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Sample records for mir-124 regulates adult

  1. Epigenetic regulation of MIR-124 under ethanol dependence and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Mizuo, Keisuke; Katada, Ryuichi; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Tateda, Kenji; Watanabe, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Withdrawal from chronic alcohol cause the persistent molecular alteration, such as changes in the release of neurotransmitter and gene expression. The alterations are thought to increase in the risk of relapse. Recent studies suggest that the gene expression regulated by histone acetylation may play an important role in the dependence of abused drugs, including of ethanol. Furthermore, miRNA, another regulator of gene expression, are also important molecules for the dependence. However, changes in the molecules under ethanol withdrawal and its relationship are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the expression of acetylated histone H3 and miR-124 in mouse brain at 3 days after ethanol withdrawal. 6-Week ages of C57BL/6J mice were treated with liquid diet containing ethanol for 10 days. Using the escalating ethanol dosage schedule, the mice were fed the ethanol diet as follows: 1st day: 1 w/v%: 2nd and 3rd day: 3 w/v%; 4th and 5th day: 4 w/v% and from the 6th to 10th day: 5 w/v% ethanol diet, respectively. The pair-fed control mice were given the same volume of ethanol-free liquid diet with glucose substituted in isocaloric quantities for ethanol. After feeding alcohol liquid diet, the mice showed severe withdrawal signs. The expression of acetylated histone H3 was significantly decreased in limbic forebrain at 3 days after withdrawal. We found that miR-124 also decreased in the limbic forebrain. It has been reported that Cdc42 regulates neuronal development as a target of miR-124. We found that Cdc42 protein markedly increased in both brain regions at 3 days after withdrawal. Our findings suggest that changes in the expression of miR-124 via histone acetylation leads to change the Cdc42 expression under ethanol withdrawal.

  2. miR-124 Regulates Diverse Aspects of Rhythmic Behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Garaulet, Daniel L.; Sun, Kailiang; Li, Wanhe; Wen, Jiayu; Panzarino, Alexandra M.; O'Neil, Jenna L.; Hiesinger, P. Robin; Young, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks enable organisms to anticipate and adapt to fluctuating environmental conditions. Despite substantial knowledge of central clock machineries, we have less understanding of how the central clock's behavioral outputs are regulated. Here, we identify Drosophila miR-124 as a critical regulator of diurnal activity. During normal light/dark cycles, mir-124 mutants exhibit profoundly abnormal locomotor activity profiles, including loss of anticipatory capacities at morning and evening transitions. Moreover, mir-124 mutants exhibited striking behavioral alterations in constant darkness (DD), including a temporal advance in peak activity. Nevertheless, anatomical and functional tests demonstrate a normal circadian pacemaker in mir-124 mutants, indicating this miRNA regulates clock output. Among the extensive miR-124 target network, heterozygosity for targets in the BMP pathway substantially corrected the evening activity phase shift in DD. Thus, excess BMP signaling drives specific circadian behavioral output defects in mir-124 knock-outs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Circadian clocks control rhythmic behaviors of most life-forms. Despite extensive knowledge of the central clock, there is less understanding of how its behavioral outputs are regulated. Here, we identify a conserved neural microRNA as a critical regulator of diurnal behavior. We find Drosophila mir-124 mutants exhibit robust activity abnormalities during normal light/dark cycles and during constant darkness. Nevertheless, as the central pacemaker is functional in these mutants, miR-124 regulates clock output. We provide mechanistic insight by showing deregulation of miR-124 targets in BMP signaling drives specific mir-124 defects. In summary, Drosophila mir-124 mutants reveal post-transcriptional control of circadian activities, and impact of BMP signaling in behavioral output. PMID:27013671

  3. miR-124-regulated RhoG

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Stefan; Franke, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    RhoG is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases sharing highest sequence similarity with Rac and Cdc42. Mig-2 and Mtl represent the functional equivalents of RhoG in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, respectively. RhoG has attracted great interest because it plays a central role in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization in various physiological and pathophysiological situations. For example, it is fundamental to phagocytotic processes, is able to regulate gene expression, cell survival and proliferation, and is involved in cell migration and in the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. The activation of Rac1 via an ELMO/Dock180 module has been elaborated to be important for RhoG signaling. Although a stimulatory role for neurite outgrowth in the pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line has been assigned to RhoG, the exact function of this GTPase for the development of the processes of primary neurons remains to be clarified. In this view, we discuss the impact of RhoG on axonal and dendritic differentiation, its role as a conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity and the functional regulation of RhoG expression by the microRNA miR-124. PMID:23303397

  4. miR-124 Regulates the Phase of Drosophila Circadian Locomotor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Lamba, Pallavi; Guo, Peiyi; Emery, Patrick

    2016-02-10

    Animals use circadian rhythms to anticipate daily environmental changes. Circadian clocks have a profound effect on behavior. In Drosophila, for example, brain pacemaker neurons dictate that flies are mostly active at dawn and dusk. miRNAs are small, regulatory RNAs (≈22 nt) that play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we identify miR-124 as an important regulator of Drosophila circadian locomotor rhythms. Under constant darkness, flies lacking miR-124 (miR-124(KO)) have a dramatically advanced circadian behavior phase. However, whereas a phase defect is usually caused by a change in the period of the circadian pacemaker, this is not the case in miR-124(KO) flies. Moreover, the phase of the circadian pacemaker in the clock neurons that control rhythmic locomotion is not altered either. Therefore, miR-124 modulates the output of circadian clock neurons rather than controlling their molecular pacemaker. Circadian phase is also advanced under temperature cycles, but a light/dark cycle partially corrects the defects in miR-124(KO) flies. Indeed, miR-124(KO) shows a normal evening phase under the latter conditions, but morning behavioral activity is suppressed. In summary, miR-124 controls diurnal activity and determines the phase of circadian locomotor behavior without affecting circadian pacemaker function. It thus provides a potent entry point to elucidate the mechanisms by which the phase of circadian behavior is determined. In animals, molecular circadian clocks control the timing of behavioral activities to optimize them with the day/night cycle. This is critical for their fitness and survival. The mechanisms by which the phase of circadian behaviors is determined downstream of the molecular pacemakers are not yet well understood. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs are important regulators of circadian outputs. We found that miR-124 shapes diurnal behavioral activity and has a striking impact on the phase of circadian locomotor behavior

  5. Epigenetic silencing of miR-124 prevents spermine oxidase regulation: implications for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Murray-Stewart, T; Sierra, J C; Piazuelo, M B; Mera, R M; Chaturvedi, R; Bravo, L E; Correa, P; Schneider, B G; Wilson, K T; Casero, R A

    2016-10-20

    Chronic inflammation contributes to the development of various forms of cancer. The polyamine catabolic enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced in chronic inflammatory conditions, including Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, where its production of hydrogen peroxide contributes to DNA damage and subsequent tumorigenesis. MicroRNA expression levels are also altered in inflammatory conditions; specifically, the tumor suppressor miR-124 becomes silenced by DNA methylation. We sought to determine if this repression of miR-124 is associated with elevated SMOX activity and concluded that miR-124 is indeed a negative regulator of SMOX. In gastric adenocarcinoma cells harboring highly methylated and silenced mir-124 gene loci, 5-azacytidine treatment allowed miR-124 re-expression and decreased SMOX expression. Overexpression of an exogenous miR-124-3p mimic repressed SMOX mRNA and protein expression as well as H2O2 production by >50% within 24 h. Reporter assays indicated that direct interaction of miR-124 with the 3'-untranslated region of SMOX mRNA contributes to this negative regulation. Importantly, overexpression of miR-124 before infection with H. pylori prevented the induction of SMOX believed to contribute to inflammation-associated tumorigenesis. Compelling human in vivo data from H. pylori-positive gastritis tissues indicated that the mir-124 gene loci are more heavily methylated in a Colombian population characterized by elevated SMOX expression and a high risk for gastric cancer. Furthermore, the degree of mir-124 methylation significantly correlated with SMOX expression throughout the population. These results indicate a protective role for miR-124 through the inhibition of SMOX-mediated DNA damage in the etiology of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer.

  6. Epigenetic silencing of miR-124 prevents spermine oxidase regulation: Implications for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Sierra, Johanna C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Mera, Robertino M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Schneider, Barbara G.; Wilson, Keith T.; Casero, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to the development of various forms of cancer. The polyamine catabolic enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced in chronic inflammatory conditions, including Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, where its production of hydrogen peroxide contributes to DNA damage and subsequent tumorigenesis. MicroRNA expression levels are also altered in inflammatory conditions; specifically, the tumor suppressor miR-124 becomes silenced by DNA methylation. We sought to determine if this repression of miR-124 is associated with elevated SMOX activity and concluded that miR-124 is indeed a negative regulator of SMOX. In gastric adenocarcinoma cells harboring highly methylated and silenced mir-124 gene loci, 5-azacytidine treatment allowed miR-124 re-expression and decreased SMOX expression. Overexpression of an exogenous miR-124-3p mimic repressed SMOX mRNA and protein expression as well as H2O2 production by >50% within 24 hours. Reporter assays indicated that direct interaction of miR-124 with the 3′-untranslated region of SMOX mRNA contributes to this negative regulation. Importantly, overexpression of miR-124 prior to infection with H. pylori prevented the induction of SMOX believed to contribute to inflammation-associated tumorigenesis. Compelling human in vivo data from H. pylori-positive gastritis tissues indicated that the mir-124 gene loci are more heavily methylated in a Colombian population characterized by elevated SMOX expression and a high risk for gastric cancer. Furthermore, the degree of mir-124 methylation significantly correlated with SMOX expression throughout the population. These results indicate a protective role for miR-124 through the inhibition of SMOX-mediated DNA damage in the etiology of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. PMID:27041578

  7. miR-124 regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy in dopaminergic neurons and protects them by regulating AMPK/mTOR pathway in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Wang, Huiqing; Ye, Yongyi; Shu, Yugao; Deng, Yongwen; He, Xiaozheng; Lu, Guohui; Zhang, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    The important roles of miR-124 in the development and progression of various diseases are being increasing recognized. This study was aimed to investigate the potential roles of miR-124 in dopaminergic (DA) neuronal apoptosis and autophagy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to explore their mechanisms. Human SH-SY5Y cells that are treated with MPTP were transfected with mature miR-124 vector and control empty vector. The effect of MPTP on miR-124 mRNA level was analyzed using RT-PCR analysis. Furthermore, the effects of miR-124 expression on neuronal apoptosis and autophagy, as well as the expression of proteins in the AMPK/mTOR pathway, were analyzed using RT-PCR and western blotting. This study found that miR-124 was down-regulated in the MPTP-treated (100 μM) neurons, and miR-124 suppression significantly increased cell apoptosis and induced autophagy-associated protein expression, including that of Beclin 1 and increased the ratio of LC3 II/LC3 I compared with that in controls. In addition, in vitro rescue of miR-124 significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and the ratio of LC3 II/LC3 I, findings that were approximately equal to the controls. Moreover, miR-124 suppression increased p-AMPK but decreased p-mTOR levels in neurons. Our study suggested that miR-124 functions as a protector of DA neurons during PD through the involvement of cell apoptosis and autophagy by regulating the AMPK/mTOR pathway. PMID:27347320

  8. The RNA-binding protein QKI5 regulates primary miR-124-1 processing via a distal RNA motif during erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Song, Wei; Zhao, Hongmei; Ma, Yanni; Li, Yuxia; Zhai, Di; Pi, Jingnan; Si, Yanmin; Xu, Jiayue; Dong, Lei; Su, Rui; Zhang, Mengmeng; Zhu, Yong; Ren, Xiaoxia; Miao, Fei; Liu, Wenjie; Li, Feng; Zhang, Junwu; He, Aibin; Shan, Ge; Hui, Jingyi; Wang, Linfang; Yu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) biogenesis is finely controlled by complex layers of post-transcriptional regulators, including RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here, we show that an RBP, QKI5, activates the processing of primary miR-124-1 (pri-124-1) during erythropoiesis. QKI5 recognizes a distal QKI response element and recruits Microprocessor through interaction with DGCR8. Furthermore, the recruited Microprocessor is brought to pri-124-1 stem loops by a spatial RNA-RNA interaction between two complementary sequences. Thus, mutations disrupting their base-pairing affect the strength of QKI5 activation. When erythropoiesis proceeds, the concomitant decrease of QKI5 releases Microprocessor from pri-124-1 and reduces mature miR-124 levels to facilitate erythrocyte maturation. Mechanistically, miR-124 targets TAL1 and c-MYB, two transcription factors involved in normal erythropoiesis. Importantly, this QKI5-mediated regulation also gives rise to a unique miRNA signature, which is required for erythroid differentiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate the pivotal role of QKI5 in primary miRNA processing during erythropoiesis and provide new insights into how a distal element on primary transcripts affects miRNA biogenesis.

  9. Circular RNA HIPK2 regulates astrocyte activation via cooperation of autophagy and ER stress by targeting MIR124-2HG.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rongrong; Zhang, Yuan; Han, Bing; Bai, Ying; Zhou, Rongbin; Gan, Guangming; Chao, Jie; Hu, Gang; Yao, Honghong

    2017-10-03

    Circular RNAs are a subclass of noncoding RNAs in mammalian cells; however, whether these RNAs are involved in the regulation of astrocyte activation is largely unknown. Here, we have shown that the circular RNA HIPK2 (circHIPK2) functions as an endogenous microRNA-124 (MIR124-2HG) sponge to sequester MIR124-2HG and inhibit its activity, resulting in increased sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1/OPRS1) expression. Knockdown of circHIPK2 expression significantly inhibited astrocyte activation via the regulation of autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through the targeting of MIR124-2HG and SIGMAR1. These findings were confirmed in vivo in mouse models, as microinjection of a circHIPK2 siRNA lentivirus into mouse hippocampi inhibited astrocyte activation induced by methamphetamine or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These findings provide novel insights regarding the specific contribution of circHIPK2 to astrocyte activation in the context of drug abuse as well as for the treatment of a broad range of neuroinflammatory disorders.

  10. HuB/C/D, nPTB, REST4, and miR-124 regulators of neuronal cell identity are also utilized in the lens

    PubMed Central

    Bitel, Claudine L.; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose An interlocking network of transcription factors, RNA binding proteins, and miRNAs globally regulates gene expression and alternative splicing throughout development, and ensures the coordinated mutually exclusive expression of non-neural and neuronal forms of these factors during neurogenesis. Striking similarities between lens fiber cell and neuron cell morphology led us to determine if these factors are also used in the lens. HuR and polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) have been described as ‘global regulators’ of RNA alternative splicing, stability, and translation in non-neuronal (including ectodermal) tissues examined to date in diverse species, and REST/NRSF (RE-1 Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuron Restrictive Silencing Factor) represses >2,000 neuronal genes in all non-neuronal tissues examined to date, but has not included the lens. During neurogenesis these factors are replaced by what has been considered neuron-specific HuB/C/D, nPTB, and alternatively spliced REST (REST4), which work with miR-124 to activate this battery of genes, comprehensively reprogram neuronal alternative splicing, and maintain their exclusive expression in post-mitotic neurons. Methods Immunoprecipitation, western blot, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression and distribution of proteins in mouse and rat lenses. Mobility shift assays were used to examine lenses for REST/NRSF DNA binding activity, and RT–PCR, DNA sequencing, and northern blots were used to identify RNA expression and alternative splicing events in lenses from mouse, rat, and goldfish (N. crassa). Results We demonstrated that REST, HuR, and PTB proteins are expressed predominantly in epithelial cells in mouse and rat lenses, and showed these factors are also replaced by the predominant expression of REST4, HuB/C/D and nPTB in post-mitotic fiber cells, together with miR-124 expression in vertebrate lenses. REST-regulated gene products were found to be

  11. MiR-124 suppresses cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting PIK3CA

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Qingbo; Ling, Changquan

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIK3CA is a novel target of miR-124 in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-124 suppresses cell proliferation by downregulating PIK3CA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-124 regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-124 overexpression inhibits the tumorigenesis in nude mice. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have crucial roles in the development and progression of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies have shown that microRNA-124 (miR-124) was downregulated in HCC; however, the underlying mechanisms by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC are largely unknown. In this study, we report that phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) is a novel target of miR-124 in HepG2 cells. Overexpression of miR-124 resulted in decreased expression of PIK3CA at both mRNA and protein levels. We found that miR-124 overexpression markedly suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1-phase cell-cycle arrest in vitro. Consistent with the restoring miR-124 expression, PIK3CA knockdown suppressed cell proliferation, whereas overexpression of PIK3CA abolished the suppressive effect of miR-124. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-124-mediated reduction of PIK3CA resulted in suppression of PI3K/Akt pathway. The expressions of Akt and mTOR, key components of the PI3K/Akt pathway, were all downregulated. Moreover, we found overexpressed miR-124 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-124 functions as a growth-suppressive miRNA and plays an important role in inhibiting the tumorigenesis through targeting PIK3CA.

  12. miR-124 function during Ciona intestinalis neuronal development includes extensive interaction with the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Pedro, Matthew San; Zeller, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    The nervous system-enriched microRNA miR-124 is necessary for proper nervous system development, although the mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, through a comprehensive analysis of miR-124 and its gene targets, we demonstrate that, in the chordate ascidian Ciona intestinalis, miR-124 plays an extensive role in promoting nervous system development. We discovered that feedback interaction between miR-124 and Notch signaling regulates the epidermal-peripheral nervous system (PNS) fate choice in tail midline cells. Notch signaling silences miR-124 in epidermal midline cells, whereas in PNS midline cells miR-124 silences Notch, Neuralized and all three Ciona Hairy/Enhancer-of-Split genes. Furthermore, ectopic expression of miR-124 is sufficient to convert epidermal midline cells into PNS neurons, consistent with a role in modulating Notch signaling. More broadly, genome-wide target extraction with validation using an in vivo tissue-specific sensor assay indicates that miR-124 shapes neuronal progenitor fields by downregulating non-neural genes, notably the muscle specifier Macho-1 and 50 Brachyury-regulated notochord genes, as well as several anti-neural factors including SCP1 and PTBP1. 3'UTR conservation analysis reveals that miR-124 targeting of SCP1 is likely to have arisen as a shared, derived trait in the vertebrate/tunicate ancestor and targeting of PTBP1 is conserved among bilaterians except for ecdysozoans, while extensive Notch pathway targeting appears to be Ciona specific. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive insight into the specific mechanisms by which miR-124 promotes neuronal development.

  13. Cocaine-mediated downregulation of microglial miR-124 expression involves promoter DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Liao, Ke; Kook, Yeon Hee; Niu, Fang; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-11-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the development of reward-related behavior in cocaine self-administration rodents. Cocaine, one of most commonly abused drugs, has been shown to activate microglia both in vitro and in vivo. Detailed molecular mechanisms underlying cocaine-mediated microglial activation remain poorly understood. microRNAs (miRs) belonging to a class of small noncoding RNA superfamily have been shown to modulate the activation status of microglia. miR-124, one of the microglia-enriched miRs, functions as an anti-inflammatory regulator that maintains microglia in a quiescent state. To date, the possible effects of cocaine on microglial miR-124 levels and the associated underlying mechanisms have not been explored. In the current study, we demonstrated that cocaine exposure decreased miR-124 levels in both BV-2 cells and rat primary microglia. These findings were further validated in vivo, wherein we demonstrated decreased abundance of miR-124 in purified microglia isolated from cocaine-administered mice brains compared with cells from saline administered animals. Molecular mechanisms underlying these effects involved cocaine-mediated increased mRNA and protein expression of DNMTs in microglia. Consistently, cocaine substantially increased promoter DNA methylation levels of miR-124 precursors (pri-miR-124-1 and -2), but not that of pri-miR-124-3, both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our findings demonstrated that cocaine exposure increased DNA methylation of miR-124 promoter resulting into its downregulation, which, in turn, led to microglial activation. Our results thus implicate that epigenetic modulation of miR-124 could be considered as a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate microglial activation and, possibly, the development of cocaine addiction.

  14. miR-124 suppresses glioblastoma growth and potentiates chemosensitivity by inhibiting AURKA.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wanchen; Guo, Beisong; Zhou, Haichun; Xu, Wanzhen; Chen, Yongjie; Liang, Yanchao; Dong, Baijing

    2017-04-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) accounts for about half of all malignant brain cancers. Although the treatment strategies for glioblastoma develop rapidly, a considerable number of patients could not benefit from temozolomide (TMZ)-based chemotherapy. Here, we revealed a miR-124-AURKA axis that regulated glioblastoma growth and chemosensitivity. Mechanistically, AURKA was up-regulated in glioblastoma tissues and associated with poor overall survival. While overexpression of AURKA enhanced tumor growth, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of AURKA led to growth-inhibitory and chemopotentiating effects in glioblastoma. AURKA was further identified as a target of miR-124. Furthermore, our data showed that miR-124 down-regulated AURKA expression and subsequently suppressed cell growth. Re-expression of AURKA significantly rescued miR124-mediated proliferation repression and chemosensitivity. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that miR-124 inhibited glioblastoma growth and potentiated chemosensitivity by targeting AURKA, which may represent promising targets and rational therapeutic options for glioblastoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Down regulation of miR-124 in both Werner syndrome DNA helicase mutant mice and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans wrn-1 reveals the importance of this microRNA in accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Alexandra; Garand, Chantal; Paquel, Eric R; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Simard, Martin J; Lebel, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs are believed to be involved in the mechanism of aging but nothing is known on the impact of microRNAs in the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome (WS). WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-like DNA helicase. Mice lacking the helicase domain of the WRN ortholog exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including a pro-oxidant status and a shorter mean life span.Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) with a nonfunctional wrn-1 DNA helicase also exhibit a shorter life span. Thus, both models are relevant to study the expression of microRNAs involved in WS. In this study, we show that miR-124 expression is lost in the liver of Wrn helicase mutant mice. Interestingly, the expression of this conserved miR-124 in whole wrn-1 mutant worms is also significantly reduced. The loss of mir-124 in C. elegans increases reactive oxygen species formation and accumulation of the aging marker lipofuscin, reduces whole body ATP levels and results in a reduction in life span. Finally, supplementation of vitamin C normalizes the median life span of wrn-1 and mir-124 mutant worms. These results suggest that biological pathways involving WRN and miR-124 are conserved in the aging process across different species.

  16. Down regulation of miR-124 in both Werner syndrome DNA helicase mutant mice and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans wrn-1 reveals the importance of this microRNA in accelerated aging

    PubMed Central

    Dallaire, Alexandra; Garand, Chantal; Paquet, Eric R.; Mitchell, Sarah J.; de Cabo, Rafael; Simard, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs are believed to be involved in the mechanism of aging but nothing is known on the impact of microRNAs in the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome (WS). WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-like DNA helicase. Mice lacking the helicase domain of the WRN ortholog exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including a pro-oxidant status and a shorter mean life span. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) with a nonfunctional wrn-1 DNA helicase also exhibit a shorter life span. Thus, both models are relevant to study the expression of microRNAs involved in WS. In this study, we show that miR-124 expression is lost in the liver of Wrn helicase mutant mice. Interestingly, the expression of this conserved miR-124 in whole wrn-1 mutant worms is also significantly reduced. The loss of mir-124 in C. elegans increases reactive oxygen species formation and accumulation of the aging marker lipofuscin, reduces whole body ATP levels and results in a reduction in life span. Finally, supplementation of vitamin C normalizes the median life span of wrn-1 and mir-124 mutant worms. These results suggest that biological pathways involving WRN and miR-124 are conserved in the aging process across different species. PMID:23075628

  17. MiR-124 represses vasculogenic mimicry and cell motility by targeting amotL1 in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hai-Ying; Li, Qin-Qin; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Wei; Li, Ya-Nan; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2014-12-01

    miRNAs have extensive functions in differentiation, metabolism, programmed cell death, and tumor metastasis by post-transcriptional regulation. Vasculogenic mimicry is an important pathway in tumor metastasis. Many factors can regulate vasculogenic mimicry, including miRNAs. In previous studies, miR-124 was found to repress proliferation and metastasis in different types of cancers, but whether it functions in cervical cancer remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that miR-124 can repress vasculogenic mimicry, migration and invasion in HeLa and C33A cells in vitro. Furthermore, we reveal that the effect of miR-124 on vasculogenic mimicry, migration and invasion results from its interaction with AmotL1. MiR-124 regulates AmotL1 negatively by targeting its 3'untranslated region (3'UTR). We found that miR-124 can repress the EMT process. Together, these results improve our understanding of the function of miR-124 in tumor metastasis and will help to provide new potential target sites for cervical cancer treatment.

  18. MiR-124 inhibits the migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by suppressing integrin αV expression

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian Qian; Dong, Yi Wei; Wang, Rong; Qi, Bing; Guo, Jun Xia; Pan, Jing; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Zhang, Chun Yi; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related death especially in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although microRNAs have been implicated in tumor development, the roles of miR-124 in HCC metastasis are still not well understood. We conducted functional analysis in this study to investigate miR-124. We observed that miR-124 significantly retarded the wound healing and migration of HCC SMMC-7721 and BEL-7404 cells. Further analysis indicated miR-124 directly targeting the transcriptional factor Sp1 which is an important transcription factor for the integrin αV subunit gene transcription. Co-transfection of miR-124 with the luciferase reporter containing Sp1 3′ untranslated region (UTR) significantly suppressed the luciferase activities. While mutation of the binding site of miR-124 in Sp1 mRNA 3′UTR completely abrogated the suppression of miR-124. Overexpression of miR-124 resulted in robust downregulation of Sp1 and integrin αV expression at either mRNA or protein level. Ectopic expression of miR-124 in HCC dramatically repressed the wound healing and migration in vitro and tumor metastasis in mouse experiments. Our findings demonstrated that miR-124 played as an important role in regulation of integrin αV expression in HCC, and reintroduction of miR-124 might be an alternative therapeutic strategy for controlling integrin αV expression in HCC. PMID:28094803

  19. Activation of PPARγ inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines production by upregulation of miR-124 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Shi, Liuyan; Xin, Wei; Xu, Jiancheng; Xu, Jing; Li, Qi; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Jianchun; Wang, Guansong; Yao, Wei; He, Binfeng; Yang, Yu; Hu, Mingdong

    2017-03-22

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and miR-124 have been reported to play important roles in regulation of inflammation. However, the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanisms remain not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the expression level of PPARγ is positively correlated with that of miR-124 in patients with sepsis. Activation of PPARγ upregulates miR-124 and in turn inhibits miR-124 target gene. PPARγ bound directly to PPRE in the miR-124 promoter region, and enhanced the promoter transcriptional activity. PPARγ-induced miR-124 is involved in the suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that PPARγ-induced miR-124 inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines is a novel PPARγ anti-inflammatory mechanism and also indicate that miR-124 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  20. miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit colorectal cancer progression by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiheng; Liu, Shaojun; Tian, Li; Wu, Minghao; Ai, Feiyan; Tang, Wuliang; Zhao, Lian; Ding, Juan; Zhang, Liyang; Tang, Anliu

    2015-11-10

    miR-124 and miR-506 are reportedly down-regulated and associated with tumor progression in many cancers, but little is known about their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we found that the miR-124 and miR-506 levels were significantly lower in human CRC tissues than in controls, as indicated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization histochemistry. We also found that the overexpression of miR-124 or miR-506 inhibited tumor cell progression and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy in vitro. Increased miR-124 or miR-506 expression also inhibited tumor cell proliferation and invasion in vivo. Luciferase reporter assays and western blotting were used to determine the association between miR-124, miR-506 and their target genes, DNMTs. We further identified that miR-124 and miR-506 directly targeted DNMT3B and indirectly targeted DNMT1. The overexpression of miR-124 and miR-506 reduced global DNA methylation and restored the expression of E-cadherin, MGMT and P16. In conclusion, our data showed that miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit progression and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1 in CRC. These findings may provide novel avenues for the development of targeted therapies.

  1. MiR-124 governs glioma growth and angiogenesis and enhances chemosensitivity by targeting R-Ras and N-Ras

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhumei; Chen, Qiudan; Li, Chongyong; Wang, Lin; Qian, Xu; Jiang, Chengfei; Liu, Xue; Wang, Xiefeng; Li, Hai; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; You, Yongping; Liu, Ning; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioma is one of the most aggressive and lethal human brain tumors. Accumulating evidence shows that microRNAs play important roles in cancers, including glioma. Previous studies reported that miR-124 levels were downregulated in glioma specimens. Here, we further investigate the potential role of miR-124 in glioma. Methods The expression levels of miR-124 were detected in glioma specimens by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. The direct targets of miR-124 were identified by bioinformatics analysis and were further validated by immunoblotting and luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-124 on glioma cell proliferation and chemosensitivity to temozolomide were analyzed by Cell-Counting Kit 8 assay. Apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. A xenograft model was used to study the effect of miR-124 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. Results Expression levels of miR-124 were greatly downregulated in glioma specimens. related Ras viral oncogene homolog (R-Ras) and neuroblastoma Ras viral oncogene homolog (N-Ras) were identified as direct targets of miR-124. MiR-124 inhibited glioma cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor growth and increased chemosensitivity to temozolomide treatment by negatively regulating the Ras family and its downstream signaling pathways: phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt and Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Furthermore, overexpression of R-Ras rescued the inhibitory effects of miR-124. Meanwhile, overexpression of R-Ras and N-Ras restored miR-124–inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription activation. In clinical glioma specimens, protein levels of R-Ras and N-Ras were upregulated and inversely correlated with miR-124 expression levels. Conclusions Taken together, these results revealed that miR-124 levels in tumor tissues are associated with glioma occurrence, angiogenesis, and chemoresistance and that miR-124 may be used as a new diagnostic marker

  2. miR-124 attenuates Japanese encephalitis virus replication by targeting DNM2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Songbai; Pei, Yue; Li, Xinyun; Zhao, Shuhong; Zhu, Mengjin; Zhao, Ayong

    2016-06-21

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes acute viral encephalitis in humans. Pigs are important amplifier hosts of JEV. Emerging evidence indicates that host microRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in modulating viral infection and pathogenesis. However, mechanistic studies delineating the roles of miRNAs in regulating host-JEV interactions remain scarce. In this study, we demonstrated that miR-124 inhibited JEV replication in porcine kidney epithelial PK15 cells. Furthermore, using bioinformatics tools, we identified dynamin2 (DNM2), a GTPase responsible for vesicle scission, as a target of miR-124. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion studies inicated that dynamin2 was required for efficient JEV replication. We also demonstrated that upregulation of miR-124 expression corresponded to decreased expression of its target, DNM2, in the JEV-infected PK15 cells. Overall, these results suggest the importance of miR-124 in modulating JEV replication and provide a scientific basis for using cellular miRNAs in anti-JEV therapies.

  3. MiR-124 Promote Neurogenic Transdifferentiation of Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Partly through RhoA/ROCK1, but Not ROCK2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Wang, Desheng; Guo, Dawen

    2016-01-01

    Some recent studies suggest that multiple miRNAs might regulate neurogenic transdifferentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). In the present study, we hypothesized that the miR-124 can repress the expression of RhoA upon the neurogenesis of adipose derived MSCs (ADMSCs). MiRNA expression dynamics during neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs were measured. The expression of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), Tuj-1 (Neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), as well as electrophysiological properties, were detected after neurogenic transdifferentiation. The targeting of miR-124 over RhoA was verified by dual luciferase assay, qRT-PCR and western blot. The functions of miR-124 and the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway were studied using gain and loss of function experiments in vitro. MiR-124 is significantly upregulated during neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs. Knockdown of endogenous miR-124 hampered neurogenic transdifferentiation and the acquired electrophysiological properties. MiR-124 could directly target RHOA mRNA and repress its expression, through which it increased the proportion of transdifferentiated (transdiff.) cells with positive NSE, Tuj-1 and GFAP. RhoA/ROCK1, but not ROCK2 is a downstream signaling pathway of miR-124 in the process of transdifferentiation. MiR-124 is an important miRNA modulating neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs at least partly via the miR-124/RhoA/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These findings provided some fundamental information for future use of ADMSCs as an agent for regenerative medicine and cell therapy for neurological diseases.

  4. MiR-124 Promote Neurogenic Transdifferentiation of Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Partly through RhoA/ROCK1, but Not ROCK2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Wang, Desheng; Guo, Dawen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Some recent studies suggest that multiple miRNAs might regulate neurogenic transdifferentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). In the present study, we hypothesized that the miR-124 can repress the expression of RhoA upon the neurogenesis of adipose derived MSCs (ADMSCs). Methods MiRNA expression dynamics during neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs were measured. The expression of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), Tuj-1 (Neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), as well as electrophysiological properties, were detected after neurogenic transdifferentiation. The targeting of miR-124 over RhoA was verified by dual luciferase assay, qRT-PCR and western blot. The functions of miR-124 and the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway were studied using gain and loss of function experiments in vitro. Results MiR-124 is significantly upregulated during neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs. Knockdown of endogenous miR-124 hampered neurogenic transdifferentiation and the acquired electrophysiological properties. MiR-124 could directly target RHOA mRNA and repress its expression, through which it increased the proportion of transdifferentiated (transdiff.) cells with positive NSE, Tuj-1 and GFAP. RhoA/ROCK1, but not ROCK2 is a downstream signaling pathway of miR-124 in the process of transdifferentiation. Conclusion MiR-124 is an important miRNA modulating neurogenic transdifferentiation of ADMSCs at least partly via the miR-124/RhoA/ROCK1 signaling pathway. These findings provided some fundamental information for future use of ADMSCs as an agent for regenerative medicine and cell therapy for neurological diseases. PMID:26745800

  5. miR-124/ATF-6, a novel lifespan extension pathway of Astragalus polysaccharide in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Jing; Xie, Fang; Gao, Xu; Ye, Jian-Han; Sun, Lu-Yao; Wei, Ran; Ai, Jing

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), especially evolutionarily conserved miRNAs play critical roles in regulating various biological process. However, the functions of conserved miRNAs in longevity are still largely unknown. Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) was recently shown to extend lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans, but its molecular mechanisms have not been fully understood. In the present study, we characterize that microRNA mediated a novel longevity pathway of APS in C. elegans. We found that APS markedly extended the lifespan of C. elegans at the second and the fourth stages. A highly conserved miRNA miR-124 was significantly upregulated in APS-treated C. elegans. Overexpression miR-124 caused the lifespan extension of C. elegans and vice versa, indicating miR-124 regulates the longevity of C. elegans. Using luciferase assay, atf-6 was established as a target gene of miR-124 which acting on three binding sites at atf-6 3'UTR. Consistently, agomir-cel-miR-124 was also shown to inhibit ATF-6 expression in C. elegans. APS-treated C. elegans showed the down-regulation of atf-6 at protein level. Furthermore, the knockdown of atf-6 by RNAi extended the lifespan of C. elegans, indicating atf-6 regulated by miR-124 contributes to lifespan extension. Taken together, miR-124 regulating ATF-6 is a new potential longevity signal pathway, which underlies the lifespan-extending effects of APS in C. elegans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. miR-124 controls male reproductive success in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ruifen; Chin, Jacqueline SR; Yew, Joanne Y; Bushati, Natascha; Cohen, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of social behavior are controlled by sex-specific pheromones. Gender-appropriate production of the sexually dimorphic transcription factors doublesex and fruitless controls sexual differentiation and sexual behavior. miR-124 mutant males exhibited increased male–male courtship and reduced reproductive success with females. Females showed a strong preference for wild-type males over miR-124 mutant males when given a choice of mates. These effects were traced to aberrant pheromone production. We identified the sex-specific splicing factor transformer as a functionally significant target of miR-124 in this context, suggesting a role for miR-124 in the control of male sexual differentiation and behavior, by limiting inappropriate expression of the female form of transformer. miR-124 is required to ensure fidelity of gender-appropriate pheromone production in males. Use of a microRNA provides a secondary means of controlling the cascade of sex-specific splicing events that controls sexual differentiation in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00640.001 PMID:23795292

  7. The miR-124 family of microRNAs is crucial for regeneration of the brain and visual system in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Sasidharan, Vidyanand; Marepally, Srujan; Elliott, Sarah A; Baid, Srishti; Lakshmanan, Vairavan; Nayyar, Nishtha; Bansal, Dhiru; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2017-09-15

    Brain regeneration in planarians is mediated by precise spatiotemporal control of gene expression and is crucial for multiple aspects of neurogenesis. However, the mechanisms underpinning the gene regulation essential for brain regeneration are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the miR-124 family of microRNAs in planarian brain regeneration. The miR-124 family (miR-124) is highly conserved in animals and regulates neurogenesis by facilitating neural differentiation, yet its role in neural wiring and brain organization is not known. We developed a novel method for delivering anti-miRs using liposomes for the functional knockdown of microRNAs. Smed-miR-124 knockdown revealed a key role for these microRNAs in neuronal organization during planarian brain regeneration. Our results also demonstrated an essential role for miR-124 in the generation of eye progenitors. Additionally, miR-124 regulates Smed-slit-1, which encodes an axon guidance protein, either by targeting slit-1 mRNA or, potentially, by modulating the canonical Notch pathway. Together, our results reveal a role for miR-124 in regulating the regeneration of a functional brain and visual system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The Long Non-Coding RNA XIST Interacted with MiR-124 to Modulate Bladder Cancer Growth, Invasion and Migration by Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yaoyao; Wang, Long; Li, Yuan; Chen, Minfeng; He, Wei; Qi, Lin

    2017-08-31

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) is involved in the progression of several tumors. The interaction between lncRNA and miRNA or miRNA's target genes is reported to play crucial roles in malignancy. In addition, Androgen receptor (AR) is considered to be involved in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the role of XIST in human bladder cancer and its interaction with miR-124 and AR. XIST and AR expression was detected in bladder tumor samples and cell lines. Effects of XIST and AR on bladder cancer cells growth, invasion and migration were analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays were used to identify the interaction among XIST, AR and miR-124. The correlations of miR-124 with XIST and AR in bladder cancer samples were statistically analyzed. XIST and AR were upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and positively correlated. Higher XIST and AR expression were related to poorer TNM stage of bladder cancer. XIST knockdown reduced bladder cancer cells' proliferation, invasion and migration. While this inhibitory effect could be partially restored by AR overexpression. XIST inhibited miR-124 expression by directly targeting. Moreover, miR-124 could bind to the 3'UTR of AR to regulate its expression. MiR-124 inhibition partially restored the XIST knockdown-induced reduction of AR, c-myc, p27, MMP13 and MMP9 expression. In bladder cancer tissues, miR-124 level was inversely correlated with the expression of XIST and AR, respectively. These findings indicated that XIST might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted the bladder cancer growth, invasion and migration via miR-124 dependent AR regulation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. miR-124-9-9* potentiates Ascl1-induced reprogramming of cultured Müller glia.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Stefanie Gabriele; Reh, Thomas Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The Müller glia of fish provide a source for neuronal regeneration after injury, but they do not do so in mammals. We previously showed that lentiviral gene transfer of the transcription factor Achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1/Mash1) in murine Müller glia cultures resulted in partial reprogramming of the cells to retinal progenitors. The microRNAs (miRNAs) miR-124-9-9* facilitate neuronal reprogramming of fibroblasts, but their role in glia reprogramming has not been reported. The aim of this study was to test whether (1) lentiviral gene transfer of miR-124-9-9* can reprogram Müller glia into retinal neurons and (2) miR-124-9-9* can improve Ascl1-induced reprogramming. Primary Müller glia cultures were generated from postnatal day (P) 11/12 mice, transduced with lentiviral particles, i.e., miR-124-9-9*-RFP, nonsense-RFP, Ascl1-GFP, or GFP-control. Gene expression and immunofluorescence analyses were performed within 3 weeks after infection. 1. Overexpression of miR-124-9-9* induced the expression of the proneural factor Ascl1 and additional markers of neurons, including TUJ1 and MAP2. 2. When Ascl1 and miR-124-9-9* were combined, 50 to 60% of Müller glia underwent neuronal reprogramming, whereas Ascl1 alone results in a 30 to 35% reprogramming rate. 3. Analysis of the miR-124-9-9* treated glial cells showed a reduction in the level of Ctdsp1 and Ptbp1, indicating a critical role for the REST pathway in the repression of neuronal genes in Müller glia. Our data further suggest that miR-124-9-9* and the REST complex may play a role in regulating the reprogramming of Müller glia to progenitors that underlies retinal regeneration in zebrafish.

  10. Fluorescence imaging of in vivo miR-124a-induced neurogenesis of neuronal progenitor cells using neuron-specific reporters.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jaeho; Lee, Song; Oh, Hyun Jeong; Choi, Yoori; Choi, Jae Hyouk; Hwang, Do Won; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-12-01

    Facilitation of the differentiation of the stem cells toward neuronal lineage is crucial for enhancing the differentiation efficacy of grafted stem cells for the possible treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. MicroRNA124a (miR-124a) has been considered as a neuronal lineage regulator, possessing the capability to activate neuronal differentiation. In this study, using a neuronal promoter-based reporter and live-cell fluorescence imaging, we visualized in vitro and in vivo the enhanced neuronal differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells with miR-124a overproduction. The neuron specific alpha1 tubulin promoter-driven RFP reporter (pTa1-RFP) was used to trace the miR-124a-induced neuronal differentiation in live cell condition. MiR-124a or miR-scramble in 10 % glucose buffer was mixed with in vivo-jetPEITM and in vivo fluorescence images were obtained daily using Maestro spectral fluorescent imager. Neurite outgrowth was clearly seen in F11 cells after miR-124a transfection, and immunofluorescence staining showed increase of Tuj1 and NF at 48 hours. When pTa1-RFP-transfected F11 cells were implanted simultaneously with miR-124a into the nude mice, gradually increasing reporter signals and morphological changes indicated neuronal differentiation for 48 hours in live cells in vitro. The miR-124a-treated F11 cells showed higher reporter signals on in vivo fluorescence imaging than miR-scramble-treated cells, which were verified by ex vivo confirmation of Tuj1 and NF expression. These results indicated that neuronal reporter-based neurogenesis imaging can be used for monitoring miR-124a acting as neuronal activator when miRNA was injected in in vivo PEI-coated form for miRNA-mediated regenerative therapy.

  11. Decline of miR-124 in myeloid cells promotes regulatory T-cell development in hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Ling; Ning, Shun B; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to attenuating immune responses during chronic viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms underlying their suppressive activities remain incompletely understood. We have recently shown marked expansion of MDSCs that promote regulatory T (Treg) cell development in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here we further investigated whether the HCV-induced expansion of MDSCs and Treg cells is regulated by an miRNA-mediated mechanism. The RNA array analysis revealed that six miRNAs were up-regulated and six miRNAs were down-regulated significantly in myeloid cells during HCV infection. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed the down-regulation of miR-124 in MDSCs from HCV patients. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that miR-124 may be involved in the regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT-3), which was overexpressed in MDSCs from HCV patients. Notably, silencing of STAT-3 significantly increased the miR-124 expression, whereas reconstituting miR-124 decreased the levels of STAT-3, as well as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which were overexpressed in MDCSs, and reduced the frequencies of Foxp3(+) Treg cells that were developed during chronic HCV infection. These results suggest that reciprocal regulation of miR-124 and STAT-3 in MDSCs promotes Treg cell development, thus uncovering a novel mechanism for the expansion of MDSC and Treg cells during HCV infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Neurophysiological Defects and Neuronal Gene Deregulation in Drosophila mir-124 Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kailiang; Westholm, Jakub Orzechowski; Tsurudome, Kazuya; Hagen, Joshua W.; Lu, Yubing; Kohwi, Minoree; Betel, Doron; Gao, Fen-Biao; Haghighi, A. Pejmun; Doe, Chris Q.; Lai, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    miR-124 is conserved in sequence and neuronal expression across the animal kingdom and is predicted to have hundreds of mRNA targets. Diverse defects in neural development and function were reported from miR-124 antisense studies in vertebrates, but a nematode knockout of mir-124 surprisingly lacked detectable phenotypes. To provide genetic insight from Drosophila, we deleted its single mir-124 locus and found that it is dispensable for gross aspects of neural specification and differentiation. On the other hand, we detected a variety of mutant phenotypes that were rescuable by a mir-124 genomic transgene, including short lifespan, increased dendrite variation, impaired larval locomotion, and aberrant synaptic release at the NMJ. These phenotypes reflect extensive requirements of miR-124 even under optimal culture conditions. Comparison of the transcriptomes of cells from wild-type and mir-124 mutant animals, purified on the basis of mir-124 promoter activity, revealed broad upregulation of direct miR-124 targets. However, in contrast to the proposed mutual exclusion model for miR-124 function, its functional targets were relatively highly expressed in miR-124–expressing cells and were not enriched in genes annotated with epidermal expression. A notable aspect of the direct miR-124 network was coordinate targeting of five positive components in the retrograde BMP signaling pathway, whose activation in neurons increases synaptic release at the NMJ, similar to mir-124 mutants. Derepression of the direct miR-124 target network also had many secondary effects, including over-activity of other post-transcriptional repressors and a net incomplete transition from a neuroblast to a neuronal gene expression signature. Altogether, these studies demonstrate complex consequences of miR-124 loss on neural gene expression and neurophysiology. PMID:22347817

  13. MicroRNA-124 (MiR-124) Inhibits Cell Proliferation, Metastasis and Invasion in Colorectal Cancer by Downregulating Rho-Associated Protein Kinase 1(ROCK1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liqing; Xu, Ziran; Ren, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Kaixuan; Xin, Shiyong

    2016-01-01

    MiR-124 inhibits neoplastic transformation, cell proliferation, and metastasis and downregulates Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK1) in Colorectal Cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to further investigate the roles and interactions of ROCK1 and miR-124 and the effects of knockdown of ROCK1and MiR-124 in human Colorectal Cancer (CRC). Three Colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT116, HT29 and SW620) and one Human Colonic Mucosa Epithelial cell line (NCM460) were studied. The protein expression of ROCK1 was examined by Western-blot and qRT-PCR were performed to examine the expression levels of ROCK1 mRNA and miR-124. Furthermore, We performed transfection of cancer cell line (SW620) with pre-miR-124(mimics), anti-miR-124(inhibitor), ROCK1 siRNA and the control, then observed the affects of ROCK1 protein expression by westen-blot, cell proliferation by EDU (5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine assay) and expression levels of ROCK1mRNA by qRT-PCR . A soft agar formation assay, Migration and invasion assays were used to determine the effect of regulation of miR-124 and ROCK1, and survivin on the transformation and invasion capability of colorectal cancer cell. MiR-124 expression was significantly downregulated in CRC cell lines compare to normal (P < 0.05). In contrast, ROCK1 protein expression was significantly increased in CRC cell lines compared to the normal (P < 0.05), whereas the gene (ROCK1mRNA) expression remained unaltered (P > 0.05). ROCK1 mRNA was unaltered in cells transfected with miR-124 mimic and miR-124 inhibitor, compared to normal controls. There was a significant reduction in ROCK1 protein in cells transfected with miR-124 mimic and a significant increase in cells transfected with miR-124 inhibitor (P < 0.05). Cell proliferation, transformation and invasion of cells transfected with miR-124 inhibitor were significantly increased compared to those in normal controls (P<0.05). However, cell proliferation, transformation and invasion of cells transfected with ROCK1

  14. Exosome-Based Delivery of miR-124 in a Huntington’s Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Im, Wooseok; Ban, Jae-Jun; Lee, Mijung; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon; Kim, Manho

    2017-01-01

    Objective Huntington’s disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease that is caused by abnormal CAG expansion. Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression also causes abnormal gene regulation in this neurodegenerative disease. The delivery of abnormally downregulated miRNAs might restore normal gene regulation and have a therapeutic effect. Methods We developed an exosome-based delivery method to treat this neurodegenerative disease. miR-124, one of the key miRNAs that is repressed in HD, was stably overexpressed in a stable cell line. Exosomes were then harvested from these cells using an optimized protocol. The exosomes (Exo-124) exhibited a high level of miR-124 expression and were taken up by recipient cells. Results When Exo-124 was injected into the striatum of R6/2 transgenic HD mice, expression of the target gene, RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor, was reduced. However, Exo-124 treatment did not produce significant behavioral improvement. Conclusion This study serves as a proof of concept for exosome-based delivery of miRNA in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28122430

  15. miR-12 and miR-124 contribute to defined early phases of long-lasting and transient memory.

    PubMed

    Michely, Julia; Kraft, Susanne; Müller, Uli

    2017-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important epigenetic regulators of mRNA translation implicated in long-lasting synaptic plasticity and long-term memory (LTM). Since recent findings demonstrated a role of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in early memory phases we investigated whether epigenetic regulation by miRNAs also contributes to early memory phases. We used the olfactory associative learning paradigm in honeybees and addressed the contribution of miRNAs depending on the conditioning strength. We selected miR-12, miR-124, and miR-125 that have been implicated in processes of neuronal plasticity and analysed their contribution to non-associative and associative learning using miRNA inhibitors. Blocking miR-12, miR-124, or miR125 neither affects gustatory sensitivity nor habituation nor sensitization. Blocking the function of miR-12 and miR-124 during and shortly after 3-trial conditioning impairs different early memory phases. Although different, the function of miR-12 and miR-124 is also required for early phases of transient memory that is induced by 1-trial conditioning. Blocking miR-125 has no effect on early memory independent of the conditioning strength. These findings demonstrate that distinct miRNAs contribute to early phases of both, transient memories as well as long-lasting memories.

  16. MicroRNA miR124 is required for the expression of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qingming; Ruan, Hongyu; Gilbert, James; Wang, Guan; Ma, Qi; Yao, Wei-Dong; Man, Heng-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a compensatory response to alterations in neuronal activity. Chronic deprivation of neuronal activity results in an increase in synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and postsynaptic currents. The biogenesis of GluA2-lacking, calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) plays a crucial role in the homeostatic response; however, the mechanisms leading to CP-AMPAR formation remain unclear. Here we show that the microRNA, miR124, is required for the generation of CP-AMPARs and homeostatic plasticity. miR124 suppresses GluA2 expression via targeting its 3′-UTR, leading to the formation of CP-AMPARs. Blockade of miR124 function abolishes the homeostatic response, whereas miR124 overexpression leads to earlier induction of homeostatic plasticity. miR124 transcription is controlled by an inhibitory transcription factor EVI1, acting by association with the deacetylase HDAC1. Our data support a cellular cascade in which inactivity relieves EVI1/HDAC-mediated inhibition of miR124 gene transcription, resulting in enhanced miR124 expression, formation of CP-AMPARs and subsequent induction of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:26620774

  17. miR-124 and miR-9 Mediated Downregulation of HDAC5 Promotes Neurite Development Through Activating MEF2C- GPM6A Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xi; Fu, Congcong; Lin, Lifang; Liu, Shuhu; Su, Xiaohong; Li, Aili; Wu, Qiaoqi; Jia, Chunhong; Zhang, Peidong; Chen, Lu; Zhu, Xinhong; Wang, Xuemin

    2017-03-23

    The class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) play important roles in the central nervous system during diverse biological processes such as synaptic plasticity, axon regeneration, cell apoptosis, and neural differentiation. Although it is known that HDAC5 regulates neuronal differentiation, neither the physiological function nor the regulation of HDAC5 in neuronal differentiation is clear. Here, we identify HDAC5 as an inhibitor of neurite elongation and show that HDAC5 is regulated by the brain enriched microRNA miR-124 and miR-9. We discover that HDAC5 inhibits neurite extension both in differentiated P19 cells and primary neurons. We also show that the neuronal membrane glycoprotein GPM6A (M6a) is a direct target gene of HDAC5 regulated transcriptional factor MEF2C. HDAC5 inhibits neurite elongation, acting at least partially via a MEF2C/M6a signaling pathway. We also confirmed the miR-124/miR-9 regulated HDAC5-MEF2C-M6a pathway regulates neurite development in primary neurons. Thus, HDAC5 emerges as a cellular conductor of MEF2C and M6a activity and is regulated by miR-124 and miR-9 to control neurite development. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 interacts with miR-124 and modulates tongue cancer growth by targeting JAG1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Han; Liang, Li-Zhong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Wu, Ji-Nan; Su, Kui; Chen, Jue-Yao; Zheng, Qiao-Yi; Huang, Hong-Zhang; Liao, Gui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), was the earliest discovered to be correlated with cancer and contributes to the initiation and development of several types of tumors. Dysregulation of MALAT1 expression is frequently observed in many types of cancer such as gastric cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and glioma. To date, the role of MALAT1 and the underlying mechanisms in tongue cancer development remain unclear. In the present study, we studied the influence of MALAT1 on tongue cancer cell lines and clinical tongue cancer samples so as to detect its function and the underlying mechanism. In the present study, lncRNA-MALAT1 was specifically upregulated in tongue cancer cell lines and overexpression promoted tongue cancer cell growth by targeting miR-124. Knockdown of MALAT1 suppressed the growth and invasion of human tongue cancer cells and inhibited metastasis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, miR-124-dependent jagged1 (JAG1) regulation was required for MALAT1-induced tongue cancer cell growth. Our data revealed that MALAT1 inhibited tongue cancer cell growth and metastasis through miR-124-dependent JAG1 regulation. In conclusion, we revealed that MALAT1 may play an oncogenic role by increasing proliferation and metastasis of tongue cancer and is a potential therapeutic target in human tongue cancer.

  19. Reactivation of epigenetically silenced miR-124 reverses the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and inhibits invasion in endometrial cancer cells via the direct repression of IQGAP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Hidemichi; Hanley, Sharon J.B.; Yamada, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Kudo, Masataka; Yue, Junming; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of IQGAP1 and microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation are frequent in human tumors, but little is known about the role of IQGAP1 and its relationship to miRNA in endometrial carcinogenesis. We demonstrate that IQGAP1 activates the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) program and that miR-124 directly represses IQGAP1 expression in endometrial cancer (EC) cells. The overexpression of IQGAP1 stimulates EMT features and enhances migration, invasion and proliferation of EC cells, whereas knocking down IQGAP1 expression reverses EMT and inhibits these malignant properties. Using miRNA microarray profiling, we identified 29 miRNAs (let-7b, let-7f, miR-10b, miR-15b, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-25, miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-30a-5p, miR-34a, miR-124, miR-127, miR-130b, miR-148a, miR-155, miR-191*, miR-194, miR-224, miR-362, miR-409-3p, miR-422b, miR-424, miR-453, miR-497, miR-518d, miR-518f*, miR-526a and miR-656) that are significantly down-regulated in an in vitro-selected highly invasive derivative cell line (HEC-50-HI) relative to the parental HEC-50 cells. We further identified miR-124 as a direct regulator of IQGAP1 in EC cells. Enforced expression of miR-124 suppresses EC cell invasion and proliferation. The expression of IQGAP1 mRNA was significantly elevated in EC tissues, while the expression of miR-124 was decreased. The downregulation of miR-124 correlates with a poor survival outcome for patients with EC. Treating EC cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased miR-124 expression and down-regulated IQGAP1 levels. Our data suggest that IQGAP1 promotes EMT, migration and invasion of EC cells. MiR-124, a novel tumor suppressor miRNA that is epigenetically silenced in EC, can reverse EMT and the invasive properties, by attenuating the expression of the IQGAP1 oncogene. PMID:26934121

  20. Evaluation of miR-29c, miR-124, miR-135a and miR-148a in predicting lymph node metastasis and tumor stage of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Ye, Jia-Xiang; Qin, Yu-Zhou; Chen, Qi-Huang; Ge, Lian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA that have diverse functions in different biological process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive ability of miR-29c, miR-124, miR-135a and miR-148a for lymph node metastasis (LNM) and tumor stage in gastric cancer. The expression of these miRNAs was detected and quantitated in gastric cancer tissues and in adjacent normal tissues from 60 patients by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. CT imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of these patients were performed. The result of this study was that these miRNAs were down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues; The low expression of miR-124 and miR-135a in LNM group and tumor III-IV stages (P < 0.01) presented the potential correlation with LNM and tumor stage; The two miRNAs were highly correlated with r = 0.730. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that miR-124 had better predictive ability to identify LNM and tumor stage. It could discriminate non-LNM from LNM with 80.0% sensitivity and 80.0% specificity and discriminate tumor Ι-II stages from tumor III-IV stages with 71.9% sensitivity and 75.0% specificity at the best cut-off value of 0.0125. Compared with CT imaging, miR-124 had similar specificity (0.800 versus 0.900, P = 0.508) but higher sensitivity (0.800 versus 0.500, P = 0.022) for lymph node assessment; Combined of miR-124 and CT imaging, The sensitivity and specificity of assessing LNM were raised to 83.3% and 90.0% respectively. Taken together, miR-124 may be a predictor for LNM and tumor stage in gastric cancer.

  1. The tumor suppressor miR-124 inhibits cell proliferation and invasion by targeting B7-H3 in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Kang, Fu-Biao; Sun, Nan; Wang, Juan; Chen, Wei; Li, Dong; Shan, Bao-En

    2016-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the expression level of B7 homolog 3 (B7-H3) was correlated with clinical staging and prognosis of osteosarcoma (OS) patients, and its silencing inhibited the proliferation and invasion of OS cells in vitro. However, its overexpression mechanism behind was far from elucidated. On the basis of bioinformatics and the preliminary screening data, we hypothesized that miR-124 might play an important role in OS development and as a lead candidate for modulating B7-H3 expression. In this study, we found that miR-124 was downregulated significantly in OS tumor tissue, compared to normal adjacent tissues (NATs). Lower miR-124 expression levels were associated with advanced Ennecking stage, lower tumor differentiation, and common pulmonary metastasis. The 5-year overall survival rate in the miR-124 upregulated group was 61.5 %, while with low miR-124 expression, only 11.8 % survived. Further studies in vitro showed that B7-H3 was a direct target of miR-124. Overexpression of miR-124 decreased B7-H3 mRNA and protein level and inhibited B7-H3 3'-UTR reporter activity. Treatment of OS cells with miR-124 mimics induced the inhibition of cell growth and invasion in vitro, which could be abrogated by transfected by B7-H3 expression vector. Our findings highlight the potential application of miR-124 as a novel onco-miRNA in OS, and its oncogenic effects are mediated chiefly through downregulation of B7-H3, thus suggesting a model for identifying miR-124 that can be exploited to improve the therapeutic potential efficacy of mAb targeting to B7-H3.

  2. Early methyl donor deficiency may induce persistent brain defects by reducing Stat3 signaling targeted by miR-124

    PubMed Central

    Kerek, R; Geoffroy, A; Bison, A; Martin, N; Akchiche, N; Pourié, G; Helle, D; Guéant, J-L; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, C; Daval, J-L

    2013-01-01

    The methyl donors folate (vitamin B9) and vitamin B12 are centrepieces of the one-carbon metabolism that has a key role in transmethylation reactions, and thus in epigenetic and epigenomic regulations. Low dietary intakes of folate and vitamin B12 are frequent, especially in pregnant women and in the elderly, and deficiency constitutes a risk factor for various diseases, including neurological and developmental disorders. In this respect, both vitamins are essential for normal brain development, and have a role in neuroplasticity and in the maintenance of neuronal integrity. The consequences of a methyl donor deficiency (MDD) were studied both in vivo in rats exposed in utero, and in vitro in hippocampal progenitors (H19-7 cell line). Deficiency was associated with growth retardation at embryonic day 20 (E20) and postnatally with long-term brain defects in selective areas. mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor Stat3 were found to be decreased in the brains of deprived fetuses and in differentiating progenitors (62 and 48% for total Stat3 protein, respectively), along with a strong reduction in its phosphorylation at both Tyr705 and Ser727 residues. Vitamin shortage also affected upstream kinases of Stat3 signaling pathway (phospho-Erk1/2, phospho-Src, phospho-JNK, and phospho-p38) as well as downstream target gene products (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL), thus promoting apoptosis. Conversely, the expression of the Stat3 regulator miR-124 was upregulated in deficiency conditions (≥65%), and its silencing by using siRNA partly restored Stat3 signaling in hippocampal neurons by increasing specifically the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Src kinases. Furthermore, miR-124 siRNA improved the phenotype of deprived cells, with enhanced neurite outgrowth. Taken together, our data suggest that downregulation of Stat3 signaling by miR-124 would be a key factor in the deleterious effects of MDD on brain development. PMID:23928694

  3. Neuronal exosomal miRNA-dependent translational regulation of astroglial glutamate transporter GLT1.

    PubMed

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-03-08

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Neuronal Exosomal miRNA-dependent Translational Regulation of Astroglial Glutamate Transporter GLT1*

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Lydie; Regan, Melissa; Higashimori, Haruki; Ng, Seng Kah; Esau, Christine; Vidensky, Svetlana; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Yang, Yongjie

    2013-01-01

    Perisynaptic astrocytes express important glutamate transporters, especially excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2, rodent analog GLT1) to regulate extracellular glutamate levels and modulate synaptic activation. In this study, we investigated an exciting new pathway, the exosome-mediated transfer of microRNA (in particular, miR-124a), in neuron-to-astrocyte signaling. Exosomes isolated from neuron-conditioned medium contain abundant microRNAs and small RNAs. These exosomes can be directly internalized into astrocytes and increase astrocyte miR-124a and GLT1 protein levels. Direct miR-124a transfection also significantly and selectively increases protein (but not mRNA) expression levels of GLT1 in cultured astrocytes. Consistent with our in vitro findings, intrastriatal injection of specific antisense against miR-124a into adult mice dramatically reduces GLT1 protein expression and glutamate uptake levels in striatum without reducing GLT1 mRNA levels. MiR-124a-mediated regulation of GLT1 expression appears to be indirect and is not mediated by its suppression of the putative GLT1 inhibitory ligand ephrinA3. Moreover, miR-124a is selectively reduced in the spinal cord tissue of end-stage SOD1 G93A mice, the mouse model of ALS. Subsequent exogenous delivery of miR-124a in vivo through stereotaxic injection significantly prevents further pathological loss of GLT1 proteins, as determined by GLT1 immunoreactivity in SOD1 G93A mice. Together, our study characterized a new neuron-to-astrocyte communication pathway and identified miRNAs that modulate GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23364798

  5. miR-124, -128, and -137 Orchestrate Neural Differentiation by Acting on Overlapping Gene Sets Containing a Highly Connected Transcription Factor Network.

    PubMed

    Santos, Márcia C T; Tegge, Allison N; Correa, Bruna R; Mahesula, Swetha; Kohnke, Luana Q; Qiao, Mei; Ferreira, Marco A R; Kokovay, Erzsebet; Penalva, Luiz O F

    2016-01-01

    The ventricular-subventricular zone harbors neural stem cells (NSCs) that can differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. This process requires loss of stem cell properties and gain of characteristics associated with differentiated cells. miRNAs function as important drivers of this transition; miR-124, -128, and -137 are among the most relevant ones and have been shown to share commonalities and act as proneurogenic regulators. We conducted biological and genomic analyses to dissect their target repertoire during neurogenesis and tested the hypothesis that they act cooperatively to promote differentiation. To map their target genes, we transfected NSCs with antagomiRs and analyzed differences in their mRNA profile throughout differentiation with respect to controls. This strategy led to the identification of 910 targets for miR-124, 216 for miR-128, and 652 for miR-137. The target sets show extensive overlap. Inspection by gene ontology and network analysis indicated that transcription factors are a major component of these miRNAs target sets. Moreover, several of these transcription factors form a highly interconnected network. Sp1 was determined to be the main node of this network and was further investigated. Our data suggest that miR-124, -128, and -137 act synergistically to regulate Sp1 expression. Sp1 levels are dramatically reduced as cells differentiate and silencing of its expression reduced neuronal production and affected NSC viability and proliferation. In summary, our results show that miRNAs can act cooperatively and synergistically to regulate complex biological processes like neurogenesis and that transcription factors are heavily targeted to branch out their regulatory effect.

  6. A functional MiR-124 binding-site polymorphism in IQGAP1 affects human cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Zhang, Rui; Li, Ming; Wu, Xujun; Wang, Jianhong; Huang, Lin; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Qingwei; Su, Bing

    2014-01-01

    As a product of the unique evolution of the human brain, human cognitive performance is largely a collection of heritable traits. Rather surprisingly, to date there have been no reported cases to highlight genes that underwent adaptive evolution in humans and which carry polymorphisms that have a marked effect on cognitive performance. IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1), a scaffold protein, affects learning and memory in a dose-dependent manner. Its expression is regulated by miR-124 through the binding sites in the 3'UTR, where a SNP (rs1042538) exists in the core-binding motif. Here we showed that this SNP can influence the miR-target interaction both in vitro and in vivo. Individuals carrying the derived T alleles have higher IQGAP1 expression in the brain as compared to the ancestral A allele carriers. We observed a significant and male-specific association between rs1042538 and tactile performances in two independent cohorts. Males with the derived allele displayed higher tactual performances as compared to those with the ancestral allele. Furthermore, we found a highly diverged allele-frequency distribution of rs1042538 among world human populations, likely caused by natural selection and/or recent population expansion. These results suggest that current human populations still carry sequence variations that affect cognitive performances and that these genetic variants may likely have been subject to comparatively recent natural selection.

  7. Reduced Levels of microRNAs miR-124a and miR-150 Are Associated with Increased Proinflammatory Mediator Expression in Krüppel-like Factor 2 (KLF2)-deficient Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Palanikumar; Basford, Joshua E.; Pilcher-Roberts, Robyn; Neumann, Jonathan; Hui, David Y.; Lingrel, Jerry B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the myeloid-specific deficiency of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) accelerates atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr−/− mice due to the enhanced adhesion of myeloid cells to activated endothelial cells in the vessel wall. This study revealed elevated basal inflammation with elevated plasma levels of Ccl2, Ccl4, Ccl5, and Ccl11 in the myeloid-specific KLF2 knock-out (myeKlf2−/−) mice. Peritoneal macrophages isolated from myeKlf2−/− mice showed increased mRNA levels of several inflammatory mediators, including Ccl2, Ccl5, Ccl7, Cox-2, Cxcl1, and IL-6. In contrast, the levels of two microRNAs, miR-124a and miR-150, were lower in Klf2−/− macrophages compared with Klf2+/+ macrophages. Additional studies showed a direct inverse relationship between miR-124a levels with Ccl2 expression, with anti-miR-124a increasing Ccl2 mRNA levels in Klf2+/+ macrophages, whereas the restoration of miR-124a levels in Klf2−/− macrophages significantly reduced Ccl2 mRNA expression. Likewise, the inverse relationship was observed between miR-150 levels and Cxcl1 expression in Klf2+/+ and Klf2−/− mice. Moreover, miR150 likely regulates the miR124a expression and thus augments expression of inflammatory mediators in myeKlf2−/− macrophages. This study documented that the transcription factor KLF2 modulates inflammatory chemokine production via regulation of microRNA expression levels in immune cells. PMID:25248747

  8. The expression of miR-124 increases in aged skin to cause cell senescence and it decreases in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Harada, Miho; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Wang, Zhongzhi; Hirano, Ayaka; Tomizawa, Yukiko; Kira, Tomomi; Igata, Toshikatsu; Masuguchi, Shinichi; Fukushima, Satoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2017-01-16

    Skin senescence is induced by various factors including intrinsic aging and extrinsic aging. The current study compared the expression of microRNAs in young facial skin and senescent facial skin, and this study identified skin aging-related microRNAs. According to the results from a microRNA PCR Array, miR-124 was the microRNA that increased the most in senescent skin compared to young skin. Real-time PCR with a greater number of samples indicated that the increase in miR-124 levels in senescent facial skin was statistically significant. In situ hybridization was performed, and results indicated that the signal for miR-124 was evident in keratinocytes of senescent skin but not in those of young skin. The morphology of cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) transfected with a miR-124 mimic changed to an enlarged and irregular shape. In addition, the number of NHEKs positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) increased significantly as a result of the overexpression of the miR-124 mimic. The expression of miR-124 increased in UVB-irradiated NHEKs compared to controls in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of miR-124 in A431, a human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line, decreased significantly compared to that in NHEKs. Forced overexpression of miR-124 as a result of the transfection of a miR-124 mimic in A431 resulted in the significant suppression of the proportion of cancer cells. The current results indicated that miR-124 increases as a result of cell senescence and that it decreases during tumorigenesis. The effect of supplementation of miR-124 in an SCC cell line suggests that senescence induction therapy with microRNA may be a new therapeutic approach for treatment of SCC.

  9. miR-124 and androgen receptor signaling inhibitors repress prostate cancer growth by downregulating androgen receptor splice variants, EZH2 and Src

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xu-Bao; Ma, Ai-Hong; Xue, Lingru; Li, Meimei; Nguyen, Hao G.; Yang, Joy C.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Evans, Christopher P.; Kung, Hsing-Jien; deVere White, Ralph W.

    2015-01-01

    miR-124 targets the androgen receptor transcript, acting as a tumor suppressor to broadly limit the growth of prostate cancer (CaP). In this study, we unraveled the mechanisms through which miR-124 acts in this setting. miR-124 inhibited proliferation of CaP cells in vitro and sensitizes them to inhibitors of androgen receptor signaling (ARSIs). Notably, miR-124 could restore the apoptotic response of cells resistant to enzalutamide, a drug approved for the treatment of castration-resistant CaP. We employed xenograft models to examine the effects of miR-124 in vivo when complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI)-derived nanoparticles. Intravenous delivery of miR-124 was sufficient to inhibit tumor growth and to increase tumor cell apoptosis in combination with enzalutamide. Mechanistic investigations revealed that miR-124 directly downregulated AR splice variants AR-V4 and V7 along with EZH2 and Src, oncogenic targets that have been reported to contribute to CaP progression and treatment resistance. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical rationale to evaluate miR-124 for cancer treatment. PMID:26573802

  10. MiR-124 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting the expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and its downstream signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Ling, Zhiqiang; Hao, Yubin; Pang, Xiaowu; Han, Xianlin; Califano, Joseph A; Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin

    2017-02-15

    By analyzing the expression profile of microRNAs in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), we found that the expression level of miR-124 was 4.59-fold lower in tumors than in normal tissues. To understand its functions, we generated a miR-124-expressing subline (JHU-22miR124) and a mock vector-transfected subline (JHU-22vec) by transfecting the mimic of miR-124 into JHU-22 cancer cells. Restored expression of miR-124 in JHU-22miR124 cells led to reduced cell proliferation, delayed colony formation, and decreased tumor growth, indicating a tumor-suppressive effect of miR-124. Subsequent target search revealed that the 3'-UTR of SphK1 mRNA carries a complementary site for the seed region of miR-124. SphK1 was also detected to be overexpressed in HNSCC cell lines, but down-expressed in JHU-22miR124 cells and tumor xenografts. These results suggest that SphK1 is a target of miR-124. To confirm this finding, we constructed a 3'-UTR-Luc-SphK1 vector and a binding site-mutated luciferase reporter vector. Co-transfection of 3'-UTR-Luc-SphK1 with miR-124 expression vector exhibited a 9-fold decrease in luciferase activity compared with mutated vector, suggesting that miR-124 inhibits SphK1 activity directly. Further studies on downstream signaling demonstrated accumulation of ceramide, increased expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax, BAD and PARP, decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and enhanced expression of cytochrome c and caspase proteins in JHU-22miR124 compared with JHU-22vec cells and tumor xenografts. We conclude that miR-124 acts as a tumor suppressor in HNSCC by directly inhibiting SphK1 activity and its downstream signals.

  11. Upregulation of miR-124 by physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside inhibits proliferation and invasion of malignant melanoma cells via repressing RLIP76.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Han, Yantao; Xu, Luo

    2016-12-01

    Melanoma is the most malignant type of skin cancer. In recent years, mounting studies have evidenced the involvement of miRNAs in melanoma. One of these miRNAs, miR-124 has been found aberrantly downregulated in a variety of human malignancies. In this study, our results showed that the expression of miR-124 was significantly lower in malignant melanoma tissues and cell lines and miR-124 functioned as a tumor suppressor in melanoma. Moreover, our findings showed that miR-124 exerted anti-tumor effect by directly targeting RLIP76, a stress-inducible non-ABC transporter that plays a crucial role in the development of melanoma. Furthermore, our study also showed that physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside, a natural compound from medicinal plant, could inhibit the proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells by targeting miR-124/RLIP76 signaling.

  12. The feedback loop between miR-124 and TGF-β pathway plays a significant role in non-small cell lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zu, Lidong; Xue, Yunjing; Wang, Jinglong; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Xiumin; Xiao, Gang; Hao, Mingang; Sun, Xueqing; Wang, Yingying; Fu, Guohui; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence shows that micro RNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in tumor development. However, the role of miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastasis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that miR-124 expression was significantly impaired in NSCLC tissues and associated with its metastasis. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that restoring miR-124 expression in NSCLC cells had a marked effect on reducing cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Mechanistic analyses show that Smad4, a cobinding protein in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway, was identified as a new target gene of miR-124. Restoring Smad4 expression in miR-124-infected cells could partially rescue miR-124-induced abolition of cell migration and invasion. Notably, upon TGF-β stimulation, phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was modulated by alteration of miR-124 or Smad4 expression, followed by inducing some special transcription of downstream genes including Snail, Slug and ZEB2, all of which may trigger epithelial-mesenchymal transition and be associated with NSCLC metastasis. Moreover, activation of TGF-β pathway may enhance expression of DNMT3a, leading to hypermethylation on miR-124 promoter. Therefore, heavily loss of miR-124 expression further enhances Smad4 level by this feedback loop. Taken together, our data show for the first time that the feedback loop between miR-124 and TGF-β pathway may play a significant role in NSCLC metastasis. Targeting the loop may prove beneficial to prevent metastasis and provide a more effective therapeutic strategy for NSCLC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Decrease in levels of the evolutionarily conserved microRNA miR-124 affects oligodendrocyte numbers in Zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline K; Chomyk, Anthony; Song, Ping; Parker, Nate; Deckard, Sadie; Trapp, Bruce D; Pimplikar, Sanjay W; Dutta, Ranjan

    2015-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes produce multi-lamellar myelin membranes that surround axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Preservation and generation of myelin are potential therapeutic targets for dysmyelinating and demyelinating diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in oligodendrocyte differentiation and overall CNS development. miR-124 is a well-conserved neuronal miRNA with important roles in neuronal differentiation and function. miR-124 levels increase following loss of myelin in both human and rodent brains. While the role of neuronal miR-124 in neurogenesis has been established, its effects on axonal outgrowth and oligodendrocytes are not currently known. We therefore explored the possible effect of selective knockdown of miR-124 in Danio rerio using a morpholino-based knockdown approach. No morphological abnormalities or loss of motor neurons were detected despite loss of axonal outgrowth. Morpholino-based knockdown of miR-124 led to reciprocal increases in mRNA levels of target genes that inhibit axonal and dendritic projections. Importantly, loss of miR-124 led to decreased oligodendrocyte cell numbers and myelination of axonal projections in the ventral hindbrain. Taken together, our results add a new dimension to the existing complexity of neuron-glial relationships and highlight the utility of Danio rerio as a model system to investigate such interactions.

  14. Increased Brain-Specific MiR-9 and MiR-124 in the Serum Exosomes of Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jingwen; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xinya; Zhao, Heng; Xu, Tian; Chen, Ling; Xu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the alternation in serum exosome concentrations and the levels of serum exosomal miR-9 and miR-124, two brain-specific miRNAs, in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients and to explore the predictive values of these miRNAs for AIS diagnosis and damage evaluation. Sixty-five patients with AIS at the acute stage were enrolled and 66 non-stroke volunteers served as controls. Serum exosomes isolated by ExoQuick precipitations were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle-tracking analysis and western blotting. The levels of exosomal miR-9 and miR-124 were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Compared with controls, the concentration of serum exosomes and the median levels of serum exosomal miR-9 and miR-124 were significantly higher in AIS patients (p<0.01). The levels of both miR-9 and miR-124 were positively correlated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, infarct volumes and serum concentrations of IL-6. The areas under the curve for exosomal miR-9 and miR-124 were 0.8026 and 0.6976, respectively. This proof of concept study suggests that serum exosomal miR-9 and miR-124 are promising biomarkers for diagnosing AIS and evaluating the degree of damage caused by ischemic injury. However, further studies are needed to explore the potential roles of the exosomes released from brain tissues in post stroke complications. PMID:27661079

  15. A SNP site in pri-miR-124 changes mature miR-124 expression but no contribution to Alzheimer's disease in a Mongolian population.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lu; Hu, Yi; Zhan, Ying; Wang, Jing; Wang, Bing-Bing; Xia, Hong-Fei; Ma, Xu

    2012-04-25

    Increasing evidence shows that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or mutations in microRNAs (miRNAs) sequence may affect the processing and function of miRNAs and participate in the occurrence of diseases. Although many SNPs of miRNAs were found, their functions in the pathological process of nerve cells were only just emerging. In the present study, the effect of the SNP of one neuronal miRNA, miR-124, on miRNA biogenesis and human genetic disease was investigated using in vitro cell line model and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the Mongolian population. Bioinformatics prediction showed that a common G/C polymorphism designated rs531564 was found in the pri-miR-124 and the G allele changed the formation of a ring-shaped structure in the predicted secondary structure of the pri-miRNA for miR-124-1. Northern blot and real-time PCR analysis showed that the amount of mature miR-124 from the C/G heterozygosity of rs531564 was increased compared with the CC or GG homozygosity of rs531564. The expression of mature miR-124 from GG homozygosity was also higher than that from CC homozygosity. But in an association study of AD patients and controls, neither genotype nor allele distribution difference was found in AD patients compared with controls. Collectively, the present study is the first to evaluate the relationship between miR-124 and AD in the Mongolian population. SNP rs531564 of miR-124 may not represent a risk factor in the development of AD among Mongolian population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The brain-enriched microRNA miR-124 in plasma predicts neurological outcome after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Gilje, Patrik; Gidlöf, Olof; Rundgren, Malin; Cronberg, Tobias; Al-Mashat, Mariam; Olde, Björn; Friberg, Hans; Erlinge, David

    2014-03-03

    Early prognostication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation is difficult, and there is a need for novel methods to estimate the extent of brain injury and predict outcome. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the cardiac arrest syndrome on the plasma levels of selected tissue-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and assessed their ability to prognosticate death and neurological disability. We included 65 patients treated with hypothermia after cardiac arrest in the study. Blood samples were obtained at 24 hours and at 48 hours. For miRNA-screening purposes, custom quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels were first used. Thereafter individual miRNAs were assessed at 48 hours with qPCR. miRNAs that successfully predicted prognosis at 48 hours were further analysed at 24 hours. Outcomes were measured according to the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after cardiac arrest and stratified into good (CPC score 1 or 2) or poor (CPC scores 3 to 5). At 48 hours, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-208b, miR-21, miR-9 and miR-128 did not differ between the good and poor neurological outcome groups. In contrast, miR-124 was significantly elevated in patients with poor outcomes compared with those with favourable outcomes (P < 0.0001) at 24 hours and 48 hours after cardiac arrest. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves at 24 and 48 hours after cardiac arrest showed areas under the curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.79 to 0.96) and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.80 to 0.97), respectively. The brain-enriched miRNA miR-124 is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological prognosis following cardiac arrest.

  17. Yokukansan normalizes glucocorticoid receptor protein expression in oligodendrocytes of the corpus callosum by regulating microRNA-124a expression after stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Tohyama, Masaya; Miyata, Shingo

    2015-05-01

    Stressful events are known to down-regulate expression levels of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the brain. Recently, we reported that stressed mice with elevated plasma levels of corticosterone exhibit morphological changes in the oligodendrocytes of nerve fiber bundles, such as those in the corpus callosum. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GR expression regulation in oligodendrocytes after stress exposure. A previous report has suggested that GR protein levels might be regulated by microRNA (miR)-18 and/or -124a in the brain. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the GR regulation mechanism in oligodendrocytes and evaluate the effects of yokukansan (YKS), a Kampo medicine, on GR protein regulation. Acute exposure to stress increased plasma corticosterone levels, decreased GR protein expression, and increased miR-124a expression in the corpus callosum of adult male mice, though the GR mRNA and miR-18 expression levels were not significant changes. YKS normalized the stress-induced changes in the plasma corticosterone, GR protein, and miR124a expression levels. An oligodendrocyte primary culture study also showed that YKS down-regulated miR-124a, but not miR-18, expression levels in dexamethasone-treated cells. These results suggest that the down-regulation of miR124a expression might be involved in the normalization of stress-induced decreases in GR protein in oligodendrocytes by YKS. This effect may imply the molecular mechanisms underlying the ameliorative effects of YKS on psychological symptoms and stress-related behaviors.

  18. The brain-enriched microRNA miR-124 in plasma predicts neurological outcome after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early prognostication after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation is difficult, and there is a need for novel methods to estimate the extent of brain injury and predict outcome. In this study, we evaluated the impact of the cardiac arrest syndrome on the plasma levels of selected tissue-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) and assessed their ability to prognosticate death and neurological disability. Methods We included 65 patients treated with hypothermia after cardiac arrest in the study. Blood samples were obtained at 24 hours and at 48 hours. For miRNA-screening purposes, custom quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels were first used. Thereafter individual miRNAs were assessed at 48 hours with qPCR. miRNAs that successfully predicted prognosis at 48 hours were further analysed at 24 hours. Outcomes were measured according to the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after cardiac arrest and stratified into good (CPC score 1 or 2) or poor (CPC scores 3 to 5). Results At 48 hours, miR-146a, miR-122, miR-208b, miR-21, miR-9 and miR-128 did not differ between the good and poor neurological outcome groups. In contrast, miR-124 was significantly elevated in patients with poor outcomes compared with those with favourable outcomes (P < 0.0001) at 24 hours and 48 hours after cardiac arrest. Analysis of receiver operating characteristic curves at 24 and 48 hours after cardiac arrest showed areas under the curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.79 to 0.96) and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.80 to 0.97), respectively. Conclusions The brain-enriched miRNA miR-124 is a promising novel biomarker for prediction of neurological prognosis following cardiac arrest. PMID:24588965

  19. Reduction of COX-2 through modulating miR-124/SPHK1 axis contributes to the antimetastatic effect of alpinumisoflavone in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Chang, Yuan; Wang, Xiuyong; Ban, Chao; Zhang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Alpinumisoflavone (AIF) is a naturally occurring flavonoid that is a major bioactive component of the medicinal plant Derris eriocarpa. In this study we evaluated the antimetastatic effect of AIF and investigated the underlying mechanism of action using in vitro and in vivo models of melanoma. We found that AIF impaired the metastatic potential of A375 and SK-MEL-1 human melanoma cells by promoting cell differentiation as assessed by melanin content, protoporphyrin IX accumulation, and tissue transglutaminase activity. In addition, AIF inhibited cell adhesion, migration, and invasion in melanoma cells. We found that AIF treatment decreased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and COX-2 overexpression attenuated the inhibitory effects of AIF on the metastatic behaviors of melanoma cells. AIF dose-dependently increased microRNA-124 (miR-124) levels and decreased levels of sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), a target of miR-124. In a mouse model of melanoma, AIF suppressed lung metastasis. Taken together, our findings suggest that AIF inhibits metastasis in melanoma by modulating COX-2 expression, at least in part, through targeting the miR-124/SphK1 axis. Our study provides evidence that AIF may be useful as an antimetastatic agent in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:28386327

  20. Micro RNA-124a regulates lipolysis via adipose triglyceride lipase and comparative gene identification 58.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman K; Stadelmeyer, Elke; Schauer, Silvia; Schwarz, Anna; Strohmaier, Heimo; Claudel, Thiery; Zechner, Rudolf; Hoefler, Gerald; Vesely, Paul W

    2015-04-16

    Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of cellular triacylglycerol (TG). Lipolytic TG breakdown is a central metabolic process leading to the generation of free fatty acids (FA) and glycerol, thereby regulating lipid, as well as energy homeostasis. The precise tuning of lipolysis is imperative to prevent lipotoxicity, obesity, diabetes and other related metabolic disorders. Here, we present our finding that miR-124a attenuates RNA and protein expression of the major TG hydrolase, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL/PNPLA2) and its co-activator comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58/ABHD5). Ectopic expression of miR-124a in adipocytes leads to reduced lipolysis and increased cellular TG accumulation. This phenotype, however, can be rescued by overexpression of truncated Atgl lacking its 3'UTR, which harbors the identified miR-124a target site. In addition, we observe a strong negative correlation between miR-124a and Atgl expression in various murine tissues. Moreover, miR-124a regulates the expression of Atgl and Cgi-58 in murine white adipose tissue during fasting as well as the expression of Atgl in murine liver, during fasting and re-feeding. Together, these results point to an instrumental role of miR-124a in the regulation of TG catabolism. Therefore, we suggest that miR-124a may be involved in the regulation of several cellular and organismal metabolic parameters, including lipid storage and plasma FA concentration.

  1. Micro RNA-124a Regulates Lipolysis via Adipose Triglyceride Lipase and Comparative Gene Identification 58

    PubMed Central

    Das, Suman K.; Stadelmeyer, Elke; Schauer, Silvia; Schwarz, Anna; Strohmaier, Heimo; Claudel, Thiery; Zechner, Rudolf; Hoefler, Gerald; Vesely, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of cellular triacylglycerol (TG). Lipolytic TG breakdown is a central metabolic process leading to the generation of free fatty acids (FA) and glycerol, thereby regulating lipid, as well as energy homeostasis. The precise tuning of lipolysis is imperative to prevent lipotoxicity, obesity, diabetes and other related metabolic disorders. Here, we present our finding that miR-124a attenuates RNA and protein expression of the major TG hydrolase, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL/PNPLA2) and its co-activator comparative gene identification 58 (CGI-58/ABHD5). Ectopic expression of miR-124a in adipocytes leads to reduced lipolysis and increased cellular TG accumulation. This phenotype, however, can be rescued by overexpression of truncated Atgl lacking its 3'UTR, which harbors the identified miR-124a target site. In addition, we observe a strong negative correlation between miR-124a and Atgl expression in various murine tissues. Moreover, miR-124a regulates the expression of Atgl and Cgi-58 in murine white adipose tissue during fasting as well as the expression of Atgl in murine liver, during fasting and re-feeding. Together, these results point to an instrumental role of miR-124a in the regulation of TG catabolism. Therefore, we suggest that miR-124a may be involved in the regulation of several cellular and organismal metabolic parameters, including lipid storage and plasma FA concentration. PMID:25894224

  2. Sulforaphane improves chemotherapy efficacy by targeting cancer stem cell-like properties via the miR-124/IL-6R/STAT3 axis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Li, Yuan; Dai, Yi; Liu, Qinqiang; Ning, Shilong; Liu, Jiao; Shen, Zhaoxia; Zhu, Dongmei; Jiang, Fei; Zhang, Jianping; Li, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma (GC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The efficacy of standard chemotherapy for GC, such as cisplatin (CDDP), is dissatisfactory partly due to the toxic/side-effects. Sulforaphane (SFN), which exhibits effective anti-cancer functions, is a phytochemical converted from cruciferous plants. Our present study aimed to identify whether SFN could enhance the anti-cancer effects of low-dose CDDP and to determine the underlying mechanisms. Herein, co-exposure of SFN and CDDP significantly inhibited the viabilities of gastric cancer cells. For the molecular mechanisms, CDDP alone increased the cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties in gastric cancer cells via activating the interleukin-6 (IL-6)/IL-6 receptor (IL-6R)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. However, SFN could activate the microRNA-124 (miR-124), which directly targets the 3′-untranslated regions (UTR) of the IL-6R and STAT3. Moreover, knockdown of miR-124 eliminated the effects of SFN on CSC-like properties in GC cells, and in turn enhanced the anti-cancer effects of low-dose CDDP. These findings not only suggested a mechanism whereby SFN enhanced the anti-cancer functions of CDDP, but also helped to regard SFN as a potential chemotherapeutic factor in gastric cancer. PMID:27824145

  3. Affection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in miR-27a, miR-124a, and miR-146a on susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese Han people.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong-Tong; Chen, Yong-Jie; Sun, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Si-Jia; Zhou, Zhong-Yu; Qiao, Hong

    2015-02-20

    Polymorphisms of microRNA (miRNA), as a novel mechanism, are closely associated with disease states by interfering with miRNA function. Direct correlations have been identified between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA, but the effect on type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) onset among Chinese population remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify correlations between common SNPs in miR-27a, miR-146a, and miR-124a with T2DM among a Chinese population, as well as to explore diabetic pathological mechanisms and the impact of environmental factors. SNPscan technology was used to genotype 995 patients newly diagnosed with T2DM and 967 controls. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare mutation frequencies between cases and controls. We found no significant correlations between all genotypes of these miRNAs and T2DM in our research. However, stratification analysis identified a lower risk of T2DM associated with the rs531564GC genotype among younger subjects (age < 45 years) (adjusted P = 0.043; odds ratio [OR] = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.54-0.99). Furthermore, the rs895819CC genotype in overweight people (24 ≤ body mass index [BMI] < 28) was significantly associated with an increased risk of T2DM (adjusted P = 0.042; OR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.02-2.94), while the rs2910164 genotype in miR-146a was not significantly correlated with T2DM. The genetic risk score was calculated based on the number of risk alleles of the three SNPs and was found to be correlated to total cholesterol (adjusted P = 0.021). The rs531564GC genotype acted as a protective factor to decrease the risk of T2DM in younger subjects (age < 45 years), while the presence of the rs895819CC genotype increased the risk of illness among overweight subjects (24 ≤ BMI < 28 kg/m 2 ). The presence of SNPs in miRNA might promote disease by affecting miRNA expression and gene function. Thus, miRNA mimics or inhibitors that directly regulate miRNA expression

  4. Micro-RNA speciation in fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, Walter J

    2007-02-12

    Micro-RNAs constitute a family of small noncoding ribonucleic acids that are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Although micro-RNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neural development, the role of micro-RNAs in brain aging and neurodegeneration is not known. This study examined micro-RNA abundance in the hippocampal region of fetal, adult and Alzheimer's disease brain. The data indicate that micro-RNAs encoding miR-9, miR-124a, miR-125b, miR-128, miR-132 and miR-219 are abundantly represented in fetal hippocampus, are differentially regulated in aged brain, and an alteration in specific micro-RNA complexity occurs in Alzheimer hippocampus. These data are consistent with the idea that altered micro-RNA-mediated processing of messenger RNA populations may contribute to atypical mRNA abundance and neural dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease brain.

  5. Lithium-induced neuroprotection in stroke involves increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance and decreased protein deubiquitination by GSK3β inhibition-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Doeppner, Thorsten R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Sanchez-Mendoza, Eduardo H; Caglayan, Ahmet B; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2017-03-01

    Lithium promotes acute poststroke neuronal survival, which includes mechanisms that are not limited to GSK3β inhibition. However, whether lithium induces long-term neuroprotection and enhanced brain remodeling is unclear. Therefore, mice were exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and lithium (1 mg/kg bolus followed by 2 mg/kg/day over up to 7 days) was intraperitoneally administered starting 0-9 h after reperfusion onset. Delivery of lithium no later than 6 h reduced infarct volume on day 2 and decreased brain edema, leukocyte infiltration, and microglial activation, as shown by histochemistry and flow cytometry. Lithium-induced neuroprotection persisted throughout the observation period of 56 days and was associated with enhanced neurological recovery. Poststroke angioneurogenesis and axonal plasticity were also enhanced by lithium. On the molecular level, lithium increased miR-124 expression, reduced RE1-silencing transcription factor abundance, and decreased protein deubiquitination in cultivated cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation and in brains of mice exposed to cerebral ischemia. Notably, this effect was not mimicked by pharmacological GSK3β inhibition. This study for the first time provides efficacy data for lithium in the postacute ischemic phase, reporting a novel mechanism of action, i.e. increased miR-124 expression facilitating REST degradation by which lithium promotes postischemic neuroplasticity and angiogenesis.

  6. Methylation Levels of CADM1, MAL, and MIR124-2 in Cervical Scrapes for Triage of HIV-Infected, High-Risk HPV-Positive Women in Kenya.

    PubMed

    De Vuyst, Hugo; Franceschi, Silvia; Plummer, Martyn; Mugo, Nelly R; Sakr, Samah R; Meijer, Chris J L M; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Tenet, Vanessa; Snijders, Peter J F; Hesselink, Albertus T; Chung, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the value of cervical cell methylation markers in screening HIV-infected women also positive for high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV). Cross-sectional and prospective. Two hundred forty-eight HIV-infected hrHPV-positive women enrolled in a cervical cancer screening study in Nairobi, Kenya, had colposcopy-directed biopsy and histological diagnoses. Exfoliated cervical cells were used to measure methylation levels of the CADM1, MAL, and MIR124-2 genes using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Methylation levels were summarized as cycle threshold (Ct) ratios compared with the β-actin gene. Median Ct ratios were compared across histological diagnoses, with 95% confidence intervals calculated by bootstrapping. Methylation levels at 6 months were assessed in 128 women who remained hrHPV positive. All 3 methylation markers showed significantly (P < 0.001) raised median Ct ratios in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 compared with women with a normal cervix. When markers were combined into a single test, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for prediction of CIN2 or worse (CIN2+) was 0.80. When the test was calibrated to have similar specificity, sensitivity of the combined tri-marker test for CIN2+ was comparable with cytology [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or worse] (89% and 95%, respectively) and superior to visual inspection with acetic acid (85% vs 70%) and HPV16/18 genotyping (65% vs 40%). Among women with no CIN2+ at baseline and persistent hrHPV at 6-month follow-up, MAL-m1 and MIR124-2 Ct ratios increased significantly. Methylation markers in combination with HPV testing may offer a full molecular screening strategy to the many HIV-infected women who are also hrHPV positive.

  7. Vocational and Adult Education: Major Regulation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Robert M.

    Federal regulations for the Adult Education Act and the Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act were revised in 1985. The following are the major changes to the Adult Education Act regulations: (1) the definition of "adult" was changed to permit services to persons under the age of 16 in some cases; (2) the definition of…

  8. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  9. Frizzled-1 receptor regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mardones, Muriel D; Andaur, Gabriela A; Varas-Godoy, Manuel; Henriquez, Jenny F; Salech, Felipe; Behrens, María Isabel; Couve, Andrés; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Varela-Nallar, Lorena

    2016-03-15

    In the adult hippocampus new neurons are continuously generated from neural stem cells (NSCs) present at the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. This process is controlled by Wnt signaling, which plays a complex role in regulating multiple steps of neurogenesis including maintenance, proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells and the development of newborn neurons. Differential effects of Wnt signaling during progression of neurogenesis could be mediated by cell-type specific expression of Wnt receptors. Here we studied the potential role of Frizzled-1 (FZD1) receptor in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In the adult dentate gyrus, we determined that FZD1 is highly expressed in NSCs, neural progenitors and immature neurons. Accordingly, FZD1 is expressed in cultured adult hippocampal progenitors isolated from mouse brain. To evaluate the role of this receptor in vivo we targeted FZD1 in newborn cells using retroviral-mediated RNA interference. FZD1 knockdown resulted in a marked decrease in the differentiation of newborn cells into neurons and increased the generation of astrocytes, suggesting a regulatory role for the receptor in cell fate commitment. In addition, FZD1 knockdown induced an extended migration of adult-born neurons within the granule cell layer. However, no differences were observed in total dendritic length and dendritic arbor complexity between control and FZD1-deficient newborn neurons. Our results show that FZD1 regulates specific stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, being required for neuronal differentiation and positioning of newborn neurons into the granule cell layer, but not for morphological development of adult-born granule neurons.

  10. Regulation of intestinal lactase in adult hypolactasia.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, M; Mevissen, G; Fischer, M; Olsen, W; Goodspeed, D; Genini, M; Boll, W; Semenza, G; Mantei, N

    1992-01-01

    Relative deficiency of intestinal lactase activity during adulthood, adult hypolactasia, is a common condition worldwide. We studied the regulation of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase in normal and adult hypolactasic subjects by correlating transcript abundance in intestinal biopsies with relative synthetic rates for the protein in cultured intestinal explants. After metabolic labelling studies in six subjects, precursor lactase-phlorizin hydrolase was identified in amounts directly proportional to the enzyme-specific activity suggesting that levels of intestinal lactase are regulated by synthetic rate. Total intestinal RNA was extracted from biopsies of these subjects and three hypolactasic adults who had participated in previous biosynthesis studies. Transcript levels were markedly reduced in deficient subjects who demonstrated diminished lactase-phlorizin hydrolase synthesis. The sequence of 1 kb of 5'-flanking region of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase gene was determined in two hypolactasic subjects and two controls. No sequence variability was identified to account for differences in mRNA levels or biosynthetic rates between the two groups. A single hypolactasic subject previously characterized as demonstrating delayed posttranslational processing, showed message levels intermediate between other deficients and controls. These results suggest that in the majority of our subjects, pretranslational mechanisms account for the predominate regulatory control of lactase-phlorizin hydrolase expression in the proximal intestine. Images PMID:1737843

  11. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  12. Tet1 Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Run-Rui; Cui, Qing-Yan; Murai, Kiyohito; Lim, Yen Ching; Smith, Zachary D.; Jin, Shengnan; Ye, Peng; Rosa, Luis; Lee, Yew Kok; Wu, Hai-Ping; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhi-Mei; Yang, Lu; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Tang, Fuchou; Meissner, Alexander; Ding, Chunming; Shi, Yanhong; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA hydroxylation catalyzed by Tet dioxygenases occurs abundantly in embryonic stem cells and neurons in mammals. However, its biological function in vivo is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that Tet1 plays an important role in regulating neural progenitor cell proliferation in adult mouse brain. Mice lacking Tet1 exhibit impaired hippocampal neurogenesis accompanied by poor learning and memory. In adult neural progenitor cells deficient in Tet1, a cohort of genes involved in progenitor proliferation were hypermethylated and down-regulated. Our results indicate that Tet1 is positively involved in the epigenetic regulation of neural progenitor cell proliferation in the adult brain. PMID:23770080

  13. Self-Regulation of Behavior: Students versus Other Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakesova, Jitka; Gavora, Peter; Kalenda, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to compare self-regulation of behaviour of two Czech samples. The first one was the representative sample of Czech adults that consisted of 1060 respondents. The second sample was university students and consisted of 1244 respondents. The measuring tool was an adapted Self-Regulation Questionnaire of which two…

  14. Wnt signaling in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain new neurons are continuously generated mainly in two regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the SGZ, radial neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to granule cells that integrate into the hippocampal circuitry and are relevant for the plasticity of the hippocampus. Loss of neurogenesis impairs learning and memory, suggesting that this process is important for adult hippocampal function. Adult neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple signaling pathways, including the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. This pathway plays important roles during the development of neuronal circuits and in the adult brain it modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we review current knowledge on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade and the potential mechanisms involved in this regulation. Also we discuss the evidence supporting that the canonical Wnt pathway is part of the signaling mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurogenesis in different physiological conditions. Finally, some unsolved questions regarding the Wnt-mediated regulation of neurogenesis are discussed. PMID:23805076

  15. Immunological regulation of neurogenic niches in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis are germinal processes that occur in the adult brain throughout life. The subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones are the main neurogenic regions in adult brain. Therein, it resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that act as neural stem cells. Increasing evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory and other immunological mediators are important regulators of neural precursors into the SVZ and the SGZ. There are a number of inflammatory cytokines that regulate the function of neural stem cells. Some of the most studied include: interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth-regulated oncogene-alpha, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. This plethora of immunological mediators can control the migration, proliferation, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of neural stem cells and their progeny. Thus, systemic or local inflammatory processes represent important regulators of germinal niches in the adult brain. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Additionally, we described the role of proinflammatory cytokines in neurodegenerative diseases and some therapeutical approaches for the immunomodulation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:22986164

  16. Self-regulation of adult thalamocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus acts as a conduit for sensory and other information traveling to the cortex. In response to continuous sensory stimulation in vivo, the firing rate of thalamocortical neurons initially increases, but then within a minute firing rate decreases and T-type Ca2+ channel-dependent action potential burst firing emerges. While neuromodulatory systems could play a role in this inhibitory response, we instead report a novel and cell-autonomous inhibitory mechanism intrinsic to the thalamic relay neuron. Direct intracellular stimulation of thalamocortical neuron firing initially triggered a continuous and high rate of action potential discharge, but within a minute membrane potential (Vm) was hyperpolarized and firing rate to the same stimulus was decreased. This self-inhibition was observed across a wide variety of thalamic nuclei, and in a subset firing mode switched from tonic to bursting. The self-inhibition resisted blockers of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, Na+-K+-ATPases, and G protein-regulated inward rectifier (GIRK) channels as implicated in other neuron subtypes, but instead was in part inhibited by an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker. The results identify a new homeostatic mechanism within the thalamus capable of gating excitatory signals at the single-cell level. PMID:25948871

  17. REST regulation of gene networks in adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shradha; Brulet, Rebecca; Zhang, Ling; Hsieh, Jenny

    2016-11-07

    Adult hippocampal neural stem cells generate newborn neurons throughout life due to their ability to self-renew and exist as quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs) before differentiating into transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control adult neural stem cell self-renewal are still largely unknown. Conditional knockout of REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) results in precocious activation of QNPs and reduced neurogenesis over time. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which REST regulates adult neural stem cells, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA-sequencing to identify direct REST target genes. We find REST regulates both QNPs and TAPs, and importantly, ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and neuronal genes in the process. Furthermore, overexpression of individual REST target ribosome biogenesis or cell cycle genes is sufficient to induce activation of QNPs. Our data define novel REST targets to maintain the quiescent neural stem cell state.

  18. REST regulation of gene networks in adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shradha; Brulet, Rebecca; Zhang, Ling; Hsieh, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neural stem cells generate newborn neurons throughout life due to their ability to self-renew and exist as quiescent neural progenitors (QNPs) before differentiating into transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control adult neural stem cell self-renewal are still largely unknown. Conditional knockout of REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) results in precocious activation of QNPs and reduced neurogenesis over time. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which REST regulates adult neural stem cells, we perform chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA-sequencing to identify direct REST target genes. We find REST regulates both QNPs and TAPs, and importantly, ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and neuronal genes in the process. Furthermore, overexpression of individual REST target ribosome biogenesis or cell cycle genes is sufficient to induce activation of QNPs. Our data define novel REST targets to maintain the quiescent neural stem cell state. PMID:27819263

  19. 34 CFR 460.3 - What regulations apply to the adult education programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply to the adult education programs...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.3 What regulations apply to the adult education programs? The following regulations apply to the...

  20. 34 CFR 460.3 - What regulations apply to the adult education programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply to the adult education programs...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.3 What regulations apply to the adult education programs? The following regulations apply to the...

  1. 34 CFR 460.3 - What regulations apply to the adult education programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply to the adult education programs...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.3 What regulations apply to the adult education programs? The following regulations apply to...

  2. 34 CFR 460.3 - What regulations apply to the adult education programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply to the adult education programs...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.3 What regulations apply to the adult education programs? The following regulations apply to...

  3. 34 CFR 460.3 - What regulations apply to the adult education programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply to the adult education programs...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 460.3 What regulations apply to the adult education programs? The following regulations apply to the...

  4. Selectivity as an Emotion Regulation Strategy: Lessons from Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Tamara; Hogan, Candice; Carstensen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Findings based on studies of daily life consistently associate older ages with relatively positive emotional experience, suggesting that older adults may regulate emotions more effectively than younger adults. Findings from laboratory studies are equivocal, however, with mixed evidence for age-related improvements in use of emotion regulatory strategies. In the current paper, we propose that findings may reflect a failure of laboratory-based experiments to capture the regulatory strategies that older people use in their everyday lives. We argue that the advantages older people have are likely due to antecedent emotion regulation as opposed to response-focused strategies. Understanding the regulatory approaches that older people actually use may inform developmental models of emotion regulation throughout adulthood as well as interventions for improving emotional experience across the life span. PMID:25914897

  5. Exploring deficient emotion regulation in adult ADHD: electrophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Shushakova, Anna; Ohrmann, Patricia; Pedersen, Anya

    2017-08-02

    Emotional dysregulation (ED) is being increasingly recognized as a core feature of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the pathophysiological underpinnings remain unclear. In this study, we provide meaningful electrophysiological evidence of ED in adult patients with ADHD (n = 39) compared to healthy controls (n = 40) by exploring the electrophysiological correlates of the emotion regulation strategies reappraisal, distraction, and expressive suppression. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during passive viewing of neutral and negative images, as well as during emotion regulation. The patients with ADHD exhibited increased frontal late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes during passive viewing of the aversive images and during emotion regulation. Compared with the healthy controls, a subgroup of medication-naïve patients with ADHD (n = 25) also exhibited larger centroparietal LPP amplitudes and provided more negative ratings of the aversive and neutral images. Both the frontal and centroparietal LPP amplitudes were associated with ADHD symptom severity. However, no significant deficit in LPP modulation during emotion regulation was found. These findings strongly support the clinical observation of increased emotional responsivity toward negative stimuli and difficulty during the implementation of emotion regulation strategies and thus encourage the implementation of emotion regulation modules in the treatment of adult patients with ADHD.

  6. Regulation and function of adult neurogenesis: from genes to cognition.

    PubMed

    Aimone, James B; Li, Yan; Lee, Star W; Clemenson, Gregory D; Deng, Wei; Gage, Fred H

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. This review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. The increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis. From Genes to Cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Aimone, J. B.; Li, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Clemenson, G. D.; Deng, W.; Gage, F. H.

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. Our review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. Furthermore, the increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders.

  8. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis. From Genes to Cognition

    DOE PAGES

    Aimone, J. B.; Li, Y.; Lee, S. W.; ...

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. Our review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages ofmore » maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. Furthermore, the increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders.« less

  9. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis: From Genes to Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, James B.; Li, Yan; Lee, Star W.; Clemenson, Gregory D.; Deng, Wei; Gage, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. This review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. The increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders. PMID:25287858

  10. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  11. The C. elegans adult neuronal IIS/FOXO transcriptome reveals adult phenotype regulators.

    PubMed

    Kaletsky, Rachel; Lakhina, Vanisha; Arey, Rachel; Williams, April; Landis, Jessica; Ashraf, Jasmine; Murphy, Coleen T

    2016-01-07

    Insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling (IIS) is a critical regulator of an organism's most important biological decisions from growth, development, and metabolism to reproduction and longevity. It primarily does so through the activity of the DAF-16 transcription factor (forkhead box O (FOXO) homologue), whose global targets were identified in Caenorhabditis elegans using whole-worm transcriptional analyses more than a decade ago. IIS and FOXO also regulate important neuronal and adult behavioural phenotypes, such as the maintenance of memory and axon regeneration with age, in both mammals and C. elegans, but the neuron-specific IIS/FOXO targets that regulate these functions are still unknown. By isolating adult C. elegans neurons for transcriptional profiling, we identified both the wild-type and IIS/FOXO mutant adult neuronal transcriptomes for the first time. IIS/FOXO neuron-specific targets are distinct from canonical IIS/FOXO-regulated longevity and metabolism targets, and are required for extended memory in IIS daf-2 mutants. The activity of the forkhead transcription factor FKH-9 in neurons is required for the ability of daf-2 mutants to regenerate axons with age, and its activity in non-neuronal tissues is required for the long lifespan of daf-2 mutants. Together, neuron-specific and canonical IIS/FOXO-regulated targets enable the coordinated extension of neuronal activities, metabolism, and longevity under low-insulin signalling conditions.

  12. Motor regulation problems and pain in adults diagnosed with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most children who are diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have moderate-to-severe motor problems using the Motor Function Neurological Assessment battery (MFNU). The MFNU focuses on specific muscle adjustment problems associated with ADHD, especially motor inhibition problems and high muscle tone. Here we investigated whether adults with ADHD/hyperkinetic disorder (HKD) have similar motor problems. In our clinical experience, adults with ADHD often complain about back, shoulder, hip, and leg pain. We also investigate reported pain in adults with ADHD. Methods Twenty-five adult outpatients diagnosed with ADHD/HKD who were responders to methylphenidate (MPH) were compared to 23 non-ADHD controls on 16 MFNU subtests and using a ‘total score’ (‘TS’) parameter. The MFNU test leader was blinded to group identity. The two groups were also compared using the Pain Drawing and Numerical Pain Rating Scale. Results The adult ADHD group had significantly (p < .001) more motor problems (higher TS) than controls. On the muscle regulation subtests, 36–96% of the ADHD group showed ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ problems compared to 13–52% of the control group, and 80% of the ADHD group reported widespread pain. Highly significant differences were found between the ADHD and control groups for the variables ‘pain level’ (p < .001) and ‘pain location’ (p < .001). Significant correlations were found between TS and ‘pain location’ and between TS and ‘pain level’. Conclusions These findings suggest that similar to children with ADHD, adults diagnosed with ADHD also have motor inhibition problems and heightened muscle tone. The presence of significantly higher pain levels and more widespread pain in the ADHD group compared to non-ADHD controls might indicate that pain is a long-term secondary effect of heightened muscle tone and restricted movement that can be demonstrated in children and adults by the MFNU

  13. Exploring Transcription Factors-microRNAs Co-regulation Networks in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Yue, Weihua; Yao Shugart, Yin; Li, Sheng; Cai, Lei; Li, Qiang; Cheng, Zaohuo; Wang, Guoqiang; Zhou, Zhenhe; Jin, Chunhui; Yuan, Jianmin; Tian, Lin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Kerang; Liu, Sha; Song, Yuqing; Zhang, Fuquan

    2016-07-01

    Transcriptional factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been recognized as 2 classes of principal gene regulators that may be responsible for genome coexpression changes observed in schizophrenia (SZ). This study aims to (1) identify differentially coexpressed genes (DCGs) in 3 mRNA expression microarray datasets; (2) explore potential interactions among the DCGs, and differentially expressed miRNAs identified in our dataset composed of early-onset SZ patients and healthy controls; (3) validate expression levels of some key transcripts; and (4) explore the druggability of DCGs using the curated database. We detected a differential coexpression network associated with SZ and found that 9 out of the 12 regulators were replicated in either of the 2 other datasets. Leveraging the differentially expressed miRNAs identified in our previous dataset, we constructed a miRNA-TF-gene network relevant to SZ, including an EGR1-miR-124-3p-SKIL feed-forward loop. Our real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated the overexpression of miR-124-3p, the under expression of SKIL and EGR1 in the blood of SZ patients compared with controls, and the direction of change of miR-124-3p and SKIL mRNA levels in SZ cases were reversed after a 12-week treatment cycle. Our druggability analysis revealed that many of these genes have the potential to be drug targets. Together, our results suggest that coexpression network abnormalities driven by combinatorial and interactive action from TFs and miRNAs may contribute to the development of SZ and be relevant to the clinical treatment of the disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Population-regulating processes during the adult phase in flatfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijnsdorp, A. D.

    Flatfish support major fisheries and the study of regulatory processes are of paramount importance for evaluating the resilience of the resource to exploitation. This paper reviews the evidence for processes operating during the adult phase that may 1. generate interannual variability in recruitment; 2. contribute to population regulation through density-dependent growth, density-dependent ripening of adults and density-dependent egg production. With regard to (1), there is evidence that in the adult phase processes do occur that may generate recruitment variability through variation in size-specific fecundity, contraction of spawning season, reduction in egg quality, change in sex ratio and size composition of the adult population. However, time series of recruitment do not provide support for this hypothesis. With regard to (2), there is ample evidence that exploitation of flatfish coincides with an increase in growth, although the mechanisms involved are not always clear. The presence of density-dependent growth in the adult phase of unexploited populations appears to be the most likely explanation in some cases. From the early years of exploitation of flatfish stocks inhabiting cold waters, evidence exists that adult fish do not spawn each year. Fecundity schedules show annual variations, but the available information suggests that size-specific fecundity is stable over a broad range of population abundance and may only decrease at high population abundance. The analysis is complicated by the possibility of a trade-off between egg numbers and egg size. Nevertheless, a density-dependent decrease in growth will automatically result in a decrease in absolute fecundity because of the reduced body size. The potential contribution of these regulatory effects on population regulation is explored. Results indicate that density-dependent ripening and absolute fecundity, mediated through density-dependent growth, may control recruitment at high levels of population

  15. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A; Burgos, Patricia V; Velásquez, Zahady D; Muñoz, Rosa I; Lafourcade, Carlos A; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as "neurogenic niche". Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles

  16. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  17. Energy density, energy intake, and body weight regulation in adults.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Philip; Roberts, Susan B

    2014-11-01

    The role of dietary energy density (ED) in the regulation of energy intake (EI) is controversial. Methodologically, there is also debate about whether beverages should be included in dietary ED calculations. To address these issues, studies examining the effects of ED on EI or body weight in nonelderly adults were reviewed. Different approaches to calculating dietary ED do not appear to alter the direction of reported relations between ED and body weight. Evidence that lowering dietary ED reduces EI in short-term studies is convincing, but there are currently insufficient data to determine long-term effectiveness for weight loss. The review also identified key barriers to progress in understanding the role of ED in energy regulation, in particular the absence of a standard definition of ED, and the lack of data from multiple long-term clinical trials examining the effectiveness of low-ED diet recommendations for preventing both primary weight gain and weight regain in nonobese individuals. Long-term clinical trials designed to examine the impact of dietary ED on energy regulation, and including multiple ED calculation methods within the same study, are still needed to determine the importance of ED in the regulation of EI and body weight. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. How do older adult drivers self-regulate? Characteristics of self-regulation classes defined by latent class analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Gwen; West, Bethany A; Luo, Feijun; Bird, Donna C; Freund, Katherine; Fortinsky, Richard H; Staplin, Loren

    2017-06-01

    Motor-vehicle crashes were the second leading cause of injury death for adults aged 65-84years in 2014. Some older drivers choose to self-regulate their driving to maintain mobility while reducing driving risk, yet the process remains poorly understood. Data from 729 older adults (aged ≥60years) who joined an older adult ride service program between April 1, 2010 and November 8, 2013 were analyzed to define and describe classes of driving self-regulation. Latent class analysis was employed to characterize older adult driving self-regulation classes using driving frequency and avoidance of seven driving situations. Logistic regression was used to explore associations between characteristics affecting mobility and self-regulation class. Three classes were identified (low, medium, and high self-regulation). High self-regulating participants reported the highest proportion of always avoiding seven risky driving situations and the lowest driving frequency followed by medium and low self-regulators. Those who were female, aged 80years or older, visually impaired, assistive device users, and those with special health needs were more likely to be high self-regulating compared with low self-regulating. Avoidance of certain driving situations and weekly driving frequency are valid indicators for describing driving self-regulation classes in older adults. Understanding the unique characteristics and mobility limitations of each class can guide optimal transportation strategies for older adults. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Fgf regulates dedifferentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Kish, Phillip E; Kahana, Alon

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) regulate critical biological processes such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. In zebrafish, Fgf signaling plays an important role in the regeneration of the spinal cord, liver, heart, fin, and photoreceptors, although its exact mechanism of action is not fully understood. Utilizing an adult zebrafish extraocular muscle (EOM) regeneration model, we demonstrate that blocking Fgf receptor function using either a chemical inhibitor (SU5402) or a dominant-negative transgenic construct (dnFGFR1a:EGFP) impairs muscle regeneration. Adult zebrafish EOMs regenerate through a myocyte dedifferentiation process, which involves a muscle-to-mesenchyme transition and cell cycle reentry by differentiated myocytes. Blocking Fgf signaling reduced cell proliferation and active caspase 3 levels in the regenerating muscle with no detectable levels of apoptosis, supporting the hypothesis that Fgf signaling is involved in the early steps of dedifferentiation. Fgf signaling in regenerating myocytes involves the MAPK/ERK pathway: inhibition of MEK activity with U0126 mimicked the phenotype of the Fgf receptor inhibition on both muscle regeneration and cell proliferation, and activated ERK (p-ERK) was detected in injured muscles by immunofluorescence and western blot. Interestingly, following injury, ERK2 expression is specifically induced and activated by phosphorylation, suggesting a key role in muscle regeneration. We conclude that the critical early steps of myocyte dedifferentiation in EOM regeneration are dependent on Fgf signaling.

  20. Inflammation regulates functional integration of neurons born in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Jakubs, Katherine; Bonde, Sara; Iosif, Robert E; Ekdahl, Christine T; Kokaia, Zaal; Kokaia, Merab; Lindvall, Olle

    2008-11-19

    Inflammation influences several steps of adult neurogenesis, but whether it regulates the functional integration of the new neurons is unknown. Here, we explored, using confocal microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, whether a chronic inflammatory environment affects the morphological and electrophysiological properties of new dentate gyrus granule cells, labeled with a retroviral vector encoding green fluorescent protein. Rats were exposed to intrahippocampal injection of lipopolysaccharide, which gave rise to long-lasting microglia activation. Inflammation caused no changes in intrinsic membrane properties, location, dendritic arborization, or spine density and morphology of the new cells. Excitatory synaptic drive increased to the same extent in new and mature cells in the inflammatory environment, suggesting increased network activity in hippocampal neural circuitries of lipopolysaccharide-treated animals. In contrast, inhibitory synaptic drive was more enhanced by inflammation in the new cells. Also, larger clusters of the postsynaptic GABA(A) receptor scaffolding protein gephyrin were found on dendrites of new cells born in the inflammatory environment. We demonstrate for the first time that inflammation influences the functional integration of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Our data indicate a high degree of synaptic plasticity of the new neurons in the inflammatory environment, which enables them to respond to the increase in excitatory input with a compensatory upregulation of activity and efficacy at their afferent inhibitory synapses.

  1. Affective Self-Regulation Trajectories During Secondary School Predict Substance Use Among Urban Minority Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Kenneth W.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Acevedo, Bianca P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between trajectories of affective self-regulation skills during secondary school and young adult substance use in a large multi-ethnic, urban sample (N = 995). During secondary school, participants completed a measure of cognitive and behavioral skills used to control negative, unpleasant emotions or perceived stress. As young adults, participants reported on the frequency and quantity of their alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use in a telephone interview. Controlling for demographic variables, self-regulation did not significantly change over adolescence, although there was significant variation in participants’ rates of growth and decline. Lower seventh grade self-regulation and less steep increases in self-regulation were predictive of higher young adult substance use. Male participants had significantly lower initial self-regulation and higher young adult substance use. The results suggest that interventions that build affective self-regulation skills in adolescence may decrease the risk of young adult substance use. PMID:26549966

  2. The microRNA-124-iGluR2/3 pathway regulates glucagon release from alpha cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Liu, Rui; Deng, Ting; Wang, Xia; Lang, Hongmei; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Huang, Dingzhi; Ying, Guoguang; Ba, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon, secreted from islet alpha cells, plays an important role in regulating glucose homeostasis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not fully understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in the function of alpha cells. Glutamate promotes glucagon secretion by mediating the opening of Ca2+ channels. In this present, iGluR2 and iGluR3 levels were significantly increased in fasting-treated mouse islets. Additional studies showed that miR-124-3p simultaneously regulates the expression of iGluR2 and iGluR3 through the direct targeting of mRNA 3’UTR of these two genes. The miR-124-iGluRs pathway also contributed to the high level of glucagon secretion through long-term high glucose levels. Thus, a novel pathway comprising miRNA, glutamate and iGluRs has been demonstrated to regulate the biological process of glucagon release. PMID:27013590

  3. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:25360084

  4. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ardiles, Alvaro O; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M; Palacios, Adrian G; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C; Martínez, Agustín D

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca(2+) concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory.

  5. Circular RNA profiling reveals an abundant circHIPK3 that regulates cell growth by sponging multiple miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiupeng; Bao, Chunyang; Guo, Weijie; Li, Shuyi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bing; Luo, Yanting; Lyu, Dongbin; Li, Yan; Shi, Guohai; Liang, Linhui; Gu, Jianren; He, Xianghuo; Huang, Shenglin

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) represent a class of widespread and diverse endogenous RNAs that may regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. However, the regulation and function of human circRNAs remain largely unknown. Here we generate ribosomal-depleted RNA sequencing data from six normal tissues and seven cancers, and detect at least 27,000 circRNA candidates. Many of these circRNAs are differently expressed between the normal and cancerous tissues. We further characterize one abundant circRNA derived from Exon2 of the HIPK3 gene, termed circHIPK3. The silencing of circHIPK3 but not HIPK3 mRNA significantly inhibits human cell growth. Via a luciferase screening assay, circHIPK3 is observed to sponge to 9 miRNAs with 18 potential binding sites. Specifically, we show that circHIPK3 directly binds to miR-124 and inhibits miR-124 activity. Our results provide evidence that circular RNA produced from precursor mRNA may have a regulatory role in human cells. PMID:27050392

  6. Intravesical treatment of advanced urothelial bladder cancers with oncolytic HSV-1 co-regulated by differentially expressed microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K-X; Matsui, Y; Lee, C; Osamu, O; Skinner, L; Wang, J; So, A; Rennie, P S; Jia, W W

    2016-05-01

    Urothelial bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary tract. Although most cases are initially diagnosed as non-muscle-invasive, more than 80% of patients will develop recurrent or metastatic tumors. No effective therapy exists currently for late-stage metastatic tumors. By intravesical application, local administration of oncolytic Herpes Simplex virus (oHSV-1) can provide a promising new therapy for this disease. However, its inherent neurotoxicity has been a perceived limitation for such application. In this study, we present a novel microRNA-regulatory approach to reduce HSV-1-induced neurotoxicity by suppressing viral replication in neurons while maintaining oncolytic selectivity toward urothelial tumors. Specifically, we designed a recombinant virus that utilizes differentially expressed endogenous microR143 (non-cancerous, ubiquitous) and microR124 (neural-specific) to regulate expression of ICP-4, a gene essential for HSV-1 replication. We found that expression of ICP-4 must be controlled by a combination of both miR143 and miR124 to achieve the most effective attenuation in HSV-1-induced toxicity while retaining maximal oncolytic capacity. These results suggest that interaction between miR143 and miR124 may be required to successfully regulate HSV-1 replication. Our resent study is the first proof-in-principle that miRNA combination can be exploited to fine-tune the replication of HSV-1 to treat human cancers.

  7. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain: same regulators, different roles

    PubMed Central

    Urbán, Noelia; Guillemot, François

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists in adult mammals in specific brain areas, known as neurogenic niches. Adult neurogenesis is highly dynamic and is modulated by multiple physiological stimuli and pathological states. There is a strong interest in understanding how this process is regulated, particularly since active neuronal production has been demonstrated in both the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult humans. The molecular mechanisms that control neurogenesis have been extensively studied during embryonic development. Therefore, we have a broad knowledge of the intrinsic factors and extracellular signaling pathways driving proliferation and differentiation of embryonic neural precursors. Many of these factors also play important roles during adult neurogenesis, but essential differences exist in the biological responses of neural precursors in the embryonic and adult contexts. Because adult neural stem cells (NSCs) are normally found in a quiescent state, regulatory pathways can affect adult neurogenesis in ways that have no clear counterpart during embryogenesis. BMP signaling, for instance, regulates NSC behavior both during embryonic and adult neurogenesis. However, this pathway maintains stem cell proliferation in the embryo, while it promotes quiescence to prevent stem cell exhaustion in the adult brain. In this review, we will compare and contrast the functions of transcription factors (TFs) and other regulatory molecules in the embryonic brain and in adult neurogenic regions of the adult brain in the mouse, with a special focus on the hippocampal niche and on the regulation of the balance between quiescence and activation of adult NSCs in this region. PMID:25505873

  8. Regulation of adult neural progenitor cell functions by purinergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Illes, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular purines are signaling molecules in the neurogenic niches of the brain and spinal cord, where they activate cell surface purinoceptors at embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and adult neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Although mRNA and protein are expressed at NSCs/NPCs for almost all subtypes of the nucleotide-sensitive P2X/P2Y, and the nucleoside-sensitive adenosine receptors, only a few of those have acquired functional significance. ATP is sequentially degraded by ecto-nucleotidases to ADP, AMP, and adenosine with agonistic properties for distinct receptor-classes. Nucleotides/nucleosides facilitate or inhibit NSC/NPC proliferation, migration and differentiation. The most ubiquitous effect of all agonists (especially of ATP and ADP) appears to be the facilitation of cell proliferation, usually through P2Y1Rs and sometimes through P2X7Rs. However, usually P2X7R activation causes necrosis/apoptosis of NPCs. Differentiation can be initiated by P2Y2R-activation or P2X7R-blockade. A key element in the transduction mechanism of either receptor is the increase of the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, which may arise due to its release from intracellular storage sites (G protein-coupling; P2Y) or due to its passage through the receptor-channel itself from the extracellular space (ATP-gated ion channel; P2X). Further research is needed to clarify how purinergic signaling controls NSC/NPC fate and how the balance between the quiescent and activated states is established with fine and dynamic regulation. GLIA 2017;65:213-230. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Psychosocial factors significantly predict driving self-regulation in Australian older adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ides Y; Smith, Simon S; Sullivan, Karen A

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate: (i) whether attitudes and beliefs about driving predict older adults' driving self-regulation, and how much variance in self-regulation can be explained by these factors; and (ii) if driving confidence is controlled, whether attitudes and beliefs remain significant independent predictors of driving self-regulation. The present study examined the psychosocial factors that underlie driving self-regulation in 277 older adults within Australia. Participants completed standardised questionnaires about their driving, attitudes, belief and use of driving self-regulation. Driving confidence, affective and instrumental attitude, and perceived behavioural control were all significant predictors of driving self-regulation. The combination of these factors accounted for 56% of the variance in driving self-regulation. Driving self-regulation is a complex behaviour influenced by a wide range of psychosocial factors. Improved understanding of these factors could inform strategies to improve older driver safety and influence the advice that people receive. © 2015 AJA Inc.

  10. Adult-Young Ratio, a Major Factor Regulating Social Behaviour of Young: A Horse Study

    PubMed Central

    Bourjade, Marie; de Boyer des Roches, Alice; Hausberger, Martine

    2009-01-01

    Background Adults play an important role in regulating the social behaviour of young individuals. However, a few pioneer studies suggest that, more than the mere presence of adults, their proportions in social groups affect the social development of young. Here, we hypothesized that aggression rates and social cohesion were correlated to adult-young ratios. Our biological model was naturally-formed groups of Przewalski horses, Equus f. przewalskii, varying in composition. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the social interactions and spatial relationships of 12 one- and two-year-old Przewalski horses belonging to five families with adult-young ratios (AYR) ranging from 0.67 to 1.33. We found striking variations of aggression rates and spatial relationships related to the adult-young ratio: the lower this ratio, the more the young were aggressive, the more young and adults segregated and the tighter the young bonded to other young. Conclusion/Significance This is the first study demonstrating a correlation between adult-young ratios and aggression rates and social cohesion of young individuals in a naturalistic setting. The increase of aggression and the emergence of social segregation in groups with lower proportions of adults could reflect a related decrease of the influence of adults as regulators of the behaviour of young. This social regulation has both theoretical and practical implications for understanding the modalities of the influence of adults during ontogeny and for recommending optimal settings, as for instance, for schooling or animal group management. PMID:19293930

  11. FKBP5 and specific microRNAs via glucocorticoid receptor in the basolateral amygdala involved in the susceptibility to depressive disorder in early adolescent stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Wang, Rui; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Dexiang; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Fang

    2017-08-14

    Exposure to stressful events induces depressive-like symptoms and increases susceptibility to depression. However, the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Studies reported that FK506 binding protein51 (FKBP5), the co-chaperone protein of glucocorticoid receptors (GR), plays a crucial role. Further, miR-124a and miR-18a are involved in the regulation of FKBP5/GR function. However, few studies have referred to effects of early life stress on depressive-like behaviours, GR and FKBP5, as well as miR-124a and miR-18a in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) from adolescence to adulthood. This study aimed to examine the dynamic alternations of depressive-like behaviours, GR and FKBP5, as well as miR-124a and miR-18a expressions in the BLA of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats and dexamethasone administration rats during the adolescent period. Meanwhile, the GR antagonist, RU486, was used as a means of intervention. We found that CUMS and dexamethasone administration in the adolescent period induced permanent depressive-like behaviours and memory impairment, decreased GR expression, and increased FKBP5 and miR-124a expression in the BLA of both adolescent and adult rats. However, increased miR-18a expression in the BLA was found only in adolescent rats. Depressive-like behaviours were positively correlated with the level of miR-124a, whereas GR levels were negatively correlated with those in both adolescent and adult rats. Our results suggested FKBP5/GR and miR-124a in the BLA were associated with susceptibility to depressive disorder in the presence of stressful experiences in early life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Older Adult Positivity Effect in Evaluations of Trustworthiness: Emotion Regulation or Cognitive Capacity?

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Boshyan, Jasmine; Ward, Noreen; Gutchess, Angela; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2017-01-01

    An older adult positivity effect, i.e., the tendency for older adults to favor positive over negative stimulus information more than do younger adults, has been previously shown in attention, memory, and evaluations. This effect has been attributed to greater emotion regulation in older adults. In the case of attention and memory, this explanation has been supported by some evidence that the older adult positivity effect is most pronounced for negative stimuli, which would motivate emotion regulation, and that it is reduced by cognitive load, which would impede emotion regulation. We investigated whether greater older adult positivity in the case of evaluative responses to faces is also enhanced for negative stimuli and attenuated by cognitive load, as an emotion regulation explanation would predict. In two studies, younger and older adults rated trustworthiness of faces that varied in valence both under low and high cognitive load, with the latter manipulated by a distracting backwards counting task. In Study 1, face valence was manipulated by attractiveness (low /disfigured faces, medium, high/fashion models' faces). In Study 2, face valence was manipulated by trustworthiness (low, medium, high). Both studies revealed a significant older adult positivity effect. However, contrary to an emotion regulation account, this effect was not stronger for more negative faces, and cognitive load increased rather than decreased the rated trustworthiness of negatively valenced faces. Although inconsistent with emotion regulation, the latter effect is consistent with theory and research arguing that more cognitive resources are required to process negative stimuli, because they are more cognitively elaborated than positive ones. The finding that increased age and increased cognitive load both enhanced the positivity of trustworthy ratings suggests that the older adult positivity effect in evaluative ratings of faces may reflect age-related declines in cognitive capacity rather

  13. The Older Adult Positivity Effect in Evaluations of Trustworthiness: Emotion Regulation or Cognitive Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Boshyan, Jasmine; Ward, Noreen; Gutchess, Angela; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2017-01-01

    An older adult positivity effect, i.e., the tendency for older adults to favor positive over negative stimulus information more than do younger adults, has been previously shown in attention, memory, and evaluations. This effect has been attributed to greater emotion regulation in older adults. In the case of attention and memory, this explanation has been supported by some evidence that the older adult positivity effect is most pronounced for negative stimuli, which would motivate emotion regulation, and that it is reduced by cognitive load, which would impede emotion regulation. We investigated whether greater older adult positivity in the case of evaluative responses to faces is also enhanced for negative stimuli and attenuated by cognitive load, as an emotion regulation explanation would predict. In two studies, younger and older adults rated trustworthiness of faces that varied in valence both under low and high cognitive load, with the latter manipulated by a distracting backwards counting task. In Study 1, face valence was manipulated by attractiveness (low /disfigured faces, medium, high/fashion models’ faces). In Study 2, face valence was manipulated by trustworthiness (low, medium, high). Both studies revealed a significant older adult positivity effect. However, contrary to an emotion regulation account, this effect was not stronger for more negative faces, and cognitive load increased rather than decreased the rated trustworthiness of negatively valenced faces. Although inconsistent with emotion regulation, the latter effect is consistent with theory and research arguing that more cognitive resources are required to process negative stimuli, because they are more cognitively elaborated than positive ones. The finding that increased age and increased cognitive load both enhanced the positivity of trustworthy ratings suggests that the older adult positivity effect in evaluative ratings of faces may reflect age-related declines in cognitive capacity

  14. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  15. Driving Skills of Young Adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Regulating Speed and Coping with Distraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Rita F.; Wann, John P.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we used an automatic car simulator to examine the steering control, speed regulation and response to hazards of young adults with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and limited driving experience. In Experiment 1 participants either used the accelerator pedal to regulate their speed, or used the brake pedal when they…

  16. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  17. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  18. Driving Skills of Young Adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Regulating Speed and Coping with Distraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Rita F.; Wann, John P.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we used an automatic car simulator to examine the steering control, speed regulation and response to hazards of young adults with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and limited driving experience. In Experiment 1 participants either used the accelerator pedal to regulate their speed, or used the brake pedal when they…

  19. Weight regulation practices of young adults. Predictors of restrictive eating.

    PubMed

    Quick, Virginia M; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2012-10-01

    Young adults frequently use restrictive eating (i.e., going for long periods [≥ 8h] without eating to influence their shape or weight) to control their weight. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of restrictive eating in young adults, compare eating behaviors of restrictive and non-restrictive eaters, and predict restrictive eaters. A diverse (56% white, 63% female) sample of young adults (n=2449) completed an online survey that included eating behavior scales (Restraint, Eating, Shape, and Weight Concerns, and Inappropriate Compensatory Behaviors from the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Emotional and Disinhibited Eating from the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, and Night Eating from the Night Eating Questionnaire) and demographics. A quarter of women and 20% of men were classified as restrictive eaters. Independent t-tests revealed restrictive eaters had significantly (p<0.001) higher BMIs than non-restrictive eaters. Restrictive eaters also had significantly higher scores on all eating behavior scales than non-restrictive eaters even after controlling for potential confounding factors (BMI, race). Stepwise binary logistic regression revealed that increased eating, shape, and weight concerns, higher BMI, endorsement of inappropriate compensatory behaviors and night eating, being female, and white increased the odds of participants being restrictive eaters. This study can help healthcare professionals become more aware of weight control practices of young adults and create appropriate interventions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Eating pathology, emotion regulation, and emotional overeating in obese adults with Binge Eating Disorder.

    PubMed

    Gianini, Loren M; White, Marney A; Masheb, Robin M

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship among emotional regulation, emotional overeating, and general eating pathology in a treatment seeking sample of adults with Binge Eating Disorder (BED). The sample was composed of 326 adults (248 women, 78 men) who were obese and met DSM-IV-TR criteria for BED. Prior to treatment, participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Emotional Overeating Questionnaire (EOQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) as part of a larger assessment battery. A series of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that difficulties with emotion regulation accounted for unique variance in both emotional overeating and general eating pathology above and beyond sex and negative affect. Emotion regulation may play a significant role in the maintenance of emotional overeating and eating pathology in obese adults with BED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Anxiety symptomatology and perceived health in African American adults: Moderating role of emotion regulation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sierra E.; Walker, Rheeda L.

    2014-01-01

    Though emotional health has been theoretically and empirically linked to physical health, the anxiety-physical health association in particular is not well understood for African American adults. This study examined anxiety as a specific correlate of perceived health in addition to testing the potential moderating role of emotion regulation, an index of how and when individuals modulate emotions, in the association for anxiety to perceived health. Study participants were 151 community-based African American adults who completed measures of anxiety symptomatology and emotion regulation in addition to responding to a self-report question of perceived health. Results showed that higher levels of anxiety symptomatology were associated with poorer health ratings for those who reported more limited access to emotion regulation strategies but not those who reported having more emotion regulation strategies. The findings suggest that anxiety-related distress and health problems may be interrelated when emotion regulation strategies are limited. PMID:25045943

  2. Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 regulates activity-dependent adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Sun, Jiaqi; Song, Juan; Kang, Eunchai; Jun, Heechul; Zhong, Chun; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U; Wang, Marie Xun; Sailor, Kurt A; Kim, Ju-Young; Gao, Yuan; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2013-02-07

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from adult neural stem cells, proceeds concurrently with ongoing neuronal circuit activity and is modulated by various physiological and pathological stimuli. The niche mechanism underlying the activity-dependent regulation of the sequential steps of adult neurogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we report that neuronal activity decreases the expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (sFRP3), a naturally secreted Wnt inhibitor highly expressed by adult dentate gyrus granule neurons. Sfrp3 deletion activates quiescent radial neural stem cells and promotes newborn neuron maturation, dendritic growth, and dendritic spine formation in the adult mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, sfrp3 reduction is essential for activity-induced adult neural progenitor proliferation and the acceleration of new neuron development. Our study identifies sFRP3 as an inhibitory niche factor from local mature dentate granule neurons that regulates multiple phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and suggests an interesting activity-dependent mechanism governing adult neurogenesis via the acute release of tonic inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Secreted frizzled-related protein 3 regulates activity-dependent adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Bonaguidi, Michael A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Sun, Jiaqi; Song, Juan; Kang, Eunchai; Jun, Heechul; Zhong, Chun; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U.; Wang, Marie Xun; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kim, Ju-Young; Gao, Yuan; Christian, Kimberly M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Adult neurogenesis, a process of generating mature neurons from adult neural stem cells, proceeds concurrently with ongoing neuronal circuit activity and is modulated by various physiological and pathological stimuli. The niche mechanism underlying activity-dependent regulation of sequential steps of adult neurogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we report that neuronal activity decreases the expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (sFRP3), a naturally secreted Wnt inhibitor highly expressed by adult dentate gyrus granule neurons. Sfrp3 deletion activates quiescent radial neural stem cells and promotes newborn neuron maturation, dendritic growth and spine formation in the adult mouse hippocampus. Furthermore, sfrp3 reduction is essential for activity-induced adult neural progenitor proliferation and acceleration of new neuron development. Our study identifies sFRP3 as an inhibitory niche factor from local mature dentate granule neurons that regulates multiple phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and suggests a novel activity-dependent mechanism governing adult neurogenesis via acute release of tonic inhibition. PMID:23395446

  4. Functional genomics identifies regulators of the phototransduction machinery in the Drosophila larval eye and adult ocelli.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek Kumar; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Tsachaki, Maria; Fritsch, Cornelia; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-02-15

    Sensory perception of light is mediated by specialized Photoreceptor neurons (PRs) in the eye. During development all PRs are genetically determined to express a specific Rhodopsin (Rh) gene and genes mediating a functional phototransduction pathway. While the genetic and molecular mechanisms of PR development is well described in the adult compound eye, it remains unclear how the expression of Rhodopsins and the phototransduction cascade is regulated in other visual organs in Drosophila, such as the larval eye and adult ocelli. Using transcriptome analysis of larval PR-subtypes and ocellar PRs we identify and study new regulators required during PR differentiation or necessary for the expression of specific signaling molecules of the functional phototransduction pathway. We found that the transcription factor Krüppel (Kr) is enriched in the larval eye and controls PR differentiation by promoting Rh5 and Rh6 expression. We also identified Camta, Lola, Dve and Hazy as key genes acting during ocellar PR differentiation. Further we show that these transcriptional regulators control gene expression of the phototransduction cascade in both larval eye and adult ocelli. Our results show that PR cell type-specific transcriptome profiling is a powerful tool to identify key transcriptional regulators involved during several aspects of PR development and differentiation. Our findings greatly contribute to the understanding of how combinatorial action of key transcriptional regulators control PR development and the regulation of a functional phototransduction pathway in both larval eye and adult ocelli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Situation Selection and Modification for Emotion Regulation in Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Kimberly M.; Isaacowitz, Derek M.

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated age differences in use and effectiveness of situation selection and situation modification for emotion regulation. Socioemotional selectivity theory suggests stronger emotional well-being goals in older age; emotion regulation may support this goal. Younger and older adults assigned to an emotion regulation or “just view” condition first freely chose to engage with negative, neutral, or positive material (situation selection), then chose to view or skip negative and positive material (situation modification), rating affect after each experience. In both tasks, older adults in both goal conditions demonstrated pro-hedonic emotion regulation, spending less time with negative material compared to younger adults. Younger adults in the regulate condition also engaged in pro-hedonic situation selection, but not modification. Whereas situation selection was related to affect, modification of negative material was not. This research supports more frequent pro-hedonic motivation in older age, as well as age differences in use of early-stage emotion regulation. PMID:26998196

  6. Self-Regulated Learning in Younger and Older Adults: Does Aging Affect Metacognitive Control?

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jodi; Hertzog, Christopher; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether younger and older adults’ self-regulated study (item selection and study time) conformed to the region of proximal learning (RPL) model when studying normatively easy, medium, and difficult vocabulary pairs. Experiment 2 manipulated the value of recalling different pairs and provided learning goals for words recalled and points earned. Younger and older adults in both experiments selected items for study in an easy-to-difficult order, indicating the RPL model applies to older adults’ self-regulated study. Individuals allocated more time to difficult items, but prioritized easier items when given less time or point values favoring difficult items. Older adults studied more items for longer but realized lower recall than did younger adults. Older adults’ lower memory self-efficacy and perceived control correlated with their greater item restudy and avoidance of difficult items with high point values. Results are discussed in terms of RPL and agenda-based regulation models. PMID:19866382

  7. GABA-CREB signalling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H.; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D. Chichung

    2009-01-01

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signalling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of CREB signalling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous fashion impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule associated protein, DCX, and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects following loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signalling. These results indicate that CREB signalling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation. PMID:19553437

  8. Immune Influence on Adult Neural Stem Cell Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pamela A.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) lie at the heart of central nervous system development and repair, and deficiency or dysregulation of NSCs or their progeny can have significant consequences at any stage of life. Immune signaling is emerging as one of the influential variables that define resident NSC behavior. Perturbations in local immune signaling accompany virtually every injury or disease state and signaling cascades that mediate immune activation, resolution, or chronic persistence influence resident stem and progenitor cells. Some aspects of immune signaling are beneficial, promoting intrinsic plasticity and cell replacement, while others appear to inhibit the very type of regenerative response that might restore or replace neural networks lost in injury or disease. Here we review known and speculative roles that immune signaling plays in the postnatal and adult brain, focusing on how environments encountered in disease or injury may influence the activity and fate of endogenous or transplanted NSCs. PMID:19840551

  9. Fragile x mental retardation protein regulates proliferation and differentiation of adult neural stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Shan, Ge; Guo, Weixiang; Smrt, Richard D; Johnson, Eric B; Li, Xuekun; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L; Szulwach, Keith E; Duan, Ranhui; Barkho, Basam Z; Li, Wendi; Liu, Changmei; Jin, Peng; Zhao, Xinyu

    2010-04-08

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the loss of functional fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is an RNA-binding protein that can regulate the translation of specific mRNAs. Adult neurogenesis, a process considered important for neuroplasticity and memory, is regulated at multiple molecular levels. In this study, we investigated whether Fmrp deficiency affects adult neurogenesis. We show that in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome, adult neurogenesis is indeed altered. The loss of Fmrp increases the proliferation and alters the fate specification of adult neural progenitor/stem cells (aNPCs). We demonstrate that Fmrp regulates the protein expression of several components critical for aNPC function, including CDK4 and GSK3beta. Dysregulation of GSK3beta led to reduced Wnt signaling pathway activity, which altered the expression of neurogenin1 and the fate specification of aNPCs. These data unveil a novel regulatory role for Fmrp and translational regulation in adult neurogenesis.

  10. A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Odette; Kempermann, Gerd; Walker, Tara L.

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation of the brain is generally studied in the context of injury or disease. Less is known about how the immune system regulates the brain during normal brain function. Recent work has redefined the field of neuroimmunology and, as long as their recruitment and activation are well regulated, immune cells are now known to have protective properties within the central nervous system in maintaining brain health. Adult neurogenesis, the process of new neuron generation in the adult brain, is highly plastic and regulated by diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Emerging research has shown that immune cells and their secreted factors can influence adult neurogenesis, both under baseline conditions and during conditions known to change neurogenesis levels, such as aging and learning in an enriched environment. This review will discuss how, under nonpathological conditions, the immune system can interact with the neural stem cells to regulate adult neurogenesis with particular focus on the hippocampus—a region crucial for learning and memory. PMID:27143977

  11. AML1/Runx1 as a versatile regulator of hematopoiesis: regulation of its function and a role in adult hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Mineo

    2006-08-01

    AML1/Runx1, originally identified as a gene located at the breakpoint of the t(8;21) translocation, encodes a transcription factor that is widely expressed in multiple hematopoietic lineages and that regulates the expression of a variety of hematopoietic genes. Numerous studies have shown that AML1 is a critical regulator of hematopoietic development. In addition, AML1 is a frequent target for chromosomal translocation in human leukemia. The activity of AML1 can be modulated by various types of posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation and acetylation. Phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of the mechanisms that dictate whether AML1 acts as either a transcriptional repressor or an activator of gene expression. Recently, a physiological role for AML1 in adult hematopoiesis was revealed by conditional gene targeting in mice. Remarkably, adult hematopoietic progenitors are maintained even in the absence of AML1, in stark contrast to the total disruption of definitive hematopoiesis during embryogenesis. AML1 is, however, critical for megakaryopoiesis and plays an important role in T-cell and B-cell development in adult mice. Recent analyses engineered to recreate hematopoiesis in vitro revealed that the transcriptional activity of AML1 is closely related with the potential of AML1 to generate hematopoietic cells and support thymocyte development.

  12. Acute Multiple Organ Failure in Adult Mice Deleted for the Developmental Regulator Wt1

    PubMed Central

    Chau, You-Ying; Brownstein, David; Mjoseng, Heidi; Lee, Wen-Chin; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Perry, Paul; Berry, Rachel; Thornburn, Anna; Sexton, David; Morton, Nik; Hohenstein, Peter; Freyer, Elisabeth; Samuel, Kay; van't Hof, Rob; Hastie, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    There is much interest in the mechanisms that regulate adult tissue homeostasis and their relationship to processes governing foetal development. Mice deleted for the Wilms' tumour gene, Wt1, lack kidneys, gonads, and spleen and die at mid-gestation due to defective coronary vasculature. Wt1 is vital for maintaining the mesenchymal–epithelial balance in these tissues and is required for the epithelial-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) that generates coronary vascular progenitors. Although Wt1 is only expressed in rare cell populations in adults including glomerular podocytes, 1% of bone marrow cells, and mesothelium, we hypothesised that this might be important for homeostasis of adult tissues; hence, we deleted the gene ubiquitously in young and adult mice. Within just a few days, the mice suffered glomerulosclerosis, atrophy of the exocrine pancreas and spleen, severe reduction in bone and fat, and failure of erythropoiesis. FACS and culture experiments showed that Wt1 has an intrinsic role in both haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell lineages and suggest that defects within these contribute to the phenotypes we observe. We propose that glomerulosclerosis arises in part through down regulation of nephrin, a known Wt1 target gene. Protein profiling in mutant serum showed that there was no systemic inflammatory or nutritional response in the mutant mice. However, there was a dramatic reduction in circulating IGF-1 levels, which is likely to contribute to the bone and fat phenotypes. The reduction of IGF-1 did not result from a decrease in circulating GH, and there is no apparent pathology of the pituitary and adrenal glands. These findings 1) suggest that Wt1 is a major regulator of the homeostasis of some adult tissues, through both local and systemic actions; 2) highlight the differences between foetal and adult tissue regulation; 3) point to the importance of adult mesenchyme in tissue turnover. PMID:22216009

  13. Effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) adults.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Erik R; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2012-12-01

    In many regions, pest management of greenhouse crops relies on the use of biological control agents; however, pesticides are also widely used, especially when dealing with multiple arthropod pests and attempting to maintain high esthetic standards. As such, there is interest in using biological control agents in conjunction with chemical control. However, the prospects of combining natural enemies and pesticides are not well known in many systems. The rove beetle, Atheta coriaria (Kraatz), is a biological control agent mainly used against fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). This study evaluated the effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on A. coriaria adult survival, development, and prey consumption under laboratory conditions. Rove beetle survival was consistently higher when adults were released 24 h after rather than before applying pesticides. The pesticides acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin were harmful to rove beetle adults, whereas Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, azadirachtin, and organic oils (cinnamon oils, rosemary oil, thyme oil, and clove oil) were nontoxic to A. coriaria adults. Similarly, the plant growth regulators acymidol, paclobutrazol, and uniconazole were not harmful to rove beetle adults. In addition, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, kinoprene, organic oils, and the plant growth regulators did not negatively affect A. coriaria development. However, B. bassiana did negatively affect adult prey consumption. This study demonstrated that A. coriaria may not be used when applying the pesticides, acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin, whereas organic oils, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, and the plant growth regulators evaluated may be used in conjunction with A. coriaria adults. As such, these compounds may be used in combination with A. coriaria in greenhouse production systems.

  14. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R; Chen, Haolin

    2016-03-08

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry.

  15. Stress Regulation in Adolescents: Physiological Reactivity during the Adult Attachment Interview and Conflict Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beijersbergen, Marielle D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined whether adolescents' attachment representations were associated with differences in emotion regulation during the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1996) and during a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task (Family Interaction Task [FIT]; J. P. Allen et al., 2003). Participants…

  16. Affective Self-Regulation Trajectories during Secondary School Predict Substance Use among Urban Minority Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kenneth W.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Acevedo, Bianca P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between trajectories of affective self-regulation skills during secondary school and young adult substance use in a large multiethnic, urban sample (N = 995). During secondary school, participants completed a measure of cognitive and behavioral skills used to control negative, unpleasant emotions or perceived…

  17. Basolateral amygdala regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and fear-related activation of newborn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Elizabeth D.; Friedman, Aaron R.; Covarrubias, David; Ying, Carl; Sun, Wayne G.; Goosens, Ki A.; Sapolsky, Robert M.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Impaired regulation of emotional memory is a feature of several affective disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Such regulation occurs, in part, by interactions between the hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Recent studies have indicated that within the adult hippocampus, newborn neurons may contribute to support of emotional memory, and that regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in depressive disorders. How emotional information impacts newborn neurons in adults is not clear. Given the role of the BLA in hippocampus-dependent emotional memory, we investigated whether hippocampal neurogenesis was sensitive to emotional stimuli from the BLA. We show that BLA lesions suppress adult neurogenesis, while lesions of the central nucleus of the amygdala do not. Similarly, we show that reducing BLA activity through viral vector-mediated overexpression of an outwardly rectifying potassium channel suppresses neurogenesis. We also show that BLA lesions prevent selective activation of immature newborn neurons in response to a fear conditioning task. These results demonstrate that BLA activity regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis and the fear context-specific activation of newborn neurons. Together, these findings denote functional implications for proliferation and recruitment of new neurons into emotional memory circuits. PMID:21670733

  18. Stress Regulation in Adolescents: Physiological Reactivity during the Adult Attachment Interview and Conflict Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beijersbergen, Marielle D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined whether adolescents' attachment representations were associated with differences in emotion regulation during the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1996) and during a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task (Family Interaction Task [FIT]; J. P. Allen et al., 2003). Participants…

  19. Affective Self-Regulation Trajectories during Secondary School Predict Substance Use among Urban Minority Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kenneth W.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Acevedo, Bianca P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between trajectories of affective self-regulation skills during secondary school and young adult substance use in a large multiethnic, urban sample (N = 995). During secondary school, participants completed a measure of cognitive and behavioral skills used to control negative, unpleasant emotions or perceived…

  20. Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Change in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdie, Nola; McCrindle, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Presents an overview of self-regulation models: theory of planned behavior, protection motivation theory, health belief model, action control theory, transtheoretical model of behavior change, health action process, and precaution adoption process. Applies models to health behavior change in older adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes.…

  1. Using humour as an extrinsic source of emotion regulation in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Harm, Jonathan; Vieillard, Sandrine; Didierjean, André

    2014-10-01

    It has been suggested that intrinsic abilities for regulating emotions remain stable or improve with ageing, but, to date, no studies have examined age-related differences in extrinsic emotion regulation. Since humour has been found to be an effective form of emotion regulation, we used a paradigm similar to that of Strick and colleagues (2009) with two objectives: to compare extrinsic humorous emotion regulation in young and older adults and to test whether the potential beneficial effect of humour on negative emotion is better explained by the cognitive distraction hypothesis or by the positive affect elicitation hypothesis. To this end, neutral, moderately, and strongly negative pictures followed by humorous, simply positive, or weird cartoons, controlled for both their funniness and cognitive demands, were presented to 26 young and 25 older adults with the instruction to report their negative feelings. When induced to feel moderately negative emotions, both young and older adults reported a lower negative feeling after viewing the humorous cartoons than after the other ones. This indicates that the extrinsic humorous emotion regulation skill remains stable with ageing and suggests that the beneficial effect of humour on emotional feeling cannot be seen as a purely cognitive distraction.

  2. Epigenetic (de)regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis: implications for depression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis represents a dynamic level of modulation upon the neuroplastic properties of the mature nervous system, that is essential to the homeostatic brain function. The adult neurogenic process comprises several sequential steps, all of which subjected to an assortment of cell-intrinsic and neurogenic-niche complex regulatory mechanisms. Among these, epigenetic regulation is now emerging as a crucial regulator of several neurogenesis steps. In particular, the active regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis and its repercussions in global hippocampal function are of special interest for the biomedical field, since imbalances at this level have been strongly related to the precipitation of several neuropsychyatric disorders, such as depression. Indeed, growing evidence supports that the detrimental effects on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, that have been associated with depression, might be epigenetically-mediated. Therefore, understanding the epigenetic regulation of the neurogenic process may provide a link between neurogenesis imbalances and the deterioration of the behavioural and cognitive domains frequently affected in depression, thus contributing to unravel the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. Here, we outline some of the major epigenetic mechanisms contributing to the regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis and discuss several lines of evidence supporting their involvement on the development of imbalances in the neurogenic process, often correlated to behavioural and cognitive deficits commonly observed in major depressive disorder. PMID:22414227

  3. Prohibition or coffee shops: regulation of amphetamine and methylphenidate for enhancement use by healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dubljević, Veljko

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes appropriate public policies for enhancement use of two most important stimulant drugs: Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts). The author argues that appropriate regulation of cognition enhancement drugs cannot be a result of a general discussion on cognitive enhancements as such, but has to be made on a case-by-case basis. Starting from the recently proposed taxation approach to cognition enhancement drugs, the author analyzes available, moderately permissive models of regulation. After a thorough analysis of relevant characteristics of methylphenidate and amphetamine, the author concludes that a moderately liberal permissive regulation of enhancement use by healthy adults might be appropriate for extended release forms of methylphenidate. However, due to their danger profile, amphetamine and instant release forms of methylphenidate should not be made readily available to healthy adults and would need to be prohibited.

  4. Exploring Transcription Factors-microRNAs Co-regulation Networks in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Yue, Weihua; Yao Shugart, Yin; Li, Sheng; Cai, Lei; Li, Qiang; Cheng, Zaohuo; Wang, Guoqiang; Zhou, Zhenhe; Jin, Chunhui; Yuan, Jianmin; Tian, Lin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Kerang; Liu, Sha; Song, Yuqing; Zhang, Fuquan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transcriptional factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been recognized as 2 classes of principal gene regulators that may be responsible for genome coexpression changes observed in schizophrenia (SZ). Methods: This study aims to (1) identify differentially coexpressed genes (DCGs) in 3 mRNA expression microarray datasets; (2) explore potential interactions among the DCGs, and differentially expressed miRNAs identified in our dataset composed of early-onset SZ patients and healthy controls; (3) validate expression levels of some key transcripts; and (4) explore the druggability of DCGs using the curated database. Results: We detected a differential coexpression network associated with SZ and found that 9 out of the 12 regulators were replicated in either of the 2 other datasets. Leveraging the differentially expressed miRNAs identified in our previous dataset, we constructed a miRNA–TF–gene network relevant to SZ, including an EGR1–miR-124-3p–SKIL feed-forward loop. Our real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated the overexpression of miR-124-3p, the under expression of SKIL and EGR1 in the blood of SZ patients compared with controls, and the direction of change of miR-124-3p and SKIL mRNA levels in SZ cases were reversed after a 12-week treatment cycle. Our druggability analysis revealed that many of these genes have the potential to be drug targets. Conclusions: Together, our results suggest that coexpression network abnormalities driven by combinatorial and interactive action from TFs and miRNAs may contribute to the development of SZ and be relevant to the clinical treatment of the disease. PMID:26609121

  5. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Block, Dena H S; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-05-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity.

  6. The Developmental Intestinal Regulator ELT-2 Controls p38-Dependent Immune Responses in Adult C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Block, Dena H. S.; Twumasi-Boateng, Kwame; Kang, Hae Sung; Carlisle, Jolie A.; Hanganu, Alexandru; Lai, Ty Yu-Jen; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play critical roles in cellular differentiation and development. However, their roles in mature tissues are less understood. In C. elegans larvae, the transcription factor ELT-2 regulates terminal differentiation of the intestine. It is also expressed in the adult intestine, where it was suggested to maintain intestinal structure and function, and where it was additionally shown to contribute to infection resistance. To study the function of elt-2 in adults we characterized elt-2-dependent gene expression following its knock-down specifically in adults. Microarray analysis identified two ELT-2-regulated gene subsets: one, enriched for hydrolytic enzymes, pointed at regulation of constitutive digestive functions as a dominant role of adult elt-2; the second was enriched for immune genes that are induced in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Focusing on the latter, we used genetic analyses coupled to survival assays and quantitative RT-PCR to interrogate the mechanism(s) through which elt-2 contributes to immunity. We show that elt-2 controls p38-dependent gene induction, cooperating with two p38-activated transcription factors, ATF-7 and SKN-1. This demonstrates a mechanism through which the constitutively nuclear elt-2 can impact induced responses, and play a dominant role in C. elegans immunity. PMID:26016853

  7. Homeostatic regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in aging rats: long-term effects of early exercise

    PubMed Central

    Merkley, Christina M.; Jian, Charles; Mosa, Adam; Tan, Yao-Fang; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is highly responsive to environmental and physiological factors. The majority of studies to date have examined short-term consequences of enhancing or blocking neurogenesis but long-term changes remain less well understood. Current evidence for age-related declines in neurogenesis warrant further investigation into these long-term changes. In this report we address the hypothesis that early life experience, such as a period of voluntary running in juvenile rats, can alter properties of adult neurogenesis for the remainder of the animal's life. The results indicate that the number of proliferating and differentiating neuronal precursors is not altered in runners beyond the initial weeks post-running, suggesting homeostatic regulation of these processes. However, the rate of neuronal maturation and survival during a 4 week period after cell division was enhanced up to 11 months of age (the end of the study period). This study is the first to show that a transient period of physical activity at a young age promotes changes in neurogenesis that persist over the long-term, which is important for our understanding of the modulation of neurogenesis by exercise with age. Functional integration of adult-born neurons within the hippocampus that resist homeostatic regulation with aging, rather than the absolute number of adult-born neurons, may be an essential feature of adult neurogenesis that promotes the maintenance of neural plasticity in old age. PMID:25071426

  8. Comprehensive Expression Map of Transcription Regulators in the Adult Zebrafish Telencephalon Reveals Distinct Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Diotel, Nicolas; Rodriguez Viales, Rebecca; Armant, Olivier; März, Martin; Ferg, Marco; Rastegar, Sepand; Strähle, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has become a model to study adult vertebrate neurogenesis. In particular, the adult telencephalon has been an intensely studied structure in the zebrafish brain. Differential expression of transcriptional regulators (TRs) is a key feature of development and tissue homeostasis. Here we report an expression map of 1,202 TR genes in the telencephalon of adult zebrafish. Our results are summarized in a database with search and clustering functions to identify genes expressed in particular regions of the telencephalon. We classified 562 genes into 13 distinct patterns, including genes expressed in the proliferative zone. The remaining 640 genes displayed unique and complex patterns of expression and could thus not be grouped into distinct classes. The neurogenic ventricular regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes, suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic niches in the telencephalon. In summary, the small telencephalon of the zebrafish shows a remarkable complexity in TR gene expression. The adult zebrafish telencephalon has become a model to study neurogenesis. We established the expression pattern of more than 1200 transcription regulators (TR) in the adult telencephalon. The neurogenic regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic potential. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:1202–1221, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25556858

  9. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    PubMed

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  10. Steroidogenic Factor 1 Differentially Regulates Fetal and Adult Leydig Cell Development in Male Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Karpova, Tatiana; Ravichandiran, Kumarasamy; Insisienmay, Lovella; Rice, Daren; Agbor, Valentine; Heckert, Leslie L.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1, AD4BP, NR5A1) is a key regulator of the endocrine axes and is essential for adrenal and gonad development. Partial rescue of Nr5a1−/− mice with an SF-1-expressing transgene caused a hypomorphic phenotype that revealed its roles in Leydig cell development. In contrast to controls, all male rescue mice (Nr5a1−/−;tg+/0) showed varying signs of androgen deficiency, including spermatogenic arrest, cryptorchidism, and poor virilization. Expression of various Leydig cell markers measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR indicated fetal and adult Leydig cell development were differentially impaired. Whereas fetal Leydig cell development was delayed in Nr5a1−/−;tg+/0 embryos, it recovered to control levels by birth. In contrast, Sult1e1, Vcam1, and Hsd3b6 transcript levels in adult rescue testes indicated complete blockage in adult Leydig cell development. In addition, between Postnatal Days 8 and 12, peritubular cells expressing PTCH1, SF-1, and CYP11A1 were observed in control testes but not in rescue testes, indicating SF-1 is needed for either survival or differentiation of adult Leydig cell progenitors. Cultured prepubertal rat peritubular cells also expressed SF-1 and PTCH1, but Cyp11a1 was expressed only after treatment with cAMP and retinoic acid. Together, data show SF-1 is needed for proper development of fetal and adult Leydig cells but with distinct primary functions; in fetal Leydig cells, it regulates differentiation, whereas in adult Leydig cells it regulates progenitor cell formation and/or survival. PMID:26269506

  11. Do local tobacco regulations influence perceived smoking norms? Evidence from adult and youth surveys in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William L; Biener, Lois; Brennan, Robert T

    2008-08-01

    Smoking behavior has been shown to be influenced by individuals' perceptions of social norms about smoking. This study examines whether local regulations regarding clean indoor air and youth access to tobacco are associated with residents' subsequent perceptions of smoking norms. Data came from Massachusetts surveys of adults and youths and from records of local tobacco control policies. Indices of perceived smoking norms were based on perceived smoking prevalence and perceived community acceptance of smoking. Multilevel models tested the association between perceived norms and the presence of strong local regulations in four policy domains (restaurant smoking bans, smoking restrictions in other venues, enforcement of laws prohibiting sales to youths and youth-oriented marketing restrictions). The model controlled for town voting results on a tobacco tax referendum, which served as a measure of antismoking sentiment pre-dating the regulations. Results showed that youths perceived community norms to be significantly more 'antismoking' if they lived in a town that had strong regulations in at least three of the four domains. For adults, having strong regulations in as few as one to two domains was associated with perceiving community norms to be significantly more antismoking. Implementing and publicizing local regulations may help shape perceptions of community smoking norms.

  12. Nicotine protects against DSS colitis through regulating microRNA-124 and STAT3.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Wan, Jing-Jing; Sun, Yang; Wu, Tingyu; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Du, Peng; Su, Ding-Feng; Yang, Yili; Liu, Xia

    2017-02-01

    Although it is generally believed that nicotine accounts for the beneficial effect of smoking on ulcerative colitis, the underlying mechanisms remain not well understood. Our previous finding that nicotine inhibits inflammatory responses through inducing miR-124 prompted us to ask whether the miRNA is involved in the protective action of nicotine against UC. Our present study found that miR-124 expression is upregulated in colon tissues from UC patients and DSS colitis mice. Nicotine treatment further augmented miR-124 expression in lymphocytes isolated from human ulcerative colonic mucosa and ulcerative colon tissues from DSS mice, both in infiltrated lymphocytes and epithelial cells. Moreover, knockdown of miR-124 significantly diminished the beneficial effect of nicotine on murine colitis and IL-6-treated Caco-2 colon epithelial cells. Further analysis indicated that nicotine inhibited STAT3 activation in vivo and in IL-6 treated Caco-2 cells and Jurkat human T lymphocytes, in which miR-124 knockdown led to increased activation of STAT3. Blocking STAT3 activity alone is beneficial for DSS colitis and also abolished nicotine's protective effect in this model. These data indicate that nicotine exerts its protective action in UC through inducing miR-124 and inhibiting STAT3, and suggest that the miR-124/STAT3 system is a potential target for the therapeutic intervention of UC.

  13. Understanding deficient emotional self-regulation in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Surman, Craig B H; Biederman, Joseph; Spencer, Thomas; Miller, Carolyn A; McDermott, Katie M; Faraone, Stephen V

    2013-09-01

    While symptoms of deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) such as low frustration tolerance, temper outbursts, emotional impulsivity, and mood lability are commonly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about their nature. The main aim of this post hoc study was to examine the correlates of DESR in a large sample of adults with and without ADHD. Subjects were 206 adults with ADHD and 123 adults without ADHD from a family study of ADHD. Emotional impulsivity was operationalized using items from the Barkley Current Behavior Scale. Subjects were comprehensively assessed for psychiatric comorbidity using structured diagnostic interview methodology. We used the Quality of Life, Enjoyment, and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (QLES-Q-SF) and Social Adjustment Scale-Self-report (SAS-SR) to assess quality of life and psychosocial functioning. DESR was more common among ADHD compared with non-ADHD adults, and 55% of adults with ADHD reported extreme DESR of greater severity than 95% of control subjects. The association of ADHD and DESR was not entirely accounted for by either current or lifetime comorbid disorders. DESR was also associated with significant functional impairment as evaluated by the QLES-Q-SF and SAS-SR, and with reduced marital status, as well as higher risk for traffic accidents and arrests. DESR adversely impacts quality of life in adults with ADHD. More work is needed to further evaluate DESR in clinical and investigational studies of subjects with ADHD.

  14. Understanding deficient emotional self-regulation in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Biederman, Joseph; Spencer, Thomas; Miller, Carolyn A.; McDermott, Katie M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2014-01-01

    While symptoms of deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) such as low frustration tolerance, temper outbursts, emotional impulsivity, and mood lability are commonly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about their nature. The main aim of this post hoc study was to examine the correlates of DESR in a large sample of adults with and without ADHD. Subjects were 206 adults with ADHD and 123 adults without ADHD from a family study of ADHD. Emotional impulsivity was operationalized using items from the Barkley Current Behavior Scale. Subjects were comprehensively assessed for psychiatric comorbidity using structured diagnostic interview methodology. We used the Quality of Life, Enjoyment, and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (QLES-Q-SF) and Social Adjustment Scale-Self-report (SAS-SR) to assess quality of life and psychosocial functioning. DESR was more common among ADHD compared with non-ADHD adults, and 55 % of adults with ADHD reported extreme DESR of greater severity than 95 % of control subjects. The association of ADHD and DESR was not entirely accounted for by either current or lifetime comorbid disorders. DESR was also associated with significant functional impairment as evaluated by the QLES-Q-SF and SAS-SR, and with reduced marital status, as well as higher risk for traffic accidents and arrests. DESR adversely impacts quality of life in adults with ADHD. More work is needed to further evaluate DESR in clinical and investigational studies of subjects with ADHD. PMID:23413201

  15. Sterilization Effects of Adult-targeted Baits Containing Insect Growth Regulators on Delia antiqua

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Zhu, Guodong; Zhao, Haipeng; Wang, Zheng; Xue, Ming; Li, Xianxian; Xu, Huaqiang; Ma, Xiaodan; Liu, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    The onion maggot, Delia antiqua, is a devastating pest of liliaceous crops and current control measures fail to avert pesticide residues, threats to agroecosystem, and costly expenditures. Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are used as trypetid pest chemosterilants for their suppression on adult fertility and fecundity, but their effects on onion flies are unknown. Here, three IGRs (lufenuron, cyromazine, pyriproxyfen) were incorporated into baits to evaluate their effects on onion fly survival, fecundity, fertility, susceptibility of adults in different ages and offspring development. Lufenuron and cyromazine did not affect survival of new-emerged adults, but lufenuron inhibited adult fertility without affecting fecundity, and cyromazine reduced fertility and fecundity. Differently, pyriproxyfen enhanced fecundity within 10 days after treatment, while it reduced adult survival without affecting fertility. The fertility of younger adults was affected by lufenuron and cyromazine whereas the fecundity was affected with cyromazine and pyriproxyfen. For offspring of onion flies treated with lufenuron or cyromazine, most of larvae died within 5 days after hatch, but surviving larvae pupated and emerged normally. Pyriproxyfen did not affect offspring larval survival or pupation but affected pupal emergence. Thus, lufenuron and cyromazine could be potential chemosterilants for onion flies. PMID:27619006

  16. Gender differences in self-regulation patterns and attitudes toward driving among older adults.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Lisa A; Donorfio, Laura K M; Coughlin, Joseph F; Mohyde, Maureen; Meyer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The automobile is essential for many older adults to fulfill their daily needs, especially since many live where they lack access to public transit or other acceptable modes of transportation. Increased self-regulation is one way older drivers continue to drive safely and maintain mobility. This research considers whether self-regulation attitudes and patterns differ by gender. Results indicate that women and men report distinct patterns of self-regulation behaviors. Age, health status, and household status also interact with gender, influencing the extent of self-regulation. The results also show that women report lower levels of confidence in their driving skills than men, although the difference varies based on whether or not a woman lives alone. Implications of these results are considered for an aging population--particularly women--that over the coming decades will be more reliant on the automobile for transportation than ever before.

  17. MicroRNA-124 suppresses growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yanxin; Yue, Xupeng; Cui, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, KeWei

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •miR-124 is down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. •Over-expression of miR-124 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells. •miR-124 inhibits xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. •STATs function as a novel target of miR-124 in HCC HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: The aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with development and progression of cancers. Down-regulation of miR-124 has been demonstrated in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-124 suppresses the tumor growth of HCC through targeting the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Overexpression of miR-124 suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in HepG-2 cells. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-124 binding to the 3′-UTR region of STAT3 inhibited the expression of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins in HepG-2 cells. Knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA in HepG-2 cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-124. Overexpression of STAT3 in miR-124-transfected HepG-2 cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation caused by miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 suppressed xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG-2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. Taken together, our findings show that miR-124 functions as tumor suppressor in HCC by targeting STAT3, and miR-124 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutics in HCC.

  18. Anxiety symptomatology and perceived health in African American adults: moderating role of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sierra E; Walker, Rheeda L

    2014-07-01

    Although emotional health has been theoretically and empirically linked to physical health, the anxiety-physical health association in particular is not well understood for African American adults. This study examined anxiety as a specific correlate of perceived health in addition to testing the potential moderating role of emotion regulation, an index of how and when individuals modulate emotions, in the association for anxiety to perceived health. Study participants were 151 community-based African American adults who completed measures of anxiety symptomatology and emotion regulation in addition to responding to a self-report question of perceived health. Results showed that higher levels of anxiety symptomatology were associated with poorer health ratings for those who reported more limited access to emotion regulation strategies but not those who reported having more emotion regulation strategies. The findings suggest that anxiety-related distress and health problems may be interrelated when emotion regulation strategies are limited. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Dissecting integrin-dependent regulation of neural stem cell proliferation in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Porcheri, Cristina; Suter, Ueli; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2014-04-09

    Controlling neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation is critical to maintain neurogenesis in the mammalian brain throughout life. However, it remains poorly understood how niche-derived cues such as β1-integrin-mediated signaling are translated into NSPC-intrinsic molecular changes to regulate NSPC activity. Here we show that genetic deletion of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) increases NSPC proliferation through PINCH1/2-dependent enhancement of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase activity in both neurogenic regions of the adult mouse brain. This effect downstream of ILK signaling is mediated through loss of Ras suppressor unit-1 (RSU-1), as virus-based reconstitution of RSU-1 expression rescued the ILK-dependent effects on NSPC proliferation. Thus, we here identified an intracellular signaling cascade linking extrinsic integrin-mediated signaling to NSPC proliferation and characterized a novel mechanism that regulates NSPC activity in the adult mammalian brain.

  20. Endothelial function and the regulation of muscle protein anabolism in older adults.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, K L; Volpi, E

    2013-12-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with aging, is a major contributor to frailty and morbidity in older adults. Recent evidence has emerged suggesting that endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance of muscle protein metabolism may significantly contribute to the development of sarcopenia. In this article we review: 1) recent studies and theories on the regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance in older adults; 2) the link between insulin resistance of muscle protein synthesis and endothelial dysfunction in aging; 3) mechanisms for impaired endothelial responsiveness in aging; and 4) potential treatments that may restore the endothelial responsiveness and muscle protein anabolic sensitivity in older adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New tools for the identification of developmentally regulated enhancer regions in embryonic and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Mitchell P; Krauss, Jana; Koehler, Carla; Boden, Cindy; Harris, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a screen to identify developmentally regulated enhancers that drive tissue-specific Gal4 expression in zebrafish. We obtained 63 stable transgenic lines with expression patterns in embryonic or adult zebrafish. The use of a newly identified minimal promoter from the medaka edar locus resulted in a relatively unbiased set of expression patterns representing many tissue types derived from all germ layers. Subsequent detailed characterization of selected lines showed strong and reproducible Gal4-driven GFP expression in diverse tissues, including neurons from the central and peripheral nervous systems, pigment cells, erythrocytes, and peridermal cells. By screening adults for GFP expression, we also isolated lines expressed in tissues of the adult zebrafish, including scales, fin rays, and joints. The new and efficient minimal promoter and large number of transactivating driver-lines we identified will provide the zebrafish community with a useful resource for further enhancer trap screening, as well as precise investigation of tissue-specific processes in vivo.

  2. Sequoia regulates cell fate decisions in the external sensory organs of adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Hillary K; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Yamamoto, Shinya; Schulze, Karen L; Bellen, Hugo J

    2009-06-01

    The adult Drosophila external sensory organ (ESO), comprising the hair, socket, neuron, sheath and glia cells, arises through the asymmetric division of sensory organ precursor cells (SOPs). In a mosaic screen designed to identify new components in ESO development, we isolated mutations in sequoia, which encodes a putative zinc-finger transcription factor that has previously been shown to have a role in dendritogenesis. Here, we show that adult clones mutant for seq exhibit a loss of hair cells and a gain of socket cells. We propose that the seq mutant phenotype arises, in part, owing to the loss of several crucial transcription factors known to be important in peripheral nervous system development such as D-Pax2, Prospero and Hamlet. Thus, Sequoia is a new upstream regulator of genes that orchestrates cell fate specification during development of the adult ESO lineage.

  3. Cell cycle regulation during neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain.

    PubMed

    Cheffer, Arquimedes; Tárnok, Attila; Ulrich, Henning

    2013-12-01

    Throughout the development of the central nervous system, neural crest cells and the primary neural stem cells originate several non-neuronal and neuronal cell types. Undifferentiated stem cells exist in the adult brain, mainly in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles, and can produce new neurons, participating in brain plasticity and tissue regeneration. Neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain occurs under the control of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the mechanisms, by which cell cycle components control neural stem cell proliferation and consequently neurogenesis, still lack further investigation. We discuss here recent knowledge obtained on cell cycle components as key regulators of neural stem and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the embryonic and adult brain.

  4. Regulation of sadness via acceptance or suppression in adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Matthies, Swantje; Philipsen, Alexandra; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Sadohara, Chiharu; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2014-12-15

    Emotion dysregulation is a recognized symptom of adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aim of this study is to induce sadness in adults suffering from ADHD and to investigate the impact of emotion regulation strategies on sadness intensity, and psychophysiological measures. Thirty-six adults diagnosed with ADHD were randomly assigned to either expressive suppression (SUPP) or acceptance (ACC) of emotion. Sadness was induced using a film clip. Participants estimated the intensity of sadness and the perception of being overwhelmed with emotion before (T1), immediately after (T2) and 2 min after the film (T3). Physiological measures were obtained. Sadness induction was effective in both conditions. The perception of being overwhelmed with emotion increased between T1 and T2 in both conditions, but persisted until T3 only in the expressive suppression condition whereas a decrease was observed in the acceptance condition. In ADHD expressive suppression of sadness seems to be associated to a prolonged recovery from the perception of being overwhelmed with emotion. Emotion-regulation via acceptance in contrast appears to allow faster recovery from the perception of being overwhelmed with emotion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify suppression as a critical mediator between an induced emotion and delayed recovery from emotional reactions in adult ADHD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cortisol-treated zebrafish embryos develop into pro-inflammatory adults with aberrant immune gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Ellen I.; Zhu, Shusen; King, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic early-life stress increases adult susceptibility to numerous health problems linked to chronic inflammation. One way that this may occur is via glucocorticoid-induced developmental programming. To gain insight into such programming we treated zebrafish embryos with cortisol and examined the effects on both larvae and adults. Treated larvae had elevated whole-body cortisol and glucocorticoid signaling, and upregulated genes associated with defense response and immune system processes. In adulthood the treated fish maintained elevated basal cortisol levels in the absence of exogenous cortisol, and constitutively mis-expressed genes involved in defense response and its regulation. Adults derived from cortisol-treated embryos displayed defective tailfin regeneration, heightened basal expression of pro-inflammatory genes, and failure to appropriately regulate those genes following injury or immunological challenge. These results support the hypothesis that chronically elevated glucocorticoid signaling early in life directs development of a pro-inflammatory adult phenotype, at the expense of immunoregulation and somatic regenerative capacity. PMID:27444789

  6. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Fiorotto, Marta; Klein, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Although skeletal muscle metabolism is a well-studied physiological process, little is known about how it is regulated at the transcriptional level. The myogenic transcription factor myogenin is required for skeletal muscle development during embryonic and fetal life, but myogenin's role in adult skeletal muscle is unclear. We sought to determine myogenin's function in adult muscle metabolism. A Myog conditional allele and Cre-ER transgene were used to delete Myog in adult mice. Mice were analyzed for exercise capacity by involuntary treadmill running. To assess oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, we performed indirect calorimetry, monitored blood glucose and lactate levels, and performed histochemical analyses on muscle fibers. Surprisingly, we found that Myog-deleted mice performed significantly better than controls in high- and low-intensity treadmill running. This enhanced exercise capacity was due to more efficient oxidative metabolism during low- and high-intensity exercise and more efficient glycolytic metabolism during high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, Myog-deleted mice had an enhanced response to long-term voluntary exercise training on running wheels. We identified several candidate genes whose expression was altered in exercise-stressed muscle of mice lacking myogenin. The results suggest that myogenin plays a critical role as a high-level transcriptional regulator to control the energy balance between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in adult skeletal muscle. PMID:21042574

  7. miR-17-92 Cluster Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Depression.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junghee; Kim, Seung-Nam; Liu, Xuqing; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Chao; Seo, Ji-Seon; Kim, Yong; Sun, Tao

    2016-08-09

    Emerging evidence has shown that noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders, although the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that altered levels of miR-17-92 in adult hippocampal neural progenitors have a significant impact on neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in mice. miR-17-92 deletion in adult neural progenitors decreases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, while its overexpression increases neurogenesis. miR-17-92 affects neurogenesis by regulating genes in the glucocorticoid pathway, especially serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (Sgk1). miR-17-92 knockout mice show anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, whereas miR-17-92 overexpressing mice exhibit anxiolytic and antidepression-like behaviors. Furthermore, we show that miR-17-92 expression in the adult mouse hippocampus responds to chronic stress, and miR-17-92 rescues proliferation defects induced by corticosterone in hippocampal neural progenitors. Our study uncovers a crucial role for miR-17-92 in adult neural progenitors through regulation of neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of Vitamin A/Retinoic Acid in Regulation of Embryonic and Adult Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Ana; Cano, Elena; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Carmona, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin A is an essential micronutrient throughout life. Its physiologically active metabolite retinoic acid (RA), acting through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), is a potent regulator of patterning during embryonic development, as well as being necessary for adult tissue homeostasis. Vitamin A deficiency during pregnancy increases risk of maternal night blindness and anemia and may be a cause of congenital malformations. Childhood Vitamin A deficiency can cause xerophthalmia, lower resistance to infection and increased risk of mortality. RA signaling appears to be essential for expression of genes involved in developmental hematopoiesis, regulating the endothelial/blood cells balance in the yolk sac, promoting the hemogenic program in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros area and stimulating eryrthropoiesis in fetal liver by activating the expression of erythropoietin. In adults, RA signaling regulates differentiation of granulocytes and enhances erythropoiesis. Vitamin A may facilitate iron absorption and metabolism to prevent anemia and plays a key role in mucosal immune responses, modulating the function of regulatory T cells. Furthermore, defective RA/RARα signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of acute promyelocytic leukemia due to a failure in differentiation of promyelocytes. This review focuses on the different roles played by vitamin A/RA signaling in physiological and pathological mouse hematopoiesis duddurring both, embryonic and adult life, and the consequences of vitamin A deficiency for the blood system. PMID:28230720

  9. The Steroid Molting Hormone Ecdysone Regulates Sleep in Adult Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Ecdysone is the major steroid hormone in insects and plays essential roles in coordinating developmental transitions such as larval molting and metamorphosis through its active metabolite 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Although ecdysone is present throughout life in both males and females, its functions in adult physiology remain largely unknown. In this study we demonstrate that ecdysone-mediated signaling in the adult is intimately involved in transitions between the physiological states of sleep and wakefulness. First, administering 20E to adult Drosophila melanogaster promoted sleep in a dose-dependent manner, and it did so primarily by altering the length of sleep and wake bouts without affecting waking activity. Second, mutants for ecdysone synthesis displayed the “short-sleep phenotype,” and this was alleviated by administering 20E at the adult stage. Third, mutants for nuclear ecdysone receptors showed reduced sleep, and conditional overexpression of wild-type ecdysone receptors in the adult mushroom bodies resulted in an isoform-specific increase in sleep. Finally, endogenous ecdysone levels increased after sleep deprivation, and mutants defective for ecdysone signaling displayed little sleep rebound, suggesting that ecdysone is involved in homeostatic sleep regulation. In light of the recent finding that lethargus—a period at larval-stage transitions in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans—is a sleep-like state, our results suggest that sleep is functionally and mechanistically linked to a genetically programmed, quiescent behavioral state during development. PMID:20215472

  10. Choir singing and creative writing enhance emotion regulation in adults with chronic mental health conditions.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Genevieve A; Williams, Elyse; Jetten, Jolanda; Welch, Jonathon

    2017-07-18

    Adults with mental health conditions commonly experience difficulties with emotion regulation which affect their social functioning. Arts-based groups provide opportunities for shared emotional experiences and emotion regulation. This study explores emotion regulation strategies and the emotional effects of arts-based group participation in adults with mental health problems and in controls. The 62 participants included 39 adults with chronic mental health problems who were members of arts-based groups (ABG) and 23 comparison choir (CC) members who were not specifically experiencing mental health problems. The repeated measures design included self-reports of emotion upon waking (T1), the hour before group (T2), end of the group (T3), and evening (T4), as well as participant notes to explain their emotion ratings at each time. They also completed measures of individual and interpersonal emotion regulation. The ABG participants engaged marginally more in affect worsening strategies than CC (p = .057 and .08), but there were no other group differences. All participants reported a significant increase in positive emotions, F (3, 180) = 28.044, p < .001, np2 = .319; and a decrease in negative emotions during the arts-based activity: F (2.637, 155.597) = 21.09, p < .001, np2 = .263. The influence on positive emotions was short-lived, while the effect on negative emotions lasted until evening. Findings show that participation in arts-based groups benefits the emotions of both healthy adults and those experiencing mental health conditions through individual and interpersonal processes. Individuals with chronic mental health conditions often experience difficulties in emotion processing Participation in arts-based groups was associated with significant increases in positive emotions although these were short-lived Negative emotion was significantly decreased during arts-based group activities, and sustained to the evening assessment Adults with chronic mental

  11. Neuronal Splicing Regulator RBFOX3 (NeuN) Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Ying; Chou, Chih-Hsuan; Wu, I-Ju; Huang, Guo-Jen; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of RBFOX3 has been identified in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder, cognitive impairments and epilepsy and a causal relationship with these diseases has been previously demonstrated with Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice. Despite the importance of RBFOX3 during neurodevelopment, the function of RBFOX3 regarding neurogenesis and synaptogenesis remains unclear. To address this critical question, we profiled the developmental expression pattern of Rbfox3 in the brain of wild-type mice and analyzed brain volume, disease-relevant behaviors, neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and synaptogenesis in Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice and their corresponding wild-type counterparts. Here we report that expression of Rbfox3 differs developmentally for distinct brain regions. Moreover, Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice exhibited cold hyperalgesia and impaired cognitive abilities. Focusing on hippocampal phenotypes, we found Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice displayed deficits in neurogenesis, which was correlated with cognitive impairments. Furthermore, RBFOX3 regulates the exons of genes with synapse-related function. Synaptic plasticity and density, which are related to cognitive behaviors, were altered in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice; synaptic plasticity decreased and the density of synapses increased. Taken together, our results demonstrate the important role of RBFOX3 during neural development and maturation. In addition, abnormalities in synaptic structure and function occur in Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice. Our findings may offer mechanistic explanations for human brain diseases associated with dysfunctional RBFOX3. PMID:27701470

  12. Noradrenergic regulation of plasticity marker expression in the adult rodent piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Vadodaria, Krishna C; Yanpallewar, Sudhirkumar U; Vadhvani, Mayur; Toshniwal, Devyani; Liles, L Cameron; Rommelfanger, Karen S; Weinshenker, David; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2017-02-23

    The adult rodent piriform cortex has been reported to harbor immature neurons that express markers associated with neurodevelopment and plasticity, namely polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and doublecortin (DCX). We characterized the expression of PSA-NCAM and DCX across the rostrocaudal axis of the rat piriform cortex and observed higher numbers of PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the posterior subdivision. As observed in the rat piriform cortex, Nestin-GFP reporter mice also revealed a similar gradient of GFP-positive cells with an increasing rostro-caudal gradient of expression. Given the extensive noradrenergic innervation of the piriform cortex and its role in regulating piriform cortex function and synaptic plasticity, we addressed the influence of norepinephrine (NE) on piriform cortex plasticity marker expression. Depletion of NE by treatment with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 significantly increased the number of DCX and PSA-NCAM immunopositive cells in the piriform cortex of adult rats. Similarly, DSP-4 treated Nestin-GFP reporter mice revealed a robust induction of GFP-positive cells within the piriform cortex following NE depletion. Genetic loss of NE in dopamine β-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice phenocopied the effects of DSP-4, with an increase noted in PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the piriform cortex. Further, chronic α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation with the agonist guanabenz increased PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the piriform cortex of adult rats and GFP-positive cells in the piriform cortex of Nestin-GFP mice. By contrast, chronic α2-adrenergic receptor blockade with the antagonist yohimbine reduced PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the piriform cortex of adult rats. Our results provide novel evidence for a role of NE in regulating the expression of plasticity markers, including PSA-NCAM, DCX, and nestin, within the adult mouse and rat piriform cortex.

  13. Interleukin-15 regulates proliferation and self-renewal of adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Nicola, Diego; Valle-Argos, Beatriz; Pallas-Bazarra, Noemí; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The impact of inflammation is crucial for the regulation of the biology of neural stem cells (NSCs). Interleukin-15 (IL-15) appears as a likely candidate for regulating neurogenesis, based on its well-known mitogenic properties. We show here that NSCs of the subventricular zone (SVZ) express IL-15, which regulates NSC proliferation, as evidenced by the study of IL-15−/− mice and the effects of acute IL-15 administration, coupled to 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine/5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine dual-pulse labeling. Moreover, IL-15 regulates NSC differentiation, its deficiency leading to an impaired generation of neuroblasts in the SVZ–rostral migratory stream axis, recoverable through the action of exogenous IL-15. IL-15 expressed in cultured NSCs is linked to self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. IL-15–/– NSCs presented deficient proliferation and self-renewal, as evidenced in proliferation and colony-forming assays and the analysis of cell cycle–regulatory proteins. Moreover, IL-15–deficient NSCs were more prone to differentiate than wild-type NSCs, not affecting the cell population balance. Lack of IL-15 led to a defective activation of the JAK/STAT and ERK pathways, key for the regulation of proliferation and differentiation of NSCs. The results show that IL-15 is a key regulator of neurogenesis in the adult and is essential to understanding diseases with an inflammatory component. PMID:21508317

  14. Eating Self-Regulation in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jill R; Yates, Bernice C; Houfek, Julia; Pullen, Carol H; Briner, Wayne; Schmid, Kendra K

    2016-04-01

    Poor eating behaviors greatly influence the development of becoming overweight or obese. Learning to better self-regulate eating is one area in which individuals can positively influence their own health. The purpose of this concept analysis is to provide an in-depth analysis of the concept eating self-regulation as it pertains to overweight and obese adults using Walker and Avant's method. The definition for eating self-regulation formulated as a result of this concept analysis and based on the critical attributes is the ability to initiate goal-related behaviors, to consistently self-monitor dietary intake, to regularly apply willpower to resist temptations, to self-evaluate where one stands in relationship to goal attainment, and finally to maintain motivation to positively change eating behaviors. Cognitive restraint, moderation, mindfulness, disinhibition, delayed gratification, emotions and moods, self-efficacy, social support, the environment, and physical activity are the antecedents that may influence eating self-regulation. Examining an individual's weight, body mass index, lipid levels, or blood pressure are some ways to determine if self-regulation of eating behavior is achieved. With a consistent definition of self-regulation and a better understanding of the critical factors that influence eating behaviors, research can better explore how to help individuals change their eating behaviors more effectively. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Flt3 Ligand Regulates the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Fetal and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Baerenwaldt, Anne; von Burg, Nicole; Kreuzaler, Matthias; Sitte, Selina; Horvath, Edit; Peter, Annick; Voehringer, David; Rolink, Antonius G; Finke, Daniela

    2016-03-15

    Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) promotes survival of lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), but its role in regulating innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) during fetal and adult life is not understood. By using Flt3L knockout and transgenic mice, we demonstrate that Flt3L controls ILC numbers by regulating the pool of α4β7(-) and α4β7(+) lymphoid tissue inducer cell progenitors in the fetal liver and common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow. Deletion of flt3l severely reduced the number of fetal liver progenitors and lymphoid tissue inducer cells in the neonatal intestine, resulting in impaired development of Peyer's patches. In the adult intestine, NK cells and group 2 and 3 ILCs were severely reduced. This effect occurred independently of DCs as ILC numbers were normal in mice in which DCs were constitutively deleted. Finally, we could show that administration of Flt3L increased the number of NKp46(-) group 3 ILCs in wild-type and even in Il7(-/-) mice, which generally have reduced numbers of ILCs. Taken together, Flt3L significantly contributes to ILC and Peyer's patches development by targeting lymphoid progenitor cells during fetal and adult life. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Reelin Exerts Structural, Biochemical and Transcriptional Regulation Over Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Elements in the Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Muhaisen, Ashraf; Pujadas, Lluís; Soriano, Eduardo; Martínez, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Reelin regulates neuronal positioning and synaptogenesis in the developing brain, and adult brain plasticity. Here we used transgenic mice overexpressing Reelin (Reelin-OE mice) to perform a comprehensive dissection of the effects of this protein on the structural and biochemical features of dendritic spines and axon terminals in the adult hippocampus. Electron microscopy (EM) revealed both higher density of synapses and structural complexity of both pre- and postsynaptic elements in transgenic mice than in WT mice. Dendritic spines had larger spine apparatuses, which correlated with a redistribution of Synaptopodin. Most of the changes observed in Reelin-OE mice were reversible after blockade of transgene expression, thus supporting the specificity of the observed phenotypes. Western blot and transcriptional analyses did not show major changes in the expression of pre- or postsynaptic proteins, including SNARE proteins, glutamate receptors, and scaffolding and signaling proteins. However, EM immunogold assays revealed that the NMDA receptor subunits NR2a and NR2b, and p-Cofilin showed a redistribution from synaptic to extrasynaptic pools. Taken together with previous studies, the present results suggest that Reelin regulates the structural and biochemical properties of adult hippocampal synapses by increasing their density and morphological complexity and by modifying the distribution and trafficking of major glutamatergic components. PMID:27303269

  17. Differential regulation of laminin b1 transgene expression in the neonatal and adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharif, K A; Baker, H; Gudas, L J

    2004-01-01

    Laminins are the major glycoproteins present in basement membrane, a type of extracellular matrix. We showed that the LAMB1 gene, which encodes the laminin beta1 subunit, is transcriptionally activated by retinoic acid in embryonic stem cells. However, little information is available concerning LAMB1 developmental regulation and spatial expression in the adult mouse brain. In this study we used transgenic mice expressing different lengths of LAMB1 promoter driving beta-galactosidase to investigate developmental and adult transcriptional regulation in the regions of the brain in which the laminin beta1 protein is expressed. CNS expression was not observed in transgenic mice carrying a 1.4LAMB1betagal construct. Mice carrying a 2.5LAMB1betagal construct expressed the LAMB1 transgene, as assayed by X-gal staining, only in the molecular layer of the neonatal cerebellum. In contrast, a 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene showed broad regional expression in the adult mouse brain, including the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, colliculi, striatum, and substantia nigra. Similar expression patterns were observed for the endogenous laminin beta1 protein and for the 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene, analyzed with an antibody against the beta-galactosidase protein. The 3.9LAMB1betagal transgene expression in the hippocampal tri-synaptic circuit suggests a role for the LAMB1 gene in learning and memory.

  18. Light regulates the expression of the BDNF/TrkB system in the adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ramos, C; Bonnin-Arias, C; Guerrera, M C; Calavia, M G; Chamorro, E; Montalbano, G; López-Velasco, S; López-Muñiz, A; Germanà, A; Vega, J A

    2013-01-01

    The retina of the adult zebrafish express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its signaling receptor TrkB. This functional system is involved in the biology of the vertebrate retina and its expression is regulated by light. This study was designed to investigate the effects of cyclic (12 h light/12 h darkness) or continuous (24 h) exposure during 10 days to white light, white-blue light, and blue light, as well as of darkness, on the expression of BDNF and TrkB in the retina. BDNF and TrkB were assessed in the retina of adult zebrafish using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Exposure to white, white-blue, and blue light causes a decrease of BDNF mRNA and of BDNF immunostaining, independently of the pattern of light exposition. Conversely, in the same experimental conditions, the expression of TrkB mRNA was upregulated and TrkB immunostaining increased. Exposition to darkness diminished BDNF and TrkB mRNAs, and abolished the immunostaining for BDNF but not modified that for TrkB. These results demonstrate the regulation of BDNF and TrkB by light in the retina of adult zebrafish and might contribute to explain some aspects of the complex pathophysiology of light-induced retinopathies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Professionalisation as development and as regulation: Adult education in Germany, the United Kingdom and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Lesley; Egetenmeyer, Regina; Singai, Chetan; Devi, Uma

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the authors seek to disentangle what they see as contradictory uses of the term "professionalisation" with reference to adult educator development and training (AEDT). They set out to distinguish professionalisation from professionalism, and to identify the locus of control of AEDT in Germany, the UK and India. In these three countries, all of which have a long tradition of adult education, "professionalisation" and "professionalism" are used interchangeably to describe conflicting purposes. The authors aim to identify and critically explore the organisations and policies which control and support AEDT in their own countries using American sociologist Eliot Freidson's "third logic" model, and drawing on his juxtaposition of "professions", "the market" and "bureaucracy". Applying Freidson's models to the organisations highlights the role of bureaucracy and that where adult education is concerned, national governments, the European Union and aid organisations not only serve bureaucracy but also support the market rather than operating separately from it. While the term "professionalisation" continues to be used to mean professional development, either by adult educators and representative organisations (as in the UK) or by organisations acting on their behalf (as in Germany and India), it is also used to denote regulation and standardisation issuing from bureaucratic institutions and adult education provider organisations in the interests of the market. The authors suggest that Freidson's model provides a useful tool for adult educators in other countries to reflect on their professional position and to engage in the development of their own professional standards, both in their own interests and in the interests of those they educate.

  20. Relaxation Therapy and Anxiety, Self-Esteem, and Emotional Regulation among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouvet, Cyrille; Coulet, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study is a randomized controlled trial on the effects of relaxation on anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) working in a center of supported employment in France. We studied 30 adults with mild or moderate ID who were split at random into a relaxation group (RG, 15 subjects), who…

  1. Relaxation Therapy and Anxiety, Self-Esteem, and Emotional Regulation among Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouvet, Cyrille; Coulet, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study is a randomized controlled trial on the effects of relaxation on anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) working in a center of supported employment in France. We studied 30 adults with mild or moderate ID who were split at random into a relaxation group (RG, 15 subjects), who…

  2. Self-Regulation, Metacognition and Child- and Adult-Initiated Activity: Does It Matter Who Initiates the Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Debate about the balance between child- and adult-initiated activities in early childhood settings is long standing. This article reports a study of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a London state school, on the influences of child- and adult-initiated activities on children's self-regulation and metacognition. Whilst both contexts were supportive,…

  3. Self-Regulation, Metacognition and Child- and Adult-Initiated Activity: Does It Matter Who Initiates the Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Debate about the balance between child- and adult-initiated activities in early childhood settings is long standing. This article reports a study of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a London state school, on the influences of child- and adult-initiated activities on children's self-regulation and metacognition. Whilst both contexts were supportive,…

  4. Expression of cell surface and cytoskeleton developmentally regulated proteins in adult centronuclear myopathies.

    PubMed

    Figarella-Branger, D; Calore, E E; Boucraut, J; Bianco, N; Rougon, G; Pellissier, J F

    1992-05-01

    In order to evaluate the developmental status of myofibers in 3 cases of adult centronuclear myopathies (CNM) with type I predominance, we searched for the expression of (a) developmentally regulated cytoskeleton proteins (myosin heavy chains (MHC), vimentin, desmin), and (b) cell surface molecules (neural cell adhesion molecules isoforms, NCAM). Desmin intermediate filaments were overexpressed in some fibers with centrally located nuclei and radially organized. Muscle fibers do not express vimentin. These findings were not observed in muscle biopsies from disease controls with numerous central nuclei. Few myofibers (less than 5%) expressed developmental MHC together with either embryonic NCAM or adult NCAM and rare fibers only expressed adult NCAM. Most of the remaining fibers neither expressed NCAM nor developmental MHC but were slow MHC positive. These features do not favor the hypothesis of a general arrest of muscle fiber maturation in adult CNM. It is more likely that fibers undergo a very slow developmental process with a long delay of innervation as shown by some fibers with NCAM expression. Nevertheless, innervation appears to be successful, as suggested by the large number of NCAM negative fibers. Moreover, the abnormal myofiber distribution could be related to this functional disturbance of innervation.

  5. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  6. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y.; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44−/− mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26546504

  7. CD44 Transmembrane Receptor and Hyaluronan Regulate Adult Hippocampal Neural Stem Cell Quiescence and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Su, Weiping; Foster, Scott C; Xing, Rubing; Feistel, Kerstin; Olsen, Reid H J; Acevedo, Summer F; Raber, Jacob; Sherman, Larry S

    2017-03-17

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) is involved in learning and memory throughout life but declines with aging. Mice lacking the CD44 transmembrane receptor for the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) demonstrate a number of neurological disturbances including hippocampal memory deficits, implicating CD44 in the processes underlying hippocampal memory encoding, storage, or retrieval. Here, we found that HA and CD44 play important roles in regulating adult neurogenesis, and we provide evidence that HA contributes to age-related reductions in neural stem cell (NSC) expansion and differentiation in the hippocampus. CD44-expressing NSCs isolated from the mouse SGZ are self-renewing and capable of differentiating into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Mice lacking CD44 demonstrate increases in NSC proliferation in the SGZ. This increased proliferation is also observed in NSCs grown in vitro, suggesting that CD44 functions to regulate NSC proliferation in a cell-autonomous manner. HA is synthesized by NSCs and increases in the SGZ with aging. Treating wild type but not CD44-null NSCs with HA inhibits NSC proliferation. HA digestion in wild type NSC cultures or in the SGZ induces increased NSC proliferation, and CD44-null as well as HA-disrupted wild type NSCs demonstrate delayed neuronal differentiation. HA therefore signals through CD44 to regulate NSC quiescence and differentiation, and HA accumulation in the SGZ may contribute to reductions in neurogenesis that are linked to age-related decline in spatial memory.

  8. Epigenetic gene regulation in the adult mammalian brain: multiple roles in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Farah D

    2011-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the life-span and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic.

  9. Lifestyle, glucose regulation and the cognitive effects of glucose load in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Riby, Deborah M; Graham, Cheryl

    2008-11-01

    Interventions aimed at improving glucose regulatory mechanisms have been suggested as a possible source of cognitive enhancement in the elderly. In particular, previous research has identified episodic memory as a target for facilitation after either moderate increases in glycaemia (after a glucose drink) or after improvements in glucose regulation. The present study aimed to extend this research by examining the joint effects of glucose ingestion and glucose regulation on cognition. In addition, risk factors associated with the development of poor glucose regulation in middle-aged adults were considered. In a repeated measures design, thirty-three middle-aged adults (aged 35-55 years) performed a battery of memory and non-memory tasks after either 25 g or 50 g glucose or a sweetness matched placebo drink. To assess the impact of individual differences in glucose regulation, blood glucose measurements were taken on four occasions during testing. A lifestyle and diet questionnaire was also administered. Consistent with previous research, episodic memory ability benefited from glucose ingestion when task demands were high. Blood glucose concentration was also found to predict performance across a number of cognitive domains. Interestingly, the risk factors associated with poor glucose regulation were linked to dietary impacts traditionally associated with poor health, e.g. the consumption of high-sugar sweets and drinks. The research replicates earlier work suggesting that task demands are critical to the glucose facilitation effect. Importantly, the data demonstrate clear associations between elevated glycaemia and relatively poor cognitive performance, which may be partly due to the effect of dietary and lifestyle factors.

  10. Goal orientation, self-regulation strategies, and job-seeking intensity in unemployed adults.

    PubMed

    Creed, Peter A; King, Vivien; Hood, Michelle; McKenzie, Robert

    2009-05-01

    At Time 1 (T1), the authors surveyed 277 unemployed adults using measures of human capital, goal orientation, self-regulation (emotion control, motivation control, work commitment), and job-seeking intensity. At Time 2 (T2), 4 months later, 155 participants indicated their reemployment outcomes in number of job interviews and number of job offers. Using T1 data, the authors tested the predictors of job-seeking intensity and whether self-regulation mediated between goal orientation and job-seeking intensity. Using T1 and T2 data, they tested for predictors of reemployment outcomes and whether job-seeking intensity mediated the relationship between T1 antecedent variables and the reemployment outcomes. Learning goal orientation and self-regulation predicted job-seeking intensity, and self-regulation mediated between learning goal orientation and job-seeking intensity. Job-seeking intensity did not mediate the relationship among human capital, goal orientation, and self-regulation variables and reemployment outcomes.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of fetal to adult hemoglobin switching: new therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Andrew; Nienhuis, Arthur W.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, embryonic, fetal, and adult hemoglobins are sequentially expressed in developing erythroblasts during ontogeny. For the past 40 years, this process has been the subject of intensive study because of its value to enlighten the biology of developmental gene regulation and because fetal hemoglobin can significantly ameliorate the clinical manifestations of both sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia. Understanding the normal process of loss of fetal globin expression and activation of adult globin expression could potentially lead to new therapeutic approaches for these hemoglobin disorders. Herein, we briefly review the history of the study of hemoglobin switching and then focus on recent discoveries in the field that now make new therapeutic approaches seem feasible in the future. Erythroid-specific knockdown of fetal gene repressors or enforced expression of fetal gene activators may provide clinically applicable approaches for genetic treatment of hemoglobin disorders that would benefit from increased fetal hemoglobin levels. PMID:21321359

  12. Immune-based regulation of adult neurogenesis: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Yaniv; Schwartz, Michal

    2008-02-01

    Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons from stem/progenitor cells, occurs in the hippocampal dentate gyrus throughout life. Although the exact function of adult hippocampal neurogenesis is currently unknown, recent studies suggest that the newly formed neuronal population plays an important role in hippocampal-dependent cognitive abilities, including declarative memory. The process of adult neurogenesis is greatly influenced by the interaction between cells of the adaptive immune system and CNS-resident immune cells. Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that immune cells contribute to maintaining life-long hippocampal neurogenesis. The regulation of such immune-cell activity is crucial: too little immune activity (as in immune deficiency syndromes) or too much immune activity (as in severe inflammatory diseases) can lead to impaired hippocampal neurogenesis, which could then result in impaired hippocampal-dependent cognitive abilities. From these converging discoveries arise a mechanism that can explain one route by which our body affects our mind.

  13. Metacognition in Later Adulthood: Spared Monitoring Can Benefit Older Adults' Self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Hertzog, Christopher; Dunlosky, John

    2011-06-01

    Metacognition includes two key concepts: monitoring of internal states, and adaptive use of control strategies based on that monitoring. We review studies that indicate that aging does not materially affect the accuracy of elementary forms of monitoring encoding and retrieval states in episodic memory tasks, even though it does influence episodic memory itself. Spared monitoring accuracy can therefore serve as a basis for older adults' use of compensatory strategies to achieve learning goals, despite the influence of aging on mechanisms of learning. Metacognitive intervention studies based on this premise show greater effects on learning than traditional strategy-training approaches. Use of strategies for self-regulation, informed by monitoring, may be an important tool for older adults' effective cognitive functioning in everyday life.

  14. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Hanson, Linda M.; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  15. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, Cecilia U D; Hanson, Linda M; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  16. Development and validation of the Self-Regulation of Eating Behaviour Questionnaire for adults.

    PubMed

    Kliemann, Nathalie; Beeken, Rebecca J; Wardle, Jane; Johnson, Fiona

    2016-08-02

    Eating self-regulatory capacity can help individuals to cope with the obesogenic environment and achieve, as well as maintain, a healthy weight and diet. At present, there is no comprehensive, reliable and valid questionnaire for assessing this capacity and measuring change in response to self-regulation interventions in adults. This paper reports the development of the Self-regulation of Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (SREBQ) for use in UK adults, and presents evidence for its reliability and construct validity. The development of the SREBQ involved generation of an item pool, followed by two pilot studies (Samples 1 and 2) and a test of the questionnaire's underlying factor structure (Sample 3). The final version of the SREBQ was then assessed for reliability and construct validity (Sample 4). Development of the SREBQ resulted in a 5-item questionnaire. The face validity was satisfactory, as assessed by the pilot studies. The factor structure analysis (Sample 3) suggested that it has a single underlying factor, which was confirmed in a second sample (Sample 4). The SREBQ had strong construct validity, showing a positive correlation with general measures of self-regulation. It was also positively correlated with motivation and behavioural automaticity, and negatively correlated with food responsiveness and emotional over-eating (p < 0.001). It showed good discriminant validity, as it was only weakly associated with satiety responsiveness, food fussiness and slowness in eating. The SREBQ is a reliable and valid measure for assessment of eating self-regulatory capacity in the general UK adult population.

  17. Regulated gene expression in cultured type II cells of adult human lung

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae W.; Fang, Xiaohui; Chapin, Cheryl; Allen, Lennell; Segal, Mark R.; Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Gonzales, Linda W.; Kolla, Venkatadri; Matthay, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Alveolar type II cells have multiple functions, including surfactant production and fluid clearance, which are critical for lung function. Differentiation of type II cells occurs in cultured fetal lung epithelial cells treated with dexamethasone plus cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (DCI) and involves increased expression of 388 genes. In this study, type II cells of human adult lung were isolated at ∼95% purity, and gene expression was determined (Affymetrix) before and after culturing 5 days on collagen-coated dishes with or without DCI for the final 3 days. In freshly isolated cells, highly expressed genes included SFTPA/B/C, SCGB1A, IL8, CXCL2, and SFN in addition to ubiquitously expressed genes. Transcript abundance was correlated between fetal and adult cells (r = 0.88), with a subset of 187 genes primarily related to inflammation and immunity that were expressed >10-fold higher in adult cells. During control culture, expression increased for 8.1% of expressed genes and decreased for ∼4% including 118 immune response and 10 surfactant-related genes. DCI treatment promoted lamellar body production and increased expression of ∼3% of probed genes by ≥1.5-fold; 40% of these were also induced in fetal cells. Highly induced genes (≥10-fold) included PGC, ZBTB16, DUOX1, PLUNC, CIT, and CRTAC1. Twenty-five induced genes, including six genes related to surfactant (SFTPA/B/C, PGC, CEBPD, and ADFP), also had decreased expression during control culture and thus are candidates for hormonal regulation in vivo. Our results further define the adult human type II cell molecular phenotype and demonstrate that a subset of genes remains hormone responsive in cultured adult cells. PMID:20382749

  18. Research involving adults lacking capacity to consent: the impact of research regulation on 'evidence biased' medicine.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Victoria

    2016-09-08

    Society is failing in its moral obligation to improve the standard of healthcare provided to vulnerable populations, such as people who lack decision making capacity, by a misguided paternalism that seeks to protect them by excluding them from medical research. Uncertainties surround the basis on which decisions about research participation is made under dual regulatory regimes, which adds further complexity. Vulnerable individuals' exclusion from research as a result of such regulation risks condemning such populations to poor quality care as a result of 'evidence biased' medicine. This paper explores the research regulation provisions for proxy decision making for those unable to provide informed consent for themselves, and the subsequent legal and practical difficulties for decision-makers. There are two separate regulatory regimes governing research involving adults who lack capacity to consent in England and Wales. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 governs how incapacitated adults can be involved in research, however clinical trials of medicinal products are separately regulated by the Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Regulations 2004. There are significant differences under these dual regimes in the provisions for those lacking capacity to participate in medical research. The level of risk permitted differs, with a greater requirement for justification for participation in a clinical trial than other types of research. Who acts as proxy decision maker, how much information is provided to the person lacking capacity, and whether they retain the power of veto also significantly differs. The development of two separate regulatory regimes has resulted in significant differences between the provisions for clinical trials and other forms of research, and from usual medical practice. The resulting uncertainty has reinforced the tendency of those approving and conducting research to exclude adults lacking capacity to avoid difficult decisions about seeking

  19. STRESS REGULATION AS A LINK BETWEEN EXECUTIVE FUNCTION AND PRE-FRAILTY IN OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Roiland, R.A.; Lin, F.; Phelan, C.; Chapman, B.P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Both pre-frailty and frailty are linked with impaired executive function (EF) but the mechanism underlying this relationship is not known. Williams and colleagues’ model posits EF affects health outcomes via stress regulation. This model was utlized to test indicators of stress regulation as mediators of the relationship between EF and pre-frailty in older adults. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Academic general clinical research centers. Participants 690 community-dwelling older adults ≥ 50 years of age. Measurements Pre-frailty was measured using a modified form of the Fried Frailty measure. EF was assessed via telephone-based neurocognitive assessments. Indicators of stress regulation included: stress exposure (measured by perceived stress), reactivity and recovery (measured by heart rate) and restoration (measured by serum interleukin-6 and sleep quality). Results 396 individuals were classified as non-frail, 277 as pre-frail, and 17 as frail. Pre-frail and non-frail individuals were included in data analyses. Compared to non-frail individuals, prefrail were older and exhibited poorer EF, higher levels of stress exposure and poorer stress restoration. Poorer EF was associated with greater stress exposure, less stress reactivity, longer stress recovery and poorer stress restoration. The total effect of the relationship between EF and pre-frailty was significant with significant indirect effects supporting stress exposure and restoration as mediators of the relationship. Conclusion Stress exposure and restoration appear to mediate the relationship between EF and pre-frailty. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the direction of causality and determine whether stress regulation processes are appropriate targets for interventions aiming to prevent declines in EF and the development of pre-frailty. PMID:26412287

  20. Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Body Weight Regulation in Adults12345

    PubMed Central

    Karl, J. Philip; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary energy density (ED) in the regulation of energy intake (EI) is controversial. Methodologically, there is also debate about whether beverages should be included in dietary ED calculations. To address these issues, studies examining the effects of ED on EI or body weight in nonelderly adults were reviewed. Different approaches to calculating dietary ED do not appear to alter the direction of reported relations between ED and body weight. Evidence that lowering dietary ED reduces EI in short-term studies is convincing, but there are currently insufficient data to determine long-term effectiveness for weight loss. The review also identified key barriers to progress in understanding the role of ED in energy regulation, in particular the absence of a standard definition of ED, and the lack of data from multiple long-term clinical trials examining the effectiveness of low-ED diet recommendations for preventing both primary weight gain and weight regain in nonobese individuals. Long-term clinical trials designed to examine the impact of dietary ED on energy regulation, and including multiple ED calculation methods within the same study, are still needed to determine the importance of ED in the regulation of EI and body weight. PMID:25398750

  1. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  2. Wnt signaling regulates acetylcholine receptor translocation and synaptic plasticity in the adult nervous system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Brockie, Penelope J; Wang, Rui; Johnson, Erica; Maxfield, Dane; Francis, Michael M; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-03-30

    The adult nervous system is plastic, allowing us to learn, remember, and forget. Experience-dependent plasticity occurs at synapses--the specialized points of contact between neurons where signaling occurs. However, the mechanisms that regulate the strength of synaptic signaling are not well understood. Here, we define a Wnt-signaling pathway that modifies synaptic strength in the adult nervous system by regulating the translocation of one class of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) to synapses. In Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that mutations in CWN-2 (Wnt ligand), LIN-17 (Frizzled), CAM-1 (Ror receptor tyrosine kinase), or the downstream effector DSH-1 (disheveled) result in similar subsynaptic accumulations of ACR-16/α7 AChRs, a consequent reduction in synaptic current, and predictable behavioral defects. Photoconversion experiments revealed defective translocation of ACR-16/α7 to synapses in Wnt-signaling mutants. Using optogenetic nerve stimulation, we demonstrate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and its dependence on ACR-16/α7 translocation mediated by Wnt signaling via LIN-17/CAM-1 heteromeric receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatially restricted Hedgehog signaling regulates HGF-induced branching of the adult prostate

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Agnes; Shin, Kunyoo; Zhao, Chen; Kawano, Sally; Beachy, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is thought to be governed by epithelial-stromal interactions, but the mechanisms underlying specification of branch location remain largely unknown. Prompted by the striking absence of Hedgehog (Hh) response at the sites of nascent buds in regenerating tubules of the adult prostate, we investigated the role of Hh signaling in adult prostate branching morphogenesis. We find that pathway activity is localized to stromal cells, and that its attenuation by genetic or pharmacologic manipulation leads to increased branching. Decreased pathway activity correlates with increased stromal production of Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf), and we show that Hgf induces epithelial tubule branching. Regulation of Hgf expression by Hh signaling is indirect, mediated by Hh-induced expression of microRNAs miR-26a and miR-26b, which in turn down-regulate expression of Hgf. Prostate tubule branching thus may be initiated from regions of low Hh pathway activity, with implications for the prostatic hyperplasia commonly observed in late adulthood. PMID:25362352

  4. Health motives and health behaviour self-regulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Schüz, Benjamin; Wurm, Susanne; Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Health motives are motivational dispositions towards health. They are implicitly inherent in most health behaviour theories, yet rarely studied. We examined the role of health motives in health behaviour self-regulation (physical activity), particularly in the mediation of intention effects on behaviour via planning in an at-risk population with high need for behaviour change, older adults with multiple illnesses. A longitudinal study with two measurement points over 6 months was conducted, assessing 309 community-dwelling adults with multiple illnesses aged 65 and older. Health motives were assessed by contrasting health ratings with all other domains on the Personal Life Investment Schedule. Data were analysed in a moderated mediation framework using path analyses. Health Motives moderated the degree to which intentions predicted behaviour via planning (intention*health motives β = .18, p < .05). Intentions are better translated into planning and behaviour if furnished with health motives. For older adults, this suggests that "health" in health behaviour change motivation merits more investigation, for example by stressing functional implications.

  5. Susceptibility of Ceraeochrysa cubana larvae and adults to six insect growth-regulator insecticides.

    PubMed

    Ono, Éric Kodi; Zanardi, Odimar Zanuzo; Aguiar Santos, Kenia Fernanda; Yamamoto, Pedro Takao

    2017-02-01

    The impacts of six insect growth-regulators were assessed on the predator Ceraeochrysa cubana (Hagen) larvae and adults. Our results showed that diflubenzuron, lufenuron and pyriproxyfen caused 100% larva mortality, whereas buprofezin, methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were similar to control treatment. In comparison to the control, buprofezin prolonged the duration of larval stage, while methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide reduced the predator larva development time. Buprofezin, methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide did not affect the C. cubana duration and survival of pupal stage, fecundity and fertility. However, methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide reduced predator female and male longevities. Based on a reduction coefficient, diflubenzuron, lufenuron and pyriproxyfen were highly harmful to first instar larvae, while buprofezin, methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were considered slightly harmful to the predator. Estimating the life table parameters, our results showed that buprofezin, methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide reduced the C. cubana Ro, r and λ. In comparison to the control, buprofezin prolonged the T and methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide shortened the predator T. In adults, our results showed that the insecticides did not cause significant mortality, but diflubenzuron, lufenuron and pyriproxyfen reduced the C. cubana fecundity and longevity. Diflubenzuron and lufenuron also reduced the C. cubana fertility. Based on a reduction coefficient, diflubenzuron and lufenuron were highly harmful to C. cubana adults, while pyriproxyfen was slightly harmful and buprofezin, methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were considered harmless to the predator. Therefore, insect growth-regulators affect the C. cubana biological or populational parameters, and they can harm the integrated pest management programs that aim the predator conservation and/or augmentation in agroecosystems.

  6. Executive function and self-regulated exergaming adherence among older adults.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J; Barcelos, Nicole; Nimon, Joseph; Rocha, Tracey; Thurin, Marisa; Maloney, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The rise in dementia and the evidence of cognitive benefits of exercise for the older adult population together make salient the research into variables affecting cognitive benefit and exercise behavior. One promising avenue for increasing exercise participation has been the introduction of exergaming, a type of exercise that works in combination with virtual reality to enhance both the exercise experience and health outcomes. Past research has revealed that executive function (EF) was related to greater use of self-regulatory strategies, which in turn was related to greater adherence to exercise following an intervention (McAuley et al., 2011). Best et al. (2014) found improvement in EF related to adherence to exercise post- intervention. Anderson-Hanley et al. (2012) found that for older adults aerobic exergaming yielded greater cognitive benefit than traditional exercise alone; however, questions remain as to the possible impact of greater cognitive benefit and other factors on participants' involvement in exercise following the end of an intervention. The current study presents follow-up data exploring the relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behavior in the post-intervention (naturalistic) period. Herein, it was predicted that higher EF at the start of the naturalistic window, would predict subsequent exercise with an exergame. Contrary to expectations, results suggest that those with poorer EF are likely to exergame more frequently. The results of this study contradict previous literature, but suggest an interesting relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behaviors when exergaming is employed, particularly with older adults with some cognitive decline. We hypothesize that other factors may be at work, perhaps expectation of cognitive benefit might act as a unique motivator.

  7. Executive function and self-regulated exergaming adherence among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J.; Barcelos, Nicole; Nimon, Joseph; Rocha, Tracey; Thurin, Marisa; Maloney, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The rise in dementia and the evidence of cognitive benefits of exercise for the older adult population together make salient the research into variables affecting cognitive benefit and exercise behavior. One promising avenue for increasing exercise participation has been the introduction of exergaming, a type of exercise that works in combination with virtual reality to enhance both the exercise experience and health outcomes. Past research has revealed that executive function (EF) was related to greater use of self-regulatory strategies, which in turn was related to greater adherence to exercise following an intervention (McAuley et al., 2011). Best et al. (2014) found improvement in EF related to adherence to exercise post- intervention. Anderson-Hanley et al. (2012) found that for older adults aerobic exergaming yielded greater cognitive benefit than traditional exercise alone; however, questions remain as to the possible impact of greater cognitive benefit and other factors on participants’ involvement in exercise following the end of an intervention. The current study presents follow-up data exploring the relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behavior in the post-intervention (naturalistic) period. Herein, it was predicted that higher EF at the start of the naturalistic window, would predict subsequent exercise with an exergame. Contrary to expectations, results suggest that those with poorer EF are likely to exergame more frequently. The results of this study contradict previous literature, but suggest an interesting relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behaviors when exergaming is employed, particularly with older adults with some cognitive decline. We hypothesize that other factors may be at work, perhaps expectation of cognitive benefit might act as a unique motivator. PMID:25538608

  8. Drebrin A regulates hippocampal LTP and hippocampus-dependent fear learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Yasuda, H; Hanamura, K; Ishizuka, Y; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2016-06-02

    Structural plasticity of dendritic spines, which underlies higher brain functions including learning and memory, is dynamically regulated by the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Drebrin A is an F-actin-binding protein preferentially expressed in the brain and localized in the dendritic spines of mature neurons. Isoform conversion from drebrin E to drebrin A and accumulation of the latter in dendritic spines occurs during synapse maturation. We have previously demonstrated that drebrin A plays a pivotal role in spine morphogenesis and plasticity. However, it is unclear whether drebrin A plays a specific role in processes required for structural plasticity, and whether drebrin E can substitute in this role. To answer these questions, we analyzed mutant mice (named DAKO mice), in which isoform conversion from drebrin E to drebrin A is disrupted. In DAKO mouse brain, drebrin E continues to be expressed throughout life instead of drebrin A. Electrophysiological studies using hippocampal slices revealed that long-term potentiation of CA1 synapses was impaired in adult DAKO mice, but not in adolescents. In parallel with this age-dependent impairment, DAKO mice exhibited impaired hippocampus-dependent fear learning in an age-dependent manner; the impairment was evident in adult mice, but not in adolescents. In addition, histological investigation revealed that the spine length of the apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal cells was significantly longer in adult DAKO mice than in wild-type mice. Our data indicate that the roles of drebrin E and drebrin A in brain function are different from each other, that the isoform conversion of drebrin is critical, and that drebrin A is indispensable for normal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent fear memory in the adult brain. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Executive function is necessary for the regulation of the stepping activity when stepping in place in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Christopher; Sciadas, Ria; Nantel, Julie

    2016-10-01

    To determine the effect of age on stepping performance and to compare the cognitive demand required to regulate repetitive stepping between older and younger adults while performing a stepping in place task (SIP). Fourteen younger (25.4 ± 6.5) and 15 older adults (71.0 ± 9.0) participated in this study. They performed a seated category fluency task and Stroop test, followed by a 60 s SIP task. Following this, both the cognitive and motor tasks were performed simultaneously. We assessed cognitive performance, SIP cycle duration, asymmetry, and arrhythmicity. Compared to younger adults, older adults had larger SIP arrhythmicity both as a single task and when combined with the Category (p < 0.001) and Stroop (p < 0.01) tasks. Older adults also had larger arrhythmicity when dual tasking compared to SIP alone (p < 0.001). Older adults showed greater SIP asymmetry when combined with Category (p = 0.006) and Stroop (p = 0.06) tasks. Finally, they had lower cognitive performance than younger adults in both single and dual tasks (p < 0.01). Age and type of cognitive task performed with the motor task affected different components of stepping. While SIP arrhythmicity was larger for all conditions in older compared to younger adults, cycle duration was not different, and asymmetry tended to be larger during SIP when paired with a verbal fluency task. SIP does not require a high level of control for dynamic stability, therefore demonstrating that higher-level executive function is necessary for the regulation of stepping activity independently of the regulation of postural balance. Furthermore, older adults may lack the cognitive resources needed to adequately regulate stepping activity while performing a cognitive task relying on the executive function.

  10. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J; Lu, Qingjun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-12-15

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles, including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or TLR-mediated signal transduction pathways. In this study, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAPK and NF-κB activation and elevated production of proinflammatory cytokines that are detrimental to neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Injection of LPS causes even more severe inhibition of BrdU incorporation in the Tyro3(-/-)Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) triple-knockout (TKO) brains, consistent with the LPS-elicited enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators, for example, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase, and this effect is antagonized by coinjection of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in wild-type but not TKO brains. Conditioned medium from TKO microglia cultures inhibits neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. IL-6 knockout in Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double-knockout mice overcomes the inflammatory inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IL-6 is a major downstream neurotoxic mediator under homeostatic regulation by TAM receptors in microglia. Additionally, autonomous trophic function of the TAM receptors on the proliferating neuronal progenitors may also promote progenitor differentiation into immature neurons.

  11. Regulation of molecular components of the synapse in the developing and adult rat superior cervical ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.; Black, I.B.

    1987-12-01

    Rat superior cervical sympathetic ganglion was used to begin studying the regulation of molecular components of the synapse. Ganglionic postsynaptic densities (PSDs) exhibited a thin, disc-shaped profile electron microscopically, comparable to that described for brain. Moreover, the presumptive ganglionic PSD protein (PSDp) was phosphorylated in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin, bound /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin, and exhibited a M/sub r/ of 51,000 all characteristic of the major PSD protein of brain. These initial studies indicated that ganglionic PSDp and the major PSD protein of brain are comparable, allowing the study synaptic regulation in the well-defined superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. To obtain enough quantities of ganglionic PSDp, the authors used synaptic membrane fractions. During postnatal development, calmodulin binding to the ganglionic PSDp increased 411-fold per ganglion from birth to 60 days, whereas synaptic membrane protein increased only 4.5-fold. Consequently, different synaptic components apparently develop differently. Moreover, denervation of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion in adult rats caused an 85% decrease in ganglionic PSDp-calmodulin binding, but denervation caused no change in synaptic membrane protein 2 weeks postoperatively. The observations suggest that presynaptic innervation selectively regulates specific molecular components of the postsynaptic membrane structure.

  12. Age differences among older adults in the use of emotion regulation strategies. What happens among over 85s and centenarians?

    PubMed

    Etxeberria, Igone; Etxebarria, Itziar; Urdaneta, Elena; Yanguas, Jose Javier

    2016-09-01

    Past research on emotion regulation strategies has concluded that older adults use more passive strategies than young adults. However, we found scarce research in this field focusing on the oldest old (i.e. those aged 85 and over). The aim of this study was to analyze whether or not differences exist in the way older adults aged 85 and over (centenarians included) use emotion regulation strategies, in comparison with younger age groups (65-74 and 75-84 years old). Participants were 257 older adults from Spain, all aged between 65 and 104. The sample was divided into four age groups: 65-74; 75-84; 85-94; and 95-104 years old. Participants completed the Strategy Questionnaire after reading each of the vignettes designed to elicit feelings of either sadness or anger. The questionnaire measures four types of regulation strategies: Passive, Express, Solve and Seek. The 85-94 age group and centenarians were found to use proactive (Express, Seek) and Solve strategies less in comparison with younger age groups when regulating sadness and anger. In contrast, an increased use of Passive strategies was observed in the regulation of both emotions in the 85-94 age group. Significant differences were also found between centenarians and younger age groups in the use of Passive strategies for sadness, although not for anger. Age differences were observed in the use of emotion regulation strategies, with older age groups using proactive strategies less and passive strategies more.

  13. The thioredoxin TRX-1 regulates adult lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Barrios, Maria; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} First in vivo data for thioredoxin in dietary-restriction-(DR)-induced longevity. {yields} Thioredoxin (trx-1) loss suppresses longevity of eat-2 mutant, a genetic DR model. {yields} trx-1 overexpression extends wild-type longevity, but not that of eat-2 mutant. {yields} Longevity by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic DR model, requires trx-1. {yields} trx-1 expression in ASJ neurons of aging adults is increased in response to DD. -- Abstract: Dietary restriction (DR) is the only environmental intervention known to extend adult lifespan in a wide variety of animal models. However, the genetic and cellular events that mediate the anti-aging programs induced by DR remain elusive. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to provide the first in vivo evidence that a thioredoxin (TRX-1) regulates adult lifespan extension induced by DR. We found that deletion of the gene trx-1 completely suppressed the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2, a genetic surrogate of DR in the worm. However, trx-1 deletion only partially suppressed the long lifespan caused by mutation of the insulin-like receptor gene daf-2 or by mutation of the sensory cilia gene osm-5. A trx-1::GFP translational fusion expressed from its own promoter in ASJ neurons (Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP) rescued the trx-1 deletion-mediated suppression of the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2. This rescue was not observed when trx-1::GFP was expressed from the ges-1 promoter in the intestine. In addition, overexpression of Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP extended lifespan in wild type, but not in eat-2 mutants. trx-1 deletion almost completely suppressed the lifespan extension induced by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic, nutrient-based model of DR in the worm. Moreover, DD upregulated the expression of a trx-1 promoter-driven GFP reporter gene (Ptrx-1::GFP) in ASJ neurons of aging adults, but not that of control Pgpa-9::GFP (which is also expressed in ASJ neurons). We propose

  14. Epigenetic regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor promoter 1(7) in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Witzmann, Simone R; Turner, Jonathan D; Mériaux, Sophie B; Meijer, Onno C; Muller, Claude P

    2012-11-01

    Regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels is an important stress adaptation mechanism. Transcription factor Nfgi-a and environmentally induced Gr promoter 1 7 methylation have been implicated in fine-tuning the expression of Gr 1 7 transcripts. Here, we investigated Gr promoter 1 7 methylation and Gr 1 7 expression in adult rats exposed to either acute or chronic stress paradigms. A strong negative correlation was observed between the sum of promoter-wide methylation levels and Gr 1 7 transcript levels, independent of the stressor. Methylation of individual sites did not, however, correlate with transcript levels. This suggested that promoter 1 7 was directly regulated by promoter-wide DNA methylation. Although acute stress increased Ngfi-a expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), Gr 1 7 transcript levels remained unaffected despite low methylation levels. Acute stress had little effect on these low methylation levels, except at four hippocampal CpGs. Chronic stress altered the corticosterone response to an acute stressor. In the adrenal and pituitary glands, but not in the brain, this was accompanied by an increase in methylation levels in orchestrated clusters rather than individual CpGs. PVN methylation levels, unaffected by acute or chronic stress, were significantly more variable within- than between-groups, suggesting that they were instated probably during the perinatal period and represent a pre-established trait. Thus, in addition to the known perinatal programming, the Gr 1 7 promoter is epigenetically regulated by chronic stress in adulthood, and retains promoter-wide tissue-specific plasticity. Differences in methylation susceptibility between the PVN in the perinatal period and the peripheral HPA axis tissues in adulthood may represent an important "trait" vs. "state" regulation of the Gr gene.

  15. Eating regulation styles, appearance schemas, and body satisfaction predict changes in body fat for emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ali Zaremba; Keiley, Margaret K; Ryan, Aubrey E; Radomski, Juliana Groves; Gropper, Sareen S; Connell, Lenda Jo; Simmons, Karla P; Ulrich, Pamela V

    2012-09-01

    . Overall, males and females with high autonomous regulation and high motivational salience are likely to maintain (instead of increase) percent body fat over the college years. Knowing the influence of these predictors can be useful for promoting health and intervening with young adults in the college setting and other emerging adults who are not enrolled in postsecondary institutions.

  16. Emotion Regulation in Emerging Adult Couples: Temperament, Attachment, and HPA Response to Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Heidemarie; Powers, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Difficulty managing the stress of conflict in close relationships can lead to mental and physical health problems, possibly through dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the neuroendocrine stress response system. Temperament, an individual characteristic, and attachment, a dyadic characteristic, have both been implicated in emotion regulation processes and physiological reactivity, yet there is no clear consensus on how the two work together to influence the stress response, especially after childhood. The present study investigated the ways in which temperament and attachment together predict HPA response in emerging adult couples. Analyses using multilevel modeling (HLM) found that partners' dyadic fit on attachment avoidance impacted females' cortisol response patterns, and attachment avoidance further moderated the effect of males' emotionality on both their own and their partners' cortisol. Results are discussed in terms of emotional coregulation processes in romantic attachment. PMID:17681662

  17. Regulation of Adult Neurogenesis and Plasticity by (Early) Stress, Glucocorticoids, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lucassen, Paul J.; Oomen, Charlotte A.; Naninck, Eva F.G.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; van Dam, Anne-Marie; Czeh, Boldizsár; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to stress is one of the best-known negative regulators of adult neurogenesis (AN). We discuss changes in neurogenesis in relation to exposure to stress, glucocorticoid hormones, and inflammation, with a particular focus on early development and on lasting effects of stress. Although the effects of acute and mild stress on AN are generally brief and can be quickly overcome, chronic exposure or more severe forms of stress can induce longer lasting reductions in neurogenesis that can, however, in part, be overcome by subsequent exposure to exercise, drugs targeting the stress system, and some antidepressants. Exposure to stress, particularly during the sensitive period of early life, may (re)program brain plasticity, in particular, in the hippocampus. This may increase the risk to develop cognitive or anxiety symptoms, common to brain diseases like dementia and depression in which plasticity changes occur, and a normalization of neurogenesis may be required for a successful treatment response and recovery. PMID:26330520

  18. Small-molecule screen in adult Drosophila identifies VMAT as a regulator of sleep.

    PubMed

    Nall, Aleksandra H; Sehgal, Amita

    2013-05-08

    Sleep is an important physiological state, but its function and regulation remain elusive. In Drosophila melanogaster, a useful model organism for studying sleep, forward genetic screens have identified important sleep-modulating genes and pathways; however, the results of such screens may be limited by developmental abnormalities or lethality associated with mutation of certain genes. To circumvent these limitations, we used a small-molecule screen to identify sleep-modulating genes and pathways. We administered 1280 pharmacologically active small molecules to adult flies and monitored their sleep. We found that administration of reserpine, a small-molecule inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) that repackages monoamines into presynaptic vesicles, resulted in an increase in sleep. Supporting the idea that VMAT is the sleep-relevant target of reserpine, we found that VMAT-null mutants have an increased sleep phenotype, as well as an increased arousal threshold and resistance to the effects of reserpine. However, although the VMAT mutants are consistently resistant to reserpine, other aspects of their sleep phenotype are dependent on genetic background. These findings indicate that small-molecule screens can be used effectively to identify sleep-modulating genes whose phenotypes may be suppressed in traditional genetic screens. Mutations affecting single monoamine pathways did not affect reserpine sensitivity, suggesting that effects of VMAT/reserpine on sleep are mediated by multiple monoamines. Overall, we identify VMAT as an important regulator of sleep in Drosophila and demonstrate that small-molecule screens provide an effective approach to identify genes and pathways that impact adult Drosophila behavior.

  19. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates new neuron differentiation in the adult olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Nissant, Antoine; Mota, Tatiana; Néant-Féry, Marie; Oostra, Ben A; Greer, Charles A; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2011-02-09

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein essential for multiple aspects of neuronal mRNA metabolism. Its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome, the most prevalent genetic form of mental retardation. The anatomical landmark of the disease, also present in the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice, is the hyperabundance of immature-looking lengthened dendritic spines. We used the well known continuous production of adult-born granule cells (GCs) in the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) to analyze the consequences of Fmrp loss on the differentiation of GCs. Morphological analysis of GCs in the Fmr1 KO mice showed an increase in spine density without a change in spine length. We developed an RNA interference strategy to cell-autonomously mutate Fmr1 in a wild-type OB network. Mutated GCs displayed an increase in spine density and spine length. Detailed analysis of the spines through immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology surprisingly showed that, despite these abnormalities, spines receive normal glutamatergic synapses, and thus that mutated adult-born neurons are synaptically integrated into the OB circuitry. Time-course analysis of the spine defects showed that Fmrp cell-autonomously downregulates the level and rate of spine production and limits their overgrowth. Finally, we report that Fmrp does not regulate dendritogenesis in standard conditions but is necessary for activity-dependent dendritic remodeling. Overall, our study of Fmrp in the context of adult neurogenesis has enabled us to carry out a precise dissection of the role of Fmrp in neuronal differentiation and underscores its pleiotropic involvement in both spinogenesis and dendritogenesis.

  20. Regulation of adult cardiocyte growth: effects of active and passive mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. L.; Janes, D. M.; Barclay, M. M.; Harger, L.; Decker, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in hemodynamic load have been documented to modulate contractile protein turnover and myofibrillar structure in the heart; however, the relative importance of active and passive loading in regulating adult cardiocyte growth remains unresolved. To address this issue at the cellular level, adult feline cardiocytes were cultured either on Silastic membranes or plastic surfaces. Cardiocyte-laden membranes were stretched 10% of their rest length to enhance passive loading, whereas heart cells cultured on plastic or Silastic were field stimulated at 1 Hz to mimic active loading. Turnover of contractile proteins and structural integrity of the contractile-cytoskeletal apparatus were monitored for periods ranging from 4 to 72 h. Active and passive loading elevated contractile protein synthesis nearly equally (approximately 50%) and promoted the attachment of remodeled myofibrils to vinculin-positive focal contacts and/or costameres during the first 24 h of loading. Thereafter, rates of contractile protein synthesis returned to control values in passively stretched heart cells but remained elevated in field-stimulated cultures. The fractional rate of growth was increased significantly (approximately 8%/day) in electrically paced cells, whereas in passively stretched cardiocytes the growth rate rose only modestly (approximately 2%/day). Changes in the rate of myocyte growth appeared more closely correlated with the development of focal contacts and myofibril remodeling than with changes in myofibrillar protein turnover per se. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime, nifedipine, and, to a lesser extent, ryanodine blocked field-stimulated contractile protein synthesis and myofibrillar remodeling but had no impact on protein turnover or myofibril reassembly in passively loaded cardiocytes. The results of these experiments imply that both active and passive loading stimulate contractile protein turnover and myofibril remodeling, but the generation of active tension accelerates

  1. Exploration of the Brn4-regulated genes enhancing adult hippocampal neurogenesis by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingjing; Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linmei; Mao, Yongxin; Tian, Guixiang; Xu, Wenhao; Wu, Yuhao; Ma, Zhi; Qin, Jianbing; Tian, Meiling; Jin, Guohua; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Xinhua

    2017-02-18

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is essential for learning and memory, and its dysfunction is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying adult hippocampal neurogenesis are still largely unknown. Our previous studies indicated that the transcription factor Brn4 was upregulated and promoted neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the surgically denervated hippocampus in rats. In this study, we use high-throughput RNA sequencing to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis induced by lentivirus-mediated Brn4 overexpression in vivo. After 10 days of the lentivirus injection, we found that the expression levels of genes related to neuronal development and maturation were significantly increased and the expression levels of genes related to NSC maintenance were significantly decreased, indicating enhanced neurogenesis in the hippocampus after Brn4 overexpression. Through RNA sequencing, we found that 658 genes were differentially expressed in the Brn4-overexpressed hippocampi compared with GFP-overexpressed controls. Many of these differentially expressed genes are involved in NSC division and differentiation. By using quantitative real-time PCR, we validated the expression changes of three genes, including Ctbp2, Notch2, and Gli1, all of which are reported to play key roles in neuronal differentiation of NSCs. Importantly, the expression levels of Ctbp2 and Notch2 were also significantly changed in the hippocampus of Brn4 KO mice, which indicates that the expression levels of Ctbp2 and Notch2 may be directly regulated by Brn4. Our current study provides a solid foundation for further investigation and identifies Ctbp2 and Notch2 as possible downstream targets of Brn4. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Regulates New Neuron Differentiation in the Adult Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Nissant, Antoine; Mota, Tatiana; Néant-Féry, Marie; Oostra, Ben A.; Greer, Charles A.; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein essential for multiple aspects of neuronal mRNA metabolism. Its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome, the most prevalent genetic form of mental retardation. The anatomical landmark of the disease, also present in the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice, is the hyperabundance of immature-looking lengthened dendritic spines. We used the well known continuous production of adult-born granule cells (GCs) in the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) to analyze the consequences of Fmrp loss on the differentiation of GCs. Morphological analysis of GCs in the Fmr1 KO mice showed an increase in spine density without a change in spine length. We developed an RNA interference strategy to cell-autonomously mutate Fmr1 in a wild-type OB network. Mutated GCs displayed an increase in spine density and spine length. Detailed analysis of the spines through immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology surprisingly showed that, despite these abnormalities, spines receive normal glutamatergic synapses, and thus that mutated adult-born neurons are synaptically integrated into the OB circuitry. Time-course analysis of the spine defects showed that Fmrp cell-autonomously downregulates the level and rate of spine production and limits their overgrowth. Finally, we report that Fmrp does not regulate dendritogenesis in standard conditions but is necessary for activity-dependent dendritic remodeling. Overall, our study of Fmrp in the context of adult neurogenesis has enabled us to carry out a precise dissection of the role of Fmrp in neuronal differentiation and underscores its pleiotropic involvement in both spinogenesis and dendritogenesis. PMID:21307257

  3. Regulation of adult cardiocyte growth: effects of active and passive mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. L.; Janes, D. M.; Barclay, M. M.; Harger, L.; Decker, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in hemodynamic load have been documented to modulate contractile protein turnover and myofibrillar structure in the heart; however, the relative importance of active and passive loading in regulating adult cardiocyte growth remains unresolved. To address this issue at the cellular level, adult feline cardiocytes were cultured either on Silastic membranes or plastic surfaces. Cardiocyte-laden membranes were stretched 10% of their rest length to enhance passive loading, whereas heart cells cultured on plastic or Silastic were field stimulated at 1 Hz to mimic active loading. Turnover of contractile proteins and structural integrity of the contractile-cytoskeletal apparatus were monitored for periods ranging from 4 to 72 h. Active and passive loading elevated contractile protein synthesis nearly equally (approximately 50%) and promoted the attachment of remodeled myofibrils to vinculin-positive focal contacts and/or costameres during the first 24 h of loading. Thereafter, rates of contractile protein synthesis returned to control values in passively stretched heart cells but remained elevated in field-stimulated cultures. The fractional rate of growth was increased significantly (approximately 8%/day) in electrically paced cells, whereas in passively stretched cardiocytes the growth rate rose only modestly (approximately 2%/day). Changes in the rate of myocyte growth appeared more closely correlated with the development of focal contacts and myofibril remodeling than with changes in myofibrillar protein turnover per se. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime, nifedipine, and, to a lesser extent, ryanodine blocked field-stimulated contractile protein synthesis and myofibrillar remodeling but had no impact on protein turnover or myofibril reassembly in passively loaded cardiocytes. The results of these experiments imply that both active and passive loading stimulate contractile protein turnover and myofibril remodeling, but the generation of active tension accelerates

  4. Emotion Regulation Difficulties, Youth-Adult Relationships, and Suicide Attempts Among High School Students in Underserved Communities

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Anthony R.; Wyman, Peter A.; Petrova, Mariya; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Goldston, David B.; Xia, Yinglin; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    To develop and refine interventions to prevent youth suicide, knowledge is needed about specific processes that reduce risk at a population level. Using a cross-sectional design, the present study tested hypotheses regarding associations between self-reported suicide attempts, emotion regulation difficulties, and positive youth-adult relationships among 7,978 high-school students (48.6% male, 49.9% female) in 30 high schools from predominantly rural, low-income communities. 683 students (8.6%) reported a past-year suicide attempt. Emotion regulation difficulties and a lack of trusted adults at home and school were associated with increased risk for making a past-year suicide attempt, above and beyond the effects of depressive symptoms and demographic factors. The association between emotion regulation difficulties and suicide attempts was modestly lower among students who perceived themselves as having higher levels of trusted adults in the family, consistent with a protective effect. Having a trusted adult in the community (outside of school and family) was associated with fewer suicide attempts in models that controlled only for demographic covariates, but not when taking symptoms of depression into account. These findings point to adolescent emotion regulation and relationships with trusted adults as complementary targets for suicide prevention that merit further intervention studies. Reaching these targets in a broad population of adolescents will require new delivery systems and “option rich” intervention designs. PMID:23666604

  5. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrón, S. R.; Radford, E. J.; Domingo-Muelas, A.; Kleine, I.; Ramme, A.; Gray, D.; Sandovici, I.; Constancia, M.; Ward, A.; Menheniott, T. R.; Ferguson-Smith, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  6. Neuregulin 1 as an endogenous regulator of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult major pelvic ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Gyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Lee, Choong-Ku; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2015-08-07

    We investigated whether endogenous neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is released in a soluble form (called sNRG1) and upregulates expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in autonomic major pelvic ganglion (MPG) neurons of adult rats. To elicit the release of sNRG1, either the hypogastric nerve or the pelvic nerve was electrically stimulated. Then, the MPG-conditioned medium (CM) was subjected to western blotting using an antibody directed against the N-terminal ectodomain of NRG1. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activation elicited the release of sNRG1 from MPG neurons in a frequency-dependent manner. The sNRG1 release was also induced by treatment of MPG neurons with either high KCl or neurotrophic factors. The biological activity of the released sNRG1 was detected by tyrosine phosphorylation (p185) of the ErbB2 receptors in MPG neurons. When MPG neurons were incubated for 6 h in the CM, the protein level of the nAChR α3 subunit and ACh-induced current (IACh) density were significantly increased. The CM-induced changes in IACh was abolished by a selective ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that NRG1 functions as an endogenous regulator of nAChR expression in adult MPG neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In Their Own Words: Young Adults' Menthol Cigarette Initiation, Perceptions, Experiences and Regulation Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wackowski, Olivia A; Evans, Kiameesha R; Harrell, Melissa B; Loukas, Alexandra; Lewis, M Jane; Delnevo, Cristine D; Perry, Cheryl L

    2017-02-17

    Menthol cigarettes are disproportionately used by young people and have been called smoking starter products. However, limited qualitative research exists on young adults' perceptions of and experiences with these products, with much of it based on document reviews of the tobacco industry's research. We conducted six focus groups with young adult (ages 18-24) menthol smokers in New Jersey (half with black smokers) between December 2014 and March 2015. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their menthol smoking initiation, preference reasons, substitution behaviors, and perceptions of menthol cigarette risks and regulation. Participants' menthol cigarette initiation and preference were influenced by their perceived popularity, brand recognition, taste, smoothness, satisfaction and access (including as "loosies," typically available for Newport). Some believed menthol cigarettes were less harmful than non-menthol cigarettes when initiating smoking. Many currently believed menthol cigarettes were more harmful because they contained extra "additives," were stronger (ie, requiring fewer cigarettes to feel satisfied), and/or based on hearsay. Many had tried new brand Camel Crush, which was perceived to be especially minty, fun, and attractive for newer smokers. While some used non-menthol cigarettes when menthols were unavailable, many said they would never or almost never substitute. Many acknowledged a menthol cigarettes ban would likely help them quit smoking, even though they did not support the idea. Menthol cigarette initiation is influenced by an interplay of multiple factors including their sensory properties, marketing, perceived popularity and availability. The FDA should continue to pursue closing this flavored cigarette loophole. In this first qualitative study of menthol cigarette use among young adults, we found further evidence that menthol cigarettes can act as starter products because they are perceived as easier to smoke and taste and smell

  8. An RbAp48-like gene regulates adult stem cells in planarians.

    PubMed

    Bonuccelli, Lucia; Rossi, Leonardo; Lena, Annalisa; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Evangelista, Monica; Iacopetti, Paola; Gremigni, Vittorio; Salvetti, Alessandra

    2010-03-01

    Retinoblastoma-associated proteins 46 and 48 (RbAp46 and RbAp48) are factors that are components of different chromatin-modelling complexes, such as polycomb repressive complex 2, the activity of which is related to epigenetic gene regulation in stem cells. To date, no direct findings are available on the in vivo role of RbAp48 in stem-cell biology. We recently identified DjRbAp48 - a planarian (Dugesia japonica) homologue of human RBAP48 - expression of which is restricted to the neoblasts, the adult stem cells of planarians. In vivo silencing of DjRbAp48 induces lethality and inability to regenerate, even though neoblasts proliferate and accumulate after wounding. Despite a partial reduction in neoblast number, we were always able to detect a significant number of these cells in DjRbAp48 RNAi animals. Parallel to the decrease in neoblasts, a reduction in the number of differentiated cells and the presence of apoptotic-like neoblasts were detectable in RNAi animals. These findings suggest that DjRbAp48 is not involved in neoblast maintenance, but rather in the regulation of differentiation of stem-cell progeny. We discuss our data, taking into account the possibility that DjRbAp48 might control the expression of genes necessary for cell differentiation by influencing chromatin architecture.

  9. Regulation of Müller glial dependent neuronal regeneration in the damaged adult zebrafish retina.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Ryne A; Hyde, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article examines our current knowledge underlying the mechanisms involved in neuronal regeneration in the adult zebrafish retina. Zebrafish, which has the capacity to regenerate a wide variety of tissues and organs (including the fins, kidney, heart, brain, and spinal cord), has become the premier model system to study retinal regeneration due to the robustness and speed of the response and the variety of genetic tools that can be applied to study this question. It is now well documented that retinal damage induces the resident Müller glia to dedifferentiate and reenter the cell cycle to produce neuronal progenitor cells that continue to proliferate, migrate to the damaged retinal layer and differentiate into the missing neuronal cell types. Increasing our understanding of how these cellular events are regulated and occur in response to neuronal damage may provide critical information that can be applied to stimulating a regeneration response in the mammalian retina. In this review, we will focus on the genes/proteins that regulate zebrafish retinal regeneration and will attempt to critically evaluate how these factors may interact to correctly orchestrate the definitive cellular events that occur during regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of Müller Glial Dependent Neuronal Regeneration in the Damaged Adult Zebrafish Retina

    PubMed Central

    Gorsuch, Ryne A.; Hyde, David R.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines our current knowledge underlying the mechanisms involved in neuronal regeneration in the adult zebrafish retina. Zebrafish, which has the capacity to regenerate a wide variety of tissues and organs (including the fins, kidney, heart, brain, and spinal cord), has become the premier model system to study retinal regeneration due to the robustness and speed of the response and the variety of genetic tools that can be applied to study this question. It is now well documented that retinal damage induces the resident Müller glia to dedifferentiate and reenter the cell cycle to produce neuronal progenitor cells that continue to proliferate, migrate to the damaged retinal layer and differentiate into the missing neuronal cell types. Increasing our understanding of how these cellular events are regulated and occur in response to neuronal damage may provide critical information that can be applied to stimulating a regeneration response in the mammalian retina. In this review, we will focus on the genes/proteins that regulate zebrafish retinal regeneration and will attempt to critically evaluate how these factors may interact to correctly orchestrate the definitive cellular events that occur during regeneration. PMID:23880528

  11. Lamins regulate cell trafficking and lineage maturation of adult human hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Won; Spinler, Kyle R.; Swift, Joe; Chasis, Joel A.; Mohandas, Narla; Discher, Dennis E.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, as well as nucleated erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, reside preferentially in adult marrow microenvironments whereas other blood cells readily cross the endothelial barrier into the circulation. Because the nucleus is the largest organelle in blood cells, we hypothesized that (i) cell sorting across microporous barriers is regulated by nuclear deformability as controlled by lamin-A and -B, and (ii) lamin levels directly modulate hematopoietic programs. Mass spectrometry-calibrated intracellular flow cytometry indeed reveals a lamin expression map that partitions human blood lineages between marrow and circulating compartments (P = 0.00006). B-type lamins are highly variable and predominate only in CD34+ cells, but migration through micropores and nuclear flexibility in micropipette aspiration both appear limited by lamin-A:B stoichiometry across hematopoietic lineages. Differentiation is also modulated by overexpression or knockdown of lamins as well as retinoic acid addition, which regulates lamin-A transcription. In particular, erythroid differentiation is promoted by high lamin-A and low lamin-B1 expression whereas megakaryocytes of high ploidy are inhibited by lamin suppression. Lamins thus contribute to both trafficking and differentiation. PMID:24191023

  12. Ethical and Regulatory Challenges with Autologous Adult Stem Cells: A Comparative Review of International Regulations.

    PubMed

    Lysaght, Tamra; Kerridge, Ian H; Sipp, Douglas; Porter, Gerard; Capps, Benjamin J

    2017-02-28

    Cell and tissue-based products, such as autologous adult stem cells, are being prescribed by physicians across the world for diseases and illnesses that they have neither been approved for or been demonstrated as safe and effective in formal clinical trials. These doctors often form part of informal transnational networks that exploit differences and similarities in the regulatory systems across geographical contexts. In this paper, we examine the regulatory infrastructure of five geographically diverse but socio-economically comparable countries with the aim of identifying similarities and differences in how these products are regulated and governed within clinical contexts. We find that while there are many subtle technical differences in how these regulations are implemented, they are sufficiently similar that it is difficult to explain why these practices appear more prevalent in some countries and not in others. We conclude with suggestions for how international governance frameworks might be improved to discourage the exploitation of vulnerable patient populations while enabling innovation in the clinical application of cellular therapies.

  13. Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis, browning, and energy balance in adult animals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Lei, Xinnuo; Benson, Tyler; Mintz, James; Xu, Xiaojing; Harris, Ruth B; Weintraub, Neal L; Wang, Xiaoling; Chen, Weiqin

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in BSCL2/SEIPIN cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (BSCL2), but the mechanisms whereby Bscl2 regulates adipose tissue function are unclear. Here, we generated adipose tissue (mature) Bscl2 knockout (Ad-mKO) mice, in which Bscl2 was specifically ablated in adipocytes of adult animals, to investigate the impact of acquired Bscl2 deletion on adipose tissue function and energy balance. Ad-mKO mice displayed reduced adiposity and were protected against high fat diet-induced obesity, but not insulin resistance or hepatic steatosis. Gene expression profiling and biochemical assays revealed increased lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue , as well as browning of WAT, owing to induction of cAMP/protein kinase A signaling upon Bscl2 deletion. Interestingly, Bscl2 deletion reduced food intake and downregulated adipose β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) expression. Impaired ADRB3 signaling partially offsets upregulated browning-induced energy expenditure and thermogenesis in Ad-mKO mice housed at ambient temperature. However, this counter-regulatory response was abrogated under thermoneutral conditions, resulting in even greater body mass loss in Ad-mKO mice. These findings suggest that Bscl2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis and β-adrenergic signaling to produce complex effects on adipose tissues and whole-body energy balance. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Changes in Emotion Regulation in Adults With and Without a History of Childhood Abuse Following PTSD Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jerud, Alissa B.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study compared changes in emotion regulation and trait affect over the course of PTSD treatment with either prolonged exposure (PE) therapy or sertraline in adults with and without a history of childhood abuse (CA). Method Two hundred adults with PTSD received 10 weeks of PE or sertraline. Emotion regulation and trait affect were assessed at pre- and post-treatment and at six-month follow-up with the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (Gross & John, 2003), the Negative Mood Regulation Scale (Catanzaro & Mearns, 1990), and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988). Results Individuals with and without a history of CA did not differ from one another at pre-treatment on PTSD severity, emotion regulation, or positive/negative affect. In addition, treatment was effective at improving emotion regulation and trait affect in those with and without a history of CA, and no significant differences in emotion regulation or trait affect emerged at post-treatment or at six-month follow-up between adults with and without a history of CA. Furthermore, non-inferiority analyses indicated that the emotion regulation and trait affect outcomes of individuals with a history of CA were no worse than those of individuals without a history of CA. Conclusion These findings cast doubt on the assumption that CA is associated with worse emotion regulation following PTSD treatment, arguing against assertions that a history of CA itself is a contraindication for traditional PTSD treatment, and that there is a clear necessity for additional interventions designed at targeting assumed emotion regulation deficits. PMID:24708349

  15. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  16. Fluid cognitive ability is a resource for successful emotion regulation in older and younger adults

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Philipp C.; Lee, Ihno A.; Gross, James J.; Urry, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    The Selection, Optimization, and Compensation with Emotion Regulation (SOC-ER) framework suggests that (1) emotion regulation (ER) strategies require resources and that (2) higher levels of relevant resources may increase ER success. In the current experiment, we tested the specific hypothesis that individual differences in one internal class of resources, namely cognitive ability, would contribute to greater success using cognitive reappraisal (CR), a form of ER in which one reinterprets the meaning of emotion-eliciting situations. To test this hypothesis, 60 participants (30 younger and 30 older adults) completed standardized neuropsychological tests that assess fluid and crystallized cognitive ability, as well as a CR task in which participants reinterpreted the meaning of sad pictures in order to alter (increase or decrease) their emotions. In a control condition, they viewed the pictures without trying to change how they felt. Throughout the task, we indexed subjective emotional experience (self-reported ratings of emotional intensity), expressive behavior (corrugator muscle activity), and autonomic physiology (heart rate and electrodermal activity) as measures of emotional responding. Multilevel models were constructed to explain within-subjects variation in emotional responding as a function of ER contrasts comparing increase or decrease conditions with the view control condition and between-subjects variation as a function of cognitive ability and/or age group (older, younger). As predicted, higher fluid cognitive ability—indexed by perceptual reasoning, processing speed, and working memory—was associated with greater success using reappraisal to alter emotional responding. Reappraisal success did not vary as a function of crystallized cognitive ability or age group. Collectively, our results provide support for a key tenet of the SOC-ER framework that higher levels of relevant resources may confer greater success at emotion regulation. PMID:24987387

  17. Emotion Regulation Difficulties, Youth-Adult Relationships, and Suicide Attempts among High School Students in Underserved Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisani, Anthony R.; Wyman, Peter A.; Petrova, Mariya; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Goldston, David B.; Xia, Yinglin; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    To develop and refine interventions to prevent youth suicide, knowledge is needed about specific processes that reduce risk at a population level. Using a cross-sectional design, the present study tested hypotheses regarding associations between self-reported suicide attempts, emotion regulation difficulties, and positive youth-adult relationships…

  18. Self-Regulation and Metacognition in Young Children: Does It Matter if Adults Are Present or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper brings together two areas of considerable interest to researchers, practitioners and policy makers: young children's developing self-regulation and metacognition, and the impact of adult (practitioner) presence or absence on their behaviour and learning. One hundred and twenty-eight observations of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a…

  19. Self-Regulation and Metacognition in Young Children: Does It Matter if Adults Are Present or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper brings together two areas of considerable interest to researchers, practitioners and policy makers: young children's developing self-regulation and metacognition, and the impact of adult (practitioner) presence or absence on their behaviour and learning. One hundred and twenty-eight observations of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a…

  20. Two Measures of Self-Regulation for Young Adults and Late Adolescents in the Academic and Social Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldhof, John; Little, Todd D.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present domain-specific measures of academic and social self-regulation in young adults. We base our scales on Baltes and colleagues' Selection, Optimization, and Compensation (SOC) model, and establish the factor structure of our new measures using data collected from a sample of 152 college students. We then compare the…

  1. Emotion Regulation Difficulties, Youth-Adult Relationships, and Suicide Attempts among High School Students in Underserved Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisani, Anthony R.; Wyman, Peter A.; Petrova, Mariya; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Goldston, David B.; Xia, Yinglin; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    To develop and refine interventions to prevent youth suicide, knowledge is needed about specific processes that reduce risk at a population level. Using a cross-sectional design, the present study tested hypotheses regarding associations between self-reported suicide attempts, emotion regulation difficulties, and positive youth-adult relationships…

  2. Two Measures of Self-Regulation for Young Adults and Late Adolescents in the Academic and Social Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldhof, John; Little, Todd D.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present domain-specific measures of academic and social self-regulation in young adults. We base our scales on Baltes and colleagues' Selection, Optimization, and Compensation (SOC) model, and establish the factor structure of our new measures using data collected from a sample of 152 college students. We then compare the…

  3. Tissue Factor Inflammatory Response Regulated by Promoter Genotype and p38 MAPK in Neonatal vs. Adult Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buzby, Jeffrey S.; Williams, Shirley A.; Imfeld, Karen L.; Kunicki, Thomas J.; Nugent, Diane J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective and design Variable tissue factor (TF) expression by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) may be regulated by two promoter haplotypes, distinguished by an 18 base pair deletion (D) or insertion (I) at -1208. We sought to determine the relationship between these haplotypes and interleukin-1 (IL-1α)-induced TF expression in neonatal versus adult HMVEC. Results IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA, protein, and activity were significantly higher in neonatal compared to adult D/D donors. IL-1-stimulated HMVEC from neonatal D/D donors expressed 3-fold higher levels of TF mRNA, 2-fold higher TF protein, and 4-fold increased TF activity compared to HMVEC from adult D/D donors. These results indicate that homozygosity for the D haplotype is characterized by increased response to IL-1 in neonates but not adults. IL-1 induced increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which was significantly greater in neonatal compared to adult HMVEC. Moreover, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway reduced IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA expression in D/D neonatal but not adult HMVEC. Conclusions Up-regulation of D/D neonatal HMVEC TF expression by IL-1 is mediated through the p38 MAPK pathway. This heightened response of D/D neonatal HMVEC to inflammatory stimuli may contribute to increased microvascular coagulopathies in susceptible newborn infants. PMID:24385191

  4. MicroRNA-124 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Ets-1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Zang, Wenqiao; Liu, Pei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Deng, Meng; Sun, Wencong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhai, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that, by targeting certain messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression or cleavage, can regulate the expression of these genes. In addition, miRNAs may also function as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, as the abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with various human tumors. However, the effects of the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer remain unclear. The present study was conducted to study the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer, paying particular attention to miR-124's relation to the proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis in breast cancer cell MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to identify miR-124 that was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. We also showed E26 transformation specific-1 (Ets-1) and miR-124 expression levels in breast cancer tissues that were associated with lymph node metastases. With transfected synthetic miR-124 agomir into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony forming potential was observed after treatment with miR-124. Apoptosis and migration rates were found to be significantly higher in two breast-derived cell lines transfected with a miR-124 agomir (P < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay and Western blot were used to verify Ets-1 as a potential major target gene of miR-124, and the result showed that miR-124 can bind to putative binding sites within the Ets-1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR) to reduce its expression. Based on these findings, we propose that miR-124 and Ets-1 may serve as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer.

  5. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  6. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Duan, Haiping; Tan, Qihua; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, cultural, social-economic backgrounds and geographical environments. Materials and Methods The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins followed up for a long period of 12 years with a mean age at intake of 38 years (range: 18–65) and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs traced for about 7 years with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years (range: 23–64). The classical twin models were fitted to the longitudinal change in each phenotype (Δphenotype) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the variation in Δphenotype. Results Moderate to high contributions by the unique environment were estimated for all phenotypes in both Danish (from 0.51 for low density lipoprotein cholesterol up to 0.72 for triglycerides) and Chinese (from 0.41 for triglycerides up to 0.73 for diastolic blood pressure) twins; low to moderate genetic components were estimated for long-term change in most of the phenotypes in Danish twins except for triglycerides and hip circumference. Compared with Danish twins, the Chinese twins tended to have higher genetic control over the longitudinal changes in lipids (except high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose, higher unique environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. Conclusion Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples. PMID:26862898

  7. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Duan, Haiping; Tan, Qihua; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, cultural, social-economic backgrounds and geographical environments. The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins followed up for a long period of 12 years with a mean age at intake of 38 years (range: 18-65) and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs traced for about 7 years with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years (range: 23-64). The classical twin models were fitted to the longitudinal change in each phenotype (Δphenotype) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the variation in Δphenotype. Moderate to high contributions by the unique environment were estimated for all phenotypes in both Danish (from 0.51 for low density lipoprotein cholesterol up to 0.72 for triglycerides) and Chinese (from 0.41 for triglycerides up to 0.73 for diastolic blood pressure) twins; low to moderate genetic components were estimated for long-term change in most of the phenotypes in Danish twins except for triglycerides and hip circumference. Compared with Danish twins, the Chinese twins tended to have higher genetic control over the longitudinal changes in lipids (except high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose, higher unique environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples.

  8. IGFBP-4 regulates adult skeletal growth in a sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Maridas, David E; DeMambro, Victoria E; Le, Phuong T; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; Mohan, Subburaman; Rosen, Clifford J

    2017-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its binding proteins are critical mediators of skeletal growth. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4) is highly expressed in osteoblasts and inhibits IGF-1 actions in vitro Yet, in vivo studies suggest that it could potentiate IGF-1 and IGF-2 actions. In this study, we hypothesized that IGFBP-4 might potentiate the actions of IGF-1 on the skeleton. To test this, we comprehensively studied 8- and 16-week-old Igfbp4(-/-) mice. Both male and female adult Igfbp4(-/-) mice had marked growth retardation with reductions in body weight, body and femur lengths, fat proportion and lean mass at 8 and 16 weeks. Marked reductions in aBMD and aBMC were observed in 16-week-old Igfbp4(-/-) females, but not in males. Femoral trabecular BV/TV and thickness, cortical fraction and thickness in 16-week-old Igfbp4(-/-) females were significantly reduced. However, surprisingly, males had significantly more trabeculae with higher connectivity density than controls. Concordantly, histomorphometry revealed higher bone resorption and lower bone formation in Igfbp4(-/-) females. In contrast, Igfbp4(-/-) males had lower mineralized surface/bone surface. Femoral expression of Sost and circulating levels of sclerostin were reduced but only in Igfbp4(-/-) males. Bone marrow stromal cultures from mutants showed increased osteogenesis, whereas osteoclastogenesis was markedly increased in cells from Igfbp4(-/-) females but decreased in males. In sum, our results indicate that loss of Igfbp4 affects mesenchymal stromal cell differentiation, regulates osteoclastogenesis and influences both skeletal development and adult bone maintenance. Thus, IGFBP-4 modulates the skeleton in a gender-specific manner, acting as both a cell autonomous and cell non-autonomous factor.

  9. Emotion regulation in disordered eating: Psychometric properties of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale among Spanish adults and its interrelations with personality and clinical severity.

    PubMed

    Wolz, Ines; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Gratz, Kim L; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were to (1) validate the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in a sample of Spanish adults with and without eating disorders, and (2) explore the role of emotion regulation difficulties in eating disorders (ED), including its mediating role in the relation between key personality traits and ED severity. One hundred and thirty four patients (121 female, mean age = 29 years) with anorexia nervosa (n = 30), bulimia nervosa (n = 54), binge eating (n = 20), or Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (n = 30) and 74 healthy control participants (51 female, mean age = 21 years) reported on general psychopathology, ED severity, personality traits and difficulties in emotion regulation. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to examine the psychometrics of the DERS in this Spanish sample (Aim 1). Additionally, to examine the role of emotion regulation difficulties in ED (Aim 2), differences in emotion regulation difficulties across eating disorder subgroups were examined and structural equation modeling was used to explore the interrelations among emotion regulation, personality traits, and eating disorder severity. RESULTS support the validity and reliability of the DERS within this Spanish adult sample and suggest that this measure has a similar factor structure in this sample as in the original sample. Moreover, emotion regulation difficulties were found to differ as a function of eating disorder subtype and to mediate the relation between two specific personality traits (i.e., high harm avoidance and low self-directedness) and ED severity. Personality traits of high harm avoidance and low self-directedness may increase vulnerability to ED pathology indirectly, through emotion regulation difficulties.

  10. Emotion regulation in disordered eating: Psychometric properties of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale among Spanish adults and its interrelations with personality and clinical severity

    PubMed Central

    Wolz, Ines; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Gratz, Kim L.; Menchón, José M.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the study were to (1) validate the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in a sample of Spanish adults with and without eating disorders, and (2) explore the role of emotion regulation difficulties in eating disorders (ED), including its mediating role in the relation between key personality traits and ED severity. Methods: One hundred and thirty four patients (121 female, mean age = 29 years) with anorexia nervosa (n = 30), bulimia nervosa (n = 54), binge eating (n = 20), or Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (n = 30) and 74 healthy control participants (51 female, mean age = 21 years) reported on general psychopathology, ED severity, personality traits and difficulties in emotion regulation. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to examine the psychometrics of the DERS in this Spanish sample (Aim 1). Additionally, to examine the role of emotion regulation difficulties in ED (Aim 2), differences in emotion regulation difficulties across eating disorder subgroups were examined and structural equation modeling was used to explore the interrelations among emotion regulation, personality traits, and eating disorder severity. Results: Results support the validity and reliability of the DERS within this Spanish adult sample and suggest that this measure has a similar factor structure in this sample as in the original sample. Moreover, emotion regulation difficulties were found to differ as a function of eating disorder subtype and to mediate the relation between two specific personality traits (i.e., high harm avoidance and low self-directedness) and ED severity. Conclusions: Personality traits of high harm avoidance and low self-directedness may increase vulnerability to ED pathology indirectly, through emotion regulation difficulties. PMID:26175710

  11. Mindfulness predicts less texting while driving among young adults: Examining attention- and emotion-regulation motives as potential mediators.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Greg; Greeson, Jeff; Renna, Megan; Robbins-Monteith, Kendra

    2011-11-01

    Many young adult drivers read and send text messages while driving despite clear safety risks. Understanding predictors of texting-while-driving may help to indentify relevant targets for interventions to reduce this dangerous behavior. The present study examined whether individual differences in mindfulness is associated with texting-while-driving in a sample of young-adult drivers. Using path analysis, we tested whether this relationship would be mediated by the degree to which individuals use text-messaging as a means of reducing unpleasant emotions (emotion-regulation motives) and the degree to which individuals limit texting in order to focus on present-moment experiences (attention-regulation motives). Individuals lower in mindfulness reported more frequent texting-while-driving and this relationship appeared to be mediated primarily by emotion-regulation motives. Results may help inform the development of mindfulness-based interventions to prevent texting-while-driving.

  12. Mindfulness predicts less texting while driving among young adults: Examining attention- and emotion-regulation motives as potential mediators

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Greg; Greeson, Jeff; Renna, Megan; Robbins-Monteith, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    Many young adult drivers read and send text messages while driving despite clear safety risks. Understanding predictors of texting-while-driving may help to indentify relevant targets for interventions to reduce this dangerous behavior. The present study examined whether individual differences in mindfulness is associated with texting-while-driving in a sample of young-adult drivers. Using path analysis, we tested whether this relationship would be mediated by the degree to which individuals use text-messaging as a means of reducing unpleasant emotions (emotion-regulation motives) and the degree to which individuals limit texting in order to focus on present-moment experiences (attention-regulation motives). Individuals lower in mindfulness reported more frequent texting-while-driving and this relationship appeared to be mediated primarily by emotion-regulation motives. Results may help inform the development of mindfulness-based interventions to prevent texting-while-driving. PMID:22031789

  13. Coping, emotion regulation, and self-blame as mediators of sexual abuse and psychological symptoms in adult sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Sarah E; Peter-Hagene, Liana C; Relyea, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether coping, emotion regulation, and self-blame mediate relationships of trauma histories with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression in adult sexual assault victims (N = 1863). A path analysis showed that theorized mediators partially mediated associations between trauma history variables and psychological symptoms. Specifically, child sexual abuse severity was related to greater post-traumatic stress disorder and depression indirectly through maladaptive coping and decreased emotion regulation but not self-blame. Other traumas had direct relationships with symptoms and partially mediated effects through maladaptive coping and emotion regulation. Child sexual abuse was unrelated to self-blame, but other traumas were related to greater self-blame. Results differed according to whether women had counseling post-assault. Implications are drawn for future research and clinical treatment of adult sexual assault victims.

  14. Periodic variation in R-R intervals and cardiovascular autonomic regulation in young adult Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Mongue-Din, H; Salmon, A; Fiszman, M Y; Fromes, Y

    2009-03-01

    Several hamster strains are commonly used as models for cardiomyopathic phenotypes evolving toward heart failure. However, little is known about heart rate variability (HRV) in this species. Prolonged surface ECG recording, a prerequisite to HRV studies, can be obtained either by telemetry or by restraints. Here, we performed long time ECG recording using telemetry on young adult Syrian hamsters and we analyzed time series of interbeat intervals. Standard statistics showed that the mean of normal R-R intervals slightly increased with age, with standard deviation of normal R-R intervals remaining stable over time. However, time domain analysis using Poincaré plots revealed dynamic changes in the HRV. Analysis of frequency domains revealed that the ratio of spectral components (low frequency/high frequency) exhibited a maturation pattern. Thus refined analysis of HRV revealed a more complex pattern than common statistical analysis would translate. Unlike other rodents, hamsters display a great spontaneous variability of their heart rate. As the complexity canvas of HRV might be the consequence of extracardiac regulation factors, we assessed the sympathovagal balance in both time and frequency domain of heart rate. Pharmacological tests revealed that both sympathetic and vagal tones contribute to HRV in Syrian hamsters. Thus Syrian hamsters have a broad intrinsic HRV with large influences of the neurovegetative system. However, the influence of the previous beat seems to prevail over the autonomic oscillators. These animals present a high sensitivity to artificially altered cardiac regulation and might be great models for the diagnosis of early alterations in the HRV related to pathology. Therefore, Syrian hamsters represent a unique model for HRV studies.

  15. Dynamic regulation of atrial coronary blood flow in healthy adult pigs.

    PubMed

    van Bragt, Kelly A; Nasrallah, Hussein M; Kuiper, Marion; van Hunnik, Arne; Kuijpers, Nico H L; Schotten, Ulrich; Verheule, Sander

    2015-05-01

    There are several indications for a mismatch between atrial oxygen supply and demand during atrial fibrillation (AF), but atrial coronary flow regulation has not been investigated extensively. The purpose of this study was to characterize the dynamic regulation of atrial coronary flow in pigs. In anesthetized open-chest pigs, Doppler flow probes were placed around left atrial (LA) and left ventricular (LV) branches of the circumflex artery. Pressures and work indices were measured simultaneously. Systolic and diastolic flow contribution, flow response kinetics, and relationship between pressures, work, and flow were investigated during sinus rhythm, atrial pacing, and acute AF. During atrial systole, LA flow decreased. Only 2% of total LA flow occurred during atrial systole. Pacing with 2:1 AV block and infusion of acetylcholine revealed that atrial contraction itself impeded atrial coronary flow. The response to sudden changes in heart rate was slower in LA compared to LV. Both LA and LV vascular conductance were positively correlated with work. After the cessation of acute AF, the LA showed a more pronounced phase of supranormal vascular conductance than the LV, indicating a period of atrial reactive hyperemia. In healthy adult pigs, atrial coronary flow is impeded by atrial contraction. Although atrial coronary blood flow is positively correlated with atrial external work, it reacts more slowly to changes in rate than ventricular flow. The occurrence of a pronounced hyperemic phase after acute AF supports the notion of a significant supply-demand mismatch during AF. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MicroRNA-124-3p affects proliferation, migration and apoptosis of bladder cancer cells through targeting AURKA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiuyue; Sun, Tingge; Ye, Feng; Kong, Weisheng; Jin, Haofan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between miR-124-3p and Aurora A kinase (AURKA) in bladder cancer (BC). The expressions of miR-124-3p and AURKA in BC tissues and cell lines were detected using RT-PCR and western blot. BC cells were transfected with miR-124-3p mimics and AURKA siRNA. After this cell proliferation, migration, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured using CCK-8, colony formation assay, wound healing assay and cytometry tests. The relationship between miR-124-3p and AURKA was confirmed with luciferase reporter assay. Mice xenograft models were constructed to examine the effects of AURKA on BC in vivo. MiR-124-3p expression was significantly down-regulated in BC tissues and cell lines, while AURKA was significantly up-regulated compared to normal samples. MiR-124-3p targeted AURKA and decreased its expression. Transfection of miR-124-3p mimics and AURKA siRNA was shown to down-regulate BC cell proliferation and migration as well as induce cell apoptosis. As suggested by xenograft models, the inhibition of AURKA can effectively suppress tumor growth. MiR-124-3p has significant impact on proliferation, migration and apoptosis of BC cells by targeting AURKA.

  17. MicroRNA-101 Regulates Multiple Developmental Programs to Constrain Excitation in Adult Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giordano; Fernandes, Catarina C; Ewell, Laura A; John, Danielle; Romoli, Benedetto; Curia, Giulia; Taylor, Seth R; Frady, E Paxon; Jensen, Anne B; Liu, Jerry C; Chaabane, Melanie M; Belal, Cherine; Nathanson, Jason L; Zoli, Michele; Leutgeb, Jill K; Biagini, Giuseppe; Yeo, Gene W; Berg, Darwin K

    2016-12-21

    A critical feature of neural networks is that they balance excitation and inhibition to prevent pathological dysfunction. How this is achieved is largely unknown, although deficits in the balance contribute to many neurological disorders. We show here that a microRNA (miR-101) is a key orchestrator of this essential feature, shaping the developing network to constrain excitation in the adult. Transient early blockade of miR-101 induces long-lasting hyper-excitability and persistent memory deficits. Using target site blockers in vivo, we identify multiple developmental programs regulated in parallel by miR-101 to achieve balanced networks. Repression of one target, NKCC1, initiates the switch in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling, limits early spontaneous activity, and constrains dendritic growth. Kif1a and Ank2 are targeted to prevent excessive synapse formation. Simultaneous de-repression of these three targets completely phenocopies major dysfunctions produced by miR-101 blockade. Our results provide new mechanistic insight into brain development and suggest novel candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Regulation of starvation-induced hyperactivity by insulin and glucagon signaling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Huang, Rui; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Vivian; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Guo; Jia, Junling; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Starvation induces sustained increase in locomotion, which facilitates food localization and acquisition and hence composes an important aspect of food-seeking behavior. We investigated how nutritional states modulated starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila. The receptor of the adipokinetic hormone (AKHR), the insect analog of glucagon, was required for starvation-induced hyperactivity. AKHR was expressed in a small group of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. Silencing AKHR+ neurons and blocking octopamine signaling in these neurons eliminated starvation-induced hyperactivity, whereas activation of these neurons accelerated the onset of hyperactivity upon starvation. Neither AKHR nor AKHR+ neurons were involved in increased food consumption upon starvation, suggesting that starvation-induced hyperactivity and food consumption are independently regulated. Single cell analysis of AKHR+ neurons identified the co-expression of Drosophila insulin-like receptor (dInR), which imposed suppressive effect on starvation-induced hyperactivity. Therefore, insulin and glucagon signaling exert opposite effects on starvation-induced hyperactivity via a common neural target in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15693.001 PMID:27612383

  19. Distinct stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis are regulated by running and the running environment.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Matthew R; Hacker, Lindsay C; Fortin-Nunez, Stéphanie; Aumont, Anne; Bergeron, Raynald; Fernandes, Karl J L

    2011-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis continues into adulthood in mammalian vertebrates, and in experimental rodent models it is powerfully stimulated by exposure to a voluntary running wheel. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to a running wheel environment, in the absence of running, is sufficient to regulate specific aspects of hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult mice were provided with standard housing, housing enriched with a running wheel or housing enriched with a locked wheel (i.e., an environment comparable to that of running animals, without the possibility of engaging in running). We found that mice in the running wheel and locked wheel groups exhibited equivalent increases in proliferation within the neurogenic niche of the dentate gyrus; this included comparable increases in the proliferation of radial glia-like stem cells and the number of proliferating neuroblasts. However, only running animals displayed increased numbers of postmitotic neuroblasts and mature neurons. These results demonstrate that the running wheel environment itself is sufficient for promoting proliferation of early lineage hippocampal precursors, while running per se enables newly generated neuroblasts to survive and mature into functional hippocampal neurons. Thus, both running-independent and running-dependent stimuli are integral to running wheel-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  20. Distribution, recognition and regulation of non-CpG methylation in the adult mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junjie U; Su, Yijing; Shin, Joo Heon; Shin, Jaehoon; Li, Hongda; Xie, Bin; Zhong, Chun; Hu, Shaohui; Le, Thuc; Fan, Guoping; Zhu, Heng; Chang, Qiang; Gao, Yuan; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-02-01

    DNA methylation has critical roles in the nervous system and has been traditionally considered to be restricted to CpG dinucleotides in metazoan genomes. Here we show that the single base-resolution DNA methylome from adult mouse dentate neurons consists of both CpG (~75%) and CpH (~25%) methylation (H = A/C/T). Neuronal CpH methylation is conserved in human brains, enriched in regions of low CpG density, depleted at protein-DNA interaction sites and anticorrelated with gene expression. Functionally, both methylated CpGs (mCpGs) and mCpHs can repress transcription in vitro and are recognized by methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) in neurons in vivo. Unlike most CpG methylation, CpH methylation is established de novo during neuronal maturation and requires DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) for active maintenance in postmitotic neurons. These characteristics of CpH methylation suggest that a substantially expanded proportion of the neuronal genome is under cytosine methylation regulation and provide a new foundation for understanding the role of this key epigenetic modification in the nervous system.

  1. CPG15 regulates synapse stability in the developing and adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Tadahiro; Leslie, Jennifer H.; Eavri, Ronen; Chen, Jerry L.; Lin, Walter C.; Flanders, Genevieve H.; Borok, Erzsebet; Horvath, Tamas L.; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-01-01

    Use-dependent selection of optimal connections is a key feature of neural circuit development and, in the mature brain, underlies functional adaptation, such as is required for learning and memory. Activity patterns guide circuit refinement through selective stabilization or elimination of specific neuronal branches and synapses. The molecular signals that mediate activity-dependent synapse and arbor stabilization and maintenance remain elusive. We report that knockout of the activity-regulated gene cpg15 in mice delays developmental maturation of axonal and dendritic arbors visualized by anterograde tracing and diolistic labeling, respectively. Electrophysiology shows that synaptic maturation is also delayed, and electron microscopy confirms that many dendritic spines initially lack functional synaptic contacts. While circuits eventually develop, in vivo imaging reveals that spine maintenance is compromised in the adult, leading to a gradual attrition in spine numbers. Loss of cpg15 also results in poor learning. cpg15 knockout mice require more trails to learn, but once they learn, memories are retained. Our findings suggest that CPG15 acts to stabilize active synapses on dendritic spines, resulting in selective spine and arbor stabilization and synaptic maturation, and that synapse stabilization mediated by CPG15 is critical for efficient learning. PMID:22190461

  2. Regulation of neuropilin 1 by spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Marta; Robinson, Michelle; Cafferty, William; Bradbury, Elizabeth J; Kilkenny, Carol; Hunt, Stephen P; McMahon, Stephen B

    2005-03-01

    Using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence, we have analyzed the expression of neuropilin 1 (Np1) in two models of spinal cord injury (spinal cord hemisection and dorsal column crush) and following dorsal root rhizotomy in adult rats. Our results show that Np1 RNA and protein are up-regulated in the spinal cord after all these lesions but remain unaltered in the adjacent dorsal root ganglia. In control animals, Np1 levels in the spinal cord are low and appear to be localized mainly in blood vessels, motoneurons, and in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn. After DCC and rhizotomy, Np1 is expressed de novo around the injury and in the deafferentated dorsal horn, respectively, mainly by OX42-positive microglial cells. Both lesions affect the sensory projections, and interestingly a consistent increase of Np1 signal is additionally seen in the dorsal horn where these projections terminate. Unexpectedly, this increase is bilateral after unilateral rhizotomy.

  3. The Mammalian Adult Neurogenesis Gene Ontology (MANGO) Provides a Structural Framework for Published Information on Genes Regulating Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Kempermann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes) to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. Conclusions/Significance The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a ‘bottom-up’ community effort complementing the already successful

  4. The mammalian adult neurogenesis gene ontology (MANGO) provides a structural framework for published information on genes regulating adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Overall, Rupert W; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Kempermann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes) to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a 'bottom-up' community effort complementing the already successful 'top-down' approach of the Gene Ontology.

  5. Continuous up-regulation of heat shock proteins in larvae, but not adults, of a polar insect.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Joseph P; Hayward, Scott A L; Elnitsky, Michael A; Sandro, Luke H; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2006-09-19

    Antarctica's terrestrial environment is a challenge to which very few animals have adapted. The largest, free-living animal to inhabit the continent year-round is a flightless midge, Belgica antarctica. Larval midges survive the lengthy austral winter encased in ice, and when the ice melts in summer, the larvae complete their 2-yr life cycle, and the wingless adults form mating aggregations while subjected to surprisingly high substrate temperatures. Here we report a dichotomy in survival strategies exploited by this insect at different stages of its life cycle. Larvae constitutively up-regulate their heat shock proteins (small hsp, hsp70, and hsp90) and maintain a high inherent tolerance to temperature stress. High or low temperature exposure does not further up-regulate these genes nor does it further enhance thermotolerance. Such "preemptive" synthesis of hsps is sufficient to prevent irreversible protein aggregation in response to a variety of common environmental stresses. Conversely, adults exhibit no constitutive up-regulation of their hsps and have a lower intrinsic tolerance to high temperatures, but their hsps can be thermally activated, resulting in enhanced thermotolerance. Thus, the midge larvae, but not the adults, have adopted the unusual strategy of expressing hsps continuously, possibly to facilitate proper protein folding in a cold habitat that is more thermally stable than that of the adults but a habitat subjected frequently to freeze-thaw episodes and bouts of pH, anoxic, and osmotic stress.

  6. Makorin ortholog LEP-2 regulates LIN-28 stability to promote the juvenile-to-adult transition in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, R. Antonio; Kiontke, Karin; Fitch, David H. A.

    2016-01-01

    The heterochronic genes lin-28, let-7 and lin-41 regulate fundamental developmental transitions in animals, such as stemness versus differentiation and juvenile versus adult states. We identify a new heterochronic gene, lep-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in lep-2 cause a delay in the juvenile-to-adult transition, with adult males retaining pointed, juvenile tail tips, and displaying defective sexual behaviors. In both sexes, lep-2 mutants fail to cease molting or produce an adult cuticle. We find that LEP-2 post-translationally regulates LIN-28 by promoting LIN-28 protein degradation. lep-2 encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the Makorin (Mkrn) family of proteins. Like lin-28 and other heterochronic pathway members, vertebrate Mkrns are involved in developmental switches, including the timing of pubertal onset in humans. Based on shared roles, conservation and the interaction between lep-2 and lin-28 shown here, we propose that Mkrns, together with other heterochronic genes, constitute an evolutionarily ancient conserved module regulating switches in development. PMID:26811380

  7. Makorin ortholog LEP-2 regulates LIN-28 stability to promote the juvenile-to-adult transition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R Antonio; Kiontke, Karin; Fitch, David H A

    2016-03-01

    The heterochronic genes lin-28, let-7 and lin-41 regulate fundamental developmental transitions in animals, such as stemness versus differentiation and juvenile versus adult states. We identify a new heterochronic gene, lep-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in lep-2 cause a delay in the juvenile-to-adult transition, with adult males retaining pointed, juvenile tail tips, and displaying defective sexual behaviors. In both sexes, lep-2 mutants fail to cease molting or produce an adult cuticle. We find that LEP-2 post-translationally regulates LIN-28 by promoting LIN-28 protein degradation. lep-2 encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the Makorin (Mkrn) family of proteins. Like lin-28 and other heterochronic pathway members, vertebrate Mkrns are involved in developmental switches, including the timing of pubertal onset in humans. Based on shared roles, conservation and the interaction between lep-2 and lin-28 shown here, we propose that Mkrns, together with other heterochronic genes, constitute an evolutionarily ancient conserved module regulating switches in development.

  8. Beyond molting—roles of the steroid molting hormone in regulation of memory and sleep in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is an active metabolite of ecdysone and plays vital roles during ontogeny of the fruit fly Drosophila, coordinating critical developmental transitions such as molting and metamorphosis. Although 20E is known to exist throughout life in both male and female flies, its functions in adult physiology and behavior remain largely elusive. Notably, findings from previous studies suggest that this hormone may be involved in adult stress responses. Consistent with this possibility, we have found that ecdysone signaling in adult flies is activated by “stressful” social interactions and plays a role in the formation of long-term courtship memory.1 In addition, we recently reported that ecdysone signaling contributes to the regulation of sleep, affecting transitions between sleep and wakefulness.2 Here we first summarize our findings on the unconventional roles of 20E in regulating memory and sleep in adult flies. We then discuss speculative ideas concerning the stress hormone-like features of 20E, as well as the possibility that ecdysone signaling contributes to remodeling of the adult nervous system, at both the functional and structural levels, through epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:21444997

  9. Knowledge About E-Cigarette Constituents and Regulation: Results From a National Survey of U.S. Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andy S. L.; Bigman, Cabral A.; Henriksen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine young adults’ knowledge of e-cigarette constituents and regulation and its association with product use and self-reported exposure to marketing. Methods: Young adults (18–34 years, N = 1,247) from a U.S. web panel were surveyed in March 2014. Using multinomial logistic regressions, self-reported exposure to marketing was examined as a predictor of whether participants responded correctly (reference category), incorrectly, or “don’t know” to four knowledge items—whether e-cigarettes contain nicotine, contain toxic chemicals, are regulated by government for safety, and are regulated for use as a cessation aid. Analyses adjusted for demographics and smoking status and were weighted to match the U.S. young adult population. Results: Most respondents did not know if e-cigarettes, contain toxic chemicals (48%), are regulated for safety (61%), and are regulated as cessation aids (68%); fewer than 37% answered all of these items correctly. Current users of e-cigarettes (past 30 days) had a lower likelihood of being incorrect about safety testing (p = .006) and being regulated as a cessation aid (p = .017). Higher exposure to e-cigarette marketing was associated with a lower likelihood of responding “don’t know” than being correct, and with a higher likelihood of being incorrect as opposed to correct about e-cigarettes containing nicotine. Conclusions: Knowledge about e-cigarette constituents and regulation was low among young adults, who are the largest consumer group for these products. Interventions, such as warning labels or information campaigns, may be necessary to educate and correct misinformation about these products. PMID:25542915

  10. Recruitment of the Sonic hedgehog signalling cascade in electroconvulsive seizure-mediated regulation of adult rat hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sunayana B.; Rajendran, Rajeev; Dias, Brian G.; Ladiwala, Uma; Tole, Shubha; Vaidya, Vidita A.

    2007-01-01

    Electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) induces structural remodelling in the adult mammalian brain, including an increase in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this increase in the proliferation of adult hippocampal progenitors are at present not well understood. We hypothesized that ECS may recruit the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway to mediate its effects on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as Shh is known to enhance the proliferation of neuronal progenitors and is expressed in the adult basal forebrain, a region that sends robust projections to the hippocampus. Here we demonstrate that the ECS-induced increase in proliferation of adult hippocampal progenitors was completely blocked in animals treated with cyclopamine, a pharmacological inhibitor of Shh signalling. Our results suggest that both acute and chronic ECS enhance Shh signalling in the adult hippocampus, as we observed a robust upregulation of Patched (Ptc) mRNA, a component of the Shh receptor complex and a downstream transcriptional target of Shh signalling. This increase was rapid and restricted to the dentate gyrus, where the adult hippocampal progenitors reside. In addition, both acute and chronic ECS decreased Smoothened (Smo) mRNA, the other component of the Shh receptor complex, selectively within the dentate gyrus. However, ECS did not appear to influence Shh expression within the basal forebrain, the site from which it has been suggested to be anterogradely transported to the hippocampus. Together, our findings demonstrate that ECS regulates the Shh signalling cascade and indicate that the Shh pathway may be an important mechanism through which ECS enhances adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:16197497

  11. A self-regulation resource model of self-compassion and health behavior intentions in emerging adults

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Fuschia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study tested a self-regulation resource model (SRRM) of self-compassion and health-promoting behavior intentions in emerging adults. The SRRM posits that positive and negative affect in conjunction with health self-efficacy serve as valuable self-regulation resources to promote health behaviors. Methods An online survey was completed by 403 emerging adults recruited from the community and a Canadian University in late 2008. Multiple meditation analyses with bootstrapping controlling for demographics and current health behaviors tested the proposed explanatory role of the self-regulation resource variables (affect and self-efficacy) in linking self-compassion to health behavior intentions. Results Self-compassion was positively associated with intentions to engage in health-promoting behaviors. The multiple mediation model explained 23% of the variance in health behavior intentions, with significant indirect effects through health self-efficacy and low negative affect. Conclusion Interventions aimed at increasing self-compassion in emerging adults may help promote positive health behaviors, perhaps through increasing self-regulation resources. PMID:26844074

  12. MicroRNAs define distinct human neuroblastoma cell phenotypes and regulate their differentiation and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. NB tumors and derived cell lines are phenotypically heterogeneous. Cell lines are classified by phenotype, each having distinct differentiation and tumorigenic properties. The neuroblastic phenotype is tumorigenic, has neuronal features and includes stem cells (I-cells) and neuronal cells (N-cells). The non-neuronal phenotype (S-cell) comprises cells that are non-tumorigenic with features of glial/smooth muscle precursor cells. This study identified miRNAs associated with each distinct cell phenotypes and investigated their role in regulating associated differentiation and tumorigenic properties. Methods A miRNA microarray was performed on the three cell phenotypes and expression verified by qRT-PCR. miRNAs specific for certain cell phenotypes were modulated using miRNA inhibitors or stable transfection. Neuronal differentiation was induced by RA; non-neuronal differentiation by BrdU. Changes in tumorigenicity were assayed by soft agar colony forming ability. N-myc binding to miR-375 promoter was assayed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of miRNA microarray data segregated neuroblastic and non-neuronal cell lines and showed that specific miRNAs define each phenotype. qRT-PCR validation confirmed that increased levels of miR-21, miR-221 and miR-335 are associated with the non-neuronal phenotype, whereas increased levels of miR-124 and miR-375 are exclusive to neuroblastic cells. Downregulation of miR-335 in non-neuronal cells modulates expression levels of HAND1 and JAG1, known modulators of neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of miR-124 in stem cells induces terminal neuronal differentiation with reduced malignancy. Expression of miR-375 is exclusive for N-myc-expressing neuroblastic cells and is regulated by N-myc. Moreover, miR-375 downregulates expression of the neuronal-specific RNA binding protein HuD. Conclusions Thus, mi

  13. Tissue factor inflammatory response regulated by promoter genotype and p38 MAPK in neonatal vs. adult microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Buzby, Jeffrey S; Williams, Shirley A; Imfeld, Karen L; Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2014-04-01

    Variable tissue factor (TF) expression by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) may be regulated by two promoter haplotypes, distinguished by an 18-basepair deletion (D) or insertion (I) at -1,208. We sought to determine the relationship between these haplotypes and interleukin-1α (IL-1α)-induced TF expression in neonatal versus adult HMVEC. IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA, protein, and activity were significantly higher in neonatal compared to adult D/D donors. IL-1-stimulated HMVEC from neonatal D/D donors expressed threefold higher levels of TF mRNA, twofold higher TF protein, and fourfold increased TF activity compared to HMVEC from adult D/D donors. These results indicate that homozygosity for the D haplotype is characterized by increased response to IL-1 in neonates, but not adults. IL-1 induced increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which was significantly greater in neonatal compared to adult HMVEC. Moreover, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway reduced IL-1-stimulated TF mRNA expression in D/D neonatal but not adult HMVEC. Upregulation of D/D neonatal HMVEC TF expression by IL-1 is mediated through the p38 MAPK pathway. This heightened response of D/D neonatal HMVEC to inflammatory stimuli may contribute to increased microvascular coagulopathies in susceptible newborn infants.

  14. Validity of a perceptually-regulated step test protocol for assessing cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Hunter; Davison, Kade; Parfitt, Gaynor; Eston, Roger

    2016-12-01

    To determine whether maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) could be predicted accurately and reliably from a 2-step, perceptually-regulated exercise test (PRET) in healthy adults. Sixteen participants (31.7 ± 11.3 years, 3 females) completed three PRETs (separated by 24-72 h) and one maximal, perceptually-regulated, graded exercise test (PRETmax) on a motorized treadmill. Oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were recorded during each test. VO2 values for RPE range 9-15 were extrapolated to RPE 20 and age-predicted maximal HR (HRmax) using individual linear regression analysis to predict VO2max values compared to measured VO2max. VO2 and HR values were consistent between each of four RPE levels of the PRET. ICC values ranged between 0.76 and 0.85. Predicted VO2max from both methods were lower than measured VO2max (p < 0.01). Limits of agreement (LoA) for measured (41.4 ± 5.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) versus predicted VO2max from each of the three PRETs using RPE20 were -1.2 ± 15.6, -1.0 ± 7.2 and -2.1 ± 5.5 and for HRmax were -1.8 ± 4.2; -2.6 ± 4.2 and -2.4 ± 4.4 ml kg(-1) min(-1) for PRET 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The step PRET elicited significant and reliable increases in VO2 across the four RPE levels, but under-estimated treadmill VO2max. However, there was better agreement between measured and predicted VO2max when extrapolated to HRmax. As evidence indicates the underestimation of VO2max is explained by the difference in the mode of exercise, the step PRET provides a simple and convenient test of cardiorespiratory fitness.

  15. Self-regulation and quality of life in high-functioning young adults with autism.

    PubMed

    Dijkhuis, Renee R; Ziermans, Tim B; Van Rijn, Sophie; Staal, Wouter G; Swaab, Hanna

    2017-10-01

    Autism is generally associated with poor functional outcome but little is known about predictors of quality of life, especially during early adulthood. This study was conducted to assess subjective quality of life during early adulthood in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and its relation with self-regulating abilities. Individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder who progressed into post-secondary higher education ( N = 75) were compared to a typical peer control group ( N = 28) based on behavioral self-report questionnaires. The results indicated that individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder reported significantly lower subjective quality of life than typical controls ( p < 0.001, effect size ( d) = 1.84). In addition, individuals with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder reported more problems with emotion processing ( p < 0.05, effect size ( d) = 0.79) and daily executive functioning ( p < 0.001, effect size ( d) = 1.29) than controls. A higher level of executive functioning problems was related to lower quality of life in the high-functioning autism spectrum disorder group, but no significant relation between level of emotion processing and subjective quality of life became apparent in the regression analysis. Our findings show that even in high-functioning young adults with autism, executive functioning, emotion processing, and subjective quality of life are low compared to typically developing peers. Furthermore, these results emphasize the importance of targeting executive functioning problems in individuals with autism to improve subjective quality of life.

  16. Acute changes in sleep duration on eating behaviors and appetite-regulating hormones in overweight/obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Chantelle N.; Carskadon, Mary A.; Demos, Kathryn E.; Van Reen, Eliza; Sharkey, Katherine M.; Raynor, Hollie A.; Considine, Robert V.; Jones, Richard N.; Wing, Rena R.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the role of sleep in weight regulation, yet few studies have examined this relationship in overweight/obese (OW/OB) adults. Using a within-subject, counterbalanced design, 12 OW/OB women were studied in lab with two nights of short (5 hours time in bed [TIB]) and two nights of long (9 hours TIB) sleep. Hunger, consumption at a buffet, and fasting hormone levels were obtained. Significant polysomnographic differences occurred between conditions in total sleep time and sleep architecture (p's < .001). Percent energy from protein at the buffet increased following short sleep. No differences were observed for total energy intake or measured hormones. Further research is needed to determine how lengthening sleep impacts weight regulation in OW/OB adults. PMID:25105727

  17. Habitual physical activity differentially affects acute and short-term energy intake regulation in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Van Walleghen, E L; Orr, J S; Gentile, C L; Davy, K P; Davy, B M

    2007-08-01

    Energy intake (EI) regulation is impaired in older adults, but it is not known if habitual physical activity affects accuracy of EI regulation in older compared with young adults. We hypothesized that the ability to compensate for a high-energy yogurt preload beverage at a subsequent ad libitum meal (i.e. acute compensation) and over the course of the testing day (i.e. short-term compensation) would decrease with age, but the magnitude of the decline would be smaller in physically active compared with sedentary older adults. On two occasions, young active (n=15), young sedentary (n=14), older active (n=14) and older sedentary (n=11) subjects consumed either a high-energy yogurt preload beverage (YP: 500 ml, 1988 kJ, men; 375 ml, 1507 kJ, women), or no preload (NP), 30 min before an ad libitum test meal. EI at both ad libitum meals was measured, and total daily EI was determined on both testing days. Percent EI compensation for the YP was calculated for the test meal and testing day to determine acute and short-term compensation. Percent EI compensation at the test meal was significantly lower in the older compared with the young subjects (65+/-4 vs 81+/-4%, P=0.005). There was no effect of habitual physical activity level on acute compensation, and no age by physical activity level interaction (P=0.60). In contrast, short-term compensation was not different with age (87+/-5 vs 93+/-6%, older vs young, P=0.45), but was more accurate in active vs sedentary subjects (100+/-5 vs 79+/-6%, P=0.01). As with acute compensation, there was no age by physical activity interaction (P=0.39). Acute EI regulation is impaired in older adults, which is not attenuated by physical activity status. However, EI regulation over the course of a day is more accurate in active vs sedentary adults, which may facilitate long-term energy balance. Future work is needed to determine if higher energy expenditure in older active vs older sedentary adults improves long-term EI regulation.

  18. Elucidation of the regulation of an adult cuticle gene Acp65A by the transcription factor Broad.

    PubMed

    Cui, H-Y; Lestradet, M; Bruey-Sedano, N; Charles, J-P; Riddiford, L M

    2009-08-01

    Broad (BR), an ecdysone-inducible transcription factor, is a major determinant of the pupal stage. The misexpression of BR-Z1 isoform (BR-Z1) during adult development of Drosophila melanogaster prevents the expression of the adult cuticle protein 65A gene (Acp65A). We found that the proximal 237 bp of the 5' flanking region of Acp65A were sufficient to mediate this suppression. A targeted point mutation of a putative BR-Z1 response element (BRE) within this region showed that it was not involved. Drosophila hormone receptor-like 38 (DHR38) is required for Acp65A expression. We found that BR-Z1 repressed DHR38 expression and that BR's inhibition of Acp65A expression was rescued by exogenous expression of DHR38. Thus, BR-Z1 suppresses Acp65A expression by preventing the normal up-regulation of DHR38 at the time of adult cuticle formation.

  19. Regulation of adult neurogenesis by stress, sleep disruption, exercise and inflammation: Implications for depression and antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Lucassen, P J; Meerlo, P; Naylor, A S; van Dam, A M; Dayer, A G; Fuchs, E; Oomen, C A; Czéh, B

    2010-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a once unorthodox concept, has changed into one of the most rapidly growing fields in neuroscience. The present report results from the ECNP targeted expert meeting in 2007 during which cellular plasticity changes were addressed in the adult brain, focusing on neurogenesis and apoptosis in hippocampus and frontal cortex. We discuss recent studies investigating factors that regulate neurogenesis with special emphasis on effects of stress, sleep disruption, exercise and inflammation, a group of seemingly unrelated factors that share at least two unifying properties, namely that they all regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis and have all been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We conclude that although neurogenesis has been implicated in cognitive function and is stimulated by antidepressant drugs, its functional impact and contribution to the etiology of depression remains unclear. A lasting reduction in neurogenesis following severe or chronic stress exposure, either in adult or early life, may represent impaired hippocampal plasticity and can contribute to the cognitive symptoms of depression, but is, by itself, unlikely to produce the full mood disorder. Normalization of reductions in neurogenesis appears at least partly, implicated in antidepressant action.

  20. SRY-box-containing Gene 2 Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Tailless (Tlx) Transcription in Adult Neural Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shimozaki, Koji; Zhang, Chun-Li; Suh, Hoonkyo; Denli, Ahmet M.; Evans, Ronald M.; Gage, Fred H.

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is maintained by self-renewable neural stem cells (NSCs). Their activity is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors. However, it has been unclear whether these factors interplay with each other at the molecular level. Here we show that SRY-box-containing gene 2 (Sox2) and nuclear receptor tailless (TLX) form a molecular network in adult NSCs. We observed that both Sox2 and TLX proteins bind to the upstream region of Tlx gene. Sox2 positively regulates Tlx expression, whereas the binding of TLX to its own promoter suppresses its transcriptional activity in luciferase reporter assays. Such TLX-mediated suppression can be antagonized by overexpressing wild-type Sox2 but not a mutant lacking the transcriptional activation domain. Furthermore, through regions involved in DNA-binding activity, Sox2 and TLX physically interact to form a complex on DNAs that contain a consensus binding site for TLX. Finally, depletion of Sox2 revealed the potential negative feedback loop of TLX expression that is antagonized by Sox2 in adult NSCs. These data suggest that Sox2 plays an important role in Tlx transcription in cultured adult NSCs. PMID:22194602

  1. HIPPOCAMPAL ADULT NEUROGENESIS: ITS REGULATION AND POTENTIAL ROLE IN SPATIAL LEARNING AND MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Pan, Yongliang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, defined here as progenitor cell division generating functionally integrated neurons in the adult brain, occurs within the hippocampus of numerous mammalian species including humans. The present review details various endogenous (e.g., neurotransmitters) and environmental (e.g., physical exercise) factors that have been shown to influence hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In addition, the potential involvement of adult-generated neurons in naturally-occurring spatial learning behavior is discussed by summarizing the literature focusing on traditional animal models (e.g., rats and mice), non-traditional animal models (e.g., tree shrews), as well as natural populations (e.g., chickadees and Siberian chipmunk). PMID:27174001

  2. MicroRNAs: potential regulators involved in human anencephaly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Chang, Huibo; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ting; Zou, Jizhen; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2010-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital anomalies that substantially impact an infant's morbidity and mortality. The miRNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment; their role in human NTDs, however, is still unknown. In this study, we show the presence of a specific miRNA expression profile from tissues of fetuses with anencephaly, one of the most severe forms of NTDs. Furthermore, we map the target genes of these miRNAs in the human genome. In comparison to healthy human fetal brain tissues, tissues from fetuses with anencephaly exhibited 97 down-regulated and 116 up-regulated miRNAs. The microarray findings were extended using real-time qRT-PCR for nine miRNAs. Specifically, of these validated miRNAs, miR-126, miR-198, and miR-451 were up-regulated, while miR-9, miR-212, miR-124, miR-138, and miR-103/107 were down-regulated in the tissues of fetuses with anencephaly. A bioinformatic analysis showed 881 potential target genes that are regulated by the validated miRNAs. Seventy-nine of these potential genes are involved in a protein interaction network. There were 6 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim process and 7 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim function found by GeneCodis 2.0. Our results suggest that miRNA dysregulation is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of anencephaly.

  3. The development, factor structure and psychometric properties of driving self-regulation scales for older adults: Has self-regulation evolved in the last 15 years?

    PubMed

    Wong, Ides Y; Smith, Simon S; Sullivan, Karen A

    2015-07-01

    The term driving self-regulation is typically used to describe the practice of drivers who avoid driving in situations that they regard as unsafe because of perceived physical impairment. Older adults report using this strategy to improve safety while retaining mobility. Self-regulation is typically assessed using the driving avoidance items from the driving habits questionnaire (DHQ) and the driver mobility questionnaire (DMQ-A). However, the psychometric properties of these measures are not well understood. Using data from 277 older drivers, exploratory factor analysis was used to test the homogeneity of three driving self-regulation scales: the DHQ, DMQ-A, and an extended DMQ-A. Good internal consistency for each of the scales was identified (all αs≥.9). A one factor solution was identified for two of the measures (DHQ, DMQ-A) and a two factor solution accounting for over 70% of the score variance was identified for the third measure. The two factors assessed situations that may be avoided while driving because of the "external" (e.g., weather-related) or "internal" (e.g., passenger-related) driving environments, respectively. The findings suggest that the interpretation of an overall summated scale score, or single-item interpretations, may not be appropriate. Instead, driving self-regulation may be a multifaceted construct comprised of distinct dimensions that have not been identified previously but can be reliably measured. These data have implications for our understanding of driving self-regulation by older adults and the way in which this behavior is measured.

  4. Regulation of miRNA-mediated gene silencing by miRNA precursors

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Chaudhuri, Biswajoy; Valdmanis, Paul N.; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Qing; Luo, Qingjun; Kay, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Processing of miRNAs from their precursors to the biologically active mature form is regulated during development and cancer. We show that mouse precursor-miR-151 can bind to and compete with mature miR-151-5p and miR-151-3p for binding sites contained within the complementary regions of the E2f6 mRNA 3′UTR. In agreement, E2f6 mRNA levels were regulated by precursor-miR-151. Conversely, the miR-151-mediated repression of ARHGDIA mRNA was only dependent on the mature miR-151 level as only the mature miRNA was able to bind to the 3′UTR. This suggests that processing of miR-151 can have different effects on separate mRNA targets within a cell. A bioinformatics pipeline revealed additional candidate regions where pre-miRNAs can compete with their mature miRNA counterparts. This was experimentally validated for miR-124 and the SNAI2 3′UTR. Hence, miRNA precursors can serve as post-transcriptional regulators of miRNA activity and are not mere biogenesis intermediates. PMID:25086740

  5. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  6. Motivational dynamics underlying eating regulation in young and adult female dieters: relationships with healthy eating behaviours and disordered eating symptoms.

    PubMed

    Verstuyf, Joke; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Soetens, Barbara; Soenens, Bart

    2016-06-01

    To investigate whether type of goals and motives underlying females' eating regulation are associated differentially with daily eating behaviours, dependent upon weight and age category. 99 late adolescent female dieters (Mage = 18.94) and 98 adult female dieters (Mage = 45.06), 23.6% of which were overweight, completed a questionnaire and a 7-day diary assessment. Descriptive analysis and path analysis were performed to investigate the research questions. Healthy eating behaviours (HEHS), drive for thinness and binge eating symptoms (EDI). Appearance-focused and controlled eating regulation were positively related to disordered eating symptoms throughout the week. In contrast, autonomous and health-focused eating regulation were associated positively with healthy eating behaviours and were either related negatively or unrelated to disordered eating symptoms. Mean level differences in motivation and eating behaviours emerged according to age and weight status. However, the examined structural model was similar for late adolescent and adult dieters and only few differences emerged between normal-weight and overweight dieters. Dieters' type of motivation helps to explain when eating regulation relates to healthy and disordered eating symptoms.

  7. Coping, Emotion Regulation, and Self-Blame as Mediators of Sexual Abuse and Psychological Symptoms in Adult Sexual Assault

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Sarah E.; Peter-Hagene, Liana C.; Relyea, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether coping, emotion regulation, and self-blame mediate relationships of trauma histories with PTSD and depression in adult sexual assault (ASA) victims (N = 1863). A path analysis showed that theorized mediators partially mediated associations between trauma history variables and psychological symptoms. Specifically, child sexual abuse (CSA) severity was related to greater PTSD and depression indirectly through maladaptive coping and decreased emotion regulation, but not self-blame. Other traumas had direct relationships with symptoms and partially mediated effects through maladaptive coping and emotion regulation. CSA was unrelated to self-blame, but other traumas were related to greater self-blame. Results differed according to whether women had counseling post-assault. Implications are drawn for future research and clinical treatment of ASA victims. PMID:24393091

  8. Short- and Long-Term Self-Regulation and Sexual Risk-Taking Behaviors in Unmarried Heterosexual Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Moilanen, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore associations between short- and long-term self-regulation and dimensions of oral and coital sexual risk-taking in emerging adulthood. A total of 287 unmarried heterosexual young adults ages 18 to 26 years (62% female; 87% European American; 81% enrolled in college) provided study data via Internet surveys. High levels of long-term self-regulation predicted later initiation of oral sex and coitus, fewer lifetime coital partners, increased likelihood of condom and other contraceptive use at last intercourse, and low composite levels of coital risk. High levels of short-term self-regulation predicted reduced likelihood of condom use and high overall coital risk. The discussion focuses on the interpretation of these effects and potential directions for future research.

  9. Effects of tamoxifen on autosomal genes regulating ovary maintenance in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingxi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jingyun; Qin, Junwen; Wang, Yongan; Wang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), known to bind to estrogen/androgen receptors and mimic native estrogens, have been implicated as a main source for increasing human reproductive and developmental deficiencies and diseases. Tamoxifen (TAM) is one of the most well-known antiestrogens with defined adverse effects on the female reproductive tract, but the mechanisms related to autosomal gene regulation governing ovary maintenance in mammals remain unclear. The expression pattern and levels of key genes and proteins involved in maintaining the ovarian phenotype in mice were analyzed. The results showed that TAM induced significant upregulation of Sox9, which is the testis-determining factor gene. The results showed that TAM induced significant upregulation of Sox9, the testis-determining factor gene, and the expression level of Sox9 mRNA in the ovaries of mice exposed to 75 or 225 mg/kg bw TAM was 2- and 10-fold that in the control group, respectively (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the testicular fibroblast growth factor gene, Fgf9, was also elevated in TAM-treated ovaries. Accordingly, expression of the ovary development marker, forkhead transcription factor (FOXL2), and WNT4/FST signaling, were depressed. The levels of protein expression changed consistently with the target genes. Moreover, the detection of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) in TAM-treated ovaries suggested the formation of vascular endothelial cells, which is a further evidence for the differentiation of the ovaries to a testis-like phenotype. During this period, the level of 17β-estradiol, progesterone, and luteinizing hormone decreased, while that of testosterone increased by 3.3-fold (p = 0.013). The activation of a testis-specific molecular signaling cascade was a potentially important mechanism contributing to the gender disorder induced by TAM, which resulted in the differentiation of the ovaries to a testis-like phenotype in adult mice. Limited with

  10. von Hippel-Lindau protein regulates transition from the fetal to the adult circulatory system in retina.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Toshihide; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Ozawa, Yoko; Takubo, Keiyo; Noda, Kousuke; Simon, M Celeste; Johnson, Randall S; Suematsu, Makoto; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ishida, Susumu; Goda, Nobuhito; Suda, Toshio; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-05-01

    In early neonates, the fetal circulatory system undergoes dramatic transition to the adult circulatory system. Normally, embryonic connecting vessels, such as the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale, close and regress. In the neonatal retina, hyaloid vessels maintaining blood flow in the embryonic retina regress, and retinal vessels take over to form the adult-type circulatory system. This process is regulated by a programmed cell death switch mediated by macrophages via Wnt and angiopoietin 2 pathways. In this study, we seek other mechanisms that regulate this process, and focus on the dramatic change in oxygen environment at the point of birth. The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) is a substrate recognition component of an E3-ubiquitin ligase that rapidly destabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor alphas (HIF-alphas) under normoxic, but not hypoxic, conditions. To examine the role of oxygen-sensing mechanisms in retinal circulatory system transition, we generated retina-specific conditional-knockout mice for VHL (Vhl(alpha)(-CreKO) mice). These mice exhibit arrested transition from the fetal to the adult circulatory system, persistence of hyaloid vessels and poorly formed retinal vessels. These defects are suppressed by intraocular injection of FLT1-Fc protein [a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-1 (FLT1)/Fc chimeric protein that can bind VEGF and inhibit its activity], or by inactivating the HIF-1alpha gene. Our results suggest that not only macrophages but also tissue oxygen-sensing mechanisms regulate the transition from the fetal to the adult circulatory system in the retina.

  11. Revisiting adult neurogenesis and the role of erythropoietin for neuronal and oligodendroglial differentiation in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hassouna, I; Ott, C; Wüstefeld, L; Offen, N; Neher, R A; Mitkovski, M; Winkler, D; Sperling, S; Fries, L; Goebbels, S; Vreja, I C; Hagemeyer, N; Dittrich, M; Rossetti, M F; Kröhnert, K; Hannke, K; Boretius, S; Zeug, A; Höschen, C; Dandekar, T; Dere, E; Neher, E; Rizzoli, S O; Nave, K-A; Sirén, A-L; Ehrenreich, H

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) improves cognitive performance in neuropsychiatric diseases ranging from schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis to major depression and bipolar disease. This consistent EPO effect on cognition is independent of its role in hematopoiesis. The cellular mechanisms of action in brain, however, have remained unclear. Here we studied healthy young mice and observed that 3-week EPO administration was associated with an increased number of pyramidal neurons and oligodendrocytes in the hippocampus of ~20%. Under constant cognitive challenge, neuron numbers remained elevated until >6 months of age. Surprisingly, this increase occurred in absence of altered cell proliferation or apoptosis. After feeding a 15N-leucine diet, we used nanoscopic secondary ion mass spectrometry, and found that in EPO-treated mice, an equivalent number of neurons was defined by elevated 15N-leucine incorporation. In EPO-treated NG2-Cre-ERT2 mice, we confirmed enhanced differentiation of preexisting oligodendrocyte precursors in the absence of elevated DNA synthesis. A corresponding analysis of the neuronal lineage awaits the identification of suitable neuronal markers. In cultured neurospheres, EPO reduced Sox9 and stimulated miR124, associated with advanced neuronal differentiation. We are discussing a resulting working model in which EPO drives the differentiation of non-dividing precursors in both (NG2+) oligodendroglial and neuronal lineages. As endogenous EPO expression is induced by brain injury, such a mechanism of adult neurogenesis may be relevant for central nervous system regeneration. PMID:26809838

  12. Revisiting adult neurogenesis and the role of erythropoietin for neuronal and oligodendroglial differentiation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, I; Ott, C; Wüstefeld, L; Offen, N; Neher, R A; Mitkovski, M; Winkler, D; Sperling, S; Fries, L; Goebbels, S; Vreja, I C; Hagemeyer, N; Dittrich, M; Rossetti, M F; Kröhnert, K; Hannke, K; Boretius, S; Zeug, A; Höschen, C; Dandekar, T; Dere, E; Neher, E; Rizzoli, S O; Nave, K-A; Sirén, A-L; Ehrenreich, H

    2016-12-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) improves cognitive performance in neuropsychiatric diseases ranging from schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis to major depression and bipolar disease. This consistent EPO effect on cognition is independent of its role in hematopoiesis. The cellular mechanisms of action in brain, however, have remained unclear. Here we studied healthy young mice and observed that 3-week EPO administration was associated with an increased number of pyramidal neurons and oligodendrocytes in the hippocampus of ~20%. Under constant cognitive challenge, neuron numbers remained elevated until >6 months of age. Surprisingly, this increase occurred in absence of altered cell proliferation or apoptosis. After feeding a (15)N-leucine diet, we used nanoscopic secondary ion mass spectrometry, and found that in EPO-treated mice, an equivalent number of neurons was defined by elevated (15)N-leucine incorporation. In EPO-treated NG2-Cre-ERT2 mice, we confirmed enhanced differentiation of preexisting oligodendrocyte precursors in the absence of elevated DNA synthesis. A corresponding analysis of the neuronal lineage awaits the identification of suitable neuronal markers. In cultured neurospheres, EPO reduced Sox9 and stimulated miR124, associated with advanced neuronal differentiation. We are discussing a resulting working model in which EPO drives the differentiation of non-dividing precursors in both (NG2+) oligodendroglial and neuronal lineages. As endogenous EPO expression is induced by brain injury, such a mechanism of adult neurogenesis may be relevant for central nervous system regeneration.

  13. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose p53 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in preventing cancer development. p53 participates in relevant aspects of cell biology, including apoptosis and cell cycle control and must be strictly regulated to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mdm2 regulates p53 in vivo in the adult lens. Methods We analyzed mice expressing human p53 transgene (Tgp53) selectively in the lens in the presence or absence of Mdm2. Mice with the required genotypes were obtained by crossing transgenic, mdm2+/−, and p53−/− mice. Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. Results In a wild-type genetic background (mdm2+/+), lens damage and microphthalmia were observed only in mice homozygous for Tgp53 (t/t). However, in an mdm2 null background, just one allele of Tgp53 (mdm2−/−/Tgp53t/0 mice) was sufficient to cause lens damage and microphthalmia. Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2+/−/Tgp53t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. Conclusions Mdm2 regulates p53 in the adult lens in vivo. This information may have relevance for analyzing normal and pathological conditions of the lens, and designing cancer therapies targeting Mdm2–p53 interaction. PMID:24339722

  14. Associations of Child and Adolescent Mastery Motivation and Self-Regulation With Adult Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of Individuals With Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Linda; Cuskelly, Monica

    2017-05-01

    This 20-year prospective longitudinal study focuses on the contribution of mastery motivation and self-regulation to adult outcomes for individuals with Down syndrome. In earlier phases of the research, 25 participants completed measures of cognitive ability, mastery motivation and self-regulation in childhood (4 to 6 years) and adolescence (11 to 15 years). In the adult phase reported here, self-determination and adaptive behavior were assessed in 21 of the original participants at age 23 to 26 years. Mastery motivation and self-regulation made unique contributions to adult outcomes, over and above the effects of cognitive ability. The findings provide powerful evidence about the important role of child and adolescent mastery motivation and self-regulation for the adult lives of individuals with Down syndrome.

  15. Timing of Expression of a Gene in the Adult Drosophila Is Regulated by Mechanisms Independent of Temperature and Metabolic Rate

    PubMed Central

    Rogina, B.; Helfand, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    The examination of β-galactosidase (β-gal) expression in the third segment of the antenna of the 2216 enhancer trap line in Drosophila melanogaster reveals two distinct spatial and temporal regulatory patterns of expression during adult life. Type I expression is characterized by a decline in the level of β-gal expression with increasing age. Starting from a maximal level of expression at the time of adult emergence, there is a decrease in the number of cells that express β-gal so that by 40-50 days of adult life few cells express β-gal. Varying the ambient temperature and using hyperactivity mutants (Hyperkinetic(1), Shaker(5)) demonstrates that the rate of this decline is independent of temperature and metabolic rate. Type II expression is distinctly different in spatial distribution and temporal regulation from the first pattern. Type II expression is restricted in the antenna to a small (<20-30) set of cells whose level of expression changes in a periodic manner with time. The regulation of this periodicity appears to be linked to ambient temperature. PMID:8844152

  16. The COP1 ortholog PPS regulates the juvenile-adult and vegetative-reproductive phase changes in rice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Itoh, Hironori; Sentoku, Naoki; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Izawa, Takeshi; Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Nagato, Yasuo

    2011-06-01

    Because plant reproductive development occurs only in adult plants, the juvenile-to-adult phase change is an indispensable part of the plant life cycle. We identified two allelic mutants, peter pan syndrome-1 (pps-1) and pps-2, that prolong the juvenile phase in rice (Oryza sativa) and showed that rice PPS is an ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1. The pps-1 mutant exhibits delayed expression of miR156 and miR172 and the suppression of GA biosynthetic genes, reducing the GA(3) content in this mutant. In spite of its prolonged juvenile phase, the pps-1 mutant flowers early, and this is associated with derepression of RAP1B expression in pps-1 plants independently of the Hd1-Hd3a/RFT1 photoperiodic pathway. PPS is strongly expressed in the fourth and fifth leaves, suggesting that it regulates the onset of the adult phase downstream of MORI1 and upstream of miR156 and miR172. Its ability to regulate the vegetative phase change and the time of flowering suggests that rice PPS acquired novel functions during the evolution of rice/monocots.

  17. Type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor regulates cerebellar circuits by maintaining the spine morphology of purkinje cells in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Takeyuki; Hisatsune, Chihiro; Le, Tung Dinh; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Hirono, Moritoshi; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Nagao, Soichi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-24

    The structural maintenance of neural circuits is critical for higher brain functions in adulthood. Although several molecules have been identified as regulators for spine maintenance in hippocampal and cortical neurons, it is poorly understood how Purkinje cell (PC) spines are maintained in the mature cerebellum. Here we show that the calcium channel type 1 inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R1) in PCs plays a crucial role in controlling the maintenance of parallel fiber (PF)-PC synaptic circuits in the mature cerebellum in vivo. Significantly, adult mice lacking IP3R1 specifically in PCs (L7-Cre;Itpr1(flox/flox)) showed dramatic increase in spine density and spine length of PCs, despite having normal spines during development. In addition, the abnormally rearranged PF-PC synaptic circuits in mature cerebellum caused unexpectedly severe ataxia in adult L7-Cre;Itpr1(flox/flox) mice. Our findings reveal a specific role for IP3R1 in PCs not only as an intracellular mediator of cerebellar synaptic plasticity induction, but also as a critical regulator of PF-PC synaptic circuit maintenance in the mature cerebellum in vivo; this mechanism may underlie motor coordination and learning in adults.

  18. A Case Study on the Impacts of Connective Technology on Self-Efficacy and Self-Regulated Learning of Female Adult Students Managing Work-Life Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheetz, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Adults frequently define their lives as "hectic" and "overextended;" yet, many make the decision to return to school and add the role of student into their busy lives. This research study explored and explained the impact of connective technology on self-efficacy and self-regulated learning of female adult students balancing…

  19. A Case Study on the Impacts of Connective Technology on Self-Efficacy and Self-Regulated Learning of Female Adult Students Managing Work-Life Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheetz, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Adults frequently define their lives as "hectic" and "overextended;" yet, many make the decision to return to school and add the role of student into their busy lives. This research study explored and explained the impact of connective technology on self-efficacy and self-regulated learning of female adult students balancing…

  20. Site-specific regulation of adult neurogenesis by dietary fatty acid content, vitamin E and flight exercise in European starlings.

    PubMed

    Hall, Zachary J; Bauchinger, Ulf; Gerson, Alexander R; Price, Edwin R; Langlois, Lillie A; Boyles, Michelle; Pierce, Barbara; McWilliams, Scott R; Sherry, David F; Macdougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    Exercise is known to have a strong effect on neuroproliferation in mammals ranging from rodents to humans. Recent studies have also shown that fatty acids and other dietary supplements can cause an upregulation of neurogenesis. It is not known, however, how exercise and diet interact in their effects on adult neurogenesis. We examined neuronal recruitment in multiple telencephalic sites in adult male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) exposed to a factorial combination of flight exercise, dietary fatty acids and antioxidants. Experimental birds were flown in a wind tunnel following a training regime that mimicked the bird's natural flight behaviour. In addition to flight exercise, we manipulated the composition of dietary fatty acids and the level of enrichment with vitamin E, an antioxidant reported to enhance neuronal recruitment. We found that all three factors - flight exercise, fatty acid composition and vitamin E enrichment - regulate neuronal recruitment in a site-specific manner. We also found a robust interaction between flight training and vitamin E enrichment at multiple sites of neuronal recruitment. Specifically, flight training was found to enhance neuronal recruitment across the telencephalon, but only in birds fed a diet with a low level of vitamin E. Conversely, dietary enrichment with vitamin E upregulated neuronal recruitment, but only in birds not flown in the wind tunnel. These findings indicate conserved modulation of adult neurogenesis by exercise and diet across vertebrate taxa and indicate possible therapeutic interventions in disorders characterized by reduced adult neurogenesis. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} is an essential transcriptional regulator for mitochondrial protection and biogenesis in adult heart.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peiyong; Liu, Jian; Li, Yuquan; Wu, Sijie; Luo, Jinwen; Yang, Huan; Subbiah, Ramasamy; Chatham, John; Zhelyabovska, Olga; Yang, Qinglin

    2010-03-19

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) (alpha, gamma, and delta/beta) are nuclear hormone receptors and ligand-activated transcription factors that serve as key determinants of myocardial fatty acid metabolism. Long-term cardiomyocyte-restricted PPARdelta deficiency in mice leads to depressed myocardial fatty acid oxidation, bioenergetics, and premature death with lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. To explore the essential role of PPARdelta in the adult heart. We investigated the consequences of inducible short-term PPARdelta knockout in the adult mouse heart. In addition to a substantial transcriptional downregulation of lipid metabolic proteins, short-term PPARdelta knockout in the adult mouse heart attenuated cardiac expression of both Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and manganese superoxide dismutase, leading to increased oxidative damage to the heart. Moreover, expression of key mitochondrial biogenesis determinants such as PPARgamma coactivator-1 were substantially decreased in the short-term PPARdelta deficient heart, concomitant with a decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Rates of palmitate and glucose oxidation were markedly depressed in cardiomyocytes of PPARdelta knockout hearts. Consequently, PPARdelta deficiency in the adult heart led to depressed cardiac performance and cardiac hypertrophy. PPARdelta is an essential regulator of cardiac mitochondrial protection and biogenesis and PPARdelta activation can be a potential therapeutic target for cardiac disorders.

  2. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Plümpe, Tobias; Ehninger, Dan; Steiner, Barbara; Klempin, Friederike; Jessberger, Sebastian; Brandt, Moritz; Römer, Benedikt; Rodriguez, Gerardo Ramirez; Kronenberg, Golo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Background In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX) expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. Results We found that (1) 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2) the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3) positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. Conclusion These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:17105671

  3. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Plümpe, Tobias; Ehninger, Dan; Steiner, Barbara; Klempin, Friederike; Jessberger, Sebastian; Brandt, Moritz; Römer, Benedikt; Rodriguez, Gerardo Ramirez; Kronenberg, Golo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2006-11-15

    In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX) expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. We found that (1) 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2) the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3) positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  4. Neuregulin 1 Regulates Proliferation of Leydig Cells to Support Spermatogenesis and Sexual Behavior in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takashi; Kawashima, Ikko; Kawai, Tomoko; Hoshino, Yumi; Morohashi, Ken-Ichirou; Shima, Yuichi; Zeng, Wenxian; Richards, JoAnne S; Shimada, Masayuki

    2016-12-01

    Adult Leydig cells are derived from proliferating stem/progenitor Leydig cells in the infant testis and subsequent differentiation to steroidogenic cells in adult mice. Leydig cell proliferation in the infant testis occurs primarily in response to increased levels of LH that induce Leydig cell expression of neuregulin 1 (NRG1). Depletion of NRG1 in Nrg1 mutant mice (Nrg1(flox;flox);Cyp19a1Cre mice) dramatically reduces Leydig cell proliferation in the infant testes, leading to a reduction of testis weight, epididymial weight, and serum T in the adult mutant mice. The mutant mice are subfertile due to impaired sexual behavior and abnormal elongation of the spermatogenic cells. These defects were reversed by T treatment of the mutant mice in vivo. Furthermore, NRG1 alone induces the proliferation of Leydig cells in cultures of infant (d 10) testes obtained from mutant mice. Collectively these results show that LH induction of NRG1 directly drives the proliferation of Leydig cells in the infant testis, leading to an obligatory number of adult Leydig cells required for the production of sufficient androgen to support and maintain spermatogenesis and sexual behavior of adult male mice.

  5. Global microRNA level regulation of EGFR-driven cell-cycle protein network in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Uhlmann, Stefan; Mannsperger, Heiko; Zhang, Jitao David; Horvat, Emöke-Ágnes; Schmidt, Christian; Küblbeck, Moritz; Henjes, Frauke; Ward, Aoife; Tschulena, Ulrich; Zweig, Katharina; Korf, Ulrike; Wiemann, Stefan; Sahin, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    The EGFR-driven cell-cycle pathway has been extensively studied due to its pivotal role in breast cancer proliferation and pathogenesis. Although several studies reported regulation of individual pathway components by microRNAs (miRNAs), little is known about how miRNAs coordinate the EGFR protein network on a global miRNA (miRNome) level. Here, we combined a large-scale miRNA screening approach with a high-throughput proteomic readout and network-based data analysis to identify which miRNAs are involved, and to uncover potential regulatory patterns. Our results indicated that the regulation of proteins by miRNAs is dominated by the nucleotide matching mechanism between seed sequences of the miRNAs and 3′-UTR of target genes. Furthermore, the novel network-analysis methodology we developed implied the existence of consistent intrinsic regulatory patterns where miRNAs simultaneously co-regulate several proteins acting in the same functional module. Finally, our approach led us to identify and validate three miRNAs (miR-124, miR-147 and miR-193a-3p) as novel tumor suppressors that co-target EGFR-driven cell-cycle network proteins and inhibit cell-cycle progression and proliferation in breast cancer. PMID:22333974

  6. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC.

  7. Sonic Hedgehog Acts as a Negative Regulator of β-Catenin Signaling in the Adult Tongue Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Fabian T.; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J.; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H.H.; Plate, Karl H.; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear β-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. β-Catenin activation in APCmin/+ mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses β-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate β-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear β-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched+/− mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear β-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce β-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on β-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/β-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control β-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC. PMID:20508033

  8. Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (SOCS2) Regulates Numbers of Mature Newborn Adult Hippocampal Neurons and Their Dendritic Spine Maturation.

    PubMed

    Basrai, Harleen S; Turbic, Alisa; Christie, Kimberly J; Turnley, Ann M

    2017-07-01

    Overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS2) has been shown to promote hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo and promote neurite outgrowth of neurons in vitro. In the adult mouse brain, SOCS2 is most highly expressed in the hippocampal CA3 region and at lower levels in the dentate gyrus, an expression pattern that suggests a role in adult neurogenesis. Herein we examine generation of neuroblasts and their maturation into more mature neurons in SOCS2 null (SOCS2KO) mice. EdU was administered for 7 days to label proliferative neural precursor cells. The number of EdU-labelled doublecortin(+) neuroblasts and NeuN(+) mature neurons they generated was examined at day 8 and day 35, respectively. While no effect of SOCS2 deletion was observed in neuroblast generation, it reduced the numbers of EdU-labelled mature newborn neurons at 35 days. As SOCS2 regulates neurite outgrowth and dentate granule neurons project to the CA3 region, alterations in dendritic arborisation or spine formation may have correlated with the decreased numbers of EdU-labelled newborn neurons. SOCS2KO mice were crossed with Nes-CreER(T2)/mTmG mice, in which membrane eGFP is inducibly expressed in neural precursor cells and their progeny, and the dendrite and dendritic spine morphology of newborn neurons were examined at 35 days. SOCS2 deletion had no effect on total dendrite length, number of dendritic segments, number of branch points or total dendritic spine density but increased the number of mature "mushroom" spines. Our results suggest that endogenous SOCS2 regulates numbers of EdU-labelled mature newborn adult hippocampal neurons, possibly by mediating their survival and that this may be via a mechanism regulating dendritic spine maturation.

  9. Cell death may regulate visual functionality in the retina of adults of the dipteran Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Elena; Barni, Sergio; Pisu, Maria Bonaria; Vaccarone, Rita; Malacrida, Anna Rodolfa; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2002-01-14

    The white eye mutation in the medfly Ceratitis capitata, like the homologous mutation in Drosophila melanogaster, was shown to impair visual function. Light and electron microscopy, combined with the DNA-end labelling histochemistry (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) technique), were used to investigate whether programmed cell death may contribute to the morpho-functional differences between the retina of adults from the white eye and wild type strains. Several photoreceptor nuclei in mature white eye flies appeared smaller and showed intensely Toluidine Blue-stained chromatin masses. At the ultrastructural level, they showed different stages of degeneration, resembling apoptotic figures. Positive TUNEL labelling in the white eye retina indicates that apoptosis may be a candidate mechanism for retinal cell degeneration in adult flies, where visual functionality is altered, to achieve the proper cell number. Apoptosis also appears to occur in the wild type retina in early adult life during normal tissue development.

  10. Loose regulation of medical marijuana programs associated with higher rates of adult marijuana use but not cannabis use disorder.

    PubMed

    Williams, Arthur Robin; Santaella-Tenorio, Julian; Mauro, Christine M; Levin, Frances R; Martins, Silvia S

    2017-11-01

    Most US states have passed medical marijuana laws (MMLs), with great variation in program regulation impacting enrollment rates. We aimed to compare changes in rates of marijuana use, heavy use and cannabis use disorder across age groups while accounting for whether states enacted medicalized (highly regulated) or non-medical mml programs. Difference-in-differences estimates with time-varying state-level MML coded by program type (medicalized versus non-medical). Multi-level linear regression models adjusted for state-level random effects and covariates as well as historical trends in use. Nation-wide cross-sectional survey data from the US National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) restricted use data portal aggregated at the state level. Participants comprised 2004-13 NSDUH respondents (n ~ 67 500/year); age groups 12-17, 18-25 and 26+ years. States had implemented eight medicalized and 15 non-medical MML programs. Primary outcome measures included (1) active (past-month) marijuana use; (2) heavy use (> 300 days/year); and (3) cannabis use disorder diagnosis, based on DSM-IV criteria. Covariates included program type, age group and state-level characteristics throughout the study period. Adults 26+ years of age living in states with non-medical MML programs increased past-month marijuana use 1.46% (from 4.13 to 6.59%, P = 0.01), skewing towards greater heavy marijuana by 2.36% (from 14.94 to 17.30, P = 0.09) after MMLs were enacted. However, no associated increase in the prevalence of cannabis use disorder was found during the study period. Our findings do not show increases in prevalence of marijuana use among adults in states with medicalized MML programs. Additionally, there were no increases in adolescent or young adult marijuana outcomes following MML passage, irrespective of program type. Non-medical marijuana laws enacted in US states are associated with increased marijuana use, but only among adults aged 26+ years. Researchers and

  11. The Association among Difficulties in Emotion Regulation, Hostility, and Empathy in a Sample of Young Italian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Contardi, Anna; Imperatori, Claudio; Penzo, Ilaria; Del Gatto, Claudia; Farina, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the role of empathy in mediating the association between difficulties in emotion regulation and hostility. Three hundred and sixty young Italian adults (220 women and 140 men) were enrolled in the study. Psychopathological assessments included the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and the Buss–Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI). Perspective taking (PT) and Personal distress (PD) are significantly associated with both DERS total score and BDHI total score. A mediational model analyzing the direct and indirect effects of DERS on BDHI through the mediating role of PT and PD showed that the relation between DERS and BDHI was partially mediated by PT total score (b = 0.16; se = 0.01; p = 0.02). Taken together our findings support the possibility that PT skills could play a crucial role in inhibiting hostility behaviors. PMID:27486417

  12. The use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques can predict health goal attainment in adults: an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Verloigne, Maite; Crombez, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation tools are not always used optimally, and implementation intention plans often lack quality. Therefore, this study explored participants’ use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques and their impact on goal attainment. Methods. Data were obtained from 452 adults in a proof of concept (POC) intervention of ‘MyPlan’, an eHealth intervention using self-regulation techniques to promote three healthy behaviours (physical activity (PA), fruit intake, or vegetable intake). Participants applied self-regulation techniques to a self-selected health behaviour, and evaluated the self-regulation techniques. The quality of implementation intentions was rated by the authors as a function of instrumentality (instrumental and non-instrumental) and specificity (non-specific and medium to highly specific). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict goal attainment. Results. Goal attainment was significantly predicted by the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:1.86), by the specificity of the implementation intentions (OR:3.5), by the motivational value of the action plan (OR:1.86), and by making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:4.10). Interaction-effects with behaviour showed that the specificity score of the implementation intention plans (OR:4.59), the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:2.38), selecting hindering factors and solutions(OR:2.00) and making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:7.54) were predictive of goal attainment only for fruit or vegetable intake. Also, when participants in the fruit and vegetable group made more than three plans, they were more likely to attain their goal (OR:1.73), whereas the reverse was the case in the PA group (OR:0.34). Discussion. The chance that adults reach fruit and vegetable goals can be increased by including motivating personal advice, self-formulated action plans, and instructions/strategies to make specific implementation intentions into eHealth interventions

  13. Professionalisation as Development and as Regulation: Adult Education in Germany, the United Kingdom and India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Lesley; Egetenmeyer, Regina; Singai, Chetan; Devi, Uma

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the authors seek to disentangle what they see as contradictory uses of the term "professionalisation" with reference to adult educator development and training (AEDT). They set out to distinguish "professionalisation" from "professionalism," and to identify the locus of control of AEDT in Germany, the…

  14. Professionalisation as Development and as Regulation: Adult Education in Germany, the United Kingdom and India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Lesley; Egetenmeyer, Regina; Singai, Chetan; Devi, Uma

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the authors seek to disentangle what they see as contradictory uses of the term "professionalisation" with reference to adult educator development and training (AEDT). They set out to distinguish "professionalisation" from "professionalism," and to identify the locus of control of AEDT in Germany, the…

  15. Gender difference in older adult's utilization of gravitational and ground reaction force in regulation of angular momentum during stair descent.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    Angular momentum of the body is a highly controlled quantity signifying stability, therefore, it is essential to understand its regulation during stair descent. The purpose of this study was to investigate how older adults use gravity and ground reaction force to regulate the angular momentum of the body during stair descent. A total of 28 participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 years and 69.0 years of mean age respectively) performed stair descent from a level walk in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were used to calculate angular momentum, gravitational moment, and ground reaction force moment about the stance foot center of pressure. Women show a significantly greater change in normalized angular momentum (0.92Nms/Kgm; p=.004) as compared to men (0.45Nms/Kgm). Women produce higher normalized GRF (p=.031) during the double support phase. The angular momentum changes show largest backward regulation for Step 0 and forward regulation for Step 2. This greater difference in overall change in the angular momentum in women may explain their increased risk of fall over the stairs.

  16. Childhood maltreatment and difficulties in emotion regulation: associations with sexual and relationship satisfaction among young adult women.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Vujanovic, Anka A; Gilbert, Myani; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    This study examined relations among childhood maltreatment, difficulties in emotion regulation, and sexual and relationship satisfaction among young adult women reporting current involvement in committed, romantic relationships. A sample of 192 women (ages 18-25) completed self-report questionnaires as part of an Internet-based survey. It was hypothesized that severity of childhood maltreatment and difficulties in emotion regulation would each independently and negatively predict (a) sexual satisfaction, (b) relationship intimacy, and (c) expression of affection within the context of the relationship. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that greater emotion regulation difficulties would moderate the effects of childhood maltreatment on these sexual and relationship variables (i.e., sexual satisfaction, relationship intimacy, and expression of affection). Findings suggest that difficulties in emotion regulation demonstrated an incremental effect with regard to sexual satisfaction, but not with intimacy and affection expression. In contrast to predictions, no significant interactive effects were documented. Clinical implications and future directions related to this line of inquiry are discussed.

  17. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits. PMID:27782186

  18. Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Daniel E; Ho, Jaclyn J; Reddien, Peter W

    2012-03-02

    Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types and identify genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system.

  19. Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Daniel E.; Ho, Jaclyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types, and identify novel genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system. PMID:22385657

  20. Relaxation therapy and anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation among adults with intellectual disabilities: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Cyrille; Coulet, Aurélie

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study is a randomized controlled trial on the effects of relaxation on anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) working in a center of supported employment in France. We studied 30 adults with mild or moderate ID who were split at random into a relaxation group (RG, 15 subjects), who completed 10 sessions of relaxation therapy, and a control group (CG, 15 subjects), who were on a waiting list. The method used is the pretest and posttest. Variables were assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory form Y scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. We found that in the RG, relaxation significantly reduced state anxiety, t(14, 15) = 17.8***, d = -0.72, and improved self-esteem, t(14, 15) = -7.7***, d = 1.03, and cognitive reappraisal, t(14, 15) = -6.3***, d = 1.3, while the CG showed no change for these variables. We conclude that relaxation seems to be an interesting therapeutic option for reducing anxiety in people with ID in a supported employment setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Circadian Regulation Gene Polymorphisms are Associated with Sleep Disruption and Duration, and Circadian Phase and Rhythm in Adults with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kathryn A.; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.

    2016-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1], and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 hours on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO), and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-hour autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in 5 candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2, and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e., viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g., race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking, depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-hour autocorrelation, and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated

  2. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST

  3. Long-distance axonal regeneration in the filum terminale of adult rats is regulated by ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Kwiecien, Jacek M; Avram, Ronen

    2008-03-01

    Studies of regeneration of transected adult central nervous system (CNS) axons are difficult due to lack of appropriate in vivo models. In adult rats, we described filum terminale (FT), a caudal slender extension of the sacral spinal cord and an integral part of the central nervous system (CNS), to use it as a model of spinal cord injury. FT is more than 3 cm long, encompasses a central canal lined with ependymal cells surrounded by a narrow band of axons interspersed with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but not neurons. Two weeks after the crush of FT, histological, ultrastructural, and axonal tracing studies revealed long distance descending axonal regeneration uniquely in close proximity of the ependymal cells of the central canal. Ependymal cells extended basal processes to form channels encompassing axons apparently regenerating at a rate of more than 2 mm a day. Remarkable increase of axonal sprouting was observed in the sacral spinal cord of Long Evans Shaker (LES) rats with crushed FT. FT offers an excellent model to study mechanisms of axonal regeneration regulated by ependymal cells in the adult CNS.

  4. HDAC3 controls gap 2/mitosis progression in adult neural stem/progenitor cells by regulating CDK1 levels.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yindi; Hsieh, Jenny

    2014-09-16

    The maintenance of the resident adult neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) pool depends on the precise balance of proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of the undifferentiated state. Identifying the mechanisms that regulate this balance in adult hippocampal NSPCs can provide insight into basic stem cell self-renewal principles important for tissue homeostasis and preventing tumor formation. Pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs), a class of histone-modifying enzymes, have promising effects in cancer cells, yet the specific roles of individual HDACs in stem cell proliferation is unclear. Here using conditional KO (cKO) mice and in vitro cell culture, we show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is required for the proliferation of adult NSPCs. Detailed cell cycle analysis of NSPCs from Hdac3 cKO mice reveals a defect in cell cycle progression through the gap 2/mitosis (G2/M) but not the S phase. Moreover, HDAC3 controls G2/M phase progression mainly through posttranslational stabilization of the G2/M cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). These results demonstrate that HDAC3 plays a critical role in NSPC proliferation and suggest that strategies aimed at pharmacological modulation of HDAC3 may be beneficial for tissue regeneration and controlling tumor cell growth.

  5. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Regulates Adult Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation in Response to Insulin.

    PubMed

    Chirivella, Laura; Kirstein, Martina; Ferrón, Sacri R; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Durupt, Fabrice C; Acosta-Umanzor, Carlos; Cano-Jaimez, Marifé; Pérez-Sánchez, Francisco; Barbacid, Mariano; Ortega, Sagrario; Burks, Deborah J; Fariñas, Isabel

    2017-08-20

    Insulin is one of the standard components used to culture primary neurospheres. Although it stimulates growth of different types of cells, the effects of insulin on adult neural stem cells (NSCs) have not been well characterized. Here, we reveal that insulin stimulates proliferation, but not survival or self-renewal, of adult NSCs. This effect is mediated by insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and subsequent activation of the protein kinase B (or Akt), leading to increased activity of the G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) and cell cycle progression. Neurospheres isolated from Irs2-deficient mice are reduced in size and fail to expand in culture and this impaired proliferation is rescued by introduction of a constitutively active Cdk4 (Cdk4(R24C/R24C) ). More interestingly, activation of the IRS2/Akt/Cdk4 signaling pathway by insulin is also necessary for the generation in vitro of neurons and oligodendrocytes from NSCs. Furthermore, the IRS2/Cdk4 pathway is also required for neuritogenesis, an aspect of neuronal maturation that has not been previously linked to regulation of the cell cycle. Differentiation of NSCs usually follows exit from the cell cycle due to increased levels of CDK-inhibitors which prevent activation of CDKs. In contrast, our data indicate that IRS2-mediated Cdk4 activity in response to a mitogen such as insulin promotes terminal differentiation of adult NSCs. Stem Cells 2017. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  6. p38α MAPK regulates adult muscle stem cell fate by restricting progenitor proliferation during postnatal growth and repair.

    PubMed

    Brien, Patrick; Pugazhendhi, Dhamayanthi; Woodhouse, Samuel; Oxley, David; Pell, Jennifer M

    2013-08-01

    Stem cell function is essential for the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. Controlling the balance between self-renewal and differentiation is crucial to maintain a receptive satellite cell pool capable of responding to growth and regeneration cues. The mitogen-activated protein kinase p38α has been implicated in the regulation of these processes but its influence in adult muscle remains unknown. Using conditional satellite cell p38α knockout mice we have demonstrated that p38α restricts excess proliferation in the postnatal growth phase while promoting timely myoblast differentiation. Differentiation was still able to occur in the p38α-null satellite cells, however, but was delayed. An absence of p38α resulted in a postnatal growth defect along with the persistence of an increased reservoir of satellite cells into adulthood. This population was still capable of responding to cardiotoxin-induced injury, resulting in complete, albeit delayed, regeneration, with further enhancement of the satellite cell population. Increased p38γ phosphorylation accompanied the absence of p38α, and inhibition of p38γ ex vivo substantially decreased the myogenic defect. We have used genome-wide transcriptome analysis to characterize the changes in expression that occur between resting and regenerating muscle, and the influence p38α has on these expression profiles. This study provides novel evidence for the fundamental role of p38α in adult muscle homeostasis in vivo.

  7. Roles of p53 and p27 Kip1 in the regulation of neurogenesis in the murine adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Perotin, Sara; Haines, Jeffery D.; Kaur, Jasbir; Marin-Husstege, Mireya; Spinetta, Michael J.; Kim, Kwi-Hye; Duran-Moreno, Maria; Schallert, Timothy; Zindy, Frederique; Roussel, Martine F.; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 (Trp53) and the cell cycle inhibitor p27 Kip1 (Cdknb1) have both been implicated in regulating proliferation of adult subventricular zone (aSVZ) cells. We previously reported that genetic ablation of Trp53 (Trp53 −/−) or Cdknb1 (p27 Kip1−/−) increased proliferation of cells in the aSVZ, but differentially affected the number of adult born neuroblasts. We therefore hypothesized that these molecules might play non-redundant roles. To test this hypothesis we generated mice lacking both genes (Trp53 −/−;p27 Kip1−/−) and analysed the consequences on aSVZ cells and adult neuroblasts. Proliferation and self-renewal of cultured aSVZ cells were increased in the double mutants compared with control, but the mice did not develop spontaneous brain tumors. In contrast, the number of adult-born neuroblasts in the double mutants was similar to wild-type animals and suggested a complementation of the p27 Kip1−/− phenotype due to loss of Trp53. Cellular differences detected in the aSVZ correlated with cellular changes in the olfactory bulb and behavioral data on novel odor recognition. The exploration time for new odors was reduced in p27 Kip1−/− mice, increased in Trp53 −/− mice and normalized in the double Trp53−/−;p27 Kip1−/− mutants. At the molecular level, Trp53 −/− aSVZ cells were characterized by higher levels of NeuroD and Math3 and by the ability to generate neurons more readily. In contrast, p27 Kip1−/− cells generated fewer neurons, due to enhanced proteasomal degradation of pro-neural transcription factors. Together, these results suggest that p27 Kip1 and p53 function non-redundantly to modulate proliferation and self-renewal of aSVZ cells and antagonistically in regulating adult neurogenesis. PMID:21899604

  8. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The chemokine receptor cxcr5 regulates the regenerative neurogenesis response in the adult zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Unlike mammals, zebrafish exhibits extensive neural regeneration after injury in adult stages of its lifetime due to the neurogenic activity of the radial glial cells. However, the genes involved in the regenerative neurogenesis response of the zebrafish brain are largely unknown. Thus, understanding the underlying principles of this regeneration capacity of the zebrafish brain is an interesting research realm that may offer vast clinical ramifications. Results In this paper, we characterized the expression pattern of cxcr5 and analyzed the function of this gene during adult neurogenesis and regeneration of the zebrafish telencephalon. We found that cxcr5 was upregulated transiently in the RGCs and neurons, and the expression in the immune cells such as leukocytes was negligible during both adult neurogenesis and regeneration. We observed that the transgenic misexpression of cxcr5 in the ventricular cells using dominant negative and full-length variants of the gene resulted in altered proliferation and neurogenesis response of the RGCs. When we knocked down cxcr5 using antisense morpholinos and cerebroventricular microinjection, we observed outcomes similar to the overexpression of the dominant negative cxcr5 variant. Conclusions Thus, based on our results, we propose that cxcr5 imposes a proliferative permissiveness to the radial glial cells and is required for differentiation of the RGCs to neurons, highlighting novel roles of cxcr5 in the nervous system of vertebrates. We therefore suggest that cxcr5 is an important cue for ventricular cell proliferation and regenerative neurogenesis in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. Further studies on the role of cxcr5 in mediating neuronal replenishment have the potential to produce clinical ramifications in efforts for regenerative therapeutic applications for human neurological disorders or acute injuries. PMID:22824261

  10. Perception of Self-Motion and Regulation of Walking Speed in Young-Old Adults.

    PubMed

    Lalonde-Parsi, Marie-Jasmine; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2015-07-01

    Whether a reduced perception of self-motion contributes to poor walking speed adaptations in older adults is unknown. In this study, speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual task) and walking speed adaptations (walking task) were compared between young (19-27 years) and young-old individuals (63-74 years), and the relationship between the performance on the two tasks was examined. Participants were evaluated while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Speed discrimination thresholds were determined using a staircase procedure. Walking speed modulation was assessed on a self-paced treadmill while exposed to different self-motion speeds ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the participants' comfortable speed. For each speed, participants were instructed to match the self-motion speed described by the moving corridor. On the walking task, participants displayed smaller walking speed errors at comfortable walking speeds compared with slower of faster speeds. The young-old adults presented larger speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual experiment) and larger walking speed errors (walking experiment) compared with young adults. Larger walking speed errors were associated with higher discrimination thresholds. The enhanced performance on the walking task at comfortable speed suggests that intersensory calibration processes are influenced by experience, hence optimized for frequently encountered conditions. The altered performance of the young-old adults on the perceptual and walking tasks, as well as the relationship observed between the two tasks, suggest that a poor perception of visual motion information may contribute to the poor walking speed adaptations that arise with aging.

  11. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons.

  12. Prenatal β-catenin/Brn2/Tbr2 transcriptional cascade regulates adult social and stereotypic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Belinson, H; Nakatani, J; Babineau, B A; Birnbaum, R Y; Ellegood, J; Bershteyn, M; McEvilly, R J; Long, J M; Willert, K; Klein, O D; Ahituv, N; Lerch, J P; Rosenfeld, M G; Wynshaw-Boris, A

    2016-10-01

    Social interaction is a fundamental behavior in all animal species, but the developmental timing of the social neural circuit formation and the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing its formation are poorly understood. We generated a mouse model with mutations in two Disheveled genes, Dvl1 and Dvl3, that displays adult social and repetitive behavioral abnormalities associated with transient embryonic brain enlargement during deep layer cortical neuron formation. These phenotypes were mediated by the embryonic expansion of basal neural progenitor cells (NPCs) via deregulation of a β-catenin/Brn2/Tbr2 transcriptional cascade. Transient pharmacological activation of the canonical Wnt pathway during this period of early corticogenesis rescued the β-catenin/Brn2/Tbr2 transcriptional cascade and the embryonic brain phenotypes. Remarkably, this embryonic treatment prevented adult behavioral deficits and partially rescued abnormal brain structure in Dvl mutant mice. Our findings define a mechanism that links fetal brain development and adult behavior, demonstrating a fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits seen in disorders such as autism.

  13. Microvillar size and espin expression in principal cells of the adult rat epididymis are regulated by androgens.

    PubMed

    Primiani, Nadia; Gregory, Mary; Dufresne, Julie; Smith, Charles E; Liu, Ye Lauren; Bartles, James R; Cyr, Daniel G; Hermo, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Principal cells of the epididymis are the most prominent cell type and are noted for an apical cell surface studded with microvilli. The latter contain channel proteins that condition the microenvironment of epididymal lumen and promote sperm maturation; however, the regulation of the structure and integrity of microvilli is not well known. Espins are a family of proteins implicated in microvillar growth. The objectives of this study were to assess the regulation of espin in epididymal principal cells both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of immortalized rat caput epididymal (RCE) cells with increasing doses of a homogenized testicular extract revealed a dose-dependent increase in the size of microvilli. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of adult rat epididymal RNA using espin-specific primers indicated the presence of a band at about 290 base pairs (bp) in all regions. Western blot analysis using affinity-purified espin antibody confirmed the presence of an approximately 110-kDa band in the epididymis, corresponding to espin isoform 1. In adult rats, immunocytochemistry revealed espin expression over principal cells. In orchidectomized rats, espin expression was significantly reduced, whereas ligation of the efferent ducts resulted in a decrease of espin expression but not to the extent of orchidectomy. The fact that espin expression was restored to control levels in orchidectomized rats supplemented with high levels of testosterone indicated that its expression was dependent on androgens and not on other lumicrine factors derived from the testis. Taken together, these data indicate that espin is expressed in the epididymis and is regulated by androgens.

  14. Changes in self-efficacy for exercise and improved nutrition fostered by increased self-regulation among adults with obesity.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J; Johnson, Ping H; McEwen, Kristin L

    2015-10-01

    Behavioral theory suggests that treatments that increase participants' use of self-regulatory skills and/or their feelings of ability (self-efficacy) will improve exercise and nutrition behaviors. In addition, psychosocial factors associated with increased exercise may carry over to improved eating. Self-regulation might enhance self-efficacy through feelings of ability to manage barriers to maintaining weight-loss behaviors. Sedentary adults with severe or morbid obesity (M age = 43 years; M BMI = 40.1 kg/m(2)) participated in a 6-month study within a community-based YMCA center. We randomly assigned participants to one of the two groups that incorporated the same cognitive-behavioral support of exercise paired with methods for controlled, healthy eating emphasizing either (a) self-efficacy (n = 138), or (b) self-regulation (n = 136) methods. Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant improvements in exercise- and eating-related self-regulation over 3 months, and exercise- and eating-related self-efficacy over 6 months. The Self-Regulation Treatment Group demonstrated greater improvements in self-regulation for eating and fruit and vegetable intake than the Self-Efficacy Group. Regression analyses indicated that for both exercise and eating, self-regulation change significantly predicted self-efficacy change. In separate equations, changes in exercise and fruit and vegetable intake mediated those relationships, and change in self-efficacy and the corresponding behavioral changes demonstrated reciprocal, mutually reinforcing, relationships. There was evidence of carry-over, or generalization, of both self-regulation and self-efficacy changes from an exercise context to an eating context. We discussed findings in terms of leveraging self-regulation to improve self-efficacy, and provide a rationale for why exercise is the strongest predictor of success with weight loss. Results may be used to inform future behavioral weight

  15. Ubx dynamically regulates Dpp signaling by repressing Dad expression during copper cell regeneration in the adult Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjie; Qi, Yanyan; Jasper, Heinrich

    2016-11-15

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of metazoans is lined by a series of regionally distinct epithelia. To maintain structure and function of the GI tract, regionally diversified differentiation of somatic stem cell (SC) lineages is critical. The adult Drosophila midgut provides an accessible model to study SC regulation and specification in a regionally defined manner. SCs of the posterior midgut (PM) have been studied extensively, but the control of SCs in the middle midgut (MM) is less well understood. The MM contains a stomach-like copper cell region (CCR) that is regenerated by gastric stem cells (GSSCs) and contains acid-secreting copper cells (CCs). Bmp-like Decapentaplegic (Dpp) signaling determines the identity of GSSCs, and is required for CC regeneration, yet the precise control of Dpp signaling activity in this lineage remains to be fully established. Here, we show that Dad, a negative feedback regulator of Dpp signaling, is dynamically regulated in the GSSC lineage to allow CC differentiation. Dad is highly expressed in GSSCs and their first daughter cells, the gastroblasts (GBs), but has to be repressed in differentiating CCs to allow Dpp-mediated differentiation into CCs. We find that the Hox gene ultrabithorax (Ubx) is required for this regulation. Loss of Ubx prevents Dad repression in the CCR, resulting in defective CC regeneration. Our study highlights the need for dynamic control of Dpp signaling activity in the differentiation of the GSSC lineage and identifies Ubx as a critical regulator of this process. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Seizures (ECS) Differentially Regulate the Expression of Epigenetic Machinery in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pusalkar, Madhavi; Ghosh, Shreya; Jaggar, Minal; Husain, Basma Fatima Anwar; Galande, Sanjeev; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive seizure treatment is a fast-acting antidepressant therapy that evokes rapid transcriptional, neurogenic, and behavioral changes. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to altered gene regulation, which underlies the neurogenic and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. We hypothesized that electroconvulsive seizure may modulate the expression of epigenetic machinery, thus establishing potential alterations in the epigenetic landscape. We examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on the gene expression of histone modifiers, namely histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases, and histone (lysine) demethylases as well as DNA modifying enzymes, including DNA methyltransferases, DNA demethylases, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins in the hippocampi of adult male Wistar rats using quantitative real time-PCR analysis. Further, we examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on global and residue-specific histone acetylation and methylation levels within the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the cellular and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. Acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure induced a primarily unique, and in certain cases bidirectional, regulation of histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins, with an overlapping pattern of gene regulation restricted to Sirt4, Mll3, Jmjd3, Gadd45b, Tet2, and Tet3. Global histone acetylation and methylation levels were predominantly unchanged, with the exception of a significant decline in H3K9 acetylation in the hippocampus following chronic electroconvulsive seizure. Electroconvulsive seizure treatment evokes the transcriptional regulation of several histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins within the hippocampus, with a predominantly distinct pattern of regulation induced by acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  17. Isolating Metamemory Deficits in the Self-Regulated Learning of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knouse, Laura E.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Dunlosky, John

    2012-01-01

    ADHD in adulthood is associated with chronic academic impairments and problems with strategic memory encoding on standardized memory assessments, but little is known about self-regulated learning that might guide intervention. Objective: Examine the contribution of metamemory judgment accuracy and use of learning strategies to self-regulated…

  18. Self-Regulation and Milestones of Adult Development: Intimacy and Generativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Holger; Hofer, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In 2 separate studies, the idea is tested that the positive association between self-regulatory capacities and well-being is partly explained by the positive effect self-regulation has on the successful resolution of developmental crises in Eriksonian terms. In Study 1, attentional control, intimacy, and subjective well-being are assessed in 177…

  19. Isolating Metamemory Deficits in the Self-Regulated Learning of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knouse, Laura E.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Dunlosky, John

    2012-01-01

    ADHD in adulthood is associated with chronic academic impairments and problems with strategic memory encoding on standardized memory assessments, but little is known about self-regulated learning that might guide intervention. Objective: Examine the contribution of metamemory judgment accuracy and use of learning strategies to self-regulated…

  20. Regional expression and androgen regulation of carbonic anhydrase IV and II in the adult rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, K; Fleming, R E; Kneer, J; Sly, W S; Rajaniemi, H

    1999-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is implicated in the acidification of epididymal fluid and thereby in the regulation of sperm maturation and motility. Among the CA isoenzymes, CA IV and II have been shown to be present in the rat epididymal duct epithelium. In the present study, we examined the expression and androgen regulation of CA IV and II mRNAs along the epididymal duct. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CA II mRNA in all regions of the epididymis with the strongest signal in the corpus region, while CA IV mRNA was expressed predominantly in the corpus epididymidis. Three days after bilateral castration, CA IV and II mRNAs were decreased by 80-90% in the corpus epididymidis. Testosterone (T) replacement maintained the expression of CA mRNAs at 50-60% of the control levels, indicating that circulating androgens alone are not sufficient to recover the CA expression in the corpus region. However, unilateral castration did not affect the mRNA levels of CA IV and II, suggesting that factors in testicular fluid do not play a major role in the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis. Immunoblot analysis showed that CA IV protein levels decreased 3 days after castration, while T administration maintained the protein expression virtually at the precastration levels. These data demonstrate that mRNAs for CA IV and II are predominantly expressed in the corpus region of the rat epididymis and can be regulated by androgens in that region. The present data suggest that the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis by androgens contributes to the known androgen effects on epididymal acidification.

  1. Stress and serial adult metamorphosis: multiple roles for the stress axis in socially regulated sex change

    PubMed Central

    Solomon-Lane, Tessa K.; Crespi, Erica J.; Grober, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Socially regulated sex change in teleost fishes is a striking example of social status information regulating biological function in the service of reproductive success. The establishment of social dominance in sex changing species is translated into a cascade of changes in behavior, physiology, neuroendocrine function, and morphology that transforms a female into a male, or vice versa. The hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI, homologous to HP-adrenal axis in mammals and birds) has been hypothesized to play a mechanistic role linking status to sex change. The HPA/I axis responds to environmental stressors by integrating relevant external and internal cues and coordinating biological responses including changes in behavior, energetics, physiology, and morphology (i.e., metamorphosis). Through actions of both corticotropin-releasing factor and glucocorticoids, the HPA/I axis has been implicated in processes central to sex change, including the regulation of agonistic behavior, social status, energetic investment, and life history transitions. In this paper, we review the hypothesized roles of the HPA/I axis in the regulation of sex change and how those hypotheses have been tested to date. We include original data on sex change in the bluebanded goby (Lythyrpnus dalli), a highly social fish capable of bidirectional sex change. We then propose a model for HPA/I involvement in sex change and discuss how these ideas might be tested in the future. Understanding the regulation of sex change has the potential to elucidate evolutionarily conserved mechanisms responsible for translating pertinent information about the environment into coordinated biological changes along multiple body axes. PMID:24265604

  2. Presenilin-1 regulates neural progenitor cell differentiation in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gadadhar, Archana; Marr, Robert; Lazarov, Orly

    2011-01-01

    Presenilin-1 (PS1) is the catalytic core of the aspartyl protease γ-secretase. Previous genetic studies using germ-line deletion of PS1 and conditional knockout mice demonstrated that PS1 plays an essential role in neuronal differentiation during neural development, but it remained unclear whether PS1 plays a similar role in neurogenesis in the adult brain. Here we show that neural progenitor cells infected with lentiviral vectors expressing short interfering RNA (siRNA) for the exclusive knockdown of PS1 in the neurogenic microenvironments, exhibit a dramatic enhancement of cell differentiation. Infected cells differentiated into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, suggesting that multipotentiality of neural progenitor cells is not affected by reduced levels of PS1. Neurosphere cultures treated with γ-secretase inhibitors exhibit a similar phenotype of enhanced cell differentiation, suggesting that PS1 function in neural progenitor cells is γ-secretase-dependent. Neurospheres infected with lentiviral vectors expressing siRNA for the targeting of PS1 differentiated even in the presence of the proliferation factors epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), suggesting that PS1 dominates EFG and bFGF signaling pathways. Reduction of PS1 expression in neural progenitor cells was accompanied by a decrease in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β-catenin expression level, suggesting that they are downstream essential transducers of PS1 signaling in adult neural progenitor cells. These findings suggest a physiological role for PS1 in adult neurogenesis, and a potential target for the manipulation of neural progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:21325529

  3. Purines regulate adult brain subventricular zone cell functions: contribution of reactive astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Boccazzi, Marta; Rolando, Chiara; Abbracchio, Maria P; Buffo, Annalisa; Ceruti, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Brain injuries modulate activation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the adult brain. In pathological conditions, the concentrations of extracellular nucleotides (eNTs) raise several folds, contribute to reactive gliosis, and possibly directly affect subventricular zone (SVZ) cell functioning. Among eNTs and derived metabolites, the P2Y1 receptor agonist ADP strongly promotes astrogliosis and might also influence SVZ progenitor activity. Here, we tested the ability of the stable P2Y1 agonist adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (ADPβS) to control adult NSC functions both in vitro and in vivo, with a focus on the possible effects exerted by reactive astrocytes. In the absence of growth factors, ADPβS promoted proliferation and differentiation of SVZ progenitors. Moreover, ADPβS-activated astrocytes markedly changed the pattern of released cytokines and chemokines, and strongly modulated neurosphere-forming capacity of SVZ progenitors. Notably, a significant enhancement in proliferation was observed when SVZ cells, initially grown in the supernatant of astrocytes exposed to ADPβS, were shifted to normal medium. In vivo, ADPβS administration in the lateral ventricle of adult mice by osmotic minipumps caused diffused reactive astrogliosis, and a strong response of SVZ progenitors. Indeed, proliferation of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive NSCs increased and led to a significant expansion of SVZ transit-amplifying progenitors and neuroblasts. Lineage tracing experiments performed in the GLAST::CreERT2;Rosa-YFP transgenic mice further demonstrated that ADPβS promoted proliferation of glutamate/aspartate transporter-positive progenitors and sustained their progression toward the generation of rapidly dividing progenitors. Altogether, our results show that the purinergic system crucially affects SVZ progenitor activities both directly and through the involvement of reactive astrocytes.

  4. Induced multipotency in adult keratinocytes through down-regulation of ΔNp63 or DGCR8

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deepavali; Su, Xiaohua; Cho, Min Soon; Bui, Ngoc Hoang Bao; Coarfa, Cristian; Venkatanarayan, Avinashnarayan; Benham, Ashley L.; Flores González, Ramón E.; Alana, Jennifer; Xiao, Weimin; Leung, Marco L.; Vin, Harina; Chan, Io Long; Aquino, Arianexys; Müller, Nicole; Wang, Hongran; Cooney, Austin J.; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the miRNA processing machinery in the regulation of stem cell biology are not well understood. Here, we show that the p53 family member and p63 isoform, ΔNp63, is a transcriptional activator of a cofactor critical for miRNA processing (DGCR8). This regulation gives rise to a unique miRNA signature resulting in reprogramming cells to multipotency. Strikingly, ΔNp63−/− epidermal cells display profound defects in terminal differentiation and express a subset of markers and miRNAs present in embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts induced to pluripotency using Yamanaka factors. Moreover, ΔNp63−/− epidermal cells transduced with an inducible DGCR8 plasmid can differentiate into multiple cell fates in vitro and in vivo. We found that human primary keratinocytes depleted of ΔNp63 or DGCR8 can be reprogrammed in 6 d and express a unique miRNA and gene expression signature that is similar but not identical to human induced pluripotent stem cells. Our data reveal a role for ΔNp63 in the transcriptional regulation of DGCR8 to reprogram adult somatic cells into multipotent stem cells. PMID:24449888

  5. Induced multipotency in adult keratinocytes through down-regulation of ΔNp63 or DGCR8.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Deepavali; Su, Xiaohua; Cho, Min Soon; Bui, Ngoc Hoang Bao; Coarfa, Cristian; Venkatanarayan, Avinashnarayan; Benham, Ashley L; Flores González, Ramón E; Alana, Jennifer; Xiao, Weimin; Leung, Marco L; Vin, Harina; Chan, Io Long; Aquino, Arianexys; Müller, Nicole; Wang, Hongran; Cooney, Austin J; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Gunaratne, Preethi H; Flores, Elsa R

    2014-02-04

    The roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the miRNA processing machinery in the regulation of stem cell biology are not well understood. Here, we show that the p53 family member and p63 isoform, ΔNp63, is a transcriptional activator of a cofactor critical for miRNA processing (DGCR8). This regulation gives rise to a unique miRNA signature resulting in reprogramming cells to multipotency. Strikingly, ΔNp63(-/-) epidermal cells display profound defects in terminal differentiation and express a subset of markers and miRNAs present in embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts induced to pluripotency using Yamanaka factors. Moreover, ΔNp63(-/-) epidermal cells transduced with an inducible DGCR8 plasmid can differentiate into multiple cell fates in vitro and in vivo. We found that human primary keratinocytes depleted of ΔNp63 or DGCR8 can be reprogrammed in 6 d and express a unique miRNA and gene expression signature that is similar but not identical to human induced pluripotent stem cells. Our data reveal a role for ΔNp63 in the transcriptional regulation of DGCR8 to reprogram adult somatic cells into multipotent stem cells.

  6. Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B regulate intestinal homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yueqin; Li, Zhouhua; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-11-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) tightly regulate stem cells for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Little is known about the regulation of tissue homeostasis by the ECM. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), important components of the ECM, are involved in a variety of biological events. Two heparin sulfate 3-O sulfotransferase (Hs3st) genes, Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B, encode the modification enzymes in heparan sulfate (HS) biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B are required for adult midgut homeostasis. Depletion of Hs3st-A in enterocytes (ECs) results in increased intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Moreover, increased ISC proliferation is also observed in Hs3st-B null mutant alone, or in combination with Hs3st-A RNAi. Hs3st-A depletion-induced ISC proliferation is effectively suppressed by simultaneous inhibition of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that tissue homeostasis loss in Hs3st-A-deficient intestines is due to increased EGFR signaling. Furthermore, we find that Hs3st-A-depleted ECs are unhealthy and prone to death, while ectopic expression of the antiapoptotic p35 is able to greatly suppress tissue homeostasis loss in these intestines. Together, our data suggest that Drosophila Hs3st-A and Hs3st-B are involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation and midgut homeostasis maintenance.

  7. Virtuously watching one's health: older adults' regulation of self in the pursuit of health.

    PubMed

    Pond, Rachael; Stephens, Christine; Alpass, Fiona

    2010-07-01

    Individual responsibility for health is socio-culturally emphasized. This study used discourse analysis to examine 60 New Zealand adults' (aged 55-70) uptake of health promotion discourse in talk about health and ageing. Many participants attempted to defy or manage an ageing body through a regime of exercise, food management and other practices. The subject position of being in control of one's health counteracted anxieties about ageing; following strictures of health promotion provided a virtuous moral identity. However, there is a danger of feeling individually responsible for ill-health, or betrayed when health promotion's promises contradict the experience of an ageing body.

  8. Parvalbumin-expressing basket-cell network plasticity induced by experience regulates adult learning.

    PubMed

    Donato, Flavio; Rompani, Santiago Belluco; Caroni, Pico

    2013-12-12

    Learning and memory processes can be influenced by recent experience, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Enhanced plasticity during critical periods of early life is linked to differentiating parvalbumin (PV)-interneuron networks, suggesting that recent experience may modulate learning by targeting the differentiation state of PV neurons in the adult. Here we show that environmental enrichment and Pavlovian contextual fear conditioning induce opposite, sustained and reversible hippocampal PV-network configurations in adult mice. Specifically, enrichment promotes the emergence of large fractions of low-differentiation (low PV and GAD67 expression) basket cells with low excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic-density ratios, whereas fear conditioning leads to large fractions of high-differentiation (high PV and GAD67 expression) basket cells with high excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic-density ratios. Pharmacogenetic inhibition or activation of PV neurons was sufficient to induce such opposite low-PV-network or high-PV-network configurations, respectively. The low-PV-network configuration enhanced structural synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation and retrieval, whereas these were reduced by the high-PV-network configuration. We then show that maze navigation learning induces a hippocampal low-PV-network configuration paralleled by enhanced memory and structural synaptic plasticity throughout training, followed by a shift to a high-PV-network configuration after learning completion. The shift to a low-PV-network configuration specifically involved increased vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-positive GABAergic boutons and synaptic transmission onto PV neurons. Closely comparable low- and high-PV-network configurations involving VIP boutons were specifically induced in primary motor cortex upon rotarod motor learning. These results uncover a network plasticity mechanism induced after learning through VIP-PV microcircuit modulation, and involving

  9. [Mediating role of emotional regulation between impulsive behavior in gambling, Internet and videogame abuse, and dysfunctional symptomatology in young adults and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Estévez Gutiérrez, Ana; Herrero Fernández, David; Sarabia Gonzalvo, Izaskun; Jáuregui Bilbao, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The way emotions are regulated might affect the engagement on risk behaviors in adolescents and young adults. Therefore, studying the relationship between these variables could be of great importance. Some of the less studied risky behaviors are pathological gambling, and Internet and videogame abuse. This research aims to analyze the existing relationship between such risky behaviors, emotion regulation, and dysfunctional psychological symptomatology (depression, anxiety, phobic anxiety, somatization, obsessive-–compulsive behavior, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism). In addition, it also looks to assess whether emotional regulation plays a mediating role between pathological gambling, and Internet and videogame abuse, and psychological symptomatology. The sample was composed of 1312 young adults and adolescents, aged between 12 and 30, recruited from scholar centers, universities and free time groups, and from associations and centers associated with FEJAR (Spanish Federation of Rehabilitated Gamblers). Participants completed measurements of impulsive behavior, emotion regulation, and dysfunctional symptomatology. Results showed that there is generally a positive and significant relation between these variables. Moreover, it has been pointed out that emotion regulation mediates the association between impulsive behavior and dysfunctional symptomatology among those young adults and adolescents who engage in these impulsive behaviors, except for the relation between videogame abuse and depressive symptomatology. Training in emotional regulation skills could be useful in dealing with and treating this type of behaviors in adolescents and young adults.

  10. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein MBD1 Regulates Neuronal Lineage Commitment through Maintaining Adult Neural Stem Cell Identity

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Emily M.; Gao, Yu; Eisinger, Brian E.; Mladucky, Janessa K.; Giuliani, Charles C.; Kelnhofer, Laurel E.

    2017-01-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding domain 1 (MBD1) belongs to a family of methyl-CpG-binding proteins that are epigenetic “readers” linking DNA methylation to transcriptional regulation. MBD1 is expressed in neural stem cells residing in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus (aNSCs) and MBD1 deficiency leads to reduced neuronal differentiation, impaired neurogenesis, learning deficits, and autism-like behaviors in mice; however, the precise function of MBD1 in aNSCs remains unexplored. Here, we show that MBD1 is important for maintaining the integrity and stemness of NSCs, which is critical for their ability to generate neurons. MBD1 deficiency leads to the accumulation of undifferentiated NSCs and impaired transition into the neuronal lineage. Transcriptome analysis of neural stem and progenitor cells isolated directly from the dentate gyrus of MBD1 mutant (KO) and WT mice showed that gene sets related to cell differentiation, particularly astrocyte lineage genes, were upregulated in KO cells. We further demonstrated that, in NSCs, MBD1 binds and represses directly specific genes associated with differentiation. Our results suggest that MBD1 maintains the multipotency of NSCs by restraining the onset of differentiation genes and that untimely expression of these genes in MBD1-deficient stem cells may interfere with normal cell lineage commitment and cause the accumulation of undifferentiated cells. Our data reveal a novel role for MBD1 in stem cell maintenance and provide insight into how epigenetic regulation contributes to adult neurogenesis and the potential impact of its dysregulation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in the hippocampus self-renew and generate neurons throughout life. We show that methyl-CpG-binding domain 1 (MBD1), a DNA methylation “reader,” is important for maintaining the integrity of NSCs, which is critical for their neurogenic potency. Our data reveal a novel role for MBD1 in stem cell maintenance and provide insight

  11. Regulation of neonatal and adult mammalian heart regeneration by the miR-15 family

    PubMed Central

    Porrello, Enzo R.; Mahmoud, Ahmed I.; Simpson, Emma; Johnson, Brett A.; Grinsfelder, David; Canseco, Diana; Mammen, Pradeep P.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Olson, Eric N.; Sadek, Hesham A.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified a brief time period during postnatal development when the mammalian heart retains significant regenerative potential after amputation of the ventricular apex. However, one major unresolved question is whether the neonatal mouse heart can also regenerate in response to myocardial ischemia, the most common antecedent of heart failure in humans. Here, we induced ischemic myocardial infarction (MI) in 1-d-old mice and found that this results in extensive myocardial necrosis and systolic dysfunction. Remarkably, the neonatal heart mounted a robust regenerative response, through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes, resulting in full functional recovery within 21 d. Moreover, we show that the miR-15 family of microRNAs modulates neonatal heart regeneration through inhibition of postnatal cardiomyocyte proliferation. Finally, we demonstrate that inhibition of the miR-15 family from an early postnatal age until adulthood increases myocyte proliferation in the adult heart and improves left ventricular systolic function after adult MI. We conclude that the neonatal mammalian heart can regenerate after myocardial infarction through proliferation of preexisting cardiomyocytes and that the miR-15 family contributes to postnatal loss of cardiac regenerative capacity. PMID:23248315

  12. A planarian p53 homolog regulates proliferation and self-renewal in adult stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Bret J; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The functions of adult stem cells and tumor suppressor genes are known to intersect. However, when and how tumor suppressors function in the lineages produced by adult stem cells is unknown. With a large population of stem cells that can be manipulated and studied in vivo, the freshwater planarian is an ideal system with which to investigate these questions. Here, we focus on the tumor suppressor p53, homologs of which have no known role in stem cell biology in any invertebrate examined thus far. Planaria have a single p53 family member, Smed-p53, which is predominantly expressed in newly made stem cell progeny. When Smed-p53 is targeted by RNAi, the stem cell population increases at the expense of progeny, resulting in hyper-proliferation. However, ultimately the stem cell population fails to self-renew. Our results suggest that prior to the vertebrates, an ancestral p53-like molecule already had functions in stem cell proliferation control and self-renewal.

  13. Eating frequency and energy regulation in free-living adults consuming self-selected diets.

    PubMed

    McCrory, Megan A; Howarth, Nancy C; Roberts, Susan B; Huang, Terry T-K

    2011-01-01

    The relative importance of eating frequency to weight control is poorly understood. This review examines the evidence to date on the role of eating frequency in weight control in free-living adults. The majority of cross-sectional studies in free-living adults show an inverse relationship between eating frequency and adiposity; however, this is likely an artifact produced by the underreporting of eating frequency concurrent with underreporting of energy intake. When implausible energy intake reporting (which is mostly underreporting) is taken into account, the association between eating frequency and adiposity becomes positive. In studies in which eating frequency is prescribed and food intake is mostly self-selected, there is either no effect or a minor positive effect of eating frequency on energy intake. Most of those studies have been short-term and lack the necessary dietary biomarkers to validate reported energy intakes and eating frequencies. In conclusion, there is some suggestion from cross-sectional studies in which energy intake underreporting is taken into account and from experimental studies to date that greater eating frequency may promote positive energy balance. However, experimental studies of longer-term duration that include objective dietary biomarkers are necessary before firm conclusions about the relative importance of eating frequency in weight control can be made.

  14. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  15. Neural stem cells in the adult ciliary epithelium express GFAP and are regulated by Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ani V.; Zhao Xing; James, Jackson; Kim, Min; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Ahmad, Iqbal . E-mail: iahmad@unmc.edu

    2006-01-13

    The identification of neural stem cells with retinal potential in the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the adult mammals is of considerable interest because of their potential for replacing or rescuing degenerating retinal neurons in disease or injury. The evaluation of such a potential requires characterization of these cells with regard to their phenotypic properties, potential, and regulatory mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that rat CE stem cells/progenitors in neurosphere culture display astrocytic nature in terms of expressing glial intermediate neurofilament protein, GFAP. The GFAP-expressing CE stem cells/progenitors form neurospheres in proliferating conditions and generate neurons when shifted to differentiating conditions. These cells express components of the canonical Wnt pathway and its activation promotes their proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activation of the canonical Wnt pathway influences neuronal differentiation of CE stem cells/progenitors in a context dependent manner. Our observations suggest that CE stem cells/progenitors share phenotypic properties and regulatory mechanism(s) with neural stem cells elsewhere in the adult CNS.

  16. The Nuclear Receptor REV-ERBα Regulates Fabp7 and Modulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Anna; Chappuis, Sylvie; Schmutz, Isabelle; Brai, Emanuele; Ripperger, Jürgen A.; Schaad, Olivier; Welzl, Hans; Descombes, Patrick; Alberi, Lavinia; Albrecht, Urs

    2014-01-01

    The function of the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα (Nr1d1) in the brain is, apart from its role in the circadian clock mechanism, unknown. Therefore, we compared gene expression profiles in the brain between wild-type and Rev-erbα knock-out (KO) animals. We identified fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, Blbp) as a direct target of repression by REV-ERBα. Loss of Rev-erbα manifested in memory and mood related behavioral phenotypes and led to overexpression of Fabp7 in various brain areas including the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, where neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) can initiate adult neurogenesis. We found increased proliferation of hippocampal neurons and loss of its diurnal pattern in Rev-erbα KO mice. In vitro, proliferation and migration of glioblastoma cells were affected by manipulating either Fabp7 expression or REV-ERBα activity. These results suggest an important role of Rev-erbα and Fabp7 in adult neurogenesis, which may open new avenues for treatment of gliomas as well as neurological diseases such as depression and Alzheimer. PMID:24932636

  17. Photoperiodic regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days (SD) with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine at multiple time points across 10 weeks of SD exposure. Compared with counterparts held in long day (LD) lengths, across the first 8 weeks of SD exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at 10 weeks in SD lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in LD lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function and behavior at multiple levels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Photoperiodic Regulation of Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Male White-footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Walton, James C.; Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Weil, Zachary M.; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well-described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog BrdU at multiple time points across ten weeks of short day exposure. Compared to counterparts held in long day lengths, across the first eight weeks of short day exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at ten weeks in short day lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in long day lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes, and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function, and behavior at multiple levels. PMID:24893623

  19. Reciprocal Interaction between TRAF6 and Notch Signaling Regulates Adult Myofiber Regeneration upon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Sajedah M.; Paul, Pradyut K.; Dahiya, Saurabh; Mishra, Vivek; Bhatnagar, Shephali; Kuang, Shihuan; Choi, Yongwon

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a postmitotic tissue that repairs and regenerates through activation of a population of stem-cell-like satellite cells. However, signaling mechanisms governing adult skeletal muscle regeneration remain less understood. In the present study, we have investigated the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an adaptor protein involved in receptor-mediated activation of multiple signaling pathways in regeneration of adult myofibers. Skeletal muscle-specific depletion of TRAF6 in mice (TRAF6mko) improved regeneration of myofibers upon injury with a concomitant increase in the number of satellite cells and activation of the Notch signaling pathway. Ex vivo cultures of TRAF6mko myofiber explants demonstrated an increase in the proliferative capacity of myofiber-associated satellite cells accompanied by an upregulation of Notch ligands. Deletion of TRAF6 also inhibited the activity of transcription factor NF-κB and the expression of inflammatory cytokines and augmented the M2c macrophage phenotype in injured muscle tissues. Collectively, our study demonstrates that specific inhibition of TRAF6 improves satellite cell activation and skeletal muscle regeneration through upregulation of Notch signaling and reducing the inflammatory repertoire. PMID:23028045

  20. Reciprocal interaction between TRAF6 and notch signaling regulates adult myofiber regeneration upon injury.

    PubMed

    Hindi, Sajedah M; Paul, Pradyut K; Dahiya, Saurabh; Mishra, Vivek; Bhatnagar, Shephali; Kuang, Shihuan; Choi, Yongwon; Kumar, Ashok

    2012-12-01

    Skeletal muscle is a postmitotic tissue that repairs and regenerates through activation of a population of stem-cell-like satellite cells. However, signaling mechanisms governing adult skeletal muscle regeneration remain less understood. In the present study, we have investigated the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an adaptor protein involved in receptor-mediated activation of multiple signaling pathways in regeneration of adult myofibers. Skeletal muscle-specific depletion of TRAF6 in mice (TRAF6(mko)) improved regeneration of myofibers upon injury with a concomitant increase in the number of satellite cells and activation of the Notch signaling pathway. Ex vivo cultures of TRAF6(mko) myofiber explants demonstrated an increase in the proliferative capacity of myofiber-associated satellite cells accompanied by an upregulation of Notch ligands. Deletion of TRAF6 also inhibited the activity of transcription factor NF-κB and the expression of inflammatory cytokines and augmented the M2c macrophage phenotype in injured muscle tissues. Collectively, our study demonstrates that specific inhibition of TRAF6 improves satellite cell activation and skeletal muscle regeneration through upregulation of Notch signaling and reducing the inflammatory repertoire.

  1. The nuclear receptor REV-ERBα regulates Fabp7 and modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Anna; Chappuis, Sylvie; Schmutz, Isabelle; Brai, Emanuele; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Schaad, Olivier; Welzl, Hans; Descombes, Patrick; Alberi, Lavinia; Albrecht, Urs

    2014-01-01

    The function of the nuclear receptor Rev-erbα (Nr1d1) in the brain is, apart from its role in the circadian clock mechanism, unknown. Therefore, we compared gene expression profiles in the brain between wild-type and Rev-erbα knock-out (KO) animals. We identified fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, Blbp) as a direct target of repression by REV-ERBα. Loss of Rev-erbα manifested in memory and mood related behavioral phenotypes and led to overexpression of Fabp7 in various brain areas including the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus, where neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) can initiate adult neurogenesis. We found increased proliferation of hippocampal neurons and loss of its diurnal pattern in Rev-erbα KO mice. In vitro, proliferation and migration of glioblastoma cells were affected by manipulating either Fabp7 expression or REV-ERBα activity. These results suggest an important role of Rev-erbα and Fabp7 in adult neurogenesis, which may open new avenues for treatment of gliomas as well as neurological diseases such as depression and Alzheimer.

  2. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  3. A planarian p53 homolog regulates proliferation and self-renewal in adult stem cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Bret J.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    The functions of adult stem cells and tumor suppressor genes are known to intersect. However, when and how tumor suppressors function in the lineages produced by adult stem cells is unknown. With a large population of stem cells that can be manipulated and studied in vivo, the freshwater planarian is an ideal system with which to investigate these questions. Here, we focus on the tumor suppressor p53, homologs of which have no known role in stem cell biology in any invertebrate examined thus far. Planaria have a single p53 family member, Smed-p53, which is predominantly expressed in newly made stem cell progeny. When Smed-p53 is targeted by RNAi, the stem cell population increases at the expense of progeny, resulting in hyper-proliferation. However, ultimately the stem cell population fails to self-renew. Our results suggest that prior to the vertebrates, an ancestral p53-like molecule already had functions in stem cell proliferation control and self-renewal. PMID:20040488

  4. Impaired prefrontal sleep spindle regulation of hippocampal-dependent learning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Mander, Bryce A; Rao, Vikram; Lu, Brandon; Saletin, Jared M; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Jagust, William J; Walker, Matthew P

    2014-12-01

    A hallmark feature of cognitive aging is a decline in the ability to form new memories. Parallel to these cognitive impairments are marked disruptions in sleep physiology. Despite recent evidence in young adults establishing a role for sleep spindles in restoring hippocampal-dependent memory formation, the possibility that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related decline in hippocampal-dependent learning remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reduced prefrontal sleep spindles by over 40% in older adults statistically mediates the effects of old age on next day episodic learning, such that the degree of impaired episodic learning is explained by the extent of impoverished prefrontal sleep spindles. In addition, prefrontal spindles significantly predicted the magnitude of impaired next day hippocampal activation, thereby determining the influence of spindles on post-sleep learning capacity. These data support the hypothesis that disrupted sleep physiology contributes to age-related cognitive decline in later life, the consequence of which has significant treatment intervention potential. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Childhood adversity and epigenetic regulation of glucocorticoid signaling genes: Associations in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Tyrka, Audrey R; Ridout, Kathryn K; Parade, Stephanie H

    2016-11-01

    Early childhood experiences have lasting effects on development, including the risk for psychiatric disorders. Research examining the biologic underpinnings of these associations has revealed the impact of childhood maltreatment on the physiologic stress response and activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. A growing body of literature supports the hypothesis that environmental exposures mediate their biological effects via epigenetic mechanisms. Methylation, which is thought to be the most stable form of epigenetic change, is a likely mechanism by which early life exposures have lasting effects. We present recent evidence related to epigenetic regulation of genes involved in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, namely, the glucocorticoid receptor gene (nuclear receptor subfamily 3, group C, member 1 [NR3C1]) and FK506 binding protein 51 gene (FKBP5), after childhood adversity and associations with risk for psychiatric disorders. Implications for the development of interventions and future research are discussed.

  6. Regulating availability: how access to alcohol affects drinking and problems in youth and adults.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    Regulations on the availability of alcohol have been used to moderate alcohol problems in communities throughout the world for thousands of years. In the latter half of the 20th century, quantitative studies of the effects of these regulations on drinking and related problems began in earnest as public health practitioners began to recognize the full extent of the harmful consequences related to drinking. This article briefly outlines the history of this work over four areas, focusing on the minimum legal drinking age, the privatization of alcohol control systems, outlet densities, and hours and days of sale. Some historical background is provided to emphasize the theoretical and empirical roots of this work and to highlight the substantial progress that has been made in each area. In general, this assessment suggests that higher minimum legal drinking ages, greater monopoly controls over alcohol sales, lower outlet numbers and reduced outlet densities, and limited hours and days of sale can effectively reduce alcohol sales, use, and problems. There are, however, substantial gaps in the research literature and a near absence of the quantitative theoretical work needed to direct alcohol-control efforts. Local community responses to alcohol policies are complex and heterogeneous, sometimes reinforcing and sometimes mitigating the effects of availability regulations. Quantitative models of policy effects are essential to accelerate progress toward the formulation and testing of optimal control strategies for the reduction of alcohol problems.

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the peripheral nervous system in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Joyce Tang, W; Chen, Jerry S; Zeller, Robert W

    2013-06-15

    The formation of the sensory organs and cells that make up the peripheral nervous system (PNS) relies on the activity of transcription factors encoded by proneural genes (PNGs). Although PNGs have been identified in the nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates, the complexity of their interactions has complicated efforts to understand their function in the context of their underlying regulatory networks. To gain insight into the regulatory network of PNG activity in chordates, we investigated the roles played by PNG homologs in regulating PNS development of the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis. We discovered that in Ciona, MyT1, Pou4, Atonal, and NeuroD-like are expressed in a sequential regulatory cascade in the developing epidermal sensory neurons (ESNs) of the PNS and act downstream of Notch signaling, which negatively regulates these genes and the number of ESNs along the tail midlines. Transgenic embryos mis-expressing any of these proneural genes in the epidermis produced ectopic midline ESNs. In transgenic embryos mis-expressing Pou4, and MyT1 to a lesser extent, numerous ESNs were produced outside of the embryonic midlines. In addition we found that the microRNA miR-124, which inhibits Notch signaling in ESNs, is activated downstream of all the proneural factors we tested, suggesting that these genes operate collectively in a regulatory network. Interestingly, these factors are encoded by the same genes that have recently been demonstrated to convert fibroblasts into neurons. Our findings suggest the ascidian PNS can serve as an in vivo model to study the underlying regulatory mechanisms that enable the conversion of cells into sensory neurons.

  8. Extrinsic regulation of injury/growth-related gene expression in the inferior olive of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Buffo, Annalisa; Carulli, Daniela; Rossi, Ferdinando; Strata, Piergiorgio

    2003-10-01

    Successful axon regeneration relies on the capability of the lesioned neurons to up-regulate a specific set of injury/growth-associated genes. In the adult central nervous system, the strength of the cell body response is generally related to the distance of the injury site from the perikaryon, being stronger for proximal lesions. Nevertheless, inferior olive (IO) cells react to injury and regenerate their axons even after distal transections. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate the IO growth properties, we examined the expression of injury/growth markers (nitric oxide synthase, growth-associated protein 43 and c-Jun) after target deletion or axotomy performed at different sites along the olivocerebellar pathway. Both axon injury and target loss disclose two subsets of IO neurons distributed within precise subnuclei: one subset up-regulates all markers in all conditions, whereas the other shows a mild c-Jun expression but remains unresponsive even after a very proximal axotomy. These observations indicate that distinct subpopulations of IO cells respond to different regulatory strategies. Unresponsive neurons appear insensitive to environmental positive or negative cues, suggesting that they are intrinsically unable to set up a cellular reaction to injury. In contrast, cell body changes in reactive neurons are elicited after the removal of retrogradely transported target-derived inhibitory signals. Target loss also induces degeneration of IO cells, whose survival remains partially dependent on Purkinje targets in adulthood. Thus, the intrinsic regenerative potential of a functionally homogeneous population is regulated by multiple mechanisms, specific for distinct neuronal subsets.

  9. Early Postnatal Manganese Exposure Causes Lasting Impairment of Selective and Focused Attention and Arousal Regulation in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Stephane A.; Strupp, Barbara J.; Strawderman, Myla; Smith, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies in children and adolescents have associated early developmental manganese (Mn) exposure with inattention, impulsivity, hyperactivity, and oppositional behaviors, but causal inferences are precluded by the correlational nature of the data and generally limited control for potential confounders. Objectives: To determine whether early postnatal oral Mn exposure causes lasting attentional and impulse control deficits in adulthood, and whether continued lifelong Mn exposure exacerbates these effects, using a rat model of environmental Mn exposure. Methods: Neonates were exposed orally to 0, 25 or 50 mg Mn/kg/day during early postnatal life (PND 1–21) or throughout life from PND 1 until the end of the study. In adulthood, the animals were tested on a series of learning and attention tasks using the five-choice serial reaction time task. Results: Early postnatal Mn exposure caused lasting attentional dysfunction due to impairments in attentional preparedness, selective attention, and arousal regulation, whereas associative ability (learning) and impulse control were spared. The presence and severity of these deficits varied with the dose and duration of Mn exposure. Conclusions: This study is the first to show that developmental Mn exposure can cause lasting impairments in focused and selective attention and arousal regulation, and to identify the specific nature of the impairments. Given the importance of attention and arousal regulation in cognitive functioning, these findings substantiate concerns about the adverse effects of developmental Mn exposure in humans. Citation: Beaudin SA, Strupp BJ, Strawderman M, Smith DR. 2017. Early postnatal manganese exposure causes lasting impairment of selective and focused attention and arousal regulation in adult rats. Environ Health Perspect 125:230–237; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP258 PMID:27384154

  10. Nerve growth factor regulates the expression of bradykinin binding sites on adult sensory neurons via the neurotrophin receptor p75.

    PubMed

    Petersen, M; Segond von Banchet, G; Heppelmann, B; Koltzenburg, M

    1998-03-01

    Neurotrophins mediate specific effects on sensory neurons through tyrosine kinase receptors. Most of these neurons also co-express the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR), but its function has remained obscure. We now show that nerve growth factor but not brain-derived neurotrophic factor or neurotrophin-3 selectively increases the expression of bradykinin binding sites on cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons from adult mouse via p75NTR. This up-regulation of bradykinin binding sites did not occur in neurons from mice lacking p75NTR or in neurons from wild-type mice treated with p75NTR-blocking antibody, indicating that tyrosine kinase receptors alone are not sufficient to trigger this physiological neuronal response. Thus, the interaction of nerve growth factor with p75NTR is an important factor contributing to chronic pain conditions.

  11. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-05

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. MECP2 regulates cortical plasticity underlying a learned behaviour in adult female mice

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Keerthi; Lau, Billy Y. B.; Ewall, Gabrielle; Huang, Z. Josh; Shea, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are marked by inappropriate synaptic connectivity early in life, but how disruption of experience-dependent plasticity contributes to cognitive and behavioural decline in adulthood is unclear. Here we show that pup gathering behaviour and associated auditory cortical plasticity are impaired in female Mecp2het mice, a model of Rett syndrome. In response to learned maternal experience, Mecp2het females exhibited transient changes to cortical inhibitory networks typically associated with limited plasticity. Averting these changes in Mecp2het through genetic or pharmacological manipulations targeting the GABAergic network restored gathering behaviour. We propose that pup gathering learning triggers a transient epoch of inhibitory plasticity in auditory cortex that is dysregulated in Mecp2het. In this window of heightened sensitivity to sensory and social cues, Mecp2 mutations suppress adult plasticity independently from their effects on early development. PMID:28098153

  13. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  14. Wnt Signaling Regulates Airway Epithelial Stem Cells in Adult Murine Submucosal Glands.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Thomas J; Anderson, Preston J; Xie, Weiliang; Crooke, Adrianne K; Liu, Xiaoming; Tyler, Scott R; Luo, Meihui; Kusner, David M; Zhang, Yulong; Neff, Traci; Burnette, Daniel C; Walters, Katherine S; Goodheart, Michael J; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-06-24

    Wnt signaling is required for lineage commitment of glandular stem cells (SCs) during tracheal submucosal gland (SMG) morphogenesis from the surface airway epithelium (SAE). Whether similar Wnt-dependent processes coordinate SC expansion in adult SMGs following airway injury remains unknown. We found that two Wnt-reporters in mice (BAT-gal and TCF/Lef:H2B-GFP) are coexpressed in actively cycling SCs of primordial glandular placodes and in a small subset of adult SMG progenitor cells that enter the cell cycle 24 hours following airway injury. At homeostasis, these Wnt reporters showed nonoverlapping cellular patterns of expression in the SAE and SMGs. Following tracheal injury, proliferation was accompanied by dynamic changes in Wnt-reporter activity and the analysis of 56 Wnt-related signaling genes revealed unique temporal changes in expression within proximal (gland-containing) and distal (gland-free) portions of the trachea. Wnt stimulation in vivo and in vitro promoted epithelial proliferation in both SMGs and the SAE. Interestingly, slowly cycling nucleotide label-retaining cells (LRCs) of SMGs were spatially positioned near clusters of BAT-gal positive serous tubules. Isolation and culture of tet-inducible H2B-GFP LRCs demonstrated that SMG LRCs were more proliferative than SAE LRCs and culture expanded SMG-derived progenitor cells outcompeted SAE-derived progenitors in regeneration of tracheal xenograft epithelium using a clonal analysis competition assay. SMG-derived progenitors were also multipotent for cell types in the SAE and formed gland-like structures in xenografts. These studies demonstrate the importance of Wnt signals in modulating SC phenotypes within tracheal niches and provide new insight into phenotypic differences of SMG and SAE SCs. Stem Cells 2016.

  15. Brain apoptosis signaling pathways are regulated by methylphenidate treatment in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Jeremias, Gabriela C; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Mello-Santos, Lis Maira; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-10-02

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for children who have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, the action mechanisms of methylphenidate have not been fully elucidated. Studies have shown a relationship between apoptosis signaling pathways and psychiatric disorders, as well as in therapeutic targets for such disorders. So, we investigated if chronic treatment with MPH at doses of 1, 2 and 10mg/kg could alter the levels of pro-apoptotic protein, Bax, anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and cytochrome c in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH at all doses increased Bax in the cortex; the Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were increased with MPH (1mg/kg) and were reduced with MPH (2 and 10mg/kg); the cytochrome c was reduced in the cortex after treatment with MPH at all doses; in the cerebellum there was an increase of Bax with MPH at all doses, however, there was a reduction of Bcl-2, caspase-3, and cytochrome c with MPH (2 and 10mg/kg); in the striatum the treatment with MPH (10mg/kg) decreased caspase-3 and cytochrome c; treatment with MPH (2 and 10mg/kg) increased Bax and decreased Bcl-2 in the hippocampus; and the caspase-3 and cytochrome c were reduced in the hippocampus with MPH (10mg/kg). In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH influences plasticity in the brain of young and adult rats; however, the effects were dependent of age and brain area, on the one hand activating the initial cascade of apoptosis, increasing Bax and reducing Bcl-2, but otherwise inhibiting apoptosis by reduction of caspase-3 and cytochrome c. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationships between dietary macronutrients and adult neurogenesis in the regulation of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yon, Marianne A; Mauger, Suzanna L; Pickavance, Lucy C

    2013-05-01

    Of the environmental factors which have an impact on body weight, nutrients are most influential. Within normal limits, hypothalamic and related neuronal populations correct perturbations in energy metabolism, to return the body to its nutritional set-point, either through direct response to nutrients or indirectly via peripheral appetite signals. Excessive intake of certain macronutrients, such as simple carbohydrates and SFA, can lead to obesity and attendant metabolic dysfunction, also reflected in alterations in structural plasticity, and, intriguingly,neurogenesis, in some of these brain regions. Neurogenesis, previously thought to occur only in the embryo, is now known to take place in the adult brain, dependent on numerous stimulating and inhibiting factors, including dietary components. Because of classic associations between neurogenesis and the hippocampus, in learning and cognition, this brain region has also been the focus of attention in the study of links between diet and neurogenesis. Recently, however, a more complete picture of this relationship has been building: not only has the hypothalamus been shown to satisfy the criteria for a neurogenic niche, but appetite-related mediators, including circulating hormones, such as leptin and ghrelin, pro-inflammatory cytokines and the endocannabinoid intracellular messengers, are also being examined for their potential role in mediating neurogenic responses to macronutrients. The present review draws together these observations and investigates whether n-3 PUFA may exert their attenuating effects on body weight through the stimulation of adult neurogenesis. Exploration of the effects of nutraceuticals on neurogenic brain regions may encourage the development of new rational therapies in the fight against obesity.

  17. Dual and opposing roles of microRNA-124 in epilepsy are mediated through inflammatory and NRSF-dependent gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gary P.; Dey, Deblina; Chen, Yuncai; Patterson, Katelin P.; Magnetta, Eric J.; Hall, Alicia M.; Dube, Celine M.; Mei, Yu-Tang; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2016-01-01

    Insult-provoked transformation of neuronal networks into epileptic ones involves multiple mechanisms. Intervention studies have identified both dysregulated inflammatory pathways and NRSF-mediated repression of crucial neuronal genes as contributors to epileptogenesis. However, it remains unclear how epilepsy-provoking insults (e.g., prolonged seizures) induce both inflammation and NRSF, and whether common mechanisms exist. We examined miR-124 as a candidate dual regulator of NRSF- and inflammatory-pathways. Status epilepticus (SE) led to reduced miR-124 expression via SIRT1, and in turn MiR-124 repression, via C/EBPα, upregulated NRSF. We tested whether augmenting miR-124 after SE would abort epileptogenesis by preventing inflammation and NRSF upregulation. SE-sustaining animals developed epilepsy but supplementing miR-124 did not modify epileptogenesis. Examining this result further, we found that synthetic miR-124 effectively blocked NRSF upregulation and rescued NRSF target genes, but also augmented microglia activation and inflammatory cytokines. Thus, miR-124 attenuates epileptogenesis via NRSF while promoting epilepsy via inflammation. PMID:26947066

  18. PPARγ mRNA in the adult mouse hypothalamus: distribution and regulation in response to dietary challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Ying; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Wu, Hua; Gautron, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was originally identified as a regulator of peroxisome proliferation and adipocyte differentiation. Emerging evidence suggests that functional PPARγ signaling also occurs within the hypothalamus. However, the exact distribution and identities of PPARγ-expressing hypothalamic cells remains under debate. The present study systematically mapped PPARγ mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. PPARγ mRNA was found to be expressed at high levels outside the hypothalamus including the neocortex, the olfactory bulb, the organ of the vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (VOLT), and the subfornical organ. Within the hypothalamus, PPARγ was present at moderate levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and the ependymal of the 3rd ventricle. In all examined feeding-related hypothalamic nuclei, PPARγ was expressed at very low levels that were close to the limit of detection. Using qPCR techniques, we demonstrated that PPARγ mRNA expression was upregulated in the SCh in response to fasting. Double in situ hybridization further demonstrated that PPARγ was primarily expressed in neurons rather than glia. Collectively, our observations provide a comprehensive map of PPARγ distribution in the intact adult mouse hypothalamus. PMID:26388745

  19. Age-Dependent Netrin-1 Signaling Regulates NG2+ Glial Cell Spatial Homeostasis in Normal Adult Gray Matter.

    PubMed

    Birey, Fikri; Aguirre, Adan

    2015-04-29

    Neuron-glial antigen 2-positive (NG2(+)) glial cells are the most proliferative glia type in the adult CNS, and their tile-like arrangement in adult gray matter is under tight regulation. However, little is known about the cues that govern this unique distribution. To this end, using a NG2(+) glial cell ablation model in mice, we examined the repopulation dynamics of NG2(+) glial cells in the mature and aged mice gray matter. We found that some resident NG2(+) glial cells that escaped depletion rapidly enter the cell cycle to repopulate the cortex with altered spatial distribution. We reveal that netrin-1 signaling is involved in the NG2(+) glial cell early proliferative, late repopulation, and distribution response after ablation in the gray matter. However, ablation of NG2(+) glial cell in older animals failed to stimulate a similar repopulation response, possibly because of a decrease in the sensitivity to netrin-1. Our findings indicate that endogenous netrin-1 plays a role in NG2(+) glial cell homeostasis that is distinct from its role in myelination.

  20. The development of emotion regulation: an fMRI study of cognitive reappraisal in children, adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gross, James J.; Weber, Jochen; Robertson, Elaine R.; Sokol-Hessner, Peter; Ray, Rebecca D.; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to use cognitive reappraisal to regulate emotions is an adaptive skill in adulthood, but little is known about its development. Because reappraisal is thought to be supported by linearly developing prefrontal regions, one prediction is that reappraisal ability develops linearly. However, recent investigations into socio-emotional development suggest that there are non-linear patterns that uniquely affect adolescents. We compared older children (10–13), adolescents (14–17) and young adults (18–22) on a task that distinguishes negative emotional reactivity from reappraisal ability. Behaviorally, we observed no age differences in self-reported emotional reactivity, but linear and quadratic relationships between reappraisal ability and age. Neurally, we observed linear age-related increases in activation in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, previously identified in adult reappraisal. We observed a quadratic pattern of activation with age in regions associated with social cognitive processes like mental state attribution (medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, anterior temporal cortex). In these regions, we observed relatively lower reactivity-related activation in adolescents, but higher reappraisal-related activation. This suggests that (i) engagement of the cognitive control components of reappraisal increases linearly with age and (ii) adolescents may not normally recruit regions associated with mental state attribution, but (iii) this can be reversed with reappraisal instructions. PMID:22228751

  1. RB regulates the production and the survival of newborn neurons in the embryonic and adult dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Vandenbosch, Renaud; Clark, Alysen; Fong, Bensun C; Omais, Saad; Jaafar, Carine; Dugal-Tessier, Delphie; Dhaliwal, Jagroop; Lagace, Diane C; Park, David S; Ghanem, Noël; Slack, Ruth S

    2016-11-01

    In mammals, hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells (DGCs) constitute a particular neuronal population produced both during embryogenesis and adult life, and play key roles in neural plasticity and memory. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating neurogenesis in the dentate lineage throughout development and adulthood are still not well understood. The Retinoblastoma protein (RB), a transcriptional repressor primarily involved in cell cycle control and cell death, plays crucial roles during cortical development but its function in the formation and maintenance of DGCs remains unknown. Here, we show that loss of RB during embryogenesis induces massive ectopic proliferation and delayed cell cycle exit of young DGCs specifically at late developmental stages but without affecting stem cells. This phenotype was partially counterbalanced by increased cell death. Similarly, during adulthood, loss of RB causes ectopic proliferation of newborn DGCs and dramatically impairs their survival. These results demonstrate a crucial role for RB in the generation and the survival of DGCs in the embryonic and the adult brain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mechanisms Underlying CD4+ Treg Immune Regulation in the Adult: From Experiments to Models

    SciTech Connect

    Caridade, Marta; Graca, Luis; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2013-11-18

    To maintain immunological balance the organism has to be tolerant to self while remaining competent to mount an effective immune response against third-party antigens. An important mechanism of this immune regulation involves the action of regulatory T-cell (Tregs). In this mini-review, we discuss some of the known and proposed mechanisms by which Tregs exert their influence in the context of immune regulation, and the contribution of mathematical modeling for these mechanistic studies. These models explore the mechanisms of action of regulatory T cells, and include hypotheses of multiple signals, delivered through simultaneous antigen-presenting cell (APC) conjugation; interaction of feedback loops between APC, Tregs, and effector cells; or production of specific cytokines that act on effector cells. As the field matures, and competing models are winnowed out, it is likely that we will be able to quantify how tolerance-inducing strategies, such as CD4-blockade, affect T-cell dynamics and what mechanisms explain the observed behavior of T-cell based tolerance.

  3. Mechanisms Underlying CD4+ Treg Immune Regulation in the Adult: From Experiments to Models

    PubMed Central

    Caridade, Marta; Graca, Luis; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2013-01-01

    To maintain immunological balance the organism has to be tolerant to self while remaining competent to mount an effective immune response against third-party antigens. An important mechanism of this immune regulation involves the action of regulatory T-cell (Tregs). In this mini-review, we discuss some of the known and proposed mechanisms by which Tregs exert their influence in the context of immune regulation, and the contribution of mathematical modeling for these mechanistic studies. These models explore the mechanisms of action of regulatory T cells, and include hypotheses of multiple signals, delivered through simultaneous antigen-presenting cell (APC) conjugation; interaction of feedback loops between APC, Tregs, and effector cells; or production of specific cytokines that act on effector cells. As the field matures, and competing models are winnowed out, it is likely that we will be able to quantify how tolerance-inducing strategies, such as CD4-blockade, affect T-cell dynamics and what mechanisms explain the observed behavior of T-cell based tolerance. PMID:24302924

  4. Mechanisms Underlying CD4+ Treg Immune Regulation in the Adult: From Experiments to Models

    DOE PAGES

    Caridade, Marta; Graca, Luis; Ribeiro, Ruy M.

    2013-11-18

    To maintain immunological balance the organism has to be tolerant to self while remaining competent to mount an effective immune response against third-party antigens. An important mechanism of this immune regulation involves the action of regulatory T-cell (Tregs). In this mini-review, we discuss some of the known and proposed mechanisms by which Tregs exert their influence in the context of immune regulation, and the contribution of mathematical modeling for these mechanistic studies. These models explore the mechanisms of action of regulatory T cells, and include hypotheses of multiple signals, delivered through simultaneous antigen-presenting cell (APC) conjugation; interaction of feedback loopsmore » between APC, Tregs, and effector cells; or production of specific cytokines that act on effector cells. As the field matures, and competing models are winnowed out, it is likely that we will be able to quantify how tolerance-inducing strategies, such as CD4-blockade, affect T-cell dynamics and what mechanisms explain the observed behavior of T-cell based tolerance.« less

  5. Phosphatase WIP1 regulates adult neurogenesis and WNT signaling during aging

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunhua; Demidov, Oleg N.; Goh, Amanda M.; Virshup, David M.; Lane, David P.; Bulavin, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The number of newly formed neurons declines rapidly during aging, and this decrease in neurogenesis is associated with decreased function of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs). Here, we determined that a WIP1-dependent pathway regulates NPC differentiation and contributes to the age-associated decline of neurogenesis. Specifically, we found that WIP1 is expressed in NPCs of the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) and aged animals with genetically enhanced WIP1 expression exhibited higher NPC numbers and neuronal differentiation compared with aged WT animals. Additionally, augmenting WIP1 expression in aged animals markedly improved neuron formation and rescued a functional defect in fine odor discrimination in aged mice. We identified the WNT signaling pathway inhibitor DKK3 as a key downstream target of WIP1 and found that expression of DKK3 in the SVZ is restricted to NPCs. Using murine reporter strains, we determined that DKK3 inhibits neuroblast formation by suppressing WNT signaling and Dkk3 deletion or pharmacological activation of the WNT pathway improved neuron formation and olfactory function in aged mice. We propose that WIP1 controls DKK3-dependent inhibition of neuronal differentiation during aging and suggest that regulating WIP1 levels could prevent certain aspects of functional decline of the aging brain. PMID:24911145

  6. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  7. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca(2+) homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Arthur M; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D; Tilley, Douglas G; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2016-03-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and L-type Ca(2+) channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca(2+) channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca(2+)]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content but not Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca(2+) uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyryl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca(2+) entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca(2+) channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure.

  8. BAG3 regulates contractility and Ca2+ homeostasis in adult mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Arthur M.; Gordon, Jennifer; Wang, JuFang; Song, Jianliang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Myers, Valerie D.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Gao, Erhe; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Tomar, Dhanendra; Madesh, Muniswamy; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Koch, Walter J.; Su, Feifei; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) is a 575 amino acid anti-apoptotic protein that is constitutively expressed in the heart. BAG3 mutations, including mutations leading to loss of protein, are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, BAG3 levels have been found to be reduced in end-stage non-familial failing myocardium. In contrast to neonatal myocytes in which BAG3 is found in the cytoplasm and involved in protein quality control and apoptosis, in adult mouse left ventricular (LV) myocytes BAG3 co-localized with Na+-K+-ATPase and L-type Ca2+ channels in the sarcolemma and t-tubules. BAG3 co-immunoprecipitated with β1-adrenergic receptor, L-type Ca2+ channels and phospholemman. To simulate decreased BAG3 protein levels observed in human heart failure, we targeted BAG3 by shRNA (shBAG3) in adult LV myocytes. Reducing BAG3 by 55% resulted in reduced contraction and [Ca2+]i transient amplitudes in LV myocytes stimulated with isoproterenol. L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content but not Na+/Ca2+ exchange current (INaCa) or SR Ca2+ uptake were reduced in isoproterenol-treated shBAG3 myocytes. Forskolin or dibutyrl cAMP restored ICa amplitude in shBAG3 myocytes to that observed in WT myocytes, consistent with BAG3 having effects upstream and at the level of the receptor. Resting membrane potential and action potential amplitude were unaffected but APD50 and APD90 were prolonged in shBAG3 myocytes. Protein levels of Ca2+ entry molecules and other important excitation-contraction proteins were unchanged in myocytes with lower BAG3. Our findings that BAG3 is localized at the sarcolemma and t-tubules while modulating myocyte contraction and action potential duration through specific interaction with the β1-adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel provide novel insight into the role of BAG3 in cardiomyopathies and increased arrhythmia risks in heart failure. PMID:26796036

  9. Gestational nicotine exposure regulates expression of AMPA and NMDA receptors and their signaling apparatus in developing and adult rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Dávila-García, Martha I.; Yarl, Weonpo; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.

    2011-01-01

    Untimely activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) by nicotine results in short- and long-term consequences on learning and behavior. In this study, the aim was to determine how prenatal nicotine exposure affects components of glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus during postnatal development. We investigated regulation of both nAChRs and glutamate receptors for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), from postnatal day (P) 1 to P63 after a temporally restricted exposure to saline or nicotine for 14 days in utero. We analyzed postsynaptic density components associated with AMPAR and NMDAR signaling: Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α (CaMKIIα), Calmodulin (CaM), and postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95), as well as presynaptically localized synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25). At P1, there was significantly heightened expression of AMPAR subunit GluR1 but not GluR2, and of NMDAR subunits NR1, NR2a and NR2d but not NR2b. NR2c was not detectable. At P1, the postsynaptic proteins CaMKIIα, CaM, and PSD95 were also significantly upregulated, together with presynaptic SNAP25. This enhanced expression of glutamate receptors and signaling proteins was concomitant with elevated levels of [3H] Epibatidine (EB) binding in prenatal nicotine-exposed hippocampus, indicating that α4β2 nAChR may influence glutamatergic function in the hippocampus at P1. By P14, neither [3H]EB binding nor the expression levels of subunits GluR1, GluR2, NR1, NR2a, NR2b, NR2c, or NR2d seemed changed with prenatal nicotine. However, CaMKIIα was significantly upregulated with nicotine treatment while CaM showed downregulation at P14. The effects of nicotine persisted in young adult brains at P63. They exhibited significantly downregulated GluR2, NR1, and NR2c expression levels in hippocampal homogenates and a considerably muted overall distribution of [3H]AMPA binding in areas CA1, CA2, CA3, and the dentate

  10. Tactical, strategic, and life-goal self-regulation of driving by older adults: development and testing of a questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Lisa J; Eby, David W; Langford, Jim; Charlton, Judith L; St Louis, Renée M; Roberts, J Scott

    2013-09-01

    Appropriate self-regulation of driving - that is, adjusting one's driving patterns by driving less or avoiding specific situations considered challenging - shows promise as a strategy for extending safe driving. However, results on the extent of self-regulatory practices among older drivers vary considerably across studies. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a questionnaire to measure self-regulation at multiple levels of driver performance and decision making, using a sample of older drivers comprised of individuals with clinically-determined functional impairments, as well as older adults recruited from the general population. Results suggest that the questionnaire is a user-friendly instrument for gathering information from older adults about their self-regulatory practices which has good construct validity. Feedback on the questionnaire was positive. Construct validity of the questionnaire was assessed by comparing the recruitment populations along various dimensions on which they might be expected to differ (e.g., self-rated health and functioning, abilities for safe driving, and feelings of driving comfort/safety) and looking for correlations between variables that one would reasonably expect to be correlated. Overall, participants rated their general health and functioning, and abilities for safe driving quite highly. However, participants from the clinic population rated themselves lower than participants from the general population on several abilities including seeing clearly during the day and night, remembering things, and processing information. While participants reported high levels of driving comfort and safety for most driving situations, the clinic population reported lower levels of comfort and safety for every driving circumstance except driving alone. High correlations were found between comfort and safety and the absolute mean scores were nearly identical for each driving circumstance. Finally, the clinic population was more

  11. Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis, browning, and energy balance in adult animals[S

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyi; Lei, Xinnuo; Benson, Tyler; Mintz, James; Xu, Xiaojing; Harris, Ruth B.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Wang, Xiaoling; Chen, Weiqin

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in BSCL2/SEIPIN cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (BSCL2), but the mechanisms whereby Bscl2 regulates adipose tissue function are unclear. Here, we generated adipose tissue (mature) Bscl2 knockout (Ad-mKO) mice, in which Bscl2 was specifically ablated in adipocytes of adult animals, to investigate the impact of acquired Bscl2 deletion on adipose tissue function and energy balance. Ad-mKO mice displayed reduced adiposity and were protected against high fat diet-induced obesity, but not insulin resistance or hepatic steatosis. Gene expression profiling and biochemical assays revealed increased lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue , as well as browning of WAT, owing to induction of cAMP/protein kinase A signaling upon Bscl2 deletion. Interestingly, Bscl2 deletion reduced food intake and downregulated adipose β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) expression. Impaired ADRB3 signaling partially offsets upregulated browning-induced energy expenditure and thermogenesis in Ad-mKO mice housed at ambient temperature. However, this counter-regulatory response was abrogated under thermoneutral conditions, resulting in even greater body mass loss in Ad-mKO mice. These findings suggest that Bscl2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis and β-adrenergic signaling to produce complex effects on adipose tissues and whole-body energy balance. PMID:26269358

  12. Serine-1321-independent regulation of the mu 1 adult skeletal muscle Na+ channel by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Bendahhou, S; Cummins, T R; Potts, J F; Tong, J; Agnew, W S

    1995-12-19

    The adult skeletal muscle Na+ channel mu1 possesses a highly conserved segment between subunit domains III and IV containing a consensus protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation site that, in the neuronal isoform, acts as a master control for "convergent" regulation by PKC and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. It lacks an approximately 200-aa segment between domains I and II though to modulate channel gating. We here demonstrate that mu1 is regulated by PKC (but not cAMP-dependent protein kinase) in a manner distinct from that observed for the neuronal isoforms, suggesting that under the same conditions muscle excitation could be uncoupled from motor neuron input. Maximal phosphorylation by PKC, in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors, reduced peak Na+ currents by approximately 90% by decreasing the maximal conductance, caused a -15 mV shift in the midpoint of steady-state inactivation, and caused a slight speeding of inactivation. Surprisingly, these effects were not affected by mutation of the conserved serine (serine-1321) in the interdomain III-IV loop. the pattern of current suppression and gating modification by PKC resembles the response of muscle Na+ channels to inhibitory factors present in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, and idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuritis.

  13. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Paredes, Niurka; Valencia, Concepción; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Arzate, Dulce-María; Baizabal, José-Manuel; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Fuentes-Hernández, Ayari; Zea-Armenta, Iván; Covarrubias, Luis

    2016-02-24

    Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs), but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+). These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons.

  14. Sex Differences Distinguish Intracortical Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Extracellular Dopamine Levels in the Prefrontal Cortex of Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Locklear, M. N.; Cohen, A. B.; Jone, A.; Kritzer, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    Executive functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are sensitive to local dopamine (DA) levels. Although sex differences distinguish these functions and their dysfunction in disease, the basis for this is unknown. We asked whether sex differences might result from dimorphisms in the glutamatergic mechanisms that regulate PFC DA levels. Using antagonists selective for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, we compared drug effects on in vivo microdialysis DA measurements in the PFC of adult male and female rats. We found that baseline DA levels were similar across sex, AMPA antagonism decreased PFC DA in both sexes, and NMDA antagonism increased DA in males but decreased DA in females. We also found that, at subseizure-producing drug levels, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A antagonism did not affect DA in either sex but that GABA-B antagonism transiently increased PFC DA in both sexes, albeit more so in females. Finally, when NMDA antagonism was coincident with GABA-B antagonism, PFC DA levels in males responded as if to GABA-B antagonism alone, whereas in females, DA effects mirrored those induced by NMDA antagonism. Taken together, these data suggest commonalities and fundamental differences in the intracortical amino acid transmitter mechanisms that regulate DA homeostasis in the male and female rat PFCs. PMID:25260707

  15. Visualizing Changes in Cdkn1c Expression Links Early-Life Adversity to Imprint Mis-regulation in Adults.

    PubMed

    Van de Pette, Mathew; Abbas, Allifia; Feytout, Amelie; McNamara, Gráinne; Bruno, Ludovica; To, Wilson K; Dimond, Andrew; Sardini, Alessandro; Webster, Zoe; McGinty, James; Paul, Eleanor J; Ungless, Mark A; French, Paul M W; Withers, Dominic J; Uren, Anthony; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Merkenschlager, Matthias; John, Rosalind M; Fisher, Amanda G

    2017-01-31

    Imprinted genes are regulated according to parental origin and can influence embryonic growth and metabolism and confer disease susceptibility. Here, we designed sensitive allele-specific reporters to non-invasively monitor imprinted Cdkn1c expression in mice and showed that expression was modulated by environmental factors encountered in utero. Acute exposure to chromatin-modifying drugs resulted in de-repression of paternally inherited (silent) Cdkn1c alleles in embryos that was temporary and resolved after birth. In contrast, deprivation of maternal dietary protein in utero provoked permanent de-repression of imprinted Cdkn1c expression that was sustained into adulthood and occurred through a folate-dependent mechanism of DNA methylation loss. Given the function of imprinted genes in regulating behavior and metabolic processes in adults, these results establish imprinting deregulation as a credible mechanism linking early-life adversity to later-life outcomes. Furthermore, Cdkn1c-luciferase mice offer non-invasive tools to identify factors that disrupt epigenetic processes and strategies to limit their long-term impact.

  16. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-Paredes, Niurka; Valencia, Concepción; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Arzate, Dulce-María; Baizabal, José-Manuel; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Fuentes-Hernández, Ayari; Zea-Armenta, Iván; Covarrubias, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs), but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+). These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26912775

  17. Fractalkine and CX3CR1 regulate hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Bachstetter, Adam D.; Morganti, Josh M.; Jernberg, Jennifer; Schlunk, Andrea; Mitchell, Staten H.; Brewster, Kaelin W.; Hudson, Charles E.; Cole, Michael J; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Bickford, Paula C.; Gemma, Carmelina

    2010-01-01

    Microglia have neuroprotective capacities, yet chronic activation can promote neurotoxic inflammation. Neuronal fractalkine (FKN), acting on CX3CR1, has been shown to suppress excessive microglia activation. We found that disruption in FKN/ CX3CR1 signaling in young adult rodents decreased survival and proliferation of neural progenitor cells through IL-1β. Aged rats were found to have decreased levels of hippocampal FKN protein; moreover, interruption of CX3CR1 function in these animals did not affect neurogenesis. The age-related loss of FKN could be restored by exogenous FKN reversing the age-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. There were no measureable changes in young animals by the addition of exogenous FKN. The results suggest that FKN/ CX3CR1 signaling has a regulatory role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis via mechanisms that involve indirect modification of the niche environment. As elevated neuroinflammation is associated with many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, enhancing FKN/ CX3CR1 interactions could provide an alternative therapeutic approach to slow age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:20018408

  18. Fractalkine and CX 3 CR1 regulate hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Bachstetter, Adam D; Morganti, Josh M; Jernberg, Jennifer; Schlunk, Andrea; Mitchell, Staten H; Brewster, Kaelin W; Hudson, Charles E; Cole, Michael J; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Bickford, Paula C; Gemma, Carmelina

    2011-11-01

    Microglia have neuroprotective capacities, yet chronic activation can promote neurotoxic inflammation. Neuronal fractalkine (FKN), acting on CX(3)CR1, has been shown to suppress excessive microglia activation. We found that disruption in FKN/CX(3)CR1 signaling in young adult rodents decreased survival and proliferation of neural progenitor cells through IL-1β. Aged rats were found to have decreased levels of hippocampal FKN protein; moreover, interruption of CX(3)CR1 function in these animals did not affect neurogenesis. The age-related loss of FKN could be restored by exogenous FKN reversing the age-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. There were no measureable changes in young animals by the addition of exogenous FKN. The results suggest that FKN/CX(3)CR1 signaling has a regulatory role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis via mechanisms that involve indirect modification of the niche environment. As elevated neuroinflammation is associated with many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, enhancing FKN/CX(3)CR1 interactions could provide an alternative therapeutic approach to slow age-related neurodegeneration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Cadmium exposure disrupts GABA and taurine regulation of prolactin secretion in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Caride, A; Fernández-Pérez, B; Cabaleiro, T; Esquifino, A I; Lafuente, A

    2009-03-28

    This work was undertaken to evaluate the possible effects of cadmium exposure on 24 h changes of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine median eminence and pituitary contents. Also the possible alterations of the regulatory mechanisms of GABA and taurine on prolactin secretion were evaluated. Adult male rats were given cadmium at a dose of 25 mg/l of cadmium chloride in the drinking water for 30 days. Control age-matched rats received cadmium free water. Metal exposure induced the appearance of a maximal value of prolactin at 08:00 h. In median eminence, cadmium abolished the GABA and taurine maximal values and decreased GABA and taurine mean levels. In the anterior pituitary, cadmium treatment phase advanced 12 h the peak observed in controls at 00:00 h for both amino acids. There was a positive correlation between GABA and taurine contents in median eminence and the anterior pituitary in both control and cadmium-exposed animals. However, the correlation between GABA or/and taurine with prolactin levels disappeared in cadmium-exposed animals. These results suggest that cadmium exposure affects GABA and taurine daily pattern in the median eminence and anterior pituitary, and those changes explain, at least in part, the modification in the regulatory pattern of prolactin secretion.

  20. p53-independent mechanisms regulate the P2-MDM2 promoter in adult astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, M; Poulogiannis, G; Liu, L; Bäcklund, L M; Pearson, D M; Ichimura, K; Collins, V P

    2008-10-07

    The MDM2 gene is amplified and/or overexpressed in about 10% of glioblastomas and constitutes one of a number of ways the p53 pathway is disrupted in these tumours. MDM2 encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates several cell proteins by binding and/or ubiquitinating them, with p53 being a well-established partner. MDM2 has two promoters, P1 and P2 that give rise to transcripts with distinct 5' untranslated regions. Transcription from P2 is believed to be controlled by p53 and a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP309, T>G) in P2 is reported to be associated with increased risk for, and early development of, malignancies. The use of P1 and P2 has not been investigated in gliomas. We used RT-PCR to study P1- and P2-MDM2 transcript expression in astrocytic tumours, xenografts and cell lines with known MDM2, TP53 and p14(ARF) gene status. Both promoters were used in all genetic backgrounds including the use of the P2 promoter in TP53 null cells, indicating a p53-independent induction of transcription. Transcripts from the P1 promoter formed a greater proportion of the total MDM2 transcripts in tumours with MDM2 amplification, despite these tumours having two wild-type TP53 alleles. Examination of SNP309 in glioblastoma patients showed a borderline association with survival but no apparent correlation with age at diagnosis nor with TP53 and p14(ARF) status of their tumours. Our findings also indicate that elevated MDM2 mRNA levels in tumours with MDM2 amplification are preferentially driven by the P1 promoter and that the P2 promoter is not only regulated by p53 but also by other transcription factor(s).

  1. Gap Junctions Enhance the Antiproliferative Effect of MicroRNA-124-3p in Glioblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Suzhi, Zhang; Liang, Tao; Yuexia, Peng; Lucy, Liu; Xiaoting, Hong; Yuan, Zhang; Qin, Wang

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) holds promise as a novel therapeutic tool for cancer treatment. However, the transfection efficiency of current delivery systems represents a bottleneck for clinical applications. Here, we demonstrate that gap junctions mediate an augmentative effect on the antiproliferation mediated by miR-124-3p in U87 and C6 glioblastoma cells. The functional inhibition of gap junctions using either siRNA or pharmacological inhibition eliminated the miR-124-3p-mediated antiproliferation, whereas the enhancement of gap junctions with retinoic acid treatment augmented this miR-124-3p-mediated antiproliferation. A similar effect was observed in glioblastoma xenograft models. More importantly, patch clamp and co-culture assays demonstrated the transmission of miR-124-3p through gap junction channels into adjacent cells. In further exploring the impact of gap junction-mediated transport of miR-124-3p on miR-124-3p target pathways, we found that miR-124-3p inhibited glioblastoma cell growth in part by decreasing the protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0 /G1 phase; moreover, pharmacological regulation of gap junctions affected this cell cycle arrest. In conclusion, our results indicate that the "bystander" effects of functional gap junctions composed of connexin 43 enhance the antitumor effect of miR-124-3p in glioblastoma cells by transferring miR-124-3p to adjacent cells, thereby enhancing G0 /G1 cell cycle arrest. These observations provide a new guiding strategy for the clinical application of miRNA therapy in tumor treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Notch regulates blastema proliferation and prevents differentiation during adult zebrafish fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Münch, Juliane; González-Rajal, Alvaro; de la Pompa, José Luis

    2013-04-01

    Zebrafish have the capacity to regenerate several organs, including the heart and fins. Fin regeneration is epimorphic, involving the formation at the amputation plane of a mass of undifferentiated, proliferating mesenchymal progenitor-like cells, called blastema. This tissue provides all the cell types that form the fin, so that after damage or amputation the fin pattern and structure are fully restored. How blastema cells remain in this progenitor-like state is poorly understood. Here, we show that the Notch pathway plays an essential role during fin regeneration. Notch signalling is activated during blastema formation and remains active throughout the regeneration process. Chemical inhibition or morpholino-mediated knockdown of Notch signalling impairs fin regeneration via decreased proliferation accompanied by reduced expression of Notch target genes in the blastema. Conversely, overexpression of a constitutively active form of the Notch1 receptor (N1ICD) in the regenerating fin leads to increased proliferation and to the expansion of the blastema cell markers msxe and msxb, as well as increased expression of the proliferation regulator aldh1a2. This blastema expansion prevents regenerative fin outgrowth, as indicated by the reduction in differentiating osteoblasts and the inhibition of bone regeneration. We conclude that Notch signalling maintains blastema cells in a plastic, undifferentiated and proliferative state, an essential requirement for fin regeneration.

  3. Up-regulation of Vps4A promotes neuronal apoptosis after intracerebral hemorrhage in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianbing; Yuan, Debin; Xie, Lili; Tao, Xuelei; Duan, Chenwei; Bao, Yifeng; He, Yunfeng; Ge, Jianbin; Lu, Hongjian

    2017-04-01

    Vps4, vacuolar protein sorting 4, belongs to ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities (AAA) protein family which is made up of Vps4A and Vps4B. Previous studies demonstrated that Vps4A plays vital roles in diverse aspects such as virus budding, the efficient transport of H-Ras to the PM (plasma membrane) and the involvement in the MVB (multivesiculate bodies) pathway. Interestingly, Vps4A is also expressed in the brain. However, the distribution and function of Vps4A in ICH diseases remain unclear. In this study, we show that Vps4A may be involved in neuronal apoptosis during pathophysiological processes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Based on the results of Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we found a remarkable up-regulation of Vps4A expression surrounding the hematoma after ICH. Double labeled immunofluorescence showed that Vps4A was co-expressed with NeuN but rarely with astrocytes and microglia. Morever, we detected that neuronal apoptosis marker active caspase-3 had co-localizations with Vps4A. Additionaly, Vps4A knockdown in vitro specifically leads to decreasing neuronal apoptosis coupled with increased Akt phosphorylation. All datas suggested that Vps4A was involved in promoting neuronal apoptosis via inhibiting Akt phosphorylation after ICH.

  4. Regulation of haematopoietic stem cell proliferation by stimulatory factors produced by murine fetal and adult liver.

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, K A; Briscoe, C V; Thomas, D B; Riches, A C

    1990-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells in murine fetal liver are in a proliferative state unlike those in normal bone marrow which are quiescent. A regulatory activity is produced by cells in the fetal liver which will switch quiescent normal bone marrow haematopoietic stem cells into cell cycle in vitro. This regulator from Day 15 fetal liver cells is produced by adherent cells and by cells fractionated on a Percoll gradient in the 1.064 and 1.076 g per cm3 density bands but not in the 1.123 g per cm3 band. Colony-stimulating factor cannot be detected in the supernatants containing the stem cell regulatory activity. The stimulator can be detected in supernatants produced from cell suspensions of liver cells at Day 15 and Day 17 of gestation and 24 hours and 72 hours after birth. However by 1 week after birth the production of the stimulator decreases and is undetectable 3 and 10 weeks after birth. The total numbers of haematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) in fetal liver decrease from Day 15 of gestation and only small numbers are present 1 week after birth. Thus the decline in the production of haematopoietic stem cell proliferation stimulator correlates with the decrease in haematopoietic stem cell numbers in the liver through gestation and after birth. PMID:2323992

  5. The Effects of Self-Regulated Strategy Development on the Writing of Expository Essays for Adults with Written Expression Difficulties: Preparing for the GED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ann Bassett; Mason, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    A multiple-probe, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used to examine the writing performance of four low-achieving adult students with and without disabilities enrolled in general equivalency diploma (GED) preparatory classes. Students' writing was evaluated before instruction and after self-regulated strategy development (SRSD)…

  6. Construct Validation of a Program to Increase Use of Self-Regulation for Physical Activity among Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Silfee, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have revealed that overweight adults with type 2 diabetes have low rates of physical activity and are resistant to change. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use construct validation of intervention methods to examine the impact of a 4-week behavioral intervention on the use of self-regulation skills for physical…

  7. The Effects of Self-Regulated Strategy Development on the Writing of Expository Essays for Adults with Written Expression Difficulties: Preparing for the GED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ann Bassett; Mason, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    A multiple-probe, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used to examine the writing performance of four low-achieving adult students with and without disabilities enrolled in general equivalency diploma (GED) preparatory classes. Students' writing was evaluated before instruction and after self-regulated strategy development (SRSD)…

  8. Construct Validation of a Program to Increase Use of Self-Regulation for Physical Activity among Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Silfee, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have revealed that overweight adults with type 2 diabetes have low rates of physical activity and are resistant to change. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use construct validation of intervention methods to examine the impact of a 4-week behavioral intervention on the use of self-regulation skills for physical…

  9. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  10. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  11. Epac activator critically regulates action potential duration by decreasing potassium current in rat adult ventricle.

    PubMed

    Brette, Fabien; Blandin, Erick; Simard, Christophe; Guinamard, Romain; Sallé, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Sympathetic stimulation is an important modulator of cardiac function via the classic cAMP-dependent signaling pathway, PKA. Recently, this paradigm has been challenged by the discovery of a family of guanine nucleotide exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac), acting in parallel to the classic signaling pathway. In cardiac myocytes, Epac activation is known to modulate Ca(2+) cycling yet their actions on cardiac ionic currents remain poorly characterized. This study attempts to address this paucity of information using the patch clamp technique to record action potential (AP) and ionic currents on rat ventricular myocytes. Epac was selectively activated by 8-CPT-AM (acetoxymethyl ester form of 8-CPT). AP amplitude, maximum depolarization rate and resting membrane amplitude were unaltered by 8-CPT-AM, strongly suggesting that Na(+) current and inward rectifier K(+) current are not regulated by Epac. In contrast, AP duration was significantly increased by 8-CPT-AM (prolongation of duration at 50% and 90% of repolarization by 41±10% and 43±8% respectively, n=11). L-type Ca(2+) current density was unaltered by 8-CPT-AM (n=16) so this cannot explain the action potential lengthening. However, the steady state component of K(+) current was significantly inhibited by 8-CPT-AM (-38±6%, n=15), while the transient outward K(+) current was unaffected by 8-CPT-AM. These effects were PKA-independent since they were observed in the presence of PKA inhibitor KT5720. Isoprenaline (100nM) induced a significant prolongation of AP duration, even in the presence of KT5720. This study provides the first evidence that the cAMP-binding protein Epac critically modulates cardiac AP duration by decreasing steady state K(+) current. These observations may be relevant to diseases in which Epac is upregulated, like cardiac hypertrophy.

  12. BDNF deficiency and young-adult methamphetamine induce sex-specific effects on prepulse inhibition regulation

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Elizabeth E.; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, yet its role in the development of specific symptoms is unclear. Methamphetamine (METH) users have an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, and METH-treated animals have been used extensively as a model to study the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether METH treatment in BDNF heterozygous (HET) mutant mice has cumulative effects on sensorimotor gating, including the disruptive effects of psychotropic drugs. BDNF HETs and wildtype (WT) littermates were treated during young adulthood with METH and, following a 2-week break, prepulse inhibition (PPI) was examined. At baseline, BDNF HETs showed reduced PPI compared to WT mice irrespective of METH pre-treatment. An acute challenge with amphetamine (AMPH) disrupted PPI but male BDNF HETs were more sensitive to this effect, irrespective of METH pre-treatment. In contrast, female mice treated with METH were less sensitive to the disruptive effects of AMPH, and there were no effects of BDNF genotype. Similar changes were not observed in the response to an acute apomorphine (APO) or MK-801 challenge. These results show that genetically-induced reduction of BDNF caused changes in a behavioral endophenotype relevant to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, major sex differences were observed in the effects of a psychotropic drug challenge on this behavior. These findings suggest sex differences in the effects of BDNF depletion and METH treatment on the monoamine signaling pathways that regulate PPI. Given that these same pathways are thought to contribute to the expression of positive symptoms in schizophrenia, this work suggests that there may be significant sex differences in the pathophysiology underlying these symptoms. Elucidating these sex differences may be important for our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and developing better treatments strategies for the

  13. Developmental fluoxetine exposure increases behavioral despair and alters epigenetic regulation of the hippocampal BDNF gene in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Fabien; Pawluski, Jodi L; Homberg, Judith R; Machiels, Barbie; Kroeze, Yvet; Kumar, Neha; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Kenis, Gunter; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of infants are exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. Perinatal exposure to SSRI medications alter neuroplasticity and increase depressive- and anxiety-related behaviors, particularly in male offspring as little work has been done in female offspring to date. The long-term effects of SSRI on development can also differ with previous exposure to prenatal stress, a model of maternal depression. Because of the limited work done on the role of developmental SSRI exposure on neurobehavioral outcomes in female offspring, the aim of the present study was to investigate how developmental fluoxetine exposure affects anxiety and depression-like behavior, as well as the regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the hippocampus of adult female offspring. To do this female Sprague-Dawley rat offspring were exposed to prenatal stress and fluoxetine via the dam, for a total of four groups of female offspring: 1) No Stress+Vehicle, 2) No Stress+Fluoxetine, 3) Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, and 4) Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Primary results show that, in adult female offspring, developmental SSRI exposure significantly increases behavioral despair measures on the forced swim test, decreases hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels, and increases levels of the repressive histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylated mark at the corresponding promoter. There was also a significant negative correlation between hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels and immobility in the forced swim test. No effects of prenatal stress or developmental fluoxetine exposure were seen on tests of anxiety-like behavior. This research provides important evidence for the long-term programming effects of early-life exposure to SSRIs on female offspring, particularily with regard to affect-related behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms.

  14. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (p<0.05) and blood glucose levels were significantly (p<0.001) decreased after short term fasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in adult male rhesus monkeys which were fasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after 48h fasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  16. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers

    PubMed Central

    Brus, Maïna; Meurisse, Maryse; Keller, Matthieu; Lévy, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the DG was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the postpartum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the DG the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the DG. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor. PMID:24600367

  17. Different regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in Western house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Fabienne; Hauser, Thomas; Lindholm, Anna K; Cameron, Heather A; Slomianka, Lutz; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Amrein, Irmgard

    2012-02-14

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) of laboratory rodents is enhanced by physical exercise in a running wheel. However, little is known about modulation of AHN in wild-living rodent species. The finding that AHN cannot be modulated by voluntary exercise in wild wood mice suggests that AHN may be regulated differently under natural conditions than in laboratory adapted animals. In order to minimize genetic influences, we aimed to investigate the genetically closest wild-living relatives of laboratory mice. Here, C57BL/6 mice and F1 offspring of wild house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) were tested in two different running paradigms: voluntary running and running-for-food--a condition in which mice had to run for their daily allowance of food. In house mice, we found a non-significant trend towards increased numbers of proliferating cells and doublecortin-positive immature neurons in both voluntary runners and runners-for-food. Voluntary running in C57BL/6 mice resulted in a 30% increase in cell proliferation and a pronounced 70% increase in doublecortin-positive cells. C57BL/6 runners-for-food ran as much as voluntary runners, but they showed no enhancement of cell proliferation, a small increase in the number of doublecortin-positive cells and more pyknotic cells compared to controls. Taken together, these findings suggest that motivational aspects of running are critical determinants of the increased cell proliferation in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, running has smaller and context-independent effects in house mice. The findings imply a difference in the regulation of AHN in C57BL/6 mice and their wild-derived conspecifics.

  18. Early postnatal stress alters extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in the corticolimbic system modulating emotional circuitry in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shuhei; Saito, Yasuhiro; Yanagawa, Yoshiki; Otani, Satoru; Hiraide, Sachiko; Shimamura, Kei-ichi; Matsumoto, Machiko; Togashi, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    The present study elucidated whether early life stress alters the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway that underlies fear retrieval and fear extinction based on a contextual fear conditioning paradigm, using a juvenile stress model. Levels of phospho-ERK (pERK), the active form of ERK, increased after fear retrieval in the hippocampal CA1 region but not in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). ERK activation in the CA1 following fear retrieval was not observed in adult rats who received aversive footshock (FS) stimuli during the second postnatal period (2wFS), which exhibited low levels of freezing. In fear extinction, pERK levels in the CA1 were increased by repeated extinction trials, but they were not altered after extinction retrieval. In contrast, pERK levels in the mPFC did not change during extinction training, but were enhanced after extinction retrieval. These findings were compatible in part with electrophysiological data showing that synaptic transmission in the CA1 field and mPFC was enhanced during extinction training and extinction retrieval, respectively. ERK activation in the CA1 and mPFC associated with extinction processes did not occur in rats that received FS stimuli during the third postnatal period (3wFS), which exhibited sustained freezing behavior. The repressed ERK signaling and extinction deficit observed in the 3wFS group were ameliorated by treatment with the partial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor agonist D-cycloserine. These findings suggest that early postnatal stress induced the downregulation of ERK signaling in distinct brain regions through region-specific regulation, which may lead to increased behavioral abnormalities or emotional vulnerabilities in adulthood.

  19. N-cadherin regulates molecular organization of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic circuits in adult hippocampus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nikitczuk, Jessica S.; Patil, Shekhar B.; Matikainen-Ankney, Bridget A.; Scarpa, Joseph; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    N-cadherin and β-catenin form a transsynaptic adhesion complex required for spine and synapse development. In adulthood, N-cadherin mediates persistent synaptic plasticity, but whether the role of N-cadherin at mature synapses is similar to that at developing synapses is unclear. To address this, we conditionally ablated N-cadherin from excitatory forebrain synapses in mice starting in late postnatal life and examined hippocampal structure and function in adulthood. In the absence of N-cadherin, β-catenin levels were reduced, but numbers of excitatory synapses were unchanged, and there was no impact on number or shape of dendrites or spines. However, the composition of synaptic molecules was altered. Levels of GluA1 and its scaffolding protein PSD95 were diminished and the density of immunolabeled puncta was decreased, without effects on other glutamate receptors and their scaffolding proteins. Additionally, loss of N-cadherin at excitatory synapses triggered increases in the density of markers for inhibitory synapses and decreased severity of hippocampal seizures. Finally, adult mutant mice were profoundly impaired in hippocampal-dependent memory for spatial episodes. These results demonstrate a novel function for the N-cadherin/β-catenin complex in regulating ionotropic receptor composition of excitatory synapses, an appropriate balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic proteins and the maintenance of neural circuitry necessary to generate flexible yet persistent cognitive and synaptic function. PMID:24753442

  20. N-cadherin regulates molecular organization of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic circuits in adult hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nikitczuk, Jessica S; Patil, Shekhar B; Matikainen-Ankney, Bridget A; Scarpa, Joseph; Shapiro, Matthew L; Benson, Deanna L; Huntley, George W

    2014-08-01

    N-Cadherin and β-catenin form a transsynaptic adhesion complex required for spine and synapse development. In adulthood, N-cadherin mediates persistent synaptic plasticity, but whether the role of N-cadherin at mature synapses is similar to that at developing synapses is unclear. To address this, we conditionally ablated N-cadherin from excitatory forebrain synapses in mice starting in late postnatal life and examined hippocampal structure and function in adulthood. In the absence of N-cadherin, β-catenin levels were reduced, but numbers of excitatory synapses were unchanged, and there was no impact on number or shape of dendrites or spines. However, the composition of synaptic molecules was altered. Levels of GluA1 and its scaffolding protein PSD95 were diminished and the density of immunolabeled puncta was decreased, without effects on other glutamate receptors and their scaffolding proteins. Additionally, loss of N-cadherin at excitatory synapses triggered increases in the density of markers for inhibitory synapses and decreased severity of hippocampal seizures. Finally, adult mutant mice were profoundly impaired in hippocampal-dependent memory for spatial episodes. These results demonstrate a novel function for the N-cadherin/β-catenin complex in regulating ionotropic receptor composition of excitatory synapses, an appropriate balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic proteins and the maintenance of neural circuitry necessary to generate flexible yet persistent cognitive and synaptic function.

  1. Regulation of autophagic cell death by glycogen synthase kinase-3β in adult hippocampal neural stem cells following insulin withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ha, Shinwon; Ryu, Hye Young; Chung, Kyung Min; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2015-05-19

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) hold great potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, programmed cell death (PCD) provoked by the harsh conditions evident in the diseased brain greatly undermines the potential of NSCs. Currently, the mechanisms of PCD that effect NSCs remain largely unknown. We have previously reported that hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells derived from the adult rat brain undergo autopahgic cell death (ACD) following insulin withdrawal without hallmarks of apoptosis despite their normal apoptotic capabilities. In this study, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) induces ACD in insulin-deprived HCN cells. Both pharmacological and genetic inactivation of GSK-3β significantly decreased ACD, while activation of GSK-3β increased autophagic flux and caused more cell death without inducing apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. In contrast, knockdown of GSK-3α barely affected ACD, lending further support to the critical role of GSK-3β. Collectively, these data demonstrate that GSK-3β is a key regulator of ACD in HCN cells following insulin withdrawal. The absence of apoptotic indices in GSK-3β-induced cell death in insulin-deprived HCN cells corroborates the notion that HCN cell death following insulin withdrawal represents the genuine model of ACD in apoptosis-intact mammalian cells and identifies GSK-3β as a key negative effector of NSC survival downstream of insulin signaling.

  2. Synthetic Cannabis Overdose and Withdrawal in a Young Adult: A Case Report, Commentary on Regulation, and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Samaan, John; Ferrer, Gerardo F; Akinyemi, Boye; Junquera, Patricia; Oms, Juan; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Marijuana has been used for its psychotropic effects including enhanced relaxation and perceptual alterations. However, the use of synthetic marijuana (SM) leads to more frequent and drastic side effects than the typical use of regular marijuana, owing to the fact that SM has a shorter duration and an earlier peak of action. Despite all the potential adverse health effects associated with SM use, current health policies on SM are very limited. It is believed that the popularity of SM has increased, due to its easy accessibility in the US and lack of detection in typical urine drug screens for THC. Case Report. One case presented is of a young adult patient, with histories of recurrent synthetic cannabis and recreational cannabis use, who had developed drastic physiological and psychiatric symptoms, including the development of acute-onset psychosis. Conclusion/Discussion. This case, as many others nationwide, exemplifies the impact of synthetic cannabinoid use and abuse in adolescents. Side effects and adverse health consequences of synthetic cannabinoid use warrant stricter regulations and policies in order to decrease psychiatric hospital admissions and associated healthcare costs.

  3. Synthetic Cannabis Overdose and Withdrawal in a Young Adult: A Case Report, Commentary on Regulation, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Gerardo F.; Akinyemi, Boye; Junquera, Patricia; Oms, Juan; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Marijuana has been used for its psychotropic effects including enhanced relaxation and perceptual alterations. However, the use of synthetic marijuana (SM) leads to more frequent and drastic side effects than the typical use of regular marijuana, owing to the fact that SM has a shorter duration and an earlier peak of action. Despite all the potential adverse health effects associated with SM use, current health policies on SM are very limited. It is believed that the popularity of SM has increased, due to its easy accessibility in the US and lack of detection in typical urine drug screens for THC. Case Report. One case presented is of a young adult patient, with histories of recurrent synthetic cannabis and recreational cannabis use, who had developed drastic physiological and psychiatric symptoms, including the development of acute-onset psychosis. Conclusion/Discussion. This case, as many others nationwide, exemplifies the impact of synthetic cannabinoid use and abuse in adolescents. Side effects and adverse health consequences of synthetic cannabinoid use warrant stricter regulations and policies in order to decrease psychiatric hospital admissions and associated healthcare costs. PMID:27777807

  4. The Drosophila Prosecretory Transcription Factor dimmed Is Dynamically Regulated in Adult Enteroendocrine Cells and Protects Against Gram-Negative Infection.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Katherine; Park, Dongkook; Taghert, Paul H; Micchelli, Craig A

    2015-05-20

    The endocrine system employs peptide hormone signals to translate environmental changes into physiological responses. The diffuse endocrine system embedded in the gastrointestinal barrier epithelium is one of the largest and most diverse endocrine tissues. Furthermore, it is the only endocrine tissue in direct physical contact with the microbial environment of the gut lumen. However, it remains unclear how this sensory epithelium responds to specific pathogenic challenges in a dynamic and regulated manner. We demonstrate that the enteroendocrine cells of the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut display a transient, sensitive, and systemic induction of the prosecretory factor dimmed (dimm) in response to the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila (Pe). In enteroendocrine cells, dimm controls the levels of the targets Phm, dcat-4, and the peptide hormone, Allatostatin A. Finally, we identify dimm as a host factor that protects against Pe infection and controls the expression of antimicrobial peptides. We propose that dimm provides "gain" in enteroendocrine output during the adaptive response to episodic pathogen exposure. Copyright © 2015 Beebe et al.

  5. Short-Term Regulation of Excitation-Contraction Coupling by the β1a Subunit in Adult Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    García, María C.; Carrillo, Elba; Galindo, José M.; Hernández, Ascensión; Copello, Julio A.; Fill, Michael; Sánchez, Jorge A.

    2005-01-01

    The β1a subunit of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated Ca2+ channel plays a fundamental role in the targeting of the channel to the tubular system as well as in channel function. To determine whether this cytosolic auxiliary subunit is also a regulatory protein of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo, we pressure-injected the β1a subunit into intact adult mouse muscle fibers and recorded, with Fluo-3 AM, the intracellular Ca2+ signal induced by the action potential. We found that the β1a subunit significantly increased, within minutes, the amplitude of Ca2+ release without major changes in its time course. β1a subunits with the carboxy-terminus region deleted did not show an effect on Ca2+ release. The possibility that potentiation of Ca2+ release is due to a direct interaction between the β1a subunit and the ryanodine receptor was ruled out by bilayer experiments of RyR1 single-channel currents and also by Ca2+ flux experiments. Our data suggest that the β1a subunit is capable of regulating E-C coupling in the short term and that the integrity of the carboxy-terminus region is essential for its modulatory effect. PMID:16183888

  6. Patterns of Level and Change in Self-Reported Driving Behaviors Among Older Adults: Who Self-Regulates?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jerri D.; Small, Brent J.; Andel, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. The present study investigated patterns of self-reported driving habits among healthy older adults over 5 years, as well as characteristics that distinguished subgroups with different patterns. Methods. Participants were drivers from the control group of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study at the baseline assessment (N = 597). The outcome was a composite of driving frequency, driving space, and perceived driving difficulty. Growth mixture models identified classes of participants with different baseline scores and change trajectories, and classes were compared in terms of baseline sensory, physical, and cognitive functioning. Results. A 3-class model was indicated, consisting of 2 classes with intercept differences and stability over time, “above-average stable” (39%) and “average stable” drivers (44%), and 1 class with a lower intercept and negative slope, “decreasers” (17%). Relative to stable drivers, decreasers exhibited significantly more depressive symptoms and poorer self-rated health, balance, everyday functioning, and speed of processing after controlling for age and education (p < .05). Discussion. The majority of older drivers maintained their driving over time at different levels, whereas a subgroup of individuals with poorer baseline functioning self-regulated by reducing their driving. Future studies should determine how such patterns affect driving safety. PMID:22138270

  7. Duration of prepupal summer dormancy regulates synchronization of adult diapause with winter temperatures in bees of the genus Osmia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Osmia (Osmia) bees are strictly univoltine and winter as diapausing adults. In these species, the timing of adult eclosion with the onset of wintering conditions is critical, because adults exposed to long pre-wintering periods show increased lipid loss and winter mortality. Populations from warm ar...

  8. p300/β-Catenin Interactions Regulate Adult Progenitor Cell Differentiation Downstream of WNT5a/Protein Kinase C (PKC)*

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Megan E.; Zhou, Beiyun; Solomon, Nicola; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Li, Changgong; Nguyen, Cu; Liu, Yixin; Pan, Jie-hong; Minoo, Parviz; Crandall, Edward D.; Brody, Steven L.; Kahn, Michael; Borok, Zea

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of stem/progenitor cell-progeny relationships is required for tissue homeostasis during normal turnover and repair. Wnt signaling is implicated in both maintenance and differentiation of adult stem/progenitor cells, yet how this pathway serves these dichotomous roles remains enigmatic. We previously proposed a model suggesting that specific interaction of β-catenin with either of the homologous Kat3 co-activators, p300 or CREB-binding protein, differentially regulates maintenance versus differentiation of embryonic stem cells. Limited knowledge of endogenous mechanisms driving differential β-catenin/co-activator interactions and their role in adult somatic stem/progenitor cell maintenance versus differentiation led us to explore this process in defined models of adult progenitor cell differentiation. We focused primarily on alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cells, progenitors of distal lung epithelium, and identified a novel axis whereby WNT5a/protein kinase C (PKC) signaling regulates specific β-catenin/co-activator interactions to promote adult progenitor cell differentiation. p300/β-catenin but not CBP/β-catenin interaction increases as AT2 cells differentiate to a type I (AT1) cell-like phenotype. Additionally, p300 transcriptionally activates AT1 cell-specific gene Aqp-5. IQ-1, a specific inhibitor of p300/β-catenin interaction, prevents differentiation of not only primary AT2 cells, but also tracheal epithelial cells, and C2C12 myoblasts. p300 phosphorylation at Ser-89 enhances p300/β-catenin interaction, concurrent with alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. WNT5a, a traditionally non-canonical WNT ligand regulates Ser-89 phosphorylation and p300/β-catenin interactions in a PKC-dependent manner, likely involving PKCζ. These studies identify a novel intersection of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling in adult progenitor cell differentiation that has important implications for targeting β-catenin to modulate adult progenitor cell

  9. Cadence, energy expenditure, and gait symmetry during music-prompted and self-regulated walking in adults with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Rowe, David A; McMinn, David; Peacock, Leslie; Buis, Arjan W P; Sutherland, Rona; Henderson, Emma; Hewitt, Allan

    2014-02-01

    Walking cadence has shown promise for estimating walking intensity in healthy adults. Auditory cues have been shown to improve gait symmetry in populations with movement disorders. We investigated the walking cadence-energy expenditure relationship in unilateral transtibial amputees (TTAs), and the potential of music cues for regulating walking cadence and improving gait symmetry. Seventeen unilateral TTAs performed 2 5-min treadmill walking trials, followed by 2 5-min overground walking trials (self-regulated "brisk" intensity, and while attempting to match a moderate-tempo digital music cue). Walking cadence significantly (P < .001) and accurately (R(2) = .55, SEE = 0.50 METs) predicted energy expenditure, and a cadence of 86 steps·min(-1) was equivalent to a 3-MET intensity. Although most participants were able to match cadence to prescribed music tempo, gait symmetry was not improved during the music-guided condition, compared with the self-regulated condition. This is the first study to investigate the utility of walking cadence for monitoring and regulating walking intensity in adults with lower limb prosthesis. Cadence has similar or superior accuracy as an indicator of walking intensity in this population, compared with the general population, and adults with a unilateral TTA are capable of walking at moderate intensity and above for meaningful bouts of time.

  10. Susceptibility of juvenile and adult blood–brain barrier to endothelin-1: regulation of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein expression and transport activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) play a critical role in keeping neurotoxic substances from entering the brain. We and others have previously reported an impact of inflammation on the regulation of adult blood–brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters. However, studies in children have not been done. From the pediatric clinical perspective, it is important to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) and BBB drug efflux transporters differ in childhood from those of adults under normal and inflammatory conditions. Therefore, we examined and compared the regulation of P-gp and BCRP expression and transport activity in young and adult BBB and investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammatory responses. Methods Rats at postnatal day (P) P21 and P84, corresponding to the juvenile and adult stages of human brain maturation, respectively, were treated with endothelin-1 (ET-1) given by the intracerebroventricular (icv) route. Twenty-four hours later, we measured P-gp and BCRP protein expression in isolated brain capillary by immunoblotting as well as by transport activity in vivo by measuring the unbound drug partitioning coefficient of the brain (Kp,uu,brain) of known efflux transporter substrates administered intravenously. Glial activation was measured by immunohistochemistry. The release of cytokines/chemokines (interleukins-1α, 1-β (IL-1β), -6 (IL-6), -10 (IL-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1/CCL2), fractalkine and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1)) were simultaneously measured in brain and serum samples using the Agilent Technology cytokine microarray. Results We found that juvenile and adult BBBs exhibited similar P-gp and BCRP transport activities in the normal physiological conditions. However, long-term exposure of the juvenile brain to low-dose of ET-1 did not change BBB P-gp transport activity but tended to decrease BCRP transport activity in the juvenile brain, while a

  11. BRG1 and BRM function antagonistically with c-MYC in adult cardiomyocytes to regulate conduction and contractility.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Holley, Darcy Wood; Wang, Zhongjing; Chen, Xin; Quintana, Megan; Jensen, Brian C; Tannu, Manasi; Parker, Joel; Jeyaraj, Darwin; Jain, Mukesh K; Wolfram, Julie A; Lee, Hyoung-Gon; Bultman, Scott J

    2017-04-01

    The contractile dysfunction that underlies heart failure involves perturbations in multiple biological processes ranging from metabolism to electrophysiology. Yet the epigenetic mechanisms that are altered in this disease state have not been elucidated. SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes are plausible candidates based on mouse knockout studies demonstrating a combined requirement for the BRG1 and BRM catalytic subunits in adult cardiomyocytes. Brg1/Brm double mutants exhibit metabolic and mitochondrial defects and are not viable although their cause of death has not been ascertained. To determine the cause of death of Brg1/Brm double-mutant mice, to test the hypothesis that BRG1 and BRM are required for cardiac contractility, and to identify relevant downstream target genes. A tamoxifen-inducible gene-targeting strategy utilizing αMHC-Cre-ERT was implemented to delete both SWI/SNF catalytic subunits in adult cardiomyocytes. Brg1/Brm double-mutant mice were monitored by echocardiography and electrocardiography, and they underwent rapidly progressive ventricular dysfunction including conduction defects and arrhythmias that culminated in heart failure and death within 3weeks. Mechanistically, BRG1/BRM repressed c-Myc expression, and enforced expression of a DOX-inducible c-MYC trangene in mouse cardiomyocytes phenocopied the ventricular conduction defects observed in Brg1/Brm double mutants. BRG1/BRM and c-MYC had opposite effects on the expression of cardiac conduction genes, and the directionality was consistent with their respective loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes. To support the clinical relevance of this mechanism, BRG1/BRM occupancy was diminished at the same target genes in human heart failure cases compared to controls, and this correlated with increased c-MYC expression and decreased CX43 and SCN5A expression. BRG1/BRM and c-MYC have an antagonistic relationship regulating the expression of cardiac conduction genes that maintain contractility

  12. Neuroprotection of hypoxic postconditioning against global cerebral ischemia through influencing posttranslational regulations of heat shock protein 27 in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lixuan; Liu, Liu; Li, Kongping; Wu, Baoxing; Liu, Dandan; Liang, Donghai; Wen, Haixia; Wang, Yanmei; Sun, Weiwen; Liao, Weiping; Xu, En

    2016-12-09

    We previously reported that hypoxic postconditioning (HPC) ameliorated hippocampal neuronal death induced by transient global cerebral ischemia (tGCI) in adult rats. However, the mechanism of HPC-induced neuroprotection is still elusive. Notably, heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) has recently emerged as a potent neuroprotectant in cerebral ischemia. Although its robust protective effect on stroke has been recognized, the mechanism of Hsp27-mediated neuroprotection is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the potential molecular mechanism by which HPC modulates the posttranslational regulations of Hsp27 after tGCI. We found that HPC increased expression of Hsp27 in CA1 subregion after tGCI. Inhibition of Hsp27 expression with lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) abolished the neuroprotection induced by HPC in vivo. Furthermore, pretreatment with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, resulted in a significant decrease in the degradation rate of Hsp27 protein in postconditioned rats, suggesting that the increase in the expression of Hsp27 after HPC might result from its decreased degradation. Next, pretreatment with leupeptin, a lysosomal inhibitor, resulted in an accumulation of Hsp27 after tGCI, indicating that autophagic pathway may be responsible for the degradation of Hsp27. We further showed that the formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes increased after tGCI. Meanwhile, the degradation of Hsp27 was suppressed and neuronal damage was reduced when blocking autophagy with 3-Methyladenine, whereas activating autophagy with rapamycin showed an opposite tendency. Lastly, we confirmed that HPC increased the expression of phosphorylated MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2) and Hsp27 after tGCI. Also, administration of SB203580, a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor, decreased the expressions of phosphorylated MK2 and Hsp27. Our results suggested that inhibition of Hsp27 degradation mediated by down-regulation of autophagy may induce ischemic tolerance after

  13. Effect of a behavioral intervention on dimensions of self-regulation and physical activity among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Silfee, Valerie; Petosa, Rick; Laurent, Devin; Schaub, Timothy; Focht, Brian

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the preliminary effect of a behavioral intervention on the use of self-regulation strategies and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. 23 individuals recruited from ResearchMatc.org and campus advertisements were randomized into an intervention (n = 12) and control (n = 11) group. The intervention group received a behavioral intervention that used goal setting, time management, and self-monitoring to target dimensions of self-regulation and MVPA. The control received information regarding their PA habits. MVPA was measured via BodyMedia Armbands at pre- and post-test. The use of self-regulatory strategies for MVPA was assessed at pretest and posttest using the Self-Regulation for Exercise Scale. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated to determine the practical impact of the intervention. The intervention had a large effect on all dimensions of self-regulation across time: including total self-regulation (3.15), self-monitoring (4.63), goal setting (3.17), social support (1.29), self-reward (1.98), time management (4.41), and overcoming barriers (2.25). The intervention had no impact on dimensions of MVPA across time. This pilot study demonstrated the ability of a behavioral intervention to improve the use of self-regulation strategies for MVPA in a sample of adults with type 2 diabetes. These findings can further inform the development of health promotion programs to promote self-regulation. Future research should focus on determining ability of improvements in self-regulation to stimulate behavior change.

  14. Cell swelling impairs dye coupling in adult rat ventricular myocytes. Cell volume as a regulator of cell communication

    PubMed Central

    De Mello, WC

    2013-01-01

    The influence of cell swelling on cell communication was investigated in cardiomyocytes isolated from the ventricle of adult rats. Measurements of dye coupling were performed in cell pairs using intracellular dialysis of Lucifer Yellow CH. The pipette was attached to one cell of the pair and after a gig ohm seal was achieved, the membrane was ruptured by a brief suction allowing the dye to diffuse from the pipette into the cell. Fluorescence of the dye in the injected as well as in non-dialyzed cell of the pair was continuously monitored. The results indicate that in cell pairs exposed to hypotonic solution the cell volume was increased by about 60% within 35 min and the dye coupling was significantly reduced by cell swelling. Calculation of gap junction permeability (P(j)) assuming an the intracellular volume accessible to intracellular diffusion of the dye as 12% of total cell volume, showed an average P(j) value of 0.16 ± 0.04 × 10−4 cm/s (n = 35) in the control and 0.89 ± 1.1 × 10−5 cm (n = 40) for cells exposed to hypotonic solution (P < 0.05). Similar results were found assuming intracellular volumes accessible to the dye of 20 and 30% of total cell volume, respectively. Cell swelling did not change the rate of intracellular diffusion of the dye. The results, which indicate that cell volume is an important regulator of gap junction permeability, have important implications to myocardial ischemia and heart failure as well as to heart pharmacology because changes in cell volume caused by drugs and transmitters can impair cell communication with consequent generation of slow conduction and cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:20512611

  15. Altered Stress-Induced Regulation of Genes in Monocytes in Adults with a History of Childhood Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiger, Marion; Grinberg, Marianna; Moser, Dirk; Zang, Johannes C S; Heinrichs, Markus; Hengstler, Jan G; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Cole, Steve; Kumsta, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to serious or traumatic events early in life can lead to persistent alterations in physiological stress response systems, including enhanced cross talk between the neuroendocrine and immune system. These programming effects may be mechanistically involved in mediating the effects of adverse childhood experience on disease risk in adulthood. We investigated hormonal and genome-wide mRNA expression responses in monocytes to acute stress exposure, in a sample of healthy adults (n=30) with a history of early childhood adversity, and a control group (n=30) without trauma experience. The early adversity group showed altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to stress, evidenced by lower ACTH and cortisol responses. Analyses of gene expression patterns showed that stress-responsive transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cytokine activity, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, chemokine activity, and G-protein coupled receptor binding. Differences between groups in stress-induced regulation of gene transcription were observed for genes involved in steroid binding, hormone activity, and G-protein coupled receptor binding. Transcription factor binding motif analysis showed an increased activity of pro-inflammatory upstream signaling in the early adversity group. We also identified transcripts that were differentially correlated with stress-induced cortisol increases between the groups, enriched for genes involved in cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction and glutamate receptor signaling. We suggest that childhood adversity leads to persistent alterations in transcriptional control of stress-responsive pathways, which—when chronically or repeatedly activated—might predispose individuals to stress-related psychopathology. PMID:27091381

  16. Driving self-regulation and ride service utilization in a multicommunity, multistate sample of U.S. older adults.

    PubMed

    Bird, Donna C; Freund, Katherine; Fortinsky, Richard H; Staplin, Loren; West, Bethany A; Bergen, Gwen; Downs, Jonathan

    2017-04-03

    This study examined a multicommunity alternative transportation program available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for any purpose, offering door-through-door service in private automobiles to members who either do not drive or are transitioning away from driving. Specific aims were to describe the characteristics of members by driving status and ride service usage of these members. Data came from administrative records maintained by a nonprofit ride service program and include 2,661 individuals aged 65+ residing in 14 states who joined the program between April 1, 2010, and November 8, 2013. Latent class analysis was used to group current drivers into 3 classes of driving status of low, medium, and high self-regulation, based on their self-reported avoidance of certain driving situations and weekly driving frequency. Demographics and ride service use rate for rides taken through March 31, 2014, by type of ride (e.g., medical, social, etc.) were calculated for nondrivers and drivers in each driving status class. The majority of ride service users were female (77%) and aged 65-74 years (82%). The primary method of getting around when enrolling for the transportation service was by riding with a friend or family member (60%). Among the 67,883 rides given, nondrivers took the majority (69%) of rides. Medical rides were the most common, accounting for 40% of all rides. Reported ride usage suggests that older adults are willing to use such ride services for a variety of trips when these services are not limited to specific types (e.g., medical). Further research can help tailor strategies to encourage both nondrivers and drivers to make better use of alternative transportation that meets the special needs of older people.

  17. High-Intensity Progressive Resistance Training Increases Strength With No Change in Cardiovascular Function and Autonomic Neural Regulation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Kanegusuku, Hélcio; Queiroz, Andréia C; Silva, Valdo J; de Mello, Marco T; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Forjaz, Cláudia L

    2015-07-01

    The effects of high-intensity progressive resistance training (HIPRT) on cardiovascular function and autonomic neural regulation in older adults are unclear. To investigate this issue, 25 older adults were randomly divided into two groups: control (CON, N = 13, 63 ± 4 years; no training) and HIPRT (N = 12, 64 ± 4 years; 2 sessions/week, 7 exercises, 2–4 sets, 10–4 RM). Before and after four months, maximal strength, quadriceps cross-sectional area (QCSA), clinic and ambulatory blood pressures (BP), systemic hemodynamics, and cardiovascular autonomic modulation were measured. Maximal strength and QCSA increased in the HIPRT group and did not change in the CON group. Clinic and ambulatory BP, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, stroke volume, heart rate, and cardiac sympathovagal balance did not change in the HIPRT group or the CON group. In conclusion, HIPRT was effective at increasing muscle mass and strength without promoting changes in cardiovascular function or autonomic neural regulation.

  18. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-05-10

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30-50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs.

  19. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Gennaro, Gianfranco Di; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30–50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  20. MicroRNA-124 suppresses proliferation and glycolysis in non-small cell lung cancer cells by targeting AKT-GLUT1/HKII.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaojian; Lu, Caiping; Chu, Weiwei; Zhang, Bing; Zhen, Qiang; Wang, Renfeng; Zhang, Yaxiao; Li, Zhe; Lv, Baolei; Li, Huixian; Liu, Jiabao

    2017-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 85% of all types of lung cancer and is the leading cause of worldwide cancer-associated mortalities. MiR-124 is epigenetically silenced in various types of cancer and plays important roles in tumor development and progression. MiR-124 was also significantly downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer patients. Glycolysis has been considered as a feature of cancer cells; hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha/beta and Akt are key enzymes in the regulation of glycolysis and energy metabolism in cancer cells. However, the role of miR-124 in non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation, glycolysis, and energy metabolism remains unknown. In this research, cell proliferation was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide; furthermore, glucose consumption and lactic acid production were assessed; adenosine triphosphate content and NAD(+)/NADH were also detected. These tests were conducted using the normal non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549, which was transfected variedly with miR-mimics, miR-124 mimics, miR-124 inhibitor, pc-DNA3.1(+)-AKT1, and pc-DNA3.1(+)-AKT2 plasmid. Here, we show that miR-124 overexpression directly decreased cell growth, glucose consumption, lactate production, and energy metabolism. MiR-124 also negatively regulates glycolysis rate-limiting enzymes, glucose transporter 1 and hexokinase II. Our results also showed that miR-124 negatively regulates AKT1 and AKT2 but no regulatory effect on hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha/beta. Overexpression of AKT reverses the inhibitory effect of miR-124 on cell proliferation and glycolytic metabolism in non-small cell lung cancer. AKT inhibition blocks miR-124 silencing-induced AKT1/2, glucose transporter 1, hexokinase II activation, cell proliferation, and glycolytic or energy metabolism changes. In summary, this study demonstrated that miR-124 is able to inhibit proliferation, glycolysis, and energy metabolism, potentially by

  1. A cognitive-behavioral intervention for emotion regulation in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Miho; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Kano, Yukiko; Kamio, Yoko

    2013-07-23

    Adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulties in social communication; thus, these individuals have trouble understanding the mental states of others. Recent research also suggests that adults with ASD are unable to understand their own mental states, which could lead to difficulties in emotion-regulation. Some studies have reported the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in improving emotion-regulation among children with ASD. The current study will investigate the efficacy of group-based CBT for adults with ASD. The study is a randomized, waitlist controlled, single-blinded trial. The participants will be 60 adults with ASD; 30 will be assigned to a CBT group and 30 to a waitlist control group. Primary outcome measures are the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, the Motion Picture Mind-Reading task, and an ASD questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures are the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale 26-item version, the Global Assessment of Functioning, State-trait Anxiety Inventory, Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory, and Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. All will be administered during the pre- and post-intervention, and 12 week follow-up periods. The CBT group will receive group therapy over an 8 week period (one session per week) with each session lasting approximately 100 minutes. Group therapy will consist of four or five adults with ASD and two psychologists. We will be using visual materials for this program, mainly the Cognitive Affective Training kit. This trial will hopefully indicate the efficacy of group-based CBT for adults with high- functioning ASD. This trial was registered in The University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry No. UMIN000006236.

  2. A cognitive-behavioral intervention for emotion regulation in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulties in social communication; thus, these individuals have trouble understanding the mental states of others. Recent research also suggests that adults with ASD are unable to understand their own mental states, which could lead to difficulties in emotion-regulation. Some studies have reported the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in improving emotion-regulation among children with ASD. The current study will investigate the efficacy of group-based CBT for adults with ASD. Methods/Design The study is a randomized, waitlist controlled, single-blinded trial. The participants will be 60 adults with ASD; 30 will be assigned to a CBT group and 30 to a waitlist control group. Primary outcome measures are the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, the Motion Picture Mind-Reading task, and an ASD questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures are the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale 26-item version, the Global Assessment of Functioning, State-trait Anxiety Inventory, Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory, and Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. All will be administered during the pre- and post-intervention, and 12 week follow-up periods. The CBT group will receive group therapy over an 8 week period (one session per week) with each session lasting approximately 100 minutes. Group therapy will consist of four or five adults with ASD and two psychologists. We will be using visual materials for this program, mainly the Cognitive Affective Training kit. Discussion This trial will hopefully indicate the efficacy of group-based CBT for adults with high- functioning ASD. Trial registration This trial was registered in The University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry No. UMIN000006236. PMID:23880333

  3. Differential regulation of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult rat spinal cord neural stem/progenitors by ERK1/2, Akt, and PLCγ

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Si; Sideris, Alexandra; Sutachan, Jhon J.; Montoya G, Jose V.; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has been identified in both normal and injured adult mammalian spinal cord. Yet the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulation of adult spinal cord NSPCs proliferation and commitment toward a neuronal lineage remain undefined. In this study, the role of three growth factor-mediated signaling pathways in proliferation and neuronal differentiation was examined. Adult spinal cord NSPCs were enriched in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). We observed an increase in the number of cells expressing the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) over time, indicating neuronal differentiation in the culture. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase 1 and 2/ERK 1 and 2 (MEK/ERK1/2) or the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways suppressed active proliferation in adult spinal cord NSPC cultures; whereas neuronal differentiation was negatively affected only when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. Inhibition of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway did not affect proliferation or neuronal differentiation. Finally, we demonstrated that the blockade of either the ERK1/2 or PLCγ signaling pathways reduced neurite branching of MAP2+ cells derived from the NSPC cultures. Many of the MAP2+ cells expressed synaptophysin and had a glutamatergic phenotype, indicating that over time adult spinal cord NSPCs had differentiated into mostly glutamatergic neurons. Our work provides new information regarding the contribution of these pathways to the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from adult spinal cord cultures, and emphasizes that the contribution of these pathways is dependent on the origin of the NSPCs. PMID:23986655

  4. Thyroid Hormone-Regulated Wnt5a/Ror2 Signaling Is Essential for Dedifferentiation of Larval Epithelial Cells into Adult Stem Cells in the Xenopus laevis Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko; Kajita, Mitsuko; Hasebe, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Amphibian intestinal remodeling, where thyroid hormone (T3) induces some larval epithelial cells to become adult stem cells analogous to the mammalian intestinal ones, serves as a unique model for studying how the adult stem cells are formed. To clarify its molecular mechanisms, we here investigated roles of non-canonical Wnt signaling in the larval-to-adult intestinal remodeling during Xenopus laevis metamorphosis. Methods/Findings Our quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that the expressions of Wnt5a and its receptors, frizzled 2 (Fzd2) and receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2) are up-regulated by T3 and are spatiotemporally correlated with adult epithelial development in the X. laevis intestine. Notably, changes in morphology of larval absorptive epithelial cells expressing Ror2 coincide well with formation of the adult stem cells during metamorphosis. In addition, by using organ cultures of the tadpole intestine, we have experimentally shown that addition of exogenous Wnt5a protein to the culture medium causes morphological changes in the larval epithelium expressing Ror2 even in the absence of T3. In contrast, in the presence of T3 where the adult stem cells are formed in vitro, inhibition of endogenous Wnt5a by an anti-Wnt5a antibody suppressed the epithelial morphological changes, leading to the failure of stem cell formation. Significance Our findings strongly suggest that the adult stem cells originate from the larval absorptive cells expressing Ror2, which require Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling for their dedifferentiation accompanied by changes in cell morphology. PMID:25211363

  5. Relation between local restaurant smoking regulations and attitudes towards the prevalence and social acceptability of smoking: a study of youths and adults who eat out predominantly at restaurants in their town

    PubMed Central

    Albers, A; Siegel, M; Cheng, D; Biener, L; Rigotti, N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relation between strength of local restaurant smoking regulations and smoking related social norms among youths and adults. Design: We used generalised estimating equations logistic regression analysis to examine the relation between regulation strength and youths' and adults' perceptions of adult smoking prevalence and the social acceptability of smoking in their town, while controlling for baseline anti-smoking sentiment in the town. Setting: Each of the 351 Massachusetts towns were classified as having strong (complete smoking ban), medium (restriction of smoking to enclosed, separately ventilated areas), or weak (all others) res