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Sample records for minnows pimephales promelas

  1. Bringing the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) into the genomic era

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. Throughout this time, a lot of knowledge has been gained about the fathead minnow&rsqu...

  2. Bringing the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) into the genomic era

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. Throughout this time, a lot of knowledge has been gained about the fathead minnow&rsqu...

  3. MICROSATELLITE DNA VARIATION IN TWO FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) STOCKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects on more than 2000 species of fish in the U.S. and Canada are estimated by sensitvity results of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) acute toxicity tests. Whether survival and susceptibility to toxicants are influenced by genetic variation is still under question...

  4. MICROSATELLITE DNA VARIATION IN TWO FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) STOCKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse effects on more than 2000 species of fish in the U.S. and Canada are estimated by sensitvity results of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) acute toxicity tests. Whether survival and susceptibility to toxicants are influenced by genetic variation is still under question...

  5. Bringing the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) into the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. Throughout this time, a lot of knowledge has been gained about the fathead minnow’s biological responses to various xenobiotics. However, despite its importance as a model organism, the fathead minnow still has few publicly available gene sequences. Recently, Burns et al. (2015; Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 35:212) described the sequencing and de-novo assembly of the fathead minnow genome. Two draft genome assemblies are now publicly available on the GenBank database. However, on their own the draft assemblies remain of limited use to researchers who are primarily interested in the functional units of the genome, i.e. the genes. In the present study, an annotation pipeline, consisting of gene prediction, evidence alignment, and data synthesis, was applied to the fathead minnow SOAPdenovo assembly. Ab initio gene prediction was performed using AUGUSTUS, which provided a starting point of 43,345 gene predictions. Fathead minnow Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and zebrafish protein-coding sequences (CDSs) were then aligned to the assembly using the corresponding spliced alignment methods of the program Exonerate. Of the over 240,000 EST alignments, 73% were successfully aligned with 90% or greater sequence identity and query coverage. Similarly, 39% of nearly 45,000 zebrafish co

  6. Bringing the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) into the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. Throughout this time, a lot of knowledge has been gained about the fathead minnow’s biological responses to various xenobiotics. However, despite its importance as a model organism, the fathead minnow still has few publicly available gene sequences. Recently, Burns et al. (2015; Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 35:212) described the sequencing and de-novo assembly of the fathead minnow genome. Two draft genome assemblies are now publicly available on the GenBank database. However, on their own the draft assemblies remain of limited use to researchers who are primarily interested in the functional units of the genome, i.e. the genes. In the present study, an annotation pipeline, consisting of gene prediction, evidence alignment, and data synthesis, was applied to the fathead minnow SOAPdenovo assembly. Ab initio gene prediction was performed using AUGUSTUS, which provided a starting point of 43,345 gene predictions. Fathead minnow Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and zebrafish protein-coding sequences (CDSs) were then aligned to the assembly using the corresponding spliced alignment methods of the program Exonerate. Of the over 240,000 EST alignments, 73% were successfully aligned with 90% or greater sequence identity and query coverage. Similarly, 39% of nearly 45,000 zebrafish co

  7. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  8. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  9. Ammonia causes decreased brain monoamines in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ronan, Patrick J.; Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steven J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; Summers, Cliff H.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperammonemia, arising from variety of disorders, leads to severe neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms of ammonia toxicity in brain are not completely understood. This study investigated the effects of ammonia on monoaminergic systems in brains of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish serve as a good model system to investigate hyperammonemic effects on brain function since no liver manipulations are necessary to increase endogenous ammonia concentrations. Using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, monoamines and some associated metabolites were measured from whole brain homogenate. Adult males were exposed for 48 h to six different concentrations of ammonia (0.01–2.36 mg/l unionized) which bracketed the 96-h LC50 for this species. Ammonia concentration-dependent decreases were found for the catecholamines (norepinephrine and dopamine) and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT). After an initial increase in the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan it too decreased with increasing ammonia concentrations. There were also significant increases in the 5-HIAA/5-HT and DOPAC/DA ratios, often used as measures of turnover. There were no changes in epinephrine (Epi) or monoamine catabolites (DOPAC, 5-HIAA) at any ammonia concentrations tested. Results suggest that ammonia causes decreased synthesis while also causing increased release and degradation. Increased release may underlie behavioral reactions to ammonia exposure in fish. This study adds weight to a growing body of evidence demonstrating that ammonia leads to dysfunctional monoaminergic systems in brain which may underlie neurological symptoms associated with human disorders such as hepatic encephalopathy.

  10. Histopathology of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to hydroxylated fullerenes

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Elizabeth M.; Palić, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxylated fullerenes are reported to be very strong antioxidants, acting to quench reactive oxygen species, thus having strong potential for important and widespread applications in innovative therapies for a variety of disease processes. However, their potential for toxicological side effects is still largely controversial and unknown. Effects of hydroxylated fullerenes C60(OH)24 on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were investigated microscopically after a 72-hour (acute) exposure by intraperitoneal injection of 20 ppm of hydroxylated fullerenes per gram of body mass. Cumulative, semi-quantitative histopathologic evaluation of brain, liver, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, skin, coelom, gills and the vestibuloauditory system revealed significant differences between control and hydroxylated fullerene-treated fish. Fullerene-treated fish had much higher cumulative histopathology scores. Histopathologic changes included loss of cellularity in the interstitium of the kidney, a primary site of haematopoiesis in fish, and loss of intracytoplasmic glycogen in liver. In the coelom, variable numbers of leukocytes, including many macrophages and fewer heterophils and rodlet cells, were admixed with the nanomaterial. These findings raise concern about in vivo administration of hydroxylated fullerenes in experimental drugs and procedures in human medicine, and should be investigated in more detail. PMID:23883179

  11. Histopathology of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to hydroxylated fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Palić, Dušan

    2014-11-01

    Hydroxylated fullerenes are reported to be very strong antioxidants, acting to quench reactive oxygen species, thus having strong potential for important and widespread applications in innovative therapies for a variety of disease processes. However, their potential for toxicological side effects is still largely controversial and unknown. Effects of hydroxylated fullerenes C60(OH)24 on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were investigated microscopically after a 72-hour (acute) exposure by intraperitoneal injection of 20 ppm of hydroxylated fullerenes per gram of body mass. Cumulative, semi-quantitative histopathologic evaluation of brain, liver, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, skin, coelom, gills and the vestibuloauditory system revealed significant differences between control and hydroxylated fullerene-treated fish. Fullerene-treated fish had much higher cumulative histopathology scores. Histopathologic changes included loss of cellularity in the interstitium of the kidney, a primary site of haematopoiesis in fish, and loss of intracytoplasmic glycogen in liver. In the coelom, variable numbers of leukocytes, including many macrophages and fewer heterophils and rodlet cells, were admixed with the nanomaterial. These findings raise concern about in vivo administration of hydroxylated fullerenes in experimental drugs and procedures in human medicine, and should be investigated in more detail.

  12. Embryotoxicity of maternally transferred methylmercury to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Bridges, Kristin N; Soulen, Brianne K; Overturf, Carmen L; Drevnick, Paul E; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-06-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and potent neurotoxin. In aquatic environments, Hg can be transformed into methylmercury (MeHg), which bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs, including fish. Methylmercury has been shown to transfer from female fish to developing eggs; however, relatively little is known regarding the effects of maternally transferred MeHg on fish embryos. The present study evaluated the effects of maternally transferred MeHg on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos. Embryos were collected from adult fatheads exposed for 30 d to 1 of 3 diets spiked with MeHg: a control diet (0.02 ppm Hg dry wt), a low diet (0.87 ppm Hg dry wt), or a high diet (5.5 ppm Hg dry wt). No effects on spawning frequency, clutch size, or total egg output were observed. In embryos, Hg concentration was a function of female diet and the duration (number of days) of female exposure. Compared with controls, embryos from the low-diet treatment displayed altered embryonic movement patterns (hyperactivity) and decreased time to hatch. Embryos from the high-diet treatment had delayed hatching and increased mortality compared with the other treatments. Collectively, these results suggest that maternally transferred Hg may impact survival, behavior, and developmental milestones of the embryo-larval stages of fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1436-1441. © 2015 SETAC.

  13. Columnaris (Flavobacterium columnare) challenge using fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in an ultra-low flow system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arkansas baitfish farms routinely struggle with columnaris disease, which is caused by Flavobacterium columnare. Columnaris is ubiquitous in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) especially after harvest while they are being held in vats and during the transport prior to being sold. Columnaris disea...

  14. VITELLOGENIN ELISA FOR FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) USING A COMPLETELY HOMOLOGOUS ASSAY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indication of vitellogenin in fish has been used as a biomarker for estrogen-receptor mediated gene induction pathways resulting from exposure to environmental estrogens. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) have been selected as one of the test models to investigate reprodu...

  15. Characterization of Ontogenetic Changes in Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow Pimephales promelas is often used for ecotoxicological studies in the US and elsewhere. Recently, researchers have begun looking at changes in gene expression in this species after contaminant exposure, mostly as a way to unravel novel mechanisms of act...

  16. EFFECTS OF HANDLING ON ENDOCRINOLOGY AND REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term (21-d) reproductive toxicity test with the fatheadt minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been proposed as a standard method for identifying certain classes of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). A potentially useful route of chemical exposure for the test is intraperi...

  17. EFFECTS OF HANDLING ON ENDOCRINOLOGY AND REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term (21-d) reproductive toxicity test with the fatheadt minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been proposed as a standard method for identifying certain classes of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). A potentially useful route of chemical exposure for the test is intraperi...

  18. VITELLOGENIN ELISA FOR FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) USING A COMPLETELY HOMOLOGOUS ASSAY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The indication of vitellogenin in fish has been used as a biomarker for estrogen-receptor mediated gene induction pathways resulting from exposure to environmental estrogens. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) have been selected as one of the test models to investigate reprodu...

  19. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING PROVIDES A SENSITIVE MEASURE OF EXPOSURE TO 17-A ETHINYLESTRADIOL IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The freshwater fish, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) represents an outstanding biological indicator response model organism based on its ubiquitous North American distribution and extensive use in acute and chronic testing of contaminants, effluents and receiving waters....

  20. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING PROVIDES A SENSITIVE MEASURE OF EXPOSURE TO 17-A ETHINYLESTRADIOL IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The freshwater fish, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) represents an outstanding biological indicator response model organism based on its ubiquitous North American distribution and extensive use in acute and chronic testing of contaminants, effluents and receiving waters....

  1. 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  2. 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL-INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION QUANTIFIED IN LIVERS OF ADULT MALES, LARVAE, AND GILLS OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have applied a method for quantifying relative levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription to assess chemically-induced gene expression in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Synthetic oligonucleotides designed for the fathead minnow vitellogenin gene transcription (Vg) p...

  3. Effects of progesterone on sperm motility in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Murack, Patrick J; Parrish, John; Barry, Terence P

    2011-07-01

    The steroid hormone progesterone (P4) is found at relatively high concentrations (∼300 ng/L) in association with concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). In an effort to better understand the potential endocrine disrupting effects of P4 in male fish, computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA) was used to evaluate the effects of this steroid on sperm motility in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). The rationale for focusing on sperm motility is that certain progestins have been shown to bind to surface membrane receptors on fish spermatozoa and increase sperm swimming velocity. It was hypothesized, therefore, that sperm swimming velocity might be a useful indicator of progestin exposure in fish. Adult male fathead minnows (ages 6-12 months) were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of P4, both longer-term (1 week, in vivo exposure) and short-term (minutes, in vitro exposure). Sperm were then video recorded and analyzed by CASA. When fathead minnows were continuously exposed for 1 week to low levels of progesterone in vivo there was a significant dose-dependent reduction in sperm motility. There was no effect of short-term P4 exposure on fathead minnow sperm swimming characteristics. Additional research is required to elucidate the mechanism by which progesterone alters sperm swimming in the fathead minnow. With further validation, the fathead minnow sperm motility assay may be a useful tool to rapidly screen for endocrine disrupting chemicals in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A COMPARISON OF THE LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL TOXICITY OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL MIXTURES TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The joint toxic effects of known binary and multiple organic chemical mixtures to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were defined at both the 96-h 50% lethal effect concentration (LC50) and sublethal (32-d growth) response levels for toxicants with a narcosis I, narcosis II...

  5. THE EFFECTS OF METHOXYCHLOR AND METHYLTESTOSTERONE ON REPRODUCTION IN A SHORT-TERM ASSAY USING THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of chemicals on reproduction of fishes is an area of great uncertainty. Because full life cycle testing of fish is cost prohibitive, we have developed a short-term assay to assess the effects of chemicals on reproduction of adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). ...

  6. Investigating Compensation and Recovery of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to 17α-Ethynylestradiol with Metabolite Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    1H-NMR spectroscopy was used to profile metabolite changes in the livers of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the synthetic estrogen 17α ethynylestradiol (EE2) via a continuous flow water exposure. Fish were exposed to either 10 or 100 ng EE2/L for 8 days, followed...

  7. SUBCHRONIC SENSITIVITY OF ONE-, FOUR-, AND SEVEN-DAY-OLD FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) LARVAE TO FIVE TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test was used to evaluate the relative sensitivity of 1-,4-, and 7-d-old larvae to five contaminants, KC1, NaC1, 1-octanol, carbaryl, and benzaldehyde. The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for survival o...

  8. Investigating Compensation and Recovery of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to 17α-Ethynylestradiol with Metabolite Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    1H-NMR spectroscopy was used to profile metabolite changes in the livers of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the synthetic estrogen 17α ethynylestradiol (EE2) via a continuous flow water exposure. Fish were exposed to either 10 or 100 ng EE2/L for 8 days, followed...

  9. THE EFFECTS OF METHOXYCHLOR AND METHYLTESTOSTERONE ON REPRODUCTION IN A SHORT-TERM ASSAY USING THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of chemicals on reproduction of fishes is an area of great uncertainty. Because full life cycle testing of fish is cost prohibitive, we have developed a short-term assay to assess the effects of chemicals on reproduction of adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). ...

  10. A COMPARISON OF THE LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL TOXICITY OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL MIXTURES TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The joint toxic effects of known binary and multiple organic chemical mixtures to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were defined at both the 96-h 50% lethal effect concentration (LC50) and sublethal (32-d growth) response levels for toxicants with a narcosis I, narcosis II...

  11. SUBCHRONIC SENSITIVITY OF ONE-, FOUR-, AND SEVEN-DAY-OLD FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) LARVAE TO FIVE TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow (pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test was used to evaluate the relative sensitivity of 1-,4-, and 7-d-old larvae to five contaminants, KC1, NaC1, 1-octanol, carbaryl, and benzaldehyde. The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for survival o...

  12. Fishy aroma of social status: Urinary chemo-signaling of territoriality in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exhibit life history traits which may be conducive to evolution of systems that use chemical communication to confer information about an individual’s social status. Reproduction in males of this species is dependent upon their ability ...

  13. Fishy aroma of social status: Urinary chemo-signaling of territoriality in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exhibit life history traits which may be conducive to evolution of systems that use chemical communication to confer information about an individual’s social status. Reproduction in males of this species is dependent upon their ability ...

  14. Modulation of estrogenic exposure effects via alterations in salinity and dissolved oxygen in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laboratory exposure data indicate that estrogens and estrogen mimics can cause endocrine disruption in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). In the wild, conditions are not static as is often the case in the laboratory. Changes in water quality parameters, such as salinity influx due to road s...

  15. Gene prediction in the fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas] genome

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established model organism which has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over half century. While much information has been gathered on the organism over the years, the fathead minnow genome, a critical source of infor...

  16. Gene prediction in the fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas] genome

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established model organism which has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over half century. While much information has been gathered on the organism over the years, the fathead minnow genome, a critical source of infor...

  17. Sequencing and de novo draft assemblies of a fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reference genome.

    PubMed

    Burns, Frank R; Cogburn, Amarin L; Ankley, Gerald T; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Waits, Eric; Chang, Yun-Juan; Llaca, Victor; Deschamps, Stephane D; Jackson, Raymond E; Hoke, Robert Alan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide the foundation for development of genome-scale resources for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), an important model organism widely used in both aquatic toxicology research and regulatory testing. The authors report on the first sequencing and 2 draft assemblies for the reference genome of this species. Approximately 120× sequence coverage was achieved via Illumina sequencing of a combination of paired-end, mate-pair, and fosmid libraries. Evaluation and comparison of these assemblies demonstrate that they are of sufficient quality to be useful for genome-enabled studies, with 418 of 458 (91%) conserved eukaryotic genes mapping to at least 1 of the assemblies. In addition to its immediate utility, the present work provides a strong foundation on which to build further refinements of a reference genome for the fathead minnow.

  18. Early life stage (ELS) toxicity of sucralose to fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, K I; Huggett, D B

    2014-10-01

    Sucralose, an intense artificial sweetener, has been detected in wastewater and surface waters at concentrations ranging from ng/L to low µg/L. Although over a hundred studies have been conducted to evaluate the safety of sucralose for human consumption, few studies have focused on the chronic ecotoxicological effects of this compound in fish. As a remedy to this data gap, an early-life stage toxicity test was conducted to assess the effects of sucralose on hatching, survival, and growth of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Hatching, survival, and growth were unaffected by 98 mg/L of sucralose. The Lowest-Observed-Effect Concentration (LOEC) and the No-Observed-Effect Concentration (NOEC) for fathead minnows determined by this study are >98 and 98 mg/L, respectively. The results from this study suggest that the concentrations of sucralose detected in the environment are well below those required to cause adverse effects to developing aquatic organisms.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  20. Sex-specific gene expression in early life stage fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) throughout development and after exposure to synthetic hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during early life stages can alter sex differentiation in fishes. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish species in endocrine disruption studies. However, limited knowledge...

  1. Sex-specific gene expression in early life stage fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) throughout development and after exposure to synthetic hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during early life stages can alter sex differentiation in fishes. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish species in endocrine disruption studies. However, limited knowledge...

  2. Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction is impaired in aged oil sands process-affected waters.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Richard J; Frank, Richard A; Oakes, Ken D; Servos, Mark R; Young, Rozlyn F; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Mike D; Solomon, Keith R; Dixon, D George; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2011-01-17

    Large volumes of fluid tailings are generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands. As part of their reclamation plan, oil sands operators in Alberta propose to transfer these fluid tailings to end pit lakes and, over time, these are expected to develop lake habitats with productive capabilities comparable to natural lakes in the region. This study evaluates the potential impact of various oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) on the reproduction of adult fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) under laboratory conditions. Two separate assays with aged OPSW (>15 years) from the experimental ponds at Syncrude Canada Ltd. showed that water containing high concentrations of naphthenic acids (NAs; >25 mg/l) and elevated conductivity (>2000 μS/cm) completely inhibited spawning of fathead minnows and reduced male secondary sexual characteristics. Measurement of plasma sex steroid levels showed that male fathead minnows had lower concentrations of testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone whereas females had lower concentrations of 17β-estradiol. In a third assay, fathead minnows were first acclimated to the higher salinity conditions typical of OSPW for several weeks and then exposed to aged OSPW from Suncor Energy Inc. (NAs ∼40 mg/l and conductivity ∼2000 μS/cm). Spawning was significantly reduced in fathead minnows held in this effluent and male fathead minnows had lower concentrations of testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that aged OSPW has the potential to negatively affect the reproductive physiology of fathead minnows and suggest that aquatic habitats with high NAs concentrations (>25 mg/l) and conductivities (>2000 μS/cm) would not be conducive for successful fish reproduction.

  3. Atrazine reduces reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Papoulias, D.M.; Whyte, J.J.; Richter, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Atrazine, the widely used herbicide, has shown to affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis in certain vertebrate species, but few studies have examined reproductive effects of this chemical on fish. Our study was designed to evaluate a population endpoint (egg production) in conjunction with histological (e.g., gonad development) and biochemical (e.g., hormone production) phenotypes associated with atrazine exposure in fathead minnows. Adult virgin breeding groups of 1 male and 2 females were exposed to nominal concentrations of 0, 0.5, 5.0, and 50 ??g/L of atrazine in a flow-through diluter for 14 or 30 days. Total egg production was lower (19-39%) in all atrazine-exposed groups as compared to the controls. The decreases in cumulative egg production of atrazine treated fish were significant by 17-20 days of exposure. Reductions in egg production in atrazine treatment groups were most attributable to reduced numbers of spawning events with increased atrazine exposure concentrations. Gonad abnormalities were observed in both male and female fish of atrazine-exposed fish. Our results also indicate that atrazine reduces egg production through alteration of final maturation of oocytes. The reproductive effects observed in this study warrant further investigation and evaluation of the potential risks posed by atrazine, particularly feral populations of fish from streams in agricultural areas with high use of this herbicide. ?? 2010.

  4. Development and validation of a 2,000-gene microarray for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, Patrick; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Liu, Li; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-07-01

    Gene microarrays provide the field of ecotoxicology new tools to identify mechanisms of action of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000-gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas, a species commonly used in ecological risk assessments in North America. The microarrays were developed from various cDNA and subtraction libraries that we constructed. Consistency and reproducibility of the microarrays were documented by examining multiple technical replicates. To test application of the fathead minnow microarrays, gene expression profiles of fish exposed to 17-estradiol, a well-characterized estrogen receptor (ER) agonist, were examined. For these experiments, adult male fathead minnows were exposed for 24 h to waterborne 17-estradiol (40 or 100 ng/L) in a flow-through system, and gene expression in liver samples was characterized. Seventy-one genes were identified as differentially regulated by estradiol exposure. Examination of the gene ontology designations of these genes revealed patterns consistent with estradiol’s expected mechanisms of action and also provided novel insights as to molecular effects of the estrogen. Our studies indicate the feasibility and utility of microarrays as a basis for understanding biological responses to chemical exposure in a model ecotoxicology test species.

  5. Antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations affect predator avoidance behavior of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, Edward T.; Barber, Larry B.; Meghan R. McGee,; Megan A. Buerkley,; Matthew L. Julius,; Vajda, Alan M.; Heiko L. Schoenfuss,; Schultz, Melissa M.; Norris, David O.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of embryonic and larval exposure to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of common antidepressants, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, and bupropion (singularly and in mixture) on C-start escape behavior were evaluated in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Embryos (postfertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 d and, after hatching, were allowed to grow in control well water until 12 d old. Similarly, posthatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 d to these compounds. High-speed (1,000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by- frame analysis of latency periods, escape velocities, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 d posthatch, fluoxetine and venlafaxine adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 d posthatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to fluoxetine but were affected by venlafaxine and bupropion exposure. Mixtures of these four antidepressant pharmaceuticals slowed predator avoidance behaviors in larval fathead minnows regardless of the exposure window. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on survival and, ultimately, reproductive fitness provides an avenue to assess the ecological relevance of exposure in an assay of relatively short duration.

  6. Antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations affect predator avoidance behavior of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Painter, M.M.; Buerkley, M.A.; Julius, M.L.; Vajda, A.M.; Norris, D.O.; Barber, L.B.; Furlong, E.T.; Schultz, M.M.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of embryonic and larval exposure to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of common antidepressants, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, and bupropion (singularly and in mixture) on C-start escape behavior were evaluated in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Embryos (postfertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 d and, after hatching, were allowed to grow in control well water until 12 d old. Similarly, posthatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 d to these compounds. High-speed (1,000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by-frame analysis of latency periods, escape velocities, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 d posthatch, fluoxetine and venlafaxine adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 d posthatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to fluoxetine but were affected by venlafaxine and bupropion exposure. Mixtures of these four antidepressant pharmaceuticals slowed predator avoidance behaviors in larval fathead minnows regardless of the exposure window. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on survival and, ultimately, reproductive fitness provides an avenue to assess the ecological relevance of exposure in an assay of relatively short duration. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  7. The effects of temperature and dissolved oxygen on antioxidant defences and oxidative damage in the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, E D; Lapidus, S J H; Brown, A C

    2013-03-01

    Fathead minnows Pimephales promelas maintained at 25° C for 6 h had significantly higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than fish maintained at 7 or 32° C, but hypoxic conditions (3 mg l(-1) O2 ) over the same time period did not affect SOD activity. Fish in better body condition (length-adjusted mass) had higher SOD activity. In a separate experiment, P. promelas maintained at three water temperatures (7, 23 and 32° C) for 31 days did not differ in liver acrolein, a biomarker of oxidative stress.

  8. Influence of multiple water-quality characteristics on copper toxicity to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sciera, K.L.; Isely, J.J.; Tomasso, J.R.; Klaine, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Water quality influences the bioavailability and toxicity of copper to aquatic organisms. Understanding the relationships between water-quality parameters and copper toxicity may facilitate the development of site-specific criteria for water quality and result in better protection of aquatic biota. Many studies have examined the influence of a single water-quality parameter on copper toxicity, but the interactions of several characteristics have not been well studied in low-hardness water. The goal of the present research was to examine the interactions among water-quality characteristics and their effects on copper toxicity to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The effects of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, DOC source, pH, and hardness on acute copper toxicity were determined using a complete factorially designed experiment. Hardness, pH, DOC, and interaction of pH and DOC all significantly affected copper toxicity. A predictive model based on these data described 88% of the variability in copper toxicity. This model also explained 58% of the variability in copper toxicity for an independent dataset of South Carolina (USA) waters. The biotic ligand model underpredicted the acute copper toxicity to fathead minnows when compared with observed values.

  9. Lead effects on the predictability of reproductive behavior in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas): A mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Alados, C.L.; Weber, D.N.

    1999-10-01

    Lead (Pb) has been shown to affect the behavior of a wide variety of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, and mammals. This article re-examines previous data on the effect of short-term, sublethal levels of waterborne Pb on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Previous research has found that Pb decreased the time spent in displaying specific reproductive behaviors in male minnows. Because each activity performed within a sequence depends upon previous parts of the sequence, the reproductive behavior of fish is not randomly distributed but is presented as a long-range self-similar correlation. By treating these data as a fractal dimension, it is now possible to determine changes in the long-term correlation of different behavioral sequences involved in nest maintenance owing to Pb exposure, both before and after adult males attain reproductive maturity. The authors hypothesized that the scaling exponent of this fluctuation varies in relation with environmental contaminants. Known Pb-induced changes in hormonal activity may account for changes in observed reproductive and nest maintenance behaviors. Pb-exposed fish exhibited higher levels of predictability in their behavioral sequences, i.e., they demonstrated an increase in the scaling parameter of the fluctuation {alpha}. However, if Pb was introduced after sexual maturity was observed, there was no significant difference in the scaling component {alpha}. Thus, the use of fractal dimension may provide a useful tool to analyze the effects of environmental contaminants and other stresses.

  10. Latent effects of early life stage exposure to triclosan on survival in fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Salierno, James D; Lopes, Melissa; Rivera, Michelle

    2016-10-02

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of early life stage triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4, dichlorophenoxy)phenol, TCS) exposure on hatching, development, and survival in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas. Embryonic minnows were exposed to TCS (50 and 100 µg L(-1)) for 10 days followed by 6 weeks depuration. Mortality and morphological deformities were recorded and quantified during exposure and at the end of depuration. No significant effects on embryonic survival, time to reach the eyed stage, or hatching were found. However, at the conclusion of the depuration period, survival was significantly reduced in TCS exposed fish depending on the concentration. Visual inspection of the exposed fish suggests that mortality is related to spinal deformities, emaciation, and reduced foraging ability. Triclosan exhibits deleterious effects in fish at lower concentrations over longer durations than previously reported. Further, mortality in exposed fish 6 weeks after exposure demonstrates the need for various exposure assays to evaluate effects of TCS.

  11. Effects of environmental exposure to diazepam on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Varenka; Choe, Ree; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are continuously discharged into the aquatic environment primarily through wastewater discharge; therefore, their possible effects on wildlife is a reason of concern. Diazepam is a widely prescribed benzodiazepine drug used to treat insomnia and anxiety disorders, and it has been found in wastewater effluents worldwide. The present study tested the effects of diazepam on fecundity and the reproductive behavior of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a fish that exhibits male parental care. Sexually mature fathead minnows were housed at a ratio of one male and two females per tank and exposed to nominal (measured) concentrations of 0, 0.1 (0.14 ± 0.06), 1.0 (1.04 ± 0.15), 10 (13.4 ± 1.5) µg L(-1) for 21 days. Fish receiving the low diazepam treatment had significantly larger clutches than fish receiving the highest concentration but neither were different from controls. Diazepam exposure was not associated with a significant change in fertilization rate, hatchability or time to hatch, but a trend toward a higher number of eggs/day was observed in fish exposed to the low diazepam concentration relative to those exposed to the medium concentration. There were no significant differences in any of the behaviors analyzed when responses were averaged over time. The results showed that exposure to diazepam at concentrations as high as 13 µg L(-1) did not significantly impact the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reciprocal influences of temperature and copper on survival of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, V.L.; Beitinger, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    Contemporary ecological concerns of accelerated global warming, increase in toxic chemicals and loss of biodiversity make relevant studies of tolerance of various organisms to abiotic variables. In this study, the reciprocal effects of temperature and copper on survival of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were determined. Temperature tolerance of fishes is limited by a cornucopia of biotic and abiotic factors, including various toxicants. Not only do chemicals affect temperature tolerance of fishes, temperature influences the sensitivity of fish to toxic chemicals; however, the relationship between temperature and lethality is complex, difficult to predict, and has not been the focus of many studies. Copper, a necessary trace element in animal metabolism and ubiquitous in aquatic environments, was selected as our test toxicant. Hodson et al. (1979) reported copper concentrations of one to 29 {mu}g/L in unpolluted surface waters in the United States. Copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}), is an algicide, bactericide and herbicide for ponds, lakes and fish hatcheries. Also, copper is recommended as a fungicide for a variety of ornamental plants and crops, and in various chemical forms enters the environment through mining, smelting, and refining activities. Copper is toxic in parts per billion concentrations ({mu}g/L) and is an EPA priority pollutant. In this research two null hypotheses were tested: (1) temperature has no effect on the lethality of copper sulfate, and (2) sublethal concentrations of copper do not affect the upper temperature tolerance of fathead minnows. It was found that acclimation temperature significantly affects the 96-hr median lethal concentration. Exposure to copper adversely affects the ability of minnows to withstand high temperatures. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  13. The Effects of Sertraline on Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Growth and Steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carty, D R; Hala, D; Huggett, D B

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the steroidogenic effects of sertraline, a popular selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on larval fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) and adult FHM. Larvae were exposed to 0.1, 1, and 10 µg/L sertraline for 28 days and analyzed for differential mRNA expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD), 20β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20β-HSD), aromatase (CYP19a), nuclear thyroid receptor alpha (TRα), and normalized to RP-L8. Adult FHM were exposed to 3 or 10 µg/L sertraline for 7 days and analyzed for differential expression of the same genes with the addition of thyroid receptor beta (TRβ). Larval FHM exposed to 0.1 μg/L had a significant upregulation of both 20β-HSD and TRα while adult FHM exposed to 10 µg/L had a significant upregulation of 11β-HSD expression in brain tissue. The significance of these findings with respect to survival, growth and reproduction are currently unknown, but represent areas for future research.

  14. CORAL: QSAR models for acute toxicity in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Lombardo, A; Roncaglioni, A; Benfenati, E; Gini, G

    2012-05-05

    CORrelation And Logic (CORAL) is a software that generates quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) for different endpoints. This study is dedicated to the QSAR analysis of acute toxicity in Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Statistical quality for the external test set is a complex function of the split (into training and test subsets), the number of epochs of the Monte Carlo optimization, and the threshold that is a criterion for dividing the correlation weights into two classes rare (blocked) and not rare (active). Computational experiments with three random splits (data on 568 compounds) indicated that this approach can satisfactorily predict the desired endpoint (the negative decimal logarithm of the 50% lethal concentration, in mmol/L, pLC50). The average correlation coefficients (r2) are 0.675 ± 0.0053, 0.824 ± 0.0242, 0.787 ± 0.0101 for subtraining, calibration, and test set, respectively. The average standard errors of estimation (s) are 0.837 ± 0.021, 0.555 ± 0.047, 0.606 ± 0.049 for subtraining, calibration, and test set, respectively. The CORAL software together with three random splits into subtraining, calibration, and test sets can be downloaded on the Internet (http://www.insilico.eu/coral/). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Exposure effects of levonorgestrel on oogenesis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Frankel, Tyler; Yonkos, Lance; Frankel, Jack

    2017-07-06

    The synthetic progestin levonorgestrel is commonly utilized in human oral contraceptives. It enters the environment as a component of wastewater treatment plant effluent, and has been measured at low ng/L concentrations in surface waters. It has been shown to activate fish androgen receptors, causing the physical masculinization of females, changes in reproductive behavior, and decreases in fecundity. In the present study, the effects of levonorgestrel exposure on early-stage oogenesis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) was examined. Adult females were exposed to 0, 10, or 100 ng/L levonorgestrel for 14 d using a flow-through exposure system. The ovaries from each female were then removed via dissection and weighed for gonadosomatic index (GSI) calculations, and oocytes from one lobe preserved in Serra's fixative. Total numbers of late-stage vitellogenic oocytes exhibiting a germinal vesicle were then quantified. In a second exposure, blood plasma samples were collected from adult females and analyzed for vitellogenin concentrations using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Females exposed to both concentrations of levonorgestrel developed male secondary sexual characteristics in a dose-dependent manner, and ovaries contained significantly fewer late stage oocytes. Exposure to 100 ng/L of levonorgestrel resulted in decreased GSI and blood plasma vitellogenin concentrations. The results suggest that female exposure to levonorgestrel alone may have profound effects on reproduction in progestin-contaminated environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-6. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  16. Sublethal effects of cadmium on auditory structure and function in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Low, Jennifer; Higgs, Dennis M

    2015-04-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are threatened by environmental contaminants, and many heavy metals can influence both the structure and function of sense organs in fishes. The use of these senses is vital to the survival and reproductive success of fish and therefore affects the health of the ecosystem as a whole. The current study examines the effects of cadmium on auditory structure and function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). In the laboratory, fish were exposed for 96 h to a range of cadmium concentrations and both hearing sensitivity and hair cell morphology were quantified. While hair cell numbers were unaffected, cadmium caused an increase in auditory threshold, with a critical range for toxic effects of cadmium estimated at 2.1-2.9 µg L(-1). Cadmium exposure also caused a decrease in response latency at higher cadmium concentrations. The current study demonstrates the sublethal effects of cadmium on fish sensory function while also pointing to the need for more careful interpretation of cadmium impacts on aquatic populations.

  17. Integrated approach to explore the mechanisms of aromatase inhibition and recovery in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Ekman, Drew R; Habib, Tanwir; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Collette, Timothy W; Bencic, David C; Ankley, Gerald T; Perkins, Edward J

    2014-07-01

    Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is a key enzyme in estradiol synthesis that catalyzes the aromatization of androgens into estrogens in ovaries. Here, we used an integrated approach to assess the mechanistic basis of the direct effects of aromatase inhibition, as well as adaptation and recovery processes in fish. We exposed female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) via the water to 30 μg/L of a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, during 8 days (exposure phase). Fish were then held in clean water for 8 more days (recovery phase). Samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, and 8 days of both the exposure and the recovery phases. Transcriptomics, metabolomics, and network inference were used to understand changes and infer connections at the transcript and metabolite level in the ovary. Apical endpoints directly indicative of endocrine function, such as plasma estradiol, testosterone, and vitellogenin levels were also measured. An integrated analysis of the data revealed changes in gene expression consistent with increased testosterone in fadrozole-exposed ovaries. Metabolites such as glycogen and taurine were strongly correlated with increased testosterone levels. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo steroidogenesis data suggested the accumulation of steroidogenic enzymes, including aromatase, as a mechanism to compensate for aromatase inhibition.

  18. Bioavailability and Kidney Responses to Diclofenac in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Bickley, Lisa K; van Aerle, Ronny; Brown, A Ross; Hargreaves, Adam; Huby, Russell; Cammack, Victoria; Jackson, Richard; Santos, Eduarda M; Tyler, Charles R

    2017-02-07

    Diclofenac is one of the most widely prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs worldwide. It is frequently detected in surface waters; however, whether this pharmaceutical poses a risk to aquatic organisms is debated. Here we quantified the uptake of diclofenac by the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) following aqueous exposure (0.2-25.0 μg L(-1)) for 21 days, and evaluated the tissue and biomolecular responses in the kidney. Diclofenac accumulated in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in the plasma of exposed fish. The highest plasma concentration observed (for fish exposed to 25 μg L(-1) diclofenac) was within the therapeutic range for humans. There was a strong positive correlation between exposure concentration and the number of developing nephrons observed in the posterior kidney. Diclofenac was not found to modulate the expression of genes in the kidney associated with its primary mode of action in mammals (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthases) but modulated genes associated with kidney repair and regeneration. There were no significant adverse effects following 21 days exposure to concentrations typical of surface waters. The combination of diclofenac's uptake potential, effects on kidney nephrons and relatively small safety margin for some surface waters may warrant a longer term chronic health effects analysis for diclofenac in fish.

  19. Influence of dissolved organic matter on acute toxicity of zinc to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Bringolf, Robert B; Morris, Brady A; Boese, Connie J; Santore, Robert C; Allen, Herbert E; Meyer, Joseph S

    2006-10-01

    We conducted laboratory toxicity tests in support of the development of a biotic ligand model (BLM) to predict acute toxicity of zinc (Zn) to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). To test the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on Zn toxicity, we exposed larval fathead minnows to Zn in water containing elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in 96-h static-renewal toxicity tests. We tested DOM isolated from four surface waters: Cypress Swamp, Delaware; Edisto River, South Carolina; Suwannee River, Georgia; and Wilmington, Delaware, wastewater treatment effluent. The DOM isolates from the Edisto River and Wilmington wastewater treatment effluent contained elevated concentrations of NaCl (20-110x control NaCl) due to the use of a Na+-exchange resin to remove Ca2+ and Mg2+ during the DOM isolation process. Therefore, we also performed Zn toxicity tests in which we added up to 20 mM NaCl to exposure solutions containing Cypress Swamp and Suwannee River DOM. A threshold concentration of 11 mg DOC/L was needed to decrease Zn toxicity, after which the 96 h Zn LC50 was positively correlated with DOC concentration. Elevated NaCl concentrations did not alter Zn toxicity in the presence of DOM. In conjunction with data from other studies with fish and invertebrates, results of this study were used to calibrate Version 2.1.1 of the Zn BLM. BLM-predicted LC50s for our exposure waters containing elevated DOM concentrations were within the range of acceptable deviation relative to the observed LC50s (i.e., 0.5-2x observed LC50s); however, BLM-predicted LC50s for our exposure waters containing < 1 mg DOC/L were 2-3x lower than the observed LC50s (i.e., the BLM over-predicted the toxicity). Therefore, the current composite-species BLM for Zn could be improved for fathead minnows if that species were modeled separately from the other species used to calibrate Version 2.1.1.

  20. Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on Thyroid Function in Developing Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Helen M.; Pickford, Daniel B.; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Brown, J. Anne

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known environmental contaminant, largely due to widespread military use as a propellant. Perchlorate acts pharmacologically as a competitive inhibitor of thyroidal iodide uptake in mammals, but the impacts of perchlorate contamination in aquatic ecosystems and, in particular, the effects on fish are unclear. Our studies aimed to investigate the effects of concentrations of ammonium perchlorate that can occur in the environment (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) on the development of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. For these studies, exposures started with embryos of < 24-hr postfertilization and were terminated after 28 days. Serial sectioning of thyroid follicles showed thyroid hyperplasia with increased follicular epithelial cell height and reduced colloid in all groups of fish that had been exposed to perchlorate for 28 days, compared with control fish. Whole-body thyroxine (T4) content (a measure of total circulating T4) in fish exposed to 100 mg/L perchlorate was elevated compared with the T4 content of control fish, but 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) content was not significantly affected in any exposure group. Despite the apparent regulation of T3, after 28 days of exposure to ammonium perchlorate, fish exposed to the two higher levels (10 and 100 mg/L) were developmentally retarded, with a lack of scales and poor pigmentation, and significantly lower wet weight and standard length than were control fish. Our study indicates that environmental levels of ammonium perchlorate affect thyroid function in fish and that in the early life stages these effects may be associated with developmental retardation. PMID:15811828

  1. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  2. EFFECTS OF EUTROPHICATION ON VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL IN FIELD MESOCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the effect of aquatic secondary nutrient supply levels (nitrogen and phosphorus) on the subcellular response of adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to a single nominal concentration of 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a potent synthetic estrog...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE ROBUSTNESS OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS, LARVAL SURVIVAL AND GROWTH TEST, U.S. EPA METHOD 1000.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intralaboratory study was conducted to evaluate the robustness of the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Larval Survival and Growth Test, Method 1000.0 Toxicity tests were conducted with the reference toxicants hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) and copper (Cu), and the data were st...

  4. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  5. Effects-based monitoring in the lower Green Bay/Fox River and Milwaukee Estuary Areas of Concern using caged Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and their potential effects on aquatic organisms, including adverse reproductive effects. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-b...

  6. Effects-based monitoring in the lower Green Bay/Fox River and Milwaukee Estuary Areas of Concern using caged Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and their potential effects on aquatic organisms, including adverse reproductive effects. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-b...

  7. EFFECTS OF EUTROPHICATION ON VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO 17A-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL IN FIELD MESOCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the effect of aquatic secondary nutrient supply levels (nitrogen and phosphorus) on the subcellular response of adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to a single nominal concentration of 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a potent synthetic estrog...

  8. Metabolite profiles of repeatedly sampled urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) contain unique lipid signatures following exposure to anti-androgens

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we sought to identify candidate markers of exposure to anti-androgens by analyzing endogenous metabolite profiles in the urine of male fathead minnows (mFHM, Pimephales promelas). Based on earlier work, we hypothesized that unidentifi...

  9. Metabolite profiles of repeatedly sampled urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) contain unique lipid signatures following exposure to anti-androgens

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we sought to identify candidate markers of exposure to anti-androgens by analyzing endogenous metabolite profiles in the urine of male fathead minnows (mFHM, Pimephales promelas). Based on earlier work, we hypothesized that unidentifi...

  10. EVALUATION OF THE ROBUSTNESS OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS, LARVAL SURVIVAL AND GROWTH TEST, U.S. EPA METHOD 1000.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intralaboratory study was conducted to evaluate the robustness of the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Larval Survival and Growth Test, Method 1000.0 Toxicity tests were conducted with the reference toxicants hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) and copper (Cu), and the data were st...

  11. Effects of a Short-term Exposure to the Fungicide Prochloraz on Endocrine Function and Gene Expression in Female Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz is a fungicide known to cause endocrine disruption through effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To determine the short-term impacts of prochloraz on gene expression and steroid production, adult female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exp...

  12. Field-Based Approach for Assessing the Impact of Treated Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent on Endogenous Metabolites of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-based metabolomic study was conducted during a shutdown of a pulp and paper mill (PPM) to assess the impacts of treated PPM effluent on endogenous polar metabolites in fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) livers. Caged male and female FHMs were deployed at a Great La...

  13. Effects of a Short-term Exposure to the Fungicide Prochloraz on Endocrine Function and Gene Expression in Female Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz is a fungicide known to cause endocrine disruption through effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To determine the short-term impacts of prochloraz on gene expression and steroid production, adult female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exp...

  14. Field-Based Approach for Assessing the Impact of Treated Pulp and Paper Mill Effluent on Endogenous Metabolites of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field-based metabolomic study was conducted during a shutdown of a pulp and paper mill (PPM) to assess the impacts of treated PPM effluent on endogenous polar metabolites in fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) livers. Caged male and female FHMs were deployed at a Great La...

  15. A New Approach for the Laboratory Culture of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. Most culture systems consist of a series of 4 to 30 individual tanks with a varied number of breeding pairs in each tank. A new mass culture system described here consists of six ...

  16. A NEW APPROACH FOR THE CULTURE OF FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. Most culture systems consist of a series of 4 to 30 individual tanks with 16 - 18 fish (2 males and 14-16 females) in each tank. The new mass culture system consists of six 50 gal...

  17. A New Approach for the Laboratory Culture of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. Most culture systems consist of a series of 4 to 30 individual tanks with a varied number of breeding pairs in each tank. A new mass culture system described here consists of six ...

  18. A NEW APPROACH FOR THE CULTURE OF FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. Most culture systems consist of a series of 4 to 30 individual tanks with 16 - 18 fish (2 males and 14-16 females) in each tank. The new mass culture system consists of six 50 gal...

  19. Influence of water quality and age on nickel toxicity to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tham Chung; Tomasso, Joseph R; Klaine, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    This research characterized the effects of water quality and organism age on the toxicity of nickel (Ni) to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to facilitate the accurate development of site-specific water-quality criteria. Nickel sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO4 x 6H2O) was used as the Ni source for performing acute toxicity tests (median lethal concentration after 96-h exposure [96-h LC50]) with < 1-d-old and 28-d-old P. promelas under varying regimes of hardness, pH, alkalinity, and natural organic matter (NOM). The toxicity of Ni was inversely related to water hardness between hardness values of 20 and 150 mg/L (as CaCO3). Below 30 mg/L alkalinity, Ni toxicity was related to alkalinity. The effect of pH was confounded by hardness and the presence of NOM. In the absence of NOM, the toxicity of Ni increased as pH increased at high hardness and alkalinity. In general, 28-d-old fish were less sensitive than < 1-d-old fish to Ni. This lower sensitivity ranged from 12-fold at low hardness and alkalinity (20 and 4 mg/L, respectively) to 5-fold at high hardness and alkalinity (100 and 400 mg/L, respectively). The presence of NOM (10 mg/L as dissolved organic carbon [DOC]) reduced Ni toxicity by up to 50%, but this effect appeared to be saturated above DOC at 5 mg/L. Incubating Ni with the NOM solution from 1 to 17 days had no effect on Ni toxicity. When using multivariate analysis, the 96-h LC50 for Ni was a function of fish age, alkalinity, hardness, and NOM (96-h LC50 = -0.642 + 0.270(fish age) + 0.005(alkalinity) + 0.018(hardness) + 0.138(DOC)). When using this model, we found a strong relationship between measured and predicted 96-h LC50 values (r2 = 0.94) throughout the treatment water qualities. The biotic ligand model (BLM) did not accurately predict Ni toxicity at high or low levels of alkalinity. Results of our research suggest that the BLM could be improved by considering NiCO3 to be bioavailable.

  20. Development and validation of a direct homologous quantitative sandwich ELISA for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Eidem, Janne K; Kleivdal, Hans; Kroll, Kevin; Denslow, Nancy; van Aerle, Ronny; Tyler, Charles; Panter, Grace; Hutchinson, Tom; Goksøyr, Anders

    2006-06-15

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is an established and sensitive endpoint for analysis of exposure to (anti-)oestrogens and their mimics in fish [Sumpter, J.P., 1995. Feminized responses in fish to environmental estrogens. Toxicol. Lett. 82, 737-742; Arukwe, A., Goksøyr, A., 2003. Eggshell and egg yolk proteins in fish: hepatic proteins for the next generation: oogenetic, population, and evolutionary implications of endocrine disruption. Comp. Hepatol. 2, 4. ]. In some instances, links have been drawn between high level induction of Vtg and adverse health effects in fish [Herman, R.L., Kincaide, H.L., 1988. Pathological effects of orally administered estradiol to rainbow trout. Aquaculture 72, 165-172; Schwaiger, J., Spieser, O.H., Bauer, C., Ferling, H., Mallow, U., Kalbfus, W., Negele, R.D., 2000. Chronic toxicity of nonylphenol and ethinyloestraiol: haematological and histopathological effects in juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Aquat. Toxicol. 51, 69-78]. The widespread use of Vtg as a biomarker has led to the development of a variety of assays to quantitatively measure Vtg concentrations in tissue samples from fish, and hence a need for a standardization of the performance criteria and validation of such assays [Goksøyr, A., Eidem, J.K., Kristiansen, S.I., Nilsen, B.M., 2003. On the need for a standardized set-up for validation studies of fish vitellogenin assays as an endpoint in endocrine disruptor testing and screening-a proposal. ]. One of the most popular test fish species for assessing chemical effects is the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), which is now used widely for studies into endocrine disruption [Panter, G.H., Hutchinson, T.H., Lange, R., Lye, C.M., Sumpter, J.P., Zerulla, M., Tyler, C.R., 2002. Utility of a juvenile fathead minnow screening assay for detecting (anti)estrogenic substances. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 21, 319-326; Hutchinson, T.H., Yokota, H., Hagino, S., Ozato, K., 2003. Development of fish tests for endocrine disruptors. Pure Appl

  1. Influence of metal concentrations, percent salinity, and length of exposure on the metabolic rate of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Pistole, David H; Peles, John D; Taylor, Kelly

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the effects of chemical toxicants on energetic processes is an important aspect of ecotoxicology. However, the influence of toxicant concentration and time of exposure on metabolism in aquatic organisms is still poorly understood. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of increasing levels of three stressors (Cu, Cd, percent salinity) and exposure time (24 h and 96 h) on the metabolic rate of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). In all 24-h exposures, there existed a threshold concentration, above which metabolic rate decreased significantly compared to the control and lower concentrations. In contrast, the metabolic rate of fish exposed for 96 h increased significantly in all concentrations compared to fish from the control. We suggest fathead minnows exhibit a consistent pattern of metabolic response to stressors, regardless of the physiological mechanisms involved, and that this response differs as a function of time of exposure.

  2. Investigation of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) as a biological control agent of Culex mosquitoes under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Patrick; Paskewitz, Susan

    2009-09-01

    Many urban areas have engineered storm-water runoff control structures such as ditches and detention ponds. These often serve as excellent habitats for Culex pipiens and Culex restuans, the primary enzootic vectors of West Nile virus in the Midwest. We evaluated predation and control of these species by a fish species native to Wisconsin, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). In the lab, a single minnow consumed an average of 74 Cx. pipiens larvae in a 24-h period. Minnow gender and age had minimal effect on predation of 2nd and 4th instars. In the field, fathead minnows (1,000 fish/ha) were introduced 1 time into 3 storm-water ditches with an additional 9 sites serving as controls. Sites where fish were introduced required no Bacillus sphaericus (VectoLex) treatments during the 10-week experiment. The control sites required 19 VectoLex treatments during the same 10-week time span. Survival analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in time to first VectoLex treatment between fish sites and control sites. Our results suggest fathead minnows may provide a long-lasting and ecologically and economically feasible alternative to the use of VectoLex for Culex larval control.

  3. Characterization of basic immune function parameters in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a common model in environmental toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Leah M; LeSueur, Meriel C; Yost, Alexandra T; Stephens, Dane A; Oris, James T; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K

    2017-02-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is an environmental sentinel species, commonly used in toxicity testing. However, there is a lack of data regarding basic immune function in this species. To improve the usefulness of the fathead minnow as a model for basic immune function and immunotoxicity, this study sought to 1) compare the differential expression of immune function genes in naïve fathead minnows and 2) determine the effects of pathogen exposure on immune gene expression and spleen index. To accomplish this, kidney, spleen and liver tissue were collected three days post injection (dpi) from adult male fathead minnows from each of the following groups: 1) uninjected control 2) sham-injected (Hank's balanced salt solution) and 3) pathogen-injected (Yersinia ruckeri). Spleen tissue was also collected at seven and 14 dpi. Differential tissue expression of immune function genes was evaluated in naïve minnows and expression patterns were similar to those found in other fish species, with liver tissue generally having the highest amount of expression. Following pathogen injection, the expression of complement component 3 (c3) (4.4-fold, kidney; 2.5-fold, liver), interleukin 11 (il11) (4.8-fold, kidney; 15.2-fold, liver) and interleukin 1β (il1β) (8.2-fold, kidney; 17.2-fold, spleen; 2.6-fold, liver) were significantly upregulated. Elastase 2 (elas2) was significantly downregulated (5.8-fold) in liver tissue. A significant increase in spleen index at seven dpi was also observed in pathogen-injected minnows. This study has identified endpoints that are part of the normal response to pathogen in fathead minnows, an essential step toward the development of the fathead minnow as a model for immunotoxicity evaluations.

  4. Population dynamics, production, and prey consumption of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in prairie wetlands: A bioenergetics approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, W.G.

    1998-01-01

    I assessed the population dynamics of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in prairie wetlands and developed a bioenergetics model to estimate their production and prey consumption. I sampled populations in four wetlands weekly from late May through June and biweekly during July and August using a Kushlan 1-m2 throw trap. I imposed commercial harvest on two populations; the other two populations served as controls. Weekly population density estimates ranged from 52 000 to 356 000??ha-1 during early June and from 5400 to 19 700??ha-1 in late August. Simulated commercial harvest did not influence population density, mortality rates, or size of fathead minnows. Standing stock biomass differed among wetlands sampled, ranging from 144 to 482 kg??ha-1 in early June and from 1 to 33 kg??ha-1 during late August. However, differences were attributed to differential predation pressure rather than harvest pressure. Net production during the period ranged from 71.5 to 202.7 kg??ha-1. Daily net production was greatest in early June (2.6-13.5 kg??ha-1??day-1) and then declined during July and August (0.1-1.2 kg??ha-1??day-1). Total mass of prey consumed by fathead minnows ranged from 332.7-1104.8 kg??ha-1 among wetlands.

  5. Parasites and a host's sense of smell: reduced chemosensory performance of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) infected with a monogenean parasite.

    PubMed

    Lari, Ebrahim; Goater, Cameron P; Cone, David K; Pyle, Greg G

    2017-01-26

    Parasites residing within the central nervous system of their hosts have the potential to reduce various components of host performance, but such effects are rarely evaluated. We assessed the olfactory acuity of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) infected experimentally with the monogenean Dactylogyrus olfactorius, the adults of which live within the host's olfactory chambers. Olfactory acuity was compared between infected and uninfected hosts by assessing electro-olfactography (EOG) neural responses to chemical stimuli that indicate the presence of food (L-alanine) or the presence of conspecifics (taurocholic acid). We also compared differences in gross morphology of the olfactory epithelium in infected and uninfected minnows. Differences in EOG responses between infected and uninfected minnows to both cue types were non-significant at 30 days post-exposure. By days 60 and 90, coincident with a two times increase in parasite intensity in the olfactory chambers, the EOG responses of infected minnows were 70-90% lower than controls. When infected fish were treated with a parasiticide (Prazipro), olfactory acuity returned to control levels by day 7 post-treatment. The observed reduction in olfactory acuity is best explained by the reduced density of cilia covering the olfactory chambers of infected fish, or by the concomitant increase in the density of mucous cells that cover the olfactory chambers. These morphological changes are likely due to the direct effects of attachment and feeding by individual worms or by indirect effects associated with host responses. Our results show that infection of a commonly occurring monogenean in fathead minnows reduces olfactory acuity. Parasite-induced interference with olfactory performance may reduce a fish's ability to detect, or respond to, chemical cues originating from food, predators, competitors or mates.

  6. Investigations of transcript expression in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) brain tissue reveal toxicological impacts of RDX exposure.

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Guan, Xin; Pirooznia, Mehdi; Habib, Tanwir; Yoo, Leslie; Wintz, Henri; Vulpe, Chris D; Perkins, Edward J

    2011-01-17

    Production, usage and disposal of the munitions constituent (MC) cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) has led to environmental releases on military facilities. The chemical attributes of RDX are conducive for leaching to surface water which may put aquatic organisms at risk of exposure. Because RDX has been observed to cause aberrant neuromuscular effects across a wide range of animal phyla, we assessed the effects of RDX on central nervous system (CNS) functions in the representative aquatic ecotoxicological model species, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). We developed a fathead minnow brain-tissue cDNA library enriched for transcripts differentially expressed in response to RDX and trinitrotoluene (TNT) exposure. All 4,128 cDNAs were sequenced, quality filtered and assembled yielding 2230 unique sequences and 945 significant blastx matches (E ≤10(-5)). The cDNA library was leveraged to create custom-spotted microarrays for use in transcript expression assays. The impact of RDX on transcript expression in brain tissue was examined in fathead minnows exposed to RDX at 0.625, 2.5, 5, 10mg/L or an acetone-spike control for 10 days. Overt toxicity of RDX in fathead minnow occurred only at the highest exposure concentration resulting in 50% mortality and weight loss. Conversely, Bayesian analysis of microarray data indicated significant changes in transcript expression at concentrations as low as 0.625 mg/L. In total, 154 cDNAs representing 44 unique transcripts were differentially expressed in RDX exposures, the majority of which were validated by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Investigation of molecular pathways, gene ontology (GO) and individual gene functions affected by RDX exposures indicated changes in metabolic processes involved in: oxygen transport, neurological function, calcium binding/signaling, energy metabolism, cell growth/division, oxidative stress and ubiquitination. In total, our study indicated that RDX exposure affected

  7. Effects of the biopesticide Zequanox® on reproduction and early development of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Diane L.; Luoma, James A.

    2017-01-01

    The biopesticide, Zequanox®, is registered for dreissenid mussel control in open water systems in the United States. Previous toxicity trials with nontarget organisms, including several young-of-the-year fish species and invertebrates, demonstrated selectivity of Zequanox for dreissenid mussels, but data are lacking on the treatment-related effects on reproduction and early life stage development of fish. The present study evaluated the effects of Zequanox on spawning and early life stages of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, after exposure to the maximum approved concentration [100 mg active ingredient (AI)/L] and exposure duration (8h) for open water application. The results showed no significant treatment-related effect of Zequanox on survival, condition, or cumulative egg production (21 d) in adult fathead minnow. Eggs (≤24 h old) exposed to Zequanox developed to the eyed-stage at a similar rate to that of untreated eggs. Additionally, Zequanox did not have a significant effect on survival and growth (90 d) of newly hatched larvae (≤24-h old). Zequanox may be an option for control of dreissenid mussels in localized open water habitats where concerns exist regarding reproduction and recruitment of cyprinids and related species.

  8. What is Normal? A Characterization of the Values and Variabilty in Reproductive Endpoints of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jensen et al. investigated aspects of the normal reproductive biology of the fathead minnow (FHM, P. promelas), and subsequent studies have generated a large amount of additional reproductive data for endpoints such as plasma steroid hormone and vitellogenin concentrations, spa...

  9. What is Normal? A Characterization of the Values and Variabilty in Reproductive Endpoints of the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jensen et al. investigated aspects of the normal reproductive biology of the fathead minnow (FHM, P. promelas), and subsequent studies have generated a large amount of additional reproductive data for endpoints such as plasma steroid hormone and vitellogenin concentrations, spa...

  10. Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas Rafinesque) exposure to three novel brominated flame retardants in outdoor mesocosms: bioaccumulation and biotransformation.

    PubMed

    de Jourdan, Benjamin P; Hanson, Mark L; Muir, Derek C G; Solomon, Keith R

    2014-05-01

    The phaseout of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has prompted the search for appropriate substitutes. These substitutes, referred to as novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), are poorly characterized in terms of their persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. The authors assessed the bioaccumulation potential of 3 non-PBDE brominated flame retardants: 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropylether) (TBBPA-BDBPE), and BZ-54, a mixture of bis(2-ethylhexyl)tetrabromophthalate) (BEH-TEBP) and 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB). Replicate outdoor aquatic mesocosms were treated individually at concentrations designed to give a maximum load of 500 ng/g of flame retardant in the upper 5 cm of the sediment. Caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, 24 fish per replicate) were introduced to each mesocosm and acclimated for 10 d prior to exposure. The exposure period was 42 d, followed by 28 d of depuration after transfer to a control mesocosm, during which physical, reproductive, and biochemical end points were examined. Tissue samples were taken to measure the accumulation, depuration, and biotransformation of NBFRs. Fathead minnows were observed to accumulate, after growth adjustment, BTBPE (16-4203 ng/g lipid) and TBBPA-BDBPE (>1000 ng/g lipid) but with a lack of consistent accumulation observed for EH-TBB and BEH-TEBP. However, limited biologically meaningful or consistent responses were observed in the monitored physical, reproductive, and biochemical parameters. Fathead minnows from each treatment exhibited several brominated transformation products. The authors conclude that these NBFRs have the potential to be bioaccumulative and persistent in vivo and, therefore, warrant further study of physiological effects linked to chronic, sublethal responses.

  11. Population and sex differences in antipredator responses of breeding fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to chemical stimuli from garter snakes (Thamnophis radix andT. sirtalis).

    PubMed

    Matity, J G; Chivers, D P; Jan F Smith, R

    1994-08-01

    We conducted a predator bite survey on a population of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) considered to be under substantial predation pressure by western plains garter snakes (Thamnophis radix). Scarring, due to failed predation attempts by garter snakes and crayfish (Orconectes virilis), was observed significantly more often in breeding males than in breeding females and nonbreeding minnows. Likely, territorial nest defense under the edges of rocks along the water's edge, a habitat occupied by crayfish and frequented by snakes, caused the breeding males to be differentially vulnerable to predation. Under controlled laboratory conditions, breeding males from this population exhibited an antipredator response to chemical stimuli from live snakes (T. sirtalis andT. radix) significantly more often than breeding female minnows from the same population and breeding minnows of both sexes from a population that was presumed to be under lower predation pressure from snakes.

  12. Triclosan impairs swimming behavior and alters expression of excitation contraction coupling proteins in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Erika B.; Connon, Richard E.; Werner, Inge; Davies, Rebecca; Beggel, Sebastian; Feng, Wei; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2013-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a high volume chemical widely used in consumer products, is a known aquatic contaminant found in fish inhabiting polluted watersheds. Mammalian studies have recently demonstrated that TCS disrupts signaling between the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two proteins essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in striated muscle. We investigated the swimming behavior and expression of EC coupling proteins in larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to TCS for up to 7 days (d). Concentrations as low as 75μg L−1 significantly altered fish swimming activity after 1d; which was consistent after 7d of exposure. The mRNA transcription and protein levels of RyR and DHPR (subunit CaV1.1) isoforms changed in a dose and time dependent manner. Crude muscle homogenates from exposed larvae did not display any apparent changes in receptor affinity toward known radioligands. In non-exposed crude muscle homogenates, TCS decreased the binding of [3H]PN200-110 to the DHPR and decreased the binding of [3H]-ryanodine to the RyR, demonstrating a direct impact at the receptor level. These results support TCS’s impact on muscle function in vertebrates further exemplifying the need to re-evaluate the risks this pollutant poses to aquatic environments. PMID:23305567

  13. Triclosan impairs swimming behavior and alters expression of excitation-contraction coupling proteins in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Erika B; Connon, Richard E; Werner, Inge; Davies, Rebecca E; Beggel, Sebastian; Feng, Wei; Pessah, Isaac N

    2013-02-19

    Triclosan (TCS), a high volume chemical widely used in consumer products, is a known aquatic contaminant found in fish inhabiting polluted watersheds. Mammalian studies have recently demonstrated that TCS disrupts signaling between the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two proteins essential for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in striated muscle. We investigated the swimming behavior and expression of EC coupling proteins in larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to TCS for up to 7 days. Concentrations as low as 75 μg L(-1) significantly altered fish swimming activity after 1 day; which was consistent after 7 days of exposure. The mRNA transcription and protein levels of RyR and DHPR (subunit CaV1.1) isoforms changed in a dose and time dependent manner. Crude muscle homogenates from exposed larvae did not display any apparent changes in receptor affinity toward known radioligands. In nonexposed crude muscle homogenates, TCS decreased the binding of [(3)H]PN20-110 to the DHPR and decreased the binding of [(3)H]-ryanodine to the RyR, demonstrating a direct impact at the receptor level. These results support TCS's impact on muscle function in vertebrates further exemplifying the need to re-evaluate the risks this pollutant poses to aquatic environments.

  14. Assessing effects of metal mining effluent on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction in a trophic-transfer exposure system.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, Carrie J; Dubé, Monique G; Weber, Lynn P; Driedger, Kimberlea L; Janz, David M

    2006-10-15

    Assessment of effects of metal mine effluent (MME) on aquatic organisms in lab-based settings predominantly evaluates contaminant transfer through the water only with little emphasis on food-borne exposure. The effects of MME on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) (FHM) have been reported downstream of metal mine discharges in the Junction Creek system, Sudbury, ON, but to date, no study has investigated the significance of trophic transfer in this system. Our objective was to develop a self-sustaining trophic-transfer bioassay, using Chironomus tentans and FHM, that allowed assessment of the effects of not only water-borne (FHM-only) but also food- and water-borne (trophic-transfer) exposure to MME on FHM reproduction. Reproductive performance of FHM was assessed for 21 days under controlled laboratory conditions to obtain baseline data of various endpoints, including egg production and hatching success. Exposure to 45% (v/v) Copper Cliff mine effluent (CCME) and control treatments for both systems was then conducted for a further 21 days. It was evident that reproductive output in both the water-only and the trophic-transfer system was reduced compared to controls. It was only in the trophic-transfer system that a significant reduction in larval hatching and an increase in deformities occurred after exposure to CCME. This would suggest that contaminated food was a route of exposure causing effects on larval survival.

  15. Subchronic sensitivity of one-, four-, and seven-day-old fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae to five toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Pickering, Q.H.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Winks, K.L.

    1996-03-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test was used to evaluate the relative sensitivity of 1-, 4-, and 7-d-old larvae to five contaminants, KCl, NaCl, 1-octanol, carbaryl, and benzaldehyde. The no observable effect concentration (NOEC) for survival of the two inorganic compounds, KCl and NaCl, was not affected by age of the larvae. The subchronic valve (SCV) for NaCl was always determined by survival. Hypothesis testing of biomass always gave the same NOEC for the three age groups for each of the two inorganic compounds, and a minimum significant difference (MSD) was always calculable. The effect of 1-octanol on growth was more sensitive than the effect on survival in eight of the nine toxicity tests. Within a set of 1-, 4-, and 7-d-old larvae tests the SCV varied only twofold; however, between sets of tests the variation was fourfold. The SCV of carbaryl was determined by the effect on growth in five of six tests. Except for one test the SCV varied only twofold. The 1-d larvae were more sensitive to benzaldehyde than 1- and 7-d larvae in two sets of tests. The SCV was determined on the basis of survival for 1-d-old larvae and on the basis of growth for 4- and 7-d-old larvae.

  16. Evaluation of potential mechanisms of atrazine-induced reproductive impairment in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, Cathy; Papoulias, Diana M.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2016-01-01

    Atrazine has been implicated in reproductive dysfunction of exposed organisms, and previous studies documented decreased egg production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during 30-d to 38-d exposures to 0.5 µg/L, 5 µg/L, and 50 µg/L atrazine. The authors evaluated possible mechanisms underlying the reduction in egg production. Gene expression in steroidogenesis pathways and the hypothalamus–pituitary–gonad axis of male and female fish was measured. Atrazine did not significantly induce gonad aromatase (cyp19a1a) expression. An atrazine-induced shift in the number of females in an active reproductive state was observed. Expression of the egg maturation genes vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and zona pellucida glycoprotein 3.1 (zp3.1) in medaka females was correlated and had a bimodal distribution. In both species, females with low vtg1 or zp3.1 expression also had low expression of steroidogenesis genes in the gonad, estrogen receptor in the liver, and gonadotropins in the brain. In the medaka, the number of females per tank that had high expression of zp3.1 was significantly correlated with egg production per tank. The number of medaka females with low expression of zp3.1 increased significantly with atrazine exposure. Thus, the decline in egg production observed in response to atrazine exposure may be the result of a coordinated downregulation of genes required for reproduction in a subset of females.

  17. Accumulation and debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) induces thyroid disruption and liver alterations.

    PubMed

    Noyes, Pamela D; Hinton, David E; Stapleton, Heather M

    2011-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are known to affect thyroid hormone (TH) regulation. The TH-regulating deiodinases have been implicated in these impacts; however, PBDE effects on the fish thyroid system are largely unknown. Moreover, the liver as a potential target of PBDE toxicity has not been explored in young fish. This study measured decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) effects on TH regulation by measuring deiodinase activity in juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Dietary accumulations and debromination of BDE-209 were also measured, and the morphology of thyroid and liver tissues was examined. Juvenile fathead minnows (28 days old) received a 28-day dietary treatment of BDE-209 at 9.8 ± 0.16 μg/g of food at 5% of their body weight per day followed by a 14-day depuration period in which they were fed clean food. Chemical analysis revealed that BDE-209 accumulated in tissues and was metabolized to reductive products ranging from penta- to octaBDEs with 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-154) being the most accumulative metabolite. By day 28 of the exposure, rates of outer and inner ring deiodination (ORD and IRD, respectively) of thyroxine (T4) were each reduced by ∼74% among treatments. Effects on T4-ORD and T4-IRD remained significant even after the 14-day depuration period. Histological examination of treated fish showed significantly increased thyroid follicular epithelial cell heights and vacuolated hepatocyte nuclei. Enlarged biliary passageways may be the cause of the distinctive liver phenotype observed, although further testing is needed. Altogether, these results suggest that juvenile fish may be uniquely susceptible to thyroid disruptors like PBDEs.

  18. Altered gene expression in the brain and liver of female fathead minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to fadrozole

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Knoebl, Iris; Larkin, Patrick; Miracle, Ann L.; Carter, Barbara J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2008-06-01

    The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a small fish species widely used for ecotoxicology research and regulatory testing in North America. This study used a novel 2000 gene oligonucleotide microarray to evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, on gene expression in the liver and brain tissue of exposed females. Exposure to 60 μg 1-1 fadrozole/L for 7 d, resulted in the significant (p<0.05; high-moderate agreement among multiple probes spotted on the array) up-regulation of approximately 47 genes in brain and 188 in liver, and the significant down-regulation of 61 genes in brain and 162 in liver. In particular, fadrozole exposure elicited significant up-regulation of five genes in brain involved in the cholesterol synthesis pathway and altered the expression of over a dozen cytoskeleton-related genes. In the liver, there was notable down-regulation of genes coding for vitellogenin precursors, vigillin, and fibroin-like ovulatory proteins which were consistent with an expected reduction in plasma estradiol concentrations as a result of fadrozole exposure and an associated reduction in measured plasma vitellogenin concentrations. These changes coincided with a general down-regulation of genes coding for non-mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and proteins that play a role in translation. With the exception of the fibroin-like ovulatory proteins, real-time PCR results largely corroborated the microarray responses. Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  19. Identification of copper-responsive genes in an early life stage of the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Solange S; Keller, Stephen J

    2009-04-01

    While physiological changes associated with copper toxicity have been studied in adult fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, little is known about the effect of copper on newly hatched larvae. As a result we initiated an investigation on the mechanism of copper toxicity in 24 h post-hatch larvae using gene expression changes to identify responsive genes. Fish were exposed to copper concentrations of 0, 50, 125 and 200 mug/L in a 48 h toxicity test. Total RNA from survivors was used in a differential display assay to screen for differentially expressed gene products. Altogether, 654 copper-responsive differentially expressed bands were collected. Database searches found homology for 261 sequences. One hundred and sixty-one bands were homologous to NCBI genes of known function, of which 69 were individual genes. The most abundant categories of functional genes responding to copper were involved in protein synthesis/translational machinery and contractile proteins. Twenty-one dose-responsive genes were measured for expression changes using real-time quantitative PCR. Differential gene expression was validated for 11 of 13 genes, when a 1.2 times qPCR difference between the copper and control samples was observed. Transcripts identified as titin, cytochrome b, fast muscle specific heavy myosin chain 4, fast muscle troponin I, proteasome 26S subunit and troponin T3a were induced over twofold. Differential display bands identified as 60S ribosomal proteins L27 and L12 were repressed approximately threefold. We conclude that copper exposure affects several cellular pathways in larval fathead minnows with protein synthesis, ribosome structure, and muscle contractile proteins being the most sensitive to this stress.

  20. Statistical models to predict the toxicity of major ions to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows)

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Gulley, D.D.; Hockett, J.R.; Garrison, T.D.; Evans, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    Toxicity of fresh waters with high total dissolved solids has been shown to be dependent on the specific ionic composition of the water. To provide a predictive tool to assess toxicity attributable to major ions, the authors tested the toxicity of over 2,900 ion solutions using the daphnids, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna, and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Multiple logistic regression was used to relate ion composition to survival for each of the three test species. In general, relative ion toxicity was K{sup +} > HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} {approx} Mg{sup 2+} > Cl{sup {minus}} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}; Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} were not significant variables in the regressions, suggesting that the toxicity of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} salts was primarily attributable to the corresponding anion. For C. dubia and D. magna, toxicity of Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and K{sup +} was reduced in solutions enriched with more than one cation. Final regression models showed a good quality of fit to the data (R{sup 2} = 0.767--0.861). Preliminary applications of these models to field-collected samples indicated a high degree of accuracy for the C. dubia model, while the D. magna and fathead minnow models tended to overpredict ion toxicity. Studies of oil and gas produced waters, irrigation drain waters, shale oil leachates, sediment pore waters, and industrial process waters have shown toxicity caused by elevated concentrations of common ions.

  1. Effects of zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) density on the survival and growth of juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas): Implications for North American river fishes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, Cecil A.

    1996-01-01

    I used replicated 37.8 1 aquaria in a factorial design (four densities of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha; two hydrologic regimes) to determine if the survival or growth of juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) was affected by the density of zebra mussel or by the retention time of the test system. None of the fathead minnows died during the 30-d experiment. However, growth of fathead minnows was lower (P0.05). These laboratory results suggest that juvenile fish survival will not be affected by low to moderate densities of mussels (0-3000 m super(-2)) but fish growth might be adversely affected at moderate densities of mussels (e.g., 3000 m super(-2)).

  2. Effects of the anti-microbial, triclocarban, on the reproductive function and ovarian transcriptome of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban (TCC) is a widely used antimicrobial agent that is routinely detected in surface waters. The present study was designed to examine TCC’s efficacy and mode of action as a reproductive toxicant in fish. Reproductively mature Pimephales promelas were continuously ...

  3. Effects of the anti-microbial, triclocarban, on the reproductive function and ovarian transcriptome of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban (TCC) is a widely used antimicrobial agent that is routinely detected in surface waters. The present study was designed to examine TCC’s efficacy and mode of action as a reproductive toxicant in fish. Reproductively mature Pimephales promelas were continuously ...

  4. Evaluation of potential mechanisms of atrazine-induced reproductive impairment in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Richter, Catherine A; Papoulias, Diana M; Whyte, Jeffrey J; Tillitt, Donald E

    2016-09-01

    Atrazine has been implicated in reproductive dysfunction of exposed organisms, and previous studies documented decreased egg production in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during 30-d to 38-d exposures to 0.5 µg/L, 5 µg/L, and 50 µg/L atrazine. The authors evaluated possible mechanisms underlying the reduction in egg production. Gene expression in steroidogenesis pathways and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis of male and female fish was measured. Atrazine did not significantly induce gonad aromatase (cyp19a1a) expression. An atrazine-induced shift in the number of females in an active reproductive state was observed. Expression of the egg maturation genes vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and zona pellucida glycoprotein 3.1 (zp3.1) in medaka females was correlated and had a bimodal distribution. In both species, females with low vtg1 or zp3.1 expression also had low expression of steroidogenesis genes in the gonad, estrogen receptor in the liver, and gonadotropins in the brain. In the medaka, the number of females per tank that had high expression of zp3.1 was significantly correlated with egg production per tank. The number of medaka females with low expression of zp3.1 increased significantly with atrazine exposure. Thus, the decline in egg production observed in response to atrazine exposure may be the result of a coordinated downregulation of genes required for reproduction in a subset of females. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2230-2238. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  5. Community structure and seasonal dynamics of Dactylogyrus Spp. (Monogenea) on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas ) from the Salt Valley Watershed, Lancaster County, Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Knipes, Alaine K; Janovy, John

    2009-12-01

    The gill monogene communities of Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) in 3 distinct sites on converging streams were investigated from 2004 to 2006 in 3 different seasons. Thirty collections of P. promelas were made in southeastern Nebraska along 3 converging tributaries: Elk Creek (40.88534°N, 96.83366°W), West Oak Creek (40.9082°N, 96.81432°W), and Oak Creek (40.91402°N, 96.770583°W), Lancaster County, Nebraska. In all, 103 P. promelas were collected from Elk Creek, 115 from West Oak Creek, and 78 from Oak Creek and examined for gill monogenes. Among the P. promelas collected, 93.5% were infected with up to 3 species of Dactylogyrus, including Dactylogyrus simplex Mizelle, 1937, Dactylogyrus bychowskyi Mizelle, 1937, and Dactylogyrus pectenatus Mayes, 1977. Mean intensities at Elk Creek, West Oak Creek, and Oak Creek were 17.6, 22.8, and 25.1, and prevalences 88, 95, and 97%, respectively. At these 3 sites: (1) P. promelas does not share Dactylogyrus species with Semotilus atromaculatus (Creek chub) or Notropis stramineus (Sand shiner); (2) fish size and sex are not predictive of Dactylogyrus infection; (3) Dactylogyrus spp. vary (not always predictably) in their seasonal occurrence; (4) populations of Dactylogyrus spp. respond to environmental differences among sites; and (5) the community structure of Dactylogyrus spp. (order of abundance) is independent of environment.

  6. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of October 21--28, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Due to serious reproduction/embryo abortion problems with the TVA daphnid cultures, TVA conducted tests during this study period using only fathead minnows. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 2.9, Mile 4.3, and Mile 5.1 on October 20, 22, and 25. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  7. Influence of Ovarian Stage on Transcript Profiles in Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Ovary Tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small fish species with an asynchronous pattern of gonad development and reproduction are commonly used test organisms in aquatic ecotoxicology and more recently in ecotoxicogenomics. This study applies coordinated histological examination and fathead minnow oligonucleotide micr...

  8. Propiconazole inhibits steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed effects of the conazole-fungicide propiconazole on endocrine function and reproductive success of the fathead minnow, using an experimental approach based on previously defined adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that inhibit steroidogenesis in fish...

  9. Influence of Ovarian Stage on Transcript Profiles in Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) Ovary Tissue

    EPA Science Inventory

    Small fish species with an asynchronous pattern of gonad development and reproduction are commonly used test organisms in aquatic ecotoxicology and more recently in ecotoxicogenomics. This study applies coordinated histological examination and fathead minnow oligonucleotide micr...

  10. HERITABLE REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF BENZO[A]PYRENE ON THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental toxicologists rarely investigate multigeneration effects of aquatic contaminants. In this study we investigated the survivorship of fathead minnow larvae two generations removed from an exposure to the potent mutagen benzo [a] pyrene. The F2 broods with grandparenta...

  11. Propiconazole inhibits steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed effects of the conazole-fungicide propiconazole on endocrine function and reproductive success of the fathead minnow, using an experimental approach based on previously defined adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that inhibit steroidogenesis in fish...

  12. Shoaling as an antiparasite defence in minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to trematode cercariae.

    PubMed

    Stumbo, Anthony D; James, Clayton T; Goater, Cameron P; Wisenden, Brian D

    2012-11-01

    1. Individuals that live in groups benefit from increased foraging success and decreased predation. Protection from some types of parasites may provide an additional benefit of group-living. For fish, the extent to which shoaling can reduce an individual's risk of exposure to the infective stages of parasites is unknown. 2. We tested for antiparasite benefits of shoaling in fathead minnows exposed to larvae (cercariae) of two of their most common species of trematode, Ornithodiplostomum ptychocheilus and Posthodiplostomum minimum. As developing stages (metacercariae) of these trematodes cause reductions in minnow activity, growth and survival, natural selection should favour the evolution of cercariae-avoidance behaviours. 3. We evaluated shoal dimensions in groups of minnows exposed to O. ptychocheilus and to other chemical/physical stimuli within aquaria. To compare risk of exposure in shoaling vs. non-shoaling fish, we confined groups of minnows into mesh cages in outdoor mesocosms, exposed them to cercariae, then compared mean worm numbers in grouped vs. solitary fish. Lastly, we tested whether fish located within the centre of an artificial shoal reduced their risk of cercariae exposure compared with those along peripheral edges. 4. Minnows distinguished infective cercariae from other potential aquatic threats and responded with activity that reduced the 2-dimensional area of their shoals 15-fold compared with water-only controls. Fish confined within artificial shoals had 3-fold fewer worms than single fish and minnows located within the centre of artificial shoals had significantly fewer worms than those without peripheral minnows. 5. These results show that shoaling reduces a minnows' risk of exposure to cercariae, either directly via detection of cercariae in the water column followed by behavioural avoidance or indirectly via behaviour-mediated differences in exposure between shoaling vs. non-shoaling fish. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology

  13. COMPARISON OF ELISAS FOR DETECTING VITELLOGENIN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations in the fathead minnow is currently being evaluated and considered for screening of endocrine active substances. One of the proposed methods, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on VTG from carp, was recently evaluate...

  14. EXPOSURE METHOD CONSIDERATIONS FOR MEASURING VITELLOGENIN EXPRESSION IN LARVAL AND MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our laboratory has developed methods for measuring the expression of the vitellogenin (Vg) gene in larval and adult male fathead minnows. During this development we found several conditions that affect background Vg levels and we observed preconditions for the expression of this...

  15. COMPARISON OF ELISAS FOR DETECTING VITELLOGENIN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations in the fathead minnow is currently being evaluated and considered for screening of endocrine active substances. One of the proposed methods, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on VTG from carp, was recently evaluate...

  16. EXPOSURE METHOD CONSIDERATIONS FOR MEASURING VITELLOGENIN EXPRESSION IN LARVAL AND MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our laboratory has developed methods for measuring the expression of the vitellogenin (Vg) gene in larval and adult male fathead minnows. During this development we found several conditions that affect background Vg levels and we observed preconditions for the expression of this...

  17. ASPECTS OF BASIC REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY AND ENDOCRINOLOGY IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow has been proposed as a model species for assessing the adverse effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on reproduction and development. The purpose of these studies was to develop baseline reproductive biology and endocrinology data for this species to...

  18. Gene prediction in the fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas] genome-presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism, having been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. While a large amount of molecular information has been gathered on the organism over the years, to date, the ...

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A 2,000 GENE MICROARRAY FOR THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of the gene microarray has provided the field of ecotoxicology a new tool to identify modes of action (MOA) of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000 gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow (P...

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A 2,000 GENE MICROARRAY FOR THE FATHEAD MINNOW, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of the gene microarray has provided the field of ecotoxicology a new tool to identify modes of action (MOA) of chemicals and chemical mixtures. Herein we describe the development and application of a 2,000 gene oligonucleotide microarray for the fathead minnow (P...

  1. Gene prediction in the fathead minnow [Pimephales promelas] genome-presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism, having been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. While a large amount of molecular information has been gathered on the organism over the years, to date, the ...

  2. Effects of the anti-androgen, bicalutamide, in a reduced life-cycle study with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Panter, G H; Glennon, Y C; Robinson, J; Hargreaves, A; Murray-Smith, R

    2012-06-15

    In support of the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of the non-steroidal anti-androgen bicalutamide, a reduced fish full life-cycle (FFLC) was conducted. The traditional FFLC is deemed to be the "gold standard" for evaluating the potential environmental impact of human pharmaceuticals, covering all life-stages and measuring long term effects. However, such studies require large numbers of animals and take considerable effort and time. The reduced FFLC, employed here, used fewer animals and was shorter in duration, yet still included sensitive life-stages and measured long term effects to provide robust information in support of the ERA for an endocrine disrupting chemical. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were held in breeding pairs and their reproductive performance assessed over 28 days. Embryos from at least two pairs per treatment were subsequently grown up until 85 days post hatch and a subset allowed to spawn to assess the developmental and reproductive effects of the parental exposure on this F1 generation. Fish were exposed in a flow-through system, at 25±1°C. Nominal (mean measured) test concentrations of bicalutamide were 0.01 (0.055), 0.10 (0.10), 1.0 (0.9), 10 (9.2) and 100 (92.1) μg L⁻¹. There were no significant effects on F0 fecundity or growth (wet weight and standard length), but a significant decrease in nuptial tubercle prominence (a secondary sexual characteristic, SSC) was observed in male fish exposed to 100 μg L⁻¹. In the F1 generation, there were no treatment-related effects on hatching success or SSC, but survival was significantly decreased in fish exposed to the top concentration (100 μg L⁻¹. In female fish, wet weight and standard length were also significantly increased at this concentration. Gonadal histopathology revealed no treatment related effects on sex ratio, sexual differentiation or sexual development. However, there was a concentration related effect on gonad lesion severity in female fish exposed to 100

  3. Pathogenesis of spring viremia of carp virus in emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque, fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque and white sucker Catostomus commersonii (Lacepede).

    PubMed

    Misk, E; Garver, K; Nagy, E; Isaac, S; Tubbs, L; Huber, P; Al-Hussinee, L; Lumsden, J S

    2016-06-01

    Spring viremia of carp (SVC) is a reportable disease to the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE) as it is known to cause significant international economic impact. In Canada, the first and only isolation of SVC virus (SVCV) was in 2006, from common carp Cyprinus carpio L., at Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario. The susceptibility of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque, emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides Rafinesque and white sucker Catostomus commersonii (Lacepede) to intraperitoneal injection of the Canadian isolate (HHOcarp06) was evaluated using experimental infection, virus isolation, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Emerald shiner and fathead minnow were most susceptible with 43 and 53% cumulative mortality, respectively, compared with koi at 33%. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that koi had high viral loads throughout the experiment. At 34 days post-infection, SVCV was detected from sampled emerald shiner and white sucker in very low titre and was not detected from fathead minnow. Koi, fathead minnow and emerald shiner had gross lesions typical of SVC disease. The histopathological picture was mostly dominated by necrotic changes in kidney, spleen, liver, pancreas and intestine. IHC further confirmed SVCV infection, and staining was largely correlated with histological lesions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Heritable reproductive effects of benzo[a]pyrene on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.A.; Robitaille, S.; Rasmussen, J.B.

    1999-08-01

    Environmental toxicologists rarely investigate multigeneration effects of aquatic contaminants. In this study the authors investigated the survivorship of fathead minnow larvae two generations removed from an exposure to the potent mutagen benzo[a]pyrene. The F2 broods with a grandparental exposure history showed a marked decrease in survival. In the highest-exposure group, reproductive capacity and larval survivorship were significantly lower than the solvent control.

  5. Studies of the environmental fate and effect of aircraft deicing fluids: Detection of 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cancilla, Devon A.; Baird, J.C.; Geis, S.W.; Corsi, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a number of field and laboratory studies to evaluate the environmental impact of aircraft deicing and anti-icing fluids (ADAFs) on aquatic systems. Both 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (5-MeBt) and 4-methyl-1H-benzotriazole (4-MeBt), known additives to ADAFs, were found in whole-tissue extracts from minnows placed downstream of an effluent outfall that receives ADAF contaminated runoff from General Mitchell International Airport (Milwaukee, WI, USA). Neither of these compounds was detected in tissues from minnows placed upstream from the airport. A toxicity assessment of water collected during the minnow exposure studies utilizing Hyalella azteca, Pimephales promelas, and Ceriodaphnia dubia showed greater toxicity in a secondary airport outfall containing ADAFs when compared to upstream non-ADAF-contaminated samples. In two 28-d static renewal tests using 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified waters, 5-MeBt was detected in whole-tissue extracts of minnows at all concentrations tested. In studies using laboratory water fortified with 5-MeBt, the median lethal concentration (LC50) of 5-MeBt for P. promelas was found to be 22.0 mg/L. The LC50 for C. dubia to 5-MeBt laboratory-fortified water was found to be 81.3 mg/L. The 25% inhibition concentration (IC25) of 5-MeBt for the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum was 23.2 mg/L, and the average median effective concentration (EC50) for Microtox was 4.25 mg/L. The results of these field and lab studies indicate that additives, other than glycols, used in aircraft deicing fluids can be found in aquatic systems and may be of greater risk than previously believed.

  6. Defining the chronic impacts of atenolol on embryo-larval development and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Winter, Matthew J; Lillicrap, Adam D; Caunter, John E; Schaffner, Christian; Alder, Alfredo C; Ramil, Maria; Ternes, Thomas A; Giltrow, Emma; Sumpter, John P; Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2008-02-18

    Atenolol is a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist ('beta-blocker') widely used for the treatment of angina, glaucoma, high blood pressure and other related conditions. Since atenolol is not appreciably metabolized in humans, the parent compound is the predominant excretory product, and has been detected in sewage effluent discharges and surface waters. Consequently, atenolol has been chosen as a reference pharmaceutical for a European Union-funded research consortium, known as ERAPharm (http://www.erapharm.org), which focused on the fate and effects of pharmaceuticals in the environment. Here, we present data generated within this project from studies assessing population-relevant effects in a freshwater fish species. Using fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) as a standard OECD test species, embryo-larval development (early life stage or ELS) and short-term (21 d) adult reproduction studies were undertaken. In the ELS study, the 4d embryo NOEC(hatching) and LOEC(hatching) values were 10 and >10mg/L, respectively, and after 28 d, NOEC(growth) and LOEC(growth) values were 3.2 and 10mg/L, respectively (arithmetic mean measured atenolol concentrations were >90% of these nominal values). In the short-term reproduction study, NOEC(reproduction) and LOEC(reproduction) values were 10 and >10mg/L, respectively (mean measured concentrations were 77-96% of nominal values), while the most sensitive endpoint was an increase in male fish condition index, giving NOEC(condition index) and LOEC(condition index) values of 1.0 and 3.2mg/L, respectively. The corresponding measured plasma concentration of atenolol in these fish was 0.0518 mg/L. These data collectively suggest that atenolol has low chronic toxicity to fish under the conditions described, particularly considering the low environmental concentrations reported. These data also allowed the assessment of two theoretical approaches proposed as predictors of the environmental impact of human pharmaceuticals: the Huggett

  7. Atrazine reduces reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas): raw data report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Whyte, Jeffrey J.; Richter, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    The herbicide, atrazine, routinely is observed in surface and groundwaters, particularly in the “corn belt” region, a high-use area of the United States. Atrazine has demonstrated effects on reproduction in mammals and amphibians, but the characterization of endocrine-related effects in fish has received only limited attention. Peak concentrations of atrazine in surface water of streams from these agricultural areas coincide with annual spawning events of native fishes. Consequently, there was an unacceptable level of uncertainty in our understanding of the risks associated with the periods of greatest atrazine exposure and greatest vulnerability of certain species of fishes. For this reason, a study of the effects of atrazine on fathead minnow reproduction was undertaken (Tillitt and others, 2010). This report provides the raw data from that study.

  8. Effects of androstenedione exposure on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction and embryonic development.

    PubMed

    DeQuattro, Zachary A; Hemming, Jocelyn D C; Barry, Terence P

    2015-11-01

    High concentrations (300 ng/L) of androstenedione (A4) were identified in snowmelt runoff from fields fertilized with manure from livestock feeding operations in Wisconsin, USA. In fishes, A4 is an active androgen and substrate for biosynthesis of functional androgens (e.g., testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) and estrogens (e.g., estradiol-17β). Thus, A4 has the potential to be a powerful endocrine disruptor. This hypothesis was tested by exposing reproductively mature fathead minnows to 0.0 ng/L, 4.5 ng/L, 74 ng/L, and 700 ng/L A4 for 26 d in a flow-through system. Various reproductive endpoints were measured including fecundity, fertilization success, secondary sexual characteristics, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and hepatic vitellogenin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. In addition, fertilized embryos from the reproduction assay were used in an embryonic development assay to assess A4 effects on development and hatchability. In males, A4 significantly increased Vtg mRNA expression (estrogenic effect), significantly reduced GSI, and had no effect on tubercle expression (p = 0.067). In females, A4 induced tubercle development (androgenic effect) with no effects on GSI. Fecundity was not significantly impacted. Exposure to A4 had no effect on fertilization, embryonic development, or hatchability. These data indicate that exogenous A4, at environmentally relevant concentrations, can significantly modulate the reproductive physiology of the fathead minnows in a sex-specific manner and that A4 should be monitored as an endocrine disruptor.

  9. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of July 22--29, 1993. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 19.0 and Mile 22.0 on July 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; and Reference toxicant test information.

  10. Effects of Sediment Containing Coal Ash from the Kingston Ash Release on Embryo-Larval Development in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty; Sherrard, Rick

    2014-01-01

    The largest environmental release of coal ash in U.S. history occurred in December 2008 with the failure of a retention structure at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such as selenium and arsenic with known toxicity to fish including embryonic and larval stages. The effects of contact exposure to sediments containing up to 78 % coal ash from the Kingston spill on the early development of fish embryos and larvae were examined in 7-day laboratory tests with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). No significant effects were observed on hatching success, incidences of gross developmental abnormalities, or embryo-larval survival. Results suggest that direct exposures to sediment containing residual coal ash from the Kingston ash release may not present significant risks to fish eggs and larvae in waterways affected by the spill.

  11. Effects of sediment containing coal ash from the Kingston ash release on embryo-larval development in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820).

    PubMed

    Greeley, Mark S; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Mary K; Sherrard, Rick M

    2014-02-01

    The largest environmental release of coal ash in US history occurred in December 2008 with the failure of a retention structure at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such as selenium and arsenic with known toxicity to fish embryonic and larval life stages. The early development of fish embryos and larvae during contact exposures to river bottom sediments containing up to 78 % coal ash from the Kingston spill was examined in 7-day laboratory tests with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). No significant effects were observed in hatching success, incidences of developmental abnormalities, or embryo-larval survival. Results suggest that direct exposures to sediment containing residual coal ash from the Kingston ash release may not present a significant risk to fish eggs and larvae in waterways affected by the coal ash spill.

  12. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22--29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis activities. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Reference toxicant test information; and Personnel training documentation.

  13. Mixture toxicity of imidacloprid and cyfluthrin to two non-target species, the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Lanteigne, Michelle; Whiting, Sara A; Lydy, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Two species, the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas and the amphipod Hyalella azteca, were tested to examine acute toxicity to two insecticides, cyfluthrin and imidacloprid individually and as a mixture. Cyfluthrin was acutely toxic to P. promelas and H. azteca with EC50 values and 95 % confidence intervals of 0.31 µg L(-1) (0.26-0.35 µg L(-1)) and 0.0015 µg L(-1) (0.0011-0.0018 µg L(-1)), respectively. Imidacloprid was not acutely toxic to P. promelas at water concentrations ranging from 1 to 5000 µg L(-1), whereas it was toxic to H. azteca with a EC50 value of 33.5 µg L(-1) (23.3-47.4 µg L(-1)). For the P. promelas mixture test, imidacloprid was added at a single concentration to a geometric series of cyfluthrin concentrations bracketing the EC50 value. A synergistic ratio (SR) of 1.9 was found for P. promelas, which was calculated using the cyfluthrin-only exposure and mixture-exposure data. Because cyfluthrin and imidacloprid were toxic to H. azteca, the mixture test was designed based on an equipotent toxic unit method. Results from the mixture test indicated a model deviation ratio (MDR) of 1.7 or 2.7 depending on the model. Mixture test results from the simultaneous exposure to cyfluthrin and imidacloprid with both species indicated a greater than expected toxic response because the SR or MDR values were >1. Because these two insecticides are commonly used together in the same product formulations, nontarget species could be more affected due to their greater-than-additive toxicity observed in the current study.

  14. Effects of progesterone and norethindrone on female fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lene H; Hala, David; Carty, Dennis; Cantu, Mark; Martinović, Dalma; Huggett, Duane B

    2015-02-01

    As knowledge of contaminants capable of adversely modulating endocrine functions increases, attention is focused on the effects of synthetic progestins as environmental endocrine disrupters. In the present study, effects of exposure to a synthetic progestin (norethindrone, 168 ± 7.5 ng/L) and endogenous progestogen (progesterone, 34 ± 4.1 ng/L) on steroidogenesis in adult female fathead minnows were examined. In vivo exposure to either compound lowered expression (nonsignificant) of luteinizing hormone (LHβ) levels in the brain along with significantly down-regulating the beta isoform of membrane progesterone receptor (mPRβ) in ovary tissue. The correspondence between lowered LHβ levels in the brain and mPRβ in the ovary is suggestive of a possible functional association as positive correlations between LHβ and mPR levels have been demonstrated in other fish species. In vitro exposure of ovary tissue to progesterone resulted in significantly elevated progestogen (pregnenolone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone, and 17α,20β-dihydroxypregnenone) and androgen (testosterone) production. Whereas in vitro exposure to norethindrone did not significantly impact steroid hormone production but showed decreased testosterone production relative to solvent control (however this was not significant). Overall, this study showed that exposure to a natural progestogen (progesterone) and synthetic progestin (norethindrone), was capable of modulating LHβ (in brain) and mPRβ expression (in ovary). © 2014 SETAC.

  15. A new approach for the laboratory culture of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Denise A; Smith, Mark E; Wratschko, Melissa; Agard, David; Holden, Lisa; Wilcox, Steve; Lazorchak, James M

    2014-01-01

    Fathead minnows are routinely cultured for use in aquatic toxicology studies. A new mass culture system described in the present study consisted of 6 stainless steel tanks, each containing 68 fish and 20 spawning substrates. Spawning results are compared with a previous system of 22 individual glass aquaria, which contained 16 fish and 4 spawning substrates per tank. During a 19-mo period, the new system produced an average of 4105 eggs/d, compared with an average of 2465 eggs/d with the previous system. Labor and maintenance were reduced with the new system. The stainless steel tanks eliminated aquaria glass breakage, and daily water use was reduced by 45%. Analysis of reference toxicant data from fish cultured using both systems indicated no change in the sensitivity of the test animals. Analyses of 2009 egg production data determined that a 6:1 to 7:1 female to male ratio had a significantly positive impact on egg production levels and that 6-mo-old breeding stock should be introduced to the spawning tanks in mid-spring for optimal egg production during the rest of the year. Implementing a stainless steel mass culture system significantly increased efficiency of egg production; reduced turnaround delay of mature animal availability for toxicity and molecular testing; and reduced labor time, costs, and inherent safety hazards, compared with glass aquaria systems.

  16. A method for the determination of genetic sex in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, to support testing of endocrine-active chemicals.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Allen W; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T; Cavallin, Jenna E; Lindberg-Livingston, Annelie; Wehmas, Leah C; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2011-04-01

    Certain endocrine-active toxicants have been reported to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species, resulting in a phenotype indistinguishable from unaffected individuals. Detection of low-level sex reversal often requires large numbers of organisms to achieve the necessary statistical power, especially in those species with predominantly genetic sex determination and cryptic/homomorphic sex chromosomes. Here we describe a method for determining the genetic sex in the commonly used ecotoxicological model, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) in a spawn of minnows resulted in detection of 10 sex-linked AFLPs, which were isolated and sequenced. No recombination events were observed with any sex-linked AFLP in the animals examined (n=112). A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was then developed that determined the presence of one of these sex-linked polymorphisms for utilization in routine toxicological testing. Analyses of additional spawns from our in-house culture indicate that fathead minnows utilize a XY sex determination strategy and confirm that these markers can be used to genotype sex; however, this method is currently limited to use in laboratory studies in which breeders possess a defined genetic makeup. The genotyping method described herein can be incorporated into endocrine toxicity assays that examine the effects of chemicals on gonad differentiation.

  17. Toxicity of oil sands acid-extractable organic fractions to freshwater fish: Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) and Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Anthony E; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Farwell, Andrea J; Dixon, D George

    2017-03-01

    The Alberta oil sands are one of the largest global petroleum deposits and, due to non-release practices for oil sands process-affected waters, produced tailings are stored in large ponds. The acid extractable organic (AEO) compounds in oil sands process-affected water are of greatest concern due to their persistence and toxicity to a variety of aquatic biota. The present study evaluated the toxicity of the five AEO fractions to two fish species: Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka) and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow). The fractions (F1-F5) were comprised of AEO with increasing mean molecular weight and subsequent increases in cyclicity, aromaticity, degree of oxygenation, and heteroatom content. The lowest molecular weight fraction, F1, displayed the lowest acute toxicity to both fish species. For fathead minnow, F5 displayed the greatest toxic potency, while F2 to F4 displayed intermediate toxicities. For Japanese medaka, F2 and F3 displayed the greatest acute toxicities and F1, F4 and F5 were significantly less potent. Overall, fathead minnow were more acutely sensitive to AEO than Japanese medaka. The present study indicates that AEO toxicity may not be solely driven by a narcotic mode of action, but chemical composition such as aromaticity and heteroatom content and their relation to toxicity suggest other drivers indicative of additional modes of toxic action.

  18. Effects of spray-dried Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A (Zequanox®) on reproduction and early development of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, Diane L.; Luoma, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The biopesticide, Zequanox®, is registered for dreissenid mussel control in open water systems. Previous toxicity trials with nontarget organisms, including young-of-the year of several fish species and invertebrates, demonstrated selectivity of Zequanox for dreissenids. However, data are lacking on its safety to reproductive and early life stages of fish. The present study evaluated the effects of Zequanox on spawning and early life stages of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, at the maximum approved concentration (100 mg Zequanox active ingredient /L) and exposure duration (8 h) for open water application. The results showed no significant effect of Zequanox on survival, condition, or cumulative egg deposition (21 d) in adult fathead minnow. Eggs (<24-h old) exposed to Zequanox developed to the eyed-stage at a similar rate to that of unexposed eggs. Additionally, Zequanox did not have a significant effect on survival and growth (90 d) of newly hatched fry (<24-h old). The results indicate that Zequanox treatment will not affect survival, spawning, and early life development of fathead minnows when applied at the recommended treatment regime.

  19. Transcriptomic profiling of progesterone in the male fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) testis.

    PubMed

    Chishti, Yasmin Z; Feswick, April; Munkittrick, Kelly R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2013-10-01

    P4 is a hormone with diverse functions that include roles in reproduction, growth, and development. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of P4 on androgen production in the mature teleost testis and to identify molecular signaling cascades regulated by P4 to improve understanding of its role in male reproduction. Fathead minnow (FHM) testis explants were treated in vitro with two concentrations of P4 (10(-8) and 10(-6) M) for 6 and 12 h. P4 significantly increased testosterone (T) production in the FHM testis but did not affect 11-ketotestosterone. Gene network analysis revealed that insulin growth factor (Igf1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor (Tnfr) signaling was significantly depressed with P4 treatment after 12h. There was also a 20% increase in a gene network for follicle-stimulating hormone secretion and an 18% decrease in genes involved in vasopressin signaling. Genes in steroid metabolism (e.g. star, cyp19a, 11bhsd) were not significantly affected by P4 treatments in this study, and it is hypothesized that pre-existing molecular machinery may be more involved in the increased production of T rather than the de novo expression of steroid-related transcripts and receptors. There was a significant decrease in prostaglandin E synthase 3b (cytosolic) (ptges3b) after treatment with P4, suggesting that there is cross talk between P4 and prostaglandin pathways in the reproductive testis. P4 has a role in regulating steroid production in the male testis and may do so by modulating gene networks related to endocrine pathways, such as Igf1, Tnfr, and vasopressin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptional networks associated with 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) ovary.

    PubMed

    Ornostay, Anna; Marr, Joshua; Loughery, Jennifer R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Androgens play a significant role in regulating oogenesis in teleost fishes. The androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is a potent non-aromatizable androgen involved in sexual differentiation in mammals; however, its actions are not well understood in teleost fish. To better characterize the physiological role of DHT in the fathead minnow (FHM) ovary on a temporal scale, in vitro assays for 17β-estradiol (E2) production were conducted in parallel with microarray analysis. Ovarian explants were incubated at different concentrations of DHT (10(-6), 10(-7), and 10(-8)M DHT) in three separate experiments conducted at 6, 9, and 12h. DHT treatment resulted in a rapid and consistent increase in E2 production from the ovary at all three time points. Therefore, DHT may act to shift the balance of metabolites in the steroidogenic pathway within the ovary. Major biological themes affected by DHT in the ovary in one or more of the time points included those related to blood (e.g. vasodilation, blood vessel contraction, clotting), lipids (e.g. lipid storage, cholesterol metabolism, lipid degradation) and reproduction (e.g. hormone and steroid metabolism). Gene networks related to immune responses and calcium signaling were also affected by DHT, suggesting that this androgen may play a role in regulating these processes in the ovary. This study detected no change in mRNA levels of steroidogenic enzymes (cyp19a1, star, 11βhsd, 17βhsd, srd5a isoforms), suggesting that the observed increase in E2 production is likely more dependent on the pre-existing gene or protein complement in the ovary rather than the de novo expression of transcripts. This study increases knowledge regarding the roles of DHT and androgens in general in the teleost ovary and identifies molecular signaling pathways that may be associated with increased E2 production.

  1. Oral exposure of PBDE-47 in fish: toxicokinetics and reproductive effects in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Muirhead, Elisabeth K; Skillman, Ann D; Hook, Sharon E; Schultz, Irvin R

    2006-01-15

    The toxicokinetics of 2,2,4,4-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE-47) was studied in the Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) after a single oral exposure followed by termination at specific time points. The effects of repeated oral exposure to PBDE-47 on reproductive performance was assessed using a pair breeding experimental design with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) given daily PBDE-47 exposures for 25 days, during which fecundity was measured as an indicator of reproductive performance. Medaka and fathead minnows were orally exposed to PBDE-47 by bioencapsulation in brine shrimp, Artemia sp. In the medaka studies, measurable levels of PBDE-47 were detected in the carcass within 0.25 h with peak levels occurring at 8 h. The body levels of PBDE-47 slowly declined and were still 25% of peak levels at 624 h after dosing. Assimilation of the bioencapsulated dose was at least 80% and may well approach 100%. The PBDE-47 concentration-time profile was fitted to a one-compartment clearance-volume toxicokinetic model and the model-predicted value for elimination half-life was determined to be 281 h and the first-order absorption rate constant was Ka = 0.26 hr(-1). In the fathead minnow study, egg laying in the PBDE-treated breeding pairs stopped after 10 days. The condition factor of PBDE-treated males was significantly reduced (P <0.011) compared with control males, whereas no significant difference was observed in females. Histological examination revealed a greater than 50% reduction in mature sperm in PBDE-47 exposed minnows compared to controls. Collectively, these results suggest PBDE-47 is selectively toxic to sexually mature male fathead minnows.

  2. Oral Exposure of PBDE-47 in Fish: Toxicokinetics and Reproductive Effects in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Elisabeth K.; Skillman, Ann D.; Hook, Sharon E.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-01-15

    The toxicokinetics of 2,2,4,4-tetrabromodipohenyl ether (PBDE-47) was studied in the Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes) after a single oral exposure followed by termination at specific time points. The effects of repeated oral exposure to PBDE-47 on reproductive performance was assessed using a pair breeding experimental design with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) given daily PBDE-47 exposures for 25 days, during which fecundity was measured as an indicator of reproductive performance. Medaka and fathead minnows were orally exposed to PBDE-47 by bioencapsulation in brine shrimp, Artemia sp. In the medaka studies, measurable levels of PBDE-47 were detected in the carcass within 0.25 hr with peak levels occurring at 8 hrs. The body levels of PBDE-47 slowly declined and were still 25% of peak levels at 624 hrs after dosing. Assimilation of the bioencapsulated dose was at least 80% and may well approach 100 %. The PBDE-47 concentration-time profile was fitted to a one-compartment clearance-volume toxicokinetic model and the model-predicted values for elimination half-life was determined to be 281 hrs and the first order absorption rate constant was (Ka) = 0.26 hr 1. In the fathead minnow study, egg laying in the PBDE-treated breeding pairs stopped after 10 days. The condition factor of PBDE-treated males was significantly reduced (P < 0.011) compared with control males, whereas no significant difference was observed in females. Histological examination revealed a greater than 50% reduction in mature sperm in PBDE-47 exposed minnows compared to controls. Collectively, these results suggest PBDE-47 is selectively toxic to sexually mature male fathead minnows.

  3. Levonorgestrel exposure to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) alters survival, growth, steroidogenic gene expression and hormone production.

    PubMed

    Overturf, Matthew D; Overturf, Carmen L; Carty, Dennis R; Hala, David; Huggett, Duane B

    2014-03-01

    Human pharmaceuticals are commonly detected in the environment. Concern over these compounds in the environment center around the potential for pharmaceuticals to interfere with the endocrine system of aquatic organisms. The main focus of endocrine disruption research has centered on how estrogenic and androgenic compounds interact with the endocrine system to elicit reproductive effects. Other classes of compounds, such as progestins, have been overlooked. Recently, studies have investigated the potential for synthetic progestins to impair reproduction and growth in aquatic organisms. The present study utilizes the OECD 210 Early-life Stage (ELS) study to investigate the impacts levonorgestrel (LNG), a synthetic progestin, on fathead minnow (FHM) survival and growth. After 28 days post-hatch, survival of larval FHM was impacted at 462 ng/L, while growth was significantly reduced at 86.9 ng/L. Further analysis was conducted by measuring specific endocrine related mRNA transcript profiles in FHM larvae following the 28 day ELS exposure to LNG. Transcripts of 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP17, AR, ERα, and FSH were significantly down-regulated following 28d exposure to 16.3 ng/L LNG, while exposure to 86.9 ng/L significantly down-regulated 3β-HSD, 20β-HSD, CYP19A, and FSH. At 2,392 ng/L of LNG, a significant down-regulation occurred with CYP19A and ERβ transcripts, while mPRα and mPRβ profiles were significantly induced. No significant changes occurred in 11β-HSD, CYP11A, StAR, LHβ, and VTG mRNA expression following LNG exposure. An ex vivo steroidogenesis assay was conducted with sexually mature female FHM following a 7 day exposure 100 ng/L LNG with significant reductions observed in pregnenolone, 17α,20β-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (17,20-DHP), testosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone. Together these data suggest LNG can negatively impact FHM larval survival and growth, with significant alterations in endocrine related responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  4. Time-specific and population-level differences in physiological responses of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) exposed to copper.

    PubMed

    Peles, John D; Pistole, David H; Moffe, Mickey C

    2012-03-01

    The influence of exposure time on gill Na+/K+ ATPase activity and metabolic rate in populations of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) hatcheries in Ohio (OH) and Pennsylvania (PA) when exposed to sublethal concentrations of copper (Cu) was examined. The pattern of change in gill Na+/K+ ATPase activity was similar in all species/populations and results support expectations based on the concept of acclimation. In all populations, Na+/K+ ATPase activity declined significantly compared to reference values within 24 h, recovered by 48 h, and then continued to increase before exceeding reference values by 192 h. With the exception of PA fathead minnows, Na+/K+ ATPase activities returned to reference levels by 384 h. Although metabolic rates of individual fish were not strongly correlated with Na+/K+ ATPase activities, the pattern of change in mean values of these physiological parameters was very similar. However, OH populations of both fathead minnows and golden shiners demonstrated much more dramatic changes in metabolic rate compared to PA fish. At 24 h, metabolic rate of PA fathead minnows had decreased by 16% compared to the reference value whereas the OH population had decreased by 31%; metabolic rate of PA golden shiners declined by 23% compared to 59% in OH shiners at 24 h. Similar differences were observed in the maximum metabolic rates achieved at 192 h. While the increased sensitivity of OH fish to Cu is not readily explainable by genetic or environmental factors, results suggest the need for considering population level differences when evaluating the physiological effects of toxicants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of quantitative real-time PCR assays for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) gonadotropin ß subunit mRNAs to support endocrine disruptor research.

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Jensen, Kathleen M.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Kahl, Michael D.; Korte, Joseph J.; Greene, Katie J.; Blake, Lindsey S.; Linnum, Ann; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-03-01

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are one of the most widely-used small fish models for regulatory ecotoxicology testing and research related to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, we isolated and sequenced cDNAs for fathead minnow follicle-stimulating hormone-like and luteinizing hormone-like β (FSHβ and LHβ) and glycoprotein α (GPα) subunits. Quantitative real-time PCR assays for measuring gonadotropin (GtH) β subunit transcripts were developed and used to examine “baseline” transcript levels over a range of age classes and reproductive states encompassed in EDC testing. In females, FSHβ and LHβ transcripts were greater in 4-5 month old than in younger fish and were significantly correlated with one another across all age classes examined. In males, FSHβ transcripts were greatest in 2-3 month old fish and were inversely correlated with various measures of testis development including, gonadal-somatic index (GSI), and histological stage. Overall, the pattern of GtHβ expression over age classes associated with gonad development was similar to that reported for other asynchronous-spawning fish. Despite significant changes in female GSI, gonad stage, and plasma vitellogenin within 24 h of spawning, GtHβ transcript levels in fish that had spawned within the preceding 24 h were not significantly different from those in fish that were 2-3 days post-spawn and expected to spawn within the next 24 h based on spawning history. Results of this study provide insights related to the role of GtHs in fathead minnow reproductive development and function. Additionally they provide useful “baseline” data needed to design and interpret effective experiments for studying direct and indirect effects of EDCs on GtH subunit mRNA expression, which will facilitate a greater understanding of integrated system-wide responses of the fathead minnow brain-pituitary-gonadal axis to stressors including EDCs.

  6. Static renewal tests using Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (daphnids). Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Clinch River-Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25--February 1, 1994. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples. Attachments to this report include: Chain of custody forms -- originals; Toxicity test bench sheets and statistical analyses; Meter calibrations; and Reference toxicant test information.

  7. Expression of two vitellogenin genes (vg1 and vg3) in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver in response to exposure to steroidal estrogens and androgens.

    SciTech Connect

    Miracle, Ann L.; Ankley, Gerald; Lattier, David

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we describe the sequence for the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) vitellogenin 3 gene (vg3), and compare the response of vg1 and vg3 following exposure to steroidal estrogens and androgens. The fathead minnow vg3 sequence is only the second nucleotide sequence described in teleosts, following the original description of this isoform in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Following a brief exposure (24 hours) to 2, 5, and 10 ng/L 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), both vg1and vg3 are upregulated in male liver. However, levels of vg3 induction are 4 orders of magnitude lower than induction of vg1. Suppression of vg in female liver following androgenic exposure with 50 or 500 ng/L 17 beta-trenbolone occurs at similar significance levels for both vg1 and vg3 isoforms. The results of this study confirm the use of vg1 as an indicator of estrogenic exposure in male fish, and present the potential for vg1 and /or vg3 for use as indicators of androgenic exposure.

  8. Determining the effects of a mixture of an endocrine disrupting compound, 17α-ethinylestradiol, and ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brandon M; Lazorchak, James M; Murphy, Cheryl A; Haring, Herman J; Jensen, Kathleen M; Smith, Mark E

    2015-02-01

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we must first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) has been known to cause adverse reproductive effects including reduced fecundity and fertility, intersex and skewed sex ratios in fish by mimicking naturally produced estrogen at low concentrations. Ammonia can cause adverse reproductive and mortality effects in individual fish through effects or damage to the central nervous system. Both EE2 and ammonia are found in most municipal effluents in various concentrations. A flow-through diluter system was used to test the individual effects of these two contaminants at their respective no observable adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) as well as their combined effects on fathead minnow, (Pimephales promelas) reproduction in a mixture exposure. While neither contaminant nor their mixture altered reproduction in terms of fecundity, their mixture resulted in significant fathead minnow mortality during a 21 d exposure. This study demonstrated the need to consider mixture effects when assessing risk for toxicity testing with multiple stressors.

  9. Predicting Fecundity of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Using a MATLAB®-Based Model of Oocyte Growth Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Karen H; Mayo, Michael; Jensen, Kathleen M; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T; Perkins, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Fish spawning is often used as an integrated measure of reproductive toxicity, and an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health in the context of forecasting potential population-level effects considered important for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, there is a need for flexible, widely-applicable, biologically-based models that can predict changes in fecundity in response to chemical exposures, based on readily measured biochemical endpoints, such as plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations, as input parameters. Herein we describe a MATLAB® version of an oocyte growth dynamics model for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) with a graphical user interface based upon a previously published model developed with MCSim software and evaluated with data from fathead minnows exposed to an androgenic chemical, 17β-trenbolone. We extended the evaluation of our new model to include six chemicals that inhibit enzymes involved in steroid biosynthesis: fadrozole, ketoconazole, propiconazole, prochloraz, fenarimol, and trilostane. In addition, for unexposed fathead minnows from group spawning design studies, and those exposed to the six chemicals, we evaluated whether the model is capable of predicting the average number of eggs per spawn and the average number of spawns per female, which was not evaluated previously. The new model is significantly improved in terms of ease of use, platform independence, and utility for providing output in a format that can be used as input into a population dynamics model. Model-predicted minimum and maximum cumulative fecundity over time encompassed the observed data for fadrozole and most propiconazole, prochloraz, fenarimol and trilostane treatments, but did not consistently replicate results from ketoconazole treatments. For average fecundity (eggs•female(-1)•day(-1)), eggs per spawn, and the number of spawns per female, the range of model-predicted values generally encompassed the experimentally observed values. Overall, we

  10. Identification and quantification of 5α-dihydrotestosterone in the teleost fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Courant, Frédérique; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Le Bizec, Bruno; Sumpter, John P

    2013-09-15

    The steroid hormone 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is one of the most physiologically important androgens in male vertebrates, with the exception of teleost fish, in which it is generally assumed that DHT does not play any major physiological role. However, this assumption is challenged by the fact that all the components involved in DHT biosynthesis and action are present and evolutionary conserved in teleost fish. In fact, testosterone (T) is converted into DHT by two isoforms of the enzyme steroid-5-alpha-reductase (5αR), and both 5αRs gene expression and enzymatic activity have been detected in several tissues of different teleost species, which also have an androgen receptor with high binding affinity to DHT. This body of evidence strongly suggest that DHT is synthesised by teleost fish. We investigated this hypothesis using the cyprinid fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as the experimental model. The study of the evolutionary and functional conservation of 5αRs in teleost fish was used to support the experimental approach, based on an ultrasensitive gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) method to identify and measure simultaneously T and DHT in fathead minnow biological fluids and tissues. The analyses were performed using plasma samples collected from both male and female adult fish and samples of testicular tissue collected from sexually mature males. Both T and DHT were identified and quantified in all the samples analysed, and in particular, the high concentrations of DHT quantified in the testes suggested that these organs are a likely site of synthesis of DHT in the teleost fathead minnow, as they are in mammals. These results may represent the basis for future studies aimed at elucidating the physiological role, if any, of DHT in teleost fish.

  11. Predicting Fecundity of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Using a MATLAB®-Based Model of Oocyte Growth Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Karen H.; Mayo, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Fish spawning is often used as an integrated measure of reproductive toxicity, and an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health in the context of forecasting potential population-level effects considered important for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, there is a need for flexible, widely-applicable, biologically-based models that can predict changes in fecundity in response to chemical exposures, based on readily measured biochemical endpoints, such as plasma vitellogenin (VTG) concentrations, as input parameters. Herein we describe a MATLAB® version of an oocyte growth dynamics model for fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) with a graphical user interface based upon a previously published model developed with MCSim software and evaluated with data from fathead minnows exposed to an androgenic chemical, 17β-trenbolone. We extended the evaluation of our new model to include six chemicals that inhibit enzymes involved in steroid biosynthesis: fadrozole, ketoconazole, propiconazole, prochloraz, fenarimol, and trilostane. In addition, for unexposed fathead minnows from group spawning design studies, and those exposed to the six chemicals, we evaluated whether the model is capable of predicting the average number of eggs per spawn and the average number of spawns per female, which was not evaluated previously. The new model is significantly improved in terms of ease of use, platform independence, and utility for providing output in a format that can be used as input into a population dynamics model. Model-predicted minimum and maximum cumulative fecundity over time encompassed the observed data for fadrozole and most propiconazole, prochloraz, fenarimol and trilostane treatments, but did not consistently replicate results from ketoconazole treatments. For average fecundity (eggs•female-1•day-1), eggs per spawn, and the number of spawns per female, the range of model-predicted values generally encompassed the experimentally observed values. Overall, we found

  12. Statistically validated QSARs, based on theoretical descriptors, for modeling aquatic toxicity of organic chemicals in Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow).

    PubMed

    Papa, Ester; Villa, Fulvio; Gramatica, Paola

    2005-01-01

    The use of Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships in assessing the potential negative effects of chemicals plays an important role in ecotoxicology. (LC50)(96h) in Pimephales promelas (Duluth database) is widely modeled as an aquatic toxicity end-point. The object of this study was to compare different molecular descriptors in the development of new statistically validated QSAR models to predict the aquatic toxicity of chemicals classified according to their MOA and in a unique general model. The applied multiple linear regression approach (ordinary least squares) is based on theoretical molecular descriptor variety (1D, 2D, and 3D, from DRAGON package, and some calculated logP). The best combination of modeling descriptors was selected by the Genetic Algorithm-Variable Subset Selection procedure. The robustness and the predictive performance of the proposed models was verified using both internal (cross-validation by LOO, bootstrap, Y-scrambling) and external statistical validations (by splitting the original data set into training and validation sets by Kohonen-artificial neural networks (K-ANN)). The model applicability domain (AD) was checked by the leverage approach to verify prediction reliability.

  13. Effects of eutrophication on vitellogenin gene expression in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 17alpha-ethynylestradiol in field mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Denise A; Toth, Gregory P; Graham, David W; Lazorchak, James M; Reddy, Tirumuru V; Knapp, Charles W; deNoyelles, Frank; Campbell, Scott; Lattier, David L

    2006-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of aquatic secondary nutrient supply levels (nitrogen and phosphorus) on the subcellular response of adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to a single nominal concentration of 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a potent synthetic estrogen, under quasi-natural field conditions. Outdoor mesocosms were maintained under low, medium, and high nutrient supply conditions as categorized by total phosphorus (TP) level (nominal 0.012, 0.025, and 0.045 mg TP/L, respectively), and treated with EE2 with and without a carrier solvent. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods, vitellogenin gene (Vg) expression was determined in the fish collected at 0 h, 8 h, 24 h, 4 d, 7 d, and 14 d post-exposure. Induction of Vg was detected as early as 8h post-exposure, with and without the carrier solvent, and persisted through Day 14. Results showed Vg to be significantly greater at low nutrient levels (p<0.05), suggesting that EE2 bioavailability to the fish was likely greater under less-turbid water conditions.

  14. Gene-class analysis of expression patterns induced by psychoactive pharmaceutical exposure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) indicates induction of neuronal systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Michael A.; Joshi, Parag P.; Klaper, Rebecca D.

    2011-01-01

    Psychoactive pharmaceuticals are among the most frequently prescribed drugs, contributing to persistent measurable concentrations in aquatic systems. Typically, it is assumed that such contaminants have no human health implications because they exist in extremely low concentrations. We exposed juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to three pharmaceuticals, fluoxetine, venlafaxine and carbamazepine, individually and in a mixture, and measured their effect on the induction of gene expression in fish brains using microarray analysis. Gene expression changes were accompanied by behavioral changes and validated by qPCR analysis. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis was used to perform gene-class analysis of gene expression, testing for enrichment of gene sets known to be involved in human neuronal development, regulation and growth. We found significant enrichment of gene sets for each of the treatments, with the largest induction of expression by the mixture treatment. These results suggest that the psychoactive pharmaceuticals are able to alter expression of fish genes associated with development, regulation and differentiation of synapses, neurons and neurotransmitters. The results provide a new perspective for the consideration of potential consequence for human health due to environmental exposure to unmetabolized psychoactive pharmaceuticals. PMID:21684349

  15. Effect of Lipid Partitioning on Predictions of Acute Toxicity of Oil Sands Process Affected Water to Embryos of Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Morandi, Garrett D; Zhang, Kun; Wiseman, Steve B; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P

    2016-08-16

    Dissolved organic compounds in oil sands process affected water (OSPW) are known to be responsible for most of its toxicity to aquatic organisms, but the complexity of this mixture prevents use of traditional bottom-up approaches for predicting toxicities of mixtures. Therefore, a top-down approach to predict toxicity of the dissolved organic fraction of OSPW was developed and tested. Accurate masses (i.e., m/z) determined by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in negative and positive ionization modes were used to assign empirical chemical formulas to each chemical species in the mixture. For each chemical species, a predictive measure of lipid accumulation was estimated by stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) to poly(dimethyl)siloxane, or by partitioning to solid-supported lipid membranes (SSLM). A narcosis mode of action was assumed and the target-lipid model was used to estimate potencies of mixtures by assuming strict additivity. A model developed using a combination of the SBSE and SSLM lipid partitioning estimates, whereby the accumulation of chemicals to neutral and polar lipids was explicitly considered, was best for predicting empirical values of LC50 in 96-h acute toxicity tests with embryos of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Model predictions were within 4-fold of observed toxicity for 75% of OSPW samples, and within 8.5-fold for all samples tested, which is comparable to the range of interlaboratory variability for in vivo toxicity testing.

  16. Field-based approach for assessing the impact of treated pulp and paper mill effluent on endogenous metabolites of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Collette, T W; Villeneuve, D L; Cavallin, J E; Teng, Q; Jensen, K M; Kahl, M D; Mayasich, J M; Ankley, G T; Ekman, D R

    2013-09-17

    A field-based metabolomic study was conducted during a shutdown of a pulp and paper mill (PPM) to assess the impacts of treated PPM effluent on endogenous polar metabolites in fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) livers. Caged male and female FHMs were deployed at a Great Lakes area of concern during multiple periods (pre-, during, and post-shutdown) near the outflow for a wastewater treatment plant. Influent to this plant is typically 40% PPM effluent by volume. Additional FHMs were exposed to reference lake water under laboratory conditions. A bioassay using T47D-KBluc cells showed that estrogenic activity of receiving water near the outflow declined by 46% during the shutdown. We then used (1)H NMR spectroscopy and principal component analysis to profile abundances of hepatic endogenous metabolites for FHMs. Profiles for males deployed pre-shutdown in receiving water were significantly different from those for laboratory-control males. Profiles were not significantly different for males deployed during the shutdown, but they were significant again for those deployed post-shutdown. Impacts of treated effluent from this PPM were sex-specific, as differences among profiles of females were largely nonsignificant. Thus, we demonstrate the potential utility of field-based metabolomics for performing biologically based exposure monitoring and evaluating remediation efforts occurring throughout the Great Lakes and other ecosystems.

  17. Examining the effects of metal mining mixtures on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using field-based multi-trophic artificial streams.

    PubMed

    Rozon-Ramilo, Lisa D; Dubé, Monique G; Rickwood, Carrie J; Niyogi, Som

    2011-09-01

    This study illustrates the use of a mesocosm approach for assessing the independent effects of three treated metal mine effluents (MME) discharging into a common receiving environment and regulated under the same regulation. A field-based, multi-trophic artificial stream study was conducted in August 2008 to assess the effects of three metal mining effluents on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) in a 21-day reproduction bioassay. The nature of the approach allowed for assessment of both dietary and waterborne exposure pathways. Elements (e.g. Se, Co, Cl, Cu, Fe) were analyzed in several media (water, sediments) and tissues (biofilm, Chironomus dilutus, female fathead minnow (FHM) body, ovary, liver, gills). Significant increases in metal and micronutrient concentrations were observed in the water and biofilm tissues in all MME treatments [20% surface water effluent (SWE), 30% mine water effluent (MWE), and 45% process water effluent (PWE)], compared to reference. However, copper was the only element to significantly increase in the sediments when exposed to PWE. Co and Ni increased significantly in C. dilutus tissues in SWE (1.4- and 1.5-fold, respectively), Cu and Se also increased in chironomid tissues in PWE (5.2- and 3.3-fold, respectively); however, no significant increases in metals or micronutrients occurred in chironomid tissues when exposed to MWE compared to reference. There were no significant increases in metal concentrations in female FHM tissues (body, liver, gonads, gills) in any of the treatments suggesting that metals were either not bioavailable, lost from the females via the eggs, or naturally regulated through homeostatic mechanisms. Cumulative number of eggs per female per day increased significantly (∼127%) after exposure to SWE and decreased significantly (∼33%) after exposure to PWE when compared to reference. Mean total number of days to hatch was reduced in PWE compared to reference. This study shows the importance of isolating

  18. The use of field-based mesocosm systems to assess the effects of uranium milling effluent on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction.

    PubMed

    Driessnack, Melissa K; Dubé, Monique G; Rozon-Ramilo, Lisa D; Jones, Paul D; Wiramanaden, Cheryl I E; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2011-08-01

    Northern Saskatchewan, Canada is home to a uranium milling operation that discharges a complex milling effluent containing nutrients, cations and anions, and many metals including selenium (Se). Se has the potential to accumulate in a system even when water concentrations are low. This study evaluated the effects of treated uranium milling effluent and contaminated sediment in combination and in isolation to determine the contribution and importance of each source to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction and survival. Trios of fathead minnows were allocated to one of four treatments for 21-days where the following were evaluated; survival (adult and 5 day larval), larval deformities, reproductive effects (egg production, spawning events) and metal tissue burdens (muscle, gonad, eggs and larvae). In addition Se speciation analysis was conducted on fish tissues. Effects were solely effluent-mediated with little contribution observed due to the presence of contaminated sediments. The contaminated sediments tested were taken from the actual receiving environment and represented the sediment composition found in greatest abundance. Results showed egg production significantly increased in the effluent treatments compared to the reference water treatments. Although egg production increased following effluent exposure, there was reduced hatching and larval survival and a significant increase in skeletal deformities in 5 day old larvae. Despite these effects on the offspring, when examined in an integrated manner relative to increased egg production, the mean number of normal larvae did not differ among treatments. Total selenium significantly increased in the effluent exposed, algae, female muscle, gonad, eggs and larvae in addition to other metals. A shift in the proportion of species of selenium was evident with changing exposure conditions. Biofilm/algae was key in the transfer of available Se into the food chain from the water and a source of direct dietary

  19. The influence of food quantity on metal bioaccumulation and reproduction in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during chronic exposures to a metal mine effluent.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jacob D; Dubé, Monique G; Niyogi, Som

    2013-05-01

    Metal mine effluents can impact fish in the receiving environment via both direct effects from exposure as well as indirect effects via food web. The main objective of the present study was to assess whether an indirect effect such as reduced food (prey) availability could influence metal accumulation and reproductive capacity in fish during chronic exposure to a metal mine effluent. Breeding pairs of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to either reference water (RW) or an environmentally relevant metal mine effluent [45 percent process water effluent (PWE)] for 21 days and fed either low food quantities [LF (a daily ration of 6-10 percent body weight)] or normal food quantities [NF (a daily ration of 20-30 percent body weight)] in artificial stream systems. Fish in RW treatments were fed Chironomus dilutus larvae cultured in RW (Treatments: RW-NF or RW-LF), while fish in PWE treatments were fed C. dilutus larvae cultured in PWE (Treatments: PWE-NF or PWE-LF). Tissue-specific (gill, liver, gonad and carcass) metal accumulation, egg production, and morphometric parameters in fish were analyzed. Fathead minnows that were exposed to LF rations had significantly smaller body, gonad and liver sizes, and were in a relatively poor condition compared to fathead minnows exposed to NF rations, regardless of the treatment water type (RW or PWE) (two-way ANOVA; p<0.05). Although elevated concentrations of copper, nickel, rubidium, selenium, and thallium were recorded in C. dilutus cultured in PWE, only the concentrations of rubidium, selenium and thallium increased in tissues of fish in PWE treatments. Interestingly though, despite the greater abundance of metal-contaminated food in the PWE-NF treatment, tissue metal accumulation pattern were almost similar between the PWE-NF and PWE-LF treatments, except for higher liver barium, cobalt and manganese concentrations in the latter treatment. This indicated that a higher food ration could help reduce the tissue

  20. Use of paired fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive test. Part 1: assessing biological effects of final bleached kraft pulp mill effluent using a mobile bioassay trailer system.

    PubMed

    Rickwood, Carrie J; Dubé, Monique G; Hewitt, L Mark; Kovacs, Tibor G; Parrott, Joanne L; MacLatchy, Deborah L

    2006-07-01

    Reproductive effects have been recorded in wild fish in waters receiving pulp mill effluent (PME) since the mid to late 1980s. Laboratory assays with fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) have been developed to better understand fish responses to PME. However, observations from laboratory studies have been variable, making it difficult to establish cause/effect relationships. A lack of environmental relevance in these laboratory studies may have contributed to the variability observed. The objectives of the present study were, first, to determine the effects of bleached kraft PME (BKME) on FHM under environmentally realistic conditions (i.e., ambient water and effluent quality) and, second, to determine the suitability of pair-breeding FHM to better link BKME-induced changes in indicators at the biochemical, individual, and population levels. A mobile bioassay trailer was situated on-site at a bleached kraft mill for 60 d, allowing supply of both ambient water (Lake Superior, Canada) and final BKME. The reproductive output of FHM was initially assessed for 21 d to obtain baseline data pre-exposure. At the end of the pre-exposure period, selected breeding pairs were exposed to final BKME (100% v/v and 1% v/v) for 21 d. Results demonstrated a stimulatory response pattern at 1% BKME (e.g., increased egg production) compared to control. In the 100% treatment, spawning events were reduced and fewer eggs were produced during the first two weeks of exposure. Exposure to 100% (v/v) BKME also resulted in ovipositor development in males and development of male secondary sex characteristics in females. Obtaining pre-exposure data and use of pair-breeding FHM in this assay gave a sensitive indication of effluent effects and allowed accurate comparisons of endpoints to be made.

  1. The genomic transcriptional response of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to an acute exposure to the androgen, 17β-trenbolone

    PubMed Central

    Dorts, Jennifer; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Carter, Barbara J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the genomic transcriptional response of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to an acute (4 day) exposure to 0.1 or 1.0 μg/L of 17β-trenbolone (TB), the active metabolite of an anabolic androgenic steroid used as a growth promoter in cattle and a contaminant of concern in aquatic systems. Our objectives were to investigate the gene expression profile induced by TB, define biomarkers of exposure to TB, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms of adverse effects of TB on fish reproduction. In female gonad tissue, microarray analysis using a 22K oligonucleotide microarray (EcoArray Inc., Gainesville, FL) showed 99 significantly upregulated genes and 741 significantly downregulated genes in response to 1 μg TB/L. In particular, hydroxysteroid (17β) dehydrogenase 12a (hsd17b12a), zona pellucida glycoprotein 2.2 (zp2.2), and protein inhibitor of activated STAT, 2 (pias2) were all downregulated in gonad. Q-PCR measurements in a larger sample set were consistent with the microarray results in the direction and magnitude of these changes in gene expression. However, several novel potential biomarkers were verified by Q-PCR in the same samples, but could not be validated in independent samples. In liver, Q-PCR measurements showed a significant decrease in vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) mRNA expression. In brain, cytochrome P450, family 19, subfamily A, polypeptide 1b (cyp19a1b, previously known as aromatase B) transcript levels were significantly reduced following TB exposure. Our study provides a candidate gene involved in mediating the action of TB, hsd17b12a, and two potential biomarkers sensitive to acute TB exposure, hepatic vtg1 and brain cyp19a1b. PMID:19019464

  2. Tissue explant coculture model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-liver axis of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as a predictive tool for endocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Theresa K; Perkins, Edward; Ferguson, Duncan C; Cropek, Donald M

    2016-10-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) can impact the reproductive system by interfering with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Although in vitro testing methods have been developed to screen chemicals for endocrine disruption, extrapolation of in vitro responses to in vivo action shows inconsistent accuracy. The authors describe a tissue coculture of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) HPG axis and liver (HPG-L) as a tissue explant model that mimics in vivo results. Brain (hypothalamus), pituitary, gonad, and liver tissue explants from adult fish were examined for function both individually and in coculture to determine combinations and conditions that could replicate in vivo behavior. Only cocultures had the ability to respond to an EDC, trenbolone, similarly to in vivo studies, based on estradiol, testosterone, and vitellogenin production trends, where lower exposure doses suppressed hormone production but higher doses increased production, resulting in distinctive U-shaped curves. These data suggest that a coculture system with all components of the HPG-L axis can be used as a link between in vitro and in vivo studies to predict endocrine system disruption in whole organisms. This tissue-based HPG-L system acts as a flexible deconstructed version of the in vivo system for better control and examination of the minute changes in system operation and response on EDC exposure with options to isolate, interrogate, and recombine desired components. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2530-2541. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  3. Chronic exposure by ingestion of environmentally relevant doses of (226)Ra leads to transient growth perturbations in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas, Rafinesque, 1820).

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Smith, Richard; Lariviere, Dominic; Seymour, Colin

    2013-11-01

    To assess the impact of environmentally relevant levels of ingested (226)Ra on a common freshwater fish species. Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas, Rafinesque) were obtained at the first feeding stage and established on a commercial fish food diet containing (226)Ra in the activity range 10 mBq/g(-1), -10,000 mBq/g(-1). They remained on this diet for 24 months and were sampled invasively at 1,6,18 and 24 months to assess growth, biochemical indices and accumulated dose and non-invasively also at 12 and 15 months to assess growth. Fish fed 10 and 100 mBq/g(-1) diet showed a small transitory deregulation of growth at 6 and 12 months. Fish fed higher activities showed less significant or insignificant effects. There was a trend at 18 months which was stronger at 24 months for the population distribution to change in all of the (226)Ra fed groups so that smaller fish were smaller and bigger fish were bigger than the controls. There were also significant differences in the ratios of protein:DNA at 24 months which were seen as a trend but were not significant at earlier time points. Fish fed a radium diet for 2 years show a small and transitory growth dysregulation at 6 and 12 months. The effects predominate at the lower activities suggesting hormetic or homeostatic adjustments. There was no effect on growth of exposure to the high activities (226)Ra. This suggests that radium does not have a serious impact on the ecology of the system and the level of radium that would be transferred to humans is very low. The results may be important in the assessment of long-term environmental impacts of (226)Ra exposure.

  4. Interactive effects of chronic waterborne copper and cadmium exposure on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Driessnack, Melissa K; Matthews, Amber L; Raine, Jason C; Niyogi, Som

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the interactive effects of chronic waterborne copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Trios (1 male: 2 female; n=5) of fish were exposed for 21days to: (i) control (no added Cu or Cd), (ii) waterborne Cu (75μg/L), (iii) waterborne Cd (5μg/L), and (iv) Cu and Cd mixture (75 and 5μg/L, respectively). Reproductive output (cumulative egg production) was significantly reduced by Cu but not by Cd. Interestingly however, no spawning occurred in fish exposed to the mixture of waterborne Cu and Cd. In general, both Cu and Cd accumulation in target tissues (gill, liver, gonad and carcass) increased significantly in fish exposed to Cu and Cd mixture, and no interaction between Cu and Cd accumulation was observed in any tissues, except in the liver where Cu accumulation was significantly reduced by Cd. The expression of female hepatic estrogen receptor genes (ER-α and ER-β) was most significantly elevated in fish exposed to Cu and Cd mixture, whereas vitellogenin gene expression was reduced maximally in the same exposure. Similarly, the hepatic expression of the metallothionein gene was most significantly upregulated in fish exposed to Cu and Cd mixture. Moreover, the circulating estradiol level in females was significantly decreased only during the co-exposure of waterborne Cu and Cd. Overall, the present study indicates that the interaction of chronic waterborne Cu and Cd exposure may elicit greater than additive effect on reproductive output in fish.

  5. Accumulation and DNA damage in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 2 brominated flame-retardant mixtures, Firemaster 550 and Firemaster BZ-54.

    PubMed

    Bearr, Jonathan S; Stapleton, Heather M; Mitchelmore, Carys L

    2010-03-01

    Firemaster 550 and Firemaster BZ-54 are two brominated formulations that are in use as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. Two major components of these mixtures are 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-ethylhexylbenzoate (TBB) and 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (TBPH). Both have been measured in environmental matrices; however, scant toxicological information exists. The present study aimed to determine if these brominated flame-retardant formulations are bioavailable and adversely affect DNA integrity in fish. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were orally exposed to either FM 550, FM BZ54, or the nonbrominated form of TBPH, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) for 56 d and depurated (e.g., fed clean food) for 22 d. At several time points, liver and blood cells were collected and assessed for DNA damage. Homogenized fish tissues were extracted and analyzed on day 0 and day 56 to determine the residue of TBB and TBPH and the appearance of any metabolites using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS). Significant increases (p < 0.05) in DNA strand breaks from liver cells (but not blood cells) were observed during the exposure period compared with controls, although during depuration these levels returned to control. Both parent compounds, TBB and TBPH, were detected in tissues at approximately 1% of daily dosage along with brominated metabolites. The present study provides evidence for accumulation, metabolism, and genotoxicity of these new formulation flame retardants in fish and highlights the potential adverse effects of TBB- and TBPH-formulated fire retardants to aquatic species.

  6. ACCUMULATION AND DNA DAMAGE IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO 2 BROMINATED FLAME-RETARDANT MIXTURES, FIREMASTER® 550 AND FIREMASTER® BZ-54

    PubMed Central

    BEARR, JONATHAN S.; STAPLETON, HEATHER M.; MITCHELMORE, CARYS L.

    2015-01-01

    Firemaster® 550 and Firemaster® BZ-54 are two brominated formulations that are in use as replacements for polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. Two major components of these mixtures are 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-ethylhexylbenzoate (TBB) and 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (TBPH). Both have been measured in environmental matrices; however, scant toxicological information exists. The present study aimed to determine if these brominated flame-retardant formulations are bioavailable and adversely affect DNA integrity in fish. Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were orally exposed to either FM 550, FM BZ54, or the nonbrominated form of TBPH, di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) for 56 d and depurated (e.g., fed clean food) for 22 d. At several time points, liver and blood cells were collected and assessed for DNA damage. Homogenized fish tissues were extracted and analyzed on day 0 and day 56 to determine the residue of TBB and TBPH and the appearance of any metabolites using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS). Significant increases ( p<0.05) in DNA strand breaks from liver cells (but not blood cells) were observed during the exposure period compared with controls, although during depuration these levels returned to control. Both parent compounds, TBB and TBPH, were detected in tissues at approximately 1% of daily dosage along with brominated metabolites. The present study provides evidence for accumulation, metabolism, and genotoxicity of these new formulation flame retardants in fish and highlights the potential adverse effects of TBB- and TBPH-formulated fire retardants to aquatic species. PMID:20821500

  7. Effects of chronic waterborne cadmium and zinc interactions on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Driessnack, Melissa K; Jamwal, Ankur; Niyogi, Som

    2017-02-21

    The present study was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of chronic waterborne cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproduction in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Trios (1 male: 2 female; n=6-7) of fish were exposed for 21 days to: (i) control (no added Cd or Zn), (ii) waterborne Cd (7µg/L), (iii) waterborne Zn (170µg/L), and (iv) Cd and Zn in mixture (7 and 170µg/L, respectively). Exposure to Cd or Zn alone did not elicit any significant effect on reproductive output (cumulative egg production) relative to the control, however exposure to Cd and Zn in mixture resulted in a ~50% decrease in fish fecundity. Plasma estradiol in females was reduced by Cd and Zn exposures, both individually and in mixture, with the maximum reduction in the metal mixture exposure. The expression of hepatic estrogen receptor genes (ER-α and ER-β) in females was affected by exposure to Zn, alone and in mixture with Cd, but not to Cd alone, whereas hepatic vitellogenin gene expression was downregulated across all treatments. Increased follicular atresia in the ovary was also recorded, but only in fish exposed to Cd and Zn in mixture. The interactions of Cd and Zn in mixture decreased Cd accumulation in tissues (gill and liver), however no reciprocal reduction in tissue Zn accumulation was observed. In addition, the expression of the hepatic metallothionein gene was upregulated following exposure to Zn, alone and in combination with Cd, with no additive effects in the latter treatment. Overall, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to waterborne Cd and Zn in mixture may induce additive reproductive toxicity, essentially by disrupting estrogen-mediated functions in fish.

  8. Metabolite profiles of repeatedly sampled urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) contain unique lipid signatures following exposure to anti-androgens.

    PubMed

    Collette, Timothy W; Skelton, David M; Davis, John M; Cavallin, Jenna E; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kahl, Michael D; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Ankley, Gerald T; Martinović-Weigelt, Dalma; Ekman, Drew R

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we sought to identify candidate markers of exposure to anti-androgens by analyzing endogenous metabolite profiles in the urine of male fathead minnows (mFHM, Pimephales promelas). Based on earlier work, we hypothesized that unidentified lipids in the urine of mFHM were selectively responsive to exposure to androgen receptor antagonists, which is otherwise difficult to confirm using established fish toxicity assays. A second goal was to evaluate the feasibility of non-lethally and repeatedly sampling urine from individual mFHMs over the time course of response to a chemical exposure. Accordingly, we exposed mFHM to the model anti-androgens vinclozolin or flutamide. Urine was collected from each fish at 48hour intervals over the course of a 14day exposure. Parallel experiments were conducted with mFHM exposed to bisphenol A or control water. The frequent handling/sampling regime did not cause apparent adverse effects on the fish. Endogenous metabolite profiling was conducted with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which exhibited lower variation for the urinary metabolome than was found in earlier work with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Specifically, for inter- and intra-individual variations, the median spectrum-wide relative standard deviation (RSD) was 32.6% and 33.3%, respectively, for GC-MS analysis of urine from unexposed mFHM. These results compared favorably with similar measurements of urine from other model species, including the Sprague Dawley rat. In addition, GC-MS allowed us to identify several lipids (e.g., certain saturated fatty acids) in mFHM urine as candidate markers of exposure to androgen receptor antagonists.

  9. The genomic transcriptional response of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to an acute exposure to the androgen, 17β-trenbolone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorts, Jennifer; Richter, Catherine A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Carter, Barbara J.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the genomic transcriptional response of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to an acute (4 days) exposure to 0.1 or 1.0 ??g/L of 17??-trenbolone (TB), the active metabolite of an anabolic androgenic steroid used as a growth promoter in cattle and a contaminant of concern in aquatic systems. Our objectives were to investigate the gene expression profile induced by TB, define biomarkers of exposure to TB, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms of adverse effects of TB on fish reproduction. In female gonad tissue, microarray analysis using a 22 K oligonucleotide microarray (EcoArray Inc., Gainesville, FL) showed 99 significantly upregulated genes and 741 significantly downregulated genes in response to 1 ??g TB/L. In particular, hydroxysteroid (17??) dehydrogenase 12a (hsd17b12a), zona pellucida glycoprotein 2.2 (zp2.2), and protein inhibitor of activated STAT, 2 (pias2) were all downregulated in gonad. Q-PCR measurements in a larger sample set were consistent with the microarray results in the direction and magnitude of these changes in gene expression. However, several novel potential biomarkers were verified by Q-PCR in the same samples, but could not be validated in independent samples. In liver, Q-PCR measurements showed a significant decrease in vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) mRNA expression. In brain, cytochrome P450, family 19, subfamily A, polypeptide 1b (cyp19a1b, previously known as aromatase B) transcript levels were significantly reduced following TB exposure. Our study provides a candidate gene involved in mediating the action of TB, hsd17b12a, and two potential biomarkers sensitive to acute TB exposure, hepatic vtg1 and brain cyp19a1b.

  10. Altered Gene Expression in the Brain and Liver of Female Fathead Minnows Pimephales promelas Rafinesque Exposed to Fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Overall, results of this study demonstrate the utility of high density oligonucleotide microarrays for unsupervised, discovery-driven, ecotoxicogenomics research with the fathead minnow and helped inform the subsequent development of a 22,000 gene microarray for the species.

  11. Natural Variation in Fish Transcriptomes: Comparative Analysis of the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnow and zebrafish are among the most intensively studied fish species in environmental toxicogenomics. To aid the assessment and interpretation of subtle transcriptomic effects from treatment conditions of interest, there needs to be a better characterization and unde...

  12. Effects of multi-well plate incubation on embryo-larval development in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Marentette, Julie R; Sullivan, Cheryl A; Lavalle, Christine; Shires, Kallie; Parrott, Joanne L

    2015-01-01

    Fathead minnow embryos and larvae are frequently used in toxicology, including short-term embryo-only tests which often use small volumes of test solution. The effect that such conditions may have on fathead minnow development has yet to be explicitly described. Here we compared rates of embryonic development in fathead minnow embryos reared under standard light and temperature conditions with a range of possible methods. All methods yielded excellent control survival. We demonstrated that fathead minnow embryos incubated in a range of small volumes in multi-well plates (500 μL to 2 mL per embryo) did not substantially vary in developmental rate, but flexed less frequently as embryos, hatched smaller, later and with larger yolk-sacs, and initiated feeding later than embryos reared in an excess of solution (20 mL per embryo) with or without supplemental aeration. Faster hatch and growth were promoted with an orbital shaker, but growth benefits were not sustained into the larval stage. Developmental differences persisted in larvae reared to 20 days post-fertilization when monitoring ceased, but growth differences did not magnify and in some measurements partially resolved. To our knowledge we are the first to report effects of incubation in multi-well plates in any fish taxa. As our data revealed that the eleutheroembryonic stage for fathead minnow may be prolonged in multi-well plates, this may allow the use of longer toxicity tests using fathead minnow embryos without conflicting with existing animal welfare legislation in many countries.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE AROMATASE INHIBITOR FADROZOLE IN A SHORT-TERM REPRODUCTION ASSAY WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a key enzyme in vertebrate steroidogenesis, catalyzing the conversion of C19 androgens to C18 estrogens such a B-estradiol (E2). The objective of this study was to assess effects of the CYP inhibitor fadrozole on fathead minnow reproductive endocrinol...

  14. A computational model linking oocyte growth and spawning to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproduction is vital to the survival of all living organisms, and reproductive toxicity is an important outcome in determining the ecological risks of chemicals in the environment. To evaluate reproductive toxicity, fathead minnow fecundity, as measured by the average number of...

  15. A computational model linking oocyte growth and spawning to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reproduction is vital to the survival of all living organisms, and reproductive toxicity is an important outcome in determining the ecological risks of chemicals in the environment. To evaluate reproductive toxicity, fathead minnow fecundity, as measured by the average number of...

  16. Environmental concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine impact specific behaviors involved in reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance in the fish Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow).

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Joel; Klaper, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) have been found in surface waters worldwide, but little is understood of their effects on the wildlife that inhabit these waters. Fluoxetine (Prozac; Eli Lilly), a highly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a commonly found PPCP in surface water. The purpose of this project was to determine if environmentally relevant concentrations of fluoxetine impact behavior that is important for population survival in native fish species, including reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance. Chronic 4-week exposures were conducted with doses ranging from 100 ng/L to 100 μg/L to cover a range of environmentally relevant concentrations up to higher concentrations comparable to other published studies with the same drug that have documented various physiological impacts. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), a species native to North America, was used as it conducts a range of specific mating behaviors and therefore serves as an excellent model of specific impacts on brain function. Fluoxetine concentrations as low as 1 μg/L, a concentration that has been found in many freshwater environments, were found to significantly impact mating behavior, specifically nest building and defending in male fish. Males were also found to display aggression, isolation, and repetitive behaviors at higher concentrations. Female mating behavior was largely unaffected. In addition, predator avoidance behaviors in males and females were also impacted at 1 μg/L. Feeding was impacted at 10 μg/L and in the highest exposure (100 μg/L), egg production was limited by deaths of females due to significant male aggressive behaviors in the first two weeks of exposure. Specific behavioral changes occurred at each concentration (most noticeably 1 μg/L and 100 μg/L) indicating a dose dependent effect that triggered different responses at lower exposures versus higher exposures or differential impacts of dose depending on brain

  17. Environmental concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine impact specific behaviors involved in reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance in the fish Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow)

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Joel; Klaper, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP) have been found in surface waters worldwide, but little is understood of their effects on the wildlife that inhabit these waters. Fluoxetine (Prozac; Eli Lilly), a highly prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is a commonly found PPCP in surface water. The purpose of this project was to determine if environmentally relevant concentrations of fluoxetine impact behavior that is important for population survival in native fish species, including reproduction, feeding and predator avoidance. Chronic 4-week exposures were conducted with doses ranging from 100 ng/L to 100 μg/L to cover a range of environmentally relevant concentrations up to higher concentrations comparable to other published studies with the same drug that have documented various physiological impacts. Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), a species native to North America, was used as it conducts a range of specific mating behaviors and therefore serves as an excellent model of specific impacts on brain function. Fluoxetine concentrations as low as 1 μg/L, a concentration that has been found in many freshwater environments, were found to significantly impact mating behavior, specifically nest building and defending in male fish. Males were also found to display aggression, isolation, and repetitive behaviors at higher concentrations. Female mating behavior was largely unaffected. In addition, predator avoidance behaviors in males and females were also impacted at 1 μg/L. Feeding was impacted at 10 μg/L and in the highest exposure (100 μg/L), egg production was limited by deaths of females due to significant male aggressive behaviors in first two weeks of exposure. Specific behavioral changes occurred at each concentration (most noticeably 1 μg/L and 100 μg/L) indicating a dose dependent effect that triggered different responses at lower exposures versus higher exposures or differential impacts of dose depending on brain region

  18. Application of endocrine disruptor screening program fish short-term reproduction assay: Reproduction and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) exposed to Bermuda pond sediment.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael; Fort, Chelsea E; Fort, Hayley M; Bacon, Jamie P

    2015-06-01

    A modified tier 1 Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) 21-d fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) was used to evaluate the effects of sediment exposure from freshwater and brackish ponds in Bermuda on reproductive fecundity and endocrine function in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Reproductively active male and female fish were exposed to control sediment and sediment from 2 freshwater ponds (fathead minnow) and 2 marine ponds (killifish) contaminated with polyaromatic hydrocarbons and metals via flow-through exposure for 21 d. Reproductive fecundity was monitored daily. At termination, the status of the reproductive endocrine system was assessed by the gonadosomatic index, gonadal histology, plasma steroids (estrogen [E2], testosterone [T], and 11-ketotestosterone [11-KT]), steroidogenic enzymes (aromatase and combined 3β/17β -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase [3β/17β-HSD]), and plasma vitellogenin (VTG). Decreased reproductive fecundity, lower male body weight, and altered endocrinological measures of reproductive status were observed in both species. Higher plasma T levels in female minnows and 11-KT levels in both male and female minnows and female killifish exposed to freshwater and brackish sediments, respectively. Decreased female E2 and VTG levels and gonadal cytochrome P19 (aromatase) activity were also found in sediment exposed females from both species. No effect on female 3β/17β-HSD activity was found in either species. The FSTRA provided a robust model capable of modification to evaluate reproductive effects of sediment exposure in fish. © 2015 SETAC.

  19. Mechanistic basis for estrogenic effects in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) following exposure to the androgen 17alpha-methyltestosterone: conversion of 17alpha-methyltestosterone to 17alpha-methylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Michael W; Jensen, Kathleen M; Korte, Joseph J; Kahl, Michael D; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Denny, Jeffrey S; Henry, Tala R; Ankley, Gerald T

    2004-01-07

    Exposure of adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to the androgen 17alpha-methyltestosterone (MT) produces both androgenic and estrogenic effects, manifested as nuptial tubercle formation in females, and vitellogenin production in males and females, respectively. The present study was conducted to determine if the unanticipated estrogenic effects are produced by conversion of MT via aromatase activity to 17alpha-methylestradiol (ME2). Aromatase activity at the end of a 7-day waterborne MT exposure (20, 200microg/l) was significantly decreased in ovarian microsomes and brain homogenates from exposed fish, to about 30-50% of control activity. Although aromatase activity was decreased by 7 days, it is possible that the conversion of MT to ME2 occurred soon after initial exposure. In support of this, ME2 was detected in plasma samples of the fish following the 7-day exposure, confirming their ability convert the androgen MT to the estrogen ME2. The concentration of ME2 in plasma was within the range of plasma 17ss-estradiol (E2) found in control female fathead minnows (4-5ng/ml). These results, in conjunction with competitive binding assays that indicate ME2 binds to the fathead minnow estrogen receptor with a relative binding affinity of 68.3% of E2, support the hypothesis that aromatization of MT to ME2 contributes to the estrogenic effects in fathead minnows following exposure to this androgen.

  20. Natural Variation in Fish Transcriptomes: Comparative Analysis of the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rong-Lin; Bencic, David C.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Biales, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Fathead minnow and zebrafish are among the most intensively studied fish species in environmental toxicogenomics. To aid the assessment and interpretation of subtle transcriptomic effects from treatment conditions of interest, better characterization and understanding are needed for natural variation in gene expression among fish individuals from lab cultures. Leveraging the transcriptomics data from a number of our toxicogenomics studies conducted over the years, we conducted a meta-analysis of nearly 600 microarrays generated from the ovary tissue of untreated, reproductively mature fathead minnow and zebrafish samples. As expected, there was considerable batch-to-batch transcriptomic variation; this “batch-effect” appeared to differentially impact subsets of fish transcriptomes in a nonsystematic way. Temporally more closely spaced batches tended to share a greater transcriptomic similarity among one another. The overall level of within-batch variation was quite low in fish ovary tissue, making it a suitable system for studying chemical stressors with subtle biological effects. The observed differences in the within-batch variability of gene expression, at the levels of both individual genes and pathways, were probably both technical and biological. This suggests that biological interpretation and prioritization of genes and pathways targeted by experimental conditions should take into account both their intrinsic variability and the size of induced transcriptional changes. There was significant conservation of both the genomes and transcriptomes between fathead minnow and zebrafish. The high degree of conservation offers promising opportunities in not only studying fish molecular responses to environmental stressors by a comparative biology approach, but also effective sharing of a large amount of existing public transcriptomics data for developing toxicogenomics applications. PMID:25493933

  1. Fishy aroma of social status: urinary chemo-signalling of territoriality in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Ekman, Drew R; Villeneuve, Daniel L; James, Channing M; Teng, Quincy; Collette, Timothy W; Ankley, Gerald T

    2012-01-01

    Chemical structures of several urinary reproductive pheromones in fish have been identified, and their role in the chemical communication of reproductive condition is well characterized. On the contrary, the role of chemical communication in signalling of social/territorial status in fish is poorly understood. Fathead minnows are an example of a fish species whose life history traits appear conducive to evolution of chemical communication systems that confer information about social/territorial status. Male reproduction in this species is dependent upon their ability to acquire and defend a high quality nesting territory, and to attract a female to the nest. We hypothesized that fathead minnow males use visual and urine-derived chemical cues to signal territorial status. To test this hypothesis, effects of territorial acquisition on male-specific secondary sex characteristics (SSCs) and urine volumes were first assessed. Second, frequencies of male urination in varying social contexts were examined. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was used to identify urinary metabolites that were differentially excreted in the urine of territorial versus non-territorial males. The expression of SSCs, sperm, and urine volumes increased with territory acquisition, and either remained unchanged or decreased in non-territorial males. Frequency of male urination increased significantly in the presence of females (but not males), suggesting that females are the main target of the urinary signals. Territorial and non-territorial males had distinct urinary metabolomic profiles. An unforeseen finding was that one could discern future territorial status of males, based on their initial metabolomic profiles. Bile acids and volatile amines were identified as potential chemical signals of social status in the fathead minnow. The finding that trimethylamine (a fishy smelling volatile amine) may be a social cue is particularly interesting, because it is known to bind trace

  2. Fishy Aroma of Social Status: Urinary Chemo-Signalling of Territoriality in Male Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    PubMed Central

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Ekman, Drew R.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; James, Channing M.; Teng, Quincy; Collette, Timothy W.; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical structures of several urinary reproductive pheromones in fish have been identified, and their role in the chemical communication of reproductive condition is well characterized. On the contrary, the role of chemical communication in signalling of social/territorial status in fish is poorly understood. Fathead minnows are an example of a fish species whose life history traits appear conducive to evolution of chemical communication systems that confer information about social/territorial status. Male reproduction in this species is dependent upon their ability to acquire and defend a high quality nesting territory, and to attract a female to the nest. We hypothesized that fathead minnow males use visual and urine-derived chemical cues to signal territorial status. To test this hypothesis, effects of territorial acquisition on male-specific secondary sex characteristics (SSCs) and urine volumes were first assessed. Second, frequencies of male urination in varying social contexts were examined. Finally, nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics was used to identify urinary metabolites that were differentially excreted in the urine of territorial versus non-territorial males. The expression of SSCs, sperm, and urine volumes increased with territory acquisition, and either remained unchanged or decreased in non-territorial males. Frequency of male urination increased significantly in the presence of females (but not males), suggesting that females are the main target of the urinary signals. Territorial and non-territorial males had distinct urinary metabolomic profiles. An unforeseen finding was that one could discern future territorial status of males, based on their initial metabolomic profiles. Bile acids and volatile amines were identified as potential chemical signals of social status in the fathead minnow. The finding that trimethylamine (a fishy smelling volatile amine) may be a social cue is particularly interesting, because it is known to bind trace

  3. Effects of acid and aluminum on swim bladder development and yolk absorption in the fathead minnow, pimephales promelas, (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Leino, R.L.; McCormick, J.H.; Jensen, K.M.

    1988-05-01

    Thirty-day old fathead minnows were raised to maturity and spawning in a laboratory flow-through system using softened water at various pH and Al levels. Successful spawnings were reduced by more than 85% at pH 6.0, 5.5-25 microg/L Al+3, and 5.5, and absent in all pH 5.2 treatments. Hatching success, larval survival, swim bladder development and yolk absorption were reduced or abnormal when spawning did occur at lower pHs.

  4. Influence of water quality on silver toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and water fleas (Daphnia magna)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen, D.J.; Ownby, D.R.; Forsythe, B.L.; Bills, T.P.; La Point, T.W.; Cobb, G.B.; Klaine, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Toxicity bioassays were conducted to quantify water quality conditions under which silver, as silver nitrate, is toxic to Oncorhynchus mykiss. Pimephales promelas, and Daphnia magna. Bioassays for P. promelas and D. magna were conducted as static replacement tests, whereas a flow-through bioassay system was modified and used for O. mykiss. Results from 96-h toxicity bioassays for O. mykiss indicated that chloride, hardness, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) protected against silver toxicosis, with DOC affording the highest protective effects. For P. promelas and D. magna, little protection was provided by increased CaCo+O{sub 3} alone, whereas DOC had a major ameliorating influence on measured silver toxicity. Lower concentrations of chloride had little effect on reducing silver nitrate toxicity. Dissolved organic carbon was more important than hardness for predicting the toxicity of ionic silver in natural waters to O. mykiss, P. promelas, and D. magna. Similarly, DOC significantly reduced silver nitrate toxicity to trout, whereas Cl{sup {minus}} and hardness had only a minor protective effect. However, Cl{sup {minus}}/DOC mixtures showed a greater-than-additive protective effect. Thus, the authors suggest that incorporating an organic carbon coefficient into the silver criterion equation will enhance the criterion values for site specificity.

  5. Impacts of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid aquatic herbicide formulations on reproduction and development of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    DeQuattro, Zachary A; Karasov, William H

    2016-06-01

    The authors studied the effects of 2 formulations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, dimethylamine salt (2,4-D) herbicide on fathead minnow reproduction, embryonic development, and larval survival. Groups of reproductively mature fathead minnows were exposed for 28 d to 0.00 ppm, 0.05 ppm, 0.50 ppm, and 2.00 ppm 2,4-D (target) in a flow-through system. Weedestroy® AM40 significantly (p ≤ 0.05) depressed male tubercle presence and significantly increased female gonadosomatic index, and there were statistical trends (0.05 ≤ p ≤ 0.10) for effects on fecundity and hepatic vitellogenin mRNA expression in females and males. The herbicide DMA® 4 IVM also significantly depressed male tubercle presence. Gonads of females exposed to DMA 4 IVM exhibited significantly depressed stage of oocyte maturation, significantly increased severity of oocyte atresia, and a significant presence of an unidentified tissue type. Also, DMA 4 IVM significantly decreased larval survival. It had no impact on hepatic vitellogenin mRNA expression or gonadosomatic index. No significant effects on fertilization, hatchability, or embryonic development were observed in either trial. The formulations tested exhibited different toxicological profiles from pure 2,4-D. These data suggest that the formulations have the potential for endocrine disruption and can exert some degree of chronic toxicity. The present use of 2,4-D formulations in lake management practices and their permitting based on the toxicological profile of 2,4-D pure compound should be reconsidered. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1478-1488. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  6. Predator avoidance performance of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) following short-term exposure to estrogen mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, M.R.; Julius, M.L.; Vajda, A.M.; Norris, D.O.; Barber, L.B.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic organisms exposed to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) at early life-stages may have reduced reproductive fitness via disruption of reproductive and non-reproductive behavioral and physiological pathways. Survival to reproductive age relies upon optimal non-reproductive trait expression, such as adequate predator avoidance responses, which may be impacted through EDC exposure. During a predator–prey confrontation, larval fish use an innate C-start escape behavior to rapidly move away from an approaching threat. We tested the hypotheses that (1) larval fathead minnows exposed to estrogens, a primary class of EDCs, singularly or in mixture, suffer a reduced ability to perform an innate C-start behavior when faced with a threat stimulus; (2) additive effects will cause greater reductions in C-start behavior; and (3) effects will differ among developmental stages. In this study, embryos (post-fertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 days to environmentally relevant concentrations of estrone (E1), 17β-estradiol (E2), and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) singularly and in mixture. Exposed embryos were allowed to hatch and grow in control well water until 12 days old. Similarly, post-hatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 days to these compounds. High-speed (1000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by-frame analysis of latency period, escape velocity, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 days post-hatch, only E1 adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 days post-hatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to E1, while adverse responses were seen in E2 and the estrogen mixture. Ethinylestradiol exposure did not elicit changes in escape behaviors at either developmental stage. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on

  7. Polycarbonate and polystyrene nanoplastic particles act as stressors to the innate immune system of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Greven, Anne-Catherine; Merk, Teresa; Karagöz, Filiz; Mohr, Kristin; Klapper, Markus; Jovanović, Boris; Palić, Dušan

    2016-12-01

    Water pollution with large-scale and small-scale plastic litter is an area of growing concern. Macro-plastic litter is a well-known threat to aquatic wildlife; however, the effects of micro-sized and nano-sized plastic particles on the health of organisms are not well understood. Small-scale plastic particles can easily be ingested by various aquatic organisms and potentially interfere with their immune system; therefore, the authors used a freshwater fish species as a model organism for nanoplastic exposure. Characterization of polystyrene (41.0 nm) and polycarbonate (158.7 nm) nanoplastic particles (PSNPs and PCNPs, respectively) in plasma was performed, and the effects of PSNPs and PCNPs on the innate immune system of fathead minnow were investigated. In vitro effects of PSNPs and PCNPs on neutrophil function were determined using a battery of neutrophil function assays. Exposure of neutrophils to PSNPs or PCNPs caused significant increases in degranulation of primary granules and neutrophil extracellular trap release compared to a nontreated control, whereas oxidative burst was less affected. The present study outlines the stress response of the cellular component of fish innate immune system to polystyrene and polycarbonate nanoparticles/aggregates and indicates their potential to interfere with disease resistance in fish populations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:3093-3100. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  8. Transcriptional and physiological response of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to urban waters entering into wildlife protected areas.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Jorquera, Ignacio A; Kroll, Kevin J; Toor, Gurpal S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2015-04-01

    The mission of protected areas is to conserve biodiversity and improve human welfare. To assess the effect of urban waters entering into protected areas, we performed 48-h whole-effluent exposures with fathead minnows, analyzing changes in steady state levels of mRNAs in the livers of exposed fish. Raw wastewater, treated city wastewater, and treated wastewater from a university were collected for exposures. All exposed fish showed altered mRNA levels of DNA damage-repair genes. Fish exposed to raw and treated wastewaters showed down-regulation of transcripts for key intermediates of cholesterol biosynthesis and elevated plasma cholesterol. The type of wastewater treatment influenced the response of gene transcription. Because of the relevance of some of the altered cellular pathways, we suggest that these effluents may cause deleterious effects on fish inside protected areas that receive these waters. Inclusion of research and mitigation efforts for this type of threat in protected areas management is advised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression profiling and gene ontology analysis in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver following exposure to pulp and paper mill effluents.

    PubMed

    Costigan, Shannon L; Werner, Julieta; Ouellet, Jacob D; Hill, Lauren G; Law, R David

    2012-10-15

    Many studies link pulp and paper mill effluent (PPME) exposure to adverse effects in fish populations present in the mill receiving environments. These impacts are often characteristic of endocrine disruption and may include impaired reproduction, development and survival. While these physiological endpoints are well-characterized, the molecular mechanisms causing them are not yet understood. To investigate changes in gene transcription induced by exposure to a PPME at several stages of treatment, male and female fathead minnows (FHMs) were exposed for 6 days to 25% (v/v) secondary (biologically) treated kraft effluent (TK) or 100% (v/v) combined mill outfall (CMO) from a mill producing both kraft pulp and newsprint. The gene expression changes in the livers of these fish were analyzed using a 22K oligonucleotide microarray. Exposure to TK or CMO resulted in significant changes in the expression levels of 105 and 238 targets in male FHMs and 296 and 133 targets in females, respectively. Targets were then functionally analyzed using gene ontology tools to identify the biological processes in fish hepatocytes that were affected by exposure to PPME after its secondary treatment. Proteolysis was affected in female FHMs exposed to both TK and CMO. In male FHMs, no processes were affected by TK exposure, while sterol, isoprenoid, steroid and cholesterol biosynthesis and electron transport were up-regulated by CMO exposure. The results presented in this study indicate that short-term exposure to PPMEs affects the expression of reproduction-related genes in the livers of both male and female FHMs, and that secondary treatment of PPMEs may not neutralize all of their metabolic effects in fish. Gene ontology analysis of microarray data may enable identification of biological processes altered by toxicant exposure and thus provide an additional tool for monitoring the impact of PPMEs on fish populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adult fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, partial life-cycle reproductive and gonadal histopathology study with bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Mihaich, Ellen; Rhodes, Jon; Wolf, Jeff; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Dietrich, Daniel; Hall, A Tilghman; Caspers, Norbert; Ortego, Lisa; Staples, Charles; Dimond, Steve; Hentges, Steven

    2012-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an intermediate used to produce epoxy resins and polycarbonate plastics. Although BPA degrades rapidly in the environment with aquatic half-lives from 0.5 to 6 d, it can be found in aquatic systems because of widespread use. To evaluate potential effects from chronic exposure, fathead minnows were exposed for 164 d to nominal concentrations of 1, 16, 64, 160, and 640 µg/L BPA. Population-level endpoints of survival, growth, and reproduction were assessed with supplemental endpoints (e.g., vitellogenin, gonad histology), including gonad cell type assessment and quantification. No statistically significant changes in growth, gonad weight, gonadosomatic index, or reproduction variables (e.g., number of eggs and spawns, hatchability) were observed; however, there was a significant impact on male survival at 640 µg/L. Vitellogenin increased in both sexes at 64 µg/L or higher. Gonad cell type frequencies were significantly different from controls at 160 µg/L or higher in males with a slight decrease in spermatocytes compared with less mature cell types, and at 640 µg/L in females with a slight decrease in early vitellogenic cells compared with less mature cells. The decrease in spermatocytes did not correspond to a decrease in the most mature sex cell type (spermatozoa) and did not impair male fertility, as hatchability was not impacted. Overall, marginal shifts in gametogenic cell maturation were not associated with any statistically significant effects on population-relevant reproductive endpoints (growth, fecundity, and hatchability) at any concentration tested. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  11. Detecting population-level genotoxic effects of benzo(a)pyrene on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.A.; Rasmussen, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) toxicity have been primarily concerned with effects mediated by somatic cell DNA damage, particularly those linked to carcinogenesis. However, somatic cell effects may be of little ecological consequence, particularly when resulting pathologies become clinically visible long after sexual maturity. Germ cell effects may be more consequential, with alterations of the germ cell mutation rate effecting the dynamics of entire populations. The goal was to demonstrate that a potent DNA damaging agent can induce detectable population level effects. To accomplish this task the authors investigated changes in the survivorship of fathead minnow larvae two generations removed from in vitro BaP exposure. The experiment was initiated by exposing laboratory-raised individuals to 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 ppb BaP or a solvent blank for a period of 3 months. Exposed pairs were isolated and mated as soon as secondary sexual characteristics became visible. Progeny of exposed, mated pairs were subsequently isolated in order to provide families with a known exposure history. Siblings from isolated families were then mated to examine the effect of BaP exposure on the survival of larvae two generations removed from the exposure. As expected, inbreeding depression decreased hatching success and larval survival in both control and experimental broods. However, while larval survival from control broods was usually greater than 50%, two-thirds of the 1 ppb BaP broods showed no survival at all. Overall, the results revealed a significant effect of BaP treatment on both hatching success and larval survival. The results also revealed evidence of a concentration-response relationship.

  12. Toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin to embryos of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas, Rafinesque)

    SciTech Connect

    Olivieri, C.; Cooper, K.

    1995-12-31

    This study correlates the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) residue and its toxicity to the fathead minnow embryo exposed to levels lower than the TCDD solubility range. The TCDD tissue doses in the embryo/larvae were related to gross lesions, delayed hatching, and death. A 7-day bioconcentration factor on a lipid basis (BCF{sub L}) was calculated. Embryos at the blatsula stage were exposed to [{sup 3}H] TCDD water concentrations (0.37, 0.59, 1.2, 2.83, and 10.1 6 ng/L), a nontreatment control and a solvent carrier control. Lesions were qualified as mild and severe based on their onset and their pathogenesis. Thus, mild lesions developed just prior to hatching or post-hatching at the fifth day of development. The severe lesions appeared at the third day of development. Embryos with tissue doses {le}2.46 {+-} 1.34 ng/g consistently developed mild lesions, while embryos with tissue doses {ge} 12.07 {+-} 4.91 ng/g developed severe lesions. The lowest observable adverse effect level was 0.04 {+-} 0.02 ng/g. The calculated 7-day ED{sub 50} was 0.14 ng/g. There was no delayed hatching at any of the concentrations tested. Embryo death occurred at a tissue concentration {ge}2.46 ng/g. The calculated 7-day LD{sub 50} was 25.71 ng/g. The relationship between the concentration of TCDD in the water (x = ng/L) and in the tissue dose (y = ng/g) fitted a linear curve y = {minus}1,143 + 3,792.5x, r{sup 2} = 0.98. The calculated BCF{sub L} (wet weight) was dose dependent. Embryos with tissue doses of 0.04 and 0.16 ng/g had BCF{sub L} of 2,700 and 3,325, respectively. Embryos with tissue doses of 2.46, 12.07, and 37.07 ng/g, had a BCF{sub L} of 104,225, 106,625 and 91,075, respectively.

  13. Cloning and in vitro expression and characterization of the androgen receptor and isolation of estrogen receptor alpha from the fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Wilson, Vickie S; Cardon, Mary C; Thornton, Joseph; Korte, Joseph J; Ankley, Gerald T; Welch, Jeffery; Gray, L Earl; Hartig, Phillip C

    2004-12-01

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the mammalian receptors, a great deal of uncertainty exists as to whether these differences affect interactions of potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) with the receptors. This leads to substantial uncertainty with respect to the utility of mammalian-based screening assays to predict possible effects of EDCs in nonmammalian wildlife. This paper describes preparation of a cDNA library from a small fish model commonly used in ecological risk assessments, the fathead minnow (Pimphales promelas). The cDNA library was subsequently used to isolate and sequence both AR and ERalpha. In addition, the fathead minnow (fh)AR was expressed and characterized with respect to function using saturation and competitive binding assays in COS monkey kidney cells. Saturation experiments along with subsequent Scatchard analysis determined that the Kd of the fhAR for the potent synthetic androgen R1881 was 1.8 nM, which is comparable to that for the human AR in the same assay system. In COS whole cell competitive binding assays, potent androgens such as dihydrotestosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were also shown to be high affinity ligands for the fhAR. We also report affinity of the receptor for a number of environmental contaminants including the AR agonists androstenedione and 17a- and 17beta-trenbolone;AR antagonists such as p,p'-DDE, linuron, and vinclozolin; and the ER agonist 17beta-estradiol. Future plans include comparison of binding affinities of the fhAR to those of the human AR, also expressed in COS cells, using a range of EDCs.

  14. Use of a 15 k gene microarray to determine gene expression changes in response to acute and chronic methylmercury exposure in the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Rafinesque

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klaper, R.; Carter, Barbara J.; Richter, C.A.; Drevnick, P.E.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the use of a 15 000 gene microarray developed for the toxicological model species, Pimephales promelas, in investigating the impact of acute and chronic methylmercury exposures in male gonad and liver tissues. The results show significant differences in the individual genes that were differentially expressed in response to each treatment. In liver, a total of 650 genes exhibited significantly (P < 0.05) altered expression with greater than two-fold differences from the controls in response to acute exposure and a total of 267 genes were differentially expressed in response to chronic exposure. A majority of these genes were downregulated rather than upregulated. Fewer genes were altered in gonad than in liver at both timepoints. A total of 212 genes were differentially expressed in response to acute exposure and 155 genes were altered in response to chronic exposure. Despite the differences in individual genes expressed across treatments, the functional categories that altered genes were associated with showed some similarities. Of interest in light of other studies involving the effects of methylmercury on fish, several genes associated with apoptosis were upregulated in response to both acute and chronic exposures. Induction of apoptosis has been associated with effects on reproduction seen in the previous studies. This study demonstrates the utility of microarray analysis for investigations of the physiological effects of toxicants as well as the time-course of effects that may take place. In addition, it is the first publication to demonstrate the use of this new 15 000 gene microarray for fish biology and toxicology. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  15. Effects of the anti-microbial contaminant triclocarban and co-exposure with the androgen 17â-trenbolone, on reproductive function and ovarian transcriptome of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban (TCC) is a widely used antimicrobial agent that is routinely detected in surface waters. The present study was designed to examine TCC’s efficacy and mode of action as a reproductive toxicant in fish. Reproductively mature Pimephales promelas were continuously ...

  16. Androgenic and estrogenic effects of the synthetic androgen 17alpha-methyltestosterone on sexual development and reproductive performance in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) determined using the gonadal recrudescence assay.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, S; Sauer, A; Shears, J A; Tyler, C R; Braunbeck, T

    2004-06-24

    The effects of the androgen, 17alpha-methyltestosterone were assessed on sexual development and reproductive performance in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using a gonadal recrudescence assay. In this assay, mature male and female fathead minnow, previously kept under simulated winter conditions (15 degrees C; 8:16 h light:dark regime) were transferred to simulated summer conditions (25 degrees C water temperature; 16:8 h light:dark regime) to induce gonadal recrudescence. To assess sexual development fish were exposed to nominal concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone. After 3 weeks of chemical exposure, effects on condition (condition factor, CF), plasma vitellogenin (VTG), secondary sex characteristics, gonad growth (gonadosomatic index; GSI) and gonad histology were investigated. Reproductive performance, including reproductive output (egg production), spawning behaviour, and fertilisation rate were measured over a subsequent 3-week-period in breeding adults maintained in clean water. 17alpha-Methyltestosterone had no effects on the condition of fish at any of the doses tested. 17alpha-Methyltestosterone induced both androgenic and estrogenic effects with females generally more affected by 17alpha-methyltestosterone than males: atretic follicles and male-specific sex characteristics (androgenic effect) were induced in females at > or = 0.1 and > or = 1 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone, respectively. An inhibitory effect on ovary growth occurred at an exposure concentration of 50 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone. In males 1 microg/L 17alpha-methyltestosterone induced a concentration-response induction of plasma vitellogenin (estrogenic effect) likely due to its conversion into 17alpha-methylestradiol, rather to the competition with endogenous steroids and their cross reactivity with the estrogen receptor. In the fish breeding studies, concentration-dependent reductions in egg number, fertilisation rate and

  17. Chronic toxicity of un-ionized ammonia to early life-stages of endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) compared to the surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fairchild, J.F.; Allert, A.L.; Sappington, L.C.; Waddell, B.

    2005-01-01

    Ammonia-contaminated groundwater enters the Upper Colorado River from beneath the abandoned Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Pile near Moab, Utah. This reach of the Upper Colorado River was designated as critical habitat for four endangered fish species because it is one of the few existing areas with known spawning and rearing habitats. Un-ionized ammonia (NH3) concentrations frequently exceed 1.00 mg/L in backwaters adjacent to the tailings pile, which exceeds the Utah 30-d average chronic water quality criterion for un-ionized ammonia (0.07 mg/L NH3; temperature 20??C; pH 8.2) by a factor of more than 10. However, there is little published information regarding the sensitivity of endangered fishes to ammonia. We conducted 28-d static renewal studies with post-swim-up larvae to determine the relative sensitivity of Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), and the standard surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to NH3. Chronic values (ChVs) for mortality and growth were determined as the geometric mean of the no observed effect concentration and the lowest observed effect concentration based on analysis of variance. The ChVs for growth of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.40, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. The ChVs for mortality of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.70, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. Therefore, the ChVs for mortality and growth were similar for fathead minnow and razorback sucker; however, the ChV for growth was lower than the ChV for mortality for Colorado pikeminnow. Maximum likelihood regression was used to calculate 28-d lethal concentrations (LCx) for each species. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for fathead minnow were 0.69, 0.42, and 0.13 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for Colorado pikeminnow were 0.76, 0.61, and 0.38 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for razorback

  18. Chronic toxicity of un-ionized ammonia to early life-stages of endangered Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius) and razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) compared to the surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Fairchild, J F; Allert, A L; Sappington, L C; Waddell, B

    2005-10-01

    Ammonia-contaminated groundwater enters the Upper Colorado River from beneath the abandoned Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Pile near Moab, Utah. This reach of the Upper Colorado River was designated as critical habitat for four endangered fish species because it is one of the few existing areas with known spawning and rearing habitats. Un-ionized ammonia (NH3) concentrations frequently exceed 1.00 mg/L in backwaters adjacent to the tailings pile, which exceeds the Utah 30-d average chronic water quality criterion for un-ionized ammonia (0.07 mg/L NH3; temperature 20 degrees C; pH 8.2) by a factor of more than 10. However, there is little published information regarding the sensitivity of endangered fishes to ammonia. We conducted 28-d static renewal studies with post-swim-up larvae to determine the relative sensitivity of Colorado pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus lucius), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus), and the standard surrogate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to NH3. Chronic values (ChVs) for mortality and growth were determined as the geometric mean of the no observed effect concentration and the lowest observed effect concentration based on analysis of variance. The ChVs for growth of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.40, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. The ChVs for mortality of fathead minnow, Colorado pikeminnow, and razorback sucker were 0.43, 0.70, and 0.67 mg/L NH3, respectively. Therefore, the ChVs for mortality and growth were similar for fathead minnow and razorback sucker; however, the ChV for growth was lower than the ChV for mortality for Colorado pikeminnow. Maximum likelihood regression was used to calculate 28-d lethal concentrations (LCx) for each species. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for fathead minnow were 0.69, 0.42, and 0.13 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for Colorado pikeminnow were 0.76, 0.61, and 0.38 mg/L NH3, respectively. The 28-d LC50, LC20, and LC1 values for

  19. PREDICTION OF THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMALAS) USING A GROUP CONTRIBUTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group contribution method has been developed to correlate the acute toxicity (96 h LC50) to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for 379 organic chemicals. Multilinear regression and computational neural networks (CNNs) were used for model building. The multilinear linear m...

  20. PREDICTION OF THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMALAS) USING A GROUP CONTRIBUTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group contribution method has been developed to correlate the acute toxicity (96 h LC50) to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for 379 organic chemicals. Multilinear regression and computational neural networks (CNNs) were used for model building. The multilinear linear m...

  1. A Method for the Determination of Genetic Sex in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas, to Support Testing of Endocrine-active Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows are used as a model fish species for the characterization of the endocrine-disrupting potential of environmental contaminants. This research describes the development of a PCR method that can determine the genetic sex in this species. This method, when incorpora...

  2. Effects of short time-course exposure to antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in ovary of female fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the mechanisms through which antiandrogens disrupt reproduction in fish are not well-characterized, this work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure, and to compare differentially expressed genes in the fathead minnow to those previously r...

  3. Profiling Lipid Metabolites Yields Unique Information on Sex- and Time-dependent Responses of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to 17α-Ethynylestradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in hepatic lipid profiles of fathead minnows (FHM) exposed to the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) were determined using 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolite profiling. The exposures were conducted using either 10 ng/l or 100 ng/l EE2 via a continuous flo...

  4. Effects of short time-course exposure to antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in ovary of female fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the mechanisms through which antiandrogens disrupt reproduction in fish are not well-characterized, this work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure, and to compare differentially expressed genes in the fathead minnow to those previously r...

  5. Profiling Lipid Metabolites Yields Unique Information on Sex- and Time-dependent Responses of Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Exposed to 17α-Ethynylestradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in hepatic lipid profiles of fathead minnows (FHM) exposed to the synthetic estrogen 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) were determined using 1H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolite profiling. The exposures were conducted using either 10 ng/l or 100 ng/l EE2 via a continuous flo...

  6. MODELLING IMPACTS ON POPULATIONS: FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSURE TO THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR 17-B-TRENBOLONE AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of population-level impacts is critical to credible ecological risk assessments. In this study, a predictive model was developed to translate changes in fecundity of the fathead minnow in a short term laboratory toxicity test to alterations in population growth rate. T...

  7. MODELLING IMPACTS ON POPULATIONS: FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSURE TO THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR 17-B-TRENBOLONE AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of population-level impacts is critical to credible ecological risk assessments. In this study, a predictive model was developed to translate changes in fecundity of the fathead minnow in a short term laboratory toxicity test to alterations in population growth rate. T...

  8. Effects of the antimicrobial contaminant triclocarban, and co-exposure with the androgen 17β-trenbolone, on reproductive function and ovarian transcriptome of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Jensen, Kathleen M; Cavallin, Jenna E; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Kahl, Michael D; Leino, Richard L; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Wehmas, Leah C; Perkins, Edward J; Ankley, Gerald T

    2017-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is an antimicrobial agent routinely detected in surface waters that has been hypothesized to interact with the vertebrate endocrine system. The present study examined the effects of TCC alone and in combination with the model endocrine disruptor 17β-trenbolone (TRB) on fish reproductive function. Adult Pimephales promelas were continuously exposed to either 1 µg TCC/L or 5 µg TCC/L, to 0.5 µg TRB/L, or to a mixture (MIX) of 5 µg TCC/L and 0.5 µg TRB/L for 22 d, and a variety of reproductive and endocrine-related endpoints were examined. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fathead minnows exposed to TRB, MIX, or 5 µg TCC/L. Exposure to 1 µg TCC/L had no effect on reproduction. In general, both TRB and MIX treatments caused similar physiological effects, evoking significant reductions in female plasma vitellogenin, estradiol, and testosterone, and significant increases in male plasma estradiol. Based on analysis of the ovarian transcriptome, there were potential pathway impacts that were common to both TRB- and TCC-containing treatment groups. In most cases, however, those pathways were more plausibly linked to differences in reproductive status than to androgen-specific functions. Overall, TCC was reproductively toxic to fish at concentrations at or near those that have been measured in surface water. There was little evidence that TCC elicits reproductive toxicity through a specific mode of endocrine or reproductive action, nor that it could augment the androgenic effects of TRB. Nonetheless, the relatively small margin of safety between some measured environmental concentrations and effect concentrations suggests that concern is warranted. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:231-242. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. Published 2016 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article

  9. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  10. Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on early life stage development of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Winden, P.J.J. de; Donselaar, E.G. van; Herwig, H.J.

    1994-12-31

    Eggs of fathead minnow were exposed to graded concentrations (0.1--100 ppt) of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) at 24 C for 5 days. Exposure started about one hour after fertilization. The medium was refreshed daily. At day 6 (one day posthatching), body lengths were measured. A dose-dependent retardation of growth (from 1 to 30%) was observed in the range from 0.1 to 20 ppt TCDD. At higher concentrations, growth reduction remained the same but mortality still increased. Microscopic observations of the TCDD-exposed embryos revealed a number of deviations from the normal early development. Initial changes consisted of congestion of the blood flow in the caudal tail area and in the yolk sac vascular complex, followed by hemorrhages. At a later stage, pericardial edema and generalized edema were observed. In addition the embryos revealed, anaemia, decreased amounts of dermal and retinal melanin, shortened mandibles, degeneration of heart tissue, absence of swim bladder, decreased utilization of yolk sac material and a curved chords. The results indicate that embryonic development of the fathead minnow is very sensitive to TCDD. It might prove a useful model for further embryotoxic studies.

  11. Short and long term bystander effect induction by fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, Rafinesque, 1820) injected with environmentally relevant whole body doses of 226Ra.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2013-12-01

    Bystander effect induction by fathead minnows injected with environmentally relevant doses of (226)Ra was investigated. Twenty four h and 6 months after injection with a single dose of 21, 210 or 2100 μBq, fin tissue samples emitted a pro-apoptotic signal, which reduced the clonogenic survival of an apoptosis sensitive reporter cell line. Twenty four h and 10 weeks after injection explants from non-injected bystander fish, swum with the injected fish, also emitted a pro-apoptotic signal. However 6 months after injection the bystander fish to 21 and 210 μBq injected fish emitted an anti-apoptotic signal. This demonstrates that extremely low dose irradiation can have effects outside of the irradiated fish. This has implications for population and ecosystem responses to contamination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exposure to the contraceptive progestin, gestodene, alters reproductive behavior, arrests egg deposition, and masculinizes development in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Tyler E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Gillis, Amanda B.; Alvarez, David A.; Orlando, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous progestogens and pharmaceutical progestins enter the environment through wastewater treatment plant effluent and agricultural field runoff. Lab studies demonstrate strong, negative exposure effects of these chemicals on aquatic vertebrate reproduction. Behavior can be a sensitive, early indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants associated with altered reproduction yet is rarely examined in ecotoxicology studies. Gestodene is a human contraceptive progestin and a potent activator of fish androgen receptors. Our objective was to test the effects of gestodene on reproductive behavior and associated egg deposition in the fathead minnow. After only 1 day, males exposed to ng/L of gestodene were more aggressive and less interested in courtship and mating, and exposed females displayed less female courtship behavior. Interestingly, 25% of the gestodene tanks contained a female that drove the male out of the breeding tile and displayed male-typical courtship behaviors toward the other female. Gestodene decreased or arrested egg deposition with no observed gonadal histopathology. Together, these results suggest that effects on egg deposition are primarily due to altered reproductive behavior. The mechanisms by which gestodene disrupts behavior are unknown. Nonetheless, the rapid and profound alterations of the reproductive biology of gestodene-exposed fish suggest that wild populations could be similarly affected.

  13. Exposure to the Contraceptive Progestin, Gestodene, Alters Reproductive Behavior, Arrests Egg Deposition, and Masculinizes Development in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Frankel, Tyler E; Meyer, Michael T; Kolpin, Dana W; Gillis, Amanda B; Alvarez, David A; Orlando, Edward F

    2016-06-07

    Endogenous progestogens and pharmaceutical progestins enter the environment through wastewater treatment plant effluent and agricultural field runoff. Lab studies demonstrate strong, negative exposure effects of these chemicals on aquatic vertebrate reproduction. Behavior can be a sensitive, early indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants associated with altered reproduction yet is rarely examined in ecotoxicology studies. Gestodene is a human contraceptive progestin and a potent activator of fish androgen receptors. Our objective was to test the effects of gestodene on reproductive behavior and associated egg deposition in the fathead minnow. After only 1 day, males exposed to ng/L of gestodene were more aggressive and less interested in courtship and mating, and exposed females displayed less female courtship behavior. Interestingly, 25% of the gestodene tanks contained a female that drove the male out of the breeding tile and displayed male-typical courtship behaviors toward the other female. Gestodene decreased or arrested egg deposition with no observed gonadal histopathology. Together, these results suggest that effects on egg deposition are primarily due to altered reproductive behavior. The mechanisms by which gestodene disrupts behavior are unknown. Nonetheless, the rapid and profound alterations of the reproductive biology of gestodene-exposed fish suggest that wild populations could be similarly affected.

  14. Effects of waterborne exposure to 4-nonylphenol and nonylphenol ethoxylate on secondary sex characteristics and gonads of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Miles-Richardson, S.R.; Pierens, S.L.; Nichols, K.M.; Kramer, V.J.; Snyder, E.M.; Snyder, S.A.; Render, J.A.; Fitzgerald, S.D.; Giesy, J.P.

    1999-02-01

    Fathead minnows were exposed to 4-nonylphenol (NP) or nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPEO) to determine the effects of these weak estrogen agonists on secondary sex characteristics and gonads of sexually mature males and females during 42-day continuous-flow exposures. Neither NP nor NPEO caused statistically significant effects on tubercles or fatpad size at the concentrations tested. Exposure to 1.1 or 3.4 {micro}g NP.L caused changes in the number and size of Sertoli cells and germ cell syncytia. Necrotic aggregates of various stages of germ cells in the spermatogenic sequence were observed in the testes of males exposed to NP. Electron microscopy of the testes of NP-exposed males revealed the presence of phagocytic cells in the lumina of seminiferous tubules. The cytoplasm of some Sertoli cells was distended with myelin figures and necrotic spermatozoa. No significant effects on the stages of follicular development were observed in females exposed to NP. There were no differences in the gonads or secondary sex characteristics of males or females exposed to 5.5 {micro}g NPEO/L, the greatest concentration studied. The histologic responses observed are sensitive indicators of waterborne exposure to NP at environmentally relevant concentrations, but not as sensitive as induction of plasma vitellogenin.

  15. Dosimetric analysis of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas, Rafinesque, 1820) exposed via ingestion to environmentally relevant activities of Ra-226 for two years.

    PubMed

    Mothersill, Carmel; Larivière, Dominic; Smith, Richard W; Thompson, Manuela P; Byun, Soo H; Prestwich, William; Seymour, Colin B

    2014-02-01

    To assess the dosimetry of Ra-226 in a two-year chronic ingestion study in laboratory maintained fathead minnow fed environmentally relevant levels of the isotope known to occur in gut contents of fish from a uranium mining area. Fish were established on reconstituted commercial fish food containing 10 mBq-10 Bq Ra-226.g(- 1) dry food. The fish were sampled at 1, 6, 18 and 24 months and the Ra-226 levels in the whole fish were directly determined using measurement performed using inorganic mass spectrometry. Pilot experiments using higher doses were also done during development of a liquid scintillation detection system which support some data. The data show that after 1 month the levels of accumulation in the fish were below detection. At 6 months there was an activity dependent accumulation which was relatively higher in the low activity groups. By 18 and 24 months the radium was very low in all groups - well below 6 month levels suggesting considerable loss of radium from the fish. These data were confirmed in a small and shorter study using higher dietary activities. The highest dose calculated for any measurement point was 16 μGy.h(- 1) in the 6-month-old fish fed the diet containing 10 Bq.g(- 1). We conclude that environmentally relevant levels of Ra-226 have a maximum impact at early time-points when the fish are still growing. After that they appear to depurate accumulated radium. In terms of environmental impact, the maximum accumulation peaks at the age where fish could be spawning but is extremely low leading to μGy.year(- 1) doses even after exposure to the high activity diets.

  16. Progesterone increases ex vivo testosterone production and decreases the expression of progestin receptors and steroidogenic enzymes in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) ovary.

    PubMed

    Chishti, Yasmin Z; Feswick, April; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    Progesterone (P4) is a metabolic precursor for a number of steroids, including estrogens and androgens. P4 also has diverse roles within the vertebrate ovary that include oocyte growth and development. The objectives of this study were to measure the effects of P4 on testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) production in the fathead minnow (FHM) ovary and on the mRNA abundance of transcripts involved in steroidogenesis and steroid receptor signaling. Ovary explants were treated with P4 (10(-6)M) for 6 and 12h. P4 administration significantly increased T production ∼3-fold at both 6 and 12h, whereas E2 production was not affected, consistent with the hypothesis that excess P4 is not converted to terminal estrogens in the mature ovary. Nuclear progesterone receptor mRNA was decreased at 6h and membrane progesterone receptor gamma-2 mRNA was significantly down-regulated at both 6 and 12h; however there was no change in membrane progesterone receptor alpha or beta mRNA levels. Androgen receptor (ar) and estrogen receptor 2a (esr2a) mRNA were significantly reduced at 6h with P4 treatment, but there was no change in esr2b mRNA at either time point. Transcripts for enzymes in the steroid pathway (star, hsd11b2) were significantly lower at 6h compared to controls, whereas cyp17a and cyp19a mRNA abundance did not change with treatments at either time point. These data suggest that P4 incubation can lead to increased T production in the FHM ovary without a concomitant change in E2, and that the membrane bound progestin receptors are differentially regulated by P4 in the teleost ovary. As environmental progestins have received increased attention due to their suspected role as endocrine disruptors, mechanistic data on the role of exogenous P4 treatments in the male and female gonad is warranted.

  17. Comparative toxicity of chlorothalonil: Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, R M; Murray-Gulde, C L; Rodgers, J H; Shah, Y T

    2003-11-01

    Chlorothalonil is a commonly used fungicide in rural and urban environments and can be incidentally introduced into aquatic systems through rainfall runoff or direct overspray and drift from aerial applications. Few studies have been published regarding risks to aquatic organisms exposed to chlorothalonil, so this study was performed to provide a first-order risk characterization for receiving system biota. Definitive laboratory toxicity tests were conducted with aqueous solutions of chlorothalonil and sentinel aquatic organisms (Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard and Pimephales promelas Rafinesque). P. promelas was more sensitive (7-day potency=6.1% mortality/mug/L) than C. dubia (7-day potency=0.94% mortality/mug/L) to chlorothalonil exposures. All mortality of P. promelas and C. dubia resulting from these chlorothalonil exposures occurred within the first 96h and no sublethal effects (i.e., growth or reproduction) were detected under these experimental conditions following 7-day exposures.

  18. Aquatic toxicity of nitrogen mustard to Ceriodaphina dubia, Daphnia magna, and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng-Hang; Lin, Tser-Sheng; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2005-06-01

    Investigation of toxicity of mustard compounds to aquatic organisms has been limited although their effects on terrestrial mammal species have been well studied. In this study, the 48-h LC50 values of nitrogen mustard (HN2) are reported for two aquatic invertebrate species (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia) and for one fish species (Pimephales promelas). Mean LC50 values to C. dubia, D. magna, and P. promela were 1.12, 2.52, and 98.86 mg/L, respectively. C. dubia was the species most sensitive to HN2. Seven-day lethal and sublethal tests with P. promelas and C. dubia were also conducted. In chronic tests, fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by 2.50 mg/L HN2, while C. dubia reproduction was significantly affected by 7.81 mug/L HN2. These adverse effects on aquatic organisms caused by lower-level concentrations of HN2 indicate that a possible aquatic ecosystem disaster could occur either after a chemical spill or during chemical warfare.

  19. Development of miniaturized acute toxicity tests for Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.L.; Kimerle, R.A.; Moser, E.M.; McKee, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Standard EPA methods for conducting static, 48-hour, acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) can be miniaturized to successfully yield accurate LC50/EC50 values. The screening procedure involves exposing the test organisms to 1 mL of test solution, in test chambers which consist of the wells on 48-well microliter plates. Toxicity of the microliter plates and solvent, DO concentration, organism biomass to test solution ratio, partitioning of the chemicals and dilution of the test solution during transfer of the test organisms were examined. Survival and exposure were not significantly altered using non-standard test chambers. Toxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), pentachlorophenol (PCP), kepone, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) was determined using D. magna and fathead minnows. Serial dilutions were made and 1 mL aliquots pipetted into the wells. Daphnia magna, < 24 hours old, and newly hatched fathead minnows, were transferred into the wells, twenty individuals per concentration, one per well. Dose-response curves were established for all test compounds. LC50/EC50`s values obtained using miniaturized methods strongly correlated with those obtained using standard EPA procedures. The tests were repeated a number of times with coefficient of variances for D. magna ranging from 10% with kepone to 64% with SLS. For fathead minnows CVs ranged from 0% with PCP to 23% with kepone. It was concluded that current methods can be miniaturized, yet still provide accurate information regarding toxicity for compounds in limited supply. This method may also be amenable to effluent testing i.e. TIE fractions. Other benefits include reducing the amount of equipment and space needed to conduct a test and the time involved.

  20. Acute toxicity of runoff from sealcoated pavement to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Barbara J; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Van Metre, Peter C; Kunz, James L; Little, Edward E

    2015-04-21

    Runoff from coal-tar-based (CT) sealcoated pavement is a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and N-heterocycles to surface waters. We investigated acute toxicity of simulated runoff collected from 5 h to 111 days after application of CT sealcoat and from 4 h to 36 days after application of asphalt-based sealcoat containing about 7% CT sealcoat (AS/CT-blend). Ceriodaphnia dubia (cladocerans) and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) were exposed in the laboratory to undiluted and 1:10 diluted runoff for 48 h, then transferred to control water and exposed to 4 h of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Mortality following exposure to undiluted runoff from unsealed asphalt pavement and UVR was ≤10% in all treatments. Test organisms exposed to undiluted CT runoff samples collected during the 3 days (C. dubia) or 36 days (P. promelas) following sealcoat application experienced 100% mortality prior to UVR exposure; with UVR exposure, mortality was 100% for runoff collected across the entire sampling period. Phototoxic-equivalent PAH concentrations and mortality demonstrated an exposure-response relation. The results indicate that runoff remains acutely toxic for weeks to months after CT sealcoat application.

  1. Acute toxicity of runoff from sealcoated pavement to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Kunz, James L.; Little, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Runoff from coal-tar-based (CT) sealcoated pavement is a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and N-heterocycles to surface waters. We investigated acute toxicity of simulated runoff collected from 5 h to 111 days after application of CT sealcoat and from 4 h to 36 days after application of asphalt-based sealcoat containing about 7% CT sealcoat (AS/CT-blend). Ceriodaphnia dubia (cladocerans) and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnows) were exposed in the laboratory to undiluted and 1:10 diluted runoff for 48 h, then transferred to control water and exposed to 4 h of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Mortality following exposure to undiluted runoff from unsealed asphalt pavement and UVR was ≤10% in all treatments. Test organisms exposed to undiluted CT runoff samples collected during the 3 days (C. dubia) or 36 days (P. promelas) following sealcoat application experienced 100% mortality prior to UVR exposure; with UVR exposure, mortality was 100% for runoff collected across the entire sampling period. Phototoxic-equivalent PAH concentrations and mortality demonstrated an exposure-response relation. The results indicate that runoff remains acutely toxic for weeks to months after CT sealcoat application.

  2. Sporadic mortality in chronic toxicity tests using Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque): Cases of characterization and control

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, P.J.; Fleming, K.; Guinn, R.; Chapman, N.; Varner, P.; Cooney, J.D.

    2000-01-01

    In whole effluent toxicity tests, organisms are exposed to various effluent concentrations for a specific time period to estimate the potential effects of an effluent on a receiving stream. Laboratories typically have good success performing valid chronic toxicity tests. However, some difficulty in conducting valid chronic whole effluent toxicity tests with Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) has been encountered as a result of sporadic control mortality. Some investigators report an interference that causes anomalous patterns of survival in chronic fathead minnow tests. This interference has been termed sporadic mortality phenomenon. Characteristics of sporadic mortality phenomenon include high variability among replicates, nonmonotonic dose responses, mortality beginning on or about day 4 of the test, and fungal growths often observed on the larvae. Histopathologic examinations often indicate bacterial and/or fungal infections on fish exhibiting symptoms of sporadic mortality phenomenon. The most plausible explanation of sporadic mortality phenomenon is a naturally occurring pathogen or pathogens that interfere with the test method. This interference may invalidate tests or falsely indicate toxicity. Sporadic mortality phenomenon can be reduced or eliminated by sample treatments intended to inactivate (heating, antibiotics, or ultraviolet light) or remove (filtration) pathogenic microorganisms. These methods must be used with forethought because of their potential to alter the toxicity of a sample.

  3. Aminomethylphosphonic acid has low chronic toxicity to Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven L; von Mérey, Georg; Minderhout, Tui; Manson, Philip; Sutton, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) is the simplest member of a class of compounds known as aminomethylenephosphonates and the only environmental metabolite measured in significant amounts during the degradation of the herbicide glyphosate in soil. However, there are additional sources of AMPA in the environment, originating from organic phosphonates which are used in water treatment to inhibit scale formation and corrosion. Like glyphosate, AMPA has low acute toxicity to aquatic animals, and the no-observed-adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) obtained from a fish full-life cycle study for glyphosate was determined to be 26 mg/L. However, the chronic toxicity of AMPA to aquatic animals has not been evaluated before. The purpose of the present study was to assess the potential for chronic toxicity of AMPA to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Daphnia magna. Chronic toxicity to P. promelas was evaluated in a fish early-life stage study. The primary endpoints were larval survival, growth, and development. The NOAEC for P. promelas was determined to be 12 mg/L, the highest concentration tested. The chronic toxicity to D. magna was evaluated in a Daphnia reproduction test. The primary endpoints were survival, growth, and reproduction. The no-observed-effect concentration for D. magna was determined to be 15 mg/L. Conservatively predicted environmental surface water concentrations for AMPA from typical foliar agricultural application rates and values from surface water monitoring programs are 100 to 1000 times less than the NOAEC values from both studies. Consequently, there is a large and highly protective margin of safety between realistic environmental exposures to AMPA and chronic toxicity to aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates.

  4. Acute toxicity of commonly used forestry herbicide mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Tatum, Vickie L; Borton, Dennis L; Streblow, William R; Louch, Jeffrey; Shepard, James P

    2012-12-01

    Because many herbicides selectively control specific species or types of vegetation, they are often applied as mixtures to achieve better control over undesirable vegetation. When herbicides are applied in forest ecosystems, streams, ponds, and other bodies of water are typically protected by buffer zones in which no herbicide is applied. However, in some landscapes, small wetlands and streams are difficult to see and avoid, thus the potential acute toxicity of herbicide mixtures to aquatic organisms is of interest, yet it has not been well-studied. We examined the acute toxicity of 23 different herbicide mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) at environmentally relevant concentrations, and, where possible, characterized mixture interactions using Marking's Additive Index. Maximum exposure concentrations were equivalent to applying the maximum allowable rate for each component directly to the surface of a 6-in. deep pond with no dissipation following application. Under the conditions of this study, herbicide formulations containing Accord Concentrate (glyphosate), Arsenal AC (imazapyr), Chopper (imazapyr), Escort (metsulfuron methyl), Oust XP (sulfometuron methyl), and Velpar L (hexazinone) were not associated with appreciable acute toxicity to fathead minnows or C. dubia when used alone or in mixtures with each other and various surfactants and adjuvants. Herbicide mixtures for which Additive Indexes could be calculated exhibited primarily antagonistic or simple additive toxicity. In the few cases where synergistic toxicity was observed, the degree of synergism was slight, never exceeding approximately twice the effect estimated based on additive toxicity. Based on the results of this study, neither acute toxicity nor enhanced acute aquatic toxicity due to synergistic mixture effects appears to be a significant concern for applications of the herbicide mixtures most commonly used in forestry. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  5. Probabilistic ecological hazard assessment of parabens using Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Laura L; Usenko, Sascha; Brain, Richard A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2009-12-01

    Parabens are common antimicrobial agents found in thousands of pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Parabens are introduced into aquatic ecosystems from wastewater treatment plant effluents and have been detected in surface waters in the low microgram per liter range. Although these compounds display low toxicity in mammals, paraben toxicity to aquatic organisms has not been investigated. Standardized acute and subchronic endpoints in larval fish (Pimephales promelas) and cladoceran (Daphnia magna) models were examined for seven different parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, isopropyl-, propyl-, isobutyl-, butyl-, benzylparaben), which encompassed a range of log P values. Paraben 48 h median lethal concentration values (LC50) ranged from 4.0 to 24.6 mg/L in D. magna and 3.3 to >160.0 mg/L in fathead minnow. Growth and reproduction in D. magna had lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOECs) ranging from 0.12 to 9.0 mg/L and 1.5 to 6.0 mg/L, respectively. Fathead minnow growth was adversely affected at levels ranging from 1.0 to 25.0 mg/L. Aquatic toxicity of the parabens was inversely related to lipophilicity, suggesting that responses using standardized endpoints resulted from narcosis. Utilizing toxicity benchmark concentrations (e.g., LC50s, LOECs) for each compound, chemical toxicity distributions, a probabilistic hazard assessment technique, were developed to assess the probabilities of detecting parabens that elicit a response at or below a given concentration. For the responses assessed in the present study, the 5th centile values (the concentration at which 5% of parabens elicit a response) ranged from 15 microg/L to 2.43 mg/L, with D. magna growth eliciting the lowest 5th centile value and acute D. magna mortality eliciting the highest. The distributions demonstrated that at environmentally relevant concentrations in developed countries there is limited acute or subchronic aquatic hazard of parabens to the organisms and responses examined.

  6. Reproductive effects in fathead minnows (Pimphales promelas) following a 21 d exposure to 17α-ethinylestradiol.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brandon M; Lazorchak, James M; Jensen, Kathleen M; Haring, Herman J; Smith, Mark E; Flick, Robert W; Bencic, David C; Biales, Adam D

    2016-02-01

    17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen that is an active ingredient in oral contraception and hormone replacement therapy. Surveys of wastewater treatment plant effluents and surface waters throughout the world have reported EE2 concentrations in the ng/L range, and these low levels can cause significant reproductive effects in fish. This study tested the effects of three environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations: 0.47, 1.54 and 3.92 ng/L using a 21 d short-term reproductive assay to investigate the effects of EE2 on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction. The two highest EE2 concentrations tested in this study caused significant liver gene expression and induction of vitellogenin plasma protein in male fathead minnows. Exposure to 3.92 ng EE2/L increased the production of plasma vitellogenin in the females. Plasma estradiol concentrations were significantly reduced in females exposed to 1.54 and 3.92 ng EE2/L. All three tested concentrations significantly reduced fathead minnow egg production after a 21 d exposure to EE2. The results of this study indicate that the previously reported no observed adverse effect concentration (NOAEC) for EE2 on fathead minnow egg production (1.0 ng/L) may be too high. Because all three treatments resulted in significantly reduced egg production, the lowest observed adverse effect concentration (LOAEC) for EE2 on fathead minnow egg production is 0.47 ng EE2/L. This research estimates a NOAEC for fathead minnow reproduction at 0.24 ng EE2/L following a 21 d exposure. Additionally, induction of vitellogenin is a sensitive indicator of estrogen exposure but does not appear to be predictive of fathead minnow egg production.

  7. ECOTOXICOGENOMICS: EXPOSURE INDICATORS USING ESTS AND SUBTRACTIVE LIBRARIES FOR MULTI-LIFE STAGES OF PIMEPHALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecotoxicogenomics is research that identifies patterns of gene expression in wildlife and predicts effects of environmental stressors. We are developing a multiple stressor, multiple life stage exposure model using the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), initially studying fou...

  8. ECOTOXICOGENOMICS: EXPOSURE INDICATORS USING ESTS AND SUBTRACTIVE LIBRARIES FOR MULTI-LIFE STAGES OF PIMEPHALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecotoxicogenomics is research that identifies patterns of gene expression in wildlife and predicts effects of environmental stressors. We are developing a multiple stressor, multiple life stage exposure model using the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), initially studying fou...

  9. EFFECTIVE CONCENTRATIONS OF 6 CONTAMINANTS TO LEMMA MINOR, PIMEPHALES PROMELA, DAPHNIA MAGNA, AND CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here resulted in EC50 and LOEC values for the contaminants copper, cadmium, diazinon, atrazine, and cyanide to the species Lemna Minor, Pimephales promelas, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Observed values were used as benchmarks for assessing the se...

  10. EFFECTIVE CONCENTRATIONS OF 6 CONTAMINANTS TO LEMMA MINOR, PIMEPHALES PROMELA, DAPHNIA MAGNA, AND CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presented here resulted in EC50 and LOEC values for the contaminants copper, cadmium, diazinon, atrazine, and cyanide to the species Lemna Minor, Pimephales promelas, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Observed values were used as benchmarks for assessing the se...

  11. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs for hormones and/or receptors of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, thyroid hormone, and corticosteroid and the gender-, tissue-, and developmental-specific expression of their mRNA transcripts in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Filby, Amy L; Tyler, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), thyroid hormones, and corticosteroids play central roles in a wide range of body functions but, in fish, information on their interactions is limited. These axes of the endocrine system are also potential targets for disruption of signaling pathways by hormone-mimicking chemicals, but have received little study. Molecular approaches offer an effective way to help unravel these endocrine interactions but require the appropriate gene-specific assays to do so. In this study, the cDNAs for a suite of hormones and/or receptors involved in signaling for the effects of GH and IGF-I [GH, GH receptor (GHR), IGF-I, IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR)], thyroid hormones [thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRalpha) and beta (TRbeta)], and corticosteroids [glucocorticoid receptor (GR)] were cloned from the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; fhm), and the tissue-, developmental-, and gender-related expression of their mRNA transcripts established. By polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy, we obtained full-length 1123-bp GH, 817-bp IGF-I, 1584-bp TRbeta, and 2571-bp GR cDNAs, coding for 210 amino acid (aa) GH, 161 aa IGF-I, 378 aa TRbeta, and 745 aa GR putative proteins, and partial-length 158-bp GHR, 811-bp IGF-IR, and 446-bp TRalpha cDNAs. Real-time PCR analyses revealed broad tissue expression for the target mRNAs; all targets were expressed in brain, pituitary, gill, liver, gonad, intestine, and muscle, with the exception of GH that was expressed only in the pituitary and gonad. Expression patterns in both juvenile and adult fhm were complex, with both temporal-, tissue-, and sex-specific characteristics. For example, hepatic expressions of GHR, IGF-I, and IGF-IR were far higher in males than in females, possibly reflecting the sex-related dimorphism in growth that occurs in this species, and TRalpha and TRbeta showed divergent expression patterns during development (where TRbeta predominated) and in adult tissues implying some

  12. Potential estrogenic effects of wastewaters on gene expression in Pimephales promelas and fish assemblages in streams of southeastern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; George, Scott D.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Hemming, Joceyln D. C.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Direct linkages between endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from municipal and industrial wastewaters and impacts on wild fish assemblages are rare. The levels of plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) and Vtg messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to wastewater effluents and dilutions of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), estrogen activity, and fish assemblages in 10 receiving streams were assessed to improve understanding of important interrelations. Results from 4-d laboratory assays indicate that EE2, plasma Vtg concentration, and Vtg gene expression in fathead minnows, and 17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq values) were highly related to each other (R2 = 0.98–1.00). Concentrations of E2Eq in most effluents did not exceed 2.0 ng/L, which was possibly a short-term exposure threshold for Vtg gene expression in male fathead minnows. Plasma Vtg in fathead minnows only increased significantly (up to 1136 μg/mL) in 2 wastewater effluents. Fish assemblages were generally unaffected at 8 of 10 study sites, yet the density and biomass of 79% to 89% of species populations were reduced (63–68% were reduced significantly) in the downstream reach of 1 receiving stream. These results, and moderate to high E2Eq concentrations (up to 16.1 ng/L) observed in effluents during a companion study, suggest that estrogenic wastewaters can potentially affect individual fish, their populations, and entire fish communities in comparable systems across New York, USA. 

  13. Effects of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the bioavailability and toxicity of diphenhydramine to Pimephales promelas in sediment exposures.

    PubMed

    Myer, Mark H; Henderson, W Matthew; Black, Marsha C

    2017-02-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and pharmaceutical compounds are classified by the US Environmental Protection Agency as contaminants of emerging concern, with significant research devoted to determining their potential environmental and toxicological effects. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are known to have a high adsorptive capacity for organic contaminants, leading to potential uses in water remediation; however, there is concern that co-exposure with MWCNTs may alter the bioavailability of organic compounds. Existing studies investigating MWCNT/organic contaminant co-exposures have shown conflicting results, and no study to date has examined the combined effects of MWCNTs and a common pharmaceutical. In the present study, juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to sublethal concentrations of the over-the-counter antihistamine diphenhydramine (DPH) in the presence of natural sediment for 10 d, with some treatment groups receiving MWCNTs. Addition of MWCNTs did not have a protective effect on DPH-related growth inhibition, and did not reduce the whole-body burden of DPH in exposed fish. Mass-balance calculations indicated that significant amounts of DPH were adsorbed to MWCNTs, and DPH concentrations in water and sediment were commensurately reduced. Bioconcentration factor and biota-sediment accumulation factor increased in the presence of MWCNTs, indicating that P. promelas accumulates DPH adsorbed to MWCNTs in sediment, likely by co-ingestion of MWCNTs during feeding from the sediment surface. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:320-328. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Background variability in whole effluent chronic toxicity test statistics for Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Canton, S.P.

    1994-12-31

    Past studies have shown considerable variability in whole effluent toxicity tests in terms of LC{sub 50}`s and NOEC`s from reference toxicant tests. However, this approach cannot differentiate between variability in test organisms themselves from the variable response to a toxicant. A data base of control treatments in chronic WET tests was constructed allowing evaluation of mean performance of WET test organisms Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas not subjected to chemical stress. Surrogate test series were then constructed by randomly selecting replicates from this control data base. These surrogate test series were analyzed using standard EPA statistical procedures to determine NOEC`s for survival and both NOEC`s and IC{sub 25} for reproduction and growth. Since NOEC`s have a significance level (p) of 0.05, it follows that approximately 5% of the tests could ``fail`` simply due to chance and this was, in fact, the case for these surrogate tests. The IC{sub 25} statistic is a linear interpolation technique, with 95% confidence intervals calculated through a bootstrap method. It does not have a statistical check for significance. With the IC{sub 25} statistic, 10.5% of the Ceriodaphnia tests indicated toxicity (i.e. an IC{sub 25} of less than 1 00% ``effluent``), while this increased to 37% for fathead minnows. There appear to be fundamental flaws in the calculation of the IC{sub 25} statistic and its confidence intervals, as currently provided in EPA documentation. Until these flaws are addressed, it is recommended that this method not be used in the analysis of chronic toxicity data.

  15. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  16. CHRONIC EFFECTS OF THE HERBICIDE DIURON ON FRESHWATER CLADOCERANS,AMPHIPODS,MIDGES,MINNOWS,WORMS, AND SNAILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chronic effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulex, and survival and growth of the amphipod Hyalella azteca, the midge Chironomus tentans, juvenile and embro/larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, annelid worms, Lumbriculus variegatus,...

  17. Inference of a Transcriptional Network Involved in Chemical Inhibition of Estrogen Synthesis in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  18. Inference of a Transcriptional Network Involved in Chemical Inhibition of Estrogen Synthesis in Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  19. EVALUATION OF A WASTEWATER DISCHARGE USING VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION AND PLASMA PROTEIN LEVELS IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liver vitellogenin gene expression and plasma vitellogenin protein presence, indicators of exposure of fish to estrogens, were measured in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) caged at two locations in a constructed wetland below a sewage treatment plant effluent outfall in...

  20. EVALUATION OF A WASTEWATER DISCHARGE USING VITELLOGENIN GENE EXPRESSION AND PLASMA PROTEIN LEVELS IN MALE FATHEAD MINNOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liver vitellogenin gene expression and plasma vitellogenin protein presence, indicators of exposure of fish to estrogens, were measured in male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) caged at two locations in a constructed wetland below a sewage treatment plant effluent outfall in...

  1. A Time-course Analysis of Effects of the Steroidogenesis Inhibitor Ketoconazole on Components of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  2. A Time-course Analysis of Effects of the Steroidogenesis Inhibitor Ketoconazole on Components of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconaz...

  3. A Time-course Analysis of Effects of the Steroidogenesis Inhibitor Ketoconazole on Components of the Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal Axis of Fathead Minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  4. A time-course analysis of effects of the steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole on components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of fathead minnows (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate temporal effects of the model steroidogenesis inhibitor ketoconazole (KTC) on aspects of reproductive endocrine function controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Ketoconazo...

  5. Photo-induced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to fish (Lepomis spp. , Lepomis macrochirus, and Pimephales promelas)

    SciTech Connect

    Oris, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The acute toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to fish in the presence of solar radiation has been assessed. These studies were conducted in a laboratory system under simulated sunlight. Anthracene, a linear 3-ring PAH was used as a model compound in the examination of light intensity and photoperiod effects, the elucidation of possible sites and modes of toxic action, and the development of an environmental hazard assessment. The primary test species in these studies was juvenile sunfish (Lepomis spp., and Lepomis macrochirus). Eleven other PAH were examined for potential photo-activity with larvae of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). A structure-activity relationship has been developed based on molecular structure and photochemical properties which can predictively classify a compound as being phototoxic or non-phototoxic. The results of these experiments are environmentally significant since when compared to current natural PAH concentrations in water and in fish tissue, there are waters in which photo-induced PAH toxicity may presently occur. It is concluded that solar radiation is an important accessory parameter that deserves consideration in the toxicity assessment of PAH in the aquatic environment.

  6. Sequencing and De novo Draft Assemblies of the Fathead Minnow (Pimphales promelas)Reference Genome

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to develop genome-scale resources for the fathead minnow (Pimphales promelas) an important model organism widely used in both aquatic ecotoxicology research and in regulatory toxicity testing. We report on the first sequencing and two draft assemblies fo...

  7. Sequencing and De novo Draft Assemblies of the Fathead Minnow (Pimphales promelas)Reference Genome

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to develop genome-scale resources for the fathead minnow (Pimphales promelas) an important model organism widely used in both aquatic ecotoxicology research and in regulatory toxicity testing. We report on the first sequencing and two draft assemblies fo...

  8. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) limit food for larval fish (Pimephales promelas) in turbulent systems: a bioenergetics analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch, L.A.; Richardson, W.B.; Sandheinrich, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a factorial experiment, in outdoor mesocosms, on the effects of zebra mussels and water column mixing (i.e., turbulence) on the diet, growth, and survival of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Significant (P < 0.05) larval mortality occurred by the end of the experiment with the highest mortality (90%) occurring in the presence of both turbulence and zebra mussels, whereas mortality was 37% in treatment with turbulence and 17% and 18% in the zebra mussels treatment, and the control, respectively. The size of individual fish was significantly different among treatments at the end of the experiment and was inversely related to survival. Levels of trophic resources (i.e., phyto and zooplankton) varied among treatments and were treatment specific. Turbulent mixing facilitated removal of phytoplankton by zebra mussels by making the entire water column of the tanks available to these benthic filter feeders. Early in the experiment (Day = 0 to 14) the physical process of turbulent mixing likely caused a reduction in standing stocks of zooplankton. The interactive effect of turbulence and mussels reduced copepod and rotifer stocks, through physical processes and through filtration by zebra mussels, relative to the turbulence treatment. The reductions in the number of total zooplankton in the turbulent mixing mesocosms and the further reduction of rotifer and copepod in the turbulence and mussels treatment coincided with a period of increased reliance of larval fathead minnows on these prey. Estimates of consumption from bioenergetics modeling and measured prey standing stocks indicated caloric resources of suitable prey in turbulence treatments during the early weeks of the experiment were insufficient to prevent starvation. Early mortality in the turbulence and mussels treatment likely released surviving fish from intense intraspecific competition and resulted in higher individual growth rates. A combination of high abundance of zebra mussels in an

  9. Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) limit food for larval fish (Pimephales promelas) in turbulent systems: A bioenergetics analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartsch, L.A.; Richardson, W.B.; Sandheinrich, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a factorial experiment, in outdoor mesocosms, on the effects of zebra mussels and water column mixing (i.e., turbulence) on the diet, growth, and survival of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Significant (P < 0.05) larval mortality occurred by the end of the experiment with the highest mortality (90%) occurring in the presence of both turbulence and zebra mussels, whereas mortality was 37% in treatment with turbulence and 17% and 18% in the zebra mussels treatment, and the control, respectively. The size of individual fish was significantly different among treatments at the end of the experiment and was inversely related to survival. Levels of trophic resources (i.e., phyto and zooplankton) varied among treatments and were treatment specific. Turbulent mixing facilitated removal of phytoplankton by zebra mussels by making the entire water column of the tanks available to these benthic filter feeders. Early in the experiment (Day = 0 to 14) the physical process of turbulent mixing likely caused a reduction in standing stocks of zooplankton. The interactive effect of turbulence and mussels reduced copepod and rotifer stocks, through physical processes and through filtration by zebra mussels, relative to the turbulence treatment. The reductions in the number of total zooplankton in the turbulent mixing mesocosms and the further reduction of rotifer and copepod in the turbulence and mussels treatment coincided with a period of increased reliance of larval fathead minnows on these prey. Estimates of consumption from bioenergetics modeling and measured prey standing stocks indicated caloric resources of suitable prey in turbulence treatments during the early weeks of the experiment were insufficient to prevent starvation. Early mortality in the turbulence and mussels treatment likely released surviving fish from intense intraspecific competition and resulted in higher individual growth rates. A combination of high abundance of zebra mussels in an

  10. Gene set enrichment analysis of microarray data from Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque), a non-mammalian model organism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methods for gene-class testing, such as Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), incorporate biological knowledge into the analysis and interpretation of microarray data by comparing gene expression patterns to pathways, systems and emergent phenotypes. However, to use GSEA to its full capability with non-mammalian model organisms, a microarray platform must be annotated with human gene symbols. Doing so enables the ability to relate a model organism's gene expression, in response to a given treatment, to potential human health consequences of that treatment. We enhanced the annotation of a microarray platform from a non-mammalian model organism, and then used the GSEA approach in a reanalysis of a study examining the biological significance of acute and chronic methylmercury exposure on liver tissue of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Using GSEA, we tested the hypothesis that fathead livers, in response to methylmercury exposure, would exhibit gene expression patterns similar to diseased human livers. Results We describe an enhanced annotation of the fathead minnow microarray platform with human gene symbols. This resource is now compatible with the GSEA approach for gene-class testing. We confirmed that GSEA, using this enhanced microarray platform, is able to recover results consistent with a previous analysis of fathead minnow exposure to methylmercury using standard analytical approaches. Using GSEA to compare fathead gene expression profiles to human phenotypes, we also found that fathead methylmercury-treated livers exhibited expression profiles that are homologous to human systems & pathways and results in damage that is similar to those of human liver damage associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis B. Conclusions This study describes a powerful resource for enabling the use of non-mammalian model organisms in the study of human health significance. Results of microarray gene expression studies involving fathead minnow, typically

  11. Relationships of quantitative structure-activity to comparative toxicity of selected phenols in the Pimephales promelas and Tetrahymena pyriformis test systems.

    PubMed

    Schultz, T W; Holcombe, G W; Phipps, G L

    1986-10-01

    The relative toxic response of 27 selected phenols in the 96-hr acute flowthrough Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) and the 48- to 60-hr chronic static Tetrahymena pyriformis (ciliate protozoan) test systems was evaluated. Log Kow-dependent linear regression analyses revealed that the data from each test system consisted of two linear equations. The less toxic chemicals form a relationship which models polar narcosis; these chemicals are slightly more active than the baseline toxicity of nonionic narcotic chemicals. The more toxic chemicals form a relationship which models uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Regression analysis of fathead minnow toxicity (log LC50 (mol/liter] vs Tetrahymena toxicity (log BR (mmol/liter] showed good correlation between the two systems. An exception appears to be 4-nitrophenol, which is more active in the Tetrahymena system than in the fathead minnow and lies outside the 95% confidence interval. Reanalysis following deletion of 4-nitrophenol results in the equation log LC50 = -0.9192 (log BR) -3.5035; n = 26, r2 = 0.887.

  12. Campus parking lot stormwater runoff: physicochemical analyses and toxicity tests using Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Andrew D; Johnson, Brenda M; Rodgers, John H; English, William R

    2010-04-01

    Campus parking lot stormwater (CPLSW) runoff can mobilize a variety of constituents from vehicular and atmospheric deposition that may pose risks to receiving aquatic systems. The objective of this study was to characterize CPLSW and to discern potential constituents of concern that may affect aquatic biota in receiving systems. Characterization of CPLSW included analyses of metals, oil and grease, and general water chemistry. Toxicity tests were performed using two sentinel species, Ceriodaphniadubia Richard and Pimephales promelas Rafinesque. Metals measured (at their maximum) in CPLSW included 4756microg Al L(-1), 53microg Cu L(-1), 130microg Pb L(-1), and 908microg Zn L(-1). Although CPLSW varied widely in composition and toxicity, constituents of concern included: pH, alkalinity, total suspended solids, biological oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, metals, and oil and grease. Fish (P. promelas) were more sensitive to CPLSW than C. dubia with decreased survival in 92% and 15% of the samples (n=13), respectively.

  13. Comparative toxicity of chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos: Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Sherrard, R M; Murray-Gulde, C L; Rodgers, J H; Shah, Y T

    2002-12-01

    This study was done to characterize responses of Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard and Pimephales promelas Rafinesque exposed to aqueous solutions of chlorothalonil (tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) and chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl phosphorothioate). Chlorothalonil (a fungicide) and chlorpyrifos (an insecticide) are intensely used in agricultural, silvicultural, and urban settings. These pesticides may enter aquatic systems through several pathways including rainfall runoff. C. dubia and P. promelas have been used to monitor surface waters and discern the effects of pesticides that contaminate those waters. Modified static renewal exposures (7 or 10 days) with individual solutions of chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos were used to obtain mortality data for C. dubia and P. promelas, from which potency curves were derived, as well as sublethal effects data (reproduction or growth). In these experiments P. promelas was more sensitive to chlorothalonil, and C. dubia was more sensitive to chlorpyrifos. Lower and upper thresholds (i.e., LC(0) and LC(100)) for 7-day P. promelas exposures to chlorothalonil were 14.4 and 30.8 microg/L, respectively, in contrast to the lower and upper threshold values, 103 and 210 microg/L, respectively, for C. dubia. Ten-day exposures of C. dubia to chlorpyrifos resulted in lower and upper threshold values of 0.05 and 0.09 microg/L, whereas 10-day exposures of P. promelas to chlorpyrifos yielded threshold values of 26 and 274 microg/L. The results of this study illustrated differences in species' sensitivities to chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos as well as differences in the duration of the exposure necessary to illustrate effects that might be elicited from pesticide exposures.

  14. Acute toxicity of PCB congeners to Daphnia magma and Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, T.M. ); Burton, W.D.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The acute toxicity (EC50/LC50) of commercial PCB mixtures has been reported to range from 2.0 to 283 ug/L. Because PCBs are very hydrophobic most biological studies have utilized a carrier solvent to facilitate introduction of PCBs into aqueous solution. As a result, biological effects are often reported at exposure concentrations exceeding water solubility. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the comparative toxicity of selected PCB congeners without carrier solvents. These tests were conducted on early life stages of two sensitive freshwater organisms, Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas.

  15. Comparative toxicity of formulated glycol deicers and pure ethylene and propylene glycol to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Pillard, D.A. )

    1995-02-01

    Airlines use deicers to remove ice and snow from aircraft before flights, and to retard the inflight buildup of these materials. Many of the deicers are formulated mixtures of ethylene glycol (EG) or propylene glycol (PG) and a variety of additives. Because these deicers may be intentionally or accidentally released into aquatic ecosystems, the possibility exists for direct and indirect adverse effects on aquatic organisms. Laboratory studies evaluated the comparative toxicity of formulated glycol deicers and pure materials on the water flea, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas. Acute and short-term chronic tests were performed according to US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The formulated mixtures were found to be substantially more toxic than either of the pure glycol materials. The 48-h LC50s for C. dubia were 13,140 mg/L and 1,020 mg/L using formulated EG and PG, and 34,400 mg/L and 18,340 mg/L using pure EG and PG, respectively. The 96-h LC50s for P. promelas were 8,050 mg/L and 710 mg/L using formulated EG and PG, and 72,860 mg/L and 55,770 mg/L using pure EG and PG, respectively. Chronic IC25s for C. dubia were 3,960 mg/L and 640 mg/L using formulated EG and PG; 12,310 mg/L and 13,470 mg/L using pure EG and PG. Chronic IC25s for P. promelas were 3,660 mg/L and 110 mg/L using formulated EG and PG; 22,520 mg/L and 6,940 mg/L using pure EG and PG. For airports that have stormwater discharge permits, numerical limits for EG and PG are generally listed; potential toxicity is assumed to be due to the glycol materials. However, other compounds in the mixtures may either contribute substantially to, or in some cases overshadow, the toxicity of the glycol materials.

  16. Comparison of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) was examined both at the transcriptome level and the proteome level. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ug/L), to an antiandrogen (flutamide, 50...

  17. Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Insights into androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) was obtained using non-gel based proteomics analysis. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr through the water to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ?g/L), a prototypical anti-andr...

  18. Comparison of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) was examined both at the transcriptome level and the proteome level. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ug/L), to an antiandrogen (flutamide, 50...

  19. Proteomic Expression Patterns in Fathead Minnows Exposed to Trenbolone and Flutamide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Insights into androgen signaling in the liver of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) was obtained using non-gel based proteomics analysis. We exposed female fathead minnows for 48 hr through the water to a prototypical androgen (17b-trenbolone, 5 ?g/L), a prototypical anti-andr...

  20. Minnows get columnaris too; copper sulfate works!

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to compare the therapeutic effects of copper sulfate (CuSO4), when delivered in either a flow-through or static system, on the survival of golden shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas; Fig. 1A) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas; Fig. 1B) infected with Flavobacterium columnare (...

  1. Improved building up a model of toxicity towards Pimephales promelas by the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A; Raskova, Maria; Raska, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    By optimization of so-called correlation weights of attributes of simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSAR) for toxicity towards Pimephales promelas are established. A new SMILES attribute has been utilized in this work. This attribute is a molecular descriptor, which reflects (i) presence of different kinds of bonds (double, triple, and stereo chemical bonds); (ii) presence of nitrogen, oxygen, sulphur, and phosphorus atoms; and (iii) presence of fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms. The statistical characteristics of the best model are the following: n=226, r(2)=0.7630, RMSE=0.654 (training set); n=114, r(2)=0.7024, RMSE=0.766 (calibration set); n=226, r(2)=0.6292, RMSE=0.870 (validation set). A new criterion to select a preferable split into the training and validation sets are suggested and discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Channel catfish polyculture with fathead minnows or threadfin shad effects on pond plankton communities and catfish fillet flavor, color, and fatty acid composition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Threadfin shad, Dorosoma petenense, or fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were co-cultured with channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, in earthen ponds to determine the effects of planktivory on plankton community dynamics and catfish fillet quality. Fathead minnows had no effect on the plankton c...

  3. Comparison of nanosilver and ionic silver toxicity in Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Hoheisel, Sarah M; Diamond, Steve; Mount, David

    2012-11-01

    The increasing use of nanosilver in consumer products and the likelihood of environmental exposure warrant investigation into the toxicity of nanosilver to aquatic organisms. A series of studies were conducted comparing the potency of nanosilver to ionic silver (Ag(+)) at acute and sublethal levels using two test organisms (Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas). The 48-h D. magna median lethal concentration (LC50) of multiple sizes (10, 20, 30, and 50 nm) of commercially prepared nanosilver (nanoComposix) ranged from 4.31 to 30.36 µg total Ag L(-1) with increasing toxicity associated with decreasing particle size. A strong relationship between estimated specific particle surface area and acute toxicity was observed. Nanosilver suspensions (10 nm) treated with cation exchange resin to reduce the concentration of Ag(+) associated with it were approximately equally toxic to D. magna compared to untreated nanosilver (48-h LC50s were 2.15 and 2.79 µg total Ag L(-1), respectively). The 96-h LC50 and 7-d sublethal 20% effective concentrations (EC20s) for P. promelas were 89.4 and 46.1 µg total Ag L(-1), respectively, for 10 nm nanosilver and 4.70 and 1.37 µg total Ag L(-1), respectively, for Ag(+); the resulting ratios of 96-h LC50 to 7-d EC20 were not significantly different for nanosilver and ionic silver. Overall, these studies did not provide strong evidence that nanosilver either acts by a different mechanism of toxicity than ionic silver, or is likely to cause acute or lethal toxicity beyond that which would be predicted by mass concentration of total silver. This in turn suggests that regulatory approaches based on the toxicity of ionic silver to aquatic life would not be underprotective for environmental releases of nanosilver.

  4. Water- and sediment-quality effects on Pimephales promelas spawning vary along an agriculture-to-urban land-use gradient.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Steven R; Klaper, Rebecca D; Weber, Daniel N; Bannerman, Roger T

    2011-10-15

    Many streams in the U.S. are "impaired" due to anthropogenic influence. For watershed managers to achieve practical understanding of these impairments, a multitude of factors must be considered, including point and nonpoint-source influence on water quality. A spawning assay was developed in this study to evaluate water- and sediment-quality effects that influenced Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) egg production over a gradient of urban and agricultural land use in 27 small watersheds in Eastern Wisconsin. Six pairs of reproducing fathead minnows were contained in separate mesh cartridges within one larger flow-through chamber. Water- and sediment quality were sampled for an array of parameters. Egg production was monitored for each pair providing an assessment of spawning success throughout the 21-day test periods. Incidences of low dissolved oxygen (DO) in many of these streams negatively impacted spawning success. Nine of 27 streams experienced DO less than 3.1mg/L and 15 streams experienced DO less than 4.8mg/L. Low DO was observed in urban and agricultural watersheds, but the upper threshold of minimum DO decreased with increasing urban development. An increase in specific conductance was related to a decrease in spawning success. In previous studies for streams in this region, specific conductance had a linear relation with chloride, suggesting the possibility that chloride could be a factor in egg production. Egg production was lower at sites with substantial urban development, but sites with low egg production were not limited to urban sites. Degradation of water- and sediment-quality parameters with increasing urban development is indicated for multiple parameters while patterns were not detected for others. Results from this study indicate that DO must be a high priority watershed management consideration for this region, specific conductance should be investigated further to determine the mechanism of the relation with egg production, and water- and

  5. Water- and sediment-quality effects on Pimephales promelas spawning vary along an agriculture-to-urban land-use gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Klaper, R.D.; Weber, D.N.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Many streams in the U.S. are "impaired" due to anthropogenic influence. For watershed managers to achieve practical understanding of these impairments, a multitude of factors must be considered, including point and nonpoint-source influence on water quality. A spawning assay was developed in this study to evaluate water- and sediment-quality effects that influenced Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) egg production over a gradient of urban and agricultural land use in 27 small watersheds in Eastern Wisconsin. Six pairs of reproducing fathead minnows were contained in separate mesh cartridges within one larger flow-through chamber. Water- and sediment quality were sampled for an array of parameters. Egg production was monitored for each pair providing an assessment of spawning success throughout the 21-day test periods. Incidences of low dissolved oxygen (DO) in many of these streams negatively impacted spawning success. Nine of 27 streams experienced DO less than 3.1. mg/L and 15 streams experienced DO less than 4.8. mg/L. Low DO was observed in urban and agricultural watersheds, but the upper threshold of minimum DO decreased with increasing urban development. An increase in specific conductance was related to a decrease in spawning success. In previous studies for streams in this region, specific conductance had a linear relation with chloride, suggesting the possibility that chloride could be a factor in egg production. Egg production was lower at sites with substantial urban development, but sites with low egg production were not limited to urban sites. Degradation of water- and sediment-quality parameters with increasing urban development is indicated for multiple parameters while patterns were not detected for others. Results from this study indicate that DO must be a high priority watershed management consideration for this region, specific conductance should be investigated further to determine the mechanism of the relation with egg production, and water

  6. Aquatic toxicity of sertraline to Pimephales promelas at environmentally relevant surface water pH.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Theodore W; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Chambliss, C Kevin; Brooks, Bryan W

    2009-12-01

    Researchers recognize that ionization state may influence the biological activity of weak acids and bases. Dissociation in aqueous solutions is controlled by the pKa of a compound and the pH of the matrix. Because many pharmaceuticals are implicitly designed as ionizable compounds, site-specific variability in pH of receiving waters may introduce uncertainty to ecological risk assessments. The present study employed 48-h and 7-d toxicity tests with Pimephales promelas exposed to the model weak base pharmaceutical sertraline over a gradient of environmentally relevant surface water pHs. The 48-h experiments were completed in triplicate, and the average lethal concentration values were 647, 205, and 72 microL sertraline at pH 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5, respectively. Survivorship, growth, and feeding rate (a nontraditional endpoint linked by other researchers to sertraline's specific mode of action) were monitored during the 7-d experiment. Adverse effects were more pronounced when individuals were exposed to sertraline at pH 8.5 compared to pH 7.5 and 6.5. The pH-dependent toxicological relationships from these studies were related to in-stream pH data for two streams in the Brazos River basin of central Texas, USA. This predictive approach was taken because of the scarcity of environmental analytical data for sertraline. The results of this study emphasized temporal variability associated with in-stream pH linked to seasonal differences within and between these spatially related systems. Relating site-specific pH variability of surface waters to ionization state may allow researchers to reduce uncertainty during ecological risk assessment of pharmaceuticals by improving estimates of biological effects associated with exposure.

  7. Male Fathead Minnow Urine-Based Metabolomics for Assessing Impacts of Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed the potential for profiling metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy was us...

  8. Sex-specific gonadal and gene expression changes throughout development in fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish in endocrine disruption studies, none have characterized sex-specific baseline expression of genes involved in sex differentiation during development in this species. Using a sex-linked DNA marker t...

  9. EFFECTS OF THE HORMONAL GROWTH SUPPLEMENT TRENBOLONE ON REPRODUCTIVE ENDOCRINOLOGY OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop and validate a fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) assay to detect chemicals that affect processes controlled by estrogens and androgens, we determined the effects of trenbolone on reproductive endocrinology of the fish. Trenbolone is a sy...

  10. Male Fathead Minnow Urine-Based Metabolomics for Assessing Impacts of Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed the potential for profiling metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy was us...

  11. Sex-specific gonadal and gene expression changes throughout development in fathead minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) are commonly used as a model fish in endocrine disruption studies, none have characterized sex-specific baseline expression of genes involved in sex differentiation during development in this species. Using a sex-linked DNA marker t...

  12. NMR ANALYSIS OF MALE FATHEAD MINNOW URINARY METABOLITES: A POTENTIAL APPROACH FOR STUDYING IMPACTS OF CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for profiling endogenous metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures was explored using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy w...

  13. Effects-based Monitoring with Caged Fathead Minnows: An Exposure Gradient Case Study in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and consideration of potential effects of chemical mixtures. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-based monitoring of CECs, we c...

  14. NMR ANALYSIS OF MALE FATHEAD MINNOW URINARY METABOLITES: A POTENTIAL APPROACH FOR STUDYING IMPACTS OF CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for profiling endogenous metabolites in urine from male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to assess chemical exposures was explored using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Both one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy w...

  15. Effects-based Monitoring with Caged Fathead Minnows: An Exposure Gradient Case Study in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and consideration of potential effects of chemical mixtures. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-based monitoring of CECs, we c...

  16. The effect of different winter feeding regimes on growth and fatty acid composition of golden shiners and fathead minnows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter mortality is a common problem for baitfish farmers in Arkansas that produce fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas). Bird predation, water quality issues, disease, and harsh fluctuating winter temperatures all contribute to winter fish losses and in ...

  17. Multi-linear regression models predict the effects of water chemistry on acute lead toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Esbaugh, A J; Brix, K V; Mager, E M; Grosell, M

    2011-09-01

    The current study examined the acute toxicity of lead (Pb) to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas in a variety of natural waters. The natural waters were selected to range in pertinent water chemistry parameters such as calcium, pH, total CO(2) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Acute toxicity was determined for C. dubia and P. promelas using standard 48h and 96h protocols, respectively. For both organisms acute toxicity varied markedly according to water chemistry, with C. dubia LC50s ranging from 29 to 180μg/L and P. promelas LC50s ranging from 41 to 3598μg/L. Additionally, no Pb toxicity was observed for P. promelas in three alkaline natural waters. With respect to water chemistry parameters, DOC had the strongest protective impact for both organisms. A multi-linear regression (MLR) approach combining previous lab data and the current data was used to identify the relative importance of individual water chemistry components in predicting acute Pb toxicity for both species. As anticipated, the P. promelas best-fit MLR model combined DOC, calcium and pH. Unexpectedly, in the C. dubiaMLR model the importance of pH, TCO(2) and calcium was minimal while DOC and ionic strength were the controlling water quality variables. Adjusted R(2) values of 0.82 and 0.64 for the P. promelas and C. dubia models, respectively, are comparable to previously developed biotic ligand models for other metals.

  18. Effects-based Monitoring with Caged Fathead Minnows: An Exposure Gradient Case Study in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, USA (SETAC meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and consideration of potential effects of chemical mixtures. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-based monitoring of CECs, we c...

  19. A study of temporal effects of the model anti-androgen flutamide on components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adult fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this study was to investigate temporal changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) treated with the model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, flutamide. Reproductively-mature fish were exposed in a flow-through, meas...

  20. A study of temporal effects of the model anti-androgen flutamide on components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in adult fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this study was to investigate temporal changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis of fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) treated with the model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, flutamide. Reproductively-mature fish were exposed in a flow-through, meas...

  1. Effects-based Monitoring with Caged Fathead Minnows: An Exposure Gradient Case Study in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, USA (SETAC meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the Great Lakes there is an increased focus on contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and consideration of potential effects of chemical mixtures. To further characterize the utility of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for effects-based monitoring of CECs, we c...

  2. EVALUATION OF THE MODEL ANTI-ANDROGEN FLUTAMIDE FOR ASSESSING THE MECHANISTIC BASIS OF RESPONSES TO AN ANDROGEN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we characterized the effects of flutamide, a model mammalian androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, on endocrine function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a small fish species which is widely used for testing endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Binding as...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE MODEL ANTI-ANDROGEN FLUTAMIDE FOR ASSESSING THE MECHANISTIC BASIS OF RESPONSES TO AN ANDROGEN IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (JOURNAL ARTICLE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we characterized the effects of flutamide, a model mammalian androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, on endocrine function in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), a small fish species which is widely used for testing endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Binding a...

  4. Impacts of an Anti-Androgen and an Adrogen/Anti-Androgen Mixture on the Metabolite Profile of Male Fathead Minnow Urine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) were exposed via water to 20 or 200 μg/L of cyproterone acetate (CA), a model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. FHM were also exposed to 500 ng/L of 17β-trenbolone (TB), a model AR agonist, and to mixtures of TB with bot...

  5. EFFECTS OF THE MAMMALIAN ANTIANDROGEN VINCLOZOLIN ON DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTION OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work with the chlorinated fungicide vinclozolin and its metabolites, 2-{[(3,5-dichloropheny1]-carbamoyl]oxy}-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), indicated antiandrogenic properties expressed in vivo as abnormalities in...

  6. A SHORT-TERM REPRODUCTION TEST WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS): L METHODS DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the time and expense associated with full life-cycle testing, most current toxicity tests with fish do not explicity consider reproductive output as an endpoint but, rather, focus on early life-stage survival and development. However, there are classes of chemicals that co...

  7. EVALUATION OF METHOXYCHLOR AS AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent concerns over the possible effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on humans and wildlife has resulted in considerable interest in environmental contaminants that adversely affect aspects of sexual reproduction and early development. The U.S. Environmental Protect...

  8. Integrated approach to explore the mechanisms of aromatase inhibition and recovery in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is a key enzyme in estradiol synthesis that catalyzes the aromatization of androgens into estrogens in ovaries. Here, we used an integrated approach to assess the mechanistic basis of the direct effects of aromatase inhibiti...

  9. Enantioselective Toxicity and Biotransformation of Fipronil in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a relatively new chiral phenylpyrazole insecticide used to control both agricultural and household invertebrate pests. Fipronil is applied as a racemate, or equal mixture, of its two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides increase, production and applicatio...

  10. Differential Toxicity and Accumulation of Fipronil Enantiomers in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a chiral insecticide applied as a racemate of two enantiomers. Because of its high log Koc, fipronil will be found primarily in sediments of aquatic environments. Although a number of studies have examined toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, data on enantioselective t...

  11. Meeting in China: Differential Toxicity and Accumulation of Fipronil Enantiomers in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a chiral insecticide applied as a racemate with two enantiomers. Because of its high log KOC, fipronil will be found primarily in sediments of aquatic environments. Although a number of studies have examined toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, data on enantioselective...

  12. Expression Signatures for a Model Androgen and Antiandrogen in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas Ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trenbolone and flutamide are prototypical model compounds for respectively androgen and antiandrogen modes of action. Trenbolone is an anabolic steroid used in cattle industry to increase weight gain and feed efficiency, and flutamide is a pharmaceutical used to treat prostate c...

  13. Genotyping Sex in Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, for Use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. Dete...

  14. Cloning and initial characterization of nuclear and membrane progesterone receptors in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both native progestagens and synthetic progestins have important effects on reproduction that are mediated through progesterone receptors (PRs). They regulate gamete maturation and can serve as precursors for other steroid hormones in vertebrates and act as reproductive pheromone...

  15. Genotyping Sex in Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, for Use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. Dete...

  16. Enantioselective Toxicity and Biotransformation of Fipronil in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a relatively new chiral phenylpyrazole insecticide used to control both agricultural and household invertebrate pests. Fipronil is applied as a racemate, or equal mixture, of its two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides increase, production and applicatio...

  17. Differential Toxicity and Accumulation of Fipronil Enantiomers in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a chiral insecticide applied as a racemate of two enantiomers. Because of its high log Koc, fipronil will be found primarily in sediments of aquatic environments. Although a number of studies have examined toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, data on enantioselective t...

  18. Meeting in China: Differential Toxicity and Accumulation of Fipronil Enantiomers in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a chiral insecticide applied as a racemate with two enantiomers. Because of its high log KOC, fipronil will be found primarily in sediments of aquatic environments. Although a number of studies have examined toxicity in aquatic invertebrates, data on enantioselective...

  19. Cloning and initial characterization of nuclear and membrane progesterone receptors in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both native progestagens and synthetic progestins have important effects on reproduction that are mediated through progesterone receptors (PRs). They regulate gamete maturation and can serve as precursors for other steroid hormones in vertebrates and act as reproductive pheromone...

  20. Integrated approach to explore the mechanisms of aromatase inhibition and recovery in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatase, a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, is a key enzyme in estradiol synthesis that catalyzes the aromatization of androgens into estrogens in ovaries. Here, we used an integrated approach to assess the mechanistic basis of the direct effects of aromatase inhibiti...

  1. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism and Steroidogenesis in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  2. Developmental Effects Of A Municipal Wastewater Effluent On Two Generations Of The Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Municipal wastewater effluents have been shown to contain a variety of anthropogenic compounds, many of which are know to display estrogenic properties. While multiple laboratory studies have shown the effects of such compounds on an individual basis at elevated concentrations, ...

  3. Effects of the azole fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Azole fungicides, used for both agriculture and human therapeutic applications may disrupt endocrine function of aquatic life. Azole fungicides are designed to inhibit the fungal enzyme lanosterol 14 á-demethylase (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 51). However, they can also interact...

  4. A SHORT-TERM REPRODUCTION TEST WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS): L METHODS DESCRIPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the time and expense associated with full life-cycle testing, most current toxicity tests with fish do not explicity consider reproductive output as an endpoint but, rather, focus on early life-stage survival and development. However, there are classes of chemicals that co...

  5. EFFECTS OF THE MAMMALIAN ANTIANDROGEN VINCLOZOLIN ON DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCTION OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work with the chlorinated fungicide vinclozolin and its metabolites, 2-{[(3,5-dichloropheny1]-carbamoyl]oxy}-2-methyl-3-butenoic acid (M1) and 3',5'-dichloro-2-hydroxy-2-methylbut-3-enanilide (M2), indicated antiandrogenic properties expressed in vivo as abnormalities in...

  6. EVALUATION OF METHOXYCHLOR AS AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent concerns over the possible effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on humans and wildlife has resulted in considerable interest in environmental contaminants that adversely affect aspects of sexual reproduction and early development. The U.S. Environmental Protect...

  7. Investigation of adaptive responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the model aromatase inhibitor fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is a highly dynamic system, which, through various feedback mechanisms, strives to maintain physiological conditions conducive to reproduction even in potentially stressful situations. The development of useful predictive m...

  8. Investigation of adaptive responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to the model aromatase inhibitor fadrozole

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is a highly dynamic system, which, through various feedback mechanisms, strives to maintain physiological conditions conducive to reproduction even in potentially stressful situations. The development of useful predictive m...

  9. A Computational Model for Oocyte Growth Dynamics in Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular biomarkers have been used in ecotoxicological studies to evaluate the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals in fish. Ideally, changes in these molecular biomarkers should be linked to the effects upon reproduction in individuals, and subsequently populations. To m...

  10. Effects of the azole fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) steroidogenesis pathway

    EPA Science Inventory

    Azole fungicides, used for both agriculture and human therapeutic applications may disrupt endocrine function of aquatic life. Azole fungicides are designed to inhibit the fungal enzyme lanosterol 14 á-demethylase (cytochrome P450 [CYP] 51). However, they can also interact...

  11. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  12. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fibrate th...

  13. Genotyping Sex in Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, for Use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. De...

  14. Determining the effects of ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we should first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. Am...

  15. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism and Steroidogenesis in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  16. Method optimization for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver S9 isolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols have been proposed to assess metabolic stability in rainbow trout liver S9 fractions. Using in vitro substrate depletion assays, in vitro intrinsic clearance rates can be calculated for a variety of study compounds. Existing protocols suggest potential adaptati...

  17. EVALUATION OF FADROZOLE AS AN ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR IN FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA has received a legislative mandate to develop and implement standardized screening and testing methods to identify and assess potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The objective of this research was to evaluate a short-term EDC screening/testing assay which ass...

  18. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fib...

  19. Effects of Gemfibrozil on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fibrate th...

  20. Effects of gemfibrozil on lipid metabolism, steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fi...

  1. A SHORT-TERM REPRODUCTIVE TEST WITH THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the time and expense associated with full life-cycle testing, most current toxicity tests with fish do not explicity consider reproductive output as an endpoint but, rather, focus on early life-stage survival and development. However, there are classes of chemicals that co...

  2. Enantioselective toxicity and bioaccumulation of fipronil in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) following water and sediment exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a widely used, broad-spectrum pesticide that is applied as an equal mixture of two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides become more stringent, production and application of fipronil is expected to grow, leading to increased inputs into aquatic environments ...

  3. ASSESSING THE USE OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS FOR FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) TO EXAMINE EXPOSURE VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology has proven to be a useful tool for analyzing the transcriptome of various organisms representing conditions such as disease states, developmental stages, and responses to chemical exposure. Although most commercially available arrays are limited to organism...

  4. Determining the effects of ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we should first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. Am...

  5. Effects of gemfibrozil on lipid metabolism, steroidogenesis and reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which are transcriptional cofactors that regulate expression of genes related to lipid metabolism. Gemfibrozil is a fi...

  6. Expression Signatures for a Model Androgen and Antiandrogen in the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas Ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trenbolone and flutamide are prototypical model compounds for respectively androgen and antiandrogen modes of action. Trenbolone is an anabolic steroid used in cattle industry to increase weight gain and feed efficiency, and flutamide is a pharmaceutical used to treat prostate c...

  7. Environmental gestagens activate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) nuclear progesterone and androgen receptors in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gestagen is a collective term for endogenous and synthetic progesterone receptor (PR) ligands. In teleost fishes, 17á,20â-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) and17á,20â,21- trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20â-S) are the predominant progestogens, whereas in other vertebrates the major pro...

  8. Enantioselective toxicity and bioaccumulation of fipronil in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) following water and sediment exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a widely used, broad-spectrum pesticide that is applied as an equal mixture of two enantiomers. As regulations on older pesticides become more stringent, production and application of fipronil is expected to grow, leading to increased inputs into aquatic environments ...

  9. Genotyping Sex in Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas, for Use in Endocrine Disruption Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting compounds have been shown to completely sex reverse both male and female individuals in amphibian, avian, fish, invertebrate, and reptile species. In many cases these sex-reversed individuals are morphologically indistinguishable from normal individuals. De...

  10. ASSESSING THE USE OF OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS FOR FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) TO EXAMINE EXPOSURE VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology has proven to be a useful tool for analyzing the transcriptome of various organisms representing conditions such as disease states, developmental stages, and responses to chemical exposure. Although most commercially available arrays are limited to organism...

  11. Environmental gestagens activate fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) nuclear progesterone and androgen receptors in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gestagen is a collective term for endogenous and synthetic progesterone receptor (PR) ligands. In teleost fishes, 17á,20â-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (DHP) and17á,20â,21- trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20â-S) are the predominant progestogens, whereas in other vertebrates the major pro...

  12. Method optimization for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) liver S9 isolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Standard protocols have been proposed to assess metabolic stability in rainbow trout liver S9 fractions. Using in vitro substrate depletion assays, in vitro intrinsic clearance rates can be calculated for a variety of study compounds. Existing protocols suggest potential adaptati...

  13. Effects of suspended solids on the acute toxicity of zinc to Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.S.; Dickson, K.L.; Saleh, F.Y.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.; Wilcox, D.; Entazami, A.

    1986-12-01

    Current procedures for setting site-specific water quality criteria consider abiotic and biotic factors. Suspended solids were shown to be important in reducing zinc toxicity to water column organisms. At zinc concentrations of approx. = 1 mg/L in solutions with < 100 mg/L of all suspended solids tested, zinc toxicity to D. magna was reduced. Sorption of zinc to suspended solids and/or changes in water chemistry due to the addition of suspended solids appear to have been the factors causing reductions in zinc toxicity to D. magna. Only suspended solids levels of 483-734 mg/L of a type that increased total alkalinity, total hardness, and total dissolved carbon clearly reduced the toxicity of approx. = 20 mg/L zinc to P. promelas. The toxic form of zinc to these organisms appears to reside in the aqueous phase. Characteristics of suspended solids did not influence the partition coefficient of zinc in sorption experiments of less than or equal to 96 h. The slopes of dose-response curves proved to be useful for assessing the potential of an organism to respond to changes in aqueous phase zinc concentrations, and may be a useful biological parameter when considering site-specific water quality criteria for chemicals.

  14. Bioaccumulation of perfluorinated carboxylates and sulfonates and polychlorinated biphenyls in laboratory-cultured Hexagenia spp., Lumbriculus variegatus and Pimephales promelas from field-collected sediments.

    PubMed

    Prosser, R S; Mahon, K; Sibley, P K; Poirier, D; Watson-Leung, T

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and perfluorinated carboxylates and sulfonates (PFASs) are persistent pollutants in sediment that can potentially bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. The current study investigates variation in the accumulation of PCBs and PFASs in laboratory-cultured Hexagenia spp., Lumbriculus variegatus and Pimephales promelas from contaminated field-collected sediment using 28-day tests. BSAF(lipid) (lipid-normalized biota-sediment accumulation factor) values for total concentration of PCBs were greater in Hexagenia spp. relative to L. variegatus and P. promelas. The distribution of congeners contributing to the total concentration of PCBs in tissue varied among the three species. Trichlorobiphenyl congeners composed the greatest proportion of the total concentration of PCBs in L. variegatus while tetra- and pentabiphenyl congeners dominated in Hexagenia spp. and P. promelas. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was present in all three species at concentrations greater than all other PFASs analyzed. Hexagenia spp. also produced the greatest BSAF(lipid) and BSAF(ww) (non-lipid-normalized biota-sediment accumulation factor) values for PFOS relative to the other two species. However, this was not the case for all PFASs. The trend of BSAF values and number of carbon atoms in the perfluoroalkyl chain of perfluorinated carboxylates varied among the three species but was similar for perfluorinated sulfonates. Differences in the dominant pathways of exposure (e.g., water, sediment ingestion) likely explain a large proportion of the variation in accumulation observed across the three species.

  15. Alteration in Pimephales promelas mucus production after exposure to nanosilver or silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Adam D; Thornton, Cammi; Steevens, Jeffery A; Willett, Kristine L

    2014-12-01

    The fish gill's ability to produce mucus effectively is a critical part of the stress response and protection against xenobiotic toxicity. Adult fathead minnows were exposed to silver nitrate (0.82 µg/L or 13.2 µg/L), polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (11.1 µg/L or 208 µg/L), and citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (10.1 µg/L or 175 µg/L) for 96 h. Mucus concentrations based on glucose as a surrogate were determined at 0 h, 1 h, 2 h, 3 h, 4 h and 24 h after re-dosing each day. Higher mucus production rates following silver treatment were observed at the beginning as compared to controls and compared to after 3 d of exposure. Control fish produced consistent mucus concentrations throughout the exposure (0.62 mg/L and 0.40 mg/L at 24 h and 96 h, respectively). Following 24 h of exposure, all silver treatment groups produced significantly more mucus than controls. Following 96 h of exposure, mucus concentrations in treatment groups were significantly reduced compared with each respective treatment at 24 h. Reduced mucus production following long-term silver exposure could prevent the gills from removing silver, and thus increase toxicity. © 2014 SETAC.

  16. Estrogenic activity of ternary UV filter mixtures in fish (Pimephales promelas) - An analysis with nonlinear isobolograms

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y.; Fent, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Numerous estrogenic compounds are present in aquatic environments, but currently it is not well understood how compounds that differ in maxima and slope of their individual dose-response curves contribute to the overall mixture effect. In order to better understand such interactions we investigated 3 commonly used UV filters, for their estrogenic mixture activity and analysed their joint effects by using the concentration addition (CA) concept. Thereby, we extended the method of isoboles for analysis of 3 compounds that differ in maxima and slopes of their dose-response curves. 3-Benzylidene camphor (3BC), benzophenone-1 (BP1) and benzophenone-2 (BP2) are estrogenic in fish and act as pure- or partial estrogen receptor {alpha} agonists. First we exposed juvenile fathead minnows for 14 days to six concentrations of each UV filter alone to determine vitellogenin (VTG) induction curves, calculate equi-effective mixture concentrations and predict mixture effects. For 3BC, BP1 and BP2 significant VTG-induction occurred at 420, 2668, and 4715 {mu}g/L, respectively. BP2 displayed a full dose-response curve, whereas 3BC and BP1 showed submaximal activity of 70 and 78%, respectively. Second, we exposed fish to 6 equi-effective mixtures (EC-NOEC, EC1, EC5, EC10, EC20, EC30) of these UV filters. Significant VTG-induction occurred at EC5 and higher. Submaximal activity of 67% as compared to the control EE2 (100 ng/L) was reached. The curves for the observed and predicted mixture activity agreed for mixture levels (EC10 to EC30), however, at EC-NOEC, EC1 and EC5, lower activity was observed than predicted by CA. Detailed isobolographic analysis indicate additivity at EC10 to EC30, and antagonism at low levels (EC-NOEC to EC5). Our data show for the first time, that for compounds with differences in maxima and slope, considerably more mixture combinations are additive than previously thought. This should be taken into account for hazard and risk assessment of UV filters and

  17. pH-dependent toxicity of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca and Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Schubauer-Berigan, M.K.; Dierkes, J.R.; Monson, P.D. ); Ankley, G.T. . Environmental Protection Agency)

    1993-07-01

    The speciation and bioavailability of metals are known to be affected by pH. Although many studies have focused on effects on metals of pH changes resulting from lake acidification, metal toxicity changes at higher pH values are of great interest to those performing effluent and sediment toxicity testing and toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). In addition, most previous studies have addressed metal toxicity changes with pH to water-column organisms rather than to benthic or epibenthic species. The authors tested the acute toxicity of five metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) to Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca, and Lubriculus variegatus at three pH values in very hard reconstituted water. Toxicity of Cd, Ni, and zn was greatest at pH 8.3 and least at pH 6.3 to most of these species. Conversely, the toxicity of Cu and Pb was greatest at pH 6.3 and least at pH 8.3 to most of the species. The acute toxicity of most of the metals to Lumbriculus variegatus was very low and occasionally was above the aqueous solubility of the metal salts in the reconstituted water.

  18. Introduction to the fathead minnow genome browser and ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ab initio gene prediction and evidence alignment were used to produce the first annotations for the fathead minnow SOAPdenovo genome assembly. Additionally, a genome browser hosted at genome.setac.org provides simplified access to the annotation data in context with fathead minnow genomic sequence. This work is meant to extend the utility of fathead minnow genome as a resource and enable the continued development of this species as a model organism. The fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) is a laboratory model organism widely used in regulatory toxicity testing and ecotoxicology research. Despite, the wealth of toxicological data for this organism, until recently genome scale information was lacking for the species, which limited the utility of the species for pathway-based toxicity testing and research. As part of a EPA Pathfinder Innovation Project, next generation sequencing was applied to generate a draft genome assembly, which was published in 2016. However, application of those genome-scale sequencing resources was still limited by the lack of available gene annotations for fathead minnow. Here we report on development of a first generation genome annotation for fathead minnow and the dissemination of that information through a web-based browser that makes it easy to search for genes of interest, extract the corresponding sequence, identify intron and exon boundaries and regulatory regions, and align the computationally predicted genes with other supporti

  19. Cloning and initial characterization of nuclear and four membrane progesterone receptors in the fathead minnow(Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both native progestagens and synthetic progestins have important effects on reproduction that are mediated through progesterone receptors (PRs). Progestagens regulate gamete maturation in vertebrates, are critical regulators of placental mammal pregnancy, and act as reproductive ...

  20. Sex Differentiation as a Target of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Early Life Stage Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in concentrated animal feed operation (CAFO) waste, and the potential effects of these chemicals on aquatic ecosystems have been of recent concern. There is evidence that exposure to EDCs during enhanced windows of sensitiv...

  1. Do environmental factors affect male fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) response to estrone? Part 2. Temperature and food availability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In nature, fish are subject to constantly changing environmental conditions and limitations on food availability, potentially impacting their response to endocrine disruptors. Outcome discrepancies between field studies and laboratory exposures of endocrine disruptors may be a result of these condi...

  2. Cloning and initial characterization of nuclear and four membrane progesterone receptors in the fathead minnow(Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both native progestagens and synthetic progestins have important effects on reproduction that are mediated through progesterone receptors (PRs). Progestagens regulate gamete maturation in vertebrates, are critical regulators of placental mammal pregnancy, and act as reproductive ...

  3. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  4. Use of Microarray to Analyze Gene Expression Profiles of Acute Effects of Prochloraz on Fathead Minnows Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool to investigate the gene expression profiles for thousands of genes simultaneously. In recent years, microarrays have been used to characterize environmental pollutants and identify molecular mode(s) of action of chemicals including endocri...

  5. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Triclocarban in a Short-term Reproduction Assay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban, commercially known as TCC, is a trichlorinated pesticide used extensively as an antimicrobial additive in personal care products. TCC is characterized as a high production volume chemical and recent monitoring programs have shown it is prevalent in aquatic environme...

  6. Crafting a gene expression timeline for the thyroid in the early-life stages of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis plays a number of critical roles in chordate physiology including regulation of metabolism, growth, and development. While the role of the HPT axis and thyroid hormone signaling in mammalian and amphibian development is well establis...

  7. Current lineages of the epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cell line are contaminated with fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.; Batts, W.; DeKinkelin, P.; LeBerre, M.; Bremont, M.; Fijan, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initially established from proliferative skin lesions of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L., the epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cell line (Fijan, Sulimanovic, Bearzotti, Muzinic, Zwillenberg, Chilmonczyk, Vautherot & de Kinkelin 1983) has become one of the most widely used tools for research on fish viruses and the diagnosis of fish viral diseases.

  8. Sex Differentiation as a Target of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Early Life Stage Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in concentrated animal feed operation (CAFO) waste, and the potential effects of these chemicals on aquatic ecosystems have been of recent concern. There is evidence that exposure to EDCs during enhanced windows of sensitiv...

  9. Effects of a real-time exposure to an estrogenic effluent on reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are a well-established point of convergence through which anthropogenic chemicals enter surface waters. Whole effluent testing guidelines were developed to screen these complex mixtures for acute toxicity. However, effects-based approac...

  10. Crafting a gene expression timeline for the thyroid in the early-life stages of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis plays a number of critical roles in chordate physiology including regulation of metabolism, growth, and development. While the role of the HPT axis and thyroid hormone signaling in mammalian and amphibian development is well establis...

  11. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Triclocarban in a Short-term Reproduction Assay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triclocarban, commercially known as TCC, is a trichlorinated pesticide used extensively as an antimicrobial additive in personal care products. TCC is characterized as a high production volume chemical and recent monitoring programs have shown it is prevalent in aquatic environme...

  12. Identification of Androgen Receptor Antagonists in Fish Using a Simple Bioassay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas .

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable effort has been expended on the development of bioassays to detect chemicals that affect endocrine function controlled by the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis via different mechanisms/modes of action (MOA). Antagonism of the androgen receptor (AR)...

  13. Do environmental factors affect male fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) response to estrone? Part 1. Dissolved oxygen and sodium chloride

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laboratory exposures indicate that estrogens and their mimics can cause endocrine disruption in male fishes. Studies of resident fish populations in estrogen-polluted waters support these findings, yet biomarker expression associated with exposure to estrogenic endocrine disruptors often differs dra...

  14. Short-term effects of propiconazole on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in the fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is an ergosterol inhibitor commonly used in agriculture and has been detected in aquatic environments. Ergosterol inhibitors decrease fungal growth through effects on 14á-demethylase, a cytochrome P450 (CYP), isoform important for ergosterol biosynthesis. In higher ...

  15. Identification of Androgen Receptor Antagonists in Fish Using a Simple Bioassay with the Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas .

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable effort has been expended on the development of bioassays to detect chemicals that affect endocrine function controlled by the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis via different mechanisms/modes of action (MOA). Antagonism of the androgen receptor (AR)...

  16. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  17. Use of Microarray to Analyze Gene Expression Profiles of Acute Effects of Prochloraz on Fathead Minnows Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool to investigate the gene expression profiles for thousands of genes simultaneously. In recent years, microarrays have been used to characterize environmental pollutants and identify molecular mode(s) of action of chemicals including endocri...

  18. A short-term study investigating the estrogenic potency of diethylstilbesterol in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen that has been banned for use in humans, but still is employed in livestock and aquaculture operations in some parts of the world. Detectable concentrations of DES in effluent and surface waters have been reported to range from slig...

  19. A short-term study investigating the estrogenic potency of diethylstilbesterol in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen that has been banned for use in humans, but still is employed in livestock and aquaculture operations in some parts of the world. Detectable concentrations of DES in effluent and surface waters have been reported to range from slig...

  20. Effects of a real-time exposure to an estrogenic effluent on reproduction in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are a well-established point of convergence through which anthropogenic chemicals enter surface waters. Whole effluent testing guidelines were developed to screen these complex mixtures for acute toxicity. However, effects-based approac...

  1. Linkage of Biochemical Responses to Population-level Effects: A Case Study with Vitellogenin in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas).

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a novel approach to quantifying estuarine habitat use by fish using stable isotopes. In brief, we further developed and evaluated an existing stable isotope turnover model to estimate the time American shad, an anadromous clupeid, spend in various river habitats durin...

  2. Effects of Cholesterol-altering Pharmaceuticals on Cholesterol Metabolism, Steroidogenesis, and Gene Expression in the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pharmaceuticals that target cholesterol biosynthesis and uptake are among the most widely prescribed drugs and have been detected in the aquatic environment. Fibrates are a class of pharmaceuticals that indirectly modulate cholesterol biosynthesis through effects on peroxisome pr...

  3. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  4. Short-term effects of propiconazole on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function in the fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is an ergosterol inhibitor commonly used in agriculture and has been detected in aquatic environments. Ergosterol inhibitors decrease fungal growth through effects on 14á-demethylase, a cytochrome P450 (CYP), isoform important for ergosterol biosynthesis. In higher ...

  5. Quantitative measurement of fathead minnow vitellogenin mRNA using hybridization protection assays.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Jones, Emma; Walkley, Neal; Morris, Ceri; Kille, Peter; Cryer, Jennifer; Weeks, Ian; Woodhead, J Stuart

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a novel test system for the quantitative assessment of gene transcription. The procedure involves the use of chemiluminescent-labeled oligonucleotide probes in a hybridization protection assay (HPA) format. We have used this technology to measure changes in vitellogenin mRNA to demonstrate the impact of estrogen exposure in the juvenile fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Marked changes in mRNA expression were observed in response to intraperitoneal injection of 17beta-estradiol demonstrating the utility of this technique for the identification and monitoring of toxic responses to xenobiotics.

  6. Evaluation of Several Biological Monitoring Techniques for Hazard Assessment of Potentially Contaminated Groundwater at the Old O-Field Site at the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    definitive acute toxicity tests run with daphnid neonates ( Daphnia magna ) and juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to untreated Old O... Daphnia magna , fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, mysid, Mysidopsis bahia, sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus

  7. The fathead minnow in aquatic toxicology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ankley, Gerald T; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2006-06-10

    This paper reviews the roles of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as a small fish model in the field of aquatic toxicology. The species has been (and is) extensively used both for regulatory testing and research, especially in North America. For example, tests with the fathead minnow, ranging from 48-h lethality through partial and full life-cycle assays, are routinely used for regulatory programs aimed at assessing potential risks of new chemicals such as high-production volume materials and pesticides, as well as impacts of complex mixtures like effluents. The species also has been used for a wide variety of research applications focused on topics like the development of quantitative structure-activity relationship models, mixture toxicity, extrapolation of the effects of chemicals across species, and understanding the results of laboratory assays relative to impacts in the field. Attributes of the fathead minnow also make it an excellent model for addressing new challenges in aquatic toxicology, including identification of sensitive life-stages/endpoints for chemicals with differing modes/mechanisms of action, predicting population-level effects based on data collected from lower levels of biological organization, and exploring/understanding the emerging role of genomics in research and regulation.

  8. Acute aquatic toxicity of nine alcohol ethoxylate surfactants to fathead minnow and Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.C.L.; Dorn, P.B.; Chai, E.Y.

    1995-12-31

    The aquatic toxicity of nine commercial-grade alcohol ethoxylate surfactants was studied in acute exposures to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Daphnia magna. All studies were conducted in accordance with USEPA TSCA Good Laboratory Practice Standards. Mean measured surfactant concentrations in exposure solutions showed good agreement with nominal concentrations for both fathead minnow and daphnid tests. Surfactant recoveries ranged from 59 to 97% and 67 to 106% in the fathead minnow and daphnid solutions, respectively. The response of both species to the surfactants was generally similar with the daphnids being slightly more sensitive to a few surfactants. Surfactant toxicity tended to increase with increasing alkyl chain lengths. The effect of low average EO groups on increased surfactant toxicity was more evident in the daphnid exposures. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed form the data which relates surfactant structure to toxicity. The models predict increasing toxicity with decreasing EO number and increasing alkyl chain length. The models also indicate that alkyl chain length has a greater effect on toxicity than EO groups. Further, the models indicate that both species did not differ markedly in their sensitivity to alkyl chain length effects, while the number of EO groups had a stronger effect on daphnids than fathead minnow. Good agreement was found between QSAR model-predicted toxicity and reported toxicity values from the literature for several surfactants previously studied.

  9. Alternative methods for toxicity assessments in fish: comparison of the fish embryo toxicity and the larval growth and survival tests in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2014-11-01

    An increased demand for chemical toxicity evaluations has resulted in the need for alternative testing strategies that address animal welfare concerns. The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test developed for zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one such alternative, and the application of the FET test to other species such as the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) has been proposed. In the present study, the performances of the FET test and the larval growth and survival (LGS; a standard toxicity testing method) test in zebrafish and fathead minnows were evaluated. This required that testing methods for the fathead minnow FET and zebrafish LGS tests be harmonized with existing test methods and that the performance of these testing strategies be evaluated by comparing the median lethal concentrations of 2 reference toxicants, 3,4-dicholoraniline and ammonia, obtained via each of the test types. The results showed that procedures for the zebrafish FET test can be adapted and applied to the fathead minnow. Differences in test sensitivity were observed for 3,4-dicholoraniline but not ammonia; therefore, conclusions regarding which test types offer the least or most sensitivity could not be made. Overall, these results show that the fathead minnow FET test has potential as an alternative toxicity testing strategy and that further analysis with other toxicants is warranted in an effort to better characterize the sensitivity and feasibility of this testing strategy. © 2014 SETAC.

  10. Hexachlorobenzene uptake by fathead minnows and macroinvertebrates in recirculating sediment/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuytema, G.S.; Krawczyk, D.F.; Griffis, W.L.; Nebeker, A.V.; Robideaux, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), the worm, Lumbriculus variegatus, and the amphipods Hyalella azteca and Gammarus lacustris were exposed to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in water with and without a bed of HCB-spiked sediment. Water HCB concentrations were maintained by recirculation through HCB-packed columns. Recirculating HCB-bound particulates and possibly eroded HCB particulates were an added source of HCB in addition to the sediment bed. Significant bioaccumulation of HCB in animal tissues was observed in water-only and water-sediment exposures. The presence of the HCB-spiked sediment did not result in a significant increase in the uptake of HCB by the organisms, but there was a substantial increase in sediment HCB levels over time. Higher tissue HCB levels in aquaria without sediment suggest that the sediment was a more efficient sink for HCB than the organisms.

  11. Genetic analysis of a novel nidovirus from fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William N.; Goodwin, Andrew E.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A bacilliform virus was isolated from diseased fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the complete genome coding for the polyprotein (pp1ab), spike (S), membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins revealed that the virus was most like white bream virus (WBV), another bacilliform virus isolated from white bream (Blicca bjoerkna L.) and the type species of the genus Bafinivirus within the order Nidovirales. In addition to similar gene order and size, alignment of deduced amino acid sequences of the pp1ab, M, N and S proteins of the fathead minnow nidovirus (FHMNV) with those of WBV showed 46, 44, 39 and 15 % identities, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis using the conserved helicase domain of the replicase showed FHMNV was distinct from WBV, yet the closest relative identified to date. Thus, FHMNV appears to represent a second species in the genus Bafinivirus. A PCR assay was developed for the identification of future FHMNV-like isolates.

  12. A Computational Model of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal Axis in Female Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 17á-ethynylestradiol and 17â-trenbolone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (e.g., estrogens, androgens and their mimics) are known to affect reproduction in fish. 17a-ethynylestradiol is a synthetic estrogen used in birth control pills. 17a-trenbolone is a relatively stable metabolite of trenbolone acetate, a synthetic and...

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRAIN AND OVARY AROMATASE ACTIVITY AND ISOFORM-SPECIFIC AROMATASE MRNA EXPRESSION IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) - JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing evidence that some chemicals present in the environment have the capacity to inhibit, or potentially induce, aromatase activity. This study compared aromatase activities and isoform-specific mRNA expression in brain and ovary tissue from non-exposed fathead minn...

  14. EVALUATION OF PILOT TREATMENT EFFLUENTS FROM SUMMITVILLE MINE, CO, USING CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA, FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS), AND RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated a remediation technology at the Summitville Mine Superfund site in southern Colorado. The technology evaluated was a successive alkalinity producing system ...

  15. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  16. Predicting fecundity of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed toeEndocrine-disrupting chemicals using a MATLAB®-based model of oocyte growth dynamics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish spawning is often used as an integrated measure of reproductive toxicity, and an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health in the context of forecasting potential population-level effects considered important for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, there is a need for fle...

  17. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive axis a case study in 21st century toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its introduction in 1983, imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal cytochrome P450 (cyp), lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit...

  18. Determining the effects of a mixture of an endocrine disrupting compound, 17a-ethinylestradiol, and ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we must first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. 17α-...

  19. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive axis a case study in 21st century toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its introduction in 1983 imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest, such as tubers and citrus fruits. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal enzyme, lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, im...

  20. A Computational Model of the Hypothalamic Pituitary Gonadal Axis in Female Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to 17á-ethynylestradiol and 17â-trenbolone

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (e.g., estrogens, androgens and their mimics) are known to affect reproduction in fish. 17a-ethynylestradiol is a synthetic estrogen used in birth control pills. 17a-trenbolone is a relatively stable metabolite of trenbolone acetate, a synthetic and...

  1. QUANTIFICATION AND ASSOCIATED VARIABILITY OF INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTS IN FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) BY QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessors have a growing need for sensitive and rapid indicators of environmental exposure in aquatic ecosystems resulting from natural and synthetic estrogen-like compounds. Investigators developing subcellular exposure markers in traditional sentinel organisms m...

  2. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive axis a case study in 21st century toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its introduction in 1983, imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal cytochrome P450 (cyp), lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit...

  3. AROMATASE-B (CYP 19B) EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO PERFLUOROOCTANE (PFOS) AND THE AROMATASE INHIBITOR FADROZOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic contaminant that is globally distributed in both humans and wildlife. PFOS belongs to a family of perfluorinated sulfonates that are highly persistent in the environment and have been commercially produced for over 40 year...

  4. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproductive axis a case study in 21st century toxicity testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since its introduction in 1983 imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest, such as tubers and citrus fruits. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal enzyme, lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, im...

  5. Evaluation of Sex-specific Responses to Trenbolone Acetate Metabolites in Early Life-stage Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Using Molecular Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in concentrated animal feed operation (CAFO) waste, and the potential effects of these chemicals on aquatic ecosystems have been of recent concern, especially in large agricultural regions. Currently, little is known concer...

  6. Determining the effects of a mixture of an endocrine disrupting compound, 17a-ethinylestradiol, and ammonia on fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are exposed to a multitude of contaminants and to fully understand the impact of multiple stressors on fish populations, we must first understand the mechanism of action for each toxicant and how the combined effects manifest at the level of the individual. 17α-...

  7. Effects of a short-term exposure to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole on steroid production and gene expression in the ovary of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a steriodogenic enzyme that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens and is critical for normal reproduction in females. Fadrozole is a well-studied aromatase inhibitor that has been shown to suppress estrogen production in the ovaries of fish. Howev...

  8. Evaluation of Sex-specific Responses to Trenbolone Acetate Metabolites in Early Life-stage Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas) Using Molecular Tools

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in concentrated animal feed operation (CAFO) waste, and the potential effects of these chemicals on aquatic ecosystems have been of recent concern, especially in large agricultural regions. Currently, little is known concer...

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRAIN AND OVARY AROMATASE ACTIVITY AND ISOFORM-SPECIFIC AROMATASE MRNA EXPRESSION IN THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) - JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing evidence that some chemicals present in the environment have the capacity to inhibit, or potentially induce, aromatase activity. This study compared aromatase activities and isoform-specific mRNA expression in brain and ovary tissue from non-exposed fathead minn...

  10. QUANTIFICATION AND ASSOCIATED VARIABILITY OF INDUCED VITELLOGENIN GENE TRANSCRIPTS IN FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) BY QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological risk assessors have a growing need for sensitive and rapid indicators of environmental exposure in aquatic ecosystems resulting from natural and synthetic estrogen-like compounds. Investigators developing subcellular exposure markers in traditional sentinel organisms m...

  11. Predicting fecundity of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed toeEndocrine-disrupting chemicals using a MATLAB®-based model of oocyte growth dynamics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish spawning is often used as an integrated measure of reproductive toxicity, and an indicator of aquatic ecosystem health in the context of forecasting potential population-level effects considered important for ecological risk assessment. Consequently, there is a need for fle...

  12. Effects of a short-term exposure to the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole on steroid production and gene expression in the ovary of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 aromatase is a steriodogenic enzyme that converts C19 androgens to C18 estrogens and is critical for normal reproduction in females. Fadrozole is a well-studied aromatase inhibitor that has been shown to suppress estrogen production in the ovaries of fish. Howev...

  13. A field-based approach for assessing the impact of paper pulp mill effluent on the metbolite profile of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evidence indicates that exposure to effluent from paper pulp mills (PME) can alter the body condition, secondary sexual characteristics, and reproductive success of aquatic organisms, there is currently little understanding of the biochemical mechanisms for these effects...

  14. AROMATASE-B (CYP 19B) EXPRESSION IN FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) EXPOSED TO PERFLUOROOCTANE (PFOS) AND THE AROMATASE INHIBITOR FADROZOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic contaminant that is globally distributed in both humans and wildlife. PFOS belongs to a family of perfluorinated sulfonates that are highly persistent in the environment and have been commercially produced for over 40 year...

  15. A field-based approach for assessing the impact of paper pulp mill effluent on the metbolite profile of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although evidence indicates that exposure to effluent from paper pulp mills (PME) can alter the body condition, secondary sexual characteristics, and reproductive success of aquatic organisms, there is currently little understanding of the biochemical mechanisms for these effects...

  16. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  17. MODELLING IMPACTS ON POPULATIONS: FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELUS) EXPOSURE TO THE ENDOCRINE DISRUPTOR 17-B-TRENBOLONE AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of population-level impacts is critical to ecological risk assessments. In this case study, a predictive model was developed to translate chamges in fecundity of the fathead minnow in a short term laboratory toxicity test to alterations in population growth rate. The m...

  18. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since its introduction in 1983 imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest, such as tubers and citrus fruits. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal enzyme, lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit a range of cytochrome p450 enzymes, including one or more involved in steroid biosynthesis. Previous in vitro and high throughput screening assays showed that imazalil can cause aromatase inhibition and reduce 17â-estradiol (E2) production by H295R cells. In the present study, we tested imazalil in a number of in vitro and in vivo bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to evaluate whether it would elicit effects consistent with an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) linking inhibition of aromatase to reduced fecundity. Ex vivo ovarian E2 and testosterone (T) production by ovary tissue from reproductively mature female P. promelas exposed to imazalil for 24 h at concentrations of 100, 500 and 1580 µg/L were significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls. Plasma E2 concentrations of females exposed for 24 h were significantly lower at imazalil concentrations of 80 and 250 µg/L, but not 2.5, 8, and 25 µg/L. In a separate 60 h exposure, plasma E2 concentrations were significantly lower than controls in mature P. promelas exposed to 200 ìg imazalil/L, but not at 0.2, 2, or 20 ug/L. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses measuring relative abundance of mRNA transcripts for v

  19. Consumption estimates of walleye stocked as fry to suppress fathead minnow populations in west-central Minnesota wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, M.C.; Willis, D.W.; Herwig, B.R.; Chipps, S.R.; Parsons, B.G.; Reed, J.R.; Hanson, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Fisheries managers throughout the Prairie Pothole Region of Minnesota often use semi-permanent and permanent wetland basins to extensively culture walleye Sander vitreus fry. Waterfowl managers have expressed concern over this practice because of the potential influence that fish have on food resources used by waterfowl during development and migration. It is well known that native fathead minnows Pimephales promelas can have detrimental effects on macroinvertebrates, zooplankton, water clarity, epiphyton, and macrophytes in wetlands. Because walleye commonly become piscivorous as soon as mouth gape allows, walleye fry may suppress fathead minnow populations and improve wetland conditions for waterfowl. In this study, we quantify consumption estimates, specifically predation on fathead minnows, by age-0 and age-1 walleye reared in natural wetland basins. Six wetlands were stocked in mid-May 2001 and 2002 at a rate of 12,000 walleye fry ha-1. Age-0 walleye were sampled bi-weekly from mid-June through mid-September 2001. Age-0 and age-1 walleye were sampled monthly from mid-May through mid-September 2002. A generalised diet shift from zooplankton to fish to macroinvertebrates was observed in 2001, whereas diets of juvenile walleye contained primarily macroinvertebrates in 2002. Stocked walleye quickly reduced fathead minnow populations in 2001 and suppression was maintained throughout 2002. Although walleye consumed primarily macroinvertebrates once prey fish populations became suppressed, consumption estimates of invertebrates by walleye were substantially less than those documented for fathead minnow populations. Thus, stocking age-0 walleye was an effective biomanipulation tool that substantially reduced fathead minnow densities and influenced lower trophic levels in these aquatic communities. ?? 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  20. Chronic toxicity of di-n-butyl and di-n-octyl phthalate to Daphnia magna and the fathead minnow

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, J.F.; Whitmore, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    The toxicities of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DOP) were assessed by measuring the effect of exposure to these compounds on the fecundity of Daphnia magna and on the hatching and survival of the early life stages of the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas. For D. magna, exposure to 1.8 mg/L DBP or 1.0 mg/L DOP caused a significant reduction in reproduction. Doses of 0.56 mg/L DBP or 0.32 mg/L DOP had no significant effect in decreasing reproduction. Survival of fathead minnow embryos was decreased by exposure to 1.8 mg/L DBP; none of the embryos exposed to this dose hatched successfully. Hatching and larval survival were affected by exposure to 1.0 mg/L DBP, but not to 0.56 mg/L. Exposure to DOP did not affect survival of either early embryos or larvae of the fathead minnow at doses up to 10 mg/L (the highest dose tested). Hatching of the embryos was significantly decreased at 10 mg/L, but not at 3.2 mg/L DOP. 26 references, 4 figures, 11 tables.

  1. Acclimation to Cu in fathead minnows: does age influence the response?

    PubMed

    Sellin, Marlo K; Tate-Boldt, Erik; Kolok, Alan S

    2005-08-30

    This study had two primary objectives. The first was to determine if the length of exposure necessary for acclimation to Cu to develop in larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) is different than that for juveniles. The second objective was to determine whether the acclimatory response, as determined by organism survival, is consistent with acclimation as determined by whole-body Na+. Six experiments were conducted: four using larval (<20-d-old) and two using juvenile (<60-d-old) fathead minnows. Within each experiment, fish were allocated to one of four groups: unexposed, continuously exposed, episodically exposed or naïvely exposed. The continuous group was exposed to a sublethal Cu exposure (125 microg/L) for 8, 12, 16 or 20 d and then subjected to a survival test at a lethal dose (375 microg/L). Fish in the episodic group were exposed to the sublethal dose for either 4 or 8 d, given a depuration period of varying lengths (4-16 d) then subjected to a survival test. Naïve minnows were maintained in clean water then given the survival challenge. Results from survival tests show that the larvae acclimate after only a 4-d sublethal exposure to Cu. In contrast, juveniles require a 16-d exposure to acclimate. Once acclimation had developed, there was a strong relationship between larval survival and whole-body Na+. Acclimated larvae maintained whole-body Na+ relative to unexposed fish, while unacclimated larvae did not. Interestingly, this was not the case for juveniles, as acclimated and unacclimated groups did not differ with respect to whole-body Na+ concentrations. The results of this study show that age influences the time course and possibly the mechanisms of acclimation in fathead minnows exposed to Cu.

  2. Acute toxicity of firefighting chemical formulations to four life stages of fathead minnow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaikowski, Mark P.; Hamilton, Steve J.; Buhl, Kevin J.; McDonald, Susan F.; Summers, Cliff H.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted with four early life stages of fathead minnow,Pimephales promelas,to determine the acute toxicity of five firefighting chemical formulations in standardized soft and hard water. Egg, fry, 30-day posthatch, and 60-day posthatch life stages were tested with three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Fire-Trol LCG-R, and Phos-Chek D75-F) and two fire-suppressant foams (Phos-Chek WD-881 and Ansul Silv-Ex). Fry were generally the most sensitive life stage tested, whereas the eggs were the least sensitive life stage. Formulation toxicity was greater in hard water than in soft water for all life stages tested. Fire-suppressant foams were more toxic than the fire retardants. The 96-hr LC50s derived for fathead minnows were rank ordered from the most toxic to the least toxic formulation as follows: Phos-Chek WD-881 (13a??32 mg/liter) > Silv-Ex (19a??32 mg/liter) > Fire-Trol GTS-R (135a??787 mg/liter) > Phos-Chek D75-F (168a??2250 mg/liter) > Fire-Trol LCG-R (519a??6705 mg/liter) (ranges are the lowest and highest 96-hr LC50for each formulation). (C) 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  3. Acute toxicity of firefighting chemical formulations to four life stages of fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Gaikowski, M P; Hamilton, S J; Buhl, K J; McDonald, S F; Summers, C H

    1996-08-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted with four early life stages of fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, to determine the acute toxicity of five firefighting chemical formulations in standardized soft and hard water. Egg, fry, 30-day posthatch, and 60-day posthatch life stages were tested with three fire retardants (Fire-Trol GTS-R, Fire-Trol LCG-R, and Phos-Chek D75-F) and two fire-suppressant foams (Phos-Chek WD-881 and Ansul Silv-Ex). Fry were generally the most sensitive life stage tested, whereas the eggs were the least sensitive life stage. Formulation toxicity was greater in hard water than in soft water for all life stages tested. Fire-suppressant foams were more toxic than the fire retardants. The 96-hr LC50s derived for fathead minnows were rank ordered from the most toxic to the least toxic formulation as follows: Phos-Chek WD-881 (13-32 mg/liter) > Silv-Ex (19-32 mg/liter) > Fire-Trol GTS-R (135-787 mg/liter) > Phos-Chek D75-F (168-2250 mg/liter) > Fire-Trol LCG-R (519-6705 mg/liter) (ranges are the lowest and highest 96-hr LC50 for each formulation).

  4. Conversion of estrone to estradiol in male fathead minnows ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estrogens are frequently observed in aquatic environments associated with anthropogenic influence, such as agricultural runoff and wastewater treatment effluent. While 17â-estradiol (E2) is the most potent naturally-occurring estrogen, estrone (E1) is often found at higher environmental concentrations. However, exogenous sources of E1 could potentially be converted to the more potent E2 through the action of endogenous 17â-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, specifically, the 17â-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 isoform (HSD17B1). Observation of increased plasma E2 concentrations without measureable changes in aromatase (cytochrome P45019a) expression in male fish caged in ambient waters containing elevated concentrations of E1, but low or non-detectable concentrations of E2, suggested this may be occurring in the field. If so, exogenous E1 may have a greater impact on reproductive function in aquatic vertebrates than previously assumed. The present study was conducted to evaluate this hypothesis. Male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to aqueous concentrations of 16.7, 50, and 150 ng E1/L in the laboratory exhibit significantly (p<0.05) elevated plasma E2 concentrations relative to control. Plasma testosterone (T) was elevated at a low E1 exposure concentration (1.8 ng E1/L) and depressed at the highest level of exposure (150 ng E1/L). Additionally, vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA expression was significantly elevated at concentrations of 50 and 10

  5. Conversion of estrone to estradiol in male fathead minnows ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estrogens are frequently observed in aquatic environments associated with anthropogenic influence, such as agricultural runoff and wastewater treatment effluent. While 17â-estradiol (E2) is the most potent naturally-occurring estrogen, estrone (E1) is often found at higher environmental concentrations. However, exogenous sources of E1 could potentially be converted to the more potent E2 through the action of endogenous 17â-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity, specifically, the 17â-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 isoform (HSD17B1). Observation of increased plasma E2 concentrations without measureable changes in aromatase (cytochrome P45019a) expression in male fish caged in ambient waters containing elevated concentrations of E1, but low or non-detectable concentrations of E2, suggested this may be occurring in the field. If so, exogenous E1 may have a greater impact on reproductive function in aquatic vertebrates than previously assumed. The present study was conducted to evaluate this hypothesis. Male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to aqueous concentrations of 16.7, 50, and 150 ng E1/L in the laboratory exhibit significantly (p<0.05) elevated plasma E2 concentrations relative to control. Plasma testosterone (T) was elevated at a low E1 exposure concentration (1.8 ng E1/L) and depressed at the highest level of exposure (150 ng E1/L). Additionally, vitellogenin (VTG) mRNA expression was significantly elevated at concentrations of 50 and 10

  6. Chronic toxicity of ammonia to fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, R.V.; Russo, R.C.; Meyn, E.L.; Zajdel, R.K.; Smith, C.E.

    1986-03-01

    Chronic effects of ammonia on the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas were studied in the laboratory in two flow-through tests, each test lasting approximately 1 year. Fish were exposed to five test concentrations over the range 0.07-0.96 mg/L un-ionized ammonia (NH/sub 3/); the mean pH of the test water was 8.0, and the mean temperature was 24.2/sup 0/C. The tests started with 3- to 5-d-old larvae that were reared to sexual maturity; progeny of these fish (F/sub 1/) were reared until they were 60 d old. The 5% probability level was chosen to indicate significance. No effects were observed on growth or survival of parental fish at 0.44 mg/L NH/sub 3/, or on egg production or viability at 0.37 mg/L, but effects on all of these were observed at 0.91 mg/L. Growth and survival of F/sub 1/ larvae were not affected at 0.36 mg/L NH/sub 3/, which was the highest concentration at which these were tested. Egg hatching success was not affected at 0.19 mg/L NH/sub 3/, but was at 0.37 mg/L. Brain lesions were common in parental fish at all stages of development at exposure concentrations of 0.21 mg/L NH/sub 3/ and higher, but not at 0.11 mg/L; no other histopathologic effects were observed at any of the test concentrations. The chronic-effects threshold concentration, based on survival, growth, and reproductive success, is estimated to be 0.27 mg/L NH/sub 3/ for the conditions of these tests. Based on histological damage, however, this concentration is estimated to be 0.15 mg/L NH/sub 3/.

  7. Effects of dietary methylmercury on reproduction of fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammerschmidt, C.R.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Wiener, J.G.; Rada, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    We examined effects of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) on reproduction of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Juvenile fish were fed one of four diets until sexual maturity (phase 1): a control diet (0.06 μg Hg g-1 dry weight) and three diets contaminated with MeHg at 0.88 (low), 4.11 (medium), and 8.46 μg Hg g-1 dry weight (high). At sexual maturity, male and female fish were paired, again fed one of the four diets, and allowed to reproduce (phase 2). To assess effects of MeHg during gametogenesis, some fish were fed diets during phase 2 that differed from those during phase 1. Spawning success of pairs fed the same diet during phases 1 and 2 was 75% for controls and 46%, 50%, and 36% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively. Spawning success of pairs fed a contaminated diet during phase 1 and a control diet during phase 2 was 63%, 40%, and 14% for the low-, medium-, and high-MeHg treatments, respectively, whereas exposure to dietary MeHg only during phase 2 did not reduce spawning success. Dietary MeHg delayed spawning, and days to spawning was positively correlated with concentration of total mercury in the carcasses of test fish. MeHg reduced the instantaneous rate of reproduction of fish fed the same diets during phases 1 and 2. Both the gonadosomatic index and reproductive effort of female fish were inversely correlated with mercury in carcasses, whereas developmental and hatching success of embryos, 7-d survival, and 7-d growth of larvae were unrelated to mercury concentrations in parental fish or their diets. MeHg decreased reproduction of adult fathead minnows at dietary concentrations encountered by predatory fishes in aquatic systems with MeHg-contaminated food webs, implying that exposed fish populations could be adversely affected by this widespread contaminant.

  8. Effects of antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in female fathead minnow ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms underlying reproductive impacts of antiandrogens in fish are not well-characterized and effective biomarkers of antiandrogen exposure are lacking. This work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promel...

  9. Effects of antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in female fathead minnow ovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms underlying reproductive impacts of antiandrogens in fish are not well-characterized and effective biomarkers of antiandrogen exposure are lacking. This work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure in the fathead minnow (Pimephales promel...

  10. Assessing the effects of the antidepressant venlafaxine to fathead minnows exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations over a full life cycle.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Joanne L; Metcalfe, Chris D

    2017-10-01

    Venlafaxine is an antidepressant drug that has been detected in municipal wastewater effluents at low μg/L concentrations. To assess the potential of this compound to affect the survival, development and reproductive capacity of fish, we exposed fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) over a full lifecycle in a flow-through system to nominal venlafaxine concentrations of 0.88, 8.8, and 88 μg/L. Mean measured venlafaxine concentrations in these treatments were 1.0, 9.3 and 75 μg/L. During the 167-168 d exposure, no significant changes were observed in survival, or the weights and lengths of fathead minnows. At maturity, there were no significant differences relative to controls in condition factor, liver-somatic index, or secondary sex characteristics in the venlafaxine exposed male or female fish. Fathead minnows from the highest venlafaxine treatment (i.e. 88 μg/L) produced 46% more eggs per female than control fish (p = 0.031). Egg quality, % fertilization, % hatching, and % deformities in F1 fry were unaffected by exposure of the parent fish to venlafaxine at any of the test concentrations. Venlafaxine exposure at environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 0.88 and 8.8 μg/L) caused no adverse effects in fathead minnows. This study is the first to assess the potential for effects in fish exposed to the antidepressant venlafaxine over a full lifecycle. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sensitivity of early life stages of white sturgeon, rainbow trout, and fathead minnow to copper.

    PubMed

    Vardy, David W; Oellers, Johanna; Doering, Jon A; Hollert, Henner; Giesy, John P; Hecker, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Populations of white sturgeon (WS; Acipenser transmontanus) are in decline in several parts of the United States and Canada, attributed primarily to poor recruitment caused by degradation of habitats, including pollution with contaminants such as metals. Little is known about sensitivity of WS to contaminants or metals such as copper (Cu). Here, acute (96 h) mortalities of WS early life stages due to exposure to Cu under laboratory conditions are reported. Two standard test species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), were exposed in parallel to determine relative sensitivity among species. Swim-up larvae [15 days post-hatch (dph)] and early juveniles (40-45 dph) of WS were more sensitive to Cu (LC(50) = 10 and 9-17 μg/L, respectively) than were yolksac larvae (8 dph; LC(50) = 22 μg/L) and the later juvenile life stage (100 dph; LC(50) = 54 μg/L). WS were more sensitive to Cu than rainbow trout and fathead minnow at all comparable life stages tested. Yolksac larvae of rainbow trout and fathead minnow were 1.8 and 4.6 times, respectively, more tolerant than WS, while swim-up and juvenile life stages of rainbow trout were between 1.4- and 2.4-times more tolerant than WS. When plotted in a species sensitivity distribution with other fishes, the mean acute toxicity value for early life stage WS was ranked between the 1st and 2nd centile. The WS life stage of greatest Cu sensitivity coincides with the beginning of active feeding and close association with sediment, possibly increasing risk. WS early life stages are sensitive to aqueous copper exposure and site-specific water quality guidelines and criteria should be evaluated closely to ensure adequate protection.

  12. The fish embryo toxicity test as a replacement for the larval growth and survival test: A comparison of test sensitivity and identification of alternative endpoints in zebrafish and fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Marlo K Sellin; Stultz, Amy E; Smith, Austin W; Stephens, Dane A; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Oris, James T

    2015-06-01

    The fish embryo toxicity (FET) test has been proposed as an alternative to the larval growth and survival (LGS) test. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the sensitivity of the FET and LGS tests in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) and to determine if the inclusion of sublethal metrics as test endpoints could enhance test utility. In both species, LGS and FET tests were conducted using 2 simulated effluents. A comparison of median lethal concentrations determined via each test revealed significant differences between test types; however, it could not be determined which test was the least and/or most sensitive. At the conclusion of each test, developmental abnormalities and the expression of genes related to growth and toxicity were evaluated. Fathead minnows and zebrafish exposed to mock municipal wastewater-treatment plant effluent in a FET test experienced an increased incidence of pericardial edema and significant alterations in the expression of genes including insulin-like growth factors 1 and 2, heat shock protein 70, and cytochrome P4501A, suggesting that the inclusion of these endpoints could enhance test utility. The results not only show the utility of the fathead minnow FET test as a replacement for the LGS test but also provide evidence that inclusion of additional endpoints could improve the predictive power of the FET test.

  13. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Lee, Kathy E; Swackhamer, Deborah L; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2007-04-20

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17beta-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  14. Reproductive responses of male fathead minnows exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent, effluent treated with XAD8 resin, and an environmentally relevant mixture of alkylphenol compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Lee, K.E.; Swackhamer, D.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2007-01-01

    On-site, continuous-flow experiments were conducted during August and October 2002 at a major metropolitan wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to determine if effluent exposure induced endocrine disruption as manifested in the reproductive competence of sexually mature male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). The fathead minnows were exposed in parallel experiments to WWTP effluent and WWTP effluent treated with XAD8 macroreticular resin to remove the hydrophobic-neutral fraction which contained steroidal hormones, alkylphenolethoxylates (APEs), and other potential endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). The effluent composition varied on a temporal scale and the continuous-flow experiments captured the range of chemical variability that occurred during normal WWTP operations. Exposure to WWTP effluent resulted in vitellogenin induction in male fathead minnows, with greater response in October than in August. Concentrations of ammonia, APEs, 17??-estradiol, and other EDCs also were greater in October than in August, reflecting a change in effluent composition. In the October experiment, XAD8 treatment significantly reduced vitellogenin induction in the male fathead minnows relative to the untreated effluent, whereas in August, XAD8 treatment had little effect. During both experiments, XAD8 treatment removed greater than 90% of the APEs. Exposure of fish to a mixture of APEs similar in composition and concentration to the WWTP effluent, but prepared in groundwater and conducted at a separate facility, elicited vitellogenin induction during both experiments. There was a positive relation between vitellogenin induction and hepatosomatic index (HSI), but not gonadosomatic index (GSI), secondary sexual characteristics index (SSCI), or reproductive competency. In contrast to expectations, the GSI and SSCI increased in males exposed to WWTP effluent compared to groundwater controls. The GSI, SSCI, and reproductive competency were positively affected by XAD8 treatment of

  15. High diet overlap between native small-bodied fishes and nonnative fathead minnow in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seegert, Sarah E. Zahn; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Baxter, Colden V.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Hall, Robert O.; Cross, Wyatt F.

    2014-01-01

    River regulation may mediate the interactions among native and nonnative species, potentially favoring nonnative species and contributing to the decline of native populations. We examined food resource use and diet overlap among small-bodied fishes in the Grand Canyon section of the Colorado River as a first step in evaluating potential resource competition. We compared the diets of the predominant small-bodied fishes (native Speckled Dace Rhinichthys osculus, juvenile Flannelmouth Sucker Catostomus latipinnis, and juvenile Bluehead Sucker C. discobolus, and nonnative Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas) across seasons at four sites downstream of Glen Canyon Dam using nonmetric multidimensional scaling and Schoener's similarity index. The diets of these fishes included diatoms, amorphous detritus, aquatic invertebrates (especially simuliid and chironomid larvae), terrestrial invertebrates, and terrestrial vegetation. Diets varied with season and were affected by high turbidity. Fish consumed more amorphous detritus and terrestrial vegetation during the summer monsoon season (July–September), when turbidity was higher. The diets of all species overlapped, but there was large variation in the degree of overlap. The diets of juvenile suckers and Fathead Minnows were most similar, while Speckled Dace had relatively distinct diets. The differences took the form of higher proportions of diatoms and amorphous detritus in the diets of Bluehead Suckers and Fathead Minnows and higher proportions of simuliids and chironomids in those of Speckled Dace. If food resources are or become limiting, diet overlap suggests that competition may occur among native and nonnative species, which could have implications for the population dynamics of these fishes and for the management of the Colorado River ecosystem in Grand Canyon.

  16. High diet overlap between native small-bodied fishes and nonnative fathead minnow in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seegert, Sarah E. Zahn; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Baxter, Colden V.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Hall, Robert O.; Cross, Wyatt F.

    2014-01-01

    River regulation may mediate the interactions among native and nonnative species, potentially favoring nonnative species and contributing to the decline of native populations. We examined food resource use and diet overlap among small-bodied fishes in the Grand Canyon section of the Colorado River as a first step in evaluating potential resource competition. We compared the diets of the predominant small-bodied fishes (native Speckled Dace Rhinichthys osculus, juvenile Flannelmouth Sucker Catostomus latipinnis, and juvenile Bluehead Sucker C. discobolus, and nonnative Fathead Minnow Pimephales promelas) across seasons at four sites downstream of Glen Canyon Dam using nonmetric multidimensional scaling and Schoener's similarity index. The diets of these fishes included diatoms, amorphous detritus, aquatic invertebrates (especially simuliid and chironomid larvae), terrestrial invertebrates, and terrestrial vegetation. Diets varied with season and were affected by high turbidity. Fish consumed more amorphous detritus and terrestrial vegetation during the summer monsoon season (July–September), when turbidity was higher. The diets of all species overlapped, but there was large variation in the degree of overlap. The diets of juvenile suckers and Fathead Minnows were most similar, while Speckled Dace had relatively distinct diets. The differences took the form of higher proportions of diatoms and amorphous detritus in the diets of Bluehead Suckers and Fathead Minnows and higher proportions of simuliids and chironomids in those of Speckled Dace. If food resources are or become limiting, diet overlap suggests that competition may occur among native and nonnative species, which could have implications for the population dynamics of these fishes and for the management of the Colorado River ecosystem in Grand Canyon.

  17. Waterborne lead affects circadian variations of brain neurotransmitters in fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, R.E.; Russo, A.C.; Weber, D.N.

    1995-09-01

    Lead is a potent neurotoxin affecting brain levels of a number of vertebrate neurotransmitters. Reports on these effects are, however, not consistent either among or within species. For example, with lead-intoxicated rats there are reports of decreased acetylcholine (ACh) release and decreased ACh brain levels as well as reports of increased levels or no change in levels. Also, with rats there are reports of increased levels, decreased levels, or no change in brain catecholamines, with lead producing similar changes in both norephinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in some cases and differences in response between the two in others. Although most early reports dealt with whole brain levels, reports on neurotransmitter levels in specific brain regions can be equally conflicting. Similar sorts of discrepancies exist among studies with fishes. Much of the variation among studies on lead effects on neurotransmitters is, no doubt, due to differences among the studies in variables such as: species, age, dosage and duration, route of administration. However, lead can apparently affect circadian locomotor rhythms of both rats and fishes. Therefore, another possible cause for the variation among studies is that there is an interaction among dosage, sampling time and endogenous rhythms. A lead-produced phase shift or disruption in endogenous neurotransmitter rhythms could in turn elicit a host of varying results and interpretations depending on the circadian time of sampling. We elected to examine this possibility in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a freshwater species widely used for toxicity studies. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Assessment of swimming activity as an indicator of sublethal toxicity to the fathead minnow

    SciTech Connect

    Hovland, D.N. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    A simple, sensitive acute-bioassay was developed that looks at spontaneous swimming activity as an indicator of sublethal effect due to toxic insult. Although a large amount of work has been done validating aquatic behavior testing, there are still no standardized testing procedures or protocols for their use in assessing environmental impact of pollutants. Attempts were made in this research to develop a behavioral test that was objective and provided a basis for standardization and use in effluent testing. Tests were performed using copper sulfate and zinc sulfate as reference toxicants. Testing procedures involved 24-hour exposures to a range of toxicant concentrations with 12 fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) per concentration. Upon completion, during a 2-minute testing period in a cylindrical aquarium, individual fish were videotaped from above, then timed later to determine actual time in swimming motion, which was averaged for each concentration group. Results demonstrate the sensitivity of the test, as significant differences from controls in swimming activity were observed at concentrations of copper sulfate as low as 1.3 ppb and zinc sulfate as low as 3.5 ppb, both well below Federal criteria for water quality. It is hoped that further research will demonstrate the utility of sublethal, behavioral toxicity tests, and that these tests will be integrated into the battery of toxicity testing procedures currently used by regulatory agencies.

  19. Effects of the fungicide imazalil on the fathead minnow ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Since its introduction in 1983, imazalil has been used primarily as a fungicide on crops post-harvest. Its effectiveness lies in the ability to inhibit the fungal cytochrome P450 (cyp), lanosterol 14 á-demethylase. However, like other azole fungicides, imazalil can inhibit a range of cyp enzymes, including one or more involved in steroid biosynthesis in vertebrates. Previous in vitro assays showed that imazalil can cause aromatase inhibition and reduce 17â-estradiol (E2) production by H295R cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of imazalil in a 21 d Fish Short-Term Reproduction Assay (FSTRA) with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to evaluate whether the chemical would elicit effects consistent with an adverse outcome pathway (AOP) linking inhibition of aromatase to reduced fecundity. Fish were sampled at two time points (10, 21 d) and several endpoints (including key events [KE]s) associated with the AOP were measured. Fecundity also was determined daily. These data, combined with results of two previous exposures of 24 h and 60 h, produce a full time-course of effects. Ex vivo ovarian E2 production in females exposed to imazalil was significantly lower (p<0.05) than controls after 24 h at concentrations of 100, 500, and 1580 µg/L and remained significantly lower at 60 h, 10 d, and 21 d in fish exposed to 200 µg/L. Plasma E2 concentrations from females exposed for 24 h were significantly lower at imazalil concentrations of 80 and 250 µg/

  20. Chronic toxicity of azo and anthracenedione dyes to embryo-larval fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Joanne L; Bartlett, Adrienne J; Balakrishnan, Vimal K

    2016-03-01

    The toxicity of selected azo and anthracenedione dyes was studied using chronic exposures of embryo-larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Newly fertilized fathead minnow embryos were exposed through the egg stage, past hatching, through the larval stage (until 14 days post-hatch), with dye solutions renewed daily. The anthracenedione dyes Acid Blue 80 (AB80) and Acid Blue 129 (AB129) caused no effects in larval fish at the highest measured concentrations tested of 7700 and 6700 μg/L, respectively. Both azo dyes Disperse Yellow 7 (DY7) and Sudan Red G (SRG) decreased survival of larval fish, with LC50s (based on measured concentrations of dyes in fish exposure water) of 25.4 μg/L for DY7 and 16.7 μg/L for SRG. Exposure to both azo dyes caused a delayed response, with larval fish succumbing 4-10 days after hatch. If the exposures were ended at the embryo stage or just after hatch, the potency of these two dyes would be greatly underestimated. Concentrations of dyes that we measured entering the Canadian environment were much lower than those that affected larval fish survival in the current tests. In a total of 162 samples of different municipal wastewater effluents from across Canada assessed for these dyes, all were below detection limits. The similarities of the structures and larval fish responses for the two azo and two anthracenedione dyes in this study support the use of read-across data for risk assessment of these classes of compounds.

  1. Reduction in organic effluent static acute toxicity to fathead minnows by various aeration techniques.

    PubMed

    Belanger, S E; Farris, J L; Cherry, D S

    1988-01-01

    This study compared results of no aeration, intermittent aeration, and constant aeration strategies in determining the static acute (48-h) toxicity of phenolic-based effluents to adult fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Toxicity was greatest in no aeration tests followed by intermittent aeration and constant aeration. Two factors were considered responsible for the observed patterns of toxicity. First, in side-by-side tests of no versus intermittent aeration and intermittent versus constant aeration, toxicity reductions were directly attributed to maintenance of dissolved oxygen above 5.0 mg litre(-1) in aerated containers. Secondly, toxicity was reduced when treatment system temperatures were warmest, probably due to increased microbial activity and volatilisation during late spring to early autumn (temperatures > 16 degrees C). Effluent was slightly more toxic on- than off-site, presumably due to degradation of phenolic compounds during transport and set-up at the off-site laboratory (approximately 4.5 h). Gill tissue ultrastructure and histopathology were used to determine the extent of effluent-induced damage and the recovery of minnows to short (6-h) effluent exposures. After a 48-h exposure to the approximate LC(50) level, gill tissue lamellae were characteristically desquamated with epithelium lifting from the basement membrane. Gill tissue was similarly damaged after a 6-h exposure to 100% effluent and had recovered to pre-exposure conditions after 42 h in clean water. Aeration strategies in these studies demonstrated potential air-stripping of volatile compounds, although stress to test organisms from low dissolved oxygen was relieved.

  2. Life-cycle exposure of fathead minnows to environmentally relevant concentrations of the β-blocker drug propranolol.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Joanne L; Balakrishnan, Vimal K

    2017-06-01

    Propranolol is a human pharmaceutical β-blocker that has been detected in municipal wastewater effluents at ng/L to low μg/L. To assess the potential of this compound to affect fish, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for a life cycle in a flow-through system to nominal propranolol concentrations of 0.87 ng/L, 8.7 ng/L, 87 ng/L, 870 ng/L, and 8700 ng/L. Measured propranolol concentrations were below detection for the 2 lowest exposure concentrations, and were 76 ng/L, 580 ng/L, and 7800 ng/L for the 3 highest exposure concentrations. During the 162-d to 165-d exposure, no significant changes in weights or lengths were seen in fathead minnows, although the highest concentration of propranolol did cause a 15% decrease in survival of larval and juvenile stage fish compared with controls. At maturity, there were no significant changes in condition factor, liver-somatic index, or secondary sex characteristics in propranolol-exposed male or female fish. Female gonadosomatic index was significantly decreased in fish exposed to the highest concentrations of propranolol, probably because of increased egg-laying. Fathead minnows from all propranolol exposures produced more eggs than control fish, with fish exposed to 7800 ng/L propranolol producing 70% more eggs per female (p = 0.060), and having significantly increased clutch size (p = 0.008). Egg quality, % fertilization, % hatching, and % deformities in F1 fry were unaffected by propranolol exposure of fish. Propranolol exposure caused no effects in fathead minnows, except at the highest exposure concentration (7800 ng/L), where there were slight decreases in survival of juvenile minnows, and indications of increased reproduction. The present study is important because it is the first to assess the potential for effects in fish exposed to propranolol for a life cycle. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1644-1651. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. Genomic investigation of year-long and multigenerational exposures of fathead minnow to the munitions compound RDX.

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Brasfield, Sandra M; Stanley, Jacob K; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Chappell, Pornsawan; Perkins, Edward J; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Lance, Richard F

    2011-08-01

    We assessed the impacts of exposure to an environmentally representative concentration (0.83 mg/L) of the explosive cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) on fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in one-year and multigenerational bioassays. In the one-year bioassay, impacts were assessed by statistical comparisons of females from breeding groups reared in control or RDX-exposure conditions. The RDX had no significant effect on gonadosomatic index or condition factor assayed at 1 d and at one, three, six, nine, and 12 months. The liver-somatic index was significantly increased versus controls only at the 12-month timepoint. RDX had no significant effect on live-prey capture rates, egg production, or fertilization. RDX caused minimal differential-transcript expression with no consistent discernable effect on gene-functional categories for either brain or liver tissues in the one-year exposure. In the multigenerational assay, the effects of acute (96 h) exposure to RDX were compared in fish reared to the F(2) generation in either control or RDX-exposure conditions. Enrichment of gene functions including neuroexcitatory glutamate metabolism, sensory signaling, and neurological development were observed comparing control-reared and RDX-reared fish. Our results indicated that exposure to RDX at a concentration representing the highest levels observed in the environment (0.83 mg/L) had limited impacts on genomic, individual, and population-level endpoints in fathead minnows in a one-year exposure. However, multigenerational exposures altered transcript expression related to neural development and function. Environ. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  4. QSTR with extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices. 15. Development of predictive models for toxicity of organic chemicals against fathead minnow using second-generation ETA indices.

    PubMed

    Roy, K; Das, R Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Modern industrialisation has led to the production of millions of toxic chemicals having hazardous effects on the ecosystem. It is impracticable to determine the toxic potential of a large number of chemicals in animal models, making the use of quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models an alternative strategy for toxicity prediction. Recently we introduced a set of second-generation extended topochemical atom (ETA) indices for predictive modelling. Here we have developed predictive toxicity models on a large dataset of 459 diverse chemicals against fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) using the second-generation ETA indices. These descriptors can be easily calculated from two-dimensional molecular representation without the need of time-consuming conformational analysis and alignment, making the developed models easily reproducible. Considering the importance of hydrophobicity for toxicity prediction, AlogP98 was used as an additional predictor in all the models, which were validated rigorously using multiple strategies. The ETA models were comparable in predictability to those involving various non-ETA topological parameters and those previously reported using various descriptors including computationally demanding quantum-chemical ones.

  5. Estimating the effects of 17α-ethinylestradiol on stochastic population growth rate of fathead minnows: a population synthesis of empirically derived vital rates.

    PubMed

    Schwindt, Adam R; Winkelman, Dana L

    2016-09-01

    Urban freshwater streams in arid climates are wastewater effluent dominated ecosystems particularly impacted by bioactive chemicals including steroid estrogens that disrupt vertebrate reproduction. However, more understanding of the population and ecological consequences of exposure to wastewater effluent is needed. We used empirically derived vital rate estimates from a mesocosm study to develop a stochastic stage-structured population model and evaluated the effect of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the estrogen in human contraceptive pills, on fathead minnow Pimephales promelas stochastic population growth rate. Tested EE2 concentrations ranged from 3.2 to 10.9 ng L(-1) and produced stochastic population growth rates (λ S ) below 1 at the lowest concentration, indicating potential for population decline. Declines in λ S compared to controls were evident in treatments that were lethal to adult males despite statistically insignificant effects on egg production and juvenile recruitment. In fact, results indicated that λ S was most sensitive to the survival of juveniles and female egg production. More broadly, our results document that population model results may differ even when empirically derived estimates of vital rates are similar among experimental treatments, and demonstrate how population models integrate and project the effects of stressors throughout the life cycle. Thus, stochastic population models can more effectively evaluate the ecological consequences of experimentally derived vital rates.

  6. Acclimation-induced changes in toxicity and induction of metallothionein-like proteins in the fathead minnow following sublethal exposure to cobalt, silver, and zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Increases in tolerance and resistance to metal toxicity by aquatic organisms have been linked to elevated levels of low-molecular-weight metal-binding proteins (e.g., metallothioneins). Acclimation-induced changes in toxic response and the concentration of metallothionein-like proteins (MTP) were studied in laboratory populations of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, following sublethal exposure to Co, Ag, and Zn. Following 7 and 14 days of sublethal exposure, tolerance and resistance, as measured by acute toxicity values, were altered in a dose dependent fashion. Acute toxicity values returned to control levels after 21 days of continuous exposure. Tolerance and resistance of Co- and Zn-acclimated animals were depressed after a 7-day post-acclimation period in control water. Tolerance and resistance of Ag-acclimated animals were temporarily enhanced after 7 days post-acclimation and returned to control levels after 14 days. Accumulation of Co, Ag, and Zn measured as wholebody residues appeared to be regulated in 4 of 6 exposure regimes with residues reaching stable levels after 7 to 14 days of exposure. MTP was induced by exposure to 1.8 mg Zn/L and 0.01 mg Ag/L, however, no sustained (i.e., post 21 days) tolerance or resistance were observed at these dose levels indicating that these two biological responses may not be directly related.

  7. From single chemicals to mixtures--reproductive effects of levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol on the fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Runnalls, Tamsin J; Beresford, Nicola; Kugathas, Subramaniam; Margiotta-Casaluci, Luigi; Scholze, Martin; Scott, Alexander P; Sumpter, John P

    2015-12-01

    The aquatic environment is polluted with thousands of chemicals. It is currently unclear which of these pose a significant threat to aquatic biota. The typical exposure scenario is now represented by a widespread blanket of contamination composed of myriads of individual pollutants-each typically present at a low concentration. The synthetic steroids, 17α-ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel, have been widely reported to be present in the aquatic environment in the low ng to sub-ng/l range. They are widely used in contraceptive formulations, both individually and in combination. Our research employed the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 21 day 'pair-breeding' assay to assess reproductive output when pairs of fish were exposed to the single chemicals at low environmentally relevant concentrations, and then to a binary mixture of them. A variety of endpoints were assessed, including egg production, which was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by both the individual chemicals and the mixture. Significant, sex specific effects were also seen with both chemicals, at differing levels of biological organisation. Plasma concentrations of EE2 and levonorgestrel were predicted and in the case of levonorgestrel measured, and compared with the human therapeutic plasma concentrations (Read-Across approach) to support the interpretation of the results. A novel quantitative method was developed for the data analysis, which ensured a suitable endpoint for the comparative mixture assessment. This approach compares the reproductive performance from individual pairs of fish during chemical exposure to its pre-treatment performance. The responses from the empirical mixture study were compared to predictions derived from the single substance data. We hypothesised combined responses which were best described by the concept of concentration addition, and found no clear indications against this additivity expectation. However, the effect profiles support the current

  8. Endocrine-disrupting effects of cattle feedlot effluent on an aquatic sentinel species, the fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Edward F; Kolok, Alan S; Binzcik, Gerry A; Gates, Jennifer L; Horton, Megan K; Lambright, Christy S; Gray, L Earl; Soto, Ana M; Guillette, Louis J

    2004-03-01

    Over the last decade, research has examined the endocrine-disrupting action of various environmental pollutants, including hormones, pharmaceuticals, and surfactants, in sewage treatment plant effluent. Responding to the growth of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and the pollutants present in their wastewater (e.g., nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and hormones), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed a new rule that tightens the regulation of CAFOs. In this study, we collected wild fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to feedlot effluent (FLE) and observed significant alterations in their reproductive biology. Male fish were demasculinized (having lower testicular testosterone synthesis, altered head morphometrics, and smaller testis size). Defeminization of females, as evidenced by a decreased estrogen:androgen ratio of in vitro steroid hormone synthesis, was also documented. We did not observe characteristics in either male or female fish indicative of exposure to environmental estrogens. Using cells transfected with the human androgen receptor, we detected potent androgenic responses from the FLE. Taken together, our morphologic, endocrinologic, and in vitro gene activation assay data suggest two hypotheses: a) there are potent androgenic substance(s) in the FLE, and/or b) there is a complex mixture of androgenic and estrogenic substances that alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, inhibiting the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone or gonadotropins. This is the first study demonstrating that the endocrine and reproductive systems of wild fish can be adversely affected by FLE. Future studies are needed to further investigate the effects of agricultural runoff and to identify the biologically active agents, whether natural or pharmaceutical in origin.

  9. Toxicity of an engineered nanoparticle (fullerene, C60) in two aquatic species, Daphnia and fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shiqian; Oberdörster, Eva; Haasch, Mary L

    2006-07-01

    Water-soluble fullerene (nC60) has been shown to induce lipid peroxidation (LPO) in brain of juvenile largemouth bass (LMB, Micropterus salmoides) [Oberdörster, E., 2004. Manufactured nanomaterials (fullerenes, c60) induce oxidative stress in brain of juvenile largemouth bass. Environ. Health Persp. 112, 1058-1062]; and upregulate genes related to the inflammatory response and metabolism, most notably CYP2K4 [. Nanotoxicology: an emerging discipline evolving from 116 studies of ultrafine particles. Environ. Health Persp. 113, 823-839]. The initial study in LMB was performed using tetrahydrofuran (THF)-solubilized nC60, although C60 can also be solubilized by stirring in water. The current study investigates differences in acute toxicity to Daphnia magna between THF-solubilized and water-stirred-nC60 as a range-find for further assays in adult male fathead minnow (FHM, Pimephales promelas). The daphnia 48-h LC50 for THF-nC60 was at least one order of magnitude less (0.8 ppm) than that for water-stirred-nC60 (> 35 ppm). FHM were dosed with either 0.5 ppm of THF- or water-stirred-nC60 for 48 h. There was 100% mortality in the THF-nC60-exposed fish between 6 and 18 h, while the water-stirred-nC60-exposed fish showed no obvious physical effects after 48 h. Water-stirred-nC60 elevated LPO in brain, significantly increased LPO in gill, and significantly increased expression of CYP2 family isozymes in liver as compared to control fish.

  10. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, M.M.; Painter, M.M.; Bartell, S.E.; Logue, A.; Furlong, E.T.; Werner, S.L.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305. ng/L and 1104. ng/L) and SER (5.2. ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28. ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish-a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Deformity, Erosion, Lesion, and Tumor Occurrence, Fluctuating Asymmetry, and Population Parameters for Bluntnose Minnow (Pimephales notatus) as Indicators of Recovering Water Quality in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, USA.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas P; Burskey, Jacob L

    2016-02-01

    The Grand Calumet River is an industrial river and a Great Lakes Area of Concern in southwestern Lake Michigan, USA. Recovery end points require well-formulated designs to assess the use of occurrence of internal and external anomalies, fluctuating asymmetry, and population indicators to determine recovery from the water-quality Beneficial Use Impairments of fish tumors and deformities. A paired-watershed approach using three reaches within the study area was sampled weekly and separated into near- and far-field reaches, whereas the Little Calumet River, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, served as a control. Field-collected Pimephales notatus were inspected for occurrence of deformities, erosion, lesion, and tumor (DELT) anomalies, measured for body symmetry, and dissected to ascertain sex and the condition of internal organs. Morphometric measurements (p ≤ 0.000), internal organ conditions (p = 0.001), and sex ratios of the fish (p = 0.001) were significantly different between the control and P. notatus test populations. The near-field individuals had the highest incidence of DELT occurrence (70 %) followed by the far-field reaches at Roxana Marsh (45 %) and Kennedy Avenue (41.9 %). Morphometric analysis showed significant differences between body size and shape and age class structure between populations. No test-reach individual lived to reach age >2 years. Gonads and livers from Grand Calumet individuals were found to be blackened, ruptured, and decreased in thickness. None of the fish from test study reaches displayed sexual structure in a 1:1 ratio. High sediment-contaminant concentrations for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metals in the Grand Calumet River correlated (r (2) = 0.998) with decreased population fitness and decreased individual reproductive health.

  12. Evaluation of Several Biological Monitoring Techniques for Hazard Assessment of Potentially Contaminated Wastewater and Groundwater. Volume 2. Aberdeen Proving Ground Wastewater Treatment Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    daphnid ( Ceriodaphnia dubia) survival and reproduction test, and 7-d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) survival 20. OISTRIBUTION IAVALASlUTY OF...growth test, 7-d daphnid ( CeriodaPhnia dubia) survival and reproduction test, and 7-d fathead minnow (•P.imphils pRom1elas) survival and growth test...capricornutum, daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia, fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes

  13. Effects of Nanosilver on Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing use of nanosilver in consumer products warrants investigation into its toxicity to aquatic organisms. A series of studies were conducted comparing the potency of nanosilver to ionic silver (Ag+) at acute and sublethal levels and to evaluate the likelihood that the ...

  14. Effects of Nanosilver on Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increasing use of nanosilver in consumer products warrants investigation into its toxicity to aquatic organisms. A series of studies were conducted comparing the potency of nanosilver to ionic silver (Ag+) at acute and sublethal levels and to evaluate the likelihood that the ...

  15. Bioassays on Illinois Waterway Dredged Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    promelas (the fathead min- now) and Daphnia magna (a freshwater cladoceran). A chronic (21-day) toxicity test was also conducted using Daphnia magna...NUMBER OF PAGES Acute Cadmium Daphnia magna Pimephales promelas 110 Ammonia Chronic Elutriate Sediment 16. PRICE CODE Bioassay Cladoceran Fathead minnow 17...11 Acute (48-hr) Bioassays with Daphnia magna ... ........... .. 11 Acute (48-hr) Bioassays with Pimephales

  16. Perchlorate Ecological Risk Studies - A Report on Literature Reviews and Studies Conducted by the Ecological Impact/Transport and Transformation Subcommittee of the Interagency Perchlorate Steering Committee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    freshwater aquatic invertebrates commonly called water fleas), Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), Eisenia foetida (the redworm), and Lactuca sativa...NOEC of 155 mg/L in Pimephales promelas. The range of LC50s was 66 mg/L in Ceriodaphnia dubia to 4450 mg/L in Eisenia foetida . Results were shared with

  17. Percholorate Ecological Risk Studies - A Report on Literature Reviews and Studies Conducted by the Ecological Impact/Transport and Transformation Subcommittee of the Interagency Perchlorate Steering Committee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    freshwater aquatic invertebrates commonly called water fleas), Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), Eisenia foetida (the redworm), and Lactuca sativa...NOEC of 155 mg/L in Pimephales promelas. The range of LC50s was 66 mg/L in Ceriodaphnia dubia to 4450 mg/L in Eisenia foetida . Results were shared with

  18. Comparative acute toxicity of a synthetic mine effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia, larval fathead minnow and the freshwater mussel Anodonta imbecilis

    SciTech Connect

    Masnado, R.G.; Geis, S.W.; Sonzogni, W.C.

    1995-11-01

    To determine if water quality-based effluent limitations recommended for a proposed discharger would provide adequate protection of aquatic life, site-specific acute toxicity tests were performed. The proposed discharger studied was a mine to be located in northern Wisconsin. The mine`s discharge would flow into the Flambeau River, a relatively pristine river that harbors endangered freshwater mussels. The toxicity effects of synthetic effluents, representing a mixture of five different metals under contrasting conditions of hardness, were tested on several different organisms. Results indicated that Ceriodaphnia dubia exhibited a much greater sensitivity to various mixtures of cadmium, hexavalent chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc than did either larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) or the freshwater mussel Anodonta imbecilis. Mixture o metals at the permitted discharge levels of individual metals were also found to be consistently toxic to C. dubia. Because C. dubia was found to be much more sensitive than A. imbecilis, an effluent safe for C. dubia should also be safe for A. imbecilis and the physiologically similar endangered mussels found in the river. Based on such testing, aquatic life toxicity-testing conditions and criteria suggested for the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit should be protective of C. dubia and, hence, other aquatic life such as endangered mussels. Overall, effluent limitations for proposed dischargers need to be based on the combined effect of complex effluents. Aquatic toxicity testing using synthetic effluents that approximate the expected discharge characteristics provides a viable approach to determining the limits for proposed dischargers of multiple pollutants.

  19. Dietary Exposure of Fathead Minnows to the Explosives TNT and RDX and to the Pesticide DDT using Contaminated Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jerre G.; Lotufo, Guilherme R.

    2005-01-01

    Explosive compounds have been released into the environment during manufacturing, handling, and usage procedures. These compounds have been found to persist in the environment and potentially promote detrimental biological effects. The lack of research on bioaccumulation and bioconcentration and especially dietary transfer on aquatic life has resulted in challenges in assessing ecological risks. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential trophic transfer of the explosive compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using a realistic freshwater prey/predator model and using dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), a highly bioaccumulative compound, to establish relative dietary uptake potential. The oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to 14C-labeled TNT, RDX or DDT for 5 hours in water, frozen in meal-size packages and subsequently fed to individual juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish were sampled for body residue determination on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 following an 8-hour gut purging period. Extensive metabolism of the parent compound in worms occurred for TNT but not for RDX and DDT. Fish body residue remained relatively unchanged over time for TNT and RDX, but did not approach steady-state concentration for DDT during the exposure period. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in fish relative to concentration in worms) was 0.018, 0.010, and 0.422 g/g for TNT, RDX and DDT, respectively, confirming the expected relatively low bioaccumulative potential for TNT and RDX through the dietary route. The experimental design was deemed successful in determining the potential for trophic transfer of organic contaminants via a realistic predator/prey exposure scenario. PMID:16705829

  20. Transcript variability and physiological correlates in the fathead minnow ovary: Implications for sample size, and experimental power.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Andrew M; Wood, Richard K; Chishti, Yasmin; Feswick, April; Loughery, Jennifer R; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2015-09-01

    Fundamental studies characterizing transcript variability in teleost tissues are needed if molecular endpoints are to be useful for regulatory ecotoxicology. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure transcript variability of steroidogenic enzymes and steroid receptors in the fathead minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas) ovary to better determine normal variability and the sample sizes needed to detect specific effect sizes and to (2) determine how expression patterns related to higher level endpoints used in some regulatory ecotoxicology programs (e.g. relative gonad size). Estrogen receptor 2b (esr2b) and 5α-reductase a3 (srd5a3) showed high variability in the ovary (CV>1.0) while progesterone receptor (pgr), androgen receptor (ar), and esr2a showed comparatively low variability (CV=~0.5--0.7). Using these estimates, a power analysis revealed that sample sizes for real-time PCR experiments would need to be>20 to detect a 2-fold change for 7 of the transcripts examined; thus many molecular studies conducted in the fish ovary may have insufficient power to detect smaller effects. Two transcripts were correlated to steroid production in the ovary; cyp19a1 levels were positively correlated to in vitro E2 production, while ar levels were negatively correlated to in vitro T production. Thus, these transcripts may be informative molecular surrogates for ovarian steroid production. No transcript investigated showed any correlation to GSI, condition, or body weight/length. Molecular approaches in fish are increasingly used to assess biological impacts of chemical stressors; however additional studies are required that determine how molecular variability relates to higher level biological endpoints.

  1. Dietary exposure of fathead minnows to the explosives TNT and RDX and to the pesticide DDT using contaminated invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jerre G; Lotufo, Guilherme R

    2005-08-01

    Explosive compounds have been released into the environment during manufacturing, handling, and usage procedures. These compounds have been found to persist in the environment and potentially promote detrimental biological effects. The lack of research on bioaccumulation and bioconcentration and especially dietary transfer on aquatic life has resulted in challenges in assessing ecological risks. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential trophic transfer of the explosive compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using a realistic freshwater prey/predator model and using dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), a highly bioaccumulative compound, to establish relative dietary uptake potential. The oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to 14C-labeled TNT, RDX or DDT for 5 hours in water, frozen in meal-size packages and subsequently fed to individual juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish were sampled for body residue determination on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 following an 8-hour gut purging period. Extensive metabolism of the parent compound in worms occurred for TNT but not for RDX and DDT. Fish body residue remained relatively unchanged over time for TNT and RDX, but did not approach steady-state concentration for DDT during the exposure period. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in fish relative to concentration in worms) was 0.018, 0.010, and 0.422 g/g for TNT, RDX and DDT, respectively, confirming the expected relatively low bioaccumulative potential for TNT and RDX through the dietary route. The experimental design was deemed successful in determining the potential for trophic transfer of organic contaminants via a realistic predator/prey exposure scenario.

  2. Poultry litter-induced endocrine disruption in fathead minnow, sheepshead minnow, and mummichog laboratory exposures.

    PubMed

    Yonkos, Lance T; Fisher, Daniel J; Van Veld, Peter A; Kane, Andrew S; McGee, Beth L; Staver, Kenneth W

    2010-10-01

    Animal feeding operations in the United States produce more than 500 million tons of manure annually. Disposal of poultry waste via application as fertilizer results in substantial runoff of poultry litter-associated contaminants (PLAC). Of particular concern are sex steroids, 17β-estradiol, estrone and testosterone, responsible for sex differentiation and development of reproductive structures. In a series of laboratory assays, mature male and mixed-sex larval/juvenile fish were continuously exposed to environmentally relevant PLAC solutions. Effects on gonads were assessed histologically, and vitellogenin (VTG) induction was measured as a gauge of estrogenicity. Twenty-one-day exposures to laboratory-generated PLAC solutions routinely induced VTG in mature male Pimephales promelas. Vitellogenesis in Fundulus heteroclitus only occurred at the highest tested PLAC concentration, and Cyprinodon variegatus were unresponsive at any tested concentration. All species produced considerable VTG in response to a 17β-estradiol-positive control. A pronounced feminization was seen in P. promelas when exposed to PLAC as larvae but not when exposed as juveniles. Runoff from a poultry litter-amended field cropped under standard agronomic practices induced significant VTG in male P. promelas. Results indicate that environmentally relevant PLAC concentrations exhibit endocrine activity sufficient to induce VTG production in male fish and possibly affect sex ratios in resident fish populations. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 2010;29:2328-2340. © 2010 SETAC.

  3. Adaptation, Compensation, and Recovery: Unraveling the Mechanisms through Genomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  4. Adaptation, Compensation, and Recovery: Unraveling the Mechanisms through Genomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using transcriptional network inferen...

  5. Inference of chemicals that cause biological effects in treated pulp and paper mill effluent using gene expression in caged fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical chemistry techniques can identify chemicals present in the waters of the Great Lakes areas of concern, however it remains a challenge to identify those chemicals or classes of chemicals that actually cause adverse effects. Use of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales prome...

  6. Inference of chemicals that cause biological effects in treated pulp and paper mill effluent using gene expression in caged fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical chemistry techniques can identify chemicals present in the waters of the Great Lakes areas of concern, however it remains a challenge to identify those chemicals or classes of chemicals that actually cause adverse effects. Use of caged fathead minnows (Pimephales prome...

  7. Influence of elevated alkalinity and natural organic matter (NOM) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproductive performance in fathead minnows during chronic, multi-trophic exposures to a metal mine effluent.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Jacob D; Dubé, Monique G; Niyogi, Som

    2013-09-01

    Metal bioavailability in aquatic organisms is known to be influenced by various water chemistry parameters. The present study examined the influence of alkalinity and natural organic matter (NOM) on tissue-specific metal accumulation and reproductive performance of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) during environmentally relevant chronic exposures to a metal mine effluent (MME). Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or NOM (as commercial humic acid) were added to a Canadian MME [45 percent process water effluent (PWE)] in order to evaluate whether increases in alkalinity (3-4 fold) or NOM (~1.5-3mg/L dissolved organic carbon) would reduce metal accumulation and mitigate reproductive toxicity in fathead minnows during a 21-day multi-trophic exposure. Eleven metals (barium, boron, cobalt, copper, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, rubidium, selenium, and strontium) were elevated in the 45 percent PWE relative to the reference water. Exposure to the unmodified 45 percent PWE resulted in a decrease of fathead minnow egg production (~300 fewer eggs/pair) relative to the unmodified reference water, over the 21-day exposure period. Water chemistry modifications produced a modest decrease in free ion activity of some metals (as shown by MINTEQ, Version 3) in the 45 percent PWE exposure water, but did not alter the metal burden in the treatment-matched larval Chironomus dilutus (the food source of fish during exposure). The tissue-specific metal accumulation increased in fish exposed to the 45 percent PWE relative to the reference water, irrespective of water chemistry modifications, and the tissue metal concentrations were found to be similar between fish in the unmodified and modified 45 percent PWE (higher alkalinity or NOM) treatments. Interestingly however, increased alkalinity and NOM markedly improved fish egg production both in the reference water (~500 and ~590 additional eggs/pair, respectively) and 45 percent PWE treatments (~570 and ~260 additional eggs

  8. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  9. Dietary selenomethionine exposure alters swimming performance, metabolic capacity and energy homeostasis in juvenile fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    McPhee, D Landon; Janz, David M

    2014-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to cause chronic toxicity in aquatic species. In particular, dietary exposure of fish to selenomethionine (SeMet), the primary form of Se in the diet, is of concern. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure to elevated dietary SeMet alters energy and endocrine homeostasis in adult fish. However, little is known about the direct effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fish. The objective of the present study was to investigate sublethal physiological effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Twenty days-post-hatch fathead minnow were exposed for 60 days to different measured concentrations (2.8, 5.4, 9.9, 26.5 μg Se/g dry mass [dm]) of Se in food in the form of SeMet. After exposure, samples were collected for Se analysis and fish were subjected to a swimming performance challenge to assess critical swim speed (Ucrit), tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude, oxygen consumption (MO2), cost of transport (COT), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate (AMR), and factorial aerobic scope (F-AS). Ucrit was decreased in the 26.5 μg Se/g dm exposure group compared to the control group. Tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude were significantly reduced in fish fed 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g. An increase in MO2 and COT was observed in the 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups compared to the control group. While the AMR of the high dose group was increased relative to control, there were no significant differences in SMR and F-AS. Energy storage capacity was measured via whole body triglyceride and glycogen concentrations. Triglyceride concentrations in non-swam fish were elevated in the 5.4 μg Se/g group relative to controls. Fatigued (swam) fish had significantly lower whole body triglycerides than non-swam fish. All non-swam SeMet exposure groups had significantly decreased whole body glycogen concentrations compared to controls, while the 5.4 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups had

  10. Toxicity of TNT Wastewater (Pink Water) to Aquatic Organisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and the aquatic invertebrate Daphnia magna . The toxicity tests were conducted on materials that had been...probably the most toxic ingredient of LAP wastewater. The minnow and Daphnia magna were equally sensitive to 2,4-DNT, but the latter was more tolerant of alpha-TNT.

  11. Comparison of nanosilver and ionic silver toxicity in Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work evaluates the relative contribution of soluble (Ag+) silver and and nano-scale silver particles (n-Ag) and thus addresses an important issue relative to potential ecological risk of n-Ag and of other partially-soluble metal nanoparticles. We used acute to chronic (based...

  12. Comparison of nanosilver and ionic silver toxicity in Daphnia magna and Pimephales promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work evaluates the relative contribution of soluble (Ag+) silver and and nano-scale silver particles (n-Ag) and thus addresses an important issue relative to potential ecological risk of n-Ag and of other partially-soluble metal nanoparticles. We used acute to chronic (based...

  13. Freshwater in situ toxicity testing: Daphnia magna, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Pimephales promelas, Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The use of traditional laboratory toxicity test species in field exposures have proven to be a valuable assessment tool for monitoring effluent, water, sediment and storm water quality. Mimicking fluctuating exposures of stressors with associated interactions with differing physico-chemical variables is difficult. In situ exposures are conducted for similar time periods measuring similar response endpoints as in more traditional laboratory tests. However, organisms are transferred to the field and exposed in various types of test chambers. The author has observed responses which are similar and which are significantly different from simultaneous laboratory exposures. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, suspended solids, natural light, flow, and predation may affect in situ responses, but are often removed from laboratory exposures. The strengths and weaknesses observed with these test systems over the past few years will be reviewed.

  14. From Scenarios to Test Implementations Via Promela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Andreas; Alikacem, El-Hachemi; Hallal, Hesham H.; Boroday, Sergiy

    We report on a tool for generating executable concurrent tests from scenarios specified as message sequence charts. The proposed approach features three steps: 1) Deriving a MSC test implementation from a MSC scenario, 2) Mapping the test implementation into a Promela model, 3) Generating executable test scripts in Java. The generation of an intermediate Promela model allows for model-checking to inspect the test implementation for properties like soundness, fault detection power as well as for consistency checking between different test scenarios. Moreover decoupling the executable test scripts from the scenario specification makes it possible to use different backend code generators to support other scripting languages when needed.

  15. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Fish: Developing Exposure Indicators and Predictive Models of Effects Based on Mechanism of Action

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we provide an overview and illustrative results from a large, integrated project that assesses the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on two small fish models, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). For this work a syste...

  16. Caught in a Network: Recovery from Aromatase Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fadrozole is an inhibitor of aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We exposed female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) to 0 or 30 ug/L fadrozole for 8 days, and fish were then held in clean water for 8 extra days. We analyzed ex vivo steroid production, pl...

  17. A novel framework for interpretation of data from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) for the detection of endocrine-disrupting chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish short term reproduction assay (FSTRA) is a key component of the USEPA endocrine disruptor screening program (EDSP). The FSTRA considers several mechanistic and apical responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to determine whether an unknown chemical is likely t...

  18. Aromatase Inhibition in a Transcriptional Network Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnow ovaries (FHM, Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using a transcriptional ne...

  19. Metabolomics for in situ environmental monitoring of surface waters impacted by contaminants from both point and non-point sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the efficacy of metabolomics for field-monitoring of fish exposed to waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and non-point sources of chemical contamination. Lab-reared male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) were held in mobile monitoring units and e...

  20. Molecular Endpoints and Mixtures of EDCs in Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology is a relatively novel tool in ecotoxicology and is beginning to be used for exposure and/or hazard characterization for ecological risk assessment. To develop a basis for this type of analysis, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were treated with two bin...

  1. Toxicity of TNT Wastewaters to Aquatic Organisms. Volume 2. Acute Toxicity of Condensate Wastewater and 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    magna), scud (Hyalella azteca), and worm ( Lumbriculus variegatus ); but T. dissimilis was the least sensitive invertebrate species to synthetic...midge) Lumbriculus variegatus (oligochaete) Fish Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow) Lepomis machrochirus (bluegill sunfish) Ictalurus punctatus...day bioconcentration test data were less than 100 in bluegills, D. magna, and L. variegatus , but 2100 to 2500 in the alga S. capricornutum. In bluegills

  2. DIETARY UPTAKE KINETICS OF 2,2', 5, 5'-TETRACHLOROBIPHENYL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposition of 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in dietary exposures with live prey. Trout were fed TCB-dosed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; 4% of body wt) containing whole-body residues of 244 (low dose) or 1663 (h...

  3. Aromatase Inhibition in a Transcriptional Network Context

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemicals in the environment have the potential to inhibit aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We examined the responses of female fathead minnow ovaries (FHM, Pimephales promelas) to a model aromatase inhibitor, fadrozole, using a transcriptional ne...

  4. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Fish: Developing Exposure Indicators and Predictive Models of Effects Based on Mechanism of Action

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we provide an overview and illustrative results from a large, integrated project that assesses the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on two small fish models, the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). For this work a syste...

  5. In vivo and in vitro neurochemical-based assessments of wastewater effluents from the Maumee River area of concern.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were caged for four days at multiple locations upstream and downstream of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharge into the Maumee River (USA, OH). Grab water samples collected at the same location were extracted using several different ...

  6. A novel framework for interpretation of data from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) for the detection of endocrine-disrupting chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish short term reproduction assay (FSTRA) is a key component of the USEPA endocrine disruptor screening program (EDSP). The FSTRA considers several mechanistic and apical responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to determine whether an unknown chemical is likely t...

  7. A novel framework for interpretation of data from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) for the detection of endocrined-disrupting chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish short term reproduction assay (FSTRA) is a key component of the USEPA endocrine disruptor screening program (EDSP). The FSTRA considers several mechanistic and apical responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to determine whether an unknown chemical is likely to...

  8. A novel framework for interpretation of data from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) for the detection of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish short term reproduction assay (FSTRA) is a key component of the USEPA endocrine disruptor screening program (EDSP). The FSTRA considers several mechanistic and apical responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to determine whether an unknown chemical is likely to...

  9. Molecular Endpoints and Mixtures of EDCs in Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology is a relatively novel tool in ecotoxicology and is beginning to be used for exposure and/or hazard characterization for ecological risk assessment. To develop a basis for this type of analysis, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were treated with two bin...

  10. DIETARY UPTAKE KINETICS OF 2,2', 5, 5'-TETRACHLOROBIPHENYL IN RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposition of 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) was studied in dietary exposures with live prey. Trout were fed TCB-dosed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; 4% of body wt) containing whole-body residues of 244 (low dose) or 1663 (h...

  11. Pathway-based Analysis of Fish Transcriptomics Data across Effluent Gradients in Minnesota Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger effort to assess the health of streams and rivers in Minnesota, a series of caged fish experiments were conducted in three locations: Ely, Hutchinson, and Rochester. The experimental design placed caged fish (fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas; FHM) across ...

  12. A novel framework for interpretation of data from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) for the detection of endocrined-disrupting chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish short term reproduction assay (FSTRA) is a key component of the USEPA endocrine disruptor screening program (EDSP). The FSTRA considers several mechanistic and apical responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to determine whether an unknown chemical is likely to...

  13. A novel framework for interpretation of data from the fish short-term reproduction assay (FSTRA) for the detection of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fish short term reproduction assay (FSTRA) is a key component of the USEPA endocrine disruptor screening program (EDSP). The FSTRA considers several mechanistic and apical responses in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to determine whether an unknown chemical is likely to...

  14. Caught in a Network: Recovery from Aromatase Inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fadrozole is an inhibitor of aromatase, an enzyme critical to estrogen synthesis. We exposed female fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) to 0 or 30 ug/L fadrozole for 8 days, and fish were then held in clean water for 8 extra days. We analyzed ex vivo steroid production, pl...

  15. Pathway-based analysis of fish transcriptomics data along effluent gradients in Minnesota rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger effort to assess the health of streams and rivers influenced by municipal effluents in Minnesota, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; FHM) were exposed to ambient surface waters from three locations. The locations were generally representative of the state: ...

  16. Metabolomics for in situ environmental monitoring of surface waters impacted by contaminants from both point and non-point sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the efficacy of metabolomics for field-monitoring of fish exposed to waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and non-point sources of chemical contamination. Lab-reared male fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas, FHM) were held in mobile monitoring units and e...

  17. In vivo and in vitro neurochemical-based assessments of wastewater effluents from the Maumee River area of concern.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were caged for four days at multiple locations upstream and downstream of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharge into the Maumee River (USA, OH). Grab water samples collected at the same location were extracted using several different ...

  18. Modulation of estrogenic effects by environmental temperature and food availability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), in combination with environmental influences, interfere with endocrine function in humans and wildlife. Estrogens are a type of EDC that may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. The impact of estrogens on P...

  19. Progressing Insensitive Munitions: Benefits and Techniques for Proactively Addressing Environmental Regulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    STRONG® Types of bioassays Medium Common Name Organism Acute toxicity Chronic toxicity Bioaccum- ulation Freshwater Water flea Daphnia...magna/pulex X X Water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia X X Fathead minnow Pimephales promelas X X Zebra fish Danio rerio X X X Green algae Pseudokirchneriella

  20. Use of vegetated agricultural drainage ditches to decrease pesticide transport from tomato and alfalfa fields in California: runoff toxicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was performed to investigate the potential of vegetated drainage ditches for mitigating the impact of agricultural irrigation runoff on downstream aquatic ecosystems. Water column toxicity to larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), and the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, was measured for ...

  1. Pathway-based analysis of fish transcriptomics data along effluent gradients in Minnesota rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger effort to assess the health of streams and rivers influenced by municipal effluents in Minnesota, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas; FHM) were exposed to ambient surface waters from three locations. The locations were generally representative of the state: ...

  2. Pathway-based Analysis of Fish Transcriptomics Data across Effluent Gradients in Minnesota Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger effort to assess the health of streams and rivers in Minnesota, a series of caged fish experiments were conducted in three locations: Ely, Hutchinson, and Rochester. The experimental design placed caged fish (fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas; FHM) across ...

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Profiles of Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Liver of Fathead Minnows Pimephalus promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgenic chemicals are present in the environment at concentrations that impair reproductive processes in fish. The objective of this experiment was to identify proteins altered by an androgen receptor agonist (17â-trenbolone) and antagonist (flutamide) in the liver. Female fa...

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Profiles of Androgen Receptor Signaling in the Liver of Fathead Minnows Pimephalus promelas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgenic chemicals are present in the environment at concentrations that impair reproductive processes in fish. The objective of this experiment was to identify proteins altered by an androgen receptor agonist (17â-trenbolone) and antagonist (flutamide) in the liver. Female fa...

  5. Integrated ecological hazard assessment of waste site soil extracts using FETAX and short-term fathead minnow teratogenesis assay

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, D.J.; Stover, E.L.; Bantle, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Frog Embryo Teratogenesis Assay-Xenopus (FETAX) is a 96-h whole embryo-larval assay designed to detect environmental developmental toxicants for use in ecological hazard assessment. FETAX offers several advantages in integrated biological hazard assessment including, time- and cost-effectiveness, technical ease, and versatility. FETAX has undergone extensive intra- and more recently interlaboratory validation with known mammalian teratogens and non-teratogens. Ecological hazard evaluations of contaminated sediments, waste site soils, and complex surface and groundwaters have also been performed. An integrated hazard assessment study using FETAX, the conventional, Pimephales promelas 7-d teratogenecity test, and an abbreviated P. promelas teratogenecity test utilizing the general FETAX protocol was conducted with specific reference toxicants and aqueous extracts of contaminated hazardous waste site soils. Results from the studies indicated that FETAX can be used as a component of a battery of bioassays designed to assess potential ecological hazard. Furthermore, the generalized FETAX protocol may be useful with other species in evaluating developmental toxicity hazard.

  6. Java PathFinder: A Translator From Java to Promela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    JAVA PATHFINDER, JPF, is a prototype translator from JAVA to PROMELA, the modeling language of the SPIN model checker. JPF is a product of a major effort by the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames to make model checking technology part of the software process. Experience has shown that severe bugs can be found in final code using this technique, and that automated translation from a programming language to a modeling language like PROMELA can help reducing the effort required.

  7. PERSONNEL - MINNOWS - SKYLAB (SL)-3 - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-07-18

    S73-30856 (29 June 1973) --- John Boyd observes a bag with two ?brackish water? minnows known as ?Mummichog Minnows? which will be onboard Skylab 3 with astronauts Alan L. Bean, Owen K. Garriott and Jack R. Lousma. The fish were added to the flight at the request of scientist-astronaut Dr. Owen K. Garriott, science pilot. Fifty eggs from the minnows will also be included in the bag. The objective of this experiment is to show what disorientation the fish will experience when exposed to weightlessness. Many fish have vestibular apparatus quite similar to man. Even though they live in an environment usually considered to resemble weightlessness, they do perceive a gravity vector. An aquarium of the minnows, caught off the coast of Beaufort, North Carolina, is in the background. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Assessing the effect of pesticides in agricultural runoff on aquatic life in the Sangamon River near Monticello, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coupe, R.H.; Henebry, M.S.; Branham, M.R.; Olem, H.

    1993-01-01

    Stream-water samples collected from a midwest stream, following a thunderstorm during May 1991 were toxic to water fleas (Ceriodaphnia dubia), but not fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), or a bacterium (Photobacterium phosphoreum) or green alga (Selenastrum capricornutum). It was unlikely that the toxicity to the water fleas was caused by herbicides, but it may have been caused by insecticides.Stream-water samples collected from a midwest stream, following a thunderstorm during May 1991 were toxic to water fleas (Ceriodaphnia dubia), but not fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), or a bacterium (Photobacterium phosphoreum) or green alga (Selenastrum capricornutum). It was unlikely that the toxicity to the water fleas was caused by herbicides, but it may have been caused by insecticides.

  9. Personnel observe minnows to be sent aboard Skylab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    John Boyd observes a bag with two 'brackish water' minnows known as 'Mummichog Minnows' which will be on board Skylab 3. The fish were added to the flight at the request of Scientist-Astronaut Dr. Owen K. Garriott, science pilot. The objective of this experiment is to show what disorientation the fish will experience when exposed to weightlessness. An aquarium of the Minnows, caught off the coast of Beaufort, North Carolina, is in the background.

  10. Aquatic Toxicity Screening of Fire Fighting Agents; 2003 Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-02

    the Trimmed Spearman - Karber Method and the results were shown in parts per million (ppm). Typical program output is shown in Appendix C. 4 SECTION... Karber Method and the results are given in parts per million (ppm). RESULTS The first sample of FireAde 2000 had a pH of 12.4, which resulted in the...the Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) as the screening organism. Aquatic toxicity screening offers an inexpensive, efficient and reliable method for

  11. Installation Restoration Program. Preliminary Assessment: Maryland Air National Guard Base, Martin State Airport, Baltimore, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    the presence of toxic materials in the environment. We use juvenile watern fleas ( Daphnia magna) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) for two U...in: (1) Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater (16th Edition); (2) Methods-forTMeasuring the Acute Toxi ---ty of Effluents to...perform our standard 48 hour acute toxicity test we use 250 ml of sample for the Daphnia or 2000 ml for the fish. All tests are run in glass beakers. We

  12. Considerations in Selecting Bioassay Organisms for Determining the Potential Environmental Impact of Dredged Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    using the water flea Daphnia magna, mayfly larvae Hexagenia limbata, and fatnead minnow Pimephales promelas. Thirteen of the sed- iments were collected...were selected for each location. Daphnia pulex juveniles were tested with samples from location 1 (0 parts per thousand [ppt] salinity), 19 A.6 grass...and Anderson 1 4 1 2 0 used larvae of the mayfly Hexagenia limbata, the water flea Daphnia magna, and the isopod Asellus communis in bioassays with

  13. Determination of the Toxicity to Acquatic Organisms of HMX and Related Wastewater Constituents. Part 3. Toxicity of HMX, TAX, and SEX to Acquatic Organisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    shielded from fluorescent light and sunlight. Larvae were fed 1-2 drops of concentrated brine shrimp daily during exposure. The HMX embryo and larvae test...were fed concentrated live brine shrimp twice daily. Fish utilized in the static acute toxicity tests were fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas...live larvae were transferred to the respective aquaria upon completion of hatching. Larvae were fed live brine shrimp (Artemia salina) nauplii three

  14. Aquatic Toxicity of Decontaminating Solutions DS-2/DS-2P

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    toxicity of the DS-2 and DS-2P mixtures on Daphnia magna, (water flea), Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), Eisenia foetida (earthwonm) and...checked graphically using the same procedure described in the daphnia methods. 2.3 Earthworm Assay Earthworm toxicity testing utiiizcd Eisenia foetida as...graphically using the same proccdure described in the daphnia methods. 2.3 Er.thworm Assay Earthworm toxicity testing utilized Eisenia foetida as the

  15. Bringing the fathead minnow into the genomic era

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. While a large amount of molecular information has been gathered on the fathead minnow over the years, the la...

  16. Bringing the fathead minnow into the genomic era

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fathead minnow is a well-established ecotoxicological model organism that has been widely used for regulatory ecotoxicity testing and research for over a half century. While a large amount of molecular information has been gathered on the fathead minnow over the years, the la...

  17. Selective uptake and biological consequences of environmentally relevant antidepressant pharmaceutical exposures on male fathead minnows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultz, Melissa M.; Painter, Meghan M.; Bartell, Stephen E.; Logue, Amanda; Furlong, Edward T.; Werner, Stephen L.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2011-01-01

    Antidepressant pharmaceuticals have been reported in wastewater effluent at the nanogram to low microgram-per-liter range, and include bupropion (BUP), fluoxetine (FLX), sertraline (SER), and venlafaxine (VEN). To assess the effects of antidepressants on reproductive anatomy, physiology, and behavior, adult male fathead minnows (Pimeplwles promelas) were exposed for 21 days either to a single concentration of the antidepressants FLX, SER, VEN, or BUP, or to an antidepressant mixture. The data demonstrated that exposure to VEN (305 ng/L and 1104 ng/L) and SER (5.2 ng/L) resulted in mortality. Anatomical alterations were noted within the testes of fish exposed to SER and FLX, both modulators of the neurotransmitter serotonin. Additionally, FLX at 28 ng/L induced vitellogenin in male fish—a common endpoint for estrogenic endocrine disruption. Significant alterations in male secondary sex characteristics were noted with single exposures. Effects of single compound exposures neither carried over, nor became additive in the antidepressant mixtures, and reproductive behavior was not affected. Analysis of brain tissues from the exposed fish suggested increased uptake of FLX, SER and BUP and minimal uptake of VEN when compared to exposure water concentrations. Furthermore, the only metabolite detected consistently in the brain tissues was norfluoxetine. Similar trends of uptake by brain tissue were observed when fish were exposed to antidepressant mixtures. The present study demonstrates that anatomy and physiology, but not reproductive behavior, can be disrupted by exposure to environmental concentrations of some antidepressants. The observation that antidepressant uptake into fish tissues is selective may have consequences on assessing the mode-of-action and effects of these compounds in future studies.

  18. Evaluation of several biological monitoring techniques for hazard assessment of potentially contaminated wastewater and groundwater. Volume 3. Old O-field groundwater. Final report, July 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.T.; Turley, S.D.

    1992-03-01

    The toxicity of contaminated Old O-Field (Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground) groundwater and the reduction and/or elimination of toxicity by various treatment processes were evaluated. The study was divided into a bench scale and pilot scale study. The bench scale studies consisted of 48-h definitive acute toxicity tests run with daphnid neonates (Daphnia magna) and juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to untreated Old O-Field groundwater and groundwater treated by metals precipitation, UV oxidation (H 2O2 ), carbon adsorption, and carbon adsorption/biological sludge. The pilot scale studies consisted of several 96-h definitive acute toxicity tests run with two freshwater and two saltwater invertebrates and fish and Ames mutagenicity assays. Acute toxicity tests were run on untreated Old O-Field groundwater and groundwater treated by metals precipitation, UV oxidation (H2O2), air stripping, and carbon adsorption during the pilot scale study. The freshwater invertebrate and fish used in the study were daphnid neonates and juvenile fathead minnows, respectively. The saltwater invertebrate and fish were juvenile mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) and juvenile sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). Ames tests were run on untreated groundwater, UV oxidation-treated groundwater, and carbon-treated groundwater.... Groundwater, Aquatic, Toxicity, Daphnia, Daphnia magna, Fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, Mysid, Mysidopsis bahia, Sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus.

  19. Behavior of fish predators and their prey: habitat choice between open water and dense vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Stein, Roy A.

    1989-01-01

    Behavior of largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, and northern pike, Esox lucius, foraging on fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, or bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, was quantified in pools with 50% cover (half the pool had artificial stems at a density of 1000 stems m−2). Both predators spent most of their time in the vegetation. Largemouth bass searched for bluegills and ambushed minnows, whereas the relatively immobile northern pike ambushed all prey. Minnows were closer to predators and were captured more frequently than bluegills. Even when minnows dispersed, they moved continually and eventually wandered within striking distance of a predator. Bluegills dispersed in the cover with predators. Bass captured the few bluegills that strayed into the open and pike captured those that approached too closely in the cover. The ability of predators to capture prey while residing in habitats containing patches of dense cover may explain their residence in areas often considered to be poor ones for foraging.

  20. The relationship of spawning mode to conservation of North American minnows (Cyprinidae)

    Treesearch

    Carol E. Johnston

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 20 percent of North American minnows are considered imperiled. The factors responsible for imperilment in this group are complex, but the relationship of spawning mode to conservation of North American minnows has not been explored. The author provides a summary of the spawning modes of imperiled North American minnows, discuss patterns between these...