently organized an international conference to organize action against child labor. 350 high-level representatives from governments, workers' and employers' organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and a number of international organizations and independent experts attended. The ILO Director-General proposed a 4-point strategy involving a political commitment to the effective and absolute abolition of child labor; a program of action involving prevention, removal, and rehabilitation; adoption of a new international convention to end all extreme forms of child labor; and a global agreement for international cooperation and mutual assistance to allocate more resources against poverty and child labor. The strategy would also fight the international aspects of the problem, such as the sale and trafficking of children and child sex tourism. PMID:12293265

  12. The hard-won benefits of familiarity in visual search: naturally familiar brand logos are found faster.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaoyan Angela; Koutstaal, Wilma; Engel, Stephen A

    2014-05-01

    Familiar items are found faster than unfamiliar ones in visual search tasks. This effect has important implications for cognitive theory, because it may reveal how mental representations of commonly encountered items are changed by experience to optimize performance. It remains unknown, however, whether everyday items with moderate levels of exposure would show benefits in visual search, and if so, what kind of experience would be required to produce them. Here, we tested whether familiar product logos were searched for faster than unfamiliar ones, and also familiarized subjects with previously unfamiliar logos. Subjects searched for preexperimentally familiar and unfamiliar logos, half of which were familiarized in the laboratory, amongst other, unfamiliar distractor logos. In three experiments, we used an N-back-like familiarization task, and in four others we used a task that asked detailed questions about the perceptual aspects of the logos. The number of familiarization exposures ranged from 30 to 84 per logo across experiments, with two experiments involving across-day familiarization. Preexperimentally familiar target logos were searched for faster than were unfamiliar, nonfamiliarized logos, by 8 % on average. This difference was reliable in all seven experiments. However, familiarization had little or no effect on search speeds; its average effect was to improve search times by 0.7 %, and its effect was significant in only one of the seven experiments. If priming, mere exposure, episodic memory, or relatively modest familiarity were responsible for familiarity's effects on search, then performance should have improved following familiarization. Our results suggest that the search-related advantage of familiar logos does not develop easily or rapidly.

  13. Line Manager Involvement in Work-Life Balance and Career Development: Can't Manage, Won't Manage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Penny; Hyde, Rosie

    2006-01-01

    Line manager involvement in HRM is an increasing trend across Europe. With the numbers of employees taking advantage of work-life balance policies also on the increase, line manager responsibility for this specific policy area is likely to become more marked. In this paper, we argue that line managers have a critical role to play in the career…

  14. What You Don't Know Won't Hurt Me: Impression Management Functions of Communication Channels in Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Patrick B.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the implications of interpersonal communication technology use for personal relationships. Tests elements of an impression management model, which specifies the processes and outcomes of strategic uses of channel and message for self-presentational goals. Supports a functional perspective that views mediated communication channels as a…

  15. 'I won't be able to go home being pregnant': sex work and pregnancy in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Katz, Karen R; McDowell, Misti; Johnson, Laura; Aziz, Sultana

    2016-07-01

    Sex workers report high rates of unintended pregnancy that are inconsistent with widespread reports of condom use. Greater understanding of the implications of an unintended pregnancy and barriers to contraceptive use is needed to better meet the broader sexual and reproductive health needs of this population. We conducted in-depth interviews with 20 women sex workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Findings reveal that most women are trying to conform to societal norms and protect their reputations. They fear pregnancy would reveal that they are having unsanctioned sex and that they are sex workers. This could lead to ostracism from families and society, resulting in homelessness and abandonment by partners. Pregnancy may affect a sex worker's ability to work and leave her unable to meet financial obligations. All study participants were using condoms but most acknowledged they could not use them consistently. They had all tried other contraceptive methods, notably injectables and the pill, but some noted experience of side-effects, difficulties in adherence and the desire to use other methods. Understanding the context of sex workers' lives is an important step in informing stakeholders about the range of services needed to improve their sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26835735

  16. All Might Have Won, But Not All Have the Prize: Optimal Treatment for Substance Abuse Among Adolescents with Conduct Problems

    PubMed Central

    Spas, Jayson; Ramsey, Susan; Paiva, Andrea L.; Stein, L.A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence from the literature on treatment outcomes indicates that substance abuse treatment among adolescents with conduct problems varies widely. Treatments commonly used among this population are cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), 12-step facilitation, multisystemic therapy (MST), psychoeducation (PE), and motivational interviewing (MI). This manuscript thoroughly and systematically reviews the available literature to determine which treatment is optimal for substance-abusing adolescents with conduct problems. Results suggest that although there are several evidence-based and empirically supported treatments, those that incorporate family-based intervention consistently provide the most positive treatment outcomes. In particular, this review further reveals that although many interventions have gained empirical support over the years, only one holds the prize as being the optimal treatment of choice for substance abuse treatment among adolescents with conduct problems. PMID:23170066

  17. Danusia Latosinski on the Work that Won City College Norwich This Year's AoC President's Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latosinski, Danusia

    2009-01-01

    The transition from school to college can be a daunting experience for any young adult. But for someone who suffers from Asperger Syndrome (AS)--an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) which affects how a person makes sense of the world, processes information and relates to other people--adapting to new surroundings and meeting new people is an even…

  18. We Won't Get Fooled Again: On the Absence of Angry Responses to Plagiarism in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robillard, Amy E.

    2007-01-01

    This is an article about the complex relationship between anger and plagiarism in composition studies. Here, the author brings into dialogue two strands of inquiry that have shaped recent disciplinary conversations in composition studies but that have yet to publicly influence each other. Because emotions and authorship have both been perceived…

  19. 'I hope we won't have to understand racism one day': researching or reproducing 'race' in social psychological research?

    PubMed

    Howarth, Caroline

    2009-09-01

    This paper examines the reification and problemization of 'race' in Psychological research in both influential studies in the field and in my empirical work. The main argument is that we need to examine how representations of 'race' are assumed, produced and contested in research practice. This argument is made by (a) showing how research in the area adopts everyday representations of 'race' as essentialized and (b) with an illustration of the construction of 'race' within my study. This study explores how children in a predominantly white setting accept and contest representations that race. twenty two children from a range of cultural backgrounds volunteered to discuss their views and experiences of 'race' and racism in a naturalistic research activity. The analysis reveals that racialized difference is something that is constructed as both 'real' - in that it can be seen, touched and even caught from 'the other' and simultaneously something that is constructed, imposed and damaging. This highlights the possibilities for racialized others to take up positions as agents and not (only) as objects of the racializing and racist gaze, and so presents the case for thinking, debating and researching beyond reifying representations of 'race'. This has important lessons for social psychology: namely, we cannot continue to take racial categorization as a naturalistic or self-evident aspect of the social worlds that our discipline plays an important role in constructing and defending.

  20. Perceptual bias in pain: a switch looks closer when it will relieve pain than when it won't.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Abby; Catley, Mark J; Gandevia, Simon; Thacker, Michael A; Lorimer Moseley, G

    2013-10-01

    Pain is fundamental to survival, as are our perceptions of the environment. It is often assumed that we see our world as a read-out of the sensory information that we receive; yet despite the same physical makeup of our surroundings, individuals perceive differently. What if we "see" our world differently when we experience pain? Until now, the causal effect of experimental pain on the perception of an external stimulus has not been investigated. Eighteen (11 female) healthy volunteers participated in this randomised repeated-measures experiment, in which participants estimated the distance to a switch placed on the table in front of them. We varied whether or not the switch would instantly stop a stimulus, set to the participant's pain threshold, being delivered to their hand, and whether or not they were required to reach for the switch. The critical result was a strong interaction between reaching and pain [F(1,181)=4.8, P=0.03], such that when participants experienced pain and were required to reach for a switch that would turn off the experimental stimulus, they judged the distance to that switch to be closer, as compared to the other 3 conditions (mean of the true distance 92.6%, 95% confidence interval 89.7%-95.6%). The judged distance was smaller than estimates in the other 3 conditions (mean±SD difference >5.7%±2.1%, t(181) >3.5, P<0.01 for all 3 comparisons). We conclude that the perception of distance to an object is modulated by the behavioural relevance of the object to ongoing pain.

  1. Why I'm a Yearbook Sponsor Again and Why I Won't Be for Long.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasovic, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Offers advice, in the form of a letter, to an aspiring teacher about the benefits of being a yearbook advisor. Reviews some of the basic skills needed to be an advisor, such as writing, photography and design skills, computer skills, budgetary and advertising skills, and public relations skills. (TB)

  2. 'I won't be able to go home being pregnant': sex work and pregnancy in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Katz, Karen R; McDowell, Misti; Johnson, Laura; Aziz, Sultana

    2016-07-01

    Sex workers report high rates of unintended pregnancy that are inconsistent with widespread reports of condom use. Greater understanding of the implications of an unintended pregnancy and barriers to contraceptive use is needed to better meet the broader sexual and reproductive health needs of this population. We conducted in-depth interviews with 20 women sex workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Findings reveal that most women are trying to conform to societal norms and protect their reputations. They fear pregnancy would reveal that they are having unsanctioned sex and that they are sex workers. This could lead to ostracism from families and society, resulting in homelessness and abandonment by partners. Pregnancy may affect a sex worker's ability to work and leave her unable to meet financial obligations. All study participants were using condoms but most acknowledged they could not use them consistently. They had all tried other contraceptive methods, notably injectables and the pill, but some noted experience of side-effects, difficulties in adherence and the desire to use other methods. Understanding the context of sex workers' lives is an important step in informing stakeholders about the range of services needed to improve their sexual and reproductive health.

  3. A field guide to real-time culture change: just "rolling out" a training program won't cut it.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Mitchell; Holloway, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Presented as a representative case of how to handle the disruptive behaviors of professionals in healthcare, this article describes the strategies of a systems approach with a five-phase model for culture change. The "large-scale, real-time" culture change process, based on our own evidence-based research on toxic behaviors and the research of others, has been demonstrated to be more effective than one-on-one feedback to change these behaviors. The real-time approach has been applied to other organizational situations--strategy formulation, change management, or service improvement--with more sustainable effects than simply training alone. This article will help your organization with four outcomes: understanding the rationale for a five-phase model for cultural change, describing the advantages of a real-time versus nonreal-time approach to change, identifying the how-to's for application within a systems approach, and articulating a clear evaluation process to sustain successful organizational culture change.

  4. The European Universities, Citizenship and Its Limits: What Won't Solve the Problems of Our Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Grahame; Martins, Herminio

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to weave together in an original manner a number of themes regarding citizenship and higher education in Europe. Thus, the authors look critically at the notion of citizenship itself; its role in Aristotle and in Hegel's state-versus-civil-society contrast; its relation to the world of work or labour; its connection with the…

  5. "Why Won't You Just Tell Us the Answer?": Teaching Historical Thinking in Grades 7-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Every major measure of students' historical understanding since 1917 has demonstrated that students do not retain, understand, or enjoy their school experiences with history. Bruce Lesh believes that this is due to the way we teach history--lecture and memorization. Over the last fifteen years, Bruce has refined a method of teaching history that…

  6. When experts disagree (and better science won't help much): using structured deliberations to support endangered species recovery planning.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Robin; Long, Graham; Colligan, Mary; Geiger, James G; Laser, Melissa

    2012-08-30

    Progress on recovery plans to conserve endangered species is often blocked due to the lack of an effective framework that technical experts and other knowledgeable stakeholders can use to examine areas of agreement or disagreement about the anticipated effects of management actions. Multi-party, multi-interest resource management deliberations, although increasingly common, are difficult in the context of recovery planning due to the range of potentially affected environmental, economic, and social concerns. These deliberations are further complicated by frequent disagreements among technical experts about how to identify and address various sources of biological uncertainty. We describe the development of a decision-aiding framework as part of an inter-agency plan to assist recovery of endangered Gulf of Maine Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), using a structured decision making approach that encouraged constructive deliberations based on rigorous analysis. Results are summarized in terms of developing an explicit set of management objectives, clarifying and prioritizing hypotheses concerning barriers to recovery, comparing alternative management initiatives in light of biological uncertainty, and incorporating resource constraints to generate preferred sets of actions. Overall, the use of a structured approach to making recovery decisions improved inter-agency cooperation and facilitated dialogue, understanding, and agreement among participating experts. It also helped to create a defensible basis for further internal discussions as well as for communicating with external stakeholders, including resource users and political decision makers.

  7. A field guide to real-time culture change: just "rolling out" a training program won't cut it.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Mitchell; Holloway, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Presented as a representative case of how to handle the disruptive behaviors of professionals in healthcare, this article describes the strategies of a systems approach with a five-phase model for culture change. The "large-scale, real-time" culture change process, based on our own evidence-based research on toxic behaviors and the research of others, has been demonstrated to be more effective than one-on-one feedback to change these behaviors. The real-time approach has been applied to other organizational situations--strategy formulation, change management, or service improvement--with more sustainable effects than simply training alone. This article will help your organization with four outcomes: understanding the rationale for a five-phase model for cultural change, describing the advantages of a real-time versus nonreal-time approach to change, identifying the how-to's for application within a systems approach, and articulating a clear evaluation process to sustain successful organizational culture change. PMID:24873126

  8. I Won't Teach Evolution; It's Against My Religion. And Now for the Rest of the Story...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trani, Randy

    2004-01-01

    In Oregon, biology teachers have a definite understanding of the nature of science and the theory of evolution. These understandings translate into a significant presentation of the theory of evolution in their classrooms.

  9. "I won, but I'm not getting my hopes up": depression moderates the relationship of outcomes and reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Olino, Thomas M; McMakin, Dana L; Dahl, Ronald E; Ryan, Neal D; Silk, Jennifer S; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A; Forbes, Erika E

    2011-12-30

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in adolescents is characterized by alterations in positive emotions and reward processing. Recent investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) find depression-related differences in reward anticipation. However, it is unknown whether feedback influences subsequent reward anticipation, which may highlight the context of reward processing. Ten youth with MDD and 16 youth with no history of MDD completed an fMRI assessment using a reward task. Reward anticipation was indexed by blood oxygen level dependent signal change in the striatum following winning, losing, non-winning, and non-losing outcomes. A significant interaction between diagnostic status and outcome condition predicted reward anticipation in the caudate. Decomposition of the interaction indicated that following winning outcomes, depressed youth demonstrated reduced reward anticipation relative to healthy youth. However, no significant differences between depressed and healthy youth were found after other outcomes. Reward anticipation is altered following winning outcomes. This finding has implications for understanding the developmental pathophysiology of MDD and suggests specific contexts where altered motivational system functioning may play a role in maintaining depression.

  10. It Won't Happen to Me: The Role of Optimistic Bias in African-American Teens' Risky Sexual Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, John

    Discovering why adolescents take sexual risks, despite knowledge of consequences, is a vital first step in combating the problem. Optimistic bias, the misperception that one is less likely than others to experience negative consequences from health behaviors, offers a promising explanation for adolescents' sexual risk-taking. Unfortunately,…

  11. "I won, but I'm not getting my hopes up": depression moderates the relationship of outcomes and reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Olino, Thomas M; McMakin, Dana L; Dahl, Ronald E; Ryan, Neal D; Silk, Jennifer S; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A; Forbes, Erika E

    2011-12-30

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in adolescents is characterized by alterations in positive emotions and reward processing. Recent investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) find depression-related differences in reward anticipation. However, it is unknown whether feedback influences subsequent reward anticipation, which may highlight the context of reward processing. Ten youth with MDD and 16 youth with no history of MDD completed an fMRI assessment using a reward task. Reward anticipation was indexed by blood oxygen level dependent signal change in the striatum following winning, losing, non-winning, and non-losing outcomes. A significant interaction between diagnostic status and outcome condition predicted reward anticipation in the caudate. Decomposition of the interaction indicated that following winning outcomes, depressed youth demonstrated reduced reward anticipation relative to healthy youth. However, no significant differences between depressed and healthy youth were found after other outcomes. Reward anticipation is altered following winning outcomes. This finding has implications for understanding the developmental pathophysiology of MDD and suggests specific contexts where altered motivational system functioning may play a role in maintaining depression. PMID:22079656

  12. They Won't Accept the What of Science If They Don't Get the Why and How

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Rush

    2016-03-01

    Denial of evidence by policy makers on controversial issues, substituting ideology for research-based findings, and suspicion of scientists of bias or even conspiracy are all enormously distasteful and sometimes bewildering to scientists. Whatever the subject-climate change, nuclear power, or GMO's- scientists should understand that the problems originate, not with demagogic or misguided politicians, but rather with millions of Americans who do not appreciate the essence of science and have a poor understanding of the basic nature and procedures of science. The public appreciation of science shows signs of further erosion, suggesting that the problems may get even worse in the future. Scientists do little to help the problem by insistently trying to teach the specifics of the controversial subjects, however clearly and logically, when the public does not even understand how science works.

  13. "Drinking won't get you thinking": a content analysis of adolescent-created print alcohol counter-advertisements.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Greene, Kathryn; Hecht, Michael L; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Elek, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    Involvement in creating antialcohol advertisements generates enthusiasm among adolescents; however, little is known about the messages adolescents develop for these activities. In this article, we present a content analysis of 72 print alcohol counteradvertisements created by high school (age 14-17 years old) and college (18-25 years old) students. The posters were content analyzed for poster message content, persuasion strategies, and production components, and we compared high school and college student posters. All of the posters used a slogan to highlight the main point/message of the ad and counterarguments/consequences to support the slogans. The most frequently depicted consequences were negative consequences of alcohol use, followed by negative-positive consequence comparison. Persuasion strategies were sparingly used in advertisements and included having fun/one of the gang, humor/unexpected, glamour/sex appeal, and endorsement. Finally, posters displayed a number of production techniques including depicting people, clear setting, multiple colors, different font sizes, and object placement. College and high school student-constructed posters were similar on many features (e.g., posters displayed similar frequency of utilization of slogans, negative consequences, and positive-negative consequence comparisons), but were different on the use of positive consequences of not using alcohol and before-after comparisons. Implications for teaching media literacy and involving adolescents and youth in developing alcohol prevention messages are discussed.

  14. Spartanburg attracts moms-to-be with a variety of media. Campaign pieces have won numerous awards.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2003-01-01

    Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System, based in Spartanburg, S.C., uses a variety of media to attract moms-to-be and other women to its many services. The award-winning campaign was cited by The National Federation of Press Women with nine awards and a First Place Sweepstakes Award.

  15. "Drinking won't get you thinking": a content analysis of adolescent-created print alcohol counter-advertisements.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Greene, Kathryn; Hecht, Michael L; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Elek, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    Involvement in creating antialcohol advertisements generates enthusiasm among adolescents; however, little is known about the messages adolescents develop for these activities. In this article, we present a content analysis of 72 print alcohol counteradvertisements created by high school (age 14-17 years old) and college (18-25 years old) students. The posters were content analyzed for poster message content, persuasion strategies, and production components, and we compared high school and college student posters. All of the posters used a slogan to highlight the main point/message of the ad and counterarguments/consequences to support the slogans. The most frequently depicted consequences were negative consequences of alcohol use, followed by negative-positive consequence comparison. Persuasion strategies were sparingly used in advertisements and included having fun/one of the gang, humor/unexpected, glamour/sex appeal, and endorsement. Finally, posters displayed a number of production techniques including depicting people, clear setting, multiple colors, different font sizes, and object placement. College and high school student-constructed posters were similar on many features (e.g., posters displayed similar frequency of utilization of slogans, negative consequences, and positive-negative consequence comparisons), but were different on the use of positive consequences of not using alcohol and before-after comparisons. Implications for teaching media literacy and involving adolescents and youth in developing alcohol prevention messages are discussed. PMID:23980705

  16. "Why Won't You Speak to Me in Gaelic?" Authenticity, Integration, and the Heritage Language Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Timothy Currie

    2013-01-01

    The last speakers of an endangered language often include many individuals who have acquired less than full productive proficiency in the language, language users Nancy Dorian (1977) called semi-speakers. When these individuals enter formal education and seek to learn or relearn their endangered heritage language, they are often frustrated by…

  17. NE Won't Return to Pre-Recession Employment until 2015, but Region's "Education" Advantage Could Offer "Economic" Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittell, Ross

    2012-01-01

    The New England states continue to experience slow growth and slow recovery of the jobs lost in the 2008 to 2009 recession. The main reason for this is the continued weakness in global and U.S. economic conditions. The U.S. and New England economies continue to be affected by the weak European economy and sovereign debt crisis and by weakness in…

  18. Breaking Up Is Hard to Do...When Your Downloaded File Won't Fit into Your Word Processor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, James S.

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of lack of room when downloading long searches onto a word processor focuses on three remedies: (1) choosing the right word processor; (2) using a utility program, such as CHOP2 or SPLIT.EXE; and (3) using the EDLIN program, which is part of a DOS disk. (five references) (LRW)

  19. "They Won't Come": Increasing Parent Involvement in Parent Management Training Programs for At-Risk Youths in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette, Philip M.; Wilkerson, David

    2008-01-01

    The absence of parents from schools is seen as an important factor related to the significant number of adolescents at risk of school failure. Effective parenting is known to be a key protective factor for adolescents at risk for school failure and other maladaptive developmental outcomes. While evidence-based parent management training models…

  20. "Mama just won't accept this": adult perspectives on engaging depressed African American teens in clinical research and treatment.

    PubMed

    Breland-Noble, Alfiee M; Bell, Carl C; Burriss, Antoinette

    2011-09-01

    This manuscript focuses on qualitative data collected for AAKOMA Project, a 2-phase treatment engagement intervention trial for depressed African American adolescents and families. Data are presented from our phase I study of adult perspectives on African American adolescent depression, depression treatment, and research engagement. The research team conducted four focus groups (N = 24) and generated major themes from the data including ideas regarding the manifestations of depression in African American youth and psychosocial barriers to participation in depression research and treatment. Findings indicate that success in recruiting and retaining African American youth in depression research and treatment may include using innovative means to overcome the culturally embedded attributions of depression to non-biological causes, beliefs about the cultural insensitivity of treatments and challenges in the logistics of obtaining care. Adults report that encouraging youth and familial involvement in treatments and research should include targeted, community-partnered activities involving diverse staff in leadership roles and including community members as equal partners.

  1. "But They Won't Come to Lectures..." The Impact of Audio Recorded Lectures on Student Experience and Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    The move to increasingly flexible platforms for student learning and experience through provision of online lecture recordings is often interpreted by educators as students viewing attendance at lectures as optional. The trend toward the use of this technology is often met with resistance from some academic staff who argue that student attendance…

  2. "You Can Try, But You Won't Stop It. It'll Always Be There": Youth Perspectives on Violence and Prevention in Schools.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vanita

    2016-02-01

    The role of schools in preventing violence among teenagers has been highlighted, as has the development of youth-led prevention initiatives. This article explores how young people's views on violence influence their perceptions of its preventability, drawing on focus group discussions with 14- to 16-year-olds from six schools across the north of England. Young people view violence as a highly individualized phenomenon, and gender norms play an important role in shaping young people's perceptions of the preventability of violence. The findings presented here suggest that school-based violence prevention must fundamentally address gender norms and expectations to challenge young people's acceptance and tolerance of violence.

  3. "I Won't Trust You if I Think You're Trying to Deceive Me": Relations between Selective Trust, Theory of Mind, and Imitation in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiYanni, Cara; Nini, Deniela; Rheel, Whitney; Livelli, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study explores connections between 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds' performance in theory-of-mind tasks, their performance on an assessment of selective trust, and their decisions to (not) imitate the questionable tool choices of an adult model. The prediction was that all the tasks would be related, with improvements in theory of mind and selective…

  4. Why Some Faces won't be Remembered: Brain Potentials Illuminate Successful Versus Unsuccessful Encoding for Same-Race and Other-Race Faces

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Heather D.; Chiao, Joan Y.; Paller, Ken A.

    2011-01-01

    Memory is often less accurate for faces from another racial group than for faces from one's own racial group. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are a topic of active debate. Contemporary theories invoke factors such as inferior expertise with faces from other racial groups and an encoding emphasis on race-specifying information. We investigated neural mechanisms of this memory bias by recording event-related potentials while participants attempted to memorize same-race (SR) and other-race (OR) faces. Brain potentials at encoding were compared as a function of successful versus unsuccessful recognition on a subsequent-memory test. Late positive amplitudes predicted subsequent memory for SR faces and, to a lesser extent, for OR faces. By contrast, the amplitudes of earlier frontocentral N200 potentials and occipito-temporal P2 potentials were larger for later-remembered relative to later-forgotten OR faces. Furthermore, N200 and P2 amplitudes were larger for OR faces with features considered atypical of that race relative to faces that were race-stereotypical (according to a consensus from a large group of other participants). In keeping with previous reports, we infer that these earlier potentials index the processing of unique or individuating facial information, which is key to remembering a face. Individuation may tend to be uniformly high for SR faces but lower and less reliable for OR faces. Individuation may also be more readily applied for OR faces that appear less stereotypical. These electrophysiological measures thus provide novel evidence that poorer memory for OR faces stems from encoding that is inadequate because it fails to emphasize individuating information. PMID:21441983

  5. The View from Topeka: Brown Plaintiffs, Local Officials Recall Victories Won, Declare Battles that Remain to Be Fought: Brown@50-- How Far Have We Come?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra; Cerstvik, Joan Preston

    2004-01-01

    It's a little-known fact, but, 50 years ago, the junior high and high schools of Topeka, Kan., were integrated--though in name only. Fear was the order of the day at the high school, where an African American assistant superintendent by the name of Harrison Caldwell roamed the halls as the "White folks' enforcer," ensuring that African American…

  6. Why I Force My Students to Memorize Poetry: Despite the Fact that It Won't Be on the Standardized Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Andy

    2011-01-01

    So often teachers see education as a series of units leading to an examination, which will in turn prepare students for the SATs or APs they need to pass to enter university where, if they pass other examinations, they will graduate and earn large incomes. Teachers hold those future earnings before their students like a carrot while beating them…

  7. What You Don't Look For, You Won't Find: A Commentary on Card and Giuliano's Examination of Universal Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Card and Giuliano's National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) working paper on universal screening is discussed. This commentary provides a brief summary and critique of the article, proposes an explanation of the results in light of the author's research on the role of nominations or screening tests in the gifted identification process, and…

  8. I won't let you down... or will I? Core self-evaluations, other-orientation, anticipated guilt and gratitude, and job performance.

    PubMed

    Grant, Adam M; Wrzesniewski, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Although core self-evaluations have been linked to higher job performance, research has shown variability in the strength of this relationship. We propose that high core self-evaluations are more likely to increase job performance for other-oriented employees, who tend to anticipate feelings of guilt and gratitude. We tested these hypotheses across 3 field studies using different operationalizations of both performance and other-orientation (prosocial motivation, agreeableness, and duty). In Study 1, prosocial motivation strengthened the association between core self-evaluations and the performance of professional university fundraisers. In Study 2, agreeableness strengthened the association between core self-evaluations and supervisor ratings of initiative among public service employees. In Study 3, duty strengthened the association between core self-evaluations and the objective productivity of call center employees, and this moderating relationship was mediated by feelings of anticipated guilt and gratitude. We discuss implications for theory and research on personality and job performance. PMID:20085409

  9. You won`t find these leaks with a blower door: The latest in {open_quotes}leaking electricity{close_quotes} in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, L.; Greenberg, S.; Meier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Leaking electricity is the energy consumed by appliances when they are switched off or not performing their principal functions. Field measurements in Florida, California, and Japan show that leaking electricity represents 50 to 100 Watts in typical homes, corresponding to about 5 GW of total electricity demand in the United States. There are three strategies to reduce leaking electricity: eliminate leakage entirely, eliminate constant leakage and replace with intermittent charge plus storage, and improve efficiency of conversion. These options are constrained by the low value of energy savings-less than $5 per saved Watt. Some technical and lifestyle solutions are proposed. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Why Counting Attendees Won't Cut it for Evaluation in the 21st Century: Planning and Evaluating Informal Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, R.

    2012-08-01

    Yogi Berra once said, "If you don't know where you are going, how will you know when you get there?" One could ask the same question to those of us who work in science education and outreach - if you haven't articulated clear goals about what you would like your program to achieve, how on Earth will you know whether you have achieved them? While all of us want to do the right thing for our audiences, knowing that we have actually done so is another story. Without sound planning (clarifying outcomes) evaluation is a moot point, and with more and more funding agencies asking their grantees to evaluate their informal science education efforts, planning with the end in mind is becoming a necessity. With budget, staffing, and time limitations, it's easy to lose track of the value of planning and evaluation. And evaluation can seem a daunting task for those who have not done it, especially when an audience is temporary or spread out over a region or the entire nation. To respond to the demands, many good books are now available with ideas for evaluating projects outside the formal classroom, including several published by the National Research Academies and NSF. In this article, we will discuss the importance of planning and evaluation, no matter what your budget size, we will share examples of how unusual projects have been evaluated, and we will suggest questions you can ask yourself and your audiences that will help you think like an evaluator. To achieve results, program leaders must first clarify what they want to achieve and then align all actions and resources towards achieving those ends. Will your strategic and daily work change as a result? Absolutely! But only if you want your program to make a difference in people's lives.

  11. Secrets of the Super Net Searchers: The Reflections, Revelations, and Hard-Won Wisdom of 35 of the World's Top Internet Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Reva

    This book presents the collected wisdom of 35 leading Internet hunters and gatherers. Through interviews, these experts offer insights, anecdotes, tips, techniques, and case histories which will raise the "searching IQ" of any serious Internet user. The Super Net Searchers explain how they find valuable information on the Internet, revealing their…

  12. "I won't be around forever": Understanding the decision-making experiences of adults with severe TBI and their parents.

    PubMed

    Knox, Lucy; Douglas, Jacinta M; Bigby, Christine

    2016-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the right of all individuals, including those with cognitive impairment, to make decisions about their own lives. However, little is known about how the process of decision making is experienced after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study used constructivist grounded theory to explore processes used by adults with severe TBI and their parents in making decisions about life after injury. Data consisted of 18 individual, in-depth interviews with four dyads (consisting of an individual with severe TBI and his or her parent). The overlying construct emerging from the data was a process of reimagining the future, which influenced how participants approached and participated in making decisions. In line with this construct, two central themes described processes of joint decision making within parent-adult child relationships after severe TBI over time: (1) making decisions with parental support, and (2) reducing parental involvement. These findings emphasise the complexity of supporting decision making after injury, and illustrate that both parents and their adult children with TBI use explicit and implicit strategies to facilitate increased participation in making decisions. This study also underscores the need for brain injury clinicians to consider the needs of parents who find themselves in this role.

  13. When the Cat Is Near, the Mice Won't Play: The Effect of External Examiners in Italian Schools. CEP Discussion Paper No. 1191

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoni, Marco; Brunello, Giorgio; Rocco, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    We use a natural experiment to show that the presence of an external examiner has both a direct and an indirect negative effect on the performance of monitored classes in standardized educational tests. The direct effect is the difference in the test performance between classes of the same school with and without external examiners. The indirect…

  14. Why Johnny Won't Read: Schools Often Dismiss What Boys Like. No Wonder They're Not Wild about Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    It's not that boys can not read, they just do not read. Study after study reveals that boys read less than girls. And according to the U.S. Department of Education, school-age boys tend to read a grade and a half lower than girls. How can librarians get guys to turn the page? For starters, they need to move beyond their traditional "here is a book…

  15. 'If your husband doesn't humiliate you, other people won't': gendered attitudes towards sexual violence in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jocelyn; Kabanga, Justin; Cragin, Will; Alcayna-Stevens, Lys; Haider, Sadia; Vanrooyen, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    More than a decade of fighting in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has resulted in extensive human rights abuses, of which sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) is one of the most salient and disturbing features. This paper uses qualitative data, based on 10 focus groups with 86 women and men to better understand gendered community perspectives on SGBV and its consequences in South Kivu. We conclude that for many survivors, rape has consequences far beyond the physiological and psychological trauma associated with the attack. Respondents say sexual violence has become a societal phenomenon, in which the community isolation and shame experienced as a result of the attack become as important as concerns about the attack itself. Male focus group participants explain their own feelings of shame and anger associated with knowing their female relatives were raped. These findings highlight the complexity of community reintegration for survivors and identify a number of programmatic and policy implications, such as the need for counselling for survivors of sexual violence with their families as well as individually; the importance of income-generating training; and the need for improved justice mechanisms to bring perpetrators to justice.

  16. In a Year, Memory Will Benefit from Learning, Tomorrow It Won't: Distance and Construal Level Effects on the Basis of Metamemory Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halamish, Vered; Nussinson, Ravit; Ben-Ari, Liat

    2013-01-01

    Metamemory judgments may rely on 2 bases of information: subjective experience and abstract theories about memory. On the basis of construal level theory, we predicted that psychological distance and construal level (i.e., concrete vs. abstract thinking) would have a qualitative impact on the relative reliance on these 2 bases: When considering…

  17. They Won't Take No for an Answer: The Relais Enfants-Parents. Early Childhood Development: Practice and Reflections Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayre, Elizabeth

    The Bernard van Leer Foundation initiated a program in France entitled Relais Enfants-Parents to bring the children of prisoners to the forefront of social, political and judicial policy. The Relais Enfants-Parents program works to safeguard the psychological and emotional development of children by serving as a link between them and their…

  18. 'It's The Sun Wot Won It': Evidence of media influence on political attitudes and voting from a UK quasi-natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Aaron; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2016-03-01

    Do print media significantly impact political attitudes and party identification? To examine this question, we draw on a rare quasi-natural experiment that occurred when The Sun, a right-leaning UK tabloid, shifted its support to the Labour party in 1997 and back to the Conservative party in 2010. We compared changes in party identification and political attitudes among Sun readers with non-readers and other newspaper readerships. We find that The Sun's endorsements were associated with a significant increase in readers' support for Labour in 1997, approximately 525,000 votes, and its switch back was associated with about 550,000 extra votes for the Conservatives in 2010. Although we observed changes in readers' party preference, there was no effect on underlying political preferences. The magnitude of these changes, about 2% of the popular vote, would have been unable to alter the outcome of the 1997 General Election, but may have affected the 2010 Election.

  19. In a year, memory will benefit from learning, tomorrow it won't: distance and construal level effects on the basis of metamemory judgments.

    PubMed

    Halamish, Vered; Nussinson, Ravit; Ben-Ari, Liat

    2013-09-01

    Metamemory judgments may rely on 2 bases of information: subjective experience and abstract theories about memory. On the basis of construal level theory, we predicted that psychological distance and construal level (i.e., concrete vs. abstract thinking) would have a qualitative impact on the relative reliance on these 2 bases: When considering learning from proximity or under a low-construal mindset, learners would rely more heavily on their experience, whereas when considering learning from a distance or under a high-construal mindset, they would rely more heavily on their abstract theories. Consistent with this prediction, results of 2 experiments revealed that temporal distance (Experiment 1) and construal level (Experiment 2) affected the stability bias--the failure to predict the benefits of learning. When considering learning from proximity or using a low-construal mindset, participants relied less heavily on their theory regarding the benefits of learning and were therefore insensitive to future learning. However, when considering learning from temporal distance or using a high-construal mindset, participants relied more heavily on their theory and were therefore better able to predict the benefits of future learning, thus overcoming the stability bias.

  20. We Made Your Bed, Why Won't You Lie in It? Food Availability and Disease May Affect Reproductive Output of Reintroduced Frogs.

    PubMed

    Klop-Toker, Kaya; Valdez, Jose; Stockwell, Michelle; Fardell, Loren; Clulow, Simon; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitigation to offset the impacts of land development is becoming increasingly common, with reintroductions and created habitat programs used as key actions. However, numerous reviews cite high rates of poor success from these programs, and a need for improved monitoring and scientific testing to evaluate outcomes and improve management actions. We conducted extensive monitoring of a released population of endangered green and golden bell frogs, Litoria aurea, within a created habitat, as well as complementary surveys of a surrounding wild population. We then compared differences between the created habitat and natural ponds where extant frogs either bred or didn't breed in order to determine factors that contributed to the breeding failure within the created habitat. We evaluated differences of L. aurea abundance, abundance of other fauna, vegetation, water quality, habitat structure, invasive fish, and disease between the three pond types (created habitat, breeding ponds, non-breeding ponds). We discovered that vegetation and invertebrate diversity were low within the created habitat, potentially reducing energy and nutritional resources required for breeding. Also, a greater proportion of frogs in the created habitat were carrying the chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, compared to the wild populations. In addition to causing the potentially fatal disease, chytridiomycosis, this pathogen has been shown to reduce reproductive functioning in male L. aurea, and subsequently may have reduced reproductive activities in the created habitat. Conspecific attraction, pond hydrology, and aquatic vegetation may also have had some influence on breeding behaviours, whilst the presence of the invasive mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, and heterospecific tadpoles were unlikely to have deterred L. aurea from breeding within the created habitat. Through the use of scientific testing and monitoring, this study is able to make recommendations for future amphibian breed and release programs, and suggests planting a diversity of plant species to attract invertebrates, creating some permanent ponds, connecting habitat with existing populations, trialling artificial mating calls, and following recommendations to reduce the prevalence of disease within the population. PMID:27463095

  1. Key opinion leaders and the corruption of medical knowledge: what the Sunshine Act will and won't cast light on.

    PubMed

    Sismondo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, in its marketing efforts, often turns to "key opinion leaders" or "KOLs" to disseminate scientific information. Drawing on the author's fieldwork, this article documents and examines the use of KOLs in pharmaceutical companies' marketing efforts. Partly due to the use of KOLs, a small number of companies with well-defined and narrow interests have inordinate influence over how medical knowledge is produced, circulated, and consumed. The issue here, as in many other cases of institutional corruption, is that a few actors have accumulated the power to shape the information on which many others base their decisions. Efforts to address this corruption should focus on correcting large imbalances in the current political economy of medical knowledge. A sequestration of pharmaceutical research and development on one hand from pharmaceutical marketing on the other, though difficult to achieve, would address this and many other problems.

  2. 'They won't change it back in their heads that we're trash': the intersection of sex work-related stigma and evolving policing strategies.

    PubMed

    Krüsi, Andrea; Kerr, Thomas; Taylor, Christina; Rhodes, Tim; Shannon, Kate

    2016-09-01

    In Vancouver, Canada, there has been a continuous shift in the policing of sex work away from arresting sex workers, which led to the implementation of a policing strategy that explicitly prioritised the safety of sex workers and continued to target sex workers' clients. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 cisgender and five transgender women street-based sex workers about their working conditions. Data were analysed thematically and by drawing on concepts of structural stigma and vulnerability. Our results indicated that despite police rhetoric of prioritising the safety of sex workers, participants were denied their citizenship rights for police protection by virtue of their 'risky' occupation and were thus responsiblised for sex work related violence. Our findings further suggest that sex workers' interactions with neighbourhood residents were predominantly shaped by a discourse of sex workers as a 'risky' presence in the urban landscape and police took swift action in removing sex workers in the case of complaints. This study highlights that intersecting regimes of stigmatisation and criminalisation continued to undermine sex workers citizenship rights to police protection and legal recourse and perpetuated labour conditions that render sex workers at increased risk for violence and poor health. PMID:27113456

  3. Distributed Leadership: A Good Theory but What if Leaders Won't, Don't Know How, or Can't Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Kathryn Bell; Locke, Leslie Ann

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results from an empirical qualitative study of the challenges faced by teacher leaders in their attempts to work directly with their colleagues to change instructional strategies and improve student success. Additionally, it offers a challenge to the utility of a naïvely espoused theory of distributed leadership, which…

  4. "This Computer Gives You a Hard Bargain": Is It Conflict or Frustration When Software Won't Let You Change Your Mind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuschner, David

    This study focused on the cognitive conflicts experienced by young children in using software programs that provided them with tools to create and/or combine individual graphic elements into larger structures. Six 5-year-old children, none with prior computer experience, were observed using three programs--Kids at Work, Picture Perfect, and…

  5. What if You Build It and They Still Won't Come? Addressing Student Awareness of Resources and Services with Promotional Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalal, Heather A.; Lackie, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    After a needs assessment exposed that even daily library users were unaware of the best resources, tools, and services, the Rider University Libraries switched gears from a focus on the creation of long step-by-step tutorials, to the creation of short promotional videos for all users, with attention on the needs of distance learners. This project…

  6. I'd Do Anything for Research, But I Won't Do That: Interest in Pharmacological Interventions in Older Adults Enrolled in a Longitudinal Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Calamia, Matthew; Bernstein, John P K; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) ranks as the 6th leading cause of death in the United States, yet unlike other diseases in this category, there are no disease-modifying medications for AD. Currently there is significant interest in exploring the benefits of pharmacological treatment before the onset of dementia (e.g., in those with mild cognitive impairment); however, recruitment for such studies is challenging. The current study examined interest in pharmacological intervention trials relative to other types of clinical interventions. A total of 67 non-demented older adults enrolled in a longitudinal cognitive aging study completed a questionnaire assessing interest in participating in a variety of hypothetical research study designs. Consistent with past research, results showed that the opportunities for participants to advance science, receive feedback about their current health, and help themselves or others, were associated with increased interest in clinical trial participation. Some factors were not associated with change in interest (e.g., a doctor not recommending participation) while others were associated with decreased interest (e.g., having to come in for multiple visits each week). Relative to other types of interventions, pharmacological intervention trials were associated with the least interest in participation, despite pharmacological interventions being rated as more likely to result in AD treatment. Decreased interest was not predicted by subjective memory concerns, number of current medications, cardiovascular risk, or beliefs about the likely success of pharmacological treatments. These results highlight the challenges faced by researchers investigating pharmacological treatments in non-demented older individuals, and suggest future research could contribute to more effective ways of recruiting participants in AD-related clinical trials. PMID:27438465

  7. "English King Frederick I Won at Arsuf, Then Took Acre, Then They All Went Home": Exploring the Challenges Involved in Reading and Writing Historical Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Paula Worth draws on three professional traditions in history education in order to build a lesson sequence on the Crusades for her Year 7s. First, she draws on the growing tradition of classroom practice using historical scholarship, not only to inform the teacher's knowledge but to deepen her pupils' direct acquaintance with scholarly…

  8. I'd Do Anything for Research, But I Won't Do That: Interest in Pharmacological Interventions in Older Adults Enrolled in a Longitudinal Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Calamia, Matthew; Bernstein, John P. K.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) ranks as the 6th leading cause of death in the United States, yet unlike other diseases in this category, there are no disease-modifying medications for AD. Currently there is significant interest in exploring the benefits of pharmacological treatment before the onset of dementia (e.g., in those with mild cognitive impairment); however, recruitment for such studies is challenging. The current study examined interest in pharmacological intervention trials relative to other types of clinical interventions. A total of 67 non-demented older adults enrolled in a longitudinal cognitive aging study completed a questionnaire assessing interest in participating in a variety of hypothetical research study designs. Consistent with past research, results showed that the opportunities for participants to advance science, receive feedback about their current health, and help themselves or others, were associated with increased interest in clinical trial participation. Some factors were not associated with change in interest (e.g., a doctor not recommending participation) while others were associated with decreased interest (e.g., having to come in for multiple visits each week). Relative to other types of interventions, pharmacological intervention trials were associated with the least interest in participation, despite pharmacological interventions being rated as more likely to result in AD treatment. Decreased interest was not predicted by subjective memory concerns, number of current medications, cardiovascular risk, or beliefs about the likely success of pharmacological treatments. These results highlight the challenges faced by researchers investigating pharmacological treatments in non-demented older individuals, and suggest future research could contribute to more effective ways of recruiting participants in AD-related clinical trials. PMID:27438465

  9. When Multiplication Facts Won't Stick: Could a Language/Story Approach Work? A Research Study Examining the Effectiveness of the "Memorize in Minutes" Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Joni D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether a story/language based method of teaching the multiplication facts would be helpful to students who previously had difficulty with the memorization of those facts. Using the curriculum "Memorize in Minutes" by Alan Walker (Walker, 2000), the researcher taught six fourth-grade students the multiplication facts (3s…

  10. 'They won't change it back in their heads that we're trash': the intersection of sex work-related stigma and evolving policing strategies.

    PubMed

    Krüsi, Andrea; Kerr, Thomas; Taylor, Christina; Rhodes, Tim; Shannon, Kate

    2016-09-01

    In Vancouver, Canada, there has been a continuous shift in the policing of sex work away from arresting sex workers, which led to the implementation of a policing strategy that explicitly prioritised the safety of sex workers and continued to target sex workers' clients. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 cisgender and five transgender women street-based sex workers about their working conditions. Data were analysed thematically and by drawing on concepts of structural stigma and vulnerability. Our results indicated that despite police rhetoric of prioritising the safety of sex workers, participants were denied their citizenship rights for police protection by virtue of their 'risky' occupation and were thus responsiblised for sex work related violence. Our findings further suggest that sex workers' interactions with neighbourhood residents were predominantly shaped by a discourse of sex workers as a 'risky' presence in the urban landscape and police took swift action in removing sex workers in the case of complaints. This study highlights that intersecting regimes of stigmatisation and criminalisation continued to undermine sex workers citizenship rights to police protection and legal recourse and perpetuated labour conditions that render sex workers at increased risk for violence and poor health.

  11. 'It's The Sun Wot Won It': Evidence of media influence on political attitudes and voting from a UK quasi-natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Aaron; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2016-03-01

    Do print media significantly impact political attitudes and party identification? To examine this question, we draw on a rare quasi-natural experiment that occurred when The Sun, a right-leaning UK tabloid, shifted its support to the Labour party in 1997 and back to the Conservative party in 2010. We compared changes in party identification and political attitudes among Sun readers with non-readers and other newspaper readerships. We find that The Sun's endorsements were associated with a significant increase in readers' support for Labour in 1997, approximately 525,000 votes, and its switch back was associated with about 550,000 extra votes for the Conservatives in 2010. Although we observed changes in readers' party preference, there was no effect on underlying political preferences. The magnitude of these changes, about 2% of the popular vote, would have been unable to alter the outcome of the 1997 General Election, but may have affected the 2010 Election. PMID:26857171

  12. Customizing an Assessment Model: Why Off the Shelf Won't Work. The Development of an Institutional Effectiveness Model at Clark State Community College, Springfield, Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salerno, Albert A.; Kristofco, John P.

    During the 1991-92 academic year, Clark State Community College's (CSCC's) Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness met on approximately 20 occasions to develop an instrument to assess the degree to which the college was achieving its goals. The group began with the assessment model produced by the Ohio Board of Regents in 1989-90, which had been…

  13. Commentary on community-led total sanitation and human rights: should the right to community-wide health be won at the cost of individual rights?

    PubMed

    Bartram, Jamie; Charles, Katrina; Evans, Barbara; O'Hanlon, Lucinda; Pedley, Steve

    2012-12-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set out to halve the proportion of the population without access to basic sanitation between 1990 and 2015. The slow pace of progress has lead to a search for innovative responses, including social motivation approaches. One example of this type of approach is 'Community-led Total Sanitation' (CLTS). CLTS represents a major shift for sanitation projects and programmes in recognising the value of stopping open-defecation across the whole community, even when the individual toilets built are not necessarily wholly hygienic. However, recent publications on CLTS document a number of examples of practices which fail to meet basic ethical criteria and infringe human rights. There is a general theme in the CLTS literature encouraging the use of 'shame' or 'social stigma' as a tool for promoting behaviours. There are reported cases where monetary benefits to which individuals are otherwise entitled or the means to practice a livelihood are withheld to create pressures to conform. At the very extreme end of the scale, the investigation and punishment of violence has reportedly been denied if the crime occurred while defecating in the open, violating rights to a remedy and related access to justice. While social mobilisation in general, and CLTS in particular, have drastically and positively changed the way we think about sanitation, they neither need nor benefit from an association with any infringements of human rights.

  14. Why Won't My Torch Work? Physics for 4 to 8 Year Olds. Australian Early Childhood Resource Booklets No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    Young children in Australia enter early childhood education settings eager to make sense of the world that surrounds them. Their interest in every day experiences is evident in the range of questions asked, many of which are scientific in nature. Intended as a resource for adults working with 4-to 8-year-old children, this booklet provides an…

  15. Won't Get Fooled Again: An Event-Related Potential Study of Task and Repetition Effects on the Semantic Processing of Items without Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszlo, Sarah; Stites, Mallory; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that semantic access is obligatory. Several studies have demonstrated that brain activity associated with semantic processing, measured in the N400 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), is elicited even by meaningless, orthographically illegal strings, suggesting that semantic access is not gated…

  16. "You Won't Believe What They Said in Class Today": Professors' Reflections on Student Resistance in Multicultural Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Alyssa Hadley; Dotson, Erica K.; Ford, Jillian C.; Roberts, Mari Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors Dunn, Dotson, Ford, and Roberts, discuss the ways they, as professors of multicultural education with different identities and experiences, attempt to understand and respond to students' implicit or explicit resistance in their classes. Though there has been a broad range of literature on student resistance, the…

  17. “A Campaign Won as a Public Issue Will Stay Won”: Using Cartoons and Comics to Fight National Health Care Reform, 1940s and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-01-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption “Result of ObamaCare” to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word “socialism.” The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform. PMID:24328659

  18. "Won't Somebody 'Think' of the Children?" Emotions, Child Poverty, and Post-Humanitarian Possibilities for Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Under models of moral and global citizenship education, compassion and caring are emphasized as a counterpoint to pervasive, heartless, neo-liberal globalization. According to such views, these and related emotions such as empathy, sympathy, and pity, can cause people to act righteously to aid others who are disadvantaged through no fault of their…

  19. "But They Won't Let You Read!" A Case Study of an Urban Middle School Male's Response to School Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Grace

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study presents the perceptions of Derrick, a Black urban adolescent male who enjoys reading but believes that inconsistent school discourses hinder his success and enjoyment as a reader. Findings show that Derrick's purposeful work while reading was limited and misunderstood because, among other factors, there was a pervasive…

  20. "They Won't Let Us Play ... Unless You're Going out with One of Them": Girls, Boys and Butler's "Heterosexual Matrix" in the Primary Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renold, Emma

    2006-01-01

    Judith Butler's conceptualisation of how gender is routinely spoken through a hegemonic heterosexual matrix has been pivotal for many social scientists researching within and beyond educational settings for exposing the ways in which children's normative gender identities ("intelligible genders") are inextricably tied to dominant notions of…

  1. "You've Got to Teach People that Racism Is Wrong and Then They Won't Be Racist": Curricular Representations and Young People&'s Understandings of "Race" and Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically examines the discursive (mis) representation of "race" and racism in the formal curriculum. Combining qualitative data derived from interviews with 35 young people who were enrolled in a Dublin-based, ethnically diverse secondary school, with a critical discursive analysis of 20 textbooks, the paper explores parallels between…

  2. Reversing hard won victories in the name of human rights: a critique of the General Comment on Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Melvyn Colin; Kolappa, Kavitha; de Almeida, Jose Miguel Caldas; Kleinman, Arthur; Makhashvili, Nino; Phakathi, Sifiso; Saraceno, Benedetto; Thornicroft, Graham

    2015-09-01

    The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is a major milestone in safeguarding the rights of persons with disabilities. However, the General Comment on Article 12 of the CRPD threatens to undermine critical rights for persons with mental disabilities, including the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health, access to justice, the right to liberty, and the right to life. Stigma and discrimination might also increase. Much hinges on the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities' view that all persons have legal capacity at all times irrespective of mental status, and hence involuntary admission and treatment, substitute decision-making, and diversion from the criminal justice system are deemed indefensible. The General Comment requires urgent consideration with the full participation of practitioners and a broad range of user and family groups.

  3. In the Maelstrom of American Independent Education: A School Leader's Guide to Chaos, Change, Competing Agendas, and the Dilemmas that Won't Go Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Today, independent school leaders operate at the fault line of pundits, parents, teachers, staff, students, board members, researchers, consultants, and more. They need to lead key constituents while weighing constituent expectations. They need to know how to sift through the increasing flow of evolving practices, research, and viewpoints…

  4. 47 CFR 73.1216 - Licensee-conducted contests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... be won; when prizes can be won; the extent, nature and value of prizes; basis for valuation of prizes... the material terms may vary widely depending upon the exact nature of the contest, they will...

  5. Jackie Joyner-Kersee: Living with Asthma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Table of Contents Jackie Joyner-Kersee Olympic triple Gold Medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee became the world’s top ... the Year. In 1988, she won two Olympic Gold Medals. And in 1992, she won Olympic Gold ...

  6. Other School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights selected construction projects for learning centers, early childhood and development schools, and special purpose educational facilities that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001.(GR)

  7. Elementary School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights elementary school construction projects that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001. Projects covered involve new school construction; and renovation, additions, and restoration. (GR)

  8. 47 CFR 24.839 - Transfer of control or assignment of license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Transfers of Licenses for Frequency Blocks C and F won in closed bidding. No assignment or transfer of control of a license for frequency Block C or frequency Block F won in closed bidding pursuant to the... license(s) for frequency blocks C and F and, at the time of receipt of such license(s), met...

  9. 47 CFR 24.839 - Transfer of control or assignment of license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transfers of Licenses for Frequency Blocks C and F won in closed bidding. No assignment or transfer of control of a license for frequency Block C or frequency Block F won in closed bidding pursuant to the... license(s) for frequency blocks C and F and, at the time of receipt of such license(s), met...

  10. 47 CFR 24.839 - Transfer of control or assignment of license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Transfers of Licenses for Frequency Blocks C and F won in closed bidding. No assignment or transfer of control of a license for frequency Block C or frequency Block F won in closed bidding pursuant to the... license(s) for frequency blocks C and F and, at the time of receipt of such license(s), met...

  11. 47 CFR 24.839 - Transfer of control or assignment of license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transfers of Licenses for Frequency Blocks C and F won in closed bidding. No assignment or transfer of control of a license for frequency Block C or frequency Block F won in closed bidding pursuant to the... license(s) for frequency blocks C and F and, at the time of receipt of such license(s), met...

  12. 47 CFR 24.839 - Transfer of control or assignment of license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transfers of Licenses for Frequency Blocks C and F won in closed bidding. No assignment or transfer of control of a license for frequency Block C or frequency Block F won in closed bidding pursuant to the... license(s) for frequency blocks C and F and, at the time of receipt of such license(s), met...

  13. Ralph Bunche's International Legacy: The Middle East, Congo, and United Nations Peacekeeping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Princeton N.

    2004-01-01

    Ralph Bunche is remembered most for three major achievements in the international field. His mediation of the end of the first Israel-Arab war, for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize; his work in the tumultuous period of independence in the Congo; and his "invention" of United Nations peacekeeping, which itself won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950.…

  14. Title Attributes of Successful Books in the United States: 1910-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, William C.

    This study examined titles of successful books, i.e., those that were best sellers or won literary prizes. In all, 3,239 titles in 71 lists by decade were characterized. The single largest category was popular general fiction followed by general nonfiction. About 49% of the titles won or were nominated for awards, and 45% were best sellers. Most…

  15. Electric Shock Injuries in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... comes into direct contact with a source of electricity, the current passes through it, producing what's called ... sturdy, dry, nonmetallic object that won't conduct electricity. Move the child as little as possible because ...

  16. 47 CFR 24.11 - Initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... applicant must file a single application for an initial authorization for all markets won and frequency blocks desired. (b) Blanket licenses are granted for each market and frequency block. Applications...

  17. 47 CFR 24.11 - Initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... applicant must file a single application for an initial authorization for all markets won and frequency blocks desired. (b) Blanket licenses are granted for each market and frequency block. Applications...

  18. 47 CFR 24.11 - Initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... applicant must file a single application for an initial authorization for all markets won and frequency blocks desired. (b) Blanket licenses are granted for each market and frequency block. Applications...

  19. 47 CFR 24.11 - Initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... applicant must file a single application for an initial authorization for all markets won and frequency blocks desired. (b) Blanket licenses are granted for each market and frequency block. Applications...

  20. 47 CFR 24.11 - Initial authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... applicant must file a single application for an initial authorization for all markets won and frequency blocks desired. (b) Blanket licenses are granted for each market and frequency block. Applications...

  1. Plotting a course from Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-12-01

    A new climate agreement won't solve climate change, but it should nudge the world onto a lower-emissions path. Research must drive deeper transformations by translating proposed solutions into workable action.

  2. Middle/High School Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights middle school/high school construction projects that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001. Projects covered involve new school construction; and renovation, additions, and restoration. (GR)

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Rh Incompatibility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... body can replace them. Red blood cells contain hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin), an iron-rich protein ... the body. Without enough red blood cells and hemoglobin, the baby won't get enough oxygen. Hemolytic ...

  4. Sobering message. Interview by Lynne Pearce.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Gary

    As Northern Ireland's first alcohol liaison nurse, Gary Doherty has dramatically reduced the number of hospital admissions where misuse was an issue. His work has won him the RCN's 2006 Northern Ireland Nurse of the Year Award.

  5. Gallstones

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver. Sometimes these fluids become solid and form stones, called gallstones. Symptoms What problems can gallstones cause? ... but no pain, chances are good that the stones won't be a problem for you. Your ...

  6. Making 'Tractor Beams' a Reality (Eventually)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Tractor beams -- the ability to trap and move objects using laser light -- are the stuff of science fiction, but a team of NASA scientists has won funding to study the concept for remotely capturin...

  7. Toxocariasis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Toxocariasis When common parasites of dogs and cats infect humans, the illness is called toxocariasis (or ... or kids whose families have pet dogs or cats. Signs and Symptoms Many kids won't have ...

  8. If My Child Has Asthma, Can We Keep Our Pet?

    MedlinePlus

    ... people say that certain breeds of dogs or cats, particularly those that don't shed, won't ... HEPA air cleaners can really help, especially for cat allergies. Vacuums are available with HEPA filters as ...

  9. Using rectal irrigation for faecal incontinence in children.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Clare

    Claire Bohr describes how she introduced rectal irrigation as a treatment for children with faecal incontinence who had failed to respond to conservative treatment. She won a Nursing Times Award in the continence care category for this service in 2008.

  10. Preschool Language Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... not get a language disorder from learning a second language. It won't confuse your child to speak ... on child language disorders describes research supporting the benefits of speech-language pathology treatment for children with language disorders. It ...

  11. 75 FR 24941 - Osprey III, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... would consist of: (1) An existing 29-foot-high concrete dam containing three sluice gates with a 100.... Hoon Won, 275 River Road, P.O. Box 202, Woolwich, Maine 04579, (207) 443-9747. FERC Contact: John...

  12. Q&A: Brian Schmidt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, Richard

    2016-09-01

    In 1998, Brian Schmidt discovered that, contrary to expectations, the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. The discovery won him a share of the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics and launched the search to uncover the nature of dark energy.

  13. 1978 Pacemaker Newspaper Awards: What Makes a Pacemaker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasler, Wayne

    1979-01-01

    Lists the nine high school and college newspapers, and the one newsmagazine, that won Pacemaker Awards in 1978; discusses characteristics that make each of them outstanding, and provides reproductions of a front page from each publication. (GT)

  14. NASA's Space Launch System Building Orion Adapter

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA is hard at work designing the nation's next flagship rocket, a heavy-lift launch vehicle that will carry explorers deeper into space than ever before. While the first full-configuration won't ...

  15. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-08-01

    A team of scientists led by defence physicist Dennis Baum has won the International Ballistics Society's Neill Griffiths Award for developing a new method of severing the connection between an offshore drilling rig and the seabed.

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Preferred Builders, Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-04-01

    The first Challenge Home built in New England features cool-roof shingles, HERS 20–42, and walls densely packed with blown fiberglass. This house won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  17. Filtrates and Residues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Robert, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (1) applications of chemistry problems encountered in the forensic science laboratory; (2) chemistry and the courtroom (inspired by a Sherlock Holmes story); and (3) the 41 women who have won the Garvan award for achievement in chemistry. (JN)

  18. Three dark-matter projects win US approval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commissariat, Tushna

    2014-08-01

    Three “second generation” dark-matter projects that will be at least 10 times more sensitive than existing experiments have won the backing of the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  19. UK businesses bag innovation awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Five UK firms have received innovation awards from the Institute of Physics (IOP), which publishes Physics World. Hallmarq Veterinary Imaging, Metrasens, M Squared Lasers, Silixa and Tracerco have all won an IOP award for developing new innovative products.

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amerisips Homes — Miller-Bloch Residence, Johns Island, SC

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    For this DOE Zero Energy Ready Home that won a Custom Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, the builder uses structural insulated panels to construct the entire building shell, including the roof, walls, and floor of the home.

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    These single-family, HERS 45 homes incorporate 2×6 wood framed walls with R-20 open cell spray insulation and OSB. The builder, StreetScape Development, won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  2. Five More Cases of Local Zika Infection Reported in Florida

    MedlinePlus

    ... assistance, has mounted and continues to mount an aggressive response, the mosquitos are persistent and we won' ... at least another couple of weeks if these aggressive control measures have worked," Frieden said Friday. Outside ...

  3. Prepare for Diabetes Care in Heat and Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... room fan won't cool you enough. Too Hot to Handle Know what else feels the heat? ... diabetes medicine in direct sunlight or in a hot car. Check package information about how high temperatures ...

  4. Asteroid Redirect Mission Robotic Trajectory and Crew Operations

    NASA Video Gallery

    This concept animation opens with a rendering of the mission's spacecraft trajectory, rendezvous, and approach to asteroid 2008 EV5. Although the mission's target asteroid won't officially be selec...

  5. New marketing mix stresses service.

    PubMed

    Collier, D A

    1991-01-01

    The seven Ps of service management include some nontraditional ingredients to help formulate marketing strategy. Two examples illustrate how competitive advantage can be won or lost based on applying or ignoring the seven Ps.

  6. Taking Care of Your Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... but it won't remove the plaque and particles of food between your teeth, under the gumline, ... frequency sound waves to loosen plaque deposits. The particles are then rinsed off with water. After cleaning, ...

  7. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-05-01

    Adrian Liu's work in the emerging field of hydrogen astronomy has won him a string of plaudits, including a Hubble Fellowship from the Space Telescope Science Institute and, most recently, the first ever Origins Project Postdoctoral Prize Lectureship.

  8. Reality of Retainers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb ... won't even notice it's there. Dentists advise reading aloud for several minutes each day. You may ...

  9. Parent Reinforcement for Child Achievement: The Use of a Lottery to Maximize Parent Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Katherine A.; Milan, Michael A.

    1982-01-01

    The study evaluated a reinforcement program in which three mothers earned lottery tickets and won prizes for the progress made by their handicapped preschool children during home based intervention. (Author)

  10. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  11. Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... and won't take long. Also explain the importance of lying still during the test, and let ...

  12. Looking Back on Books and Other Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carl D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents 11 responses received from U.S. scientists who have won Nobel Prizes (physics or physics-related work) indicating what books, discoveries, people, or issues of the last 50 years have most decisively influenced them. (Author/JN)

  13. Personal Stories | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2012 Table of Contents "I Plead with People…Go Get Checked for Diabetes!" Carol Dixon (right), diagnosed ... all," she says. "I plead with people to go get checked for diabetes annually. Otherwise, you won' ...

  14. Albinism

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition where people are born without the usual pigment (color) in their bodies. Their bodies aren't ... gene and the other parent has a normal pigment gene, their children won't have oculocutaneous albinism. ...

  15. What It? How Apportionment Methods Choose Our Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caulfield, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    What if Stephen Douglas instead of Abraham Lincoln had won the U.S. presidential election of 1860? What if John F. Kennedy had not carried some of the eight states he won by 2 percentage points or fewer in 1960? What if six hundred more people in Florida had voted for Al Gore in 2000? And what if, in that same year, the U.S. House of…

  16. Building a School that Works, Brick by Brick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins-Newby,Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    You won't see any cutting-edge pedagogy at the Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr. Academy in East Orange, New Jersey. You won't hear staff talking about or practicing the latest-of-the-latest ideas and innovations. What you will see, if you watch quietly, is the slow but solid construction of a school that works for economically disadvantaged children. You…

  17. Global Issues and the Precautionary Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    The author observes that environmental science is finding that industrial chemicals act like pharmaceuticals: a dose that won't hurt an adult can harm a fetus or a child; an amount that won't harm the mother can hurt her child in utero; some people are more sensitive than others to the effect; and one substance can interact with others and cause a…

  18. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Haemophilus Influenzae Type B Immunization in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sangjin; Ki, Moran

    2008-01-01

    An economic evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) immunization was conducted to examine whether Hib immunization should be included in the Korea's national immunization program. The costs and benefits included direct and indirect values and an estimation of the economic efficiency. We determined that a universal Hib immunization program in Korea would prevent 17 deaths and 280 invasive Hib cases. When we assumed the one Hib immunization cost as 26,000 won, the national Hib immunization would cost 34.6 billion won. Costs for various Hib diseases were estimated at 26.8 billion won (11.8 billion won from direct costs and 14.9 billion won from indirect costs). A benefit-cost ratio of 0.77 showed that the economic efficiency of the integration of Hib immunization in Korea is low because of the low incidence rate of Hib disease and high price of vaccine. However, if the Hib immunization cost decrease to less than 20,000 won, a benefit-cost ratio increase to 1.0 and above, integrating Hib immunization into the national immunization program with economic efficiency can be considered. PMID:18436997

  19. Work centrality and post-award work behavior of lottery winners.

    PubMed

    Arvey, Richard D; Harpaz, Itzhak; Liao, Hui

    2004-09-01

    Individuals who had won the lottery responded to a survey concerning whether they had continued to work after winning. They were also asked to indicate how important work was in their life using items and scales commonly used to measure work centrality. The authors predicted that whether lottery winners would continue to work would be related to their level of work centrality as well as to the amount of their winnings. Individuals who won large amounts in the lottery would be less likely to quit work if they had relatively greater degrees of work centrality. After controlling for a number of variables (i.e., age, gender, education, occupation, and job satisfaction), results indicated that work centrality and the amount won were significantly related to whether individuals continued to work and, as predicted, the interaction between the two was also significantly related to work continuance.

  20. Technophilic hubris and espionage styles during the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Macrakis, Kristie

    2010-06-01

    During the Cold War the United States developed an espionage style that reflected its love affair with technology (technophilia) whereas the Soviet Union and the East Bloc continued a tradition of using humans to collect intelligence. This essay places the origins and development of these espionage styles during the Cold War in historical and social context, and assesses their strengths and weaknesses by drawing on examples from particular cases. While the United States won the Cold War, the East Bloc won the spy wars because of a more effective espionage style. I conclude with some reflections on the uses of history for future policy, and suggest areas for further study.

  1. Paramont's Black Bear No. 4 mine does it right, again

    SciTech Connect

    Sanda, A.

    2007-07-15

    The Paramont Coal Company Virginia, LLC, a subsidiary of Alpha Natural Resources, recently won the '2007 overall award for excellence in mining and reclamation from the Virginia Division of Mined Land Reclamation and the Virginia Mining Association. Coal People Magazine recently visited Black Bear No. 4 mine where a settling pond was being removed and stream bed placed to drain the area, part of the 451-acre award winning reclamation project. The article recounts discussions with mining engineers about the company's operations with emphasis on the Black Bear No. 4 mine. Black Bear No. 1 mine won five state and national awards last year for conservation and land management practices. 8 photos.

  2. Technophilic hubris and espionage styles during the Cold War.

    PubMed

    Macrakis, Kristie

    2010-06-01

    During the Cold War the United States developed an espionage style that reflected its love affair with technology (technophilia) whereas the Soviet Union and the East Bloc continued a tradition of using humans to collect intelligence. This essay places the origins and development of these espionage styles during the Cold War in historical and social context, and assesses their strengths and weaknesses by drawing on examples from particular cases. While the United States won the Cold War, the East Bloc won the spy wars because of a more effective espionage style. I conclude with some reflections on the uses of history for future policy, and suggest areas for further study. PMID:20718278

  3. Hitting the Goalpost: Calculating the Fine Line Between Winning and Losing a Penalty Shootout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Portland Timbers won their first Major League Soccer (MLS) Cup Championship in December 2015. However, if it had not been for a kind double goalpost miss during a penalty shootout a few weeks earlier, the Timbers would never have been in the finals. On Oct. 30th, after what has been called "the greatest penalty kick shootout in MLS…

  4. An Evaluation of the New York City School Choice Scholarships Program: The First Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Paul E.; Myers, David; Howell, William G.

    This paper reports on first-year results for an evaluation of the New York School Choice Scholarships Foundation program, which was designed to provide scholarships for children from low-income families currently attending public schools to transfer to private schools. Families won scholarships through a lottery. Researchers examined data from…

  5. A challenge for green chemistry: designing molecules that readily dissolve in carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Beckman, E J

    2004-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is a green yet feeble solvent whose full potential won't be realized until we develop a more thorough understanding of its solvent behavior at the molecular level. Fortunately, advances in molecular modeling coupled with experiments are rapidly improving our understanding of CO(2)'s behavior, permitting design of new, more sustainable "CO(2)-philes". PMID:15340588

  6. At Last: Researching Teaching Practices: "Talking the Talk" versus "Walking the Walk"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahiri, Jabari

    2004-01-01

    Researchers of literacies in out-of-school settings often argue that their studies hold significant implications for teaching practices. This argument seems to be partially supported by studies that have won the Alan C. Purves Award between 1998 and 2001, acknowledging RTE articles most likely to impact educational practice. Yet this line of…

  7. Television Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Monte Union High School District, Rosemead, CA.

    An overview of the Rosemead High School (California) student-operated educational television system (KRHS) is presented, starting with its inception in 1964. Briefly described are the development of KRHS into a closed-circuit production facility with editing capabilities; awards that KRHS programs have won; places that KRHS student crews have…

  8. A Survey of Exemplar Teachers' Perceptions, Use, and Access of Computer-Based Games and Technology for Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Michael D.; Marks, Yaela

    2013-01-01

    This research reports and analyzes for archival purposes surveyed perceptions, use, and access by 259 United States based exemplar Primary and Secondary educators of computer-based games and technology for classroom instruction. Participating respondents were considered exemplary as they each won the Milken Educator Award during the 1996-2009…

  9. Lessons for Tennessee from Florida's Education Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladner, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Jeb Bush campaigned for governor on a clear and bracing set of education reforms in 1998. Having won office, he immediately pursued a dual-track strategy for reforming Florida's K-12 education system: standards and accountability for public schools, choice and options for parents. Florida lawmakers followed those reforms with additional measures.…

  10. Talent Search: How to Identify, Develop, and Empower Future Leaders within Your Ranks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullman, Helen

    2014-01-01

    As pressure mounts to increase completion rates at the nation's community colleges, presidents and CEOs know the myriad reforms required to create substantive change won't happen overnight. In most cases, it will take months, even years, for these efforts to have their desired impact. That's why it's important for community colleges to train…

  11. A Young University in India Focuses on Real-World Industry and Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neelakantan, Shailaja

    2009-01-01

    A small, relatively new Indian university is making a name for itself--nationally and internationally--in the rapidly growing field of sustainable development. TERI University, the creation of one of India's leading environmentalists, has won praise from industry executives and academics alike. They say the institution is tackling some of the…

  12. Tools for Employers: Making Equal Pay a Reality in Your Workplace. Facts on Working Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    This publication presents six primary tools employers can use to narrow or eliminate pay gaps in their workplaces. After each tool is a discussion of the problem and examples of "best practices" by employers that have won the Department of Labor's Opportunity 2000 and EVE (Exemplary Voluntary Efforts) awards. The report is divided into six tools:…

  13. Tales of A Martian Schoolmarm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascenzi, Laurie

    2000-01-01

    A former substitute teacher explains how she won first-graders' attention and significantly improved deportment by pretending to be a Martian with different communication modes and hearing capabilities than terrestrials. Children painlessly learn tips on listening, communicating, and engaging in friendly behaviors. (MLH)

  14. A Conversation with the Reverend Jesse Jackson: The Quest for Economic and Educational Parity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Enterprise Inst. for Public Policy Research, Washington, DC.

    This booklet contains an edited transcript of a visit by the black civil rights leader to the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) in May 1978. Reverend Jackson addresses issues that go beyond the freedoms won in the civil rights movement toward the goals of educational and economic parity for all Americans. AEI scholars and fellows,…

  15. The Metis: Canada's Forgotten People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealey, D. Bruce; Lussier, Antoine S.

    The Metis appeared early on the pages of Canada's history, were a major determinant in the westward expansion of the nation, and are still a significant segment of modern Canadian society. This book (1) traces their origin and their slow evolution to nationhood; (2) examines the Golden Age; (3) describes the battles won and lost with the nation of…

  16. Choices in Schools: What's Ahead and What to Do. Education USA/Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCurdy, Jack

    There are parents and students who are to be won or lost depending on which sector--public or private--answers their calls for programs to match their learning styles and desire for rigor, vitality, and variety. This report examines where choice has evolved from, what it offers parents and students, and how its disappearance could affect this…

  17. Can the League Cope with a Renegade Owner?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Robert S.

    1983-01-01

    The Raiders won the right in court to move from Oakland to Los Angeles, but they face an appeal by the National Football League (NFL) and a separate lawsuit by the city of Oakland. The NFL's appeal of the antitrust verdict and Oakland's suit based on eminent domain theory are reviewed. (SR)

  18. Milton M. Holland: Panola County Recipient of the Medal of Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This publication features an article about Milton M. Holland, a black American from East Texas, who is credited with being the first black Texan to have won the Congressional Medal of Honor during the U.S. Civil War. The articles in the issue concern Milton Holland and other black Americans who served in the Civil War. The articles include:…

  19. An Evaluation of the Children's Scholarship Fund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Paul E.; Campbell, David E.

    This paper presents first-year results of an evaluation of a Children's Scholarship Fund (CSF) program which provided scholarships enabling low-income families nationwide to send their K-8 children to private schools of their choice. Families won scholarships through a lottery. Telephone surveys of parents/caretakers of children who took advantage…

  20. The Pragmatic Idealist: Valerie Gross--Howard County Library, Columbia, MD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In the two years since Valerie Gross became director of the Howard County Library (HCL), it has won the county's Community Organization of the Year award, its Accessibility Award, and its Chamber of Commerce's Non-Profit Business of the Year ACE award for contributions to education, economic development, and quality of life. And for the first…

  1. UCLA Plans Online Encyclopedia of Egyptology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) has unveiled plans for what appears to be the world's first online, peer-reviewed encyclopedia devoted to ancient Egypt. The "UCLA Encyclopedia of Egypt," which in April won a $325,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, will include material in Arabic as well as English. The…

  2. St. Louis Blues: Tax Credits down and out in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Wilbur C.

    2008-01-01

    Many school choice enthusiasts think school choice legislation can be passed if only a number of minority political leaders can be won to the cause. Polls show that African Americans are among the strongest supporters of vouchers, tax credits, and charter schools. If minority leaders can be weaned away from traditional alliances, the underlying…

  3. Talking about Books: Outstanding Nonfiction Choices for 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerper, Richard M.; Aoki, Elaine; Duthie, Christine; Jensen, Julie; Lott, Carolyn; Nathan, Ruth; Smith, Karen Patricia; Zarnowski, Myra

    2000-01-01

    Presents and discusses the book which won the 2000 Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children: "Through My Eyes" by Ruby Bridges. Discusses the five Honor books chosen by the award committee, and offers descriptions of 14 other nonfiction books selected as outstanding by the award committee. (SR)

  4. Student Intern Lands Top Prize in National Science Competition | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Student intern Sam Pritt’s interest in improving geolocation led him to develop a project that won a top regional prize at the Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology in November. Pritt was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship, and he competed in the national competition in early December.

  5. Society News: Astronomy in the garden wins RHS prize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    The Spaced Out garden, sponsored by the RAS, won a Gold Medal from the Royal Horticultural Society at the Tatton Park Garden Show in August. It also provided a showcase for a model of the Philae Lander, part of ESA's Rosetta mission to comet 67 P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and an unusual occasion for astronomy outreach.

  6. Adopting Frank Warren's PostSecret Art Project to Illustrate the Role of Secrets in Interpersonal Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxman, Christina G.

    2013-01-01

    The exploration of secrets summons the adage that ''what someone doesn't know won't hurt them.'' While this phrase implies that keeping secrets can be advantageous, it also foreshadows another consideration: secrets have the propensity to hurt others (Caughlin, Scott, Miller, & Hefner, 2009). Despite this, the act…

  7. Winning in the Rural Zone: How Cam Henderson Invented the Zone Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Bob

    1992-01-01

    Assesses the distinguished coaching career of Cam Henderson, who won over 611 games in 36 seasons of college basketball and coached over 151 college football wins at West Virginia colleges, mainly at Marshall University (Huntington). His influence has been so pervasive that Marshall University's basketball arena is named in his honor. (LP)

  8. The Little District that Could.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carole; Klinsing, Susan

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe how a small school district produced a major interactive video program on employability that won the Silver Star Award at the 1988 Houston Film Festival. Topics covered include obtaining financial support and assembling an ad hoc production company. (CH)

  9. Visual Argument for Social Ends: "Captain Planet" and the Integration of Environmental Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Star A.

    While "Captain Planet and the Planeteers" has won numerous awards and is currently the number one rate household animated children's television program in the United States, the contradictions and complications of instilling environmental values in children through the medium of television are apparent. A content analysis of 15 episodes of…

  10. Get Your Green on!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederickson, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    In the span of five years, the staff and students at Council Rock School District in Pennsylvania won three Energy Star Awards, saved more than $7 million, and completely changed the culture of the district. This article describes how they did it. (Contains 5 online resources.)

  11. Growing Pains: Scaling up the Nation's Best Charter Schools. Education Sector Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Sector, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Amistad Academy is a bright shining star in public school reform. Founded in 1999 in a renovated warehouse in a blighted New Haven, Connecticut, neighborhood by a group of Yale law school students, the 289-student charter school has won the praise of the last two federal education secretaries. Educators throughout the country have traveled to the…

  12. Craig v. Alabama University: Reverse Discrimination in Employment and Historical Black Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Frank

    This paper presents an indepth analysis of Craig v. Alabama State University (ASU), a lawsuit involving charges of reverse discrimination in employment against a historical black college. The plaintiff, who felt that the nonrenewal of his contract was due to his race, won his suit against ASU for himself and all other whites similarly situated.…

  13. DeFunis--What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James B.

    1974-01-01

    The DeFunis case regarding reverse discrimination in law school admissions, won in the state trial court, reversed by the State Supreme Court, then rejected in 1974 in the U.S. Supreme Court as a "moot" case (DeFunis had already graduated), is reviewed. An outline of the appeal argument is included along with discussion of the unresolved issues.…

  14. The Fruits of Literacy: Loss or Gain--Zitkala-Sa: Native American Author and Reformer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidner, Heidemarie Z.

    Zitkala-Sa, a 19th century Native American woman who won second place in an 1896 Midwestern oratorical contest, resembles many students who daily cross borders--geographical, economic, linguistic, and cultural--balancing on a tightrope of assured losses and uncertain gains. Known as Gertrude Simmons before and Gertrude Bonnin after her marriage,…

  15. IFLA General Conference, 1992. Division of Collections and Services: Section on Acquisition and Exchange; Section on Serial Publications; Section on Interlending and Document Delivery. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, London (England).

    Eight papers for the Collections and Services Division of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions that were given at the 1992 annual meeting are presented. These papers deal with the acquisition and exchange of library materials, interlending, and serial publications. The following papers are included: (1) "Why Won't…

  16. Cyber terror.

    PubMed

    Haugh, Richard

    2003-06-01

    If terrorists attack America's health care info-tech systems, it probably won't be one big blow but rather a series of small incursions that are much more difficult to detect. How can your hospital protect its IT system before and after such insidious attacks.

  17. Tactical Speedball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubacs-Collins, Klara

    2010-01-01

    Virtually all conscientious teachers in the field of physical education aim to enhance the quality of their classes by introducing both content and approach innovations into their gymnasiums and classrooms, because the "same old stuff" just won't help achieve the goal of creating and maintaining an interest in the topic. Thus, one way to…

  18. Why Did the Founding Fathers Write the Constitution of the United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan

    1987-01-01

    Presents a mock dialogue among Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and Abigail Adams that questions whether the Founding Fathers wrote the U.S. Constitution as defenders of hard-won liberty or as self-serving aristocrats whose sole interest was in preserving their own economic and political positions. (BSR)

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: M Street Homes — Smartlux on Greenpark, Houston, TX

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder certified its first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home and won a Production Builder honor in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. It is the first home in the world to use a tri-generation system to supply electricity, heating, and cooling on site.

  20. Meet the decade's biggest challenges by stemming the tide of turnover.

    PubMed

    Tressler, T L; Atkins, W

    1990-01-01

    A 10 percent raise won't cut it for most of your top people, and salary demands are only one of the factors contributing to the turnover problem in I/S organizations. Here's how to keep your winners on board so projects stay on time and on budget.

  1. Award-Winning Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2006-01-01

    Kenneth E. Brashier, Mark S. Lewine, Alexei V. Filippenko, and Donna C. Boyd were the four professors who won the Professors of the Year for 2006. They were chosen from nearly 300 candidates nominated by their institutions for their "outstanding commitment to teaching undergraduate students and their influence on teaching." The annual competition…

  2. Removal of Books from School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Judith K.

    This report reviews the seven times that the courts have considered the question of whether school boards can remove books from school libraries. Because the first and the three most recent cases upheld the rights of boards, while the other three cases were won by plaintiffs who had filed their cases against the boards, the differences in the…

  3. Iranian Students' Performance on the IELTS: A Question of Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaemi, Farid; Daftarifard, Parisa; Shirkhani, Servat

    2011-01-01

    Reading comprehension has won much effort on the part of teachers, testers, and researchers in Iran due to the fact that the immediate need of Iranian students at different university levels is the ability to read in order to get new information on the topic they are studying. The question raised is how much reading practice can move learners…

  4. 47 CFR 24.717 - Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....717 Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. 24.717 Section 24.717 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  5. 47 CFR 24.717 - Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....717 Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. 24.717 Section 24.717 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  6. 47 CFR 24.717 - Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....717 Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. 24.717 Section 24.717 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  7. 47 CFR 24.717 - Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....717 Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. (a) Except with respect to licenses won in... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bidding credits for licenses for frequency Block F. 24.717 Section 24.717 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED)...

  8. Why We Need Neil Simon's Lost in Yonkers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coates, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    Nathan Coates, a high school teacher, describes the necessity of comedy in classrooms and also offers many points of discussion for approaching Neil Simon's play. Neil Simon's "Lost in Yonkers", which has won the Tony Award for the best play and the Pulitzer Award, both in 1991, tackles the toughest problems with the delicacy of a safecracker and…

  9. Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Steven W.; Chapman, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    "Six Pillars of Dynamic Schools" uncovers an often overlooked truth--effective change is the product of hard work and dedication. There is no silver bullet; no matter how many programs, software packages, or new initiatives a district uses, the magic won't just "happen." Dynamic schools result from consistent and redundant focus on the fundamental…

  10. Peter Sis: Gifted Creator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a brief biography of Peter Sis, an author and illustrator of children's books. Includes awards he has won; extension activities; and annotated bibliographies of books written and illustrated by Sis, selected books illustrated by Sis, audiobooks, videorecordings, sources for biographical information, and information on the Web. (LRW)

  11. Home care goes corporate.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H

    1997-05-01

    Some 18,000 home health agencies dot today's landscape--one of health care's last cottage industries. But the spread of managed care, plus long-promised Medicare payment reform, will change all that. Waves of consolidation and cost-cutting won't be far behind.

  12. One Vote for the Electoral College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, John J., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    For students of history, the acrimonious and contentious 1876 presidential canvass came to mind during the 2000 election imbroglio. Democrat Samuel J. Tilden won the popular vote, but to the dismay of outraged Democrats, an electoral commission of eight Republicans and seven Democrats decided along strict party lines to give twenty disputed…

  13. Becoming a Voice: A Conversation with George Littlechild, Illustrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Jean

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with George Littlechild, a Canadian Plains Cree artist, writer and illustrator who has created nearly 500 paintings that have been exhibited on several continents. Discusses his autobiographical "This Land is My Land" which is illustrated with his paintings and which won the Jane Addams Picture Book Award. (SG)

  14. Stimulating Cultural Appetites: An Experiential Gourmet Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Carolyn I.; Hu Poirier, Vickie

    2007-01-01

    This article is an extension of a presentation that won "Best Exercise" at the Eastern Academy of Management, 1998. The authors introduce an experiential gourmet approach using "food stories" to stimulate an aura of acceptance and appreciation for human commonalities before delving into human differences. The authors use a semester long…

  15. Teacher Education at Oxford University: James Is Alive but Living in Karachi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The arguments at Oxford about the start of teacher education within the University have been repeated many times and in many ways, not least in the 1972 James Committee. The strong advocacy there for much greater attention to, and investment in, continuing professional development may not have won the day in England, but, through the influence of…

  16. Representations of Material Culture and Gender in Award-Winning Children's Books: A 20-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crabb, Peter B.; Marciano, Deb L.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that children's books accurately reflect the gender-based division of labor in the culture and historical period in which they were published. A content analysis was performed on illustrations in books that won the Caldecott Medal or Honor between 1990 and 2009. The final sample included 490 illustrations in 68 of…

  17. Outcry against Violence: Beating Death of Student in Chicago Spurs Attention to a Nationwide Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarons, Dakarai I.

    2010-01-01

    In the wake of the beating death of a Chicago high school student in September, law-enforcement officials and educators have called for renewed efforts to stem youth violence. But they also acknowledged that money and programs alone won't solve the problem. U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan traveled to…

  18. Response to the Comment by J. Grunenberg on "The Nature of the Fourth Bond in the Ground State of C2: The Quadruple Bond Conundrum''.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Sason; Danovich, David; Hiberty, Philippe C

    2015-11-16

    The quadruple bond structure in C2 emerges from solid quantum-chemical calculations and won't go away! There is no mystery in the rather small bond dissociation energy, and this cannot constitute the reason to reconsider the whole concept of quadruple bonding. PMID:26482677

  19. Why Bringing Back Grammar Schools Is Not Proving a Popular Idea: Two Successes for the Comprehensive Argument in Recent Student Union Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benn, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    As moves grow once more to expand selective education in the United Kingdom, this is a short report of two lively and well-attended debates at the universities of Manchester and Cambridge in the early part of 2015. Both debates were resoundingly won by those arguing against a return to a divisive system based on the 11+. Instead, audiences…

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Cobblestone Homes — 2014 Model Home, Midland, MI

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder's first DOE Zero Energy Ready Home won a Custom Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, scored HERS 49 without PV or HERS 44 with 1.4 kW of PV, and served as a prototype and energy efficiency demonstration model while performance testing was conducted.

  1. Ideas on Creative and Practical IQ Underlie New Tests of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Robert J. Sternberg often writes about a lecture-style psychology course he took as a college freshman in which he got a C. "There is a famous Sternberg in psychology," the professor told him at the time, "and it looks like there won't be another." To Mr. Sternberg, the vignette illustrates that conventional assessments do not measure all the…

  2. Correcting Our Connecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toshalis, Eric

    2016-01-01

    "We often say to one another that "students won't care what you know until they know that you care," and this may be true. But our students' knowledge that they are cared for depends on what we do far more than on what we say," writes Eric Toshalis. In this impassioned article, he urges educators to rethink what it means to…

  3. Cyber terror.

    PubMed

    Haugh, Richard

    2003-06-01

    If terrorists attack America's health care info-tech systems, it probably won't be one big blow but rather a series of small incursions that are much more difficult to detect. How can your hospital protect its IT system before and after such insidious attacks. PMID:12838886

  4. A First-Year Teacher's Top 10 Mistakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nourie, Meredith C.

    2011-01-01

    In June the author completed her first full year of high school teaching. In this article, she shares her top 10 mistakes for several reasons: (1) so that other beginners will know what to expect; (2) so that teacher educators will share with candidates for licensure; (3) so that she won't make the same mistakes again; (4) so that veteran teachers…

  5. Return on Investment: Strategies for Improving Remedial Education. Complete to Compete Briefing Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandal, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Every year millions of students enroll in colleges with the goal of completing a college degree or certificate so they can find a well-paying job. Unfortunately, many arrive on college campuses, take a college placement exam and discover they will need to complete remedial education courses in math, reading, or writing that won't count toward a…

  6. Middle Level Learning Number 47

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapham, Steven S.; Hanes, Peter; Turner, Thomas N.; Clabough, Jeremiah C.; Cole, William

    2013-01-01

    This issue's "Middle Level Learning" section presents two articles. The first is "Harriet Tubman: Emancipate Yourself!" (by Steven S. Lapham and Peter Hanes). "Argo," which won the 2012 Oscar for best picture, was about a daring escape of six U.S. diplomats from Iran during the 1979 hostage crisis. Now imagine…

  7. Accountability for Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellman, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Productivity gains in higher education won't be made just by improving cost effectiveness or even performance. They need to be documented, communicated, and integrated into a strategic agenda to increase attainment. This requires special attention to "accountability" for productivity, meaning public presentation and communication of evidence about…

  8. Whatever Happened to Foxfire? Still Glowing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickman, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of the creation of "Foxfire" magazine and the Foxfire Museum and Heritage Center merits the question of how that innovative program of teaching and learning influences education today. Despite its troubled history, the program continues to exist and won the 2015 Georgia Governor's Awards for the Arts and Humanities…

  9. Building Systems for Evaluation of Teachers Poses Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Rounding the corner on the design of new teacher-evaluation plans, states and districts are beginning to wrestle with the significant technical and logistical hurdles for transforming their blueprints into reality. In the coming months, more states--especially those that won grants through the $4 billion federal Race to the Top initiative--are…

  10. Local Authors in the Classroom: Bringing Readers and Writers Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moynihan, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    Students seem to believe that novels appear whole cloth; the writer just types away, channeling the muse in the attic. Poetry is pure inspiration--one has the gift or one does not. Students need to know that writing is hard work, and that the blank page stares down every good writer, even authors whose books have won critical acclaim and graced…

  11. The Marriott Philosophy at Work: A Study of Corporate Success with the Handicapped. Project TROPHY. Transition Research on Problems of Handicapped Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Charles; Zhu, Guangli

    This monograph examines the Marriott Corporation, which has won numerous awards for its involvement in creating employment situations for the handicapped. Part 1 examines the Marriott Corporation in its wider economic, political, and religious contexts, including its founding by a Mormon family. Part 2 addresses central features of the Marriott…

  12. A Persistent Reformer: Jonathan Kozol's Work to Promote Equality in America. Adolescent Cultures, School and Society. Volume 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ognibene, Richard, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Jonathan Kozol has been a leading educational critic and social activist since 1967 when "Death at an Early Age," his book about racism in Boston's schools, was published and won a National Book Award. Since then, Kozol has written eleven more books which focus on such issues as segregation in schools and society, poverty, inequitable school…

  13. Women even the odds. Healthcare isn't an "old boys' network" anymore, as women catch up to men in leadership positions.

    PubMed

    Szot, Alison

    2005-04-18

    Women are increasingly taking influential jobs in healthcare, whether it's Carolyn Clancy at the AHRQ helping lead the way on improving quality through IT or Risa Lavizzo-Mourey helping dole out millions of dollars in grants at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Both won spots on Modern Healthcare's inaugural list of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare.

  14. Living Independently in a Home and Community of Choice: How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braswell, Gail; Ritter, Linda; Sufficool, Mary Jane

    2009-01-01

    Residents in a group home, supported apartment, or intermediate care facility for the mentally retarded (ICF/MR) are not guaranteed a place for life. Neither are they guaranteed they won't have to move if their provider needs to "rearrange" clients. Separating residence from support gives an individual control over the most basic decisions…

  15. Shoulder-To-Shoulder Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Arizona's Vail School District won this year's Sylvia Charp Award because of its revolutionary--and truly collaborative--approach to standards-based curriculum development that it is sharing with the rest of the state. This article takes a look at how they did it.

  16. Reading Second. Brown Letters on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Grover

    2009-01-01

    Former President George W. Bush finished his tenure without having won congressional renewal of his No Child Left Behind (NCLB) policy. With President Barack Obama now at the helm, NCLB is up for debate. Brown Center Director Grover "Russ" Whitehurst examines Reading First, a key component of NCLB, that aims to ensure that all children learn to…

  17. 13 CFR 124.501 - What general provisions apply to the award of 8(a) contracts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION 8(a) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT/SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS STATUS DETERMINATIONS 8(a) Business Development Contractual Assistance § 124.501 What general provisions apply to the award of 8(a) contracts? (a... awards won through competition with other Participants. (c) Admission into the 8(a) BD program does...

  18. Counterfactuals and Causal Models: Introduction to the Special Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Judea Pearl won the 2010 Rumelhart Prize in computational cognitive science due to his seminal contributions to the development of Bayes nets and causal Bayes nets, frameworks that are central to multiple domains of the computational study of mind. At the heart of the causal Bayes nets formalism is the notion of a counterfactual, a representation…

  19. "Here's to the Crazy Ones:" Legendary Words Spark Educators and Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Realon, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    During the summer of 2006, as part of a court ruling, Olympic High School of Charlotte-Mecklenberg School (CMS) District, was accused of committing "academic genocide" against its students and was threatened to be taken over by the state of North Carolina. However, in 2005, Olympic had earlier won a $1.2 million grant from a high school…

  20. Higher Education and the American Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKiernan, Holiday Hart

    2012-01-01

    Without college-level learning, American workers simply won't have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in today's global economy. The country's long-term economic recovery will rely on getting a greater number of high-quality degrees into the hands of a larger, more diverse pool of graduates. College and university governing boards that…

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Garbett Homes, Herriman, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    As the first net zero-energy production home certified in Utah, this house incorporates two 94% efficient tankless water heaters and two roof-mounted solar panels that preheat the home's water supply. This home won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the production builder category.

  2. Vitalizing Creative Learning in Science and Technology through an Extracurricular Club: A Perspective Based on Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Hwang, Ming-Yueh

    2013-01-01

    A case study was undertaken in a junior high school that had won the highest award of the National PowerTech Contest in Taiwan. In the contest, students were required to create their own wooden robot (mechatronics project) in the morning and compete in the afternoon, in order to better avoid the intervention of parents and teachers in the process.…

  3. Alma Flor Ada: Writer, Translator, Storyteller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the work of children's author Alma Flor Ada, a Cuban native who has won awards honoring Latino writers and illustrators. Includes part of an interview that explores her background, describes activity ideas, and presents a bibliography of works written by her (several title published in both English and Spanish) as well as sources of…

  4. Harassment: What's Sex Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoop, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An educational law professor reflects on the context of sexual harassment prevention. Some people won't take the subject seriously and are concerned only with legalities. Every school needs a formal plan to eradicate sexual harassment. Milder forms often worsen, if uncorrected, and kids cannot learn if they are afraid. (MLH)

  5. U.S. Students Win Medals in International Chemistry Olympiad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1985-01-01

    The four members of the American team in the International Chemistry Olympiad won medals in this international competition (which involved written/laboratory examinations in organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry, and biochemistry). Selection of the team involved a nationwide examination and participation in a two-week chemistry camp. (DH)

  6. Turn Your Boys into Readers!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Pam

    2011-01-01

    Girls outscore boys in reading proficiency levels; the gender gap is startling and concerning. The myth that boys won't read or that it's not "cool" for boys to love reading plays a big part in how these low levels come to be. Low expectations from teachers, and an assumption that boys prefer physical activity, mean that boys often don't find…

  7. 10 Things We Know So Far about Online Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Ten tips for online courses are as follow: (1) provide technical support; (2) plan the program; (3) use it for soft skills; (4) offer training during working hours; (5) keep lessons short; (6) keep traffic moving; (7) avoid using plug-ins; (8) teach the basics; (9) retain the human touch; and (10) realize the Web won't put trainers out of…

  8. Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough in kids. If you get the flu vaccine, it will protect you from getting a bad case of the flu. You either won't get the flu at all, or if you do get it, you will have only mild symptoms and you should get better pretty quickly. Here's what the vaccine means for most kids: Kids older than 9 ...

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: KB Home — Double ZeroHouse, Lancaster, CA

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    The home that won a Production Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards serves as a model for this builder, showcasing high-tech features including an electric car charging station; a compressed natural gas (CNG) car fueling station; a greywater recycling system that filters shower, sink, and clothes washer water for yard irrigation; smart appliances; and an electronic energy management system.

  10. Digital doctor.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2014-07-01

    As telemedicine gains momentum, so does policy interest at the state and federal levels. A new Federation of State Medical Boards model policy aims to create a roadmap for the safe and appropriate practice of telemedicine. But a provision that has sparked debate says a telephone call or online visit alone won't suffice for newly established patient relationships.

  11. "Against Fascism, War and Economies": The Communist Party of Great Britain's Schoolteachers during the Popular Front, 1935-1939

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavanagh, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The Popular Front line made the Communist Party of Great Britain (CPGB) a more hospitable place for "brain workers." The emphasis the line placed on mass ideological and cultural struggle against fascism meant that they became important allies to be won for the working class. As the principal transmitters of ideology and culture to the…

  12. Two Legacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Before Heman Sweatt, an African-American from Houston, won his lawsuit to attend the University of Texas (UT) School of Law, Carlos Cadena, a Mexican-American from San Antonio, was among its brightest students. Cadena graduated summa cum laude from the law school in 1940, a decade before Sweatt's lawsuit forced UT to open its graduate and…

  13. Strategies for Directing Existing Educational Systems Towards Life-Long Education: What Algerian Experience Has to Contribute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skander, O.

    The motive power in Algeria's national educational system has been and still remains the ideological force of the Algerian revolution. After independence was won, a dramatic increase in school enrollments (resulting from decentralization) intensified the need for more teachers, better facilities and materials, new curricula, oriented to national…

  14. When Sinuses Attack!

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a cold? continue When Good Sinuses Go Bad What about that cold that won't go away? A cold virus can: damage the delicate ... if you are feeling well enough, you can go to school or go outside and play. In ...

  15. Safety Tips: Basketball (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Few Other Reminders If it's on-court and serious, make sure a responsible adult — be it a coach, parent, or referee — is on hand. Kids probably won't need adult supervision for games of one-on-one or two-on-two ...

  16. Connecting Rural School Reform and Rural Child Advocacy. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Jonathan P.

    In North Carolina, legislation giving health insurance to children of modest-income working families was won because a broad coalition of over 100 organizations got the attention of lawmakers. Because all children benefitted, rural children benefited, but a few groups pushing for health insurance for just rural children would not have gotten their…

  17. Company Plans to Challenge Dominance of Common Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2007-01-01

    Last week ApplicationsOnline LLC, in Baltimore, unveiled its Universal College Application, which has already won a baker's dozen of clients dissatisfied with the Common Application, including Duke and Harvard Universities. Although some of the 13 institutions plan to use ApplicationsOnline's service in addition to the Common Application, the…

  18. Award-Winning Performance and Consulting: An Interview with Burt Huber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickelman, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Burt Huber and his team from Ariel Performance Centered Systems won a performance support design award at last year's Online Learning Conference for their system at Payless shoes. Huber discusses some details of his organization's designs; how he approaches a client; how he assesses organizational readiness for performance support; role of…

  19. Joseph Rotblat: Influences, Scientific Achievements and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Joseph Rotblat was one of the most distinguished nuclear physicists and peace campaigners of the post Second World War period. His peace activities rank alongside those of Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell; he won the Nobel Peace Prize, jointly with the Pugwash movement, that he helped found. However, he made significant contributions to…

  20. An Elite South African University Seeks To Make Itself More "African."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergnani, Linda

    1998-01-01

    The administration of the University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) is committed to increasing the number of black faculty and providing support to reduce their isolation. This year, for the first time, blacks make up 51% of the student population. The new president, a white man, appears to have won strong, broad-based support within the…

  1. Microbial Scourges and Their Impact on Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Dennis G.; Soltys, Marian A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of great epidemics (rat-borne, plague, smallpox, cholera, influenza, rabies, tuberculosis) reveals the devastation they have caused. Success in the battle against these is being won through hygiene, sanitation, vector control, and vaccines, especially since microbiology has provided a rational understanding of the diseases. (Author/JN)

  2. From Students to Change Agents: The 2009 K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    One of the author's chief delights as editor of "Change" is to read, every year, the personal statements of students who have won the K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Award. Pat Cross, professor "emerita" at the University of California, Berkeley, has long been a leading scholar in higher education. These future leaders of higher education,…

  3. The monster in the woods. Responding to the East Bay fire.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, E

    1993-08-01

    One agency decided to fight fire with earthquake when it applied its hard-won knowledge of disaster relief to community efforts during and following the East Bay fire. By drawing on its experience with the earthquake of 1989, Vesper Hospice of the East Bay and Vesper Home Health Agency were able to tame the "monster in the woods."

  4. We'll Paint the Octopus Red.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuve-Bodeen, Stephanie

    This children's book tells the story of a little girl who has a new baby brother with Down syndrome. Her contemplation of the advantages and disadvantages of having a sibling is highlighted. When she finds out the baby has Down syndrome, her initial reaction is that the baby won't be able to do all the wonderful things she has thought they would…

  5. Celebrating Love in All Shades: YA Books with LGBTQ Themes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, Mark, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author highlights outstanding literature written for young adults that contains LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning) themes, or contains LGBTQ characters. One of the most critically hailed books with LGBTQ characters from 2007 was Perry Moore's debut novel, "Hero" (Hyperion). This book won the Lambda…

  6. 75 FR 24942 - Osprey I, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... consist of: (1) An existing 12-foot- high, 91-foot-wide concrete dam with a 58-foot-wide spillway; (2) an... Won, 275 River Road, P.O. Box 202, Woolwich, Maine 04579, (207) 443-9747. FERC Contact: John...

  7. (Re)location of Home in Louise Erdrich's "The Game of Silence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Li Ping

    2011-01-01

    Louise Erdrich is one of the most influential writers of the Native American Renaissance. Her contributions to the representation of Native American history have been great, and her masterpieces of children's literature have won her a prominent reputation. This article explores the (re)location of the concept of home in Erdrich's "The Game of…

  8. The Big Disconnect between Segregation and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdun, Vincene

    2005-01-01

    The hearts and minds of the American people have been won over on the issue of segregation. However, the dilemma is that while an overwhelming majority of Americans would cringe at the idea of a racially segregated America, America remains racially segregated and racial equality is more ideal than real. Even though there is almost no legal…

  9. 76 FR 47182 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... & NVO), 1915 McKinley Avenue, Suite E, La Verne, CA 91750, Officers: Mary Ann Ruiz, COO (Qualifying.... (OFF & NVO), 147-03 182nd Street, Jamaica, NY 11413, Officer: Byung (Brian) Kim, President/Secretary... (Qualifying Individual), Won Kyung Kim, President/CEO/CFO, Application Type: New OFF & NVO License....

  10. Be Our Guest--Safely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    One has more than language barriers and varying cultural differences to consider when staying overseas these days. In the wake of hotel terrorist bombings in countries such as Indonesia and India in the last few years, travelers need to be assured the place they call home for the duration of their stay won't result in injury or death. To reduce…

  11. Pilot Fullerton examines SE-81-8 Insect Flight Motion Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton examines Student Experiment 81-8 (SE-81-8) Insect Flight Motion Study taped to the airlock on aft middeck. Todd Nelson, a high school senior from Minnesota, won a national contest to fly his experiment on this particular flight. Moths, flies, and bees were studied in the near weightless environment.

  12. Author! Author! Amazing Cartoonist, Gifted Writer: William Steig

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2004-01-01

    This article gives a brief biography of William Steig, one of America's best-known cartoonists and, later in life, a beloved children's author and illustrator. A major motion picture based on Steig's picture book "Shrek!" won the first Oscar in the category of best animated feature film in 2002. Steig passed away at the age of 95 in October, 2003.…

  13. Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby Baumgard; Steve Ephraim

    2001-04-18

    Summaries of paper: Emission requirements dictate vehicle update cycles; Packaging, performance and cost impacted; Styling updates can be integrated; Opportunity to integrate features and performance; Non-uniform regulations challenge resources; and Customers won't expect to pay more or receive less.

  14. Synthesizing a Life: An Interview with Carl Djerassi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardellini, Liberato

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Carl Djerassi recalls his first years, from his pleasant childhood, to how he escaped the Nazi persecutions, to his college education in America. He remembers how with his research group he won the race for synthesis of cortisone, and how they then synthesized norethindrone, the active ingredient in oral contraceptives. Djerassi…

  15. Organizing to Organize: The Case of a Successful Long-Haul Campaign for Collective Bargaining Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniffin, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    After nearly four decades of campaigning, faculty and academic staff union members across the University of Wisconsin (UW) System won the right to bargain collectively in June 2009 when the Governor signed legislation that modified state labor law. In this paper, I present historical and interdisciplinary analyses of the organizational structures…

  16. Muslim Students in Malta: Citizens at the Margins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chircop, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Malta is a small island at the periphery of Europe, often referred to as a bridge connecting Africa with the European continent. Discourse about multiculturalism opens a Pandora's box, albeit the very recently elected Labour Party won the election on the call of Malta Taghna Lkoll (Malta belongs to all of us). This was the first time that…

  17. A Cauldron of Opposition in Duncan's Hometown: Rank-and-File Teachers Score Huge Victory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethinking Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In a stunning victory, a group of rank-and-file teachers won election to leadership of the powerful Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) this past June. Karen Lewis, a high school chemistry teacher, defeated the two-time incumbent president, winning 60 percent of the vote. Lewis led a slate of candidates from the Caucus of Rank-and-File Educators (CORE),…

  18. The Secrets of My Success: An African American Librarian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Roberta

    1994-01-01

    Relates the experiences of an African-American woman who won an ALA (American Library Association) scholarship to attend library school. Topics discussed include leadership programs; changing careers; finances; ALA conference experiences; ALA's Black Caucus; and working part-time while attending school part-time. (LRW)

  19. My Child the Math Whiz!! Or Buy Your Child a Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiehl, Charles F.; Harper, B. Ann

    1979-01-01

    An overview of the disadvantages and advantages of the mini-calculator in the public school classroom. While some educators fear students won't learn basic arithmetic and will become dependent on the calculator, others note its value in skill reinforcement, motivation, job preparation, and saving time in the classroom. (SB)

  20. No More Nice Girls: Feminist Art as Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullarkey, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Nothing says "the sixties" like the word "revision," and, in keeping with those times, the fledgling feminist art movement dismissed hard-won mastery as "mere skill" and snubbed the canon of Western art as evidence of male dominion over the criteria for legitimacy and achievement. In debunking the myth of the Great (male) Artist, the women's…

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South Sarasota County, Nokomis, FL

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    The builder won an Affordable Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards for this super-insulated home that features a 5.5-inch-thick layer of open-cell spray foam on the inside of the attic ceiling, providing an R-20-insulated, cool, conditioned space for the home’s high-efficiency SEER 15 heat pumps.

  2. Accounting Professor Is Unlikely Heroine in Battle against Sex Bias at Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magner, Denise K.

    1993-01-01

    A woman associate professor denied tenure by male colleagues sued and won in federal court, claiming sex discrimination in assessment of her scholarship. She is being reimbursed by the university for costs of her extensive publicity campaign. University failure to file a required affirmative-action plan was also found. (MSE)

  3. TACSCE Research Annual 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesko, Silvia Jo

    1991-01-01

    This annual contains the paper that won the 1991 President's Award of the Texas Association for Community Service and Continuing Education (TACSCE) as well as the runner-up paper and other articles. An editorial, "Learning to Crawl" (Silvia Lesko), focuses on the editor's "discovery" of the adult learner. "Ethics and Continuing Education" (Janet…

  4. Kelly D. Brownell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of Kelly D. Brownwell, winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Applications of Psychology (2012). He won the award for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the etiology and management of obesity and the crisis it poses for the modern world. A seminal thinker in…

  5. Bay State Bravado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    As a bright and ambitious youngster growing up poor in Southside Chicago, Deval L. Patrick won a scholarship to Milton Academy, a private Massachusetts boarding school, courtesy of the acclaimed "A Better Chance" initiative. Attending the prestigious and rigorous prep school altered the course of Patrick's life. He flourished at Milton before…

  6. Striking the Right Balance in Summer Learning for Special Needs Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipperer, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Parents of special needs children know how hard their children work to master new skills. It can be heartrending when hard-won progress evaporates. Summer can present a particular dilemma to those with learning challenges. The freedom, recreation, and fun is something everybody looks forward to, but this break from learning can result in the loss…

  7. Are They Bloody Guilty? Blood Doping with Simulated Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Parker E.; Lees, Kelsey D.; Milanick, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    In this practice-based lab, students are provided with four Olympic athlete profiles and simulated blood and urine samples to test for illegal substances and blood-doping practices. Throughout the course of the lab, students design and conduct a testing procedure and use their results to determine which athletes won their medals fairly. All of the…

  8. Math-Science Bills Advance in Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.; Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    Improving K-12 instruction and student achievement in mathematics and science is at the heart of separate bills intended to bolster America's economic standing that won overwhelming approval in both houses of Congress last week. The House on April 24 approved the 10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds Science and Math Scholarship Act by a vote of…

  9. The Americans with Disabilities Act in Higher Education: The Plight of Disabled Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    Explores reasons why disability discrimination lawsuits by university professors usually fail. Reviews the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Analyzes cases involving disabled professors who lost their cases and those who won them. Compares successful and unsuccessful ADA litigation. (Contains 86 references.) (PKP)

  10. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-07-01

    Medical physicist Alla Reznik's work on next-generation positron emission tomography (PET) devices - which recently won her a Leadership Award from the Ontario Research and Innovation Optical Network (ORION) - developed out of more than a decade of research into the fundamental properties of wide band-gap semiconductors.

  11. Principal Selection Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    The choice of principals is too important to be left to chance. Dynamic, committed leaders not only help determine the quality of teachers that are recruited, but provide the key to effective schools where the battle for excellence will be won or lost. Section 1, "The Effective Principal," outlines the tasks that an effective principal performs.…

  12. Southern Hospitality and a Ton of People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    It had been more than 20 years since ACTE had held its Annual Convention and Career Tech Expo in Atlanta, Georgia, and the overwhelming success of this year's Convention guaranteed that there won't be another 20 years in between visits. More than 6,000 career and technical educators filled the Georgia World Congress Center to network with…

  13. Objecting To Dissection: A College Student's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Anti-Vivisection Society, Chicago, IL.

    In a number of states, students from kindergarten through high school have won the right to refuse to dissect or kill animals and the right to substitute an alternative project. This booklet was designed to help college science students take an ethical stand by refusing to participate in dissection exercises. The booklet begins with an overview of…

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes — Kaltenbach Residence, Clinton, WA

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This home on Whidbey Island won a Custom Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home scores HERS 37 without PV or HERS -13 with 10 kW PV, enough to power the home and an electric car.

  15. Whatever the Change, Count It All Joy!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Jewel's Learning Center won the honor of being the first center to win an Extreme Makeover, courtesy of "Exchange" magazine and its partners! The author was over the top! Not only were they getting a new playground, but all new furnishings and toys for the entire center! Wow! It really happened! Changes just keep coming and coming. They have made…

  16. Wrapping Her Mouth Around Juicy Words: An Interview with Kathi Appelt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesesne, Teri S.

    2005-01-01

    Sometimes one meet a person and instantly know that he or she share a connection. Such is the case with the incredibly talented author, Kathi Appelt. Kathi's work has won her critical acclaim and many readers. Her exuberant love of language and her dedication to the craft and art of writing shine forth in her books and in her words. In this…

  17. 77 FR 23768 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc.; Notice of Filing and Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ...-Counter (``OTC'') foreign currency (``FX'') product offering to facilitate changing its methodology for... (``USD/ INR''), U.S. Dollar/Korean Won (``USD/KRW''), U.S. Dollar/Philippine Peso (``USD/PHP''), U.S... obligations of the clearing agency or persons using such service. CME further notes that the policies of...

  18. 77 FR 18897 - Greek Independence Day: A National Day of Celebration of Greek and American Democracy, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Civil War, Greek Americans served and fought to preserve our Union. Through two World Wars and a long Cold War, America and Greece stood as allies in the pursuit of peace. And for generations, Greek... Greek people won their war to return democracy to their homeland and become a sovereign state,...

  19. Waiver Given for New York Schools Chief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on a promise to name a chief academic officer as second in charge of the New York City schools which paved the way for Cathleen P. Black to succeed Joel I. Klein as the district's next chancellor. The compromise plan, announced amid intensifying debate over her selection by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, won a state waiver…

  20. Native American Mascots in Contemporary Higher Education: Part 1--Politically Acceptable or Ethnically Objectionable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamey, Becky Avery

    2009-01-01

    The battle of the Little Big Horn in 1876 was one of the last great wars fought by Native Americans on a grassy battlefield. The battle was fought over territory and the right to live in the Dakota and Montana territories. The Native Americans won the battle of Little Big Horn but eventually lost the war and were forced to live on a reservation…

  1. Play Projects and Preschool Standards: Nurturing Children's Sense of Wonder and Joy in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Gera; Crowley, Kathy E.

    2006-01-01

    This book offers lively, creative ideas to develop children's curiosity while helping them build the skills needed to succeed in kindergarten and beyond while meeting standards and benchmarks. "Play, Projects and Preschool Standards" has won the Distinguished Achievement Award for "Best Teacher Resource" in the professional development books…

  2. Something to "Speak" about: Addressing Sensitive Issues through Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    "Speak," by Laurie Halse Anderson, is one of the most powerful young adult novels to come along in the past decade. It has won numerous awards, including the "School Library Journal" award for "Best Book of the Year," and was a National Book Award Finalist. Despite this acclaim, many English teachers are uncomfortable teaching "Speak" in their…

  3. Green Injustice: Who's Winning the Race for Environmental Dollars?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Valerie

    1994-01-01

    Grass-root environmental justice organizations charge that, when funding for projects targeting minority communities is won by multimillion-dollar environmental organizations, community-based environmental justice groups are underfunded and the concentration of toxic waste facilities in minority communities continues to grow. Lists top 10…

  4. And Now, the Indian Spelling Gene?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2005-01-01

    Children of Indian descent have won first place in five of the last seven years of the Scripps National Spelling Bee, and this year they made up 30 of the 273 contestants, a proportion many times larger than their 0.66% of the population. These achievements were possible because some Indian parents can become obsessive when it comes to the…

  5. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  6. Enhancing Academic Engagement: Providing Opportunities for Responding and Influencing Students to Choose to Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Pappas, Danielle N.; Davis, Kai A.

    2005-01-01

    Although educators often provide opportunities for students to engage in active academic responding, in many situations, students either cannot or will not respond. In the current article, we analyze the reasons students fail to respond. Practical procedures educators can use to prevent "can't do" problems are provided. "Won't do" problems are…

  7. Prominent Charter School Networks Seeking Fresh Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2012-01-01

    A handful of prominent charter school networks that have won praise for their academic performance and unorthodox models are expanding to new parts of the country, in some cases after receiving recruiting pitches from state and local officials determined to bring proven operators into their communities. Until now, organizations such as Aspire…

  8. Lighting up Students with Technology and Progressive 21st Century Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueauff, Ronda; Wall, Tony; Essley, Ron; Hall, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A child starting school today won't leave until 2023, by which point who knows what technology will be commonplace? Schooling must become more flexible and therefore more engaging and interesting. Classrooms worldwide remain largely traditional, and technology is usually prescriptive. It is clear that bold action is required to improve STEM…

  9. Exciting Research Transforms Practice: 1989 AASA Research Award Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Administrator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Features researchers reviewed by the AASA Advisory Committee on Higher Education Relationships and selected to present research findings at the 1989 AASA convention. Iris McGinnis won the Research Award in the graduate student research category for work on school board participation in contract bargaining. Two other commendation awards are…

  10. ProxiScan™: A Novel Camera for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph James

    2009-10-27

    ProxiScan is a compact gamma camera suited for high-resolution imaging of prostate cancer. Developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc., ProxiScan won a 2009 R&D 100 Award, sponsored by R&D Magazine to recognize t

  11. Risk averse` DOE is wasting time, money in cleanup effort-GAO

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.

    1994-09-01

    According to an August 1994 GAO report, internal strife, poor decisionmaking and conflicting stakeholder interests have plague the cleanup effort and prevented DOE from taking advantages of what its won technology program call the best hope for ensuring a substantive waste reduction. This article details the problems effecting radioactive waste cleanup at DOE facilities, and lists the five technology priorities which have been established.

  12. Philanthropy Gets in the Ring: Edu-Funders Get Serious about Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2012-01-01

    Foundations must encourage rigorous debate over objectives, strategies, and outcomes as they become more engaged in policy-focused giving. In doing this, they must make it abundantly clear that they won't blacklist critics. The value of skeptics is that they raise unpleasant issues and make it possible for those inside an organizational bubble to…

  13. In Nova Scotia, a Mi'kmaw Model for First Nation Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewington, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In 1999, under federal government legislation, Mi'kmaw communities in Nova Scotia won the right to manage the education of their children for the first time in a century. With support from Mi'kmaw Kina'matnewey, an education authority that provides central services, local Mi'kmaw schools deliver language immersion courses, culturally-appropriate…

  14. A College that Reinvented Itself: The Wilson College Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armacost, Mary-Linda Merriam

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the story of Wilson College, the only college in the United States where a group of alumnae took the trustees to court over the issue of the announced closing and won the case. The court reversed the trustees' decision on the grounds that the college had failed to seek approval from the court before announcing the change in…

  15. Sowing Green Seeds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yingjun, Chen; Jianzhuang, Rong

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with the development of environmental education Hunan Yueyang Middle School Number One. Famous for its beautiful environment and lush green trees, the school has won titles such as "park" unit, "garden" school, "green school" and "National Advanced Unit for Environmental Education." In order to popularize scientific knowledge of…

  16. Higher Education in Recessionary Times: A UK Colloquium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This article talks about a meeting on "Higher Education in Recessionary Times" on March 24, 2010, which was hosted by the Society for Higher Education Research Policy Network. Although the meeting did take place in the context of an expected General Election, and on budget day, there was a general sense on the day that whoever won the Election (or…

  17. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  18. The Amateur Scientist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Jearl

    1979-01-01

    Describes a student investigation of a reverse flame in a atmosphere of methane that won second place in the physics division of the International Science and Engineering Fair. Includes a discussion of falling and fracturing behavior, specifically dealing with chimneys, trees, pencil point, stirring rods, and chalk. (BT)

  19. Thomas L. Griffiths: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (2012). Thomas L. Griffiths won the award for bringing mathematical precision to the deepest questions in human learning, reasoning, and concept formation. In his pioneering work,…

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes — First DOE Zero Energy Ready Manufactured Home, Russellville, AL

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This home is the first manufactured home built to the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home standard and won an Affordable Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovations Awards. This manufactured home achieved a HERS score of 57 without photovoltaics and includes superior insulation and air sealing.

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Nexus EnergyHomes, Frederick, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This urban infill community with 24 duplexes, 19 townhomes, and 7 single-family homes features SIP walls, geothermal heat pumps, solar PV, and a proprietary energy management system. The builder won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the production builder category.

  2. Discipline Goes on Trial at Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Conduct officers have been moving away from the legalistic disciplinary systems that colleges built in the latter half of the 20th century on the belief that they'd lose lawsuits without them. Confident now that judges won't expect those systems to conform to the rules of criminal procedure, colleges are making hearings less like trials, and more…

  3. Bonds Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar outlines…

  4. The ASE Improving Practical Work in Triple Science Learning Skills Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Paul; Chapman, Georgina; Ellis-Sackey, Cecilia; Grainger, Beth; Jones, Steve

    2011-01-01

    In July 2010, the Association for Science Education won a bid to run a "Sharing innovation network" for the Triple Science Support Programme, which is delivered by the Learning Skills Network on behalf of the Department for Education. The network involves schools from the London boroughs of Tower Hamlets and Greenwich. In this article, the…

  5. Towering tribute to botany.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nigel

    2003-08-01

    One of the world's greatest plant collections has won a top heritage award at a time when it is highlighting with a tree-top walkway the need to study the forest canopy which is one of the most crucial but least understood habitats.

  6. Virginia Standards Predated the Common Core Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowledge Quest, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Virginia Board of Education is committed to the Virginia Standards of Learning (SOL) program and opposed to adoption of the newly developed Common Core State Standards as a prerequisite for participation in federal competitive grant and entitlement programs. The Standards of Learning are clear and rigorous and have won the acceptance and trust…

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Sterling Brook Custom Homes — Village Park Eco Home, Double Park, TX

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder won a Custom Builder honor in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards for this showcase home that serves as an energy-efficient model home for the custom home builder: 1,300 visitors toured the home, thousands more learned about the home’s advanced construction via the webpage, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.

  8. Institution Closures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the need to accelerate the closing of institutions for people with mental retardation. Articles are by both current and former residents of institutions and by professionals, and include: "The Realities of Institutions" (Tia Nelis); "I Cry Out So That I Won't Go Insane" (Mary F. Hayden); "Trends in…

  9. The Impact of Adult Mortality on Primary School Enrollment in Northwestern Tanzania. Africa Region Human Development Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Martha; Beegle, Kathleen; Koda, Godlike

    The AIDS epidemic is making orphans out of many African children and threatens to reverse hard-won gains in raising school enrollments. The average gross primary enrollment ration (GPER) the number of children enrolled as a percent of the total number of children of school age was only 77% for Sub-Saharan Africa in 1996. The countries are hard-hit…

  10. Rewarding Results: The MetLife Foundation Community College Excellence Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazis, Richard; Newton, Anne

    2004-01-01

    At the 2004 AACC Annual Convention, Sybil Jacobson, president and CEO of MetLife Foundation, announced the two recipients of the 2004 MetLife Foundation Community College Excellence Award. The award, won by City College of San Francisco (CCSF) and Community College of Denver (CCD), honors two colleges that have made great strides in helping…

  11. Post-Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement: Policy and Practice Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Trenette T.; Sparks, Michele Jones; McDonald, Theresa M.; Dickerson, Janet D.

    2011-01-01

    The 1998 Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) was developed between states and tobacco manufacturers to settle the states' lawsuits against tobacco manufacturers and recover tobacco health-related costs. States won billions of dollars and concessions regarding how tobacco products could be advertised. The purpose of the MSA was to prevent…

  12. Globalization and World-Class Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Joseph O.

    2007-01-01

    The rush of jobs from the United States to other nations has been explained by the Bush administration as a win-win situation for both technically advanced and developing countries. The free-market argument claims that the more sophisticated, complex jobs generated by an avalanche of new industries will be won by a well-trained, highly educated…

  13. Colorado's Singular "No"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiedeman, Reeves

    2008-01-01

    Supporters of affirmative action may have finally found a way to defeat state ballot measures that would ban such programs: Latch onto an inspirational presidential candidate with piles of cash and an unprecedented voter-turnout machine. Those activists won a narrow victory in Colorado this month, when 50.7 percent of voters made the state the…

  14. A public-private partnership facilitates accountability and outcomes. Interview by Susan H. Cummings.

    PubMed

    Pointer, T

    1995-06-01

    The article presents an interview about a unique and successful public-private partnership that uses social and medical case management services to manage the health and social needs of an indigent population. This program, which won the Merck/National Managed Health Care Congress Partnership Award in 1993, has resulted in client satisfaction, quality care, and cost-effective outcomes.

  15. Unleash the Power! Knowledge - Technology - Diversity: Papers Presented at the Third International Forum on Research in School Librarianship, Annual Conference of the International Association of School Librarianship (IASL) (28th, Birmingham, Alabama, November 10-14, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lighthall, Lynne, Ed.; Howe, Eleanor, Ed.

    Papers presented at this forum were grouped under the following four broad themes: "Unleash the Power!,""Powerful Roles,""Powerful Partnerships," and "Powerful Technologies." Also included is the paper that won the Takeshi Murofushi Research Award, "Implementing Flexible Scheduling in Elementary Libraries" (Joy H. McGregor). Titles and authors of…

  16. From Hills to Halls: A Modern Parable of Transitioning to Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Laura; Sholder, Jack

    2013-01-01

    This reflective essay tells the story of the transition of a Hollywood director to the professoriate. Jack Sholder's name may be familiar to those who are film buffs. As a filmmaker in Hollywood, he directed such films as "Alone in the Dark," "Nightmare on Elm Street 2," and "The Hidden." In addition, he won an…

  17. Today and Yesterday in Early Childhood Education in Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Guang-Lea

    Early childhood education has always been considered important in Korea, with the education of the child valued highly, regardless of the parent's educational background or socioeconomic status. The main social facility for early childhood education outside home in Korea is called "Yoo Chee Won," which means kindergarten. This paper describes the…

  18. The Promise of Brown: Desegregation, Affirmative Action and the Struggle for Racial Equality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marable, Manning

    2005-01-01

    In measuring the shortcomings of "Brown's" victory and legacy, the author tells us to remember that Robert Carter--best known as one of the principal attorneys who won the famous "Brown v. Board of Education" case--never underestimated the enormous difficulty of achieving racial fairness through the desegregation of public schools, or the…

  19. An Interview with Gene V. Glass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Daniel H.

    2004-01-01

    Gene V. Glass is presently Regents' Professor of both Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and Psychology in Education at Arizona State University. He won the Palmer O. Johnson Award for best article in the "American Educational Research Journal" in both 1968 and 1970. Dr. Glass has also served on the editorial boards of 13 journals and has…

  20. Crunch Seen on Ed. Issues after Election

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    From the White House to Capitol Hill, the winners in this week's elections won't have much time to savor their victories. Even as federal policymakers sort out the political landscape, the remainder of 2012 and the early months of 2013 are likely to be dominated by divisive, unresolved issues with broad consequences for K-12 and higher…

  1. A Traditional Educational Practice Adapted for the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Elizabeth; Etheridge, Brian; Walsh, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of The King Years, a weekly seminar taught at the University of Baltimore (UB) by Taylor Branch, the scholar who won the Pulitzer Prize for the first volume of his trilogy on the Civil Rights era. The King Years represents a foot in the water for a campus seeking a slow yet innovative entry into the world of…

  2. Q&A: Michael Honey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helicher, Karl

    2007-01-01

    The mid-1960s saw civil rights victories in Congress during Lyndon B. Johnson's presidency. In "Going Down Jericho Road," Michael Honey wrote how Martin Luther King Jr.'s final focus showed that the struggle for black and working class parity continued. The 1968 Memphis sanitation workers strike was a gritty struggle won in the streets by a host…

  3. From Edison to Enron

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Kenneth Lay's secret partnerships and deceitful accounting certainly hurt Enron's investors, customers, and employees and tarnished his reputation, even if he's not found guilty of any crime when he goes to trial in January. Yet like Samuel Insull a century before him, Lay's trial probably won't stop the revolution he advanced within the power industry.

  4. Winning Students Back from McDonald's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hean, Lim Lee; Tin, Low Guat

    1996-01-01

    Describes a Singapore principal's turnaround strategy to improve his secondary students' academic performance and study habits. Principal Tong Pak Goh won students back from McDonald's and other distractions by creating an atmosphere of care and casual comfort, holding afterschool tutoring sessions for problem and latchkey kids, and counseling…

  5. Up in the Air: Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    When airline employees try to cart her wheelchair off to the cargo hold, disability advocate Jill Hindman becomes even more assertive than usual. Like Hindman, many people with disabilities are frustrated with air travel, especially in smaller planes. Complaints range from lavatories that are too cramped to move around in to armrests that won't…

  6. The Art and Craft of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Walter Alvarez, a doctor and physiologist of some renown, decided to send his scientifically talented son, Luis, to an arts and crafts school where Luis took industrial drawing and woodworking instead of calculus. Luis Alvarez won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1968. Einstein was certainly not a standout in his mathematics and physics classes. Yet…

  7. Motivational Aspects of Moral Learning and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curren, Randall

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses a puzzle about moral learning concerning its social context and the potential for moral progress: Won't the social context of moral learning shape moral perceptions, beliefs, and motivation in ways that will inevitably "limit" moral cognition, motivation, and progress? It addresses the relationships between…

  8. Early Favorite in Academe Wins Handily

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebel, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Among the many groups of Barack Obama's supporters who considered him one of their own, and helped propel him into the presidency, were large numbers of the nation's college professors, administrators, and students. The president-elect won overwhelming support from academe throughout the campaign. The Obama campaign aggressively courted student…

  9. Faculty Collective Bargaining in the California State University. A Staff Report on the 1983-1986 Agreement between the Board of Trustees and the California Faculty Association for Unit 3--Faculty. Commission Report 84-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    Features of a 1983-1986 faculty collective bargaining contract at the California State University (CSU) are described. The Congress of Faculty Associations won representation rights for the faculty bargaining unit at CSU in a 1983 election. Attention is directed to: grievance procedures; appointment, probation, tenure, and promotions; layoff;…

  10. Bargaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clear, Delbert K.

    Reviewed in this chapter are decisions handed down in 1982 involving aspects of collective bargaining. Much of this litigation is perceived as rooted in attempts by school boards to upset awards of arbitrators or by efforts of employees' associations to consolidate dearly-won power; these actions result from many boards' and associations'…

  11. Collective Bargaining: A View from the Faculty. Orientation Paper No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubeck, Leroy W.

    In the spring of 1971, the Temple University faculty indicated its intention to adopt collective bargaining. The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) won the election in 1972 to be the faculty bargaining representative. One of the first issues that faced the faculty was to reorganize the structure of its AAUP chapter along lines…

  12. Mitosis detection in breast cancer histology images with deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cireşan, Dan C; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We use deep max-pooling convolutional neural networks to detect mitosis in breast histology images. The networks are trained to classify each pixel in the images, using as context a patch centered on the pixel. Simple postprocessing is then applied to the network output. Our approach won the ICPR 2012 mitosis detection competition, outperforming other contestants by a significant margin.

  13. The Advantages of Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Totten, Herman L.

    2013-01-01

    In college, I was surprised by the excitement of those in the student union who were hovering over the headlines in the local newspaper: "Russia Launches the First Satellite...'Sputnik.'" Russia had won the "race to space." How could Russia, where the majority of the population had only learned to read and write in…

  14. Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakstone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    This column presents an interview with Nick Baker, Reference and Web Services librarian at Williams College. Baker has produced several films for and about the library profession. In 2007, he won an InfoTubey Award for Outstanding Library YouTube Productions for his work. In this interview, Baker shares his ideas and experiences about this…

  15. What's Sweat?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to put liquid back in your body by drinking plenty of water so you won't get dehydrated (say: dee-HI-drayt-ed). Why Does Sweat Smell? Sweat isn't just wet — it can be kind of stinky, too. But the next time you get a whiff of yourself after running around outside and want to blame your sweat ...

  16. Hungry Kids: The Solvable Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felling, Christy

    2013-01-01

    The numbers speak for themselves in terms of the crisis of hunger among kids in the United States: More than 16 million children--one in five--live in households that struggle to put food on the table. Nearly half of all food stamp recipients are children. But, argues Felling, the battle against childhood hunger can be won; the United States has…

  17. Retrieval Bargaining: A Guide for Public Sector Labor Negotiations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Richard G.

    Retrieval bargaining is the process of removing, through collective bargaining, benefits won by employees in previous negotiations. This document treats the retrieval bargaining process, explaining first the factors that could make such cutback management techniques necessary in the public sector, including federal funding reductions, inflationary…

  18. Moving Mountains: Reform, Resistance and Resiliency in an Appalachian Kentucky High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maureen K.

    This dissertation, which won the Dissertation of the Year Award, examines how stakeholders in an Appalachian Kentucky high school addressed educational problems that they had targeted for reform. Set against the backdrop of the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA), this ethnographic study describes the challenges of effectively coupling top-down…

  19. "Boys Don't Do Dance, Do They?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the Warwick Arts Centre launched the "Boys Dancing" project through the formation of the West Midlands Boys Dance Alliance. Aimed exclusively at boys and young men, the project has offered a range of performance-making opportunities with male professionals including Liam Steel (DV8, Stan Won't Dance) and David McKenna (Beingfrank Physical…

  20. Response to the Comment by J. Grunenberg on "The Nature of the Fourth Bond in the Ground State of C2: The Quadruple Bond Conundrum''.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Sason; Danovich, David; Hiberty, Philippe C

    2015-11-16

    The quadruple bond structure in C2 emerges from solid quantum-chemical calculations and won't go away! There is no mystery in the rather small bond dissociation energy, and this cannot constitute the reason to reconsider the whole concept of quadruple bonding.

  1. "Mac"Roon and White: A School Newspaper Comes of Age on a Macintosh Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Wayne

    After placing second in an international school newspaper competition for which they had won first prize seven consecutive years, and discovering that the reasons for the drop included typographical errors and poor printing, the staff of the student newspaper of Danville (Illinois) High School invested in a Macintosh 128K computer. The Macintosh…

  2. Cloudy outlook. Supercommittee failure leaves healthcare providers questioning future cuts, impact on hospitals.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Jessica

    2011-11-28

    President Barack Obama responded to the failure of the so-called supercommittee with a message that he won't allow Congress to water down the automatic cuts triggered under the August deficit law, which would include a 2% reduction in Medicare payments. PMID:22250356

  3. "Love Your China" and Evangelise: Religion, Nationalism, Racism and Immigrant Settlement in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Huamei

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores how race, religion and national origin intersect in one transnational context. In an educational ethnography, I encountered a discourse that called for overseas Chinese to convert and evangelise other Chinese (in China), which won many followers in Canada. Using Critical Race Theory and the notion of "intersectionality," I…

  4. Good for patients, good for doctors.

    PubMed

    Conde, Crystal

    2011-09-01

    The medical liability reforms the Texas Medical Association pushed through eight years ago are still paying off. Texas has more physicians, thereby increasing patients' access to care; liability insurance premiums have been drastically cut; and there are fewer lawsuits. But TMA leaders say physicians must remain vigilant and protect the noneconomic damage cap and other provisions won through tort reform.

  5. 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5-second rule" — that random saying about how food won't become contaminated with bacteria if you pick it up off the floor in 5 seconds or less. The 5-second rule has become such a part of our culture that scientists actually tested it. As you can ...

  6. Jackpot? Gender Differences in the Effects of Lottery Wins on Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boertien, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    In this study, information on small to modest lottery wins from the British Household Panel Survey (N = 2,563) was used to investigate the effect of income on separation. The analysis demonstrated that money matters within relationships. Lottery wins temporarily reduced the odds of separation after men won. Men spent more on leisure and became…

  7. Ice Storage System for School Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Ross D.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project at the Manatee Education Center in Naples, Florida, which won an ASHRAE award. Project involved the implementation of ice-storage technology in 19 schools. Compares the performance of ice-storage systems with traditional chiller designs in two other schools. Tables illustrate costs for the campuses. Addresses the maintenance…

  8. Chemical Disposal for a High School Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mento, Mary Ann

    1973-01-01

    A method of disposal is suggested that is superior to the dilution method. The proceudres are based on the conversion of the wastes to less toxic or harmless forms or neutralization, so that they won't be a shock to the sewage system, and then excess dilution. (Author/DF)

  9. Taking Stock of a Decade of Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Next, 2011

    2011-01-01

    School reformers have made forward strides in the last ten years, and public debate has acquired a bipartisan cast. But just how successful have reform efforts been? The editors of "Education Next" assess the movement's victories and challenges. Two essays are presented in this issue's "Forum": (1) "A Battle Begun, Not Won" (Paul E. Peterson,…

  10. A Green Polymerization of Aspartic Acid for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, George D.

    2005-01-01

    The green polymerization of aspartic acid carried out during an organic-inorganic synthesis laboratory course for undergraduate students is described. The procedure is based on work by Donlar Corporation, a Peru, Illinois-based company that won a Green Chemistry Challenge Award in 1996 in the Small Business category for preparing thermal…

  11. Effects of Ownership Rights on Conflicts between Toddler Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Hildy S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined property conflicts in thirty-two 20-and 30-month-old peer dyads during eighteen 40-min play sessions. Ownership influenced conflicts. Both 20- and 30-month-old owners claimed ownership ("mine") and instigated and won property conflicts more often than non-owners. At 30 months, owners also resisted peers' instigations more often…

  12. Talent Developed: Conversations with Masters of the Arts and Sciences (Joshua Lederberg: Scientific Risk-Taker and Innovator).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Rena F.

    1995-01-01

    This interview with Joshua Lederberg, who won the 1958 Nobel prize in physiology and medicine, covers his research interests, the role of mentors, his childhood and school years as a highly gifted child, the nature of good teaching, child prodigies, and the scientific endeavor. (DB)

  13. Highly Inventive Explorer of Creativity: An Interview with John Baer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Baer is a Professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Rider University. Dr. Baer has published 10 books and scores of research articles and book chapters on creativity, cooperative learning, and other educational psychology topics. His research on the development of creativity and his teaching have both won national awards,…

  14. Bonus Activity Book. Peacemakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Betsy Blizard

    1992-01-01

    Activity book helps elementary students learn about peace and see themselves as peacemakers and peacekeepers. Students are introduced to literary and historical figures who have worked for peace and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Activities teach students that peace means more than calm situations or absence of war. (SM)

  15. Private I: The Protagonists in Lynne Rae Perkins' Newbery-Winning Novel Are Shy, Talented, and Extremely Thoughtful--Kind of Like the Author

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barstow, Barb

    2006-01-01

    Lynne Rae Perkins is the author of "Criss Cross," which won the Newbery Medal, the nation's most prestigious prize for children's book. Perkins grew up in Cheswick, PA, near Pittsburgh, majored in printmaking at Penn State, and attended grad school at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She moved to Leelanau County, MI, in 1987 with her…

  16. Quality of Blended Learning within the Scope of the Bologna Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monteiro, Angelica; Leite, Carlinda; Lima, Lurdes

    2013-01-01

    This article builds on existing data about the blended learning approach in higher education. It presents the theoretical framework and data of an empirical study conducted at the University of Porto in Portugal involving teachers who won the E-Learning Prize of Excellence in the period between 2006 and 2010. The main objective of this article is…

  17. Girls & Young Women Inventing: Twenty True Stories about Inventors Plus How You Can Be One Yourself.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnes, Frances A.; Bean, Suzanne M.

    This book presents first-person accounts of 20 young female inventors. Most have won prizes for their inventions; some have even obtained patents. Part 1 "Inventors and Their Inventions," focuses on the young inventors and their lives, how they came up with their ideas, who helped them, what problems they faced, and how they solved their problems.…

  18. Educational Practices in an Age of Information Innovation: Audiovisual Education Prize Winning Papers in 1998. AVE in Japan No. 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japan Audiovisual Information Center for International Service, Tokyo.

    This booklet contains two papers that won the 1998 Audiovisual Education Prize of the Japan Audio-Visual Education Association. "Nurturing the Ability To Live in an Advanced Information Network Society: Making the Most Effective Use of Networking" reports on a study of 7th grade students in Okazaki City (Japan). The focus was on an 8-month…

  19. The Poetics of Remembering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldblatt, Eli

    1996-01-01

    Argues that writing charged with spiritual awareness can also be politically responsible. Uses poetry as an illustration, specifically the poetry of George Oppen, a Jewish-American who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1969. Discusses his poetry. Examines what the act of remembering means for a researcher and composition teacher. (PA)

  20. Minfong Ho: Politics in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Joy L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews Minfong Ho, an award-winning Thai writer of children's and young adult novels. Ho was born in Burma to Chinese parents in 1951, raised in Singapore and Thailand, educated in Bangkok, Taiwan, and at Cornell University in New York. Ho's first novel, "Sing to the Dawn," won first prize from the Council of…