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Sample records for minoxidil

  1. Minoxidil overdose.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, A R; Warshawski, F J; Steinberg, R A

    1993-04-01

    A 52-year-old man ingested 60 ml of 2 percent topical minoxidil solution resulting in severe hypotension and tachycardia. He was resuscitated with intravenously administered crystalloid solution and treated with intravenously administered dopamine, resulting in a partial hemodynamic improvement. Further treatment with intravenously administered phenylephrine infusion resulted in resolution of hypotension. The patient suffered a non-Q-wave myocardial infarction as a result of the ingestion. The toxicity of this increasingly common preparation is profound. PMID:8131492

  2. Infantile generalized hypertrichosis caused by topical minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Rampon, Greice; Henkin, Caroline; de Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de

    2016-01-01

    Rare cases of hypertrichosis have been associated with topically applied minoxidil. We present the first reported case in the Brazilian literature of generalized hypertrichosis affecting a 5-year-old child, following use of minoxidil 5%, 20 drops a day, for hair loss. The laboratory investigation excluded hyperandrogenism and thyroid dysfunction. Topical minoxidil should be used with caution in children. PMID:26982785

  3. Infantile generalized hypertrichosis caused by topical minoxidil*

    PubMed Central

    Rampon, Greice; Henkin, Caroline; de Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira

    2016-01-01

    Rare cases of hypertrichosis have been associated with topically applied minoxidil. We present the first reported case in the Brazilian literature of generalized hypertrichosis affecting a 5-year-old child, following use of minoxidil 5%, 20 drops a day, for hair loss. The laboratory investigation excluded hyperandrogenism and thyroid dysfunction. Topical minoxidil should be used with caution in children. PMID:26982785

  4. Topical minoxidil: cardiac effects in bald man.

    PubMed Central

    Leenen, F H; Smith, D L; Unger, W P

    1988-01-01

    Systemic cardiovascular effects during chronic treatment with topical minoxidil vs placebo were evaluated using a double-blind, randomized design for two parallel groups (n = 20 for minoxidil, n = 15 for placebo). During 6 months of follow-up, blood pressure did not change, whereas minoxidil increased heart rate by 3-5 beats min-1. Compared with placebo, topical minoxidil caused significant increases in LV end-diastolic volume, in cardiac output (by 0.751 min-1) and in LV mass (by 5 g m-2). We conclude that in healthy subjects short-term use of topical minoxidil is likely not to be detrimental. However, safety needs to be established regarding ischaemic symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease as well as for the possible development of LV hypertrophy in healthy subjects during years of therapy. PMID:3191000

  5. Promotive Effect of Topical Ketoconazole, Minoxidil, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin on Hair Growth in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aldhalimi, Muhsin A.; Hadi, Najah R.; Ghafil, Fadaa A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently topical use of 2% Ketoconazole solution has been reported to have a therapeutic effect on androgenic alopecia. Minoxidil is a vasodilatory medication used primarily as antihypertensive drug. It was discovered to have the side effect of hair growth and reversing baldness. Tretinoin is commonly used topically for acne treatment and in the treatment of photoaging. It is used by some as hair loss treatment. Objective. To compare the stimulatory effect of Ketoconazole, Minoxidil, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin on hair growth in a mouse model. Materials and Methods. Coat hairs on the dorsal skin of seven weeks old male mice were gently clipped and then stained by using commercial dye. These mice were divided into four groups each of five treated with topical application of ethanol 95%, Ketoconazole solution 2%, Minoxidil solution 5%, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin solution 0.1%, respectively. The drugs were applied once daily for three weeks, the clipped area was photographed, and the ratio of regrown coat area was calculated. Results. The results demonstrated that Ketoconazole, Minoxidil, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin had a significant stimulatory effect on hair growth compared with the control group and Minoxidil was the most effective drug among them. PMID:24734193

  6. Promotive effect of topical ketoconazole, minoxidil, and minoxidil with tretinoin on hair growth in male mice.

    PubMed

    Aldhalimi, Muhsin A; Hadi, Najah R; Ghafil, Fadaa A

    2014-01-01

    Recently topical use of 2% Ketoconazole solution has been reported to have a therapeutic effect on androgenic alopecia. Minoxidil is a vasodilatory medication used primarily as antihypertensive drug. It was discovered to have the side effect of hair growth and reversing baldness. Tretinoin is commonly used topically for acne treatment and in the treatment of photoaging. It is used by some as hair loss treatment. Objective. To compare the stimulatory effect of Ketoconazole, Minoxidil, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin on hair growth in a mouse model. Materials and Methods. Coat hairs on the dorsal skin of seven weeks old male mice were gently clipped and then stained by using commercial dye. These mice were divided into four groups each of five treated with topical application of ethanol 95%, Ketoconazole solution 2%, Minoxidil solution 5%, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin solution 0.1%, respectively. The drugs were applied once daily for three weeks, the clipped area was photographed, and the ratio of regrown coat area was calculated. Results. The results demonstrated that Ketoconazole, Minoxidil, and Minoxidil with Tretinoin had a significant stimulatory effect on hair growth compared with the control group and Minoxidil was the most effective drug among them. PMID:24734193

  7. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  8. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-01-01

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a Kd value of 2.6 μM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases. PMID:24742982

  9. 5% Minoxidil: treatment for female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Foley, Kelly A

    2014-01-01

    Minoxidil is a Health Canada and US FDA-approved medication for hair loss in men and women. While 5% minoxidil foam has been approved for men since 2006, Health Canada and the FDA only approved 5% minoxidil foam for female pattern hair loss (FPHL) in 2014. Recent Phase III clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy of once daily 5% minoxidil foam for treatment of FPHL, where a significant change from baseline in the target area hair count was observed compared to placebo. Similar changes in hair count for 5% foam and twice daily 2% minoxidil solution established noninferiority of the 5% foam formulation. Five percent minoxidil foam provides an additional option for women with FPHL and will soon be available in Canada. PMID:25807073

  10. Stability of minoxidil in Espumil foam base.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Christine M; Sorenson, Bridget; Whaley, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Minoxidil is a drug used to stimulate hair growth and to slow balding. It is marketed under a number of trade names, including Rogaine, and is available in varying strength dose forms from a number of generic manufacturers. Minoxidil is available in oral and topical forms. In topical form, it can be applied by a metered-spray or rub-on applicator. A hydroalcoholic compounding vehicle can minimize greasiness, itching, burning, and contact dermatitis where low concentrations of ethanol and propylene glycol are present. Espumil Foam Base contains low concentrations of these ingredients and also can form a foam on topical application. Espumil's unique delivery by foam-activating packaging assures simple application to difficult-to-treat areas, and it vanishes quickly after application, keeping it in place and avoiding health skin areas. The objective of this study was to determine the stability of minoxidil in Espumil Foam Base. The studied sample was compounded into a 50-mg/mL solution and stored in a plastic foam-activating bottle at room temperature conditions. Three samples were assayed at each time point out to 90 days by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. The method was validated for its specificity through forced-degradation studies. The beyond-use-date is at least 90 days, based on data collected when this formulation was stored at room temperature, protected from light. PMID:23696178

  11. Topical minoxidil in the treatment of male erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Radomski, S B; Herschorn, S; Rangaswamy, S

    1994-05-01

    Topically applied 2% minoxidil solution has been reported to increase diameter, rigidity and arterial flow to the penis. As a result it has been suggested as a possible treatment for erectile dysfunction. A total of 21 patients received 2% minoxidil for treatment of erectile dysfunction with instructions to apply 1 cc of the solution slowly over the glans penis 20 minutes before intercourse. Average patient age was 52.5 years (range 29 to 65 years). The etiology of the impotence was neurogenic in 8 patients, vascular in 7, psychogenic in 4 and other causes in 2. Two patients also had clinical evidence of venous incompetence and 4 were diabetics. One patient with psychogenic impotence noticed improvement in the duration of erection but no increase in rigidity or size after minoxidil application. One patient with impotence after excision of a Peyronie's plaque reported a rigid erection adequate for intercourse after using minoxidil. This patient subsequently was able to achieve erections without using minoxidil. The remaining 19 patients had no improvement in erectile rigidity, or the ability to obtain or maintain an erection. One patient did notice some mild burning on the glans penis after applying the minoxidil. No other side effects were noted in any patient. These results indicate that 2% topical minoxidil solution is not effective when applied to the penis in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. It is possible that a higher concentration, a different delivery medium or a different chemical composition may yield better results. PMID:8158763

  12. Effects of Minoxidil Gel on Burn Wound Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khazaeli, Payam; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Rohani, Shohreh; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Ghalekhani, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Minoxidil has been reported to inhibit in-vitro fibroblast proliferation and lysyl hydroxylase activity, a key enzyme in collagen biosynthesis. These in-vitro effects proposed minoxidil to be a potential antifibrotic agent. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of minoxidil gel on wound healing procedure in a second-degree burn model in rats. Wistar rats were anesthetized and a second-degree burn was induced on the back of Wistar rats using a heated 2 cm diameter metal plate. Experimental groups received 2% or 5% topical minoxidil gel, dexpanthenol or sliver sulfadiazine. Histological parameters including collagen content, angiogenesis, number of preserved follicles and necrosis along with tensile strength of burn wound area were assessed on days 3, 7, 14 and 21 post-injury.Microscopic evaluation of specimens collected from sample animals were consistent and showed a second-degree burn. Main histological findings regarding minoxidil topical usage showed that collagen content and tensile strength of burned area did not differ between groups. However, minoxidil increased the number and diameter of blood vessels significantly compared with other groups.Although minoxidil improved the process of wound-healing, our results did not support the proposed idea of its usage as an antifibrotic agent. However, to reject its possible effects as an antifibrotic agent, more objective animal models should be developed and studied. PMID:24734077

  13. Generalized Hypertrichosis Induced by Topical Minoxidil in an Adult Woman.

    PubMed

    Chellini, Patrícia Rocha; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Raso, Paula; Sodré, Celso T

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is a common side effect of topical minoxidil and has been reported to occur mainly close to the areas of application. In this paper, we present a case of a 26-year-old woman who developed generalized hypertrichosis 8 weeks after treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution for alopecia areata. Generalized hypertrichosis is a rare side effect and has been described mainly in children and adolescents. Even though minoxidil is commonly prescribed for alopecia areata, there is insufficient evidence to support its systematic use and the occurrence of adverse effects should prompt drug interruption. Nonetheless, topical minoxidil has been shown to be a safe medication for adult patients, and we believe that the present case was an isolated one, possibly resulting from the misuse of the drug. PMID:26903750

  14. Generalized Hypertrichosis Induced by Topical Minoxidil in an Adult Woman

    PubMed Central

    Chellini, Patrícia Rocha; Pirmez, Rodrigo; Raso, Paula; Sodré, Celso T

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is a common side effect of topical minoxidil and has been reported to occur mainly close to the areas of application. In this paper, we present a case of a 26-year-old woman who developed generalized hypertrichosis 8 weeks after treatment with 5% topical minoxidil solution for alopecia areata. Generalized hypertrichosis is a rare side effect and has been described mainly in children and adolescents. Even though minoxidil is commonly prescribed for alopecia areata, there is insufficient evidence to support its systematic use and the occurrence of adverse effects should prompt drug interruption. Nonetheless, topical minoxidil has been shown to be a safe medication for adult patients, and we believe that the present case was an isolated one, possibly resulting from the misuse of the drug. PMID:26903750

  15. Allergic contact dermatitis to topical minoxidil solution: etiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Edward S; Friedman, Paul M; Cohen, David E; Washenik, Ken

    2002-02-01

    After more than a decade of use, topical minoxidil solution has proven to be a safe and effective treatment for androgenetic alopecia. However, some patients present with complaints of pruritus and scaling of the scalp. The most common causes of these symptoms include irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, or an exacerbation of seborrheic dermatitis. Patients suffering from allergic contact dermatitis may benefit from patch testing to determine the causative allergen. Among the patients we patch tested, propylene glycol was found to be the contactant in a majority of cases, not the minoxidil itself. Many of these patients may be candidates for treatment with alternative formulations using other solvents, such as butylene glycol, polysorbate, or glycerol. Although predictive, patch testing results do not ensure that the compounded preparations will be tolerated. Unfortunately, patients found to be allergic to minoxidil are no longer candidates for topical treatment of their alopecia with any preparations of minoxidil. PMID:11807448

  16. Hair follicle biology and topical minoxidil: possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Headington, J T

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which minoxidil, whether given orally or applied topically, stimulates hair growth remains undetermined. Possible indirect drug action, such as vasodilatation and increased blood flow to the dermal papilla, or possible local irritation related to minoxidil or to one or more components of the vehicle used for topical application has been suggested. Possible sites of direct drug action include either the dermal papilla of the follicle or hair matrix cells or possibly both. Morphometric studies of control scalp biopsies taken from young male patients with androgenetic alopecia reveal that the primary morphologic event in androgenetic alopecia is miniaturization of terminal hair follicles. Shortening and diminution of follicle size is undoubtedly accompanied by shortening of the hair growth cycle (decreased anagen time). Morphometric evaluation of scalp biopsies of patients receiving topical minoxidil in a vehicle composed of propylene glycol, water and ethanol has revealed growth of larger normally formed follicles when compared with pretreatment biopsies from the same individual. There has been no suggestion in any morphologic studies of minoxidil-treated patients for development of new follicles (follicular neogenesis). Because the dermal papilla of the hair follicle apparently controls both growth and differentiation of hair matrix cells and because there are no observable dysplastic or atypical changes in follicular germinal epithelium during or after application of topical minoxidil, it is concluded that the most probable site for the action of minoxidil is on the specialized mesenchymal cells of the follicular dermal papilla. PMID:3319729

  17. Preparation and evaluation of minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Shatalebi, M A; Rafiei, Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion with the purpose of improving minoxidil permeation into the skin, increasing hair growth, reducing skin irritation, and increasing consumer compliance. Minoxidil was dissolved in a solvent system comprising ethanol: glycerin: lactic acid: water (10:20:5:65). The foamable emulsion was prepared by mixing the oil phase with minoxidil solution using different amount of various emulsifiers. Seventeen formulations were prepared and the most stable foamable emulsion was selected and evaluated for various pharmaceutical parameters such as homogeneity, pH, stability to centrifugal stress, freeze-thaw and foamability. The adopted formulation showed good pharmaceutical characteristics. In vitro release rate of the formulations were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell using phosphate buffer pH 7.4 and ethanol as the receiver medium at sink condition. The release rate of formulations was found to obey Higuchi kinetic model. Experimental animal study was performed to evaluate hair growth potential of the formulation. Different cyclic phases of hair follicles, like anagen, and telogen phases, were determined at one month period. Histological study after treatment with adopted formulation exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (96%) which were higher as compared to marketed 5% minoxidil solution (Pakdaru® 70%) and the control group (42%). From animal study it was concluded that the selected formulation exhibited a significant potency in promoting hair growth in comparison with marketed 5% minoxidil solution Pakdaru®. PMID:25657781

  18. Preparation and evaluation of minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion

    PubMed Central

    Shatalebi, M.A.; Rafiei, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a minoxidil foamable emu oil emulsion with the purpose of improving minoxidil permeation into the skin, increasing hair growth, reducing skin irritation, and increasing consumer compliance. Minoxidil was dissolved in a solvent system comprising ethanol: glycerin: lactic acid: water (10:20:5:65). The foamable emulsion was prepared by mixing the oil phase with minoxidil solution using different amount of various emulsifiers. Seventeen formulations were prepared and the most stable foamable emulsion was selected and evaluated for various pharmaceutical parameters such as homogeneity, pH, stability to centrifugal stress, freeze-thaw and foamability. The adopted formulation showed good pharmaceutical characteristics. In vitro release rate of the formulations were evaluated using Franz diffusion cell using phosphate buffer pH 7.4 and ethanol as the receiver medium at sink condition. The release rate of formulations was found to obey Higuchi kinetic model. Experimental animal study was performed to evaluate hair growth potential of the formulation. Different cyclic phases of hair follicles, like anagen, and telogen phases, were determined at one month period. Histological study after treatment with adopted formulation exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (96%) which were higher as compared to marketed 5% minoxidil solution (Pakdaru® 70%) and the control group (42%). From animal study it was concluded that the selected formulation exhibited a significant potency in promoting hair growth in comparison with marketed 5% minoxidil solution Pakdaru®. PMID:25657781

  19. [Treatment of androgenic alopecia with topical minoxidil].

    PubMed

    Brenner, S; Tamir, A

    1991-11-01

    Minoxidil, a vasodilator, was first marketed in 1979 as an oral antihypertensive. Since hypertrichosis occurred as an adverse effect in most patients treated, a 2% topical solution was developed for use in men with androgenic alopecia. It was approved by the American Food and Drug Administration and by the Israel Ministry of Health. A follow-up of 30 cases treated with the preparation is presented. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by hair counts in a marked area on the balding scalp, as well as by subjective evaluations of patients and physicians. The treatment was beneficial in 63%: balding was slowed in most, while in a minority hair density actually increased. However, in only 6.6% was dramatic cosmetic improvement achieved. PMID:1800277

  20. Clinical and haemodynamic study of minoxidil in moderately hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Aerenlund Jensen, H; Rasmussen, K; Mosbaek, N

    1976-12-01

    1. We have evaluated the effectiveness and safety of minoxidil in moderately hypertensive out-patients. Eight patients were treated with hydrochlorothiazide and minoxidil for 5 months. The only female patient developed slight, reversible facial hair growth. In the other seven patients there was a moderate decrease in blood pressure. There were only minimal side-effects. Mild exertional tachycardia and a mean increase in body weight of 0-5 kg was found, but no oedema or signs of cardiac insufficiency were observed. No abnormalities were seen during routine blood tests. 2. This study shows that minoxidil combined with a diuretic may be successfully used in treating moderately hypertensive male patients. PMID:1071686

  1. Topical minoxidil for glaucoma filtration surgery in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sharir, M

    1994-12-01

    Studies evaluated the effect of topical minoxidil on the proliferation of limbal fibroblasts in rabbits following filtration surgery. New Zealand white rabbits underwent unguarded trabeculectomies in a masked, randomized, paired-design prospective study. Rabbits were treated topically every 3 hr around the clock for 1, 2 or 4 days post-operatively, with one drop of a 50-microliters solution containing either 20, 40 or 120 nM minoxidil or the vehicle alone. Another group of animals continued to receive 120 nM minoxidil topically every 8 hr for up to 10 days. Intraocular pressure (IOP), bleb appearance, signs of ocular toxicity and anterior chamber reaction were monitored. Animals were killed and tissues immediately surrounding the trabeculectomy ostium were removed and processed for vimentin detection by immunohistochemistry. Minoxidil, in 20 and 40 nM concentrations, did not induce a significant IOP reduction, nor prolonged bleb survival at any time point, and the changes in fibroblast counts between treated and control eyes were insignificant (P > 0.05). Fibroblast counts in the 120 mM minoxidil-treated eyes were significantly reduced by 42.6% within 24 hr compared to control (P < 0.001). This inhibitory effect remained for at least 2 days after surgery (P < 0.05), the critical period for scar formation. The blebs in this group remained consistently higher than in any other group, and some blebs survived for up to 8 days after surgery. IOP remained below preoperative level for at least 6 days in 50% of the eyes treated with 120 mM minoxidil (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7698263

  2. Minoxidil topical solution: an unsafe product for children.

    PubMed

    Claudet, Isabelle; Cortey, Caroline; Honorat, Raphaele; Franchitto, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Minoxidil hair formulation is commonly used for the treatment of male or female androgenic alopecia. This over-the-counter product is wrongly considered safe. The ingestion of a few milliliters by a child can lead to significant intoxication. We report a case of significant intoxication after the ingestion of topical minoxidil (Alopexy; Pierre Fabre Laboratoires, SA, Switzerland). A 7-year-old girl, who accidentally ingested a teaspoon of minoxidil hair solution, presented to the pediatric emergency department for emesis. At admission, she had a blood pressure of 86/56 mm Hg and a pulse of 149 beats per minute. Hypotension lasted 40 hours with the lowest value 24 hours after ingestion (79/33 mm Hg). She presented electrocardiogram changes (sinus tachycardia and flattening T-waves) but normal cardiac enzymes. Infusion of 20 mL/kg of normal saline fluid had no hemodynamic effect. Her blood pressure normalized on day 2. Minoxidil topical solution is an unsafe product for children. This formulation should be strictly kept out of reach of children and manufacturers should enhance child-resistance security of packaging. The over-the-counter availability must be questioned. PMID:25426682

  3. Transcutol containing vesicles for topical delivery of minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Mura, Simona; Manconi, Maria; Valenti, Donatella; Sinico, Chiara; Vila, Amparo Ofelia; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of Transcutol (Trc) to produce elastic vesicles with soy lecithin (SL) and study the influence of the obtained vesicles on in vitro (trans)dermal delivery of minoxidil. To this purpose, so-called penetration enhancer-containing vesicles (PEVs) were prepared using Trc aqueous solutions (5-10-20-30% v/v) as hydrophilic phase. SL liposomes, without Trc, were used as control. Prepared formulations were characterized in terms of size distribution, morphology, zeta potential, deformability, and rheological behavior. The influence of the obtained PEVs on (trans)dermal delivery of minoxidil was studied by in vitro diffusion experiments through pig skin. Results showed that all prepared PEVs were able to give good entrapment efficiency (E%≈67) similar to that of conventional liposomes. Trc-containing PEVs showed to be more deformable than liposomes only when minoxidil was loaded in 5 and 10% Trc-containing vesicles. Rheological studies showed that PEVs have higher fluidity than conventional liposomes. All PEVs showed a higher stability than liposomes as shown by studying zeta potential and size distribution during three months. Results of in vitro diffusion experiments showed that Trc-containing PEVs are able to deliver minoxidil to deep skin layers without any transdermal permeation. PMID:20446805

  4. A hairy fall: syncope resulting from topical application of minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, S W; VanGriethuysen, J; Edwards, C M B

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a young man who developed syncope after using a high strength formulation of topical minoxidil as a hair growth restorer. Other potential cardiovascular and endocrine causes were excluded, and his symptoms resolved on discontinuation of the product. While syncope is a recognised side effect of using this powerful systemic antihypertensive agent, few cases are documented in the literature, which we illustrate in our discussion. PMID:26347235

  5. Clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Roberts, Janet; McCoy, John; Desai, Nisha; Zarrab, Zoulikha; Pietrzak, Aldona; Lotti, Torello

    2015-01-01

    Clinical response to 5% topical minoxidil for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is typically observed after 3-6 months. Approximately 40% of patients will regrow hair. Given the prolonged treatment time required to elicit a response, a diagnostic test for ruling out nonresponders would have significant clinical utility. Two studies have previously reported that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts a patient's response to topical minoxidil therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing. In this communication, the present authors conducted an analysis of completed and ongoing studies of minoxidil response testing. The analysis confirmed the clinical utility of a sulfotransferase enzyme test in successfully ruling out 95.9% of nonresponders to topical minoxidil for the treatment of AGA. PMID:25112173

  6. Penetration of minoxidil from ethanol/propylene glycol solutions: effect of application volume and occlusion.

    PubMed

    Tata, S; Flynn, G L; Weiner, N D

    1995-06-01

    We have previously established that the relative concentrations of propylene glycol and ethanol as a binary solvent system have a significant effect on the skin penetration of 2% solutions of minoxidil at 50 microL/cm2. The present work extends these studies and investigates the penetration of minoxidil from the different vehicle combinations as functions of application volume and occlusion. Decreasing the application volume has a variable effect which depends on vehicle composition. Penetration of minoxidil from 100% ethanol solutions decreased linearly with application volume. Generally, irrespective of the volume applied, the penetration of minoxidil increased with increasing ethanol fraction with a maximum penetration at 90% ethanol. Penetration from all the formulations was enhanced upon occluding the skin, with greatest increase evident in solutions with higher volatile fraction. Penetration of minoxidil in vivo showed trends similar to those seen in vitro. PMID:7562405

  7. Doppler laser imaging predicts response to topical minoxidil in the treatment of female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    McCoy, J; Kovacevic, M; Situm, M; Stanimirovic, A; Bolanca, Z; Goren, A

    2016-01-01

    Topical minoxidil is the only drug approved by the US FDA for the treatment of female pattern hair loss. Unfortunately, following 16 weeks of daily application, less than 40% of patients regrow hair. Several studies have demonstrated that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts topical minoxidil response in female pattern hair loss patients. However, due to patients’ discomfort with the procedure, and the time required to perform the enzymatic assay it would be ideal to develop a rapid, non-invasive test for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Minoxidil is a pro-drug converted to its active form, minoxidil sulfate, by sulfotransferase enzymes in the outer root sheath of hair. Minoxidil sulfate is the active form required for both the promotion of hair regrowth and the vasodilatory effects of minoxidil. We thus hypothesized that laser Doppler velocimetry measurement of scalp blood perfusion subsequent to the application of topical minoxidil would correlate with sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles. In this study, plucked hair follicles from female pattern hair loss patients were analyzed for sulfotransferase enzyme activity. Additionally, laser Doppler velocimetry was used to measure the change in scalp perfusion at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes, after the application of minoxidil. In agreement with our hypothesis, we discovered a correlation (r=1.0) between the change in scalp perfusion within 60 minutes after topical minoxidil application and sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hairs. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using laser Doppler imaging as a rapid, non-invasive diagnostic test to predict topical minoxidil response in the treatment of female pattern hair loss. PMID:27049083

  8. Ionic and secretory response of pancreatic islet cells to minoxidil sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.H.; Hermann, M.; Herchuelz, A.; Lebrun, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Minoxidil sulfate is an antihypertensive agent belonging to the new class of vasodilators, the K+ channel openers. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effects of minoxidil sulfate on ionic and secretory events in rat pancreatic islets. The drug unexpectedly provoked a concentration-dependent decrease in 86Rb outflow. This inhibitory effect was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by glucose and tolbutamide. Minoxidil sulfate did not affect 45Ca outflow from islets perfused in the presence of extracellular Ca++ and absence or presence of glucose. However, in islets exposed to a medium deprived of extracellular Ca++, the drug provoked a rise in 45Ca outflow. Whether in the absence or presence of extracellular Ca++, minoxidil sulfate increased the cytosolic free Ca++ concentration of islet cells. Lastly, minoxidil sulfate increased the release of insulin from glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets. These results suggest that minoxidil sulfate reduces the activity of the ATP-sensitive K+ channels and promotes an intracellular translocation of Ca++. The latter change might account for the effect of the drug on the insulin-releasing process. However, the secretory response to minoxidil sulfate could also be mediated, at least in part, by a modest Ca++ entry.

  9. Minoxidil use in dermatology, side effects and recent patents.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alfredo; Cantisani, Carmen; Melis, Luca; Iorio, Alessandra; Scali, Elisabetta; Calvieri, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Minoxidil, a vasodilator medication known for its ability to slow or stop hair loss and promote hair regrowth, was first introduced, exclusively as an oral drug, to treat high blood pressure. It was however discovered to have the important side-effect of increasing growth or darkening of fine body hairs; this led to the development of a topical formulation as a 2% concentration solution for the treatment of female androgenic alopecia or 5% for treating male androgenic alopecia. Measurable changes disappear within months after discontinuation of treatment. The mechanism by which it promotes hair growth is not fully understood. Minoxidil is a potassium channel opener, causing hyperpolarization of cell membranes and it is also a vasodilator, it is speculated that, by widening blood vessels and opening potassium channels, it allows more oxygen, blood and nutrients to the follicle. This can also cause follicles in the telogen phase to shed, usually soon to be replaced by new, thicker hairs in a new anagen phase. It needs to be applied regularly, once or twice daily, for hair gained to be maintained, and side effects are common. The most common adverse reactions of the topical formulation are limited to irritant and allergic contact dermatitis on the scalp. There have been cases of allergic reactions to the nonactive ingredient propylene glycol, which is found in some topical solution especially if they are galenic. Increased hair loss which can occur during Minoxidil use, is due to the synchronization of the hair cycle that the treatment induces. In this review, we described its mechanism of action, use in dermatology and some patents related to alternative treatment of allergic reactions due to its use. PMID:22409453

  10. Scalp Psoriasiform Contact Dermatitis with Acute Telogen Effluvium due to Topical Minoxidil Treatment

    PubMed Central

    La Placa, Michelangelo; Balestri, Riccardo; Bardazzi, Federico; Vincenzi, Colombina

    2016-01-01

    Topical minoxidil, the only approved treatment for female pattern hair loss (FPHL), has been associated with scalp allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). We report the case of 2 female patients who developed ACD from minoxidil solution with severe telogen effluvium and psoriasiform scalp dermatitis. Scalp dermoscopy was useful to identify the psoriasiform vascular pattern, whereas patch testing made it possible to differentiate the cause of sensitization. In one case, minoxidil was the sole cause of scalp dermatitis, while in the other patient it was only the vehicle, thus permitting the patient to continue the treatment for FPHL. PMID:27172052

  11. Scalp Psoriasiform Contact Dermatitis with Acute Telogen Effluvium due to Topical Minoxidil Treatment.

    PubMed

    La Placa, Michelangelo; Balestri, Riccardo; Bardazzi, Federico; Vincenzi, Colombina

    2016-02-01

    Topical minoxidil, the only approved treatment for female pattern hair loss (FPHL), has been associated with scalp allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). We report the case of 2 female patients who developed ACD from minoxidil solution with severe telogen effluvium and psoriasiform scalp dermatitis. Scalp dermoscopy was useful to identify the psoriasiform vascular pattern, whereas patch testing made it possible to differentiate the cause of sensitization. In one case, minoxidil was the sole cause of scalp dermatitis, while in the other patient it was only the vehicle, thus permitting the patient to continue the treatment for FPHL. PMID:27172052

  12. The induction by topical minoxidil of increased fenestration in the perifollicular capillary wall.

    PubMed

    Sakita, S; Kagoura, M; Toyoda, M; Morohashi, M

    1999-02-01

    We report the induction by topical minoxidil of increased fenestration in the perifollicular capillary wall. Male 30-day-old Wistar rats were divided into two groups, i.e. an experimental group which received 4% minoxidil solution topically on the dorsal skin, and a control group which received only vehicle solution topically. Using transmission electron microscopy, follicular and subepidermal capillaries and dermal fibres were compared between both groups. There were no obvious differences in subepidermal capillaries or dermal fibres between the two groups. However, topically applied minoxidil increased fenestration in follicular capillary walls around anagen hair bulbs. PMID:10233226

  13. Chitosan microparticles for sustaining the topical delivery of minoxidil sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Gratieri, Taís; Simão, Patrícia Sper; de Freitas, Luís Alexandre Pedro; Lopez, Renata Fonseca Vianna

    2011-01-01

    Given the hypothesis that microparticles can penetrate the skin barrier along the transfollicular route, this work aimed to obtain and characterise chitosan microparticles loaded with minoxidil sulphate (MXS) and to study their ability to sustain the release of the drug, attempting a further application utilising them in a targeted delivery system for the topical treatment of alopecia. Chitosan microparticles, containing different proportions of MXS/polymer, were prepared by spray drying and were characterised by yield, encapsulation efficiency, size and morphology. Microparticles selected for further studies showed high encapsulation efficiency (∼82%), a mean diameter of 3.0 µm and a spherical morphology without porosities. When suspended in an ethanol/water solution, chitosan microparticles underwent instantaneous swelling, increasing their mean diameter by 90%. Release studies revealed that the chitosan microparticles were able to sustain about three times the release rate of MXS. This feature, combined with suitable size, confers to these microparticles the potential to target and improve topical therapy of alopecia with minoxidil. PMID:21824068

  14. Minoxidil 5% solution for topical treatment of loose anagen hair syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Nisha S; Oranje, Arnold P

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl with a diagnosis of loose anagen hair syndrome was treated with a tapering regime of minoxidil 5% solution over 28 months, resulting in quick, significant clinical improvement with no adverse effects. PMID:24602086

  15. Long-pulsed Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of facial hypertrichosis during topical minoxidil therapy.

    PubMed

    Benmously Mlika, Rym; Ben Hamida, Myriam; Hammami, Houda; Dorbani Ben Thabet, Imen; Rouatbi, Mondher; Mokhtar, Inçaf

    2013-08-01

    Hypertrichosis is a well-recognized adverse effect of therapy with either oral or topical minoxidil. We report a case of fronto-temporal hypertrichosis occurring in an 8-year-old girl treated for patchy alopecia areata of the frontal area of the scalp with 2% minoxidil solution. After failure of 5-months minoxidil-discontinuation, hair removal with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm line) (Smartepil II, Deka) was tested leading to complete resolution within 2 sessions. PMID:23463948

  16. Liposomes and niosomes as potential carriers for dermal delivery of minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Mura, Simona; Pirot, Fabrice; Manconi, Maria; Falson, Françoise; Fadda, Anna M

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work was to formulate minoxidil loaded liposome and niosome formulations to improve skin drug delivery. Multilamellar liposomes were prepared using soy phosphatidylcholine at different purity degrees (Phospholipon 90, 90% purity, soy lecithin (SL), 75% purity) and cholesterol (Chol), whereas niosomes were made with two different commercial mixtures of alkylpolyglucoside (APG) surfactants (Oramix NS10, Oramix CG110), Chol and dicetylphosphate. Minoxidil skin penetration and permeation experiments were performed in vitro using vertical diffusion Franz cells and human skin treated with either drug vesicular systems or propylene glycol-water-ethanol solution (control). Penetration of minoxidil in epidermal and dermal layers was greater with liposomes than with niosomal formulations and the control solution. These differences might be attributed to the smaller size and the greater potential targeting to skin and skin appendages of liposomal carriers, which enhanced globally the skin drug delivery. The greatest skin accumulation was always obtained with non-dialysed vesicular formulations. No permeation of minoxidil through the whole skin thickness was detected in the present study irrespective of the existence of hair follicles. Alcohol-free liposomal formulations would constitute a promising approach for the topical delivery of minoxidil in hair loss treatment. PMID:17365280

  17. Minoxidil-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC): characterization and rheological behaviour of topical formulations.

    PubMed

    Silva, A C; Santos, D; Ferreira, D C; Souto, E B

    2009-03-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are used as biocompatible carriers for several types of drugs intended for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biochemical purposes. The wide range of lipids and surfactants available for the production of such particles turns these carriers highly suitable for distinct applications (topical, dermal and transdermal, parenteral, pulmonary, and oral administration). This work describes the development of a special type of lipid particles, namely nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC), for minoxidil as an alternative to conventional topical alcoholic solutions. NLC were composed of stearic acid and oleic acid, being the matrix stabilized with poloxamer 188 in aqueous dispersion. To develop a suitable topical formulation, lipid dispersions were further mixed with freshly prepared Carbopol or perfluorocarbon based hydrogels. Minoxidil-loaded NLC were approximately 250 nm in size before the entrapment within the gel network and remained below 500 nm after mixing with both types of hydrogels. The occurrence of minoxidil crystallization in the aqueous phase of lipid dispersions was discarded under analysis by light microscopy and by scanning electron microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to assess the recrystallization index (i.e. measure of the percentage of lipid matrix that is crystallized) of the particles, which was shown to be 62% for minoxidil-free dispersions and 68% for minoxidil-loaded NLC dispersions. Rheological analysis of hydrogels containing NLC dispersions showed typical pseudoplastic behaviour which makes them suitable for topical purposes. PMID:19348340

  18. Transcutaneous minoxidil in the treatment of erectile dysfunctions in spinal cord injured men.

    PubMed

    Beretta, G; Saltarelli, O; Marzotto, M; Zanollo, A; Re, B

    1993-01-01

    We have tested the erectile effect of a topical applied drug (Minoxidil) in 15 spinal cord injured men. Minoxidil exerts a direct relaxant effect on arterial smooth muscles. This topical vasodilatory agent (1 ml of a 2% solution) was applied on the skin of the penile shaft. Increases in diameter and rigidity were measured with the RigiScan device (Dacomed Minneapolis, Minnesota). A total of 4 paraplegic men with a complete dorsal level lesion reported a positive erectile response. 3 of these 4 patients preferred to continue with this noninvasive treatment compared to prostaglandin E1 intracavernous injections. In our study no side effects were emerged and minoxidil proved to be well tolerated at the cutaneous level of the penis. Our results indicate that this treatment should be tested in spinal cord injured men before a invasive therapy is initiated. PMID:8303971

  19. Sulfotransferase activity in plucked hair follicles predicts response to topical minoxidil in the treatment of female androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Janet; Desai, Nisha; McCoy, John; Goren, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Two percent topical minoxidil is the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the treatment of female androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Its success has been limited by the low percentage of responders. Meta-analysis of several studies reporting the number of responders to 2% minoxidil monotherapy indicates moderate hair regrowth in only 13-20% of female patients. Five percent minoxidil solution, when used off-label, may increase the percentage of responders to as much as 40%. As such, a biomarker for predicting treatment response would have significant clinical utility. In a previous study, Goren et al. reported an association between sulfotransferase activity in plucked hair follicles and minoxidil response in a mixed cohort of male and female patients. The aim of this study was to replicate these findings in a well-defined cohort of female patients with AGA treated with 5% minoxidil daily for a period of 6 months. Consistent with the prior study, we found that sulfotransferase activity in plucked hair follicles predicts treatment response with 93% sensitivity and 83% specificity. Our study further supports the importance of minoxidil sulfation in eliciting a therapeutic response and provides further insight into novel targets for increasing minoxidil efficacy. PMID:24773771

  20. Formulation and in vitro assessment of minoxidil niosomes for enhanced skin delivery.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Prabagar; Shanmugam, Srinivasan; Lee, Won Seok; Lee, Won Mo; Kim, Jong Oh; Oh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Kim, Jung Sun; Yoo, Bong Kyu; Choi, Han-Gon; Woo, Jong Soo; Yong, Chul Soon

    2009-07-30

    Niosomes have been reported as a possible approach to improve the low skin penetration and bioavailability characteristics shown by conventional topical vehicle for minoxidil. Niosomes formed from polyoxyethylene alkyl ethers (Brij) or sorbitan monoesters (Span) with cholesterol molar ratios of 0, 1 and 1.5 were prepared with varying drug amount 20-50mg using thin film-hydration method. The prepared systems were characterized for entrapment efficiency, particle size, zeta potential and stability. Skin permeation studies were performed using static vertical diffusion Franz cells and hairless mouse skin treated with either niosomes, control minoxidil solution (propylene glycol-water-ethanol at 20:30:50, v/v/v) or a leading topical minoxidil commercial formulation (Minoxyl). The results showed that the type of surfactant, cholesterol and incorporated amount of drug altered the entrapment efficiency of niosomes. Higher entrapment efficiency was obtained with the niosomes prepared from Span 60 and cholesterol at 1:1 molar ratio using 25mg drug. Niosomal formulations have shown a fairly high retention of minoxidil inside the vesicles (80%) at refrigerated temperature up to a period of 3 months. It was observed that both dialyzed and non-dialyzed niosomal formulations (1.03+/-0.18 to 19.41+/-4.04%) enhanced the percentage of dose accumulated in the skin compared to commercial and control formulations (0.11+/-0.03 to 0.48+/-0.17%) except dialyzed Span 60 niosomes. The greatest skin accumulation was always obtained with non-dialyzed vesicular formulations. Our results suggest that these niosomal formulations could constitute a promising approach for the topical delivery of minoxidil in hair loss treatment. PMID:19394413

  1. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 1% topical minoxidil solution in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Ryoji; Tanaka, Takao; Nishikawa, Tooru; Ueki, Rie; Yamada, Hidekazu; Katsuoka, Kensei; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takeda, Katsuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Minoxidil is effective in inducing hair growth in patients with androgenetic alopecia by stimulating hair follicles to undergo transition from early to late anagen phase. However, there have been no controlled studies of topical minoxidil in Asian women. The objective of this trial was to investigate the efficacy of 1% topical minoxidil for androgenetic alopecia in Japanese female patients using a double-blind controlled method. This trial included 280 Japanese female patients aged 20 years or older with androgenetic alopecia who were administered either 1% topical minoxidil (n = 140) or placebo (n = 140) for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy variable was mean change from baseline in non-vellus hair count/cm(2). The mean change was 8.15 in the 1% topical minoxidil group and 2.03 in the placebo group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.001) [difference: 6.12 (two-sided 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.29-8.96)]. Secondary variables included investigators' assessments and patients' self-assessments. As assessed by investigators, 29.2% (40/137) of the patients had moderate or better improvement in the 1% topical minoxidil group compared to 11.8% (16/136) in the placebo group (p < 0.001 versus placebo). The effect on hair growth was assessed as improved or better by 36.5% (50/137) of the patients themselves in the 1% topical minoxidil group compared to 23.5% (32/136) in the placebo group (p = 0.019 versus placebo). The patients tolerated treatment with 1% topical minoxidil well without significant adverse effects. PMID:17324826

  2. Combined treatment with oral finasteride and topical minoxidil in male androgenetic alopecia: a randomized and comparative study in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiming; Xu, Feng; Sheng, Youyu; Qi, Sisi; Han, Yumei; Miao, Ying; Rui, Wenlong; Yang, Qinping

    2015-01-01

    Finasteride at 1 mg/day and 5% topical minoxidil are effective in male androgenetic alopecia (MAGA). However, studies describing their effects in Chinese individuals are scarce. 450 Chinese MAGA patients were randomly assigned to receive finasteride (n = 160), minoxidil (n = 130) and combined medication (n = 160) for 12 months. The patients returned to the clinic every 3 months for efficacy evaluation. And efficacy was evaluated in 428 men at treatment end, including 154, 122, and 152 in the finasteride, 5% minoxidil, and combination groups, respectively. All groups showed similar baseline characteristics, including age at enrollment, and duration and severity of alopecia (p > 0.05). At 12 months, 80.5, 59, and 94.1% men treated with finasteride, 5% minoxidil and the combination therapy showed improvement, respectively. Adverse reactions were rare (finasteride, 1.8%; minoxidil, 6.1%), and disappeared right after drug withdrawal. In conclusion, finasteride is superior to 5% minoxidil, while the combined medication showed the best efficacy. PMID:26031764

  3. The penetration enhancer SEPA augments stimulation of scalp hair growth by topical minoxidil in the balding stumptail macaque.

    PubMed

    Diani, A R; Shull, K L; Zaya, M J; Brunden, M N

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the penetration enhancer SEPA (2-n-nonyl-1,3-dioxolane) would augment the scalp hair growth effects of topical minoxidil in the balding stumptail macaque. A 1-in2 area on the balding scalp of 40 adult female monkeys (four drug-treated and four vehicle-treated groups of 5 monkeys each) was topically treated 5 days/week, q.d. or b.i.d., with approximately 250 microliters of minoxidil-SEPA (2.5% minoxidil, weight/volume in 10% SEPA, 25% propylene glycol and 65% isopropyl alcohol), Rogaine topical solution (TS, 2% minoxidil, weight/volume in 20% propylene glycol, 60% ethanol and 20% water) or respective vehicles (without drug) for 16 weeks via paintbrush application. Scalp hair was collected by shaving and vacuuming the dosed area at baseline and at 4-week intervals. The shaved hair was filtered, weighed and recorded as the change from baseline. The q.d. and b.i.d. minoxidil-SEPA groups displayed a significant increase in hair weight compared to their respective vehicles at week 4 whereas q.d. and b.i.d. Rogaine TS groups were not active until week 8 and 12, respectively. Both minoxidil-SEPA treatments produced significantly greater cumulative hair weight over the entire 16-week study compared to either of the Rogaine TS treatments. Comparable increases in cumulative hair weight were evident between q.d. and b.i.d. minoxidil-SEPA groups and between q.d. and b.i.d. Rogaine TS groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8527153

  4. Rosemary oil vs minoxidil 2% for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia: a randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Marzony, Eisa Tahmasbpour; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. is a medicinal plant with diverse activities including enhancement microcapillary perfusion. The present study aimed to investigate the clinical efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and compare its effects with minoxidil 2%. Patients with AGA were randomly assigned to rosemary oil (n = 50) or minoxidil 2% (n = 50) for a period of 6 months. After a baseline visit, patients returned to the clinic for efficacy and safety evaluations every 3 months. A standardized professional microphotographic assessment of each volunteer was taken at the initial interview and after 3 and 6 months of the trial. No significant change was observed in the mean hair count at the 3-month endpoint, neither in the rosemary nor in the minoxidil group (P > .05). In contrast, both groups experienced a significant increase in hair count at the 6-month endpoint compared with the baseline and 3-month endpoint (P < .05). No significant difference was found between the study groups regarding hair count either at month 3 or month 6 (> .05). The frequencies of dry hair, greasy hair, and dandruff were not found to be significantly different from baseline at either month 3 or month 6 trial in the groups (P > .05). The frequency of scalp itching at the 3- and 6-month trial points was significantly higher compared with baseline in both groups (P < .05). Scalp itching, however, was more frequent in the minoxidil group at both assessed endpoints (P < .05). The findings of the present trial provided evidence with respect to the efficacy of rosemary oil in the treatment of AGA. PMID:25842469

  5. Treatment of female pattern hair loss with a combination of spironolactone and minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Hoedemaker, Carlijn; van Egmond, Sylvia; Sinclair, Rodney

    2007-02-01

    A 53-year-old woman with clinical evidence of female pattern hair loss and histological evidence of androgenetic alopecia was initially treated with the oral antiandrogen spironolactone 200 mg daily. Serial scalp photography documented hair regrowth at 12 months; however, the hair regrowth plateaued, and at 24 months there had been no further improvement in hair density. Twice daily therapy with topical minoxidil 5% solution was then introduced and further regrowth documented, confirming the additive effect of combination therapy. PMID:17222303

  6. Topical minoxidil counteracts stress-induced hair growth inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Arck, Petra Clara; Handjiski, Bori; Peters, Eva M J; Hagen, Evelin; Klapp, Burghard F; Paus, Ralf

    2003-10-01

    Stress has long been suspected as a possible cause of hair loss in various species, even though convincing experimental evidence has not been available. Recently, we have shown in a murine model that sonic stress alters hair growth and cycling in vivo, and have postulated the existence of a 'brain-hair follicle axis' (BHA). In order to study whether a clinically available and widely used topically active hair growth stimulator mitigates stress-triggered hair growth inhibition in this stress model, we have applied a 5% minoxidil solution. Female CBA/J mice were depilated and randomized in to two groups: control (n = 20) and sonic stress (n = 20). These groups were further divided and either treated daily with 5% minoxidil solution or vehicle alone. The stress group was exposed to sonic stress for 24 h starting 14 days after anagen induction by depilation. All mice were sacrificed 16 days after the depilation and assessed by quantitative histomorphometry. Sonic stress significantly increased the number of hair follicles with apoptotic cells and inhibited intrafollicular keratinocyte proliferation. In addition, the number of clusters of perifollicular MHC class II+ cells and degranulated perifollicular mast cells was significantly enhanced in the stressed mice. In accordance with previous findings, all stressed mice showed an advanced hair cycle progression towards catagen. All of these stress-induced hair growth inhibitory changes along the BHA were down-regulated by topical minoxidil application. This encourages one to explore clinically whether topical minoxidil is a safe and effective pharmacologic tool for the management of stress-associated telogen effluvium in humans. PMID:14705798

  7. Topical Minoxidil: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Its Efficacy in Androgenetic Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Charrette, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Topical minoxidil has become a mainstay in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Despite being a longstanding treatment for AGA, relatively few reviews of its efficacy have been published. The current study sought to synthesize the available efficacy data by performing a systematic review of the literature and conducting random-effects pairwise meta-analyses for the outcomes percent increase in hair count from baseline, investigator assessment, and patient self-assessment. Results showed that minoxidil is more effective than placebo in promoting total and nonvellus hair growth (mean difference [MD], 16.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.34-24.03 and MD, 20.90; 95% CI, 9.07-32.74). A significantly higher proportion of participants in the minoxidil group had greater hair growth than participants in the placebo group as judged by both investigators and self-reports (relative risk [RR], 2.28; 95% CI, 1.58-3.31 and RR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.34-1.80). Despite significant clinical efficacy, cosmetically acceptable results are present in only a subset of patients. Compliance is thought to be a major limiting factor and is being addressed by novel formulations and combinations. PMID:26380504

  8. Relative influence of ethanol and propylene glycol cosolvents on deposition of minoxidil into the skin.

    PubMed

    Tata, S; Weiner, N; Flynn, G

    1994-10-01

    Minoxidil, a potent antihypertensive, is moderately effective in the treatment of hair loss when it is applied to the scalp as a 2% solution in 60% ethanol, 20% propylene glycol and 20% water. Important questions remain concerning both the mechanism of delivery and the pathway of penetration of this drug from its ternary solvent system. Since preliminary studies in our laboratory indicated that water in the formulation influenced permeation far less than the other two solvents, we examined the relative deposition and penetration influences of binary combinations of ethanol and propylene glycol. When 50 microL/cm2 of the formulations was spread over hairless mouse skin sections mounted in Franz diffusion cells, only small amounts of minoxidil were actually recovered from the receiver compartments. Nevertheless, more minoxidil penetrated the skin as the proportion of ethanol in the mixtures was increased. To determine if these in vitro results formed a representative picture of the in vivo behaviors of these vehicles, selected deposition experiments were performed on live, anesthetized mice under experimental conditions similar to those used in the diffusion cell work. The good agreement between in vivo and in vitro studies may be a result of the relatively fast partitioning of the drug into the skin as compared to its diffusion through the skin. PMID:7884676

  9. Squarticles as a lipid nanocarrier for delivering diphencyprone and minoxidil to hair follicles and human dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Sung, Calvin T; Shen, Feng-Ming; Huang, Chi-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of diphencyprone (DPCP) and minoxidil to hair follicles and related cells is important in the treatment of alopecia. Here we report the development of "squarticles," nanoparticles formed from sebum-derived lipids such as squalene and fatty esters, for use in achieving targeted drug delivery to the follicles. Two different nanosystems, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) and nanoemulsions (NE), were prepared. The physicochemical properties of squarticles, including size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, and drug release, were examined. Squarticles were compared to a free control solution with respect to skin absorption, follicular accumulation, and dermal papilla cell targeting. The particle size of the NLC type was 177 nm; that of the NE type was 194 nm. Approximately 80% of DPCP and 60% of minoxidil were entrapped into squarticles. An improved drug deposition in the skin was observed in the in vitro absorption test. Compared to the free control, the squarticles reduced minoxidil penetration through the skin. This may indicate a minimized absorption into systemic circulation. Follicular uptake by squarticles was 2- and 7-fold higher for DPCP and minoxidil respectively compared to the free control. Fluorescence and confocal images of the skin confirmed a great accumulation of squarticles in the follicles and the deeper skin strata. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in dermal papilla cells was significantly upregulated after the loading of minoxidil into the squarticles. In vitro papilla cell viability and in vivo skin irritancy tests in nude mice suggested a good tolerability of squarticles to skin. Squarticles provide a promising nanocarrier for topical delivery of DPCP and minoxidil. PMID:24307611

  10. Effect of tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate on the percutaneous penetration of minoxidil from water/ethanol/polyethylene glycol 400 solutions.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ming-Thau; Wu, An-Bang; Lin, Keng-Ping; Shen, Chao-Hui; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2006-06-01

    We described to achieve the local retention of minoxidil which has penetrated the skin with minimization of its absorption into the general circulation and elimination of local irritation induced by propylene glycol. The effect of tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) on the penetration flux of minoxidil and its retention in the skin from topical minoxidil formulations consisting of water, alcohol, and polyethylene glycol 400 was characterized by an experimental design of ten solvent formulations in this study. Results show that the addition of TPGS was only able to improve the solubility of minoxidil in those solvent systems containing higher proportions of water and PEG 400, and the extent of improvement was also more profound with the addition of TPGS at concentrations higher than 5%. For those solvent systems containing a higher fraction of alcohol, an insignificant change in minoxidil solubility with increasing added amounts of TPGS was noted even with the tendency to decrease the solubility of minoxidil with higher amounts of TPGS. Increasing the amount of TPGS added gradually increased the flux and the corrected flux from solvent formulations with a lower solubility parameter, but decreased those from solvent systems with a higher solubility parameter. With the addition of TPGS, solvent formulation F6 (alcohol:PEG 400 of 50:50) was demonstrated to be the optimal choice by having an improved local effect and a reduced systemic effect compared to the reference of 2% Regaine((R)). Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) was mainly retained locally in the stratum corneum, and the amount was proportional to the increase in the amount of TPGS added to these ten solvent formulations. PMID:16720414

  11. Near ultraviolet spectroscopic studies of 2,4-diamino-6-piperidinopyrimidine-3-oxide (minoxidil) and 2,4-diamino-6-piperidinopyrimidine (desoxyminoxidil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamann, Thomas J.

    The near u.v. spectra of 2,4-diamino-6-piperidinopyrimidine (desoxyminoxidil) and 2,4-diamino-6-piperidinopyrimidine-3-oxide (minoxidil) can be viewed as perturbed pyrimidine spectra. The u.v. properties of pyrimidine and a series of aminopyrimidines, specifically 2,4,6-triaminopyrimidine, are examined to obtain u.v. spectral assignments for desoxyminoxidil and minoxidil. Minoxidil and its desoxy counterpart have C s symmetry, and all π → π* absorptions are allowed 1A' ← 1A' transitions. The two lowest energy π →- π* absorptions observed in minoxidil (262 nm, 292 nm) are tentatively assigned as very mild oxygen → pyrimidine ring charge-transfer transitions. Intensity decreases in protic solvents, and the results of simple Hückel molecular orbital calculations indicate that the 292 nm transition has more charge-transfer character than the 262 nm absorption. The protonated species of desoxyminoxidil and minoxidil have very similar u.v. spectra. This is due to the lack of oxygen-related charge transfer in protonated minoxidil, and the high probability that the positive charge resides in similar environments in the minoxidil and desoxyminoxidil molecular frameworks.

  12. Role of protein sulfation in vasodilation induced by minoxidil sulfate, a K+ channel opener

    SciTech Connect

    Meisheri, K.D.; Oleynek, J.J.; Puddington, L. )

    1991-09-01

    Evidence from contractile, radioisotope ion flux and electrophysiological studies suggest that minoxidil sulfate (MNXS) acts as a K+ channel opener in vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to examine possible biochemical mechanisms by which MNXS exerts such an effect. Experiments performed in the isolated rabbit mesenteric artery (RMA) showed that MNXS, 5 microM, but not the parent compound minoxidil, was a potent vasodilator. Whereas the relaxant effects of an another K+ channel opener vasodilator, BRL-34915 (cromakalim), were removed by washing with physiological saline solution, the effects of MNXS persisted after repeated washout attempts. Furthermore, after an initial exposure of segments of intact RMA to (35S) MNXS, greater than 30% of the radiolabel was retained 2 hr after removal of the drug. In contrast, retention of radiolabel was not detected with either (3H)MNXS (label on the piperidine ring of MNXS) or (3H)minoxidil (each less than 3% after a 2-hr washout). These data suggested that the sulfate moiety from MNXS was closely associated with the vascular tissue. To determine if proteins were the acceptors of sulfate from MNXS, intact RMAs were incubated with (35S)MNXS, and then 35S-labeled proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analyzed by fluorography. Preferential labeling of a 116 kD protein was detected by 2 and 5 min of treatment. A 43 kD protein (resembling actin) also showed significant labeling. A similar profile of 35S-labeled proteins was observed in (35S) MNXS-treated A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells, suggesting that the majority of proteins labeled by (35S)MNXS in intact RMA were components of smooth muscle cells.

  13. Drug and vehicle deposition from topical applications: use of in vitro mass balance technique with minoxidil solutions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, J C; Cappel, M J; Flynn, G L; Weiner, N D; Kreuter, J; Ferry, J J

    1992-08-01

    The disposition of minoxidil and propylene glycol from topical solutions was measured by using an in vitro mass balance technique. The experimental approach included assessment of the following compartments of the skin and the diffusion cell as a function of time: (1) donor compartment; (2) hairless mouse skin surface, epidermis, and dermis; and (3) receiver compartment. Excellent mass balance was achieved for minoxidil at three doses. However, the recovery of propylene glycol depended on both application volume and time. The experiment involving the evaporation of propylene glycol and water from the propylene glycol:ethanol:water (20:60:20, v/v) mixture, which was placed in the well of a tissue culture plate at room temperature and 37 degrees C, substantiated the loss of vehicles to the air. When a thin application of 20 microL/cm2 was used, 60% of the propylene glycol was unaccounted for after 16 h. The evaporation of propylene glycol concentrated the solution to supersaturation, precipitated out the drug, and then stabilized the thermodynamic activity of the drug in the vehicle. The amount of formulation applied influences the rate of concentration and, thus, the time at which minoxidil precipitates. The precipitation limits the amount of minoxidil that can be absorbed and leads to poor percutaneous absorption of drug from the formulation. PMID:1403715

  14. Drug and vehicle deposition from topical applications: localization of minoxidil within skin strata of the hairless mouse.

    PubMed

    Tsai, J C; Weiner, N; Flynn, G L; Ferry, J J

    1994-01-01

    The cutaneous bioavailability of topical 2% minoxidil solution was verified in live hairless mice. Minoxidil and propylene glycol deposition on the skin surface, epidermis and dermis from the single-dose in vivo study were compared with the results from previous in vitro studies. A distinct difference is apparent in the epidermis where the in vitro values are 11-22 times higher than the in vivo values for minoxidil and 8-16 times higher for propylene glycol. The differences were not as great in the dermis. Percutaneous absorption of the drug appeared to be a very small fraction of the applied dose. Similarly shaped stratum corneum and plasma concentration profiles and the relatively constant dermal profiles of minoxidil and propylene glycol open the possibility of transappendageal routes being involved in percutaneous absorption. The greater amount of drug and vehicle found in the dermis from in vitro studies can be explained by the absence of dermal clearance. The overestimation in the amount of drug found in the epidermis in vitro may also be attributable to poor dermal clearance. On the whole, the study raises questions about the use of in vitro tissue dispositions for bioavailability assessment and bioequivalence demonstration. PMID:8054208

  15. Changes in hair weight and hair count in men with androgenetic alopecia, after application of 5% and 2% topical minoxidil, placebo, or no treatment.

    PubMed

    Price, V H; Menefee, E; Strauss, P C

    1999-11-01

    Quantitative estimation of hair growth using hair weight and number was recorded for 120 weeks in 4 groups of 9 men with androgenetic alopecia. Three double-blind groups applied either 2% or 5% minoxidil solution, or vehicle. The fourth group, unblinded, received no treatment. Measurements of hair weight and number were continued for 96 weeks, when treatment (if any) was stopped, though measurements were continued for another 24 weeks. Although not compared statistically, the placebo and untreated groups behaved in a similar fashion. In contrast, the 5% and 2% minoxidil treatment groups showed a statistically significant increase in mean percentage change in interval weight from baseline compared with placebo; results for number counts were usually less significant. Over 96 weeks, topical minoxidil induced and maintained an increase in interval weight over baseline of about 30%. After treatment was stopped, hair weight and number counts for the minoxidil groups returned to about the same levels as placebo in 24 weeks. PMID:10534633

  16. Simultaneous effects of tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS) on local hair growth promotion and systemic absorption of topically applied minoxidil in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Ho; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Wu, An-Bang; Lin, Keng-Ping; Ho, Hsiu-O

    2005-12-01

    In this study, topical minoxidil solutions supplemented with TPGS in cosolvent systems of various compositions consisting of water, alcohol, and polyethylene glycol 400 were designed to evaluate the efficacy of promoting hair growth after topical application and the safety in terms of the amount of minoxidil absorbed through the skin into the circulation using C57BL/6J mice as a model. The commercial product of 2% Regaine) was used as the positive control. The role, which sulfotransferase activity plays in hair growth with treatment using minoxidil, was determined as well. The results revealed that the addition of 0.5% TPGS was able to enhance the proliferation of hair, but an increase in the amount of TPGS to 2% led to deterioration in the enhancement of hair growth. At the higher added amount (2.0%) of TPGS, the promotion of hair growth was slightly reduced for both cosolvent formulations F1 (100% water) and F3 (100% PEG 400), whereas it was reduced to a greater extent for the cosolvent formulations F8-F10. In comparison, the influences of cosolvent compositions with TPGS amounts of 0.0 and 2.0% on the promotion of hair growth were similar. On the contrary, variability in the promotion of hair growth by different solvent formulations was minimal when the added amount of TPGS was 0.5%. In general, a relationship between hair growth and sulfotransferase activities after topical application of 2% Regaine and minoxidil formulations containing various amounts of TPGS was not demonstrated. Plasma concentrations of minoxidil with 2% Regaine were found to be greater than those of 2% minoxidil in those cosolvent formulations containing various amounts of TPGS, while showing insignificant differences among those 10 cosolvent formulations with a fixed amount of TPGS. A tendency for the plasma concentration of minoxidil to increase after the topical administration of minoxidil formulations containing the higher amount of TPGS (2%) was noted. PMID:16253450

  17. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles. PMID:26222406

  18. Synthesis of minoxidil conjugates and their evaluation as HL-60 differentiation agents.

    PubMed

    Stoica, Sonia; Magoulas, George E; Antoniou, Antonia I; Suleiman, Sherif; Cassar, Analisse; Gatt, Lucienne; Papaioannou, Dionissios; Athanassopoulos, Constantinos M; Schembri-Wismayer, Pierre

    2016-02-15

    Activation of minoxidil (MNX) with N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole and coupling with natural polyamines (PAs) and commercially available aliphatic or aromatic amines provided a series of new conjugates which were evaluated for their ability to induce differentiation to HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia cancer cells, using a modified NBTZ reduction test. Although neither MNX nor 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA) or 2,7-diaminofluorene (DAF), alone or in combination, had any effect, the MNX-spermine (SPM) conjugate (11) and the conjugates 7 and 8 of MNX with MDA and DAF exhibited a differentiation-inducing effect at a concentration of 10 μM without being toxic on proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:26832215

  19. New ethanol and propylene glycol free gel formulations containing a minoxidil-methyl-β-cyclodextrin complex as promising tools for alopecia treatment.

    PubMed

    Lopedota, Angela; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Denora, Nunzio; Laquintana, Valentino; Lopalco, Antonio; Selva, Stefano; Ragni, Lorella; Tongiani, Serena; Franco, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    New topical totally aqueous formulations that improve the low water solubility of minoxidil and realize an adequate permeability of drug in the skin are proposed. These formulations are lacking in propylene glycol and alcohol that are the principal irritant ingredients present in minoxidil commercial solutions. In order to enhance poor water solubility of minoxidil randomly methyl-β-cyclodextrin was used, and four hydrogels such as, calcium alginate, sodium alginate, carbopol 934 and hydroxyethylcellulose were utilized to ensure a prolonged time of contact with the scalp. The inclusion complex minoxidil/methyl-β-cyclodextrin with a molar ratio 1:1 was obtained by freeze drying and evaluated by NMR, FT-IR and DSC analysis. An apparent stability constant of formed inclusion complex was calculated by phase solubility diagram and its value was 400 M(-1). The solid inclusion complex was used to prepare gel formulations with similar dose to minoxidil commercial solution. The gels were evaluated for various technological parameters including rheological behavior, in vitro drug release and ex vivo permeation through pig skin. The best performance was observed for the calcium alginate formulation. PMID:24650036

  20. Influence of application time and formulation reapplication on the delivery of minoxidil through hairless mouse skin as measured in Franz diffusion cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, J C; Flynn, G L; Weiner, N; Ferry, J J

    1994-01-01

    Relationships are drawn between the extent of topical delivery of test compounds in solution and the period of residence of their formulation on the skin. The studies were performed using in vitro diffusion cell techniques and a test formulation containing 2% 3H-minoxidil dissolved in 60% ethanol, 20% water and 20% 14C-propylene glycol. The permeation of propylene glycol was effectively halted upon cleansing the skin surface; the skin had very little reservoir capacity for this substance. However, the rate of delivery of minoxidil was only slowed but not stopped upon cleansing. The suggestion here is that a reservoir of minoxidil is formed in the skin which is capable of sustaining an appreciable input of drug even after the skin's surface is scrupulously cleaned. Assay of epidermal concentrations of these species not only confirms the existence of the minoxidil reservoir but also shows that the degree of its tissue concentration is proportional to the time of residence of the formulation on the skin surface. Reapplication of blank vehicle to the cleansed surface had little to no effect on the permeation of the minoxidil and was similarly without effect on that of propylene glycol. While it comes as no surprise that formulation residence time is an important variable in topical delivery, this study demonstrates the complexities of quantitative dependencies of delivery on residence time. PMID:8054209

  1. Positive lymphocyte transformation test in a patient with allergic contact dermatitis of the scalp after short-term use of topical minoxidil solution.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Tobias; Schlütter-Böhmer, Brigitte; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Bieber, Thomas; Novak, Natalija

    2005-07-01

    Topical 2,4-diamino-6-piperidinopyrimidine-3-oxide (minoxidil) solution has been widely used for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia for over 15 years now and the substance is currently approved for this indication in 2% and 5% formulation. Typical side effects of this topical treatment include irritative dermatitis going along with pruritus, erythema, scaling and dryness, which occur especially at the onset of the therapy. In some cases, allergic contact dermatitis or exacerbation of seborrheic dermatitis has been reported. While most of the patients with allergic contact dermatitis described in the literature showed a positive sensitization to the vehicle substance propylene glycol evaluated by patch testing, reactions to the active ingredient minoxidil are rare. Here, we report a case of allergic sensitization to minoxidil, which we evaluated and differentiated from an irritative reaction by a combination of patch testing and lymphocyte transformation test. The differentiation of allergic and irritative adverse effects and the identification of the causative allergen are of major relevance for the proceeding and adjustment of the therapy. Patients with sensitizations against propylene glycol are candidates for preparations with alternative solvents but can proceed treatment with minoxidil. In contrast, patients with allergies to the active ingredient itself are no longer candidates for treatment with minoxidil and should undergo alternative therapeutic options. PMID:15982234

  2. Minoxidil Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... Place the large cap on the metered-spray bottle or the small cap on the extender spray nozzle when not in ... and rub on the medication. Place the large cap on the bottle when not in use. If you use your ...

  3. Minoxidil Oral

    MedlinePlus

    ... dizziness fainting If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

  4. Iontophoresis-targeted, follicular delivery of minoxidil sulfate for the treatment of alopecia.

    PubMed

    Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Gratieri, Tais; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Vianna Lopez, Renata Fonseca

    2013-05-01

    Although minoxidil (MX) is a drug known to stimulate hair growth, the treatment of androgenic alopecia could be improved by delivery strategies that would favor drug accumulation into the hair follicles. This work investigated in vitro the potential of iontophoresis to achieve this objective using MX sulfate (MXS), a more water-soluble derivative of MX. Passive delivery of MXS was first determined from an ethanol-water solution and from a thermosensitive gel. The latter formulation resulted in greater accumulation of MXS in the stratum corneum (skin's outermost layer) and hair follicles and an overall decrease in absorption through the skin. Anodal iontophoresis of MXS from the same gel formulation was then investigated at pH 3.5 and pH 5.5. Compared with passive delivery, iontophoresis increased the amount of drug reaching the follicular infundibula from 120 to 600 ng per follicle. In addition, drug recovery from follicular casts was threefold higher following iontophoresis at pH 5.5 compared with that at pH 3.5. Preliminary in vivo experiments in rats confirmed that iontophoretic delivery of MXS facilitated drug accumulation in hair follicles. Overall, therefore, iontophoresis successfully and significantly enhanced follicular delivery of MX suggesting a useful opportunity for the improved treatment of alopecia. PMID:23450524

  5. Chitosan nanoparticles for targeting and sustaining minoxidil sulphate delivery to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Matos, Breno Noronha; Reis, Thaiene Avila; Gratieri, Taís; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins

    2015-04-01

    This work developed minoxidil sulphate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (MXS-NP) for targeted delivery to hair follicles, which could sustain drug release and improve the topical treatment of alopecia. Chitosan nanoparticles were obtained using low-molecular weight chitosan and tripolyphosphate as crosslink agent. MXS-NP presented a monomodal distribution with hydrodynamic diameter of 235.5 ± 99.9 nm (PDI of 0.31 ± 0.01) and positive zeta potential (+38.6 ± 6.0 mV). SEM analysis confirmed nanoparticles average size and spherical shape. A drug loading efficiency of 73.0 ± 0.3% was obtained with polymer:drug ratio of 1:1 (w/w). Drug release through cellulose acetate membranes from MXS-NP was sustained in about 5 times in comparison to the diffusion rate of MXS from the solution (188.9 ± 6.0 μg/cm(2)/h and 35.4 ± 1.8 μg/cm(2)/h). Drug permeation studies through the skin in vitro, followed by selective recovery of MXS from the hair follicles, showed that MXS-NP application resulted in a two-fold MXS increase into hair follicles after 6h in comparison to the control solution (5.9 ± 0.6 μg/cm(2) and 2.9 ± 0.8 μg/cm(2)). MXS-loading in nanoparticles appears as a promising and easy strategy to target and sustain drug delivery to hair follicles, which may improve the topical treatment of alopecia. PMID:25647618

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil 5% Foam in Combination With a Botanical Hair Solution in Men With Androgenic Alopecia.

    PubMed

    Keaney, Terrence C; Pham, Hanh; von Grote, Erika; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-04-01

    Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the most common type of hair loss in men, characterized by hair miniaturization, hairline recession, and vertex balding. It affects approximately 50% of men, negatively affecting self-esteem and sociability. Topical minoxidil formulations are approved up to a 5% concentration for men, but patient adherence to treatment is challenged by gradual results that may be perceived as a lack of initial benefit. Herbal extracts, which are also believed to promote healthier-looking hair, have a long history of use in hair care formulations. The safety and efficacy of a twice-daily regimen of 5% minoxidil foam used in combination with a novel botanical hair solution was evaluated in a 12-week, multicenter, single-arm, open label study in 56 subjects with mild to moderate AGA. Assessments included investigator ratings of improvement and subject self-ratings of satisfaction. Investigator ratings indicated significant improvement in scalp hair coverage and perception of overall treatment benefit in as early as 4 weeks (P<.001). Subject self-ratings were significant for improved hair growth and hair appearance in as few as 4 weeks (P<.05). The regimen was well tolerated, and subjects indicated a high degree of satisfaction. Investigator and subject-assessed efficacy and subject satisfaction with this novel regimen provide clinicians with an effective treatment option for AGA that also provides a high level of patient satisfaction, which may help promote patient adherence to long-term treatment. PMID:27050695

  7. Quality of life in women with female pattern hair loss and the impact of topical minoxidil treatment on quality of life in these patients.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiao-Sheng; Zheng, You-You; Xu, Jia-Jia; Fan, Wei-Xin

    2013-08-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is the most common hair loss disorder in women and it may impact on the psychological and social activities of patients, thereby reducing their quality of life (QoL). Topical minoxidil has been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of patients with FPHL. The aim of this study was to assess the QoL of patients with FPHL and investigate whether topical minoxidil solution treatment improves the QoL of these patients. In this study, we enrolled 125 female patients aged 16-72 years to answer visual analog scale (VAS) and dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaires. Of these patients, 31 were recruited for the follow-up study after 12 months of treatment with 2% minoxidil. Each index and the change in QoL prior to and following treatment were statistically analyzed. There was identified to be a correlation between clinical severity and the values of the indices in all patients. There was a statistically significant difference between the VAS and DLQI scores prior to and following treatment with 2% minoxidil. A comparison between the good responders (n=23) and the poor responders (n=8) revealed no significant difference in the improvement of VAS and DLQI scores. The QoL of the patients was severely impaired by FPHL. The DLQI and VAS used in this study were validated as useful indices for the evaluation of QoL due to their high reliability, sensitivity and simplicity. This evaluation is recommended for the management of FPHL treatment. The results of the study demonstrated that topical minoxidil improved the QoL of the patients. PMID:24137223

  8. Stability indicating RP-HPLC method development and validation for the simultaneous determination of aminexil and minoxidil in pharmaceutical dosage form.

    PubMed

    Siddiraju, S; Sahithi, M

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of aminexil and minoxidil in pharmaceutical dosage form. The chromatographic separation was achieved with BDS Hypersil C18 column (250 mm×4.6 mm×5 μ) as stationary phase and phosphate buffer and acetonitrile (78:22) as mobile phase. The method was employed by using a flow rate of 1.1 mL/min kept at 30°C. The detection wavelength was kept at 238 nm by using photo-diode array detector. The retention times of the aminexil and minoxidil were found to be 2.3 min and 3.9 min, respectively. The method developed was validated in accordance with ICH guidelines with respect to the stability indicating capacity of the method including system suitability, accuracy, precision, linearity, range, limit of detection, limit of quantification and robustness. The linearity responses of aminexil and minoxidil were found to be in the concentration ranges of 18.75-112.5 μg/mL and 25-150 μg/mL, respectively. The LOD and LOQ values for aminexil were found to be 0.31 and 0.92 μg/mL and minoxidil were found to be 0.03 and 0.10 μg/mL respectively. The percentage recoveries for both the drugs were found in the range of 98-101%. This method is accurate, precise and sensitive; hence, it can be employed for routine quality control of aminexil and minoxidil in pharmaceutical industries and drug testing laboratories. PMID:25542653

  9. Molecular biology of the human cytosolic sulfotransferase gene superfamily implicated in the bioactivation of minoxidil and cholesterol in skin.

    PubMed

    Dooley, T P

    1999-08-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases (ST) catalyze the sulfation of various phenolic agents, catecholamines, thyroid hormones, steroids, drugs, and procarcinogens, usually resulting in the inactivation and subsequent excretion of the compound. My laboratory's efforts have focused on the cloning of the human phenol-sulfating (PST) members of this gene superfamily, implicated in the bioactivation of the hair growth stimulant, minoxidil. At least two major forms of human PST enzymes have been characterized biochemically, the phenol-preferring PST (P-PST), and the catecholamine-preferring PST (M-PST). Various cDNAs have been cloned representing alleles of 3 gene loci termed as STP1, STP2, and STM, which were all mapped precisely to a small region on human chromosome 16p and to the homologous region of mouse chromosome 7. Human cosmid genomic clones have been sequenced to determine the genomic organization for each of the 3 highly-related genes. All contain 7 coding exons, with conserved intron-exon boundaries, and presumptive alternative tissue-specific promoters. At least one of the 3 PST-encoding genes is responsible for forming minoxidil sulfate in the lower outer root sheath of anagen hair follicles. The steroid sulfating genes, STD and STE, have been cloned by other laboratories. The isozyme products of these genes sulfate DHEA and estrogens, respectively. I hypothesize that either STE or STD is involved in the formation of cholesterol sulfate (CS) in epidermal keratinocytes. CS has been demonstrated by other groups to be an activator of keratinocyte Protein Kinase Ceta, which subsequently results in the activation of epidermal transglutaminase and formation of the cornified envelop. STE or STD might also be involved in bioinactivation of estrogens and androgens within skin. Our recent unpublished results have focused on elucidating the patterns of ST gene expression in cultured keratinocytes and fibroblasts derived from human skin using RT-PCR, to understand which of the

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil 2% Solution in Combination With a Botanical Hair Solution in Women With Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Amy; Pham, Hanh; von Grote, Erika; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-04-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL), also known as female androgenic alopecia, affects over 21 million women in the United States with devastating effects on self-esteem and psychosocial functioning. Topical minoxidil 2% and 5% formulations are the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for FPHL. The length of time it typically takes to observe the benefits is a challenge for many patients, and may affect adherence to treatment. Herbal extracts, which are also believed to promote healthier-looking hair, have a long history of use in hair care formulations. The safety and efficacy of a twice-daily regimen of 2% minoxidil solution used in combination with the botanical hair solution for 12 weeks in 54 subjects was evaluated in a multicenter, single-arm, open-label study. Assessments included investigator and subject ratings of improvement and subject satisfaction. Investigator ratings indicated significant improvement in hair growth and overall treatment benefits in as early as 6 weeks (P<.001). Subject self-ratings indicated significant satisfaction with hair volume and quality improvement at week 6 (P<.001). Subjects also indicated an increase in self-confidence and attractiveness at week 12 (P<.001). The investigator and subject-assessed efficacy and subject satisfaction with this regimen provides clinicians with an effective treatment option for FPHL that also provides a high level of patient acceptance, which ultimately may help promote minoxidil treatment adherence. PMID:27050694

  11. Improvement in physicochemical parameters of DPPC liposomes and increase in skin permeation of aciclovir and minoxidil by the addition of cationic polymers.

    PubMed

    Hasanovic, Amra; Hollick, Caroline; Fischinger, Kerstin; Valenta, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) liposomes were prepared by high-pressure homogeniser and coated with two cationic polymers, chitosan (CS) and for the first time Eudragit EPO (EU), respectively. Compared to the control liposomes, the polymeric liposomes showed greater physicochemical stability in terms of mean particle size and zeta potential at room temperature. In the present study, aciclovir and minoxidil have been used as hydrophilic and hydrophobic candidates. In the presence of the drugs, the polymeric liposomes still showed constant particle size and zeta potential. Influences of polymers and model drugs on thermotropic phase transition of DPPC liposomes were studied by micro-differential scanning calorimetry (microDSC). The influences on configuration of DPPC liposomes were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). According to DSC results, cationic polymers had a stabilising effect, whereas aciclovir and minoxidil changed the physical properties of the DPPC bilayers by influencing the main phase transition temperature and erasing the pre-transition. The investigation of CO stretching bands of DPPC at 1736 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra showed that aciclovir has strong hydrogen bonding with CO groups of DPPC, whereas carbonyl groups were free in minoxidil presence. Moreover, the coating of liposomes with CS or EU led to higher skin diffusion for both drugs. This could be explained as an effect of positively charged liposomes to interact stronger with skin negatively charged surface and their possible interactions with structures below the stratum corneum. PMID:20332029

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of topical minoxidil 5% and adenosine 0.75% solutions on male androgenetic alopecia and measuring patient satisfaction rate.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Iraji, Fariba; Rajaee Harandi, Manijeh; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad-Ali; Askari, Gholamreza

    2013-01-01

    According to the hypothesis on the stimulating effect of adenosine on increasing fibroblast growth factor 7 in dermal papilla cells and its vasorelaxant effect, we performed this study to compare the effect of topical minoxidil 5% and adenosine 0.75% on male pattern androgenetic alopecia. This prospective-randomized study recruited 110 male patients suffering from grade II-V Hamilton androgenetic alopecia. Fifty-five patients received minoxidil 5% (group 1) and adenosine 0.75% (group 2) each. Later, 16 patients were excluded due to allergic reactions or loss to follow up. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, complete and relative recovery rates alongside patient satisfaction rate (faster prevention of primary hair loss and appearance of newly grown hair) were compared between the groups. After 3 months of treatment, relative recovery was achieved in 2.4% and 1.9% of patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively, which was not significantly different (p=0.17). During 6 months, the relative recovery rate did not change either within or between the groups (p=0.99) and after 6 months none of the patients achieved complete recovery. However, the patient satisfaction rate was significantly higher in group 2 (p=0.003). In the light of the results, adenosine has no statistically superiority to minoxidil in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia according to recovery rates. However, the patients were significantly more satisfied with adenosine because of faster prevention of hair loss and appearance of the newly grown hairs. It seems further studies with larger sample size or different drug dosages are required to clarify the findings. PMID:24183218

  13. Effectiveness of a Layer-by-Layer Microbubbles-Based Delivery System for Applying Minoxidil to Enhance Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Lu, Ying-Jui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hang-Kang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Minoxidil (Mx) is a conventional drug for treating androgenetic alopecia, preventing hair loss, and promoting hair growth. The solubility of Mx has been improved using chemical enhancement methods to increase its skin permeability over the long term. This study created a new ultrasound (US) contrast agent—albumin-shelled microbubbles (MBs) that absorb chitosan oligosaccharide lactate (COL) and Mx—and combined it with sonication by US energy in the water phase to enhance hair growth while shortening the treatment period. COL and Mx grafted with MBs (mean diameter of 1480 nm) were synthesized into self-assembled complexes of COL-MBs and Mx-COL-MBs that had mean diameters of 4150 and 4500 nm, respectively. The US was applied at 3 W/cm2 for 1 min, and combined with Mx-COL-MBs containing 0.3% Mx. The diffusion of Mx through the dialysis membrane from Mx-COL-MB during US (US+Mx-COL-MB) was more rapid at pH 4 than at pH 7.4, which is favorable given that the environment of the scalp is mildly acidic (pH=4.5-5.5). In Franz diffusion experiments performed in vitro, the release rates at 18 hours in the US+Mx-COL-MBs and US+MBs+Mx groups resulted in 2.3 and 1.7 times the penetration and deposition, respectively, of Mx relative to the group with Mx alone. During 21 days treatment in animal experiments, the growth rates at days 10 and 14 in the US+Mx-COL-MBs group increased by 22.6% and 64.7%, respectively, and there were clear significant differences (p<0.05) between the US+Mx-COL-MBs group and the other four groups. The use of US+Mx-COL-MB in the water phase can increased the effects of Mx so as to shorten the telogen phase, and also increase both the diameter of keratinized hair shafts and the size of hair follicles without causing skin damage. PMID:27162552

  14. Effectiveness of a Layer-by-Layer Microbubbles-Based Delivery System for Applying Minoxidil to Enhance Hair Growth.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Lu, Ying-Jui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hang-Kang; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Minoxidil (Mx) is a conventional drug for treating androgenetic alopecia, preventing hair loss, and promoting hair growth. The solubility of Mx has been improved using chemical enhancement methods to increase its skin permeability over the long term. This study created a new ultrasound (US) contrast agent-albumin-shelled microbubbles (MBs) that absorb chitosan oligosaccharide lactate (COL) and Mx-and combined it with sonication by US energy in the water phase to enhance hair growth while shortening the treatment period. COL and Mx grafted with MBs (mean diameter of 1480 nm) were synthesized into self-assembled complexes of COL-MBs and Mx-COL-MBs that had mean diameters of 4150 and 4500 nm, respectively. The US was applied at 3 W/cm(2) for 1 min, and combined with Mx-COL-MBs containing 0.3% Mx. The diffusion of Mx through the dialysis membrane from Mx-COL-MB during US (US+Mx-COL-MB) was more rapid at pH 4 than at pH 7.4, which is favorable given that the environment of the scalp is mildly acidic (pH=4.5-5.5). In Franz diffusion experiments performed in vitro, the release rates at 18 hours in the US+Mx-COL-MBs and US+MBs+Mx groups resulted in 2.3 and 1.7 times the penetration and deposition, respectively, of Mx relative to the group with Mx alone. During 21 days treatment in animal experiments, the growth rates at days 10 and 14 in the US+Mx-COL-MBs group increased by 22.6% and 64.7%, respectively, and there were clear significant differences (p<0.05) between the US+Mx-COL-MBs group and the other four groups. The use of US+Mx-COL-MB in the water phase can increased the effects of Mx so as to shorten the telogen phase, and also increase both the diameter of keratinized hair shafts and the size of hair follicles without causing skin damage. PMID:27162552

  15. Fuzzy Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Rick

    1991-01-01

    Research on the structure, growth, development, and loss of hair in humans is reviewed. Studies designed to investigate methods of hair restoration using minoxidil and other compounds and treatments are discussed. (CW)

  16. KF19418, a new compound for hair growth promotion in vitro and in vivo mouse models.

    PubMed

    Shirai, A; Ikeda, J; Kawashima, S; Tamaoki, T; Kamiya, T

    2001-04-01

    KF19418, a newly synthesized compound, stimulated proliferation of cultured hair bulb cells from new born mice in concentration-dependent manner in the range under 10 microM. In the culture system of whole skin pieces from 4-week-old mice which we earlier established, KF19418 promoted hair follicle elongation as in the case of minoxidil. After topical application for 2 weeks of KF19418 or minoxidil to dorsal skin of hair-clipped mouse alopecia model, KF19418 at 1% suspension accelerated hair regrowth at a rate comparable to 1% minoxidil solution. Thus, it was shown that KF19418 directly stimulated hair follicle in vitro and had hair growth promoting activities in vivo. PMID:11240269

  17. Comparative efficacy of various treatment regimens for androgenetic alopecia in men.

    PubMed

    Khandpur, Sujay; Suman, Mansi; Reddy, Belum Sivanagi

    2002-08-01

    Our understanding of the aetiology of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) has substantially increased in recent years. As a result, several treatment modalities have been tried with promising results especially in early stages of AGA. However, as far as has been ascertained, there is no comprehensive study comparing the efficacy of these agents alone and in combination with each other. One hundered male patients with AGA of Hamilton grades II to IV were enrolled in an open, randomized, parallel-group study, designed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of oral finasteride (1 mg per day), topical 2% minoxidil solution and topical 2% ketoconazole shampoo alone and in combination. They were randomized into four groups. Group I (30 patients) was administered oral finasteride, Group II (36 patients) was given a combination of finasteride and topical minoxidil, Group III (24 patients) applied minoxidil alone and Group IV (10 patients) was administered finasteride with topical ketoconazole. Treatment efficacy was assessed on the basis of patient and physician assessment scores and global photographic review during the study period of one year. At the end of one year, hair growth was observed in all the groups with best results recorded with a combination of finasteride and minoxidil (Group II) followed by groups IV, I and III. Subjects receiving finasteride alone or in combination with minoxidil or ketoconazole showed statistically significant improvement (p<0.05) over minoxidil only recipients. No signifcant side-effects related to the drugs were observed. In conclusion, it is inferred that the therapeutic efficacy is enhanced by combining the two drugs acting on different aetiological aspects of AGA. PMID:12227482

  18. A Randomized Evaluator Blinded Study of Effect of Microneedling in Androgenetic Alopecia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhurat, Rachita; Sukesh, MS; Avhad, Ganesh; Dandale, Ameet; Pal, Anjali; Pund, Poonam

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Dermal papilla (DP) is the site of expression of various hair growth related genes. Various researches have demonstrated the underlying importance of Wnt proteins and wound growth factors in stimulating DP associated stem cells. Microneedling works by stimulation of stem cells and inducing activation of growth factors. Materials and Methods: Hundred cases of mild to moderate (III vertex or IV) androgenetic alopecia (AGA) were recruited into 2 groups. After randomization one group was offered weekly microneedling treatment with twice daily 5% minoxidil lotion (Microneedling group); other group was given only 5% minoxidil lotion. After baseline global photographs, the scalp were shaved off to ensure equal length of hair shaft in all. Hair count was done in 1 cm2 targeted fixed area (marked with tattoo) at baseline and at end of therapy (week 12). The 3 primary efficacy parameters assessed were: Change from baseline hair count at 12 weeks, patient assessment of hair growth at 12 weeks, and investigator assessment of hair growth at 12 weeks. A blinded investigators evaluated global photographic response. The response was assessed by 7- point scale. Results: (1) Hair counts – The mean change in hair count at week 12 was significantly greater for the Microneedling group compared to the Minoxidil group (91.4 vs 22.2 respectively). (2) Investigator evaluation – Forty patients in Microneedling group had +2 to +3 response on 7-point visual analogue scale, while none showed the same response in the Minoxidil group. (3) Patient evaluation – In the Microneedling group, 41 (82%) patients reported more than 50% improvement versus only 2 (4.5%) patients in the Minoxidil group. Unsatisfied patients to conventional therapy for AGA got good response with Microneedling treatment. Conclusion: Dermaroller along with Minoxidil treated group was statistically superior to Minoxidil treated group in promoting hair growth in men with AGA for all 3 primary efficacy

  19. Androgenetic Alopecia: An Update of Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Yanna; Blanco, Aline; Tosti, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by a non-scarring progressive miniaturization of the hair follicle in predisposed men and women with a pattern distribution. Although AGA is a very prevalent condition, approved therapeutic options are limited. This article discusses the current treatment alternatives including their efficacy, safety profile, and quality of evidence. Finasteride and minoxidil for male androgenetic alopecia and minoxidil for female androgenetic alopecia still are the therapeutic options with the highest level evidence. The role of antiandrogens for female patients, the importance of adjuvant therapies, as well as new drugs and procedures are also addressed. PMID:27554257

  20. Effect of Tectona grandis Linn. seeds on hair growth activity of albino mice.

    PubMed

    Jaybhaye, Deepali; Varma, Sushikumar; Gagne, Nitin; Bonde, Vijay; Gite, Amol; Bhosle, Deepak

    2010-10-01

    The seeds of Tectona grandis Linn. are traditionally acclaimed as hair tonic in the Indian system of medicine. Studies were therefore undertaken in order to evaluate petroleum ether extract of T. grandis seeds for its effect on hair growth in albino mice. The 5% and 10% extracts incorporated into simple ointment base were applied topically on shaved denuded skin of albino mice. The time required for initiation of hair growth as well as completion of hair growth cycle was recorded. Minoxidil 2% solution was applied topically and served as positive control. The result of treatment with minoxidil 2% is 49% hair in anagenic phase. Hair growth initiation time was significantly reduced to half on treatment with the extracts compared to control animals. The treatment was successful in bringing a greater number of hair follicles (64% and 51%) in anagenic phase than standard minoxidil (49%). The results of treatment with 5% and 10% petroleum ether extracts were comparable to the positive control minoxidil. PMID:21455447

  1. Current treatment of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jerry

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of alopecia areata is dependent on age of patient as well as the extent and duration of scalp involvement. Treatments include steroids, topical immunotherapy, topical minoxidil, anthralin, and immunosuppressants. Each case must be dealt with on a customized individual basis. PMID:24326551

  2. Effectiveness of the combinational treatment of Laminaria japonica and Cistanche tubulosa extracts in hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Tae-Su; Kyung, Jangbeen; Kim, Dajeong; Park, Dongsun; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Yang, Woong-Suk; Kang, Myung-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Since scalp hair loss has increased recently even in young people, seriously affecting individual's quality of life, the hair growth-stimulating effects of Laminaria japonica extract (LJE) and Cistanche tubulosa extract (CTE) were investigated. After confirming anagen phase of follicles under shaving, male C57BL/6 mice were dermally applied with 3% Minoxidil or orally administered with the combinations of LJE and CTE for 21 days. Minoxidil promoted the hair regrowth and increased γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities. In addition, Minoxidil up-regulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Co-administration of LJE and CTE at 54 mg/kg LJE plus 162 mg/kg CTE exerted synergistic promoting effects on the hair regrowth, comparable to 3% Minoxidil. LJE preferentially enhanced ALP activity, while CTE increased both γ-GTP and ALP activities as well as EGF and VEGF expressions. In vivo air pouch inflammation model, carrageenan-induced vascular exudation and increased nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 concentrations in the exudates were synergistically suppressed by co-administration of LJE and CTE. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration was substantially inhibited by the combinational treatment. The results suggest that combinational oral treatment with LJE and CTE in appropriate doses and ratios prevent hair loss and improve alopecia, which might be in part mediated by their anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:25806080

  3. Monilethrix: a typical case report with microscopic and dermatoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Elisa Fontenelle de; Araripe, Ana Luiza Cotta de Alencar

    2015-01-01

    Monilethrix is a rare hereditary condition generally considered to be an autosomal dominant disorder with variable penetrance. A case of a 6-year-old girl without a familial background for this disease is reported. The diagnosis was made by optic microscopy and dermoscopy. A therapeutic trial with topical minoxidil was conducted. PMID:25672313

  4. Effectiveness of the combinational treatment of Laminaria japonica and Cistanche tubulosa extracts in hair growth.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Tae-Su; Kyung, Jangbeen; Kim, Dajeong; Park, Dongsun; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Yang, Woong-Suk; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-03-01

    Since scalp hair loss has increased recently even in young people, seriously affecting individual's quality of life, the hair growth-stimulating effects of Laminaria japonica extract (LJE) and Cistanche tubulosa extract (CTE) were investigated. After confirming anagen phase of follicles under shaving, male C57BL/6 mice were dermally applied with 3% Minoxidil or orally administered with the combinations of LJE and CTE for 21 days. Minoxidil promoted the hair regrowth and increased γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GTP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities. In addition, Minoxidil up-regulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels. Co-administration of LJE and CTE at 54 mg/kg LJE plus 162 mg/kg CTE exerted synergistic promoting effects on the hair regrowth, comparable to 3% Minoxidil. LJE preferentially enhanced ALP activity, while CTE increased both γ-GTP and ALP activities as well as EGF and VEGF expressions. In vivo air pouch inflammation model, carrageenan-induced vascular exudation and increased nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 concentrations in the exudates were synergistically suppressed by co-administration of LJE and CTE. In addition, inflammatory cell infiltration was substantially inhibited by the combinational treatment. The results suggest that combinational oral treatment with LJE and CTE in appropriate doses and ratios prevent hair loss and improve alopecia, which might be in part mediated by their anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:25806080

  5. Monilethrix: a typical case report with microscopic and dermatoscopic findings*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Elisa Fontenelle; Araripe, Ana Luiza Cotta de Alencar

    2015-01-01

    Monilethrix is a rare hereditary condition generally considered to be an autosomal dominant disorder with variable penetrance. A case of a 6-year-old girl without a familial background for this disease is reported. The diagnosis was made by optic microscopy and dermoscopy. A therapeutic trial with topical minoxidil was conducted. PMID:25672313

  6. Erectile response to topical, intraurethral and intracorporal pharmacotherapy in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rivas, D A; Chancellor, M B; Huang, B; Salzman, S K

    1995-10-01

    In order to compare the erectile response to topical, intraurethral and intracorporal administration of vasoactive substances in neurologically intact and spinal cord injured (SCI) rats, a standard rat model of SCI using impact trauma at the level of T10 was employed, comparing the tumescence of 24 SCI and 25 control rats. Four weeks after SCI, the effect of vasoactive substances on erectile function was evaluated. Under ketamine anesthesia, the penis was exposed and intracorporal pressure (ICP) was monitored using saline infusion cavernosometry through a 24-gauge catheter inserted into one corpus cavernosum. Changes in ICP were recorded in response to the topical and intraurethral (IU) application of minoxidil (0.1 ml, 2% solution) and 2% nitroglycerin (NTG) ointment (0.1 gm), as well as the intracorporal (IC) administration of papaverine (0.0001-0.10 mg/kg). Results indicated that the mean baseline ICP was 8 +/- 5 mmHg for SCI and 9 +/- 4 mmHg for control rats. No response to topical therapy onto the undegloved penis was noted in either SCI or control rats. IU application of minoxidil to the degloved phallus developed ICP greater than that achieved with topical minoxidil; the topical application of NTG was less effective. In SCI rats, IC papaverine injection achieved an ICP of 56.9 +/- 24.3 mmHg, whereas papaverine in control rats generated an ICP of 43.5 +/- 38.8 mmHg. A greater increase in ICP at lower doses of each agent occurred in SCI than in control rats. We conclude that only the degloved phallus responded to topical vasoactive pharmacotherapy. Although both topical and IU applications of NTG and minoxidil increase ICP, tumescence was significantly less than that achieved with IC injection of papaverine. The IU application of minoxidil demonstrated significantly greater activity than other topical therapies. SCI rats displayed a supersensitive response to all modes of pharmacologic erectile therapy. PMID:8591071

  7. Controversy: Is There a Role for Adjuvants in the Management of Male Pattern Hair Loss?

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Rajendrasingh J

    2010-01-01

    Patients with hair loss are seeking treatment at a younger age and during earlier stages. Not all need hair transplants. Because of the lack of assured management and the fear of side-effects, patients are turning to ineffective alternative remedies from self-claimed experts. In this report, we discuss the available treatment options and how best they can be used in combination to produce satisfactory results. The traditional approach consists of administration of drugs such as minoxidil and finasteride. We propose a hypothesis that nutritional supplements, 2% ketoconazole shampoo and low-level laser therapy along with finasteride 1 mg used once in 3 days with 2% minoxidil used everyday, given in a cyclical medicine program may be useful to manage hair loss and achieve new hair growth. The scientific rationale for such an approach is explained. The need for further studies to establish the efficacy of the regime is stressed upon. PMID:21031065

  8. Effect of cyclosporin on hair-existing area of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Y; Imaizumi, T; Kondo, S

    1994-07-01

    We investigated the effect of cyclosporin, as well as minoxidil, testosterone, estradiol and corticosteroid on the hair growth on the hairy part of nude mice. Aliquots of solutions of cyclosporin and other agents were applied once per every day topically on the tails and the lower backs of 5 week-old BALB/c nude mice, for as long as 6 weeks. Cyclosporin prolonged the hair-existing phase of the hair cycle, but did not change the term of the hair cycle, i.e., the resting phase was not affected. Minoxidil, testosterone and estradiol did not influence the hair growth cycle. Combination of cyclosporin and other agents demonstrated that there was neither additive nor synergistic effect, but a high dose of corticosteroid inhibit the cyclosporin effect, as well as suppressing completely the reappearance of the growing phase. PMID:7999675

  9. Androgenetic alopecia in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Price, Vera H

    2003-02-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or hereditary hair thinning, is a common and unwelcome cause of hair loss in men and women. AGA also occurs in adolescents, though its prevalence in this younger population is not known. Physical appearance is extremely important to most adolescents, and early onset of hair loss can have a definite negative effect on self-image and self-esteem. Minoxidil topical solution is widely used by adults for hair loss, but its use by adolescents has not been systematically evaluated. This article provides an overview of AGA and presents new information on the prevalence and age at onset of hereditary hair thinning in adolescents. In addition, data are presented on the efficacy and proper use of minoxidil topical solution in adolescent boys and girls. PMID:12635889

  10. Evidence for supplemental treatments in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Famenini, Shannon; Goh, Carolyn

    2014-07-01

    Currently, topical minoxidil and finasteride are the only treatments that have been FDA approved for the treatment of female pattern hair loss and androgenetic alopecia. Given the incomplete efficacy and sife effect profile of these medications, some patients utilize alternative treatments to help improve this condition. In this review, we illustrate the scientific evidence underlying the efficacy of these alternative approaches, including biotin, caffeine, melatonin, a marine extract, and zinc. PMID:25007363

  11. Lipid nanoparticles for topical and transdermal application for alopecia treatment: development, physicochemical characterization, and in vitro release and penetration studies

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria João; Martins, Susana; Ferreira, Domingos; Segundo, Marcela A; Reis, Salette

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a dermatological disorder, commonly known as hair loss, which affects up to half of the Caucasian male population by middle age, and almost all (95%) Caucasian men by old age. Considering that alopecia affects so many people and that there is currently no scientifically proven treatment with few side effects, new drug-delivery systems able to improve alopecia therapy are urgently required. With this purpose in mind, the present study aimed to develop lipid nanoparticles (nanostructured lipid carriers) with the ability to incorporate and deliver anti-alopecia active compounds (minoxidil and finasteride) into the dermis and hair follicles. Lipid nanoparticles, prepared by ultrasonication method, showed mean particle sizes around 200 nm, which is sufficient for reaching the dermis and hair follicles, and zeta potential values around −30 mV, which indicates good physical stability. Over 28 days of storage, no significant variations in these parameters were observed, which indicates that all nanoformulations are stable in storage over that period. Cryo-scanning electron microscope measurements showed that all the lipid nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape and a smooth surface regardless of their composition. Differential scanning calorimetry studies allowed the determination of phase transition temperatures and confirmed the recrystallization of the lipid nanoparticles (recrystallization index between 11% and 86%). A high loading efficiency was achieved for finasteride (between 70% and 90%), while less than 30% was achieved for minoxidil nanoparticles, over 28 days. Controlled release assays in physiological conditions demonstrated that nanoparticles loaded with minoxidil yielded a prolonged release, as desired. Penetration assays through pig ear skin demonstrated that nanoparticles loaded with minoxidil and finasteride had low levels of penetration. These results suggest that the proposed novel formulation presents several good characteristics

  12. Use of Low-Level Laser Therapy as Monotherapy or Concomitant Therapy for Male and Female Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Munck, Andréia; Gavazzoni, Maria Fernanda; Trüeb, Ralph M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of hair loss in men and in women. Currently, minoxidil and finasteride are the treatments with the highest levels of medical evidence, but patients who exhibit intolerance or poor response to these treatments are in need of additional treatment modalities. Objective: The aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for AGA, either as monotherapy or as concomitant therapy with minoxidil or finasteride, in an office-based setting. Materials and Methods: Retrospective observational study of male and female patients with AGA, treated with the 655 nm-HairMax Laser Comb®, in an office-based setting. Efficacy was assessed with global photographic imaging. Results: Of 32 patients (21 female, 11 male), 8 showed significant, 20 moderate, and 4 no improvement. Improvement was seen both with monotherapy and with concomitant therapy. Improvement was observed as early as 3 months and was sustained up to a maximum observation time of 24 months. No adverse reactions were reported. Conclusions: LLLT represents a potentially effective treatment for both male and female AGA, either as monotherapy or concomitant therapy. Combination treatments with minoxidil, finasteride, and LLLT may act synergistic to enhance hair growth. PMID:25191036

  13. Erbium: YAG laser (2,940 nm) treatment stimulates hair growth through upregulating Wnt 10b and β-catenin expression in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jin; Guan, Huiwen; Li, Shan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Li; Yan, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of 2,940 nm erbium: YAG laser in hair growth in C57BL/6 mice. Methods: Anagen was experimentally induced by depilation. Healthy C57BL/6 mice (n=22) were randomly divided into four groups, with treatment of laser or minoxidil, or with combined laser and minoxidil treatments. The skin color of each mouse was observed each day. The time from telogen (pink skin color) to anagen (black coloration) phase and from anagen (black coloration) to catagen (all hairs grew out of the depilated skin) have been recorded. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) assay was done at fifteen days after the first treatment for each group to observe hair follicles and hair cycle score. Western blot analysis was utilized to detect the expression levels of Wnt 10-b and β-catenin. Results: Black pigmentation started significantly earlier both in the laser and combination group than in the control group. Moreover, the time from anagen to catagen in the laser, minoxidil and combination groups were all significantly shorter from the control group. Histopathology with H&E staining showed an obvious increase in the number of hair follicles in the anagen phase caused by the treatment of 2,940 nm erbium: YAG laser and minoxidil. Similarly, the percentage of hair follicles in anagen VI accounted for 19.5%, 37.5%, 41.5% and 44% in control, laser, minoxidil, and combination group, respectively. Western blot analysis showed that both the levels of Wnt 10b and β-catenin were significantly increased by the treatment of 2,940 nm erbium: YAG laser. Conclusion: Our findings showed that 2,940-nm Er: YAG laser could promote hair growth by inducing hair cycle transition from telogen to anagen phases in C57BL/6 mice through up regulating Wnt 10b and β-catenin. These results suggest that 2,940-nm Er: YAG laser may be a potential therapy for hair loss. PMID:26885014

  14. Extensive Alopecia Areata: Not Necessarily Recalcitrant to Therapy!

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Deepal; Dhurat, Rachita; Saraogi, Punit; Mishra, Sunil; Nayak, Chitra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Extensive alopecia areata includes alopecia universalis, alopecia totalis, ophiasis and patients having more than 50% scalp involvement. Alopecia universalis (AU) and totalis (AT) are considered to be resistant to single modalities of treatment. Our study highlights the efficacy and safety of combination therapy in extensive alopecia areata. Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination treatment with oral bethametasone mini-pulse, topical minoxidil and short contact anthralin in long-standing, treatment-resistant, extensive alopecia areata. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients aged 7 to 45 years with extensive, treatment-resistant alopecia areata (AU: 7; AT: 1; ophiasis: 4; patients with more than 50% scalp involvement: 3) were treated with betamethasone oral mini-pulse (0.1 mg per kg body weight per dose on two consecutive days per week) along with short contact anthralin (1.15%) and 2-5% minoxidil lotion daily, till response. The response was assessed by the severity of alopecia tool (SALT) score. Cosmetic response was defined as regrowth obviating the need of a wig. Failure of treatment was defined as no growth or vellus hair on the scalp. Results: Out of eight patients with AU/AT, two attained cosmetic response as early as three months, two at six months and one had partial response. Cosmetic response was attained in all four patients with ophiasis and all three patients with more than 50% scalp involvement at six months. All responders maintained their response without systemic steroids beyond 12 months. Among a total of twelve responders (80%), two with AU showed a mild relapse and were effectively treated with intralesional steroids. Side effects to therapy were mild and reversible. Conclusion: A combination therapy of oral steroid minipulse with topical anthralin and minoxidil acts synergistically, being effective as well as safe in treatment-resistant, extensive, long-standing alopecia areata. PMID:22223966

  15. Topical Products for Human Hair Regeneration: A Comparative Study on an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Orasan, Meda Sandra; Coneac, Andrei; Muresan, Adriana; Mihu, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background Hair loss and hair growth is the subject of tremendous amount of research. Objective This study investigated the efficacy of three chemical treatments used in humans for hair loss, using a rat model of hair regrowth. The products tested were 2% minoxidil, Hairgrow (Dar-Al-Dawa Pharma), Aminexil, Dercos (Vichy Laboratoires), and Kerium, Anti-chute (La Roche-Posay). Methods Thirty-two adult female Wistar-Bratislava rats were assigned to 4 groups. Two rectangular areas (2×4 cm) were shaved on either sides of the mid dorsal line (left side - control; right side - test area). Group I was treated topically with 2% minoxidil, group II with Aminexil, and group III with Kerium. Each rat received 0.3 ml of substance applied topically to the shaved dorsal skin every day for 28 days. Rats in group IV served as sham controls receiving no treatment. Hair regrowth was evaluated by trichoscopy (with a dermatoscope), grown hair weight (from a surface area of 1 cm2), and histopathological examination for skin thickness, follicle count, and percentage of anagen induction (morphometric assessment). Results Treatment with 2% minoxidil significantly induced hair regrowth as assessed by trichoscopy, hair weight examination, and morphometric evaluation. Hair weight examination and morphometric assessment demonstrated the lowest hair growth effect with Aminexil among the tested products. Treatment with Kerium was found to significantly induce hair regrowth (p<0.05 as compared to the control group). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that hair regrowth efficacy of products recommended for human use is not similar when tested on an animal model. PMID:26848220

  16. Androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Otberg, Nina; Finner, Andreas M; Shapiro, Jerry

    2007-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), or male pattern hair loss, affects approximately 50% of the male population. AGA is an androgen-related condition in genetically predisposed individuals. There is no treatment to completely reverse AGA in advanced stages, but with medical treatment (eg, finasteride, minoxidil, or a combination of both), the progression can be arrested and partly reversed in the majority of patients who have mild to moderate AGA. Combination with hair restoration surgery leads to best results in suitable candidates. Physicians who specialize in male health issues should be familiar with this common condition and all the available approved treatment options. PMID:17543725

  17. Drug-induced hair colour changes.

    PubMed

    Bublin, J G; Thompson, D F

    1992-10-01

    Drug-induced hair colour changes are not a common adverse effect from medications. A wide variety of drugs have been implicated in causing hair colour changes but very few have data to support a true relationship. Of the drugs reported, chloroquine and cancer chemotherapeutic agents have the best evidence to support an association. Other drugs, such as p-aminobenzoic acid, calcium pantothenate, anthralin, chinoform, mephenesin, minoxidil, propofol, valproic acid, and verapamil await confirmatory data. Drug-induced causes should be considered in any patient with unexplained hair colour changes. PMID:1464633

  18. Association of migraine-like headaches with Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Donmez, Osman; Sloan, Emily A; Elizondo, Leah I; Huang, Cheng; André, Jean-Luc; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Cockfield, Sandra; Cordeiro, Isabel; Deschenes, Georges; Fründ, Stefan; Kaitila, Ilkka; Lama, Giuliana; Lamfers, Petra; Lücke, Thomas; Milford, David V; Najera, Lydia; Rodrigo, Francisco; Saraiva, Jorge M; Schmidt, Beate; Smith, Graham C; Stajic, Nastasa; Stein, Anja; Taha, Doris; Wand, Dorothea; Armstrong, Dawna; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2005-06-01

    Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (SIOD) is characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, nephropathy, and T-cell deficiency. SIOD is caused by mutations in the putative chromatin remodeling protein SMARCAL1. We report an 8-year-old boy with SIOD and recurrent, severe, refractory migraine-like headaches. Through a retrospective questionnaire-based study, we found that refractory and severely disabling migraine-like headaches occur in nearly half of SIOD patients. We have also found that the vasodilator minoxidil provided symptomatic relief for one patient. We hypothesize that these headaches may arise from an intrinsic vascular, neuroimmune, or neurovascular defect resulting from loss of SMARCAL1 function. PMID:15884045

  19. Preventive effects of cedrol against alopecia in cyclophosphamide-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yan; Lu, Qiu-Li; Lin, Zhe; Zhao, Yuqing

    2016-09-01

    Although numerous hypotheses have been proposed to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), effective pharmaceuticals have yet to be developed. In our study, the back hairs of C57BL/6 mice were factitiously removed. These mice were then treated with cedrol or minoxidil daily. Mice with early-stage anagen VI hair follicles were treated with cyclophosphamide (CYP, 125mg/kg) to induce alopecia. The CYP-damaged hair follicles were observed and quantified by using a digital photomicrograph. The results demonstrated that the minoxidil-treated mice suffered from complete alopecia similar to the model 6days after CYP administration. Simultaneously, the cedrol-treated (200mg/kg) mice manifested mild alopecia with 40% suppression. Histological observation revealed that anagen hair follicles of the cedrol-pretreated mice (82.5%) likely provided from damage compared with the sparse and dystrophic hair follicles of the model mice (37.0%). Therefore, the use of topical cedrol can prevent hair follicle dystrophy and provide local protection against CIA. PMID:27522546

  20. Structures of prostacyclin synthase and its complexes with substrate analog and inhibitor reveal a ligand-specific heme conformation change.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Ching; Chiang, Chia-Wang; Yeh, Hui-Chun; Hsu, Pei-Yung; Whitby, Frank G; Wang, Lee-Ho; Chan, Nei-Li

    2008-02-01

    Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) is a cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme that catalyzes production of prostacyclin from prostaglandin H(2). PGIS is unusual in that it catalyzes an isomerization rather than a monooxygenation, which is typical of P450 enzymes. To understand the structural basis for prostacyclin biosynthesis in greater detail, we have determined the crystal structures of ligand-free, inhibitor (minoxidil)-bound and substrate analog U51605-bound PGIS. These structures demonstrate a stereo-specific substrate binding and suggest features of the enzyme that facilitate isomerization. Unlike most microsomal P450s, where large substrate-induced conformational changes take place at the distal side of the heme, conformational changes in PGIS are observed at the proximal side and in the heme itself. The conserved and extensive heme propionate-protein interactions seen in all other P450s, which are largely absent in the ligand-free PGIS, are recovered upon U51605 binding accompanied by water exclusion from the active site. In contrast, when minoxidil binds, the propionate-protein interactions are not recovered and water molecules are largely retained. These findings suggest that PGIS represents a divergent evolution of the P450 family, in which a heme barrier has evolved to ensure strict binding specificity for prostaglandin H(2), leading to a radical-mediated isomerization with high product fidelity. The U51605-bound structure also provides a view of the substrate entrance and product exit channels. PMID:18032380

  1. CARI ONE induces anagen phase of telogenic hair follicles through regulation of β-catenin, stimulation of dermal papilla cell proliferation, and melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The use of herbal mixtures in the hair growth market has increased dramatically over the last decade. In this study, we investigated the hair growth-promoting activity of CARI ONE, a mixture of medicinal plants and mushrooms, in telogenic 6-week-old C57BL/6N mice. CARI ONE promoted hair growth through stimulation of the telogen to anagen transition. Histomorphometry analysis data indicated that topical application of CARI ONE induced an earlier anagen phase and prolonged the mature anagen phase, and also increased the number and size of hair follicles (HFs) as compared to either the control or 1% minoxidil-treated group. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an earlier induction of β-catenin and Trp-1 protein in the HFs of the CARI ONE-treated group compared to that in the control group or 1% minoxidil-treated group. In vitro, CARI ONE promoted the proliferation of dermal papilla cells and resulted in increased melanin content in B16F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. These results suggest that CARI ONE promotes hair growth through induction of the anagen phase in resting HFs. PMID:24773048

  2. Protopanaxatirol type ginsenoside Re promotes cyclic growth of hair follicles via inhibiting transforming growth factor β signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Sunchang; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-02-19

    Ginsenosides, the major bio-active ingredients included in Panax ginseng, have been known for the hair growth activity and used to treat patients who suffer from hair loss; however, the detailed mechanisms of this action are still largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for hair growth promoting effect of ginsenoside Re (GRe) in vitro and in vivo. Different doses of minoxidil and GRe were administered topically to the back regions of nude mice for up to 45 days, and hair shaft length and hair cycles were determined for hair promoting activities. Topical treatment of GRe significantly increased the hair shaft length and hair existent time, which was comparable to the action of minoxidil. We also demonstrated that GRe stimulated hair shaft elongation in the ex vivo cultures of vibrissa hair follicles isolated from C57BL/6 mouse. Systemic transcriptome analysis by next generation sequencing demonstrated that TGF-β-pathway related genes were selectively down-regulated by treatment of GRe in vivo, and the same treatment suppressed TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of ERK in HeLa cells. The results clearly indicated that GRe is the effective constituent in the ginseng on hair promotion via selective inhibition of the hair growth phase transition related signaling pathways, TGF-β signaling cascades. PMID:26820528

  3. Hair growth promoting activity of Eclipta alba in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, R K; Thakur, Mayank; Dixit, V K

    2008-08-01

    Alopecia is a dermatological disorder with psychosocial implications on patients with hair loss. Eclipta alba Hassk. is a well-known Ayurvedic herb with purported claims of hair growth promotion. In the reported work attempts were undertaken to evaluate petroleum ether and ethanol extract of E. alba Hassk. for their effect on promoting hair growth in albino rats. The extracts were incorporated into oleaginous cream (water in oil cream base) and applied topically on shaved denuded skin of albino rats. The time (in days) required for hair growth initiation as well as completion of hair growth cycle was recorded. Minoxidil 2% solution was applied topically and served as positive control for comparison. Hair growth initiation time was significantly reduced to half on treatment with the extracts, as compared to control animals. The time required for complete hair growth was also significantly reduced. Quantitative analysis of hair growth after treatment with petroleum ether extract (5%) exhibited greater number of hair follicles in anagenic phase (69 +/- 4) which were higher as compared to control (47 +/- 13). The result of treatment with 2 and 5% petroleum ether extracts were better than the positive control minoxidil 2% treatment. PMID:18478241

  4. North American Virginian Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana): Based Scalp Care and Protection for Sensitive Scalp, Red Scalp, and Scalp Burn-Out

    PubMed Central

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2014-01-01

    Background: A sensitive scalp is a frequent problem in daily clinical practice and often represents a major challenge for dermatologists. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of a Northamerican Virginian Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana)-based shampoo and tonic (Erol® Energy) for treatment of the sensitive scalp. Methods: Retrospective observational study of male and female patients given Erol® Energy products in the period between August 2010 and December 2013 at the Center for Dermatology and Hair Diseases Professor Trüeb to treat irritable scalp conditions or as concomitant treatment to minoxidil therapy for androgenetic alocepia. Results: Shampoo was applied successfully in 1,373 patients (1,233 women and 140 men). Patients reported improvement of subjective manifestations of irritation and rated tolerance of both products as good to excellent. During this period, 369 (26.9%) have received Erol® shampoo more than once. Conclusions: The choice of appropriate hair-care products represents an important aspect in the management of the sensitive scalp and related conditions. With the Erol® Energy hair-care products, the advantages of H. virginiana are available for successful treatment of the scalp, especially in the context of problems associated with red scalp, scalp burn-out, and the use of topical minoxidil for androgenetic alopecia. PMID:25210333

  5. Management of androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, C; Shapiro, J

    2000-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia is by far the most common cause of hair loss. It affects approximately 50% of men by the age of 50 and 20 to 53% of women by the age 50. Although it is a medically benign condition, it is a significant psychosocial issue for many patients. Various different treatment options are now available for androgenetic alopecia. The best treatment option for women with androgenetic alopecia Ludwig stage I and II is minoxidil 5% solution. If it is not effective after 1 year, antiandrogens can be tried, but there are no large studies showing their efficacy and they have considerable adverse effects. Also, for patients with alopecia that is unresponsive to treatment or with Ludwig stage III, hair transplantation can be offered if the occipital donor area is sufficient. For men, we always offer minoxidil or finasteride therapy and leave the choice of therapy to the patient. Some patients may prefer a systemic agent, whereas others may favor a topical agent. If the condition is not stabilized after 1 year or if the patient wants greater hair density, hair transplantation can be discussed. There have been tremendous advances in the treatment of hair loss in recent years and the future is very encouraging. As our knowledge of androgenetic alopecia pathophysiology increases, novel targeted treatments will potentially be developed. PMID:11702296

  6. Use of a commercial consumer panel to recruit a comparator cohort for a pharmacoepidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J S; Szpunar, C A; O'Connell, M J; Facklam, D P; Mariano, J P; Borden, E K; Leinweber, F B

    1996-05-01

    The Upjohn Consumer Health Survey (UCHS) was a prospective, observational study designed to comply with the US FDA's request that 10,000 users of ROGAINE (REGAINE in international markets) Topical Solution 2% (2% minoxidil solution) be systematically studied in the first year following the product's approval. Members of the Drug cohort were recruited at the time they filled prescriptions for 2% minoxidil solution at cooperating retail pharmacies in the United States. To meet the need for rapid identification of a cooperative comparison group, the Comparator cohort was selected by stratified random sampling from members of a commercial consumer panel. Group matching of Comparators to the Drug cohort on four variables--age, sex, race, and geography of residence--was accomplished prior to recruitment on the basis of information available from the consumer panel records; education was obtained via consent procedures and was also used as a group matching variable. Data collection was accomplished by participant interviews and confirmation of participant-reported medical events. Interviewing costs averaged 18.88 US dollars/completed interview. A commercial consumer panel offers a pool of rapidly identifiable subjects with known demographic characteristics and established willingness to participate in research for efficient cohort recruitment. PMID:15073833

  7. Hypotension- and osmotically induced thirst in old Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Thunhorst, Robert L.; Beltz, Terry G.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2009-01-01

    Compared to young cohorts, old rats drink less water in response to several thirst-inducing stimuli. In these experiments, we characterized water drinking in response to hypotension and cellular dehydration in young (4 mo), middle-aged adult (12 mo) and old (29–30 mo) male Brown Norway rats. We injected the vasodilator, minoxidil as an intravenous bolus in a range of doses (0–20 mg/kg), so that drinking responses could be compared at equivalent reductions of arterial pressure. Old rats had greatly diminished reflex tachycardia and became significantly more hypotensive after minoxidil compared with young and middle-aged rats. When compared at equivalent reductions of arterial pressure, old rats drank one-third as much as middle-aged rats, and one-fifth as much as young rats. In addition, there were age-related deficits in drinking in response to a range of administered loads of sodium (0.15–2 M NaCl, 2 ml/100 g body wt). Urinary excretion of water and sodium in response to the loads was equivalent across ages. Both middle-aged and old rats were less able than young rats to repair their water deficits after sodium loading, attributable almost entirely to their reduced drinking responses compared with young rats. Lastly, age-related declines in drinking appeared to be more severe in response to hypotension than in response to cellular dehydration. PMID:19420291

  8. Alopecia areata treated with phenolisation and intravenous dexamethasone pulses.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sumit; Singh, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Phenol is an aromatic hydrocarbon derived from coal tar or manufactured from monochlorobenzene. Alopecia areata is a common non scarring autoimmune condition characterised by patchy loss of hair without atrophy. Various treatment modalities have been proposed and used for the treatment of alopecia areata, which is indeed a difficult condition to treat. Variable results have been documented using intralesional corticosteroid injections, topical minoxidil, topical anthralin ointment, topical contact sensitizers like diphencyprone, dinitrochlorobenzene or squaric acid dibutyl ester, and oral mini pulse with betamethasone. The use of 88% phenol for the treatment of alopecia areata has been documented in literature, but it has failed to secure a place in the priority list. Herein we have reported a case of a young girl who was treated with short-time aggressive therapy using 88% phenol and dexamethasone pulse therapy and who responded well to the treatment with no recurrence in the last 6 months of follow-up. PMID:23960401

  9. Alopecia Areata Treated with Phenolisation and Intravenous Dexamethasone Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sumit; Singh, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Phenol is an aromatic hydrocarbon derived from coal tar or manufactured from monochlorobenzene. Alopecia areata is a common non scarring autoimmune condition characterised by patchy loss of hair without atrophy. Various treatment modalities have been proposed and used for the treatment of alopecia areata, which is indeed a difficult condition to treat. Variable results have been documented using intralesional corticosteroid injections, topical minoxidil, topical anthralin ointment, topical contact sensitizers like diphencyprone, dinitrochlorobenzene or squaric acid dibutyl ester, and oral mini pulse with betamethasone. The use of 88% phenol for the treatment of alopecia areata has been documented in literature, but it has failed to secure a place in the priority list. Herein we have reported a case of a young girl who was treated with short-time aggressive therapy using 88% phenol and dexamethasone pulse therapy and who responded well to the treatment with no recurrence in the last 6 months of follow-up. PMID:23960401

  10. Hair loss and regeneration performed on animal models.

    PubMed

    Orasan, Meda Sandra; Roman, Iulia Ioana; Coneac, Andrei; Muresan, Adriana; Orasan, Remus Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Research in the field of reversal hair loss remains a challenging subject. As Minoxidil 2% or 5% and Finasteride are so far the only FDA approved topical treatments for inducing hair regrowth, research is necessary in order to improve therapeutical approach in alopecia. In vitro studies have focused on cultures of a cell type - dermal papilla or organ culture of isolated cell follicles. In vivo research on this topic was performed on mice, rats, hamsters, rabbits, sheep and monkeys, taking into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of each animal model and the depilation options. Further studies are required not only to compare the efficiency of different therapies but more importantly to establish their long term safety. PMID:27547051

  11. Results of a national survey on over-the-counter medicines, Part 1: Pharmacist opinion on current scheduling status

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeff; Landry, Eric; Lalonde, Lyne; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2012-01-01

    >Background: OTC medicines make up an important part of the community pharmacy world. As with most aspects of practice, however, hurdles exist that prevent an optimal level of care. Objective: To gauge pharmacist agreement on the scheduling status of various OTC medicines. Methods: Pharmacists across Canada were surveyed by mail. Results: Of the 5037 surveys mailed, 2403 were returned, with 2305 being usable for analysis (response rate of 49.4%). Across 25 agents, pharmacists tended to support existing control for pharmacies (such as Nix crème rinse and minoxidil topical solution) and returning control to pharmacies for unscheduled agents (such as ranitidine 75 mg tablets and nicotine patches). Conclusions: Pharmacists generally favour tighter control of OTC agents, especially those that are unscheduled. This hopefully reflects pharmacist desire to ensure their proper selection and use. PMID:23509487

  12. Hair loss and regeneration performed on animal models

    PubMed Central

    ORASAN, MEDA SANDRA; ROMAN, IULIA IOANA; CONEAC, ANDREI; MURESAN, ADRIANA; ORASAN, REMUS IOAN

    2016-01-01

    Research in the field of reversal hair loss remains a challenging subject. As Minoxidil 2% or 5% and Finasteride are so far the only FDA approved topical treatments for inducing hair regrowth, research is necessary in order to improve therapeutical approach in alopecia. In vitro studies have focused on cultures of a cell type - dermal papilla or organ culture of isolated cell follicles. In vivo research on this topic was performed on mice, rats, hamsters, rabbits, sheep and monkeys, taking into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of each animal model and the depilation options. Further studies are required not only to compare the efficiency of different therapies but more importantly to establish their long term safety. PMID:27547051

  13. [Resistant hypertension : What is it?].

    PubMed

    Luft, F C

    2015-03-01

    When blood pressure is poorly controlled despite treatment with a diuretic and two antihypertensive drugs at adequate doses, the hypertension is termed resistant. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is increasing. Once pseudo-resistance due to poor compliance, secondary forms of hypertension, and massive salt consumption have been excluded, some authorities maintain that blood pressure can be invariably lowered using minoxidil or mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. I also adhered to this belief until we encountered a patient who despite treatment with seven antihypertensive agents, electrical carotid sinus stimulation, and catheter-based renal denervation continued to exhibit extraordinarily high blood pressure values. I am now convinced that resistant hypertension does indeed exist. The prevalence of such patients can be substantially reduced by means of a thorough history and physical examination, determining drug serum concentrations, and excluding secondary causes. PMID:25668441

  14. [Topical therapy in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Floth, A

    2000-01-01

    All forms of pharmacological therapy result in a relaxation of the corporeal smooth muscle. Intracorporeal injection of vasoactive drugs was introduced around 15 years ago and still is the most effective therapy in erectile dysfunction. Resulting in a consistent success rate of 70-80% this form of therapy will find numerous applications, even after the introduction of effective oral agents such as sildenafil. Prostaglandin E1 and--less frequently used--the combination of papaverine and phentolamine are the mainstay of intracorporeal injection therapy. Intraurethral prostaglandin (MUSE) has recently become available and is somewhat less effective than injection therapy. Externally applied drugs (nitroglycerin paste on the penile shaft and minoxidil solution on the glans penis) have not succeeded in the long run. Vacuum erection devices represent a form of physical topical therapy that is very versatile and also effective but rather infrequently applied. PMID:10746290

  15. Promising therapies for treating and/or preventing androgenic alopecia.

    PubMed

    McElwee, K J; Shapiro, J S

    2012-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) may affect up to 70% of men and 40% of women at some point in their lifetime. While men typically present with a distinctive alopecia pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding, women normally exhibit a diffuse hair thinning over the top of their scalps. The treatment standard in dermatology clinics continues to be minoxidil and finasteride with hair transplantation as a surgical option. Here we briefly review current therapeutic options and treatments under active investigation. Dutasteride and ketoconazole are also employed for AGA, while prostaglandin analogues latanoprost and bimatoprost are being investigated for their hair growth promoting potential. Laser treatment products available for home use and from cosmetic clinics are becoming popular. In the future, new cell mediated treatment approaches may be available for AGA. While there are a number of potential treatment options, good clinical trial data proving hair growth efficacy is limited. PMID:22735503

  16. Effects of isradipine and other calcium antagonists on arteriovenous-shunt flow in anesthetized rabbits and cats

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, R.P.

    1989-04-17

    The effects of vasodilators on arteriovenous (AV)-shunt flow was investigated in anesthetized cats and rabbits, using the tracer microsphere method. In cats, the calcium antagonist isradipine reduced AV-shunt flow; verapamil showed a similar tendency and nicardipine was without effect. Dihydralazine strongly increased, but nitroglycerin and dipyridamole decreased AV-shunt flow. In rabbits, the effects of isradipine and verapamil were similar to those seen in cats. Sodium nitroprusside had no effect, whereas prazosin, minoxidil, and the potassium-channel activator cromakalim increased AV-shunt flow. The contrasting effects of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action suggest that target-tissue selectivity is more important than the mechanism of action. An increase of AV-shunt flow is unlikely to be beneficial but could be associated with a number of undesirable side effects. It might negatively affect migraine sufferers and, if AV-shunt dilatation shows no tolerance development, it represents an unnecessary hemodynamic burden for the heart.

  17. Development of a rate model to investigate contributions of anatomic and physiologic determinants of in vivo skin permeation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, N.M.

    1991-01-01

    The skin is a heterogeneous, bi-directional impediment to chemical flux, in which the stratum corneum is a major, though not the sole, rate-limiting barrier layer to permeation. Systemic toxicity following dermal exposure to environmental chemicals and use of skin as a portal for systemic administration of drugs have led to extensive investigations of the inward flux of xenobiotics applied to the outer surface of skin. Those investigations mainly utilized in vitro experimental systems that were limited by the absence of normal physiologic functions. The objective of the present research was to investigate an in vivo skin permeation model system that was sensitive to perturbations of skin capillary physiology and stratum corneum. A [open quotes]fuzzy[close quotes] rat model system was devised that employed outward cutaneous migration of a systemically administered permeation probe, isoflurane. Specially devised, transdermal vapor collection devices were used to capture the outward flux of isoflurane through the skin. Isoflurane flux measurements, coupled with blood isoflurane concentrations, were used to calculate cutaneous permeability coefficients (K[sub p]) of isolflurane, as an index of permeation, under various conditions of normal or perturbed cutaneous physiologic states. Physiologic perturbations were performed to test the sensitivity of the model system to detect effects of minoxidil-mediated vasodilation, phenylephrine-mediated vasoconstriction, and leukotriene D[sub 4]-mediated increased capillary permeability on the outward flux of isoflurane. Tape stripping and topical ether-ethanol application produced either physical removal or chemical disruption of the stratum corneum, respectively. Minoxidil, leukotriene D[sub 4], tape stripping of stratum corneum, and topical ether-ethanol experiments produced statistically significant increases (52 to 193%) in the K[sub p's], while phenylephrine had no significant effect on isoflurane permeation.

  18. Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. Extract Has a High Antioxidant Capacity and Exhibits Hair Growth-promoting Effects in Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Joo Yeon; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Bog-Hieu

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. (PSE) extract on mouse hair growth and to determine the mechanism of action of PSE. PSE was purchased and its antioxidant activities, such as electron donating ability, total polyphenol content, and flavonoid content were tested. Toxicity during topical treatment was determined by the CCK-8 assay, a cell viability test. Fifteen 4-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to receive one of three treatments: dimethyl sulfoxide (negative control), minoxidil (positive control) or PSE. Test materials were topically applied to the shaved dorsal skin of each mouse daily for 3 weeks. After 21 days, we observed skin tissue hair follicle morphology and length, mast cell number, and stem cell factor (SCF) expression using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of cytokines involved in hair growth [i.e., insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1] was determined by PCR. PSE was found to have very high antioxidant activity. The cell viability rate of PSE-treated mice was markedly higher than that of mice in the control group. We also observed an increase in hair follicle length, strong SCF staining, and a decrease in mast cell number in the PSE group. In addition, PSE-treated mice had higher IGF-1 and KGF expression and lower TGF-β1 expression than mice in the minoxidil-treated group. These results suggest that topical application of PSE promotes hair growth by intensifying SCF, suppressing mast cell production, and increasing hair growth-promoting cytokine expression. PMID:25320710

  19. Response to Microneedling Treatment in Men with Androgenetic Alopecia Who Failed to Respond to Conventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dhurat, Rachita; Mathapati, Sukesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of conventional therapy viz. finasteride and minoxidil in androgenetic alopecia (AGA) that is based on both preventing hair loss and promoting new hair growth, varies between 30% and 60%. This has led to a large number of patients unsatisfied who demand for a better cosmetic coverage over the scalp. Microneedling has recently been reported to be promising, effective and a safe treatment modality in the treatment of AGA. This augments the response of conventional therapy. Materials and Methods: Four men with AGA were on finasteride and 5% minoxidil solution since 2 to 5 years. Though there was no worsening in their respective AGA stages with the therapy, they showed no new hair growth. They were subjected to microneedling procedure over a period of 6 months along with their ongoing therapy. Patients were assessed with the use of the standardized 7-point evaluation scale and patients’ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The patients were followed up for 18 months post microneedling procedure to assess the sustainability of the response. Results: All patients showed a response of + 2 to + 3 on standardized 7-point evaluation scale. The response in the form of new hair growth started after 8-10 sessions. The patients’ satisfaction was more than 75% in three patients and more 50% in one patient, on patients’ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The obtained results were sustained post procedure during 18 months follow-up period. Conclusion Treatment with microneedling showed an accelerated response with addition of microneedling procedure leading to significant scalp density. This is the first case series to report the boosting effect of microneedling with respect to new hair follicle stimulation in patients with androgenetic alopecia who were poor responders to conventional therapy. PMID:26120151

  20. The Success of Thread-embedding Therapy in Generating Hair Re-growth in Mice Points to Its Possibly Having a Similar Effect in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyun Jong; Lee, Dong-Jin; Kwon, Kang; Seo, Hyung-Sik; Jeong, Han-Sol; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Ha, Ki-Tae; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jang, Yong-Suk; Lee, Byung-Wook; Kim, Byung Joo; Jung, Myeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, thread-embedding therapy (TET) has been widely applied in Korean medicine for cosmetic purposes such as reducing skin wrinkles. An inserted thread was reported to have induced continuous stimulation, followed by support for connective tissue regeneration. However, the potential role of TET in hairgrowth has not yet been reported. Methods: We designed this study to evaluate whether TET has a hair-growth-promoting effect. C57 black 6 (C57BL/6) mice were divided into three groups: normal saline-treated, minoxidil-treated, and thread-embedded groups. Normal saline or 5% minoxidil was topically sprayed on the dorsal skin of the mice once a day for 16 days. Medical threads were embedded into the dorsal skin of the mice in a single application. Hair growth activity was evaluated by using dermoscopic and microscopic observations. Sections of the dorsal skin were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Expressions of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7), and fibroblast growth factor-5 (FGF-5) were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was adopted to measure the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of FGF-7 and FGF-5. Results: TET enhanced anagen development in the hair follicles of C57BL/6 mice. The expressions of BrdU and PCNA, both of which imply active cellular proliferation, were increased by using TET. Moreover, TET increased the expression of FGF-7, an anagen-inducing growth factor, while decreasing the expression of FGF-5, an anagen-cessation growth factor, both at the protein and the mRNA levels. Conclusion: TET enhanced hair re-growth in C57BL/6 mice. TET regulated the expressions of anagen-associated growth factors and activated the proliferation of hair follicular cells in depilated skin lesions. Considering its long-lasting effect, TET may be a good alternative therapeutic for the treatment of alopecia

  1. Low-Level Laser (Light) Therapy (LLLT) for Treatment of Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Pinar; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Clark, Jason; Wikonkal, Norbert; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Alopecia is a common disorder affecting more than half of the population worldwide. Androgenetic alopecia, the most common type, affects 50% of males over the age of 40 and 75% of females over 65. Only two drugs have been approved so far (minoxidil and finasteride) and hair transplant is the other treatment alternative. This review surveys the evidence for low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied to the scalp as a treatment for hair loss and discusses possible mechanisms of actions. Methods and Materials Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar were carried out using keywords alopecia, hair loss, LLLT, photobiomodulation. Results Studies have shown that LLLT stimulated hair growth in mice subjected to chemotherapy-induced alopecia and also in alopecia areata. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that LLLT stimulated hair growth in both men and women. Among various mechanisms, the main mechanism is hypothesized to be stimulation of epidermal stem cells in the hair follicle bulge and shifting the follicles into anagen phase. Conclusion LLLT for hair growth in both men and women appears to be both safe and effective. The optimum wavelength, coherence and dosimetric parameters remain to be determined. PMID:23970445

  2. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Context: Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) also known as female androgenetic alopecia is a common condition afflicting millions of women that can be cosmetically disrupting. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for obtaining optimal outcome. This review addresses the clinical presentation of female pattern hair loss, its differential diagnosis and treatment modalities. Evidence Acquisition: A) Diffuse thinning of the crown region with preservation of the frontal hairline (Ludwig’s type) B) The “Christmas tree pattern” where the thinning is wider in the frontal scalp giving the alopecic area a triangular shaped figure resembling a christmas tree. C) Thinning associated with bitemporal recession (Hamilton type). Generally, FPHL is not associated with elevated androgens. Less commonly females with FPHL may have other skin or general signs of hyperandrogenism such as hirsutism, acne, irregular menses, infertility, galactorrhea and insulin resistance. The most common endocrinological abnormality associated with FPHL is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Results: The most important diseases to consider in the differential diagnosis of FPHL include Chronic Telogen Effluvium (CTE), Permanent Alopecia after Chemotherapy (PAC), Alopecia Areata Incognito (AAI) and Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia (FFA). This review describes criteria for distinguishing these conditions from FPHL. Conclusions: The only approved treatment for FPHL, which is 2% topical Minoxidil, should be applied at the dosage of 1ml twice day for a minimum period of 12 months. This review will discuss off-label alternative modalities of treatment including 5-alfa reductase inhibitors, antiandrogens, estrogens, prostaglandin analogs, lasers, light treatments and hair transplantation. PMID:24719635

  3. Pharmacologic interventions in aging hair

    PubMed Central

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people’s overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today’s increasing life-expectations, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and is delivering active products directed towards meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft, decrease of melanocyte function, and decrease in hair production. The scalp is subject to intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation: prototypes are familial premature graying, and androgenetic alopecia. Currently available pharmacologic treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and air pollution. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress also plays a role in hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds include photoprotectors and antioxidants. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants remain the mainstay of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are currently under investigation. PMID:18044109

  4. Pilot Study of 15 Patients Receiving a New Treatment Regimen for Androgenic Alopecia: The Effects of Atopy on AGA

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, A. W.; Katz, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. We examined the efficacy of a new regimen to treat AGA, with attention to male patients who are atopic. Objective. To assess the efficacy of a four-part regimen for the treatment of AGA in atopic and nonatopic patients. NuH Hair is a novel topical combination of finasteride, dutasteride, and minoxidil, which is blended in a hypoallergenic lotion. The other three components included Rogaine foam, Propecia, and ketoconazole shampoo. Methods. A prospective pilot study was conducted in 15 patients. All patients were assessed for the presence of atopy. Each patient served as their own control. All patients were treated specifically with NuH Hair and were given the option to add any of the other components of the protocol to their regimen. Photographs were taken of each patient's scalp at months 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9. Results. All 15 patients demonstrated significant growth of hair. In those patients who utilized all 4 components, significant growth was achieved in as little as 30 days. In those patients who choose only to utilize NuH Hair, significant growth was demonstrated after 3 months. Conclusion. Aggressively treating AGA achieves significant and rapid growth of new hair. This is effective in atopic and nonatopic male patients. PMID:22363845

  5. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  6. Effect of cholesterol and ethanol on dermal delivery from DPPC liposomes.

    PubMed

    López-Pinto, J M; González-Rodríguez, M L; Rabasco, A M

    2005-07-14

    The main objective of the present work was to compare the dermal delivery of minoxidil (Mx), a lipophilic drug from ethosomes versus classic liposomes, containing different cholesterol (CHOL) concentrations. All the systems were characterized for shape, lamellarity, particle size and entrapment efficiency percentage (EE), by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), laser diffraction and ultracentrifugation or dialysis methods, respectively. Multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were obtained and one to six lamellae were visualized by CLSM. The presence of ethanol in the formulations affects the particle size in terms of reducing this parameter. In addition, it was possible to appreciate the influence of CHOL on the vesicle size, because it was increased, as CHOL concentration was higher. When the EE was determined by two different methods (ultracentrifugation and dialysis methods), a clear losing of entrapped drug by the ultracentrifugation method was observed, because the strong energy transmitted to the samples disrupted vesicles. Vesicles were non-occlusively applied on rat skin and the permeation pattern of the different systems, depth into the skin and the main permeation pathway were studied by using beta-carotene as a fluorescent probe. CLSM studies showed that ethosomal systems were much more efficient at delivering the fluorescent substance into the skin in terms of quantity and depth, than either liposomes or hydroalcoholic solutions. PMID:15896932

  7. Effects of Lycopersicon esculentum extract on hair growth and alopecia prevention.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Jung, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min-Hee; Moon, Jin-Nam; Moon, Woi-Sook; Ji, Yi-Hwa; Choi, In Soon; Wook Son, Sang

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the potential hair growth-promoting activity and the expression of cell growth factors of Lycopersicon esculentum extracts, each 3% (w/w) of ethyl acetate extract (EAE), and supercritical CO2 extract (SCE) of L. esculentum and isolated lycopene Tween 80 solution (LTS) and test hair tonic (THT) containing LTS were applied on the dorsal skin of C57BL/6 mice, once a day for 4 weeks. At week 4, LTS and THT exhibited hair growth-promoting potential similar to that of 3% minoxidil as a positive control (PC). Further, in the LTS group, a significant increase of mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), keratinocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was observed than PC, as well as the negative control (NC). In the THT group, increases in IGF-1 and decrease in VEGF and transforming growth factor-β expression were significant over the NC. In a histological examination in the THT group, the induction of anagen stage of hair follicles was faster than that of NC. In the Draize skin irritation study for THT, no observable edema or erythema was observed on all four sectors in the back skin after exposure for 24 or 72 h for any rabbit. Therefore, this study provides reasonable evidence that L. esculentum extracts promote hair growth and suggests that applications could be found in hair loss treatments without skin irritation at moderate doses. PMID:24397881

  8. Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boo Hyeong; Lee, Jae Soon; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent. PMID:27123160

  9. High-performance liquid chromatography-diode array and electrospray-mass spectrometry analysis of non-allowed substances in cosmetic products for preventing hair loss and other hormone-dependent skin diseases.

    PubMed

    De Orsi, Daniela; Pellegrini, Manuela; Pichini, Simona; Mattioli, Donatella; Marchei, Emilia; Gagliardi, Luigi

    2008-11-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet diode array (UV-DAD) and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection has been developed for the determination of minoxidil, progesterone, estrone, spironolactone, canrenone, hydrocortisone and triamcinolone acetonide in cosmetic products. The presence of these substances in commercial cosmetic samples is prohibited. The compounds were separated by reversed phase chromatography with water (0.1% trifluoroacetic acid) and acetonitrile gradient elution and detected by UV-DAD at 230, 254 and 280 nm and by ESI-MS positive ionisation mode. Benzoic acid was used as internal standard. Linearity was studied with UV-DAD detection from 1.50 to 1,000 microg/ml or mug/g range, depending on the different compounds and type of cosmetic preparation and with ESI-MS in the 50-1,000 ng/ml or ng/g range. Good determination coefficients (r(2)>or=0.99) were found in both UV and ESI-MS. At three concentrations spanning the linear dynamic ranges of both UV-DAD and ESI-MS assay, mean recoveries were always higher than 90% for the different analytes. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of substances under investigations illegally added in cosmetic cream and lotions, sold on internet web sites to prevent hair loss and other hormone-dependent skin diseases, like acne and hirsutism. PMID:18656319

  10. Peppermint Oil Promotes Hair Growth without Toxic Signs.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Young; Park, Min Ah; Kim, Young Chul

    2014-12-01

    Peppermint (Mentha piperita) is a plant native to Europe and has been widely used as a carminative and gastric stimulant worldwide. This plant also has been used in cosmetic formulations as a fragrance component and skin conditioning agent. This study investigated the effect of peppermint oil on hair growth in C57BL/6 mice. The animals were randomized into 4 groups based on different topical applications: saline (SA), jojoba oil (JO), 3% minoxidil (MXD), and 3% peppermint oil (PEO). The hair growth effects of the 4-week topical applications were evaluated in terms of hair growth, histological analysis, enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gene expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), known bio-markers for the enhanced hair growth. Of the 4 experimental groups, PEO group showed the most prominent hair growth effects; a significant increase in dermal thickness, follicle number, and follicle depth. ALP activity and IGF-1 expression also significantly increased in PEO group. Body weight gain and food efficiency were not significantly different between groups. These results suggest that PEO induces a rapid anagen stage and could be used for a practical agent for hair growth without change of body weight gain and food efficiency. PMID:25584150

  11. Androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Piraccini, B M; Alessandrini, A

    2014-02-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of alopecia, affecting up to 80% of men and 50% of women in the course of their life. AGA is caused by a progressive reduction in the diameter, length and pigmentation of the hair. Hair thinning results from the effects of the testosterone metabolite dehydrotestosterone (DHT) on androgen-sensitive hair follicles. In women, AGA produces diffuse thinning of the crown region with maintenance of the frontal hairline (Ludwig pattern AGA). In premenopausal women, AGA can be a sign of hyperandrogenism, together with hirsutism and acnes. Male pattern is characterized by bitemporal recession of the frontal hairline, followed by diffuse thinning at the vertex. Today, scalp dermoscopy is used routinely in patients with androgenetic alopecia, as it facilitates the diagnosis and differential diagnosis with other diseases, allows staging of severity, and allows you to monitor the progress of the disease in time and response to treatment. AGA is a progressive disease that tends to worsen with time. Medical treatment of AGA includes topical minoxidil, antiandrogen agents, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. PMID:24566563

  12. The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias.

    PubMed

    Khidhir, Karzan G; Woodward, David F; Farjo, Nilofer P; Farjo, Bessam K; Tang, Elaine S; Wang, Jenny W; Picksley, Steven M; Randall, Valerie A

    2013-02-01

    Balding causes widespread psychological distress but is poorly controlled. The commonest treatment, minoxidil, was originally an antihypertensive drug that promoted unwanted hair. We hypothesized that another serendipitous discovery, increased eyelash growth side-effects of prostamide F(2α)-related eyedrops for glaucoma, may be relevant for scalp alopecias. Eyelash hairs and follicles are highly specialized and remain unaffected by androgens that inhibit scalp follicles and stimulate many others. Therefore, we investigated whether non-eyelash follicles could respond to bimatoprost, a prostamide F(2α) analog recently licensed for eyelash hypotrichosis. Bimatoprost, at pharmacologically selective concentrations, increased hair synthesis in scalp follicle organ culture and advanced mouse pelage hair regrowth in vivo compared to vehicle alone. A prostamide receptor antagonist blocked isolated follicle growth, confirming a direct, receptor-mediated mechanism within follicles; RT-PCR analysis identified 3 relevant receptor genes in scalp follicles in vivo. Receptors were located in the key follicle regulator, the dermal papilla, by analyzing individual follicular structures and immunohistochemistry. Thus, bimatoprost stimulates human scalp follicles in culture and rodent pelage follicles in vivo, mirroring eyelash behavior, and scalp follicles contain bimatoprost-sensitive prostamide receptors in vivo. This highlights a new follicular signaling system and confirms that bimatoprost offers a novel, low-risk therapeutic approach for scalp alopecias. PMID:23104985

  13. The clinical pharmacology of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Lowenthal, D T; Saris, S D; Haratz, A; Packer, J; Porter, R S; Conry, K

    1984-12-01

    Antihypertensive drugs act centrally (methyldopa, clonidine, guanabenz), peripherally (prazosin, guanadrel, guanethedine, hydralazine, minoxidil), centrally and peripherally (beta-adrenergic blocking drugs) and systemically [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics]. Centrally-acting antihypertensives decrease blood pressure by diminishing sympathetic outflow from the vasomotor centre. Peripherally-acting antihypertensives act by depleting or inhibiting the release of catecholamines from the peripheral nerve ending or altering the response at alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptor sites. Beta-adrenergic blocking drugs act through a variety of mechanisms by either decreasing cardiac output, decreasing renin release, inhibiting prejunctional release of norepinephrine or through central mechanisms. Diuretics act as indirect vasodilators by depleting salt and water not only within the intravascular compartment but within the intramural portion of the arteriole, thereby diminishing its responsiveness to catecholamine and angiotensin II stimulation. ACE inhibitors such as captopril and enalapril act by inhibiting the conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II thereby decreasing the vasoconstrictor effect of angiotensin II and the aldosterone production secondary to angiotensin II stimulation. The main differences between captopril and enalapril is that enalapril does not possess the potentially toxic sulphydryl group and can be given twice-daily. Both drugs may show accumulation in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:6152830

  14. Essential roles of insulin, AMPK signaling and lysyl and prolyl hydroxylases in the biosynthesis and multimerization of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Li, Ming-Ming; Corcoran, Marie; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the adiponectin molecule are essential for its full bioactivity, and defects in PTMs leading to its defective production and multimerization have been linked to the mechanisms of insulin resistance, obesity, and type-2 diabetes. Here we observed that, in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, decreased insulin signaling caused by blocking of insulin receptors (InsR) with an anti-InsR blocking antibody, increased rates of adiponectin secretion, whereas concomitant elevations in insulin levels counteracted this effect. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling regulated adiponectin production by modulating the expression of adiponectin receptors, the secretion of adiponectin, and eventually the expression of adiponectin itself. We found that lysyl hydroxylases (LHs) and prolyl hydroxylases (PHs) were expressed in white-adipose tissue of ob/ob mice, wherein LH3 levels were increased compared with controls. In differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, both non-specific inhibition of LHs and PHs by dipyridyl, and specific inhibition of LHs by minoxidil and of P4H with ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, caused significant suppression of adiponectin production, more particularly of the higher-order isoforms. Transient gene knock-down of LH3 (Plod3) caused a suppressive effect, especially on the high molecular-weight (HMW) isoforms. These data indicate that PHs and LHs are both required for physiological adiponectin production and in particular are essential for the formation/secretion of the HMW isoforms. PMID:25240468

  15. In vivo hair growth-promoting effect of rice bran extract prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide fluid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Jeon, Min-Hee; Moon, Woi-Sook; Moon, Jin-Nam; Cheon, Eun Jin; Kim, Joo-Wan; Jung, Sung Kyu; Ji, Yi-Hwa; Son, Sang Wook; Kim, Mi-Ryung

    2014-01-01

    The potential hair growth-promoting activity of rice bran supercritical CO2 extract (RB-SCE) and major components of RB-SCE, linoleic acid, policosanol, γ-oryzanol, and γ-tocotrienol, were evaluated with the histological morphology and mRNA expression levels of cell growth factors using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in C57BL/6 mice. RB-SCE showed hair growth-promoting potential to a similar extent as 3% minoxidil, showing that the hair follicles were induced to be in the anagen stage. The numbers of the hair follicles were significantly increased. In addition, mRNA expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) were also significantly increased and that of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) decreased in RB-SCE-treated groups. Among the major components of RB-SCE, linoleic acid and γ-oryzanol induced the formation of hair follicles according to examination of histological morphology and mRNA expression levels of cell growth factors. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that RB-SCE, particularly linoleic acid and γ-oryzanol, promotes hair growth and suggests RB-SCE can be applied as hair loss treatment. PMID:24389480

  16. Potential of polar lipids from bovine milk to regulate the rodent dorsal hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Kumura, H; Sawada, T; Oda, Y; Konno, M; Kobayashi, K

    2012-07-01

    Among the lipids in bovine milk, minor components such as conjugated linoleic acids and phospholipids are more attractive than triacylglycerols from the standpoint of biological activity. To explore novel functions of bovine milk polar lipids (MPL), topical application to murine dorsal skin was introduced as an assay system. The acetone-insoluble lipid fraction derived from bovine milk was dispersed in ethanol and applied to 9-wk-old C57BL/6N female mice for 3 wk. In combination with visual assessment of the dorsal pigmentation, the progression of the hair cycle was estimated by calculating the ratio of subcutis to dermis thickness. The administration of MPL led to earlier progression of the hair cycle compared with administration of the vehicle. In some cases, the extent of MPL-induced hair cycle progression was comparable to that in animals treated with minoxidil, the most well-known reagent that initiates anagen. These results indicate that the MPL preparation contains a dermal penetrative component that can regulate the hair cycle and, thus, this preparation possesses potential for cosmetic use. PMID:22720920

  17. Pharmacologic interventions in aging hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today's increasing life-expectations, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and is delivering active products directed towards meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft, decrease of melanocyte function, and decrease in hair production. The scalp is subject to intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation: prototypes are familial premature graying, and androgenetic alopecia. Currently available pharmacologic treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil and oral finasteride. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and air pollution. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress also plays a role in hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds include photoprotectors and antioxidants. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants remain the mainstay of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are currently under investigation. PMID:18044109

  18. Aging of hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2005-06-01

    The appearance of hair plays an important role in people's overall physical appearance and self-perception. With today's increasing life expectation, the desire to look youthful plays a bigger role than ever. The hair care industry has become aware of this and also more capable to deliver active products that are directed toward meeting this consumer demand. The discovery of pharmacological targets and the development of safe and effective drugs also indicate strategies of the drug industry for maintenance of healthy and beautiful hair. Hair aging comprises weathering of the hair shaft and aging of the hair follicle. The latter manifests as decrease of melanocyte function or graying, and decrease in hair production in androgenetic and senescent alopecia. The scalp is also subject to intrinsic or physiologic aging and extrinsic aging caused by external factors. Intrinsic factors are related to individual genetic and epigenetic mechanisms with interindividual variation. Prototypes are familial premature graying and androgenetic alopecia. Extrinsic factors include ultraviolet radiation and smoking. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress plays a role in skin and hair aging. Topical anti-aging compounds for hair include humefactants, hair conditioners, photoprotectors, and antioxidants. Current available treatment modalities with proven efficacy for treatment of androgenetic alopecia are topical minoxidil, oral finasteride, and autologous hair transplantation. In the absence of another way to reverse hair graying, hair colorants are the mainstays of recovering lost hair color. Topical liposome targeting for melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles are under current investigation. PMID:17166201

  19. Female pattern hair loss: Current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Quan Q; Sinclair, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful. PMID:18044135

  20. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. PMID:24039457

  1. Hair growth promoting potential of phospholipids purified from porcine lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-03-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  2. Alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide family physicians with a background understanding of the therapeutic regimens and treatment outcomes for alopecia areata (AA), as well as to help identify those patients for whom dermatologist referral might be required. Sources of information PubMed was searched for relevant articles regarding the treatment of AA. Main message Alopecia areata is a form of autoimmune hair loss affecting both children and adults. While there is no associated mortality with the disease, morbidity from the psychological effects of hair loss can be devastating. Upon identification of AA and the disease subtype, an appropriate therapeutic regimen can be instituted to help halt hair loss or possibly initiate hair regrowth. First-line treatment involves intralesional triamcinolone with topical steroids or minoxidil or both. Primary care physicians can safely prescribe and institute these treatments. More advanced or refractory cases might require oral immunosuppressants, topical diphenylcyclopropenone, or topical anthralin. Eyelash loss can be treated with prostaglandin analogues. Those with extensive loss might choose camouflaging options or a hair prosthesis. It is important to monitor for psychiatric disorders owing to the profound psychological effects of hair loss. Conclusion Family physicians will encounter many patients experiencing hair loss. Recognition of AA and an understanding of the underlying disease process will allow an appropriate therapeutic regimen to be instituted. More advanced or refractory cases need to be identified, allowing for an appropriate dermatologist referral when necessary. PMID:26371098

  3. Bee Venom Promotes Hair Growth in Association with Inhibiting 5α-Reductase Expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Seeun; Erdogan, Sedef; Hwang, Dahyun; Hwang, Seonwook; Han, Eun Hye; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Alopecia is an important issue that can occur in people of all ages. Recent studies show that bee venom can be used to treat certain diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, neuralgia, and multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of bee venom on alopecia, which was measured by applying bee venom (0.001, 0.005, 0.01%) or minoxidil (2%) as a positive control to the dorsal skin of female C57BL/6 mice for 19 d. Growth factors responsible for hair growth were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis using mice skins and human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs). Bee venom promoted hair growth and inhibited transition from the anagen to catagen phase. In both anagen phase mice and dexamethasone-induced catagen phase mice, hair growth was increased dose dependently compared with controls. Bee venom inhibited the expression of SRD5A2, which encodes a type II 5α-reductase that plays a major role in the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, bee venom stimulated proliferation of hDPCs and several growth factors (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and 7) in bee venom-treated hDPCs dose dependently compared with the control group. In conclusion, bee venom is a potentially potent 5α-reductase inhibitor and hair growth promoter. PMID:27040904

  4. Direct Vasodilators and Sympatholytic Agents.

    PubMed

    McComb, Meghan N; Chao, James Y; Ng, Tien M H

    2016-01-01

    Direct vasodilators and sympatholytic agents were some of the first antihypertensive medications discovered and utilized in the past century. However, side effect profiles and the advent of newer antihypertensive drug classes have reduced the use of these agents in recent decades. Outcome data and large randomized trials supporting the efficacy of these medications are limited; however, in general the blood pressure-lowering effect of these agents has repeatedly been shown to be comparable to other more contemporary drug classes. Nevertheless, a landmark hypertension trial found a negative outcome with a doxazosin-based regimen compared to a chlorthalidone-based regimen, leading to the removal of α-1 adrenergic receptor blockers as first-line monotherapy from the hypertension guidelines. In contemporary practice, direct vasodilators and sympatholytic agents, particularly hydralazine and clonidine, are often utilized in refractory hypertension. Hydralazine and minoxidil may also be useful alternatives for patients with renal dysfunction, and both hydralazine and methyldopa are considered first line for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy. Hydralazine has also found widespread use for the treatment of systolic heart failure in combination with isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN). The data to support use of this combination in African Americans with heart failure are particularly robust. Hydralazine with ISDN may also serve as an alternative for patients with an intolerance to angiotensin antagonists. Given these niche indications, vasodilators and sympatholytics are still useful in clinical practice; therefore, it is prudent to understand the existing data regarding efficacy and the safe use of these medications. PMID:26033778

  5. Alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Perera, Eshini; Yip, Leona; Sinclair, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, non-scarring alopecia that usually presents as well-circumscribed patches of sudden hair loss and affects 0.1-0.2% of the population. The aetiology of AA is thought to be both genetic and autoimmune in nature. One hundred and thirty-nine single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to AA have been identified in 8 regions of the genome and have been found to be associated with T cells or the hair follicle. Furthermore, patients with AA have been found to have an increased frequency of hair follicle-specific auto-antibodies. The diagnosis of AA is usually made on clinical grounds, and further investigations are not usually needed. Intralesional corticosteroids remain the treatment of choice. Systemic steroids are also highly effective; however, side effects make them less desirable to both patients and physicians. Other available treatment options include anthralin, minoxidil, topical immunotherapy and systemic immunosuppressants. These treatments will be discussed in depth in this chapter. The morbidity of AA is largely psychological; therefore, the successful treatment of AA should include focusing on improving the psychological impact of this condition. PMID:26370645

  6. Effects of subfornical organ lesions on acutely induced thirst and salt appetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thunhorst, R. L.; Beltz, T. G.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the role of the subfornical organ (SFO) in stimulating thirst and salt appetite using two procedures that initiate water and sodium ingestion within 1-2 h of extracellular fluid depletion. The first procedure used injections of a diuretic (furosemide, 10 mg/kg sc) and a vasodilator (minoxidil, 1-3 mg/kg ia) to produce hypotension concurrently with hypovolemia. The resulting water and sodium intakes were inhibited by intravenous administration of ANG II receptor antagonist (sarthran, 8 micrograms . kg(-1). min(-1)) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (captopril, 2.5 mg/h). The second procedure used injections of furosemide (10 mg/kg sc) and a low dose of captopril (5 mg/kg sc) to initiate water and sodium ingestion upon formation of ANG II in the brain. Electrolytic lesions of the SFO greatly reduced the water intakes, and nearly abolished the sodium intakes, produced by these relatively acute treatments. These results contrast with earlier findings showing little effect of SFO lesions on sodium ingestion after longer-term extracellular fluid depletion.

  7. Human placental extract exerts hair growth-promoting effects through the GSK-3β signaling pathway in human dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Oh, Chang Taek; Choi, Eun Ja; Park, Hye Min; Han, Hae Jung; Ji, Hyi Jeong; Kim, Beom Joon

    2015-10-01

    Human placental extract (HPE) is widely used in Korea to relieve fatigue. However, its effects on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) remain unknown. In the present study, in an effort to develop novel therapies to promote hair growth, we screened HPE. We demonstrate that HPE has hair growth‑promoting activities and induces β‑catenin expression through the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase‑3β (GSK‑3β) by phosphorylation in hDPCs. Treatment with HPE significantly increased the viability of the hDPCs in a concentration‑dependent manner, as shown by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay. HPE also significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression levels. The increased β‑catenin levels and the inhibition of GSK‑3β (Ser9) by phosphorylation suggested that HPE promoted the hair-inductive capacity of hDPCs. We compared the effects of treatment with HPE alone and treatment with HPE in conjunction with minoxidil (MXD). We found that HPE plus MXD effectively inhibited GSK‑3β by phosphorylation (Ser9) in the hDPCs. Moreover, we demonstrated that HPE was effective in inducing root hair elongation in rat vibrissa hair follicles, and that treatment with HPE led to a delay in catagen progression. Overall, our findings suggest that HPE promotes hair growth and may thus provide the basis of a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical treatment of hair loss. PMID:26311045

  8. Prognosis and Management of Congenital Hair Shaft Disorders with Fragility-Part I.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gaurav; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-09-01

    Hair shaft disorders are characterized by congenital or acquired abnormalities of the hair shaft. The objective was to review the literature regarding the prognosis and treatment options of hair shaft disorders. We used keywords in the search engines PubMed and Medline to identify all publications in the English language related to the prognosis and management of hair shaft disorders. Data were extracted from 96 articles that met search criteria. Findings were limited to case reports and small case series, as no studies were found. Disorders that improve in childhood include pili torti, trichorrhexis invaginata, wooly hair, and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Others, such as trichorrhexis nodosa, monilethrix, pili annulati, and pili bifurcati improve with minoxidil. Oral retinoids have improved hair abnormalities in trichorrhexis invaginata and monilethrix. There is no specific treatment for congenital hair shaft abnormalities. Gentle hair care is the mainstay of care for hair shaft disorders associated with fragility. Practices for gentle care include no brushing, backcombing, chemical products, tight braids, heat exposure, or mechanical grooming. Any inherited or congenital disorder requires genetic counseling as part of management. PMID:27292719

  9. Prognosis and Management of Congenital Hair Shaft Disorders without Fragility-Part II.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gaurav; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-09-01

    Hair shaft disorders are characterized by congenital or acquired abnormalities of the hair shaft. The objective of this study was to review the literature regarding the prognosis and treatment options for hair shaft disorders. We used keywords in the search engines PubMed and Medline to identify all publications in English related to the prognosis and management of hair shaft disorders. Data were extracted from 96 articles that met search criteria. Findings were limited to case reports and small case series, as no studies were found. Disorders that improve in childhood include pili torti, trichorrhexis invaginata, woolly hair, and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Others, such as trichorrhexis nodosa, monilethrix, pili annulati, and pili bifurcati, improve with minoxidil. Oral retinoids have been found to improve hair abnormalities in trichorrhexis invaginata and monilethrix. There is no specific treatment for congenital hair shaft abnormalities. Gentle hair care is the mainstay of care for hair shaft disorders associated with fragility. Practices for gentle care include no brushing, backcombing, chemical products, tight braids, heat exposure, or mechanical grooming. Furthermore, any inherited or congenital disorder requires genetic counseling as part of management. PMID:27293153

  10. Normal and aging hair biology and structure 'aging and hair'.

    PubMed

    Goodier, Molly; Hordinsky, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Much like an individual's hairstyle, hair fibers along the scalp see a number of changes over the course of one's lifetime. As the decades pass, the shine and volume synonymous with youthful hair may give way to thin, dull, and brittle hair commonly associated with aging. These changes are a result of a compilation of genetic and environmental elements influencing the cells of the hair follicle, specifically the hair follicle stem cells and melanocytes. Telomere shortening, decrease in cell numbers, and particular transcription factors have all been implicated in this process. In turn, these molecular alterations lead to structural modifications of the hair fiber, decrease in melanin production, and lengthening of the telogen phase of the hair cycle. Despite this inevitable progression with aging, there exists an array of treatments such as light therapy, minoxidil, and finasteride which have been designed to mitigate the effects of aging, particularly balding and thinning hair. Although each works through a different mechanism, all aim to maintain or potentially restore the youthful quality of hair. PMID:26370639

  11. Mycophenolate-Induced Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khajuria, Bhavik; Khajuria, Mansi; Agrawal, Yashwant

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with diffuse anasarca and shortness of breath. Workup revealed a creatinine of 3.3 and a glomerular filtration rate of 17. The patient was also found to be pancytopenic with evidence of hemolytic anemia. A renal biopsy showed evidence of stage IV lupus nephritis with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her lupus was further classified as ANA negative and anti-dsDNA positive. Mycophenolate and triweekly hemodialysis were started along with a steroid burst of methylprednisolone 1 g for 3 days followed by prednisone 60 mg daily. Four days after discharge, the patient represented with a witnessed 3-minute seizure involving bowel incontinence, altered mental status, and tongue biting. She was given 2 mg intravenous lorazepam and loaded with 1000 mg levetiracetam for seizure prophylaxis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head revealed bilateral posterior hemispheric subcortical edema, and the diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was made. Mycophenolate was immediately discontinued and replaced with cyclophosphamide. Strict blood pressure control below 140/90 mm Hg was maintained initially with intravenous nicardipine drip and then transitioned to oral nifedipine, clonidine, losartan, and minoxidil. A repeat head magnetic resonance imaging 8 days later showed resolved subcortical edema consistent with the patient's improved mental status. No permanent neurologic sequelae were recorded as a result of this hospital episode. PMID:25933141

  12. Hair Growth-Promoting Effects of Lavender Oil in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boo Hyeong; Lee, Jae Soon; Kim, Young Chul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hair growth effects of lavender oil (LO) in female C57BL/6 mice. The experimental animals were divided into a normal group (N: saline), a vehicle control group (VC: jojoba oil), a positive control group (PC: 3% minoxidil), experimental group 1 (E1: 3% LO), and experimental group 2 (E2: 5% LO). Test compound solutions were topically applied to the backs of the mice (100 μL per application), once per day, 5 times a week, for 4 weeks. The changes in hair follicle number, dermal thickness, and hair follicle depth were observed in skin tissues stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and the number of mast cells was measured in the dermal and hypodermal layers stained with toluidine blue. PC, E1, and E2 groups showed a significantly increased number of hair follicles, deepened hair follicle depth, and thickened dermal layer, along with a significantly decreased number of mast cells compared to the N group. These results indicated that LO has a marked hair growth-promoting effect, as observed morphologically and histologically. There was no significant difference in the weight of the thymus among the groups. However, both absolute and relative weights of the spleen were significantly higher in the PC group than in the N, VC, E1, or E2 group at week 4. Thus, LO could be practically applied as a hair growth-promoting agent. PMID:27123160

  13. Androgenetic alopecia in women.

    PubMed

    Price, Vera H

    2003-06-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA), also known in women as female pattern hair loss, is caused by androgens in genetically susceptible women and men. The thinning begins between ages 12 and 40 years, the inheritance pattern is polygenic, and the incidence is the same as in men. In susceptible hair follicles, dihydrotestosterone binds to the androgen receptor, and the hormone-receptor complex activates the genes responsible for the gradual transformation of large terminal follicles to miniaturized follicles. Both young women and young men with AGA have higher levels of 5alpha reductase and androgen receptor in frontal hair follicles compared to occipital follicles. At the same time, young women have much higher levels of cytochrome p-450 aromatase in frontal follicles than men who have minimal aromatase, and women have even higher aromatase levels in occipital follicles. The diagnosis of AGA in women is supported by early age of onset, the pattern of increased thinning over the frontal/parietal scalp with greater density over the occipital scalp, retention of the frontal hairline, and the presence of miniaturized hairs. Most women with AGA have normal menses and pregnancies. Extensive hormonal testing is usually not needed unless symptoms and signs of androgen excess are present such as hirsutism, severe unresponsive cystic acne, virilization, or galactorrhea. Topical minoxidil solution is the only drug available for promoting hair growth in women with AGA. Efficacy has been shown in double-blind studies using hair counts and hair weight. PMID:12894991

  14. Causes of hair loss and the developments in hair rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Rushton, D H; Norris, M J; Dover, R; Busuttil, Nina

    2002-02-01

    Hair is considered to be a major component of an individual's general appearance. The psychological impact of hair loss results in a measurably detrimental change in self-esteem and is associated with images of reduced worth. It is not surprising that both men and women find hair loss a stressful experience. Genetic hair loss is the major problem affecting men and by the age of 50, up to 50% will be affected. Initial attempts to regenerate the lost hair have centred on applying a topical solution of between 2% to 5% minoxidil; however, the results proved disappointing. Recently, finasteride, a type II 5alpha reductase inhibitor has been found to regrow a noticeable amount of hair in about 40% of balding men. Further developments in treatments have lead to the use of a dual type I and type II inhibitor where 90% of those treated regrow a noticeable amount of hair. In women the major cause of hair loss before the age of 50 is nutritional, with 30% affected. Increased and persistent hair shedding (chronic telogen effluvium) and reduced hair volume are the principle changes occurring. The main cause appears to be depleted iron stores, compromised by a suboptimal intake of the essential amino acid l-lysine. Correction of these imbalances stops the excessive hair loss and returns the hair back to its former glory. However, it can take many months to redress the situation. PMID:18498491

  15. Hair Growth Promoting Potential of Phospholipids Purified from Porcine Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  16. Ethosomes: new prospects in transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Godin, Biana; Touitou, Elka

    2003-01-01

    Ethosomes are noninvasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. Although ethosomal systems are conceptually sophisticated, they are characterized by simplicity in their preparation, safety, and efficacy--a combination that can highly expand their application. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles tailored for enhanced delivery of active agents. This article reviews work carried out in vitro, in vivo, in animal models, and in humans with various ethosomal systems incorporating a wide range of drugs. Because of their unique structure, ethosomes are able to encapsulate and deliver through the skin highly lipophilic molecules such as cannabinoids, testosterone, and minoxidil, as well as cationic drugs such as propranolol and trihexyphenidil. Results obtained in a double-blind two-armed randomized clinical study showed that treatment with the ethosomal acyclovir formulation significantly improved all the evaluated parameters. Preliminary studies with plasmids and insulin revealed that the ethosomal carrier may be used for enhanced delivery of these agents. In further work, the ethosomal technology was broadened to introduce agents into cultured cells and microorganisms. Enhanced delivery of bioactive molecules through the skin and cellular membranes by means of an ethosomal carrier opens numerous challenges and opportunities for the research and future development of novel improved therapies. PMID:12911264

  17. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications - minoxidil and finasteride - are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. PMID:24039457

  18. Pilot Study of 15 Patients Receiving a New Treatment Regimen for Androgenic Alopecia: The Effects of Atopy on AGA.

    PubMed

    Rafi, A W; Katz, R M

    2011-01-01

    Background. We examined the efficacy of a new regimen to treat AGA, with attention to male patients who are atopic. Objective. To assess the efficacy of a four-part regimen for the treatment of AGA in atopic and nonatopic patients. NuH Hair is a novel topical combination of finasteride, dutasteride, and minoxidil, which is blended in a hypoallergenic lotion. The other three components included Rogaine foam, Propecia, and ketoconazole shampoo. Methods. A prospective pilot study was conducted in 15 patients. All patients were assessed for the presence of atopy. Each patient served as their own control. All patients were treated specifically with NuH Hair and were given the option to add any of the other components of the protocol to their regimen. Photographs were taken of each patient's scalp at months 0, 1, 3, 6, and 9. Results. All 15 patients demonstrated significant growth of hair. In those patients who utilized all 4 components, significant growth was achieved in as little as 30 days. In those patients who choose only to utilize NuH Hair, significant growth was demonstrated after 3 months. Conclusion. Aggressively treating AGA achieves significant and rapid growth of new hair. This is effective in atopic and nonatopic male patients. PMID:22363845

  19. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Miteva, Mariya

    2016-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is the most common scarring alopecia among African American women. Data about epidemiology, etiology, genetic inheritance, and management are scarce and come from individual reports or small series. CCCA has been associated with hot combing and traumatic hair styling for years; however, studies fail to confirm it as the sole etiologic factor. It has been shown in a small series that CCCA can be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, with a partial penetrance and a strong modifying effect of hairstyling and sex. CCCA presents clinically as a central area of progressive irreversible hair loss that expands to the periphery. A patchy form has also been described. Dermoscopy is helpful to identify the optimal site for the biopsy, which establishes the diagnosis. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to discover the optimal management. At this point, patients are advised to avoid traction and chemical treatments; topical and intralesional steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and minoxidil can be helpful in halting the progression. PMID:27574457

  20. UTILITY OF DERMOSCOPY IN ALOPECIA AREATA

    PubMed Central

    Mane, Mandar; Nath, Amiya Kumar; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Alopecia areata (AA) shows several well-defined dermoscopic features which may help in confirming diagnosis in AA. Aims: We carried out a study to examine the dermoscopic features of AA and develop a protocol for diagnosis of AA by dermoscopy. Materials and Methods: Dermoscopy was performed in 66 patients with AA. Hanse HVS-500NP dermoscope (magnification of ×32 and ×140) was used. Results: The mean age of the patients (46 males and 20 females) was 26.85 years. The mean age of onset was 25.15 years. The mean duration of alopecia was 10.3 months. Most common AA in our study was patchy type (57/66, 87.7%). Single patch was seen in 24 patients and multiple patches in 33 patients. Diffuse AA was seen in five patients. Ophiasis and alopecia universalis were seen in two patients each. Nail changes were fine pitting (4), ridging (2), thinning of nail plate (2). Twenty nail dystrophy, distal onycholysis, striate leukonychia and coarse pitting were seen in one patient each. Intralesional triamcinolone acetonide was the most common therapy offered. Others were oral betamethasone minipulse therapy, dexamethasone pulse, minoxidil, anthralin and corticosteroids. The most common dermoscopic finding was yellow dots seen in 54 patients (81.8%), followed by black dots (44 patients, 66.6%), broken hairs (36 patients, 55.4%), short vellus hair (27 patients, 40.9%) and tapering hairs (8 patients, 12.1%). Conclusions: The most common dermoscopic finding of AA in our study was yellow dots, followed by black dots, broken hairs, short vellus hair and tapering hairs. Dermoscopic findings were not affected by the type of AA or the severity of the disease. PMID:21965849

  1. Regulation of lysyl oxidase mRNA in dermal fibroblasts from normal donors and patients with inherited connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Yeowell, H N; Marshall, M K; Walker, L C; Ha, V; Pinnell, S R

    1994-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) is an extracellular copper-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the initial reaction in the formation of lysine or hydroxylysine-derived crosslinks during collagen biosynthesis. We have isolated a cDNA for human LO from skin fibroblast poly(A+)RNA by PCR using primers based on the recently published sequence of human LO. This cDNA probe detects a major mRNA of 4.2 kb on Northern blots of RNA from normal fibroblasts. The level of LO mRNA was not significantly affected by cell density or by ascorbate treatment. Treatment of skin fibroblasts with hydralazine (50 microM), which increases the mRNAs for both the alpha and the beta subunits of prolyl hydroxylase (PH) and the mRNAs for lysyl hydroxylase, also increased LO mRNA by fourfold over a 72-h time course. In contrast, hydralazine dramatically decreased the mRNAs for alpha 1(I) collagen. Administration of minoxidil (500 microM), which specifically decreases LH activity without affecting PH activity or collagen biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts, stimulated the level of LO mRNA. Neither the administration of penicillamine (100 microM), which interferes with collagen cross-linking, nor the administration of beta-aminopropionitrile, which is a strong irreversible inhibitor of LO, to fibroblasts significantly changed the levels of LO mRNA over a 72-h time course. However, bleomycin (0.6 microgram/ml) significantly decreased the 4.2-kb LO mRNA in contrast to the levels of the alpha 1(I) collagen mRNAs, which were unchanged. No significant change was observed in the steady-state levels of LO mRNAs in fibroblasts isolated from patients with certain connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Menkes disease, cutis laxa, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. PMID:7508709

  2. Lack of manifestations of diazoxide/5-hydroxydecanoate-sensitive KATP channel in rat brain nonsynaptosomal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Shalbuyeva, Natalia; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacological modulation of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel (mitoKATP) sensitive to diazoxide and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) represents an attractive strategy to protect cells against ischaemia/reperfusion- and stroke-related injury. To re-evaluate a functional role for the mitoKATP in brain, we used Percoll-gradient-purified brain nonsynaptosomal mitochondria in a light absorbance assay, in radioisotope measurements of matrix volume, and in measurements of respiration, membrane potential (ΔΨ) and depolarization-induced K+ efflux. The changes in mitochondrial morphology were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Polyclonal antibodies raised against certain fragments of known sulphonylurea receptor subunits, SUR1 and SUR2, and against different epitopes of K+ inward rectifier subunits Kir 6.1 and Kir 6.2 of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel of the plasma membrane (cellKATP), were employed to detect similar subunits in brain mitochondria. A variety of plausible blockers (ATP, 5-hydroxydecanoate, glibenclamide, tetraphenylphosphonium cation) and openers (diazoxide, pinacidil, chromakalim, minoxidil, testosterone) of the putative mitoKATP were applied to show the role of the channel in regulating matrix volume, respiration, and ΔΨ and K+ fluxes across the inner mitochondrial membrane. None of the pharmacological agents applied to brain mitochondria in the various assays pinpointed processes that could be unequivocally associated with mitoKATP activity. In addition, immunoblotting analysis did not provide explicit evidence for the presence of the mitoKATP, similar to the cellKATP, in brain mitochondria. On the other hand, the depolarization-evoked release of K+ suppressed by ATP could be re-activated by carboxyatractyloside, an inhibitor of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT). Moreover, bongkrekic acid, another inhibitor of the ANT, inhibited K+ efflux similarly to ATP. These observations implicate the ANT in ATP-sensitive K+ transport in

  3. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Singal, Archana; Sonthalia, Sidharth; Verma, Prashant

    2013-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common cause of hair loss in women characterized by diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. Its prevalence increases with advancing age and is associated with significant psychological morbidity. The pathophysiology of FPHL is still not completely understood and seems to be multifactorial. Although androgens have been implicated, the involvement of androgen-independent mechanisms is evident from frequent lack of clinical or biochemical markers of hyperandrogenism in affected women. The role of genetic polymorphisms involving the androgen and estrogen receptors is being increasingly recognized in its causation and predicting treatment response to anti-androgens. There are different clinical patterns and classifications of FPHL, knowledge of which facilitates patient management and research. Chronic telogen effluvium remains as the most important differential diagnosis. Thorough history, clinical examination, and evaluation are essential to confirm diagnosis. Patients with clinical signs of androgen excess require assessment of biochemical parameters and imaging studies. It is prudent to screen the patients for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. The treatment comprises medical and/or surgical modalities. Medical treatment should be initiated early as it effectively arrests hair loss progression rather than stimulating regrowth. Minoxidil continues to be the first line therapy whereas anti-androgens form the second line of treatment. The progressive nature of FPHL mandates long-term treatment for sustained effect. Medical therapy may be supplemented with cosmetic concealment in those desirous of greater hair density. Surgery may be worthwhile in some carefully selected patients. PMID:23974580

  4. Erbium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser irradiation ameliorates skin permeation and follicular delivery of antialopecia drugs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-11-01

    Alopecia usually cannot be cured because of the available drug therapy being unsatisfactory. To improve the efficiency of treatment, erbium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er-YAG) laser treatment was conducted to facilitate skin permeation of antialopecia drugs such as minoxidil (MXD), diphencyprone (DPCP), and peptide. In vitro and in vivo percutaneous absorption experiments were carried out by using nude mouse skin and porcine skin as permeation barriers. Fluorescence and confocal microscopies were used to visualize distribution of permeants within the skin. Laser ablation at a depth of 6 and 10 μm enhanced MXD skin accumulation twofold to ninefold depending on the skin barriers selected. DPCP absorption showed less enhancement by laser irradiation as compared with MXD. An ablation depth of 10 μm could increase the peptide flux from zero to 4.99 and 0.33 μg cm(-2) h(-1) for nude mouse skin and porcine skin, respectively. The laser treatment also promoted drug uptake in the hair follicles, with DPCP demonstrating the greatest enhancement (sixfold compared with the control). The imaging of skin examined by microscopies provided evidence of follicular and intercellular delivery assisted by the Er-YAG laser. Besides the ablative effect of removing the stratum corneum, the laser may interact with sebum to break up the barrier function, increasing the skin delivery of antialopecia drugs. The minimally invasive, well-controlled approach of laser-mediated drug permeation offers a potential way to treat alopecia. This study's findings provide the basis for the first report on laser-assisted delivery of antialopecia drugs. PMID:25187109

  5. The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Khidhir, Karzan G.; Woodward, David F.; Farjo, Nilofer P.; Farjo, Bessam K.; Tang, Elaine S.; Wang, Jenny W.; Picksley, Steven M.; Randall, Valerie A.

    2013-01-01

    Balding causes widespread psychological distress but is poorly controlled. The commonest treatment, minoxidil, was originally an antihypertensive drug that promoted unwanted hair. We hypothesized that another serendipitous discovery, increased eyelash growth side-effects of prostamide F2α-related eyedrops for glaucoma, may be relevant for scalp alopecias. Eyelash hairs and follicles are highly specialized and remain unaffected by androgens that inhibit scalp follicles and stimulate many others. Therefore, we investigated whether non-eyelash follicles could respond to bimatoprost, a prostamide F2α analog recently licensed for eyelash hypotrichosis. Bimatoprost, at pharmacologically selective concentrations, increased hair synthesis in scalp follicle organ culture and advanced mouse pelage hair regrowth in vivo compared to vehicle alone. A prostamide receptor antagonist blocked isolated follicle growth, confirming a direct, receptor-mediated mechanism within follicles; RT-PCR analysis identified 3 relevant receptor genes in scalp follicles in vivo. Receptors were located in the key follicle regulator, the dermal papilla, by analyzing individual follicular structures and immunohistochemistry. Thus, bimatoprost stimulates human scalp follicles in culture and rodent pelage follicles in vivo, mirroring eyelash behavior, and scalp follicles contain bimatoprost-sensitive prostamide receptors in vivo. This highlights a new follicular signaling system and confirms that bimatoprost offers a novel, low-risk therapeutic approach for scalp alopecias.—Khidhir, K. G., Woodward, D. F., Farjo, N. P., Farjo, B. K., Tang, E. S., Wang, J. W., Picksley, S. M., and Randall, V. A. The prostamide-related glaucoma therapy, bimatoprost, offers a novel approach for treating scalp alopecias. PMID:23104985

  6. Oral Finasteride Presents With Sexual-Unrelated Withdrawal in Long-Term Treated Androgenic Alopecia in Men.

    PubMed

    Perez-Mora, Nicolas; Velasco, Carlos; Bermüdez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Side effects associated with oral finasteride (FT) (1 mg/d) and topical 5% minoxidil (M5) have been previously described. The authors have evaluated long-term adverse effects and causes of long-term therapy withdrawal in patients with androgenic alopecia (AGA) treated with M5+FT vs M5 without FT. A total of 130 AGA patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up volunteered to complete a questionnaire on side effects. Patients' responses were classified as "never," "rarely," "sometimes," "often," and "all the time." An adverse effect was considered in the presence of an "often" or "all the time" response. A total of 100 patients received combined M5+FT and were compared with 30 patients receiving single-therapy M5 according to the physician's clinical criteria. Erectile dysfunction (3%), diminished libido (4%), and reduced ejaculation (7%) were present in patients taking M5+FT but were absent in patients taking M5. Only 1 of 100 patients taking M5+FT quit long-term therapy due to sexual adverse effects (diminished libido). The main causes for therapy withdrawal in the FT group were lack of positive results in 11% and in the M5 group side effects in 4% (P < .02). Increased body hair was different between groups: with 6.6% in the M5 group and 4% in the M5+FT group (P < .03). FT demonstrates sexual-unrelated reasons as the main cause of therapy withdrawal in long-term treated AGA patients. PMID:26380503

  7. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  8. Natriuretic Peptides as Cardiovascular Safety Biomarkers in Rats: Comparison With Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Heart Weight.

    PubMed

    Engle, Steven K; Watson, David E

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is an important cause of failure during drug development. Blood-based biomarkers can be used to detect CV toxicity during preclinical development and prioritize compounds at lower risk of causing such toxicities. Evidence of myocardial degeneration can be detected by measuring concentrations of biomarkers such as cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase in blood; however, detection of functional changes in the CV system, such as blood pressure, generally requires studies in animals with surgically implanted pressure transducers. This is a significant limitation because sustained changes in blood pressure are often accompanied by changes in heart rate and together can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial degeneration in animals, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in humans. Increased concentrations of NPs in blood correlate with higher risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and MACE in humans. Their utility as biomarkers of CV function and toxicity in rodents was investigated by exploring the relationships between plasma concentrations of NTproANP and NTproBNP, blood pressure, heart rate, and heart weight in Sprague Dawley rats administered compounds that caused hypotension or hypertension, including nifedipine, fluprostenol, minoxidil, L-NAME, L-thyroxine, or sunitinib for 1-2 weeks. Changes in NTproANP and/or NTproBNP concentrations were inversely correlated with changes in blood pressure. NTproANP and NTproBNP concentrations were inconsistently correlated with relative heart weights. In addition, increased heart rate was associated with increased heart weights. These studies support the use of natriuretic peptides and heart rate to detect changes in blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in short-duration rat studies. PMID:26609138

  9. Action Mechanism of Chamaecyparis obtusa Oil on Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Ok; Kim, Su-Eun; Kim, Young-Chul

    2013-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the action mechanism of Chamaecyparis obtusa oil (CO) on hair growth in C57BL/6 mice. For alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) activities in the skin tissue, at week 4, the 3% minoxidil (MXD) and 3% CO treatment groups showed an ALP activity that was significantly higher by 85% (p < 0.001) and 48% (p < 0.05) and an γ-GT activity that was significantly higher by 294% (p < 0.01) and 254% (p < 0.05) respectively, as compared to the saline (SA) treatment group. For insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression in the skin tissue, at week 4, the MXD and CO groups showed a significantly higher expression by 204% (p < 0.05) and 426% (p < 0.01) respectively, as compared to the SA group. At week 4, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in the MXD and CO groups showed a significantly higher expression by 74% and 96% (p < 0.05) respectively, however, epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in the MXD and CO groups showed a significantly lower expression by 66% and 61% (p < 0.05) respectively, as compared to the SA group. Stem cell factor (SCF) expression in the MXD and CO groups was observed by immunohistochemistry as significant in a part of the bulge around the hair follicle and in a part of the basal layer of the epidermis. Taking all the results together, on the basis of effects on ALP and γ-GT activity, and the expression of IGF-1, VEGF and SCF, which are related to the promotion of hair growth, it can be concluded that CO induced a proliferation and division of hair follicle cells and maintained the anagen phase. Because EGF expression was decreased significantly, CO could delay the transition to the catagen phase. PMID:24578794

  10. Hair restoration approaches for early onset male androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Hammad A; Basra, Mohammad K A; Patel, Girish K

    2013-09-01

    Society places great emphasis on the presence of hair. Some degree of hair loss is accepted as a normal part of the aging process, in line with the observation that more than 50% of men will develop androgenetic alopecia by the age of 50 years. However, it is possible to understand the psychosocial isolation and distress felt by men with a strong familial predisposition to androgenetic alopecia, who tend to display hair loss in their late teens or twenties. There are currently two drugs which have been licensed for the treatment of male androgenetic alopecia: oral finasteride and topical minoxidil solution which are effective to some extent. Furthermore, upon discontinuing treatment, any gain that has been achieved is quickly lost. Added to which there is an entire market of unproven over the counter products: advertised in the electronic media, local hair salons, and various departmental stores. In this review, we highlight the important advances in the management of male androgenetic alopecia with emphasis on approaches that can lead to more successful and long-term hair restoration for young adults. In particular, we discuss the evidence supporting the use of the follicular unit grafting technique in conjunction with medical treatment before and after the procedure. Moreover, some other alterations of this most popular state of the art hair restoration technique have been mentioned briefly. As a result, patients and physicians seem equally satisfied from this procedure for its naturally looking results which are cosmetically more acceptable and esthetically pleasing for longer period of time. PMID:23992164

  11. Hypernatremia-induced vasopressin secretion is not altered in TRPV1-/- rats.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Andrew Blake; Stocker, Sean D

    2016-09-01

    Changes in osmolality or extracellular NaCl concentrations are detected by specialized neurons in the hypothalamus to increase vasopressin (VP) and stimulate thirst. Recent in vitro evidence suggests this process is mediated by an NH2-terminal variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expressed by osmosensitive neurons of the lamina terminalis and vasopressinergic neurons of the supraoptic nucleus. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by analysis of plasma VP levels during acute hypernatremia in awake control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. TRPV1(-/-) rats were produced by a Zinc-finger-nuclease 2-bp deletion in exon 13. Intravenous injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hypotension and bradycardia in control rats, but this response was absent in TRPV1(-/-) rats. Infusion of 2 M NaCl (1 ml/h iv) increased plasma osmolality, electrolytes, and VP levels in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. However, plasma VP levels did not differ between strains at any time. Furthermore, a linear regression between plasma VP versus osmolality revealed a significant correlation in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats, but the slope of the regression lines was not attenuated in TRPV1(-/-) versus control rats. Hypotension produced by intravenous injection of minoxidil decreased blood pressure and increased plasma VP levels similarly in both groups. Finally, both treatments stimulated thirst; however, cumulative water intakes in response to hypernatremia or hypotension were not different between control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. These findings suggest that TRPV1 channels are not necessary for VP secretion and thirst stimulated by hypernatremia. PMID:27335281

  12. Evaluation of Perifollicular Inflammation of Donor Area during Hair Transplantation in Androgenetic Alopecia and its Comparison with Controls

    PubMed Central

    Nirmal, Balakrishnan; Somiah, Savitha; Sacchidanand, Sarvajnamurthy A; Biligi, Dayananda S; Palo, Seetu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mild perifollicular inflammation is seen in both androgenetic alopecia (AGA) cases and normal controls, whereas moderate or dense inflammation with concentric layers of collagen, is seen in AGA cases but only in very few normal controls, and may lessen the response to topical minoxidil. Moderate or dense lymphocytic inflammation and perifollicular fibrosis have poor hair growth following transplantation. Aim: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the perifollicular lymphocytic inflammation and fibrosis in AGA patients during follicular unit hair transplantation (FUT) and its comparison in normal controls. Materials and Methods: A total of 21 male patients with AGA and 7 matched controls participated in the study. Histopathological analysis of biopsy specimens from donor strip of patients during the hair transplantation and two 4 mm punch biopsies on controls were performed. Morphometric analysis was performed and perifollicular fibrosis was scored based on the width of the condensed collagen at the lower infundibulum and isthmus from 0 to 3. Perifollicular infiltrate was also scored 0-3 and a total score of 3 or more out of 6 was considered significant. Results: Nearly 76% of AGA patients had perifollicular fibrosis more than 50 μm at ×200 magnification. Almost 33.33% patients had moderate/dense perifollicular lymphocytic infiltrate whereas none of the controls had it. Total score in AGA cases was significantly higher than controls (P = 0.012) using Chi-square test. Out of 21 patients, 13 had a score of 3 or more and were followed-up with monthly treatment with intralesional steroids using a dermaroller. Conclusion: Histopathological evaluation of the donor area is a must during hair transplantation to evaluate the extent of perifollicular inflammation and achieve better results by following it up with treatment directed to decrease the inflammation. PMID:24403768

  13. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre les schémas thérapeutiques et les résultats des traitements pour la pelade par plaques, de même que les aider à identifier les patients pour qui une demande de consultation en dermatologie pourrait s’imposer. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant le traitement de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte pileuse qui touche à la fois les enfants et les adultes. Même s’il n’y a pas de mortalité associée à la maladie, la morbidité découlant des effets psychologiques de la perte des cheveux peut être dévastatrice. Lorsque la pelade par plaques et le sous-type de la maladie sont identifiés, un schéma thérapeutique approprié peut être amorcé pour aider à arrêter la chute des cheveux et possiblement faire commencer la repousse. Les traitements de première intention sont la triamcinolone intralésionnelle avec des corticostéroïdes topiques ou du minoxidil ou les 2. Les médecins de famille peuvent prescrire ces traitements en toute sécurité et amorcer ces thérapies. Les cas plus avancés ou réfractaires pourraient avoir besoin de diphénylcyclopropénone topique ou d’anthraline topique. On peut traiter la perte de cils avec des analogues de la prostaglandine. Les personnes ayant subi une perte de cheveux abondante peuvent recourir à des options de camouflage ou à des prothèses capillaires. Il est important de surveiller les troubles psychiatriques en raison des effets psychologiques profonds de la perte de cheveux. Conclusion Les médecins de famille verront de nombreux patients qui perdent leurs cheveux. La reconnaissance de la pelade par plaques et la compréhension du processus pathologique sous-jacent permettent d’amorcer un schéma thérapeutique approprié. Les cas plus graves ou r

  14. An observational Study of the Association between Androgenetic Alopecia and Size of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ramsamy, Kanagaraj; Subramaniyan, Radhakrishnan; Patra, Anjan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is characterized by miniaturization of the hair follicle, leading to vellus transformation of the terminal hair follicle. It is caused by interactions between androgens, several genes, and environmental factors with hair follicles. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is highly prevalent among elderly men but infrequent in those younger than 40 years. Because both entities share a common pathogenesis and AGA manifests before the onset of BPH, there could be an association between AGA and BPH. Aim: To study the possible association between AGA and the size of prostate. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five consecutive male patients, 35–65 years of age with AGA of Hamilton–Norwood classification Grades 3–7, were included in the study. AGA of Grades 1 and 2 patients on treatment with minoxidil, finasteride, or other treatments for AGA with history of prostate cancer or prostate disease were excluded from the study. Prostate size was measured through transabdominal ultrasonography. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS software. Results: Of the 65 AGA patients, the mean age was 47.18 years. Grade 4 AGA was the most common grade seen in 19 patients (29.2%), out of which, most (47.4%) were in the 56–65 years age group. 52.3% patients had normal prostate volume, and 47.7% had an enlarged prostate. The percentage of patients with the normal and enlarged prostate in moderate Grade 3 AGA was 68.8% and 31.2%, and in severe Grade 6 AGA, it was 33.3% and 66.7%, respectively. Prostate enlargement was more likely to occur in severe AGA than in moderate AGA(odds ratio 3.311; P = 0.025, which is significant). Conclusion: This study revealed an increase in prostate size with increasing age, with higher prevalence of Grade 1 prostate enlargement in younger individuals, and with higher prevalence of Grade 3 prostate enlargement in elderly men. The study also found a positive correlation between AGA and prostate size, with higher grades of

  15. Adverse Reaction to Cetuximab, an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Štulhofer Buzina, Daška; Martinac, Ivana; Ledić Drvar, Daniela; Čeović, Romana; Bilić, Ivan; Marinović, Branka

    2016-04-01

    with dry, scaly, itchy skin (Figure 2). Furthermore, hair and nail changes gradually developed, culminating with trichomegaly (Figure 3) and paronychia (Figure 4). The patient was treated with oral antibiotics (tetracycline) and a combination of topical steroids with moisturizing emollients due to xerosis, without reduction of EGFRI therapy and with a very good response. Trichomegaly was regularly sniped with scissors. Nail fungal infection was ruled out by native examination and cultivation, so antiseptics and corticosteroid ointments were introduced for paronychia treatment. During the above-mentioned therapy, apart from skin manifestations, iatrogenic neutropenia grade IV occurred, with one febrile episode, and because of this, the dose of cytostatic drugs was reduced. After 10 months of therapy, progression of the disease occurred with lung metastases, so EGFRI therapy was discontinued and the patient was given second-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal carcinoma. This led to gradual resolution of all aforementioned cutaneous manifestations. Since the pathogenesis of skin side-effects due to EGFRI is not yet fully understood, there are no strict therapy protocols. Therapy is mainly based on clinical experience and follows the standard treatments for acne, rosacea, xerosis, paronychia, and effluvium. The therapeutic approach for papulopustular exanthema includes topical and systemic antibiotics for their antimicrobial as well as anti-inflammatory effect, sometimes in combination with topical steroids. Topical application of urea cream with K1 vitamin yielded positive results in skin-changes prevention during EGFRI therapy, especially with xerosis, eczema, and pruritus (6). Hair alterations in the form of effluvium are usually tolerable, and if needed a 2% minoxidil solution may be applied. Trichomegaly or abnormal eyelash growth can lead to serious complications, so ophthalmologic examination is needed. At the beginning of the growth, regular lash clipping

  16. Hair loss in women.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Martínez, Francisco M

    2009-03-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a clinical problem that is becoming more common in women. Female alopecia with androgen increase is called female androgenetic alopecia (FAGA) and without androgen increase is called female pattern hair loss. The clinical picture of typical FAGA begins with a specific "diffuse loss of hair from the parietal or frontovertical areas with an intact frontal hairline." Ludwig called this process "rarefaction." In Ludwig's classification of hair loss in women, progressive type of FAGA, 3 patterns were described: grade I or minimal, grade II or moderate, and grade III or severe. Ludwig also described female androgenetic alopecia with male pattern (FAGA.M) that should be subclassified according to Ebling's or Hamilton-Norwood's classification. FAGA.M may be present in 4 conditions: persistent adrenarche syndrome, alopecia caused by an adrenal or an ovarian tumor, posthysterectomy, and as an involutive alopecia. A more recent classification (Olsen's classification of FPHL) proposes 2 types: early- and late-onset with or without excess of androgens in each. The diagnosis of FPHL is made by clinical history, clinical examination, wash test, dermoscopy, trichoscan, trichograms and laboratory test, especially androgenic determinations. Topical treatment of FPHL is with minoxidil, 2-5% twice daily. When FPHL is associated with high levels of androgens, systemic antiandrogenic therapy is needed. Persistent adrenarche syndrome (adrenal SAHA) and alopecia of adrenal hyperandrogenism is treated with adrenal suppression and antiandrogens. Adrenal suppression is achieved with glucocorticosteroids. Antiandrogens therapy includes cyproterone acetate, drospirenone, spironolactone, flutamide, and finasteride. Excess release of ovarian androgens (ovarian SAHA) and alopecia of ovarian hyperandrogenism is treated with ovarian suppression and antiandrogens. Ovarian suppression includes the use of contraceptives containing an estrogen, ethinylestradiol, and a