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Sample records for mir-124 regulates adult

  1. MicroRNA miR-124 Regulates Neurite Outgrowth during Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jenn-Yah; Chung, Kwan-Ho; Deo, Monika; Thompson, Robert C.; Turner, David L.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs with diverse regulatory roles. The miR-124 miRNA is expressed in neurons in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that overexpression of miR-124 in differentiating mouse P19 cells promotes neurite outgrowth, while blocking miR-124 function delays neurite outgrowth and decreases acetylated α-tubulin. Altered neurite outgrowth also was observed in mouse primary cortical neurons when miR-124 expression was increased, or when miR-124 function was blocked. In uncommitted P19 cells, miR-124 expression led to disruption of actin filaments and stabilization of microtubules. Expression of miR-124 also decreased Cdc42 protein and affected the subcellular localization of Rac1, suggesting that miR-124 may act in part via alterations to members of the Rho GTPase family. Furthermore, constitutively active Cdc42 or Rac1 attenuated neurite outgrowth promoted by miR-124. To obtain a broader perspective, we identified mRNAs downregulated by miR-124 in P19 cells using microarrays. mRNAs for proteins involved in cytoskeletal regulation were enriched among mRNAs downregulated by miR-124. A miR-124 variant with an additional 5’ base failed to promote neurite outgrowth and downregulated substantially different mRNAs. These results indicate that miR-124 contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth during neuronal differentiation, possibly by regulation of the cytoskeleton. PMID:18619591

  2. miR-124 regulates fetal pulmonary epithelial cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Huang, Chaoqun; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Xi, Dong; Weng, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a family of small noncoding RNAs that regulate the expression of their target proteins at the posttranscriptional level. Their functions cover almost every aspect of cell physiology. However, the roles of microRNAs in fetal lung development are not completely understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the regulation and molecular mechanisms of alveolar epithelial cell maturation during fetal lung development by miR-124. We discovered that miR-124 was downregulated during rat fetal lung development and predominantly expressed in the epithelial cells at late stage of the lung development. Overexpression of miR-124 with an adenovirus vector led to the inhibition of epithelial maturation in rat fetal lung organ cultures and fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells, as demonstrated by a decrease in the type II cell marker expression and an increase in glycogen content. We further demonstrated by luciferase reporter assays that miR-124 inhibited the NF-κB, cAMP/PKA, and MAPK/ERK pathways. In addition, nuclear factor I/B (NFIB), a critical protein in fetal lung maturation, was validated as a direct target of miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 expression was induced by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway through a direct interaction of LEF1 and the miR-124 promoter region. We concluded that miR-124 downregulation is critical to fetal lung epithelial maturation and miR-124 inhibits this maturation process at least partially through the inhibition of NFIB. PMID:26071557

  3. miR-124-regulated RhoG

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Stefan; Franke, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    RhoG is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases sharing highest sequence similarity with Rac and Cdc42. Mig-2 and Mtl represent the functional equivalents of RhoG in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, respectively. RhoG has attracted great interest because it plays a central role in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization in various physiological and pathophysiological situations. For example, it is fundamental to phagocytotic processes, is able to regulate gene expression, cell survival and proliferation, and is involved in cell migration and in the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. The activation of Rac1 via an ELMO/Dock180 module has been elaborated to be important for RhoG signaling. Although a stimulatory role for neurite outgrowth in the pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line has been assigned to RhoG, the exact function of this GTPase for the development of the processes of primary neurons remains to be clarified. In this view, we discuss the impact of RhoG on axonal and dendritic differentiation, its role as a conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity and the functional regulation of RhoG expression by the microRNA miR-124. PMID:23303397

  4. Regulation of Nuclear Receptor Nur77 by miR-124.

    PubMed

    Tenga, Alexa; Beard, Jordan A; Takwi, Apana; Wang, Yue-Ming; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Nur77 is commonly upregulated in adult cancers and has oncogenic functions. Nur77 is an immediate-early response gene that acts as a transcription factor to promote proliferation and protect cells from apoptosis. Conversely, Nur77 can translocate to the mitochondria and induce apoptosis upon treatment with various cytotoxic agents. Because Nur77 is upregulated in cancer and may have a role in cancer progression, it is of interest to understand the mechanism controlling its expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for inhibiting translation of their target genes by binding to the 3'UTR and either degrading the mRNA or preventing it from being translated into protein, thereby making these non-coding endogenous RNAs vital regulators of every cellular process. Several miRNAs have been predicted to target Nur77; however, strong evidence showing the regulation of Nur77 by any miRNA is lacking. In this study, we used a luciferase reporter assay containing the 3'UTR of Nur77 to screen 296 miRNAs and found that miR-124, which is the most abundant miRNA in the brain and has a role in promoting neuronal differentiation, caused the greatest reduction in luciferase activity. Interestingly, we discovered an inverse relationship in Daoy medulloblastoma cells and undifferentiated granule neuron precursors in which Nur77 is upregulated and miR-124 is downregulated. Exogenous expression to further elevate Nur77 levels in Daoy cells increased proliferation and viability, but knocking down Nur77 via siRNA resulted in the opposite phenotype. Importantly, exogenous expression of miR-124 reduced Nur77 expression, cell viability, proliferation, and tumor spheroid size in 3D culture. In all, we have discovered miR-124 to be downregulated in instances of medulloblastoma in which Nur77 is upregulated, resulting in a proliferative state that abets cancer progression. This study provides evidence for increasing miR-124 expression as a potential therapy for cancers

  5. Expression of Flotilin-2 and Acrosome Biogenesis Are Regulated by MiR-124 during Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Haoyu; Jiang, Min; Xia, Zhengrong; Yu, Jinjin; Chen, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNA molecules, which diversely regulate gene expression in organisms. Although the regulatory role of these small RNA molecules has been recently explored in animal spermatogenesis, the role of miR-124 in male germ cells is poorly defined. In our previous study, flotillin-2 was investigated as a novel Golgi-related protein involved in sperm acrosome biogenesis. The current study was designed to analyze the contribution of miR-124 in the regulation of flotillin-2 expression during mouse acrosome biogenesis. Luciferase assays revealed the target effects of miR-124 on flotillin-2 expression. Following intratesticular injection of miR-124 in 3-week-old male mice, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis were employed to confirm the function of miR-124 in regulating flotillin-2 after 48 hours. Sperm abnormalities were assessed 3 weeks later by ordinary optical microscopy, the acrosome abnormalities were also assessed by PNA staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed the proportion of sperm acrosome abnormalities was significantly higher than that of the control group. The expression of flotillin-2 and caveolin-1 was significantly downregulated during acrosome biogenesis. These results indicated that miR-124 could potentially play a role in caveolin-independent vesicle trafficking and modulation of flotillin-2 expression in mouse acrosome biogenesis. PMID:26313572

  6. miR-124 Regulates the Phase of Drosophila Circadian Locomotor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Pallavi; Guo, Peiyi

    2016-01-01

    Animals use circadian rhythms to anticipate daily environmental changes. Circadian clocks have a profound effect on behavior. In Drosophila, for example, brain pacemaker neurons dictate that flies are mostly active at dawn and dusk. miRNAs are small, regulatory RNAs (≈22 nt) that play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we identify miR-124 as an important regulator of Drosophila circadian locomotor rhythms. Under constant darkness, flies lacking miR-124 (miR-124KO) have a dramatically advanced circadian behavior phase. However, whereas a phase defect is usually caused by a change in the period of the circadian pacemaker, this is not the case in miR-124KO flies. Moreover, the phase of the circadian pacemaker in the clock neurons that control rhythmic locomotion is not altered either. Therefore, miR-124 modulates the output of circadian clock neurons rather than controlling their molecular pacemaker. Circadian phase is also advanced under temperature cycles, but a light/dark cycle partially corrects the defects in miR-124KO flies. Indeed, miR-124KO shows a normal evening phase under the latter conditions, but morning behavioral activity is suppressed. In summary, miR-124 controls diurnal activity and determines the phase of circadian locomotor behavior without affecting circadian pacemaker function. It thus provides a potent entry point to elucidate the mechanisms by which the phase of circadian behavior is determined. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In animals, molecular circadian clocks control the timing of behavioral activities to optimize them with the day/night cycle. This is critical for their fitness and survival. The mechanisms by which the phase of circadian behaviors is determined downstream of the molecular pacemakers are not yet well understood. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs are important regulators of circadian outputs. We found that miR-124 shapes diurnal behavioral activity and has a striking impact on the phase of circadian

  7. Epigenetic silencing of miR-124 prevents spermine oxidase regulation: Implications for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Sierra, Johanna C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Mera, Robertino M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Schneider, Barbara G.; Wilson, Keith T.; Casero, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to the development of various forms of cancer. The polyamine catabolic enzyme spermine oxidase (SMOX) is induced in chronic inflammatory conditions, including Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, where its production of hydrogen peroxide contributes to DNA damage and subsequent tumorigenesis. MicroRNA expression levels are also altered in inflammatory conditions; specifically, the tumor suppressor miR-124 becomes silenced by DNA methylation. We sought to determine if this repression of miR-124 is associated with elevated SMOX activity and concluded that miR-124 is indeed a negative regulator of SMOX. In gastric adenocarcinoma cells harboring highly methylated and silenced mir-124 gene loci, 5-azacytidine treatment allowed miR-124 re-expression and decreased SMOX expression. Overexpression of an exogenous miR-124-3p mimic repressed SMOX mRNA and protein expression as well as H2O2 production by >50% within 24 hours. Reporter assays indicated that direct interaction of miR-124 with the 3′-untranslated region of SMOX mRNA contributes to this negative regulation. Importantly, overexpression of miR-124 prior to infection with H. pylori prevented the induction of SMOX believed to contribute to inflammation-associated tumorigenesis. Compelling human in vivo data from H. pylori-positive gastritis tissues indicated that the mir-124 gene loci are more heavily methylated in a Colombian population characterized by elevated SMOX expression and a high risk for gastric cancer. Furthermore, the degree of mir-124 methylation significantly correlated with SMOX expression throughout the population. These results indicate a protective role for miR-124 through the inhibition of SMOX-mediated DNA damage in the etiology of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. PMID:27041578

  8. miR-124 regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy in dopaminergic neurons and protects them by regulating AMPK/mTOR pathway in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Wang, Huiqing; Ye, Yongyi; Shu, Yugao; Deng, Yongwen; He, Xiaozheng; Lu, Guohui; Zhang, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    The important roles of miR-124 in the development and progression of various diseases are being increasing recognized. This study was aimed to investigate the potential roles of miR-124 in dopaminergic (DA) neuronal apoptosis and autophagy in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to explore their mechanisms. Human SH-SY5Y cells that are treated with MPTP were transfected with mature miR-124 vector and control empty vector. The effect of MPTP on miR-124 mRNA level was analyzed using RT-PCR analysis. Furthermore, the effects of miR-124 expression on neuronal apoptosis and autophagy, as well as the expression of proteins in the AMPK/mTOR pathway, were analyzed using RT-PCR and western blotting. This study found that miR-124 was down-regulated in the MPTP-treated (100 μM) neurons, and miR-124 suppression significantly increased cell apoptosis and induced autophagy-associated protein expression, including that of Beclin 1 and increased the ratio of LC3 II/LC3 I compared with that in controls. In addition, in vitro rescue of miR-124 significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and the ratio of LC3 II/LC3 I, findings that were approximately equal to the controls. Moreover, miR-124 suppression increased p-AMPK but decreased p-mTOR levels in neurons. Our study suggested that miR-124 functions as a protector of DA neurons during PD through the involvement of cell apoptosis and autophagy by regulating the AMPK/mTOR pathway. PMID:27347320

  9. Methylation-regulated miR-124-1 suppresses tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting CASC3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Xia, Yujing; Chen, Kan; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Wang, Yugang; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate the roles and mechanisms of miR-124-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We analyzed the expression of miR-124-1 in human HCC tissues and cell lines. Luciferase reporter assays were used to analyze the target of miR-124-1. Human HCC cell lines were transduced with lentiviruses expressing miR-124-1, and proliferation and colony formation were analyzed. The growth of human HCC cells overexpressing miR-124-1 was assessed in nude mice. The expression of p38-MAPK, JNK, ERK and related signaling molecules was detected by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that miR-124-1 levels were reduced in HCC tissues and cell lines compared with those in adjacent non-cancer tissues and normal liver cell lines respectively. Downregulation of miR-124-1 in HCC cell lines were attributed to hypermethylation of its promoter region. Overexpression of miR-124-1 inhibited HCC cell proliferation in vitro, whereas miR-124-1 was correlated with clinicopathological parameters of HCC patients. HCC cell-mediated overexpression of miR-124-1 in nude mice suppressed tumor growth. Cancer susceptibility candidate 3 (CASC3) was identified as a direct target of miR-124-1 by computational analysis and experimental assays. MiR-124-1-mediated downregulation of CASC3 resulted in the inactivation of p38-MAPK, JNK and ERK. Our findings provide potential new targets for the prevention or treatment of HCC. PMID:27029030

  10. miR-9 and miR-124 synergistically affect regulation of dendritic branching via the AKT/GSK3β pathway by targeting Rap2a

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qian; Yu, Caiyong; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Kun; Fang, Chao; Liu, Fangfang; Bian, Ganlan; Song, Bing; Yang, Angang; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    A single microRNA (miRNA) can regulate expression of multiple proteins, and expression of an individual protein may be controlled by numerous miRNAs. This regulatory pattern strongly suggests that synergistic effects of miRNAs play critical roles in regulating biological processes. miR-9 and miR-124, two of the most abundant miRNAs in the mammalian nervous system, have important functions in neuronal development. In this study, we identified the small GTP-binding protein Rap2a as a common target of both miR-9 and miR-124. miR-9 and miR-124 together, but neither miRNA alone, strongly suppressed Rap2a, thereby promoting neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) and dendritic branching of differentiated neurons. Rap2a also diminished the dendritic complexity of mature neurons by decreasing the levels of pAKT and pGSK3β. Our results reveal a novel pathway in which miR-9 and miR-124 synergistically repress expression of Rap2a to sustain homeostatic dendritic complexity during neuronal development and maturation. PMID:27221778

  11. miR-124 downregulation leads to breast cancer progression via LncRNA-MALAT1 regulation and CDK4/E2F1 signal activation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Tongbao; Shao, Fang; Wu, Qiyong; Zhang, Xiaohang; Xu, Dongqin; Qian, Keqing; Xie, Yewen; Wang, Shizhong; Xu, Ning; Wang, Yong; Qi, Chunjian

    2016-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) has been recently shown to be dysregulated in several cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying the role of MALAT1 in breast cancer remain unclear. Herein, we showed that MALAT1 was aberrantly increased in breast cancer tissues and cells. MALAT1-siRNA inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, MALAT1 acted as an endogenous potent regulator by directly binding to miR-124 and down-regulating miR-124 expression. In addition, MALAT1 reversed the inhibitory effect of miR-124 on breast cancer proliferation and was involved in the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression. Taken together, our data highlight the pivotal role of MALAT1 in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Moreover, the present study elucidated the MALAT1-miR-124-CDK4/E2F1 signaling pathway in breast cancer, which might provide a new approach for tackling breast cancer. PMID:26918449

  12. miR-124 downregulation leads to breast cancer progression via LncRNA-MALAT1 regulation and CDK4/E2F1 signal activation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tongbao; Shao, Fang; Wu, Qiyong; Zhang, Xiaohang; Xu, Dongqin; Qian, Keqing; Xie, Yewen; Wang, Shizhong; Xu, Ning; Wang, Yong; Qi, Chunjian

    2016-03-29

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) has been recently shown to be dysregulated in several cancers. However, the mechanisms underlying the role of MALAT1 in breast cancer remain unclear. Herein, we showed that MALAT1 was aberrantly increased in breast cancer tissues and cells. MALAT1-siRNA inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, MALAT1 acted as an endogenous potent regulator by directly binding to miR-124 and down-regulating miR-124 expression. In addition, MALAT1 reversed the inhibitory effect of miR-124 on breast cancer proliferation and was involved in the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression. Taken together, our data highlight the pivotal role of MALAT1 in breast cancer tumorigenesis. Moreover, the present study elucidated the MALAT1-miR-124-CDK4/E2F1 signaling pathway in breast cancer, which might provide a new approach for tackling breast cancer.

  13. Valproic acid mediates miR-124 to down-regulate a novel protein target, GNAI1.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Hirotaka; Goh, Wilson W B; Lim, Vania K J; Wong, Limsoon; Sng, Judy C G

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is an anti-convulsant drug that is recently shown to have neuroregenerative therapeutic actions. In this study, we investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of VPA and its effects on Bdnf transcription through microRNAs (miRNAs) and their corresponding target proteins. Using in silico algorithms, we predicted from our miRNA microarray and iTRAQ data that miR-124 is likely to target at guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha inhibitor 1 (GNAI1), an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. With the reduction of GNAI1 mediated by VPA, the cAMP is enhanced to increase Bdnf expression. The levels of GNAI1 protein and Bdnf mRNA can be manipulated with either miR-124 mimic or inhibitor. In summary, we have identified a novel molecular mechanism of VPA that induces miR-124 to repress GNAI1. The implication of miR-124→GNAI1→BDNF pathway with valproic acid treatment suggests that we could repurpose an old drug, valproic acid, as a clinical application to elevate neurotrophin levels in treating neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. MiR-124 suppresses the chemotactic migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells toward HGF by downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qing; Zhang, Yu; Li, Xianyang; He, Lihong; Hu, Ya'nan; Wang, Xianyao; Xu, Xiaojing; Shen, Yixin; Zhang, Huanxiang

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibit the potential to repair a wide variety of injured adult tissues. The migration capability of MSCs is an important determinant of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are increasingly implicated in regulating the migration of MSCs. Herein, we show that the expression of miR-124 was downregulated in rat MSCs (rMSCs) treated with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Overexpression of miR-124 significantly reduced the chemotactic migration of rMSCs toward HGF, while inhibition of endogenous miR-124 promoted the chemotactic migration. A further study revealed that miR-124 directly targeted FZD4 and LRP6, which encode a receptor and co-receptor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, respectively, thus reducing the activity of this signaling. Consistently, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway by LiCl and ΔN89β-catenin rescued the inhibitory effect of miR-124 on the chemotactic migration of rMSCs toward HGF, while inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by FH535 abrogated the enhanced chemotactic response achieved by the miR-124 inhibitor. Collectively, our study demonstrates that miR-124 downregulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling via targeting FZD4 and LRP6 and thus suppresses the chemotactic migration of rMSCs toward HGF.

  15. Tumor suppressive miR-124 targets androgen receptor and inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xu-Bao; Xue, Lingru; Ma, Ai-Hong; Tepper, Clifford G.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Kung, Hsing-Jien; deVere White, Ralph W.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer (CaP) is the most frequently diagnosed malignant tumor in American men, the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of CaP remain largely unknown. Recent studies have shown that downregulation of miR-124 occurs in several types of human cancer, suggesting a tumor suppressive function of miR-124. Until now, however, it has been unclear whether miR-124 is associated with CaP. In the present study, we completed a series of experiments to understand the functional role of miR-124 in CaP. We detected the expression level of miR-124 in clinical CaP tissues, evaluated the influence of miR-124 on the growth of CaP cells, and investigated the mechanism underlying the dysregulation of miR-124. We found that i) miR-124 directly targets the androgen receptor (AR) and subsequently induces a upregulation of p53; ii) miR-124 is significantly down-regulated in malignant prostatic cells compared to that in benign cells and DNA methylation causes the reduced expression of miR-124; and iii) miR-124 can inhibit the growth of CaP cells in vitro and in vivo. Data from this study revealed that loss of miR-124 expression is a common event in CaP, which may contribute to pathogenesis of CaP. Our studies also suggest that miR-124 is a potential tumor suppressive gene in CaP, and restoration of miR-124 expression may represent a novel strategy for CaP therapy. PMID:23069658

  16. MiR-124 suppresses cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting PIK3CA

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Qingbo; Ling, Changquan

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIK3CA is a novel target of miR-124 in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-124 suppresses cell proliferation by downregulating PIK3CA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-124 regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-124 overexpression inhibits the tumorigenesis in nude mice. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have crucial roles in the development and progression of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies have shown that microRNA-124 (miR-124) was downregulated in HCC; however, the underlying mechanisms by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC are largely unknown. In this study, we report that phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) is a novel target of miR-124 in HepG2 cells. Overexpression of miR-124 resulted in decreased expression of PIK3CA at both mRNA and protein levels. We found that miR-124 overexpression markedly suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1-phase cell-cycle arrest in vitro. Consistent with the restoring miR-124 expression, PIK3CA knockdown suppressed cell proliferation, whereas overexpression of PIK3CA abolished the suppressive effect of miR-124. Mechanistic studies showed that miR-124-mediated reduction of PIK3CA resulted in suppression of PI3K/Akt pathway. The expressions of Akt and mTOR, key components of the PI3K/Akt pathway, were all downregulated. Moreover, we found overexpressed miR-124 effectively repressed tumor growth in xenograft animal experiments. Taken together, our results demonstrate that miR-124 functions as a growth-suppressive miRNA and plays an important role in inhibiting the tumorigenesis through targeting PIK3CA.

  17. Down regulation of miR-124 in both Werner syndrome DNA helicase mutant mice and mutant Caenorhabditis elegans wrn-1 reveals the importance of this microRNA in accelerated aging.

    PubMed

    Dallaire, Alexandra; Garand, Chantal; Paquel, Eric R; Mitchell, Sarah J; de Cabo, Rafael; Simard, Martin J; Lebel, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Small non-coding microRNAs are believed to be involved in the mechanism of aging but nothing is known on the impact of microRNAs in the progeroid disorder Werner syndrome (WS). WS is a premature aging disorder caused by mutations in a RecQ-like DNA helicase. Mice lacking the helicase domain of the WRN ortholog exhibit many phenotypic features of WS, including a pro-oxidant status and a shorter mean life span.Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) with a nonfunctional wrn-1 DNA helicase also exhibit a shorter life span. Thus, both models are relevant to study the expression of microRNAs involved in WS. In this study, we show that miR-124 expression is lost in the liver of Wrn helicase mutant mice. Interestingly, the expression of this conserved miR-124 in whole wrn-1 mutant worms is also significantly reduced. The loss of mir-124 in C. elegans increases reactive oxygen species formation and accumulation of the aging marker lipofuscin, reduces whole body ATP levels and results in a reduction in life span. Finally, supplementation of vitamin C normalizes the median life span of wrn-1 and mir-124 mutant worms. These results suggest that biological pathways involving WRN and miR-124 are conserved in the aging process across different species.

  18. miR-124/ATF-6, a novel lifespan extension pathway of Astragalus polysaccharide in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Liu, Jing; Xie, Fang; Gao, Xu; Ye, Jian-Han; Sun, Lu-Yao; Wei, Ran; Ai, Jing

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), especially evolutionarily conserved miRNAs play critical roles in regulating various biological process. However, the functions of conserved miRNAs in longevity are still largely unknown. Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) was recently shown to extend lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans, but its molecular mechanisms have not been fully understood. In the present study, we characterize that microRNA mediated a novel longevity pathway of APS in C. elegans. We found that APS markedly extended the lifespan of C. elegans at the second and the fourth stages. A highly conserved miRNA miR-124 was significantly upregulated in APS-treated C. elegans. Overexpression miR-124 caused the lifespan extension of C. elegans and vice versa, indicating miR-124 regulates the longevity of C. elegans. Using luciferase assay, atf-6 was established as a target gene of miR-124 which acting on three binding sites at atf-6 3'UTR. Consistently, agomir-cel-miR-124 was also shown to inhibit ATF-6 expression in C. elegans. APS-treated C. elegans showed the down-regulation of atf-6 at protein level. Furthermore, the knockdown of atf-6 by RNAi extended the lifespan of C. elegans, indicating atf-6 regulated by miR-124 contributes to lifespan extension. Taken together, miR-124 regulating ATF-6 is a new potential longevity signal pathway, which underlies the lifespan-extending effects of APS in C. elegans.

  19. Loss of Brain-enriched miR-124 MicroRNA Enhances Stem-like Traits and Invasiveness of Glioma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongping; Cheung, William K. C.; Ng, Samuel S.; Jiang, Xiaochun; Jiang, Songshan; Sze, Johnny; Leung, Gilberto K. K.; Lu, Gang; Chan, Danny T. M.; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Poon, Wai Sang; Lin, Marie C.

    2012-01-01

    miR-124 is a brain-enriched microRNA that plays a crucial role in neural development and has been shown to be down-regulated in glioma and medulloblastoma, suggesting its possible involvement in brain tumor progression. Here, we show that miR-124 is down-regulated in a panel of different grades of glioma tissues and in all of the human glioma cell lines we examined. By integrated bioinformatics analysis and experimental confirmation, we identified SNAI2, which is often up-regulated in glioma, as a direct functional target of miR-124. Because SNAI2 has been shown to regulate stem cell functions, we examined the roles of miR-124 and SNAI2 in glioma cell stem-like traits. The results showed that overexpression of miR-124 and knockdown of SNAI2 reduced neurosphere formation, CD133+ cell subpopulation, and stem cell marker (BMI1, Nanog, and Nestin) expression, and these effects could be rescued by re-expression of SNAI2. Furthermore, enhanced miR-124 expression significantly inhibited glioma cell invasion in vitro. Finally, stable overexpression of miR-124 and knockdown of SNAI2 inhibited the tumorigenicity and invasion of glioma cells in vivo. These findings reveal, for the first time, that the tumor suppressor activity of miR-124 could be partly due to its inhibitory effects on glioma stem-like traits and invasiveness through SNAI2. PMID:22253443

  20. MiR-124 represses vasculogenic mimicry and cell motility by targeting amotL1 in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hai-Ying; Li, Qin-Qin; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Wei; Li, Ya-Nan; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2014-12-01

    miRNAs have extensive functions in differentiation, metabolism, programmed cell death, and tumor metastasis by post-transcriptional regulation. Vasculogenic mimicry is an important pathway in tumor metastasis. Many factors can regulate vasculogenic mimicry, including miRNAs. In previous studies, miR-124 was found to repress proliferation and metastasis in different types of cancers, but whether it functions in cervical cancer remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that miR-124 can repress vasculogenic mimicry, migration and invasion in HeLa and C33A cells in vitro. Furthermore, we reveal that the effect of miR-124 on vasculogenic mimicry, migration and invasion results from its interaction with AmotL1. MiR-124 regulates AmotL1 negatively by targeting its 3'untranslated region (3'UTR). We found that miR-124 can repress the EMT process. Together, these results improve our understanding of the function of miR-124 in tumor metastasis and will help to provide new potential target sites for cervical cancer treatment.

  1. miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit colorectal cancer progression by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiheng; Liu, Shaojun; Tian, Li; Wu, Minghao; Ai, Feiyan; Tang, Wuliang; Zhao, Lian; Ding, Juan; Zhang, Liyang; Tang, Anliu

    2015-01-01

    miR-124 and miR-506 are reportedly down-regulated and associated with tumor progression in many cancers, but little is known about their intrinsic regulatory mechanisms in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we found that the miR-124 and miR-506 levels were significantly lower in human CRC tissues than in controls, as indicated by qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization histochemistry. We also found that the overexpression of miR-124 or miR-506 inhibited tumor cell progression and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy in vitro. Increased miR-124 or miR-506 expression also inhibited tumor cell proliferation and invasion in vivo. Luciferase reporter assays and western blotting were used to determine the association between miR-124, miR-506 and their target genes, DNMTs. We further identified that miR-124 and miR-506 directly targeted DNMT3B and indirectly targeted DNMT1. The overexpression of miR-124 and miR-506 reduced global DNA methylation and restored the expression of E-cadherin, MGMT and P16. In conclusion, our data showed that miR-124 and miR-506 inhibit progression and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy by targeting DNMT3B and DNMT1 in CRC. These findings may provide novel avenues for the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26497367

  2. miR-124 promotes the neuronal differentiation of mouse inner ear neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Di; Du, Jintao; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhou, Wei; Zong, Lin; Dong, Chang; Chen, Kaitian; Chen, Yu; Chen, Xihui; Jiang, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) act as key regulators in neuronal development, synaptic morphogenesis and plasticity. However, their role in the neuronal differentiation of inner ear neural stem cells (NSCs) remains unclear. In this study, 6 miRNAs were selected and their expression patterns during the neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs were examined by RT-qPCR. We demonstrated that the culture of spiral ganglion stem cells present in the inner ears of newborn mice gave rise to neurons in vitro. The expression patterns of miR-124, miR-132, miR-134, miR-20a, miR-17-5p and miR-30a-5p were examined during a 14-day neuronal differentiation period. We found that miR-124 promoted the neuronal differentiation of and neurite outgrowth in mouse inner ear NSCs, and that the changes in the expression of tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) during inner ear NSC differentiation were associated with miR-124 expression. Our findings indicate that miR-124 plays a role in the neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs. This finding may lead to the development of novel strategies for restoring hearing in neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Acute stress alters amygdala microRNA miR-135a and miR-124 expression: inferences for corticosteroid dependent stress response.

    PubMed

    Mannironi, Cecilia; Camon, Jeremy; De Vito, Francesca; Biundo, Antonio; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Persiconi, Irene; Bozzoni, Irene; Fragapane, Paola; Mele, Andrea; Presutti, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is a brain structure considered a key node for the regulation of neuroendocrine stress response. Stress-induced response in amygdala is accomplished through neurotransmitter activation and an alteration of gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression in the nervous system and are very well suited effectors of stress response for their ability to reversibly silence specific mRNAs. In order to study how acute stress affects miRNAs expression in amygdala we analyzed the miRNA profile after two hours of mouse restraint, by microarray analysis and reverse transcription real time PCR. We found that miR-135a and miR-124 were negatively regulated. Among in silico predicted targets we identified the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) as a target of both miR-135a and miR-124. Luciferase experiments and endogenous protein expression analysis upon miRNA upregulation and inhibition allowed us to demonstrate that mir-135a and mir-124 are able to negatively affect the expression of the MR. The increased levels of the amygdala MR protein after two hours of restraint, that we analyzed by western blot, negatively correlate with miR-135a and miR-124 expression. These findings point to a role of miR-135a and miR-124 in acute stress as regulators of the MR, an important effector of early stress response.

  4. Acute Stress Alters Amygdala microRNA miR-135a and miR-124 Expression: Inferences for Corticosteroid Dependent Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Mannironi, Cecilia; Camon, Jeremy; De Vito, Francesca; Biundo, Antonio; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Persiconi, Irene; Bozzoni, Irene; Fragapane, Paola; Mele, Andrea; Presutti, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala is a brain structure considered a key node for the regulation of neuroendocrine stress response. Stress-induced response in amygdala is accomplished through neurotransmitter activation and an alteration of gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression in the nervous system and are very well suited effectors of stress response for their ability to reversibly silence specific mRNAs. In order to study how acute stress affects miRNAs expression in amygdala we analyzed the miRNA profile after two hours of mouse restraint, by microarray analysis and reverse transcription real time PCR. We found that miR-135a and miR-124 were negatively regulated. Among in silico predicted targets we identified the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) as a target of both miR-135a and miR-124. Luciferase experiments and endogenous protein expression analysis upon miRNA upregulation and inhibition allowed us to demonstrate that mir-135a and mir-124 are able to negatively affect the expression of the MR. The increased levels of the amygdala MR protein after two hours of restraint, that we analyzed by western blot, negatively correlate with miR-135a and miR-124 expression. These findings point to a role of miR-135a and miR-124 in acute stress as regulators of the MR, an important effector of early stress response. PMID:24023867

  5. MALAT1-miR-124-RBG2 axis is involved in growth and invasion of HR-HPV-positive cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Zeng, Saitian; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT 1) is a large, infrequently spliced non-coding RNA aberrantly expressed in cervical cancer. But the molecular mechanisms of its oncogenic role are still not quite clear. The present study explored whether there is a competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) mechanism involved in the oncogenic effect of MALAT1. MALAT1 expression was firstly verified in high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV)-positive tumor tissues and cell lines. Its regulation over miR-124 and the downstream target of miR-124 in regulation of growth, invasion, and apoptosis of the cancer cells are also studied. Findings of this study confirmed higher MALAT1 expression in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer. Knockdown of endogenous MALAT1 significantly reduced cell growth rate and invasion and increased cell apoptosis of Hela and siHa cells. Besides, knockdown of MALAT1 increased the expression of miRNA-124, while ectopic expression of miR-124 decreased MALAT1 expression. In addition, we also verified a direct interaction between miR-124 and 3'UTR of GRB2. MALAT1 can indirectly modulate GRB2 expression via competing miR-124. Knockdown of GRB2 reduced cell invasion and increased cell apoptosis. In conclusion, MALAT1 can promote HR-HPV (+) cancer cell growth and invasion at least partially through the MALAT1-miR-124-RBG2 axis. This finding might provide some useful evidence about the lncRNA interaction regulatory network in tumorigenesis cervical cancer.

  6. MicroRNA miR124 is required for the expression of homeostatic synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qingming; Ruan, Hongyu; Gilbert, James; Wang, Guan; Ma, Qi; Yao, Wei-Dong; Man, Heng-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a compensatory response to alterations in neuronal activity. Chronic deprivation of neuronal activity results in an increase in synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and postsynaptic currents. The biogenesis of GluA2-lacking, calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) plays a crucial role in the homeostatic response; however, the mechanisms leading to CP-AMPAR formation remain unclear. Here we show that the microRNA, miR124, is required for the generation of CP-AMPARs and homeostatic plasticity. miR124 suppresses GluA2 expression via targeting its 3′-UTR, leading to the formation of CP-AMPARs. Blockade of miR124 function abolishes the homeostatic response, whereas miR124 overexpression leads to earlier induction of homeostatic plasticity. miR124 transcription is controlled by an inhibitory transcription factor EVI1, acting by association with the deacetylase HDAC1. Our data support a cellular cascade in which inactivity relieves EVI1/HDAC-mediated inhibition of miR124 gene transcription, resulting in enhanced miR124 expression, formation of CP-AMPARs and subsequent induction of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:26620774

  7. Reactivation of epigenetically silenced miR-124 reverses the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and inhibits invasion in endometrial cancer cells via the direct repression of IQGAP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Hidemichi; Hanley, Sharon J.B.; Yamada, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Kudo, Masataka; Yue, Junming; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of IQGAP1 and microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation are frequent in human tumors, but little is known about the role of IQGAP1 and its relationship to miRNA in endometrial carcinogenesis. We demonstrate that IQGAP1 activates the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) program and that miR-124 directly represses IQGAP1 expression in endometrial cancer (EC) cells. The overexpression of IQGAP1 stimulates EMT features and enhances migration, invasion and proliferation of EC cells, whereas knocking down IQGAP1 expression reverses EMT and inhibits these malignant properties. Using miRNA microarray profiling, we identified 29 miRNAs (let-7b, let-7f, miR-10b, miR-15b, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-25, miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-30a-5p, miR-34a, miR-124, miR-127, miR-130b, miR-148a, miR-155, miR-191*, miR-194, miR-224, miR-362, miR-409-3p, miR-422b, miR-424, miR-453, miR-497, miR-518d, miR-518f*, miR-526a and miR-656) that are significantly down-regulated in an in vitro-selected highly invasive derivative cell line (HEC-50-HI) relative to the parental HEC-50 cells. We further identified miR-124 as a direct regulator of IQGAP1 in EC cells. Enforced expression of miR-124 suppresses EC cell invasion and proliferation. The expression of IQGAP1 mRNA was significantly elevated in EC tissues, while the expression of miR-124 was decreased. The downregulation of miR-124 correlates with a poor survival outcome for patients with EC. Treating EC cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased miR-124 expression and down-regulated IQGAP1 levels. Our data suggest that IQGAP1 promotes EMT, migration and invasion of EC cells. MiR-124, a novel tumor suppressor miRNA that is epigenetically silenced in EC, can reverse EMT and the invasive properties, by attenuating the expression of the IQGAP1 oncogene. PMID:26934121

  8. Silencing of miR-124 induces neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through promoting AHR.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsui-Chin; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Pei-Yi; Lee, Hsinyu; Liao, Yung-Feng; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2011-11-16

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. We investigate whether miR-124, the abundant neuronal miRNA, plays a pivotal role in neuroblastoma. Knockdown of miR-124 promotes neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell differentiation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Further miR-124 is predicted to target aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) which may promote neuroblastoma cell differentiation. We validate that miR-124 may suppress the expression of AHR by targeting its 3'-UTR. These results suggest that miR-124 could serve as a potential therapeutic target of neuroblastoma.

  9. The feedback loop between miR-124 and TGF-β pathway plays a significant role in non-small cell lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zu, Lidong; Xue, Yunjing; Wang, Jinglong; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Xiumin; Xiao, Gang; Hao, Mingang; Sun, Xueqing; Wang, Yingying; Fu, Guohui; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Increasing evidence shows that micro RNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in tumor development. However, the role of miRNAs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastasis remains largely unknown. Here, we found that miR-124 expression was significantly impaired in NSCLC tissues and associated with its metastasis. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that restoring miR-124 expression in NSCLC cells had a marked effect on reducing cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Mechanistic analyses show that Smad4, a cobinding protein in transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway, was identified as a new target gene of miR-124. Restoring Smad4 expression in miR-124-infected cells could partially rescue miR-124-induced abolition of cell migration and invasion. Notably, upon TGF-β stimulation, phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was modulated by alteration of miR-124 or Smad4 expression, followed by inducing some special transcription of downstream genes including Snail, Slug and ZEB2, all of which may trigger epithelial-mesenchymal transition and be associated with NSCLC metastasis. Moreover, activation of TGF-β pathway may enhance expression of DNMT3a, leading to hypermethylation on miR-124 promoter. Therefore, heavily loss of miR-124 expression further enhances Smad4 level by this feedback loop. Taken together, our data show for the first time that the feedback loop between miR-124 and TGF-β pathway may play a significant role in NSCLC metastasis. Targeting the loop may prove beneficial to prevent metastasis and provide a more effective therapeutic strategy for NSCLC. PMID:26818357

  10. MicroRNA-124 negatively regulates LPS-induced TNF-α production in mouse macrophages by decreasing protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Qin, Zhen; Li, Qi; Wan, Jing-jing; Cheng, Ming-he; Wang, Peng-yuan; Su, Ding-feng; Yu, Jian-guang; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: MicroRNAs play pivotal roles in regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effects of microRNA-124 (miR-124) on production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mouse macrophages. Methods: Mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 was stimulated with LPS (100 ng/mL). The levels of miR-124 and TNF-α mRNA were evaluated using q-PCR. ELISA and Western blotting were used to detect TNF-α protein level in cell supernatants and cells, respectively. 3′-UTR luciferase reporter assays were used to analyze the targets of miR-124. For in vivo experiments, mice were injected with LPS (30 mg/kg, ip). Results: LPS stimulation significantly increased the mRNA level of miR-124 in RAW264.7 macrophages in vitro and mice in vivo. In RAW264.7 macrophages, knockdown of miR-124 with miR-124 inhibitor dose-dependently increased LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α protein and prolonged the half-life of TNF-α protein, but did not change TNF-α mRNA levels, whereas overexpression of miR-124 with miR-124 mimic produced the opposite effects. Furthermore, miR-124 was found to directly target two components of deubiquitinating enzymes: ubiquitin-specific proteases (USP) 2 and 14. Knockdown of USP2 or USP14 accelerated protein degradation of TNF-α, and abolished the effect of miR-124 on TNF-α protein stability. Conclusion: miR-124, targeting USP2 and USP14, negatively regulates LPS-induced TNF-α production in mouse macrophages, suggesting miR-124 as a new therapeutic target in inflammation-related diseases. PMID:27063215

  11. Yokukansan normalizes glucocorticoid receptor protein expression in oligodendrocytes of the corpus callosum by regulating microRNA-124a expression after stress exposure.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Tohyama, Masaya; Miyata, Shingo

    2015-05-01

    Stressful events are known to down-regulate expression levels of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the brain. Recently, we reported that stressed mice with elevated plasma levels of corticosterone exhibit morphological changes in the oligodendrocytes of nerve fiber bundles, such as those in the corpus callosum. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GR expression regulation in oligodendrocytes after stress exposure. A previous report has suggested that GR protein levels might be regulated by microRNA (miR)-18 and/or -124a in the brain. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the GR regulation mechanism in oligodendrocytes and evaluate the effects of yokukansan (YKS), a Kampo medicine, on GR protein regulation. Acute exposure to stress increased plasma corticosterone levels, decreased GR protein expression, and increased miR-124a expression in the corpus callosum of adult male mice, though the GR mRNA and miR-18 expression levels were not significant changes. YKS normalized the stress-induced changes in the plasma corticosterone, GR protein, and miR124a expression levels. An oligodendrocyte primary culture study also showed that YKS down-regulated miR-124a, but not miR-18, expression levels in dexamethasone-treated cells. These results suggest that the down-regulation of miR124a expression might be involved in the normalization of stress-induced decreases in GR protein in oligodendrocytes by YKS. This effect may imply the molecular mechanisms underlying the ameliorative effects of YKS on psychological symptoms and stress-related behaviors.

  12. MiR-124 is differentially expressed in derivatives of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage and promotes neurite elongation in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Shtukmaster, Stella; Narasimhan, Priyanka; El Faitwri, Tehani; Stubbusch, Jutta; Ernsberger, Uwe; Rohrer, Hermann; Unsicker, Klaus; Huber, Katrin

    2016-08-01

    The neural-crest-derived sympathoadrenal cell lineage gives rise to sympathetic neurons and to endocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. Both cell types express a largely overlapping set of genes, including those coding for the molecular machinery related to the synthesis and exocytotic release of catecholamines. During their early development, sympathetic neurons and chromaffin cells rely on a shared transcription factor network that controls the establishment of these common features. Despite many similarities, mature sympathetic neurons and chromaffin cells significantly differ regarding their morphology and function. Most prominently, sympathetic neurons possess axons that are absent in mammalian adrenal chromaffin cells. The molecular mechanism underlying the divergent development of sympathoadrenal cells into neuronal and endocrine cells remains elusive. Mutational inactivation of the ribonuclease dicer hints at the importance of microRNAs in this diversification. We show here that miR-124 is detectable in developing sympathetic neurons but absent in chromaffin cell precursors. We further demonstrate that miR-124 promotes neurite elongation when transfected into cultured chromaffin cells indicating its capability to support the establishment of a neuronal morphology in non-neuronal sympathoadrenal cells. Our results also show that treatment of PC12 cells with the neurotrophin nerve growth factor leads to an upregulation of miR-124 expression and that inhibition of miR-124 reduces nerve-growth-factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Thus, our data indicate that miR-124 contributes to the establishment of specific neuronal features in developing sympathoadrenal cells. PMID:27094431

  13. MicroRNA-124 Targets Tip110 Expression and Regulates Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Huang, Xinxin; Timani, Khalid Amine; Broxmeyer, Hal E; He, Johnny J

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNA (miR) regulates hematopoiesis through targeting different genes post-transcriptionally. We have recently shown that Tip110 expression is downregulated during hematopoietic stem cell differentiation. However, the underlying mechanisms are not known. In this study, we identified a conserved miR-124-binding site on the Tip110 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) and showed that Tip110 was downregulated by miR-124 through its 3'-UTR. We then examined the relationship among miR-124 and Tip110 expression and differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells. We found that miR-124 was expressed in a low level in human cord blood CD34(+) cells, but it was considerably upregulated during culturing and differentiation of these cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-124 expression decreased Tip110 expression and promoted differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells, while miR-124 knockdown increased Tip110 expression, slowed down differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells, and caused an expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. Finally, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Tip110 transgenic mice, performed the exon array analysis, and found that Tip110 altered a number of genes in the hematopoiesis pathways. Dnmt3a as de novo methyltransferase was also significantly upregulated. That miR-124 was markedly upregulated during human cord blood CD34(+) cell differentiation could be the result of direct loss of its promoter methylation from Dnmt3a. Taken together, our study demonstrates that miR-124 regulates Tip110 expression and differentiation of human cord blood CD34(+) cells and suggests important roles of miR-124/Tip110 in hematopoiesis. PMID:25928721

  14. Hypoxia-responsive miR-124 and miR-144 reduce hypoxia-induced autophagy and enhance radiosensitivity of prostate cancer cells via suppressing PIM1.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hao; Liu, Mingzhu; Ding, Changmao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Rui; Wu, Xinyu; Fan, Ruitai

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cells in hypoxia usually make adaptive changes in cellular metabolism, such as altered autophagy. This might be a cause of enhanced radioresistance in some types of cancer. In this study, we investigated hypoxia-responsive miRNAs in two prostate cancer cell lines (DU145 and PC3). This study firstly reported that hypoxia induces further downregulation of miR-124 and miR-144, which might be a result of impaired dicer expression. These two miRNAs can simultaneously target 3'UTR of PIM1. Functional study showed that miR-124 or miR-144 overexpression can inhibit hypoxia-induced autophagy and enhance radiosensitivity at least via downregulating PIM1. Therefore, hypoxia induced miR-124 and miR-144 downregulation may contribute to a prosurvival mechanism of prostate cancer cells to hypoxia and irradiation at least through attenuated suppressing of PIM1. This finding presents a potential therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26990493

  15. Validation of the FAM19A4/mir124-2 DNA methylation test for both lavage- and brush-based self-samples to detect cervical (pre)cancer in HPV-positive women

    PubMed Central

    De Strooper, Lise M.A.; Verhoef, Viola M.J.; Berkhof, Johannes; Hesselink, Albertus T.; de Bruin, Helena M.E.; van Kemenade, Folkert J.; Bosgraaf, Remko P.; Bekkers, Ruud L.M.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Melchers, Willem J.G.; Steenbergen, Renske D.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives DNA methylation analysis of cancer-related genes is a promising tool for HPV-positive women to identify those with cervical (pre)cancer (CIN3+) in need of treatment. However, clinical performance of methylation markers can be influenced by the sample type utilized. We describe a multiplex quantitative methylation-specific PCR that targets FAM19A4 and mir124-2 loci, to detect CIN3+ using both HPV-positive lavage- and brush self-samples. Methods We determined methylation thresholds for clinical classification using HPV-positive training sets comprising lavage self-samples of 182 women (including 40 with CIN3+) and brush self-samples of 224 women (including 61 with CIN3+). Subsequently, independent HPV-positive validation sets of 389 lavage self-samples (including 78 with CIN3+), and 254 brush self-samples (including 72 with CIN3+) were tested using the preset thresholds. Furthermore, the clinical performance of combined methylation analysis and HPV16/18 genotyping was determined. Results Training set analysis revealed similar FAM19A4 and mir124-2 thresholds for both self-sample types to yield highest CIN3+ sensitivity at 70% specificity. Validation set analysis resulted in a CIN3+ sensitivity of 70.5% (95%CI: 60.4–80.6) at a specificity of 67.8% (95%CI: 62.7–73.0) for lavage self-samples, and a CIN3+ sensitivity of 69.4% (95%CI: 58.8–80.1) at a 76.4% (95%CI: 70.2–82.6) specificity for brush self-samples. In combination with HPV16/18 genotyping, CIN3+ sensitivity and specificity were 88.5% (95%CI: 81.4–95.6) and 46.0% (95%CI: 40.4–51.5) for lavage self-samples, and 84.7% (95%CI: 76.4–93.0) and 54.9% (95%CI: 47.7–62.2) for brush self-samples. Conclusions FAM19A4/mir124-2 methylation analysis performs equally well in HPV-positive lavage- and brush self-samples to identify women with CIN3+. In combination with HPV16/18 genotyping, significantly higher CIN3+ sensitivities are obtained, at decreased specificity. PMID:26921784

  16. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  17. Emotion Regulation and Impulsivity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana R.N.; Grant, Jon E.; Odlaug, Brian L.

    2012-01-01

    Past research has linked both emotion regulation and impulsivity with the development and maintenance of addictions. However, no research has investigated the relationship between emotion regulation and impulsivity within young adults. In the present study, we analyzed 194 young adults (27.8% female; 21.3 ± 3.32 years old; 91.8% single; 85.1% Caucasian), grouping them as low, average, or high emotionally dysregulated, and compared self-reported impulsivity, impulsive behaviors (such as alcohol and substance use and gambling) and cognitive impulsivity. We hypothesized that those with high levels of emotion dysregulation would score higher on self-reported and cognitive impulsivity, and report more impulsive behaviors. Analysis indicated that compared to low, the high emotion dysregulation group scored significantly higher on two self-report measures of impulsivity, harm avoidance, and cognitive reasoning. No significant differences were found between groups in impulsive behaviors and cognitive impulsivity. Overall, this study highlights the relationship between emotion dysregulation and impulsivity, suggesting that emotion regulation may be an important factor to consider when assessing individuals at a higher risk for developing an addiction. PMID:22385661

  18. HuR-regulated lncRNA NEAT1 stability in tumorigenesis and progression of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yiqing; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhikun; Liu, Liwei

    2016-07-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as pivotal regulators in governing fundamental biological processes, as well as in tumorigenesis. The nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) is one of the most highly regulated lncRNAs in recent genomic datasets, however, its biological role and regulatory mechanism in ovarian cancer (OC) development and progression are poorly defined. In this study, we identified that NEAT1 was up-regulated in OC patients and cell lines, and its expression was associated with the FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of NEAT1_1 in OVCAR-3 cell lines promoted cell proliferation and invasion, whereas knockdown of NEAT1_1 did the opposite. Furthermore, NEAT1_1 was stabilized by an RNA-binding protein HuR, but suppressed by miR-124-3p in OC cells. Accordingly, the increased HuR mRNA and decreased miR-124-3p levels were observed in OC patients. These results suggested that lncRNA NEAT1, whose expression was collaboratively controlled by HuR and miR-124-3p, could regulate ovarian carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential target for antineoplastic therapies.

  19. Adult-type hypolactasia and regulation of lactase expression.

    PubMed

    Troelsen, Jesper T

    2005-05-25

    A common genetically determined polymorphism in the human population leads to two distinct phenotypes in adults, lactase persistence and adult-type hypolactasia (lactase non-persistence). All healthy newborn children express high levels of lactase and are able to digest large quantities of lactose, the main carbohydrate in milk. Individuals with adult-type hypolactasia lose their lactase expression before adulthood and consequently often become lactose intolerant with associated digestive problems (e.g. diarrhoea). In contrast, lactase persistent individuals have a lifelong lactase expression and are able to digest lactose as adults. Lactase persistence can be regarded as the mutant phenotype since other mammals down-regulate their lactase expression after weaning (the postweaning decline). This phenomenon does not occur in lactase persistent individuals. The regulation of lactase expression is mainly transcriptional and it is well established that adult-type hypolactasia is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner, whereas persistence is dominant. The recent findings of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with lactase persistence have made it possible to study the potential mechanisms underlying adult-type hypolactasia. This work has led to the identification of gene-regulatory sequences located far from the lactase gene (LCT). The present review describes the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of lactase expression and the possible mechanisms behind adult-type hypolactasia.

  20. Immunological regulation of neurogenic niches in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Gutierrez-Fernandez, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Collas-Aguilar, Jorge; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, neurogenesis and oligodendrogenesis are germinal processes that occur in the adult brain throughout life. The subventricular (SVZ) and subgranular (SGZ) zones are the main neurogenic regions in adult brain. Therein, it resides a subpopulation of astrocytes that act as neural stem cells. Increasing evidence indicates that pro-inflammatory and other immunological mediators are important regulators of neural precursors into the SVZ and the SGZ. There are a number of inflammatory cytokines that regulate the function of neural stem cells. Some of the most studied include: interleukin-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin-like growth factor-1, growth-regulated oncogene-alpha, leukemia inhibitory factor, cardiotrophin-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. This plethora of immunological mediators can control the migration, proliferation, quiescence, cell-fate choices and survival of neural stem cells and their progeny. Thus, systemic or local inflammatory processes represent important regulators of germinal niches in the adult brain. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines involved in the regulation of adult neural stem cells under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Additionally, we described the role of proinflammatory cytokines in neurodegenerative diseases and some therapeutical approaches for the immunomodulation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:22986164

  1. Jasmonate regulates juvenile-to-adult phase transition in rice.

    PubMed

    Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Isono, Miyako; Mimura, Manaki; Sentoku, Naoki; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kitomi, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Takanori; Itoh, Jun-Ichi; Nagato, Yasuo

    2016-09-15

    Juvenile-to-adult phase transition is an important shift for the acquisition of adult vegetative characteristics and subsequent reproductive competence. We identified a recessive precocious (pre) mutant exhibiting a long leaf phenotype in rice. The long leaf phenotype is conspicuous in the second to the fourth leaves, which are juvenile and juvenile-to-adult transition leaves. We found that morphological and physiological traits, such as midrib formation, shoot meristem size, photosynthetic rate and plastochron, in juvenile and juvenile-to-adult transition stages of the pre mutant have precociously acquired adult characteristics. In agreement with these results, expression patterns of miR156 and miR172, which are microRNAs regulating phase change, support the accelerated juvenile-to-adult phase change in the pre mutant. The mutated gene encodes an allene oxide synthase (OsAOS1), which is a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid (JA). The pre mutant showed a low level of JA and enhanced sensitivity to gibberellic acid, which promotes the phase change in some plant species. We also show that prolonged plastochron in the pre mutant is caused by accelerated PLASTOCHRON1 (PLA1) function. The present study reveals a substantial role of JA as a negative regulator of vegetative phase change. PMID:27578792

  2. Self-regulation of adult thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Kasten, Michael R; Anderson, Matthew P

    2015-07-01

    The thalamus acts as a conduit for sensory and other information traveling to the cortex. In response to continuous sensory stimulation in vivo, the firing rate of thalamocortical neurons initially increases, but then within a minute firing rate decreases and T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent action potential burst firing emerges. While neuromodulatory systems could play a role in this inhibitory response, we instead report a novel and cell-autonomous inhibitory mechanism intrinsic to the thalamic relay neuron. Direct intracellular stimulation of thalamocortical neuron firing initially triggered a continuous and high rate of action potential discharge, but within a minute membrane potential (Vm) was hyperpolarized and firing rate to the same stimulus was decreased. This self-inhibition was observed across a wide variety of thalamic nuclei, and in a subset firing mode switched from tonic to bursting. The self-inhibition resisted blockers of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPases, and G protein-regulated inward rectifier (GIRK) channels as implicated in other neuron subtypes, but instead was in part inhibited by an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker. The results identify a new homeostatic mechanism within the thalamus capable of gating excitatory signals at the single-cell level. PMID:25948871

  3. Selectivity as an Emotion Regulation Strategy: Lessons from Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Tamara; Hogan, Candice; Carstensen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Findings based on studies of daily life consistently associate older ages with relatively positive emotional experience, suggesting that older adults may regulate emotions more effectively than younger adults. Findings from laboratory studies are equivocal, however, with mixed evidence for age-related improvements in use of emotion regulatory strategies. In the current paper, we propose that findings may reflect a failure of laboratory-based experiments to capture the regulatory strategies that older people use in their everyday lives. We argue that the advantages older people have are likely due to antecedent emotion regulation as opposed to response-focused strategies. Understanding the regulatory approaches that older people actually use may inform developmental models of emotion regulation throughout adulthood as well as interventions for improving emotional experience across the life span. PMID:25914897

  4. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis. From Genes to Cognition

    DOE PAGES

    Aimone, J. B.; Li, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Clemenson, G. D.; Deng, W.; Gage, F. H.

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. Our review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages ofmore » maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. Furthermore, the increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders.« less

  5. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis: From Genes to Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, James B.; Li, Yan; Lee, Star W.; Clemenson, Gregory D.; Deng, Wei; Gage, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. This review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. The increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders. PMID:25287858

  6. Regulation and Function of Adult Neurogenesis. From Genes to Cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Aimone, J. B.; Li, Y.; Lee, S. W.; Clemenson, G. D.; Deng, W.; Gage, F. H.

    2014-10-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is a notable process due not only to its uniqueness and potential impact on cognition but also to its localized vertical integration of different scales of neuroscience, ranging from molecular and cellular biology to behavior. Our review summarizes the recent research regarding the process of adult neurogenesis from these different perspectives, with particular emphasis on the differentiation and development of new neurons, the regulation of the process by extrinsic and intrinsic factors, and their ultimate function in the hippocampus circuit. Arising from a local neural stem cell population, new neurons progress through several stages of maturation, ultimately integrating into the adult dentate gyrus network. Furthermore, the increased appreciation of the full neurogenesis process, from genes and cells to behavior and cognition, makes neurogenesis both a unique case study for how scales in neuroscience can link together and suggests neurogenesis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for a number of disorders.

  7. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  8. Motor regulation problems and pain in adults diagnosed with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most children who are diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have moderate-to-severe motor problems using the Motor Function Neurological Assessment battery (MFNU). The MFNU focuses on specific muscle adjustment problems associated with ADHD, especially motor inhibition problems and high muscle tone. Here we investigated whether adults with ADHD/hyperkinetic disorder (HKD) have similar motor problems. In our clinical experience, adults with ADHD often complain about back, shoulder, hip, and leg pain. We also investigate reported pain in adults with ADHD. Methods Twenty-five adult outpatients diagnosed with ADHD/HKD who were responders to methylphenidate (MPH) were compared to 23 non-ADHD controls on 16 MFNU subtests and using a ‘total score’ (‘TS’) parameter. The MFNU test leader was blinded to group identity. The two groups were also compared using the Pain Drawing and Numerical Pain Rating Scale. Results The adult ADHD group had significantly (p < .001) more motor problems (higher TS) than controls. On the muscle regulation subtests, 36–96% of the ADHD group showed ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ problems compared to 13–52% of the control group, and 80% of the ADHD group reported widespread pain. Highly significant differences were found between the ADHD and control groups for the variables ‘pain level’ (p < .001) and ‘pain location’ (p < .001). Significant correlations were found between TS and ‘pain location’ and between TS and ‘pain level’. Conclusions These findings suggest that similar to children with ADHD, adults diagnosed with ADHD also have motor inhibition problems and heightened muscle tone. The presence of significantly higher pain levels and more widespread pain in the ADHD group compared to non-ADHD controls might indicate that pain is a long-term secondary effect of heightened muscle tone and restricted movement that can be demonstrated in children and adults by the MFNU

  9. Astrocytes regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis through ephrin-B signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Randolph S.; Conway, Anthony; Pangarkar, Chinmay; Bergen, Jamie; Lim, Kwang-Il; Shah, Priya; Bissell, Mina; Schaffer, David V.

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus involves activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs) to yield transiently amplifying NSCs and progenitors, and ultimately neurons that affect learning and memory. This process is tightly controlled by microenvironmental cues, though few endogenous factors are known to regulate neuronal differentiation. While astrocytes have been implicated, their role in juxtacrine (i.e. cell-cell contact-dependent) signaling within NSC niches has not been investigated. We show that ephrin-B2 presented from rodent hippocampal astrocytes regulates neurogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, clonal analysis in NSC fate-mapping studies reveals a novel role for ephrin-B2 in instructing neuronal differentiation. Additionally, ephrin-B2 signaling, transduced by EphB4 receptors on NSCs, activates β-catenin in vitro and in vivo independent of Wnt signaling and upregulates proneural transcription factors. Ephrin-B2+ astrocytes thus promote neuronal differentiation of adult NSCs through juxtacrine signaling, findings that advance our understanding of adult neurogenesis and may have future regenerative medicine implications. PMID:22983209

  10. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  11. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A; Burgos, Patricia V; Velásquez, Zahady D; Muñoz, Rosa I; Lafourcade, Carlos A; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as "neurogenic niche". Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles

  12. Prolonged abstinence from developmental cocaine exposure dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the medial prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Giuseppe; Caffino, Lucia; Calabrese, Francesca; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Although evidence exists that chronic cocaine exposure during adulthood is associated with changes in BDNF expression, whether and how cocaine exposure during adolescence modulates BDNF is still unknown. To address this issue, we exposed rats to repeated cocaine injections from post-natal day (PD) 28 to PD 42, a period that roughly approximates adolescence in humans, and we carried out a detailed analysis of the BDNF system in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats sacrificed 3 d (PD 45) and 48 d (PD 90) after the last cocaine treatment. We found that developmental exposure to cocaine altered transcriptional and translational mechanisms governing neurotrophin expression. Total BDNF mRNA levels, in fact, were enhanced in the mPFC of PD 90 rats exposed to cocaine in adolescence, an effect sustained by changes in BDNF exon IV through the transcription factors CaRF and NF-kB. While a profound reduction of specific BDNF-related miRNAs (let7d, miR124 and miR132) may contribute to explaining the increased proBDNF levels, the up-regulation of the extracellular proteases tPA is indicative of increased processing leading to higher levels of released mBDNF. These changes were associated with increased activation of the trkB-Akt pathway resulting in enhanced pmTOR and pS6 kinase, which ultimately produced an up-regulation of Arc and a consequent reduction of GluA1 expression in the mPFC of PD 90 cocaine-treated rats. These findings demonstrate that developmental exposure to cocaine dynamically dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the mPFC of adult rats, providing novel mechanisms that may contribute to cocaine-induced changes in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24345425

  13. Prolonged abstinence from developmental cocaine exposure dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the medial prefrontal cortex of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Giuseppe; Caffino, Lucia; Calabrese, Francesca; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A; Fumagalli, Fabio

    2014-04-01

    Although evidence exists that chronic cocaine exposure during adulthood is associated with changes in BDNF expression, whether and how cocaine exposure during adolescence modulates BDNF is still unknown. To address this issue, we exposed rats to repeated cocaine injections from post-natal day (PD) 28 to PD 42, a period that roughly approximates adolescence in humans, and we carried out a detailed analysis of the BDNF system in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats sacrificed 3 d (PD 45) and 48 d (PD 90) after the last cocaine treatment. We found that developmental exposure to cocaine altered transcriptional and translational mechanisms governing neurotrophin expression. Total BDNF mRNA levels, in fact, were enhanced in the mPFC of PD 90 rats exposed to cocaine in adolescence, an effect sustained by changes in BDNF exon IV through the transcription factors CaRF and NF-kB. While a profound reduction of specific BDNF-related miRNAs (let7d, miR124 and miR132) may contribute to explaining the increased proBDNF levels, the up-regulation of the extracellular proteases tPA is indicative of increased processing leading to higher levels of released mBDNF. These changes were associated with increased activation of the trkB-Akt pathway resulting in enhanced pmTOR and pS6 kinase, which ultimately produced an up-regulation of Arc and a consequent reduction of GluA1 expression in the mPFC of PD 90 cocaine-treated rats. These findings demonstrate that developmental exposure to cocaine dynamically dysregulates BDNF and its signaling network in the mPFC of adult rats, providing novel mechanisms that may contribute to cocaine-induced changes in synaptic plasticity.

  14. An Expanded Notch-Delta Model Exhibiting Long-Range Patterning and Incorporating MicroRNA Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jerry S.; Gumbayan, Abygail M.; Zeller, Robert W.; Mahaffy, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Notch-Delta signaling is a fundamental cell-cell communication mechanism that governs the differentiation of many cell types. Most existing mathematical models of Notch-Delta signaling are based on a feedback loop between Notch and Delta leading to lateral inhibition of neighboring cells. These models result in a checkerboard spatial pattern whereby adjacent cells express opposing levels of Notch and Delta, leading to alternate cell fates. However, a growing body of biological evidence suggests that Notch-Delta signaling produces other patterns that are not checkerboard, and therefore a new model is needed. Here, we present an expanded Notch-Delta model that builds upon previous models, adding a local Notch activity gradient, which affects long-range patterning, and the activity of a regulatory microRNA. This model is motivated by our experiments in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis showing that the peripheral sensory neurons, whose specification is in part regulated by the coordinate activity of Notch-Delta signaling and the microRNA miR-124, exhibit a sparse spatial pattern whereby consecutive neurons may be spaced over a dozen cells apart. We perform rigorous stability and bifurcation analyses, and demonstrate that our model is able to accurately explain and reproduce the neuronal pattern in Ciona. Using Monte Carlo simulations of our model along with miR-124 transgene over-expression assays, we demonstrate that the activity of miR-124 can be incorporated into the Notch decay rate parameter of our model. Finally, we motivate the general applicability of our model to Notch-Delta signaling in other animals by providing evidence that microRNAs regulate Notch-Delta signaling in analogous cell types in other organisms, and by discussing evidence in other organisms of sparse spatial patterns in tissues where Notch-Delta signaling is active. PMID:24945987

  15. Affective Self-Regulation Trajectories During Secondary School Predict Substance Use Among Urban Minority Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Kenneth W.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Acevedo, Bianca P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between trajectories of affective self-regulation skills during secondary school and young adult substance use in a large multi-ethnic, urban sample (N = 995). During secondary school, participants completed a measure of cognitive and behavioral skills used to control negative, unpleasant emotions or perceived stress. As young adults, participants reported on the frequency and quantity of their alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use in a telephone interview. Controlling for demographic variables, self-regulation did not significantly change over adolescence, although there was significant variation in participants’ rates of growth and decline. Lower seventh grade self-regulation and less steep increases in self-regulation were predictive of higher young adult substance use. Male participants had significantly lower initial self-regulation and higher young adult substance use. The results suggest that interventions that build affective self-regulation skills in adolescence may decrease the risk of young adult substance use. PMID:26549966

  16. pH regulation in adult cardiac myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallert, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the pH{sub i} regulatory mechanisms of adult ventricular myocytes, the cells that perform the pumping work of the heart. The cell system for this study was the ventricular myocyte, isolated by enzymatic dissociation from adult rate heart. In agreement with the findings on other cardiac model cells, I demonstrated the existence of a Cl{sup {minus}}/HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} exchanger and a Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger in ventricular myocytes. The existence of the anion exchanger was demonstrated in {sup 36}Cl{sup {minus}} flux experiments and as stilbene disulfonate-inhibitable and Cl{sup {minus}} gradient-dependent intracellular pH shifts in the presence of bicarbonate. The fluorescein derivative BCECF served as a fluorescent probe of intracellular pH in the these experiments. The existence of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger was demonstrated in pH{sub i} experiments using BCECF. Further experiments characterized the kinetics of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger and its regulation. The steady-state pH{sub i} of ventricular myocytes was 7.16 {+-} 0.11 at pH{sub 0} = 7.4. Several agonists caused a rise in steady-state pH{sub i}: the protein kinase stimulator phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), the {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic agonist 6-fluoro-norepinephrine (6F-NE) and the {beta}-agonist UK14304, and ATP.

  17. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Ardiles, Alvaro O.; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory. PMID:25360084

  18. The microRNA-124-iGluR2/3 pathway regulates glucagon release from alpha cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Liu, Rui; Deng, Ting; Wang, Xia; Lang, Hongmei; Qu, Yanjun; Duan, Jingjing; Huang, Dingzhi; Ying, Guoguang; Ba, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon, secreted from islet alpha cells, plays an important role in regulating glucose homeostasis; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not fully understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in the function of alpha cells. Glutamate promotes glucagon secretion by mediating the opening of Ca2+ channels. In this present, iGluR2 and iGluR3 levels were significantly increased in fasting-treated mouse islets. Additional studies showed that miR-124-3p simultaneously regulates the expression of iGluR2 and iGluR3 through the direct targeting of mRNA 3’UTR of these two genes. The miR-124-iGluRs pathway also contributed to the high level of glucagon secretion through long-term high glucose levels. Thus, a novel pathway comprising miRNA, glutamate and iGluRs has been demonstrated to regulate the biological process of glucagon release. PMID:27013590

  19. Critical Analysis of the Adult Literacy Curriculum: Instructional or Regulative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Nina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a brief critical analysis of the adult literacy curriculum as one element of the Skills for Life Strategy and to consider how it has been used to legitimise a dominant adult literacy policy based on economic and political rationales. The term critical has many meanings. Here it is used to explore how the adult…

  20. A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Odette; Kempermann, Gerd; Walker, Tara L

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation of the brain is generally studied in the context of injury or disease. Less is known about how the immune system regulates the brain during normal brain function. Recent work has redefined the field of neuroimmunology and, as long as their recruitment and activation are well regulated, immune cells are now known to have protective properties within the central nervous system in maintaining brain health. Adult neurogenesis, the process of new neuron generation in the adult brain, is highly plastic and regulated by diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Emerging research has shown that immune cells and their secreted factors can influence adult neurogenesis, both under baseline conditions and during conditions known to change neurogenesis levels, such as aging and learning in an enriched environment. This review will discuss how, under nonpathological conditions, the immune system can interact with the neural stem cells to regulate adult neurogenesis with particular focus on the hippocampus-a region crucial for learning and memory.

  1. Circular RNA profiling reveals an abundant circHIPK3 that regulates cell growth by sponging multiple miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiupeng; Bao, Chunyang; Guo, Weijie; Li, Shuyi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bing; Luo, Yanting; Lyu, Dongbin; Li, Yan; Shi, Guohai; Liang, Linhui; Gu, Jianren; He, Xianghuo; Huang, Shenglin

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) represent a class of widespread and diverse endogenous RNAs that may regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. However, the regulation and function of human circRNAs remain largely unknown. Here we generate ribosomal-depleted RNA sequencing data from six normal tissues and seven cancers, and detect at least 27,000 circRNA candidates. Many of these circRNAs are differently expressed between the normal and cancerous tissues. We further characterize one abundant circRNA derived from Exon2 of the HIPK3 gene, termed circHIPK3. The silencing of circHIPK3 but not HIPK3 mRNA significantly inhibits human cell growth. Via a luciferase screening assay, circHIPK3 is observed to sponge to 9 miRNAs with 18 potential binding sites. Specifically, we show that circHIPK3 directly binds to miR-124 and inhibits miR-124 activity. Our results provide evidence that circular RNA produced from precursor mRNA may have a regulatory role in human cells. PMID:27050392

  2. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  3. Weight regulation practices of young adults. Predictors of restrictive eating.

    PubMed

    Quick, Virginia M; Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2012-10-01

    Young adults frequently use restrictive eating (i.e., going for long periods [≥ 8h] without eating to influence their shape or weight) to control their weight. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of restrictive eating in young adults, compare eating behaviors of restrictive and non-restrictive eaters, and predict restrictive eaters. A diverse (56% white, 63% female) sample of young adults (n=2449) completed an online survey that included eating behavior scales (Restraint, Eating, Shape, and Weight Concerns, and Inappropriate Compensatory Behaviors from the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, Emotional and Disinhibited Eating from the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, and Night Eating from the Night Eating Questionnaire) and demographics. A quarter of women and 20% of men were classified as restrictive eaters. Independent t-tests revealed restrictive eaters had significantly (p<0.001) higher BMIs than non-restrictive eaters. Restrictive eaters also had significantly higher scores on all eating behavior scales than non-restrictive eaters even after controlling for potential confounding factors (BMI, race). Stepwise binary logistic regression revealed that increased eating, shape, and weight concerns, higher BMI, endorsement of inappropriate compensatory behaviors and night eating, being female, and white increased the odds of participants being restrictive eaters. This study can help healthcare professionals become more aware of weight control practices of young adults and create appropriate interventions.

  4. An insulin-like peptide regulates size and adult stem cells in planarians.

    PubMed

    Miller, Claire M; Newmark, Phillip A

    2012-01-01

    Animal growth depends on nutritional intake during development. In many animals, nutritional status is uncoupled from moderation of adult stature after adult size is achieved. However, some long-lived animals continue to regulate adult size and fertility in a nutrition-dependent manner. For example, the regenerating flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea becomes smaller, or degrows, during periods of starvation. These animals provide an opportunity to readily observe adult stem cell population dynamics in response to nutritional cues. We explored the role of insulin signaling in S. mediterranea. We disrupted insulin signaling via RNA interference and showed that animals, despite eating, degrew similarly to starved animals. Utilizing in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, we assessed cellular changes in proliferative populations including the planarian adult stem cell population (neoblasts) and the germline. Both impaired insulin signaling and nutritional deprivation correlated with decreased neoblast proliferation. Additionally, insulin signaling played a role in supporting spermatogenesis that was distinct from the effects of starvation. In sum, we have demonstrated that insulin signaling is responsible for regulation of adult animal size and tissue homeostasis in an organism with plastic adult size. Importantly, insulin signaling continued to affect stem cell and germline populations in a mature organism. Furthermore, we have shown that adult organisms can differentially regulate specific cell populations as a result of environmental challenges.

  5. Sex hormones and adult hippocampal neurogenesis: Regulation, implications, and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Rand; Wainwright, Steven R; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-04-01

    Neurogenesis within the adult hippocampus is modulated by endogenous and exogenous factors. Here, we review the role of sex hormones in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in males and females. The review is framed around the potential functional implications of sex hormone regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, with a focus on cognitive function and mood regulation, which may be related to sex differences in incidence and severity of dementia and depression. We present findings from preclinical studies of endogenous fluctuations in sex hormones relating to reproductive function and ageing, and from studies of exogenous hormone manipulations. In addition, we discuss the modulating roles of sex, age, and reproductive history on the relationship between sex hormones and neurogenesis. Because sex hormones have diverse targets in the central nervous system, we overview potential mechanisms through which sex hormones may influence hippocampal neurogenesis. Lastly, we advocate for a more systematic consideration of sex and sex hormones in studying the functional implications of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  6. Driving Skills of Young Adults with Developmental Coordination Disorder: Regulating Speed and Coping with Distraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Rita F.; Wann, John P.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we used an automatic car simulator to examine the steering control, speed regulation and response to hazards of young adults with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and limited driving experience. In Experiment 1 participants either used the accelerator pedal to regulate their speed, or used the brake pedal when they…

  7. Adult Antisocial Behavior and Affect Regulation among Primary Crack/Cocaine-Using Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Lisa Caren; Hien, Denise A.; Levin, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between deficits in affect regulation and Adult Antisocial Behavior (ASB) in primary crack/cocaine-using women was explored in a sample of 80 inner-city women. Narrative early memories were coded for two components of affect regulation, Affect Tolerance and Affect Expression, using the Epigenetic Assessment Rating Scale (EARS;…

  8. Eating Pathology, Emotion Regulation, and Emotional Overeating in Obese Adults with Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gianini, Loren M.; White, Marney A.; Masheb, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship among emotional regulation, emotional overeating, and general eating pathology in a treatment seeking sample of adults with Binge Eating Disorder (BED). Method The sample was composed of 326 adults (248 women, 78 men) who were obese and met DSM-IV-TR criteria for BED. Prior to treatment, participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Emotional Overeating Questionnaire (EOQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) as part of a larger assessment battery. Results A series of hierarchical regression analyses indicated that difficulties with emotion regulation accounted for unique variance in both emotional overeating and general eating pathology above and beyond sex and negative affect. Discussion Emotion regulation may play a significant role in the maintenance of emotional overeating and eating pathology in obese adults with BED. PMID:23910772

  9. Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 regulates integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xin; Chang, Jay H.; Ge, Shaoyu; Faulkner, Regina L.; Kim, Ju Young; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Liu, Xiao-bo; Yang, Chih-Hao; Jordan, J. Dedrick; Ma, Dengke K.; Liu, Cindy Y.; Ganesan, Sundar; Cheng, Hwai-Jong; Ming, Guo-li; Lu, Bai; Song, Hongjun

    2007-01-01

    Summary Adult neurogenesis occurs throughout life in discrete regions of the adult mammalian brain. Little is known about the mechanism governing the sequential developmental process that leads to integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells into the existing circuitry. Here, we investigated roles of Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a schizophrenia susceptibility gene, in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Unexpectedly, down regulation of DISC1 leads to accelerated neuronal integration, resulting in aberrant morphological development and mis-positioning of new dentate granule cells in a cell-autonomous fashion. Functionally, newborn neurons with DISC1 knockdown exhibit enhanced excitability and accelerated dendritic development and synapse formation. Furthermore, DISC1 cooperates with its binding partner Ndel1 in regulating adult neurogenesis. Taken together, our study identifies DISC1 as a key regulator that orchestrates the tempo of functional neuronal integration in the adult brain and demonstrates essential roles of a susceptibility gene for major mental illness in neuronal development, including adult neurogenesis. PMID:17825401

  10. Anxiety symptomatology and perceived health in African American adults: Moderating role of emotion regulation

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sierra E.; Walker, Rheeda L.

    2014-01-01

    Though emotional health has been theoretically and empirically linked to physical health, the anxiety-physical health association in particular is not well understood for African American adults. This study examined anxiety as a specific correlate of perceived health in addition to testing the potential moderating role of emotion regulation, an index of how and when individuals modulate emotions, in the association for anxiety to perceived health. Study participants were 151 community-based African American adults who completed measures of anxiety symptomatology and emotion regulation in addition to responding to a self-report question of perceived health. Results showed that higher levels of anxiety symptomatology were associated with poorer health ratings for those who reported more limited access to emotion regulation strategies but not those who reported having more emotion regulation strategies. The findings suggest that anxiety-related distress and health problems may be interrelated when emotion regulation strategies are limited. PMID:25045943

  11. Functional genomics identifies regulators of the phototransduction machinery in the Drosophila larval eye and adult ocelli.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek Kumar; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Tsachaki, Maria; Fritsch, Cornelia; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-02-15

    Sensory perception of light is mediated by specialized Photoreceptor neurons (PRs) in the eye. During development all PRs are genetically determined to express a specific Rhodopsin (Rh) gene and genes mediating a functional phototransduction pathway. While the genetic and molecular mechanisms of PR development is well described in the adult compound eye, it remains unclear how the expression of Rhodopsins and the phototransduction cascade is regulated in other visual organs in Drosophila, such as the larval eye and adult ocelli. Using transcriptome analysis of larval PR-subtypes and ocellar PRs we identify and study new regulators required during PR differentiation or necessary for the expression of specific signaling molecules of the functional phototransduction pathway. We found that the transcription factor Krüppel (Kr) is enriched in the larval eye and controls PR differentiation by promoting Rh5 and Rh6 expression. We also identified Camta, Lola, Dve and Hazy as key genes acting during ocellar PR differentiation. Further we show that these transcriptional regulators control gene expression of the phototransduction cascade in both larval eye and adult ocelli. Our results show that PR cell type-specific transcriptome profiling is a powerful tool to identify key transcriptional regulators involved during several aspects of PR development and differentiation. Our findings greatly contribute to the understanding of how combinatorial action of key transcriptional regulators control PR development and the regulation of a functional phototransduction pathway in both larval eye and adult ocelli.

  12. Functional genomics identifies regulators of the phototransduction machinery in the Drosophila larval eye and adult ocelli.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhishek Kumar; Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Tsachaki, Maria; Fritsch, Cornelia; Sprecher, Simon G

    2016-02-15

    Sensory perception of light is mediated by specialized Photoreceptor neurons (PRs) in the eye. During development all PRs are genetically determined to express a specific Rhodopsin (Rh) gene and genes mediating a functional phototransduction pathway. While the genetic and molecular mechanisms of PR development is well described in the adult compound eye, it remains unclear how the expression of Rhodopsins and the phototransduction cascade is regulated in other visual organs in Drosophila, such as the larval eye and adult ocelli. Using transcriptome analysis of larval PR-subtypes and ocellar PRs we identify and study new regulators required during PR differentiation or necessary for the expression of specific signaling molecules of the functional phototransduction pathway. We found that the transcription factor Krüppel (Kr) is enriched in the larval eye and controls PR differentiation by promoting Rh5 and Rh6 expression. We also identified Camta, Lola, Dve and Hazy as key genes acting during ocellar PR differentiation. Further we show that these transcriptional regulators control gene expression of the phototransduction cascade in both larval eye and adult ocelli. Our results show that PR cell type-specific transcriptome profiling is a powerful tool to identify key transcriptional regulators involved during several aspects of PR development and differentiation. Our findings greatly contribute to the understanding of how combinatorial action of key transcriptional regulators control PR development and the regulation of a functional phototransduction pathway in both larval eye and adult ocelli. PMID:26769100

  13. Self-Regulated Learning in Younger and Older Adults: Does Aging Affect Metacognitive Control?

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jodi; Hertzog, Christopher; Dunlosky, John

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether younger and older adults’ self-regulated study (item selection and study time) conformed to the region of proximal learning (RPL) model when studying normatively easy, medium, and difficult vocabulary pairs. Experiment 2 manipulated the value of recalling different pairs and provided learning goals for words recalled and points earned. Younger and older adults in both experiments selected items for study in an easy-to-difficult order, indicating the RPL model applies to older adults’ self-regulated study. Individuals allocated more time to difficult items, but prioritized easier items when given less time or point values favoring difficult items. Older adults studied more items for longer but realized lower recall than did younger adults. Older adults’ lower memory self-efficacy and perceived control correlated with their greater item restudy and avoidance of difficult items with high point values. Results are discussed in terms of RPL and agenda-based regulation models. PMID:19866382

  14. A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Odette; Kempermann, Gerd; Walker, Tara L

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation of the brain is generally studied in the context of injury or disease. Less is known about how the immune system regulates the brain during normal brain function. Recent work has redefined the field of neuroimmunology and, as long as their recruitment and activation are well regulated, immune cells are now known to have protective properties within the central nervous system in maintaining brain health. Adult neurogenesis, the process of new neuron generation in the adult brain, is highly plastic and regulated by diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Emerging research has shown that immune cells and their secreted factors can influence adult neurogenesis, both under baseline conditions and during conditions known to change neurogenesis levels, such as aging and learning in an enriched environment. This review will discuss how, under nonpathological conditions, the immune system can interact with the neural stem cells to regulate adult neurogenesis with particular focus on the hippocampus-a region crucial for learning and memory. PMID:27143977

  15. A Common Language: How Neuroimmunological Cross Talk Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Odette; Kempermann, Gerd; Walker, Tara L.

    2016-01-01

    Immune regulation of the brain is generally studied in the context of injury or disease. Less is known about how the immune system regulates the brain during normal brain function. Recent work has redefined the field of neuroimmunology and, as long as their recruitment and activation are well regulated, immune cells are now known to have protective properties within the central nervous system in maintaining brain health. Adult neurogenesis, the process of new neuron generation in the adult brain, is highly plastic and regulated by diverse extrinsic and intrinsic cues. Emerging research has shown that immune cells and their secreted factors can influence adult neurogenesis, both under baseline conditions and during conditions known to change neurogenesis levels, such as aging and learning in an enriched environment. This review will discuss how, under nonpathological conditions, the immune system can interact with the neural stem cells to regulate adult neurogenesis with particular focus on the hippocampus—a region crucial for learning and memory. PMID:27143977

  16. Effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) adults.

    PubMed

    Echegaray, Erik R; Cloyd, Raymond A

    2012-12-01

    In many regions, pest management of greenhouse crops relies on the use of biological control agents; however, pesticides are also widely used, especially when dealing with multiple arthropod pests and attempting to maintain high esthetic standards. As such, there is interest in using biological control agents in conjunction with chemical control. However, the prospects of combining natural enemies and pesticides are not well known in many systems. The rove beetle, Atheta coriaria (Kraatz), is a biological control agent mainly used against fungus gnats (Bradysia spp.). This study evaluated the effects of reduced-risk pesticides and plant growth regulators on A. coriaria adult survival, development, and prey consumption under laboratory conditions. Rove beetle survival was consistently higher when adults were released 24 h after rather than before applying pesticides. The pesticides acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin were harmful to rove beetle adults, whereas Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, azadirachtin, and organic oils (cinnamon oils, rosemary oil, thyme oil, and clove oil) were nontoxic to A. coriaria adults. Similarly, the plant growth regulators acymidol, paclobutrazol, and uniconazole were not harmful to rove beetle adults. In addition, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, kinoprene, organic oils, and the plant growth regulators did not negatively affect A. coriaria development. However, B. bassiana did negatively affect adult prey consumption. This study demonstrated that A. coriaria may not be used when applying the pesticides, acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, and cyfluthrin, whereas organic oils, B. bassiana, azadirachtin, and the plant growth regulators evaluated may be used in conjunction with A. coriaria adults. As such, these compounds may be used in combination with A. coriaria in greenhouse production systems.

  17. Acute Multiple Organ Failure in Adult Mice Deleted for the Developmental Regulator Wt1

    PubMed Central

    Chau, You-Ying; Brownstein, David; Mjoseng, Heidi; Lee, Wen-Chin; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Nerlov, Claus; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Perry, Paul; Berry, Rachel; Thornburn, Anna; Sexton, David; Morton, Nik; Hohenstein, Peter; Freyer, Elisabeth; Samuel, Kay; van't Hof, Rob; Hastie, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    There is much interest in the mechanisms that regulate adult tissue homeostasis and their relationship to processes governing foetal development. Mice deleted for the Wilms' tumour gene, Wt1, lack kidneys, gonads, and spleen and die at mid-gestation due to defective coronary vasculature. Wt1 is vital for maintaining the mesenchymal–epithelial balance in these tissues and is required for the epithelial-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) that generates coronary vascular progenitors. Although Wt1 is only expressed in rare cell populations in adults including glomerular podocytes, 1% of bone marrow cells, and mesothelium, we hypothesised that this might be important for homeostasis of adult tissues; hence, we deleted the gene ubiquitously in young and adult mice. Within just a few days, the mice suffered glomerulosclerosis, atrophy of the exocrine pancreas and spleen, severe reduction in bone and fat, and failure of erythropoiesis. FACS and culture experiments showed that Wt1 has an intrinsic role in both haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell lineages and suggest that defects within these contribute to the phenotypes we observe. We propose that glomerulosclerosis arises in part through down regulation of nephrin, a known Wt1 target gene. Protein profiling in mutant serum showed that there was no systemic inflammatory or nutritional response in the mutant mice. However, there was a dramatic reduction in circulating IGF-1 levels, which is likely to contribute to the bone and fat phenotypes. The reduction of IGF-1 did not result from a decrease in circulating GH, and there is no apparent pathology of the pituitary and adrenal glands. These findings 1) suggest that Wt1 is a major regulator of the homeostasis of some adult tissues, through both local and systemic actions; 2) highlight the differences between foetal and adult tissue regulation; 3) point to the importance of adult mesenchyme in tissue turnover. PMID:22216009

  18. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R; Chen, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry.

  19. Regulation of seminiferous tubule-associated stem Leydig cells in adult rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoheng; Wang, Zhao; Jiang, Zhenming; Guo, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuxi; Li, Chenhao; Chung, Jinyong; Folmer, Janet; Liu, June; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Zirkin, Barry R.; Chen, Haolin

    2016-01-01

    Testicular Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in males. Adult Leydig cells have been shown to arise from stem cells present in the neonatal testis. Once established, adult Leydig cells turn over only slowly during adult life, but when these cells are eliminated experimentally from the adult testis, new Leydig cells rapidly reappear. As in the neonatal testis, stem cells in the adult testis are presumed to be the source of the new Leydig cells. As yet, the mechanisms involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of these stem cells remain unknown. We developed a unique in vitro system of cultured seminiferous tubules to assess the ability of factors from the seminiferous tubules to regulate the proliferation of the tubule-associated stem cells, and their subsequent entry into the Leydig cell lineage. The proliferation of the stem Leydig cells was stimulated by paracrine factors including Desert hedgehog (DHH), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and activin. Suppression of proliferation occurred with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). The differentiation of the stem cells was regulated positively by DHH, lithium- induced signaling, and activin, and negatively by TGF-β, PDGFBB, and FGF2. DHH functioned as a commitment factor, inducing the transition of stem cells to the progenitor stage and thus into the Leydig cell lineage. Additionally, CD90 (Thy1) was found to be a unique stem cell surface marker that was used to obtain purified stem cells by flow cytometry. PMID:26929346

  20. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Dentate Gyrus Excitability by Adult-Born Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Hye; Burghardt, Nesha S.; Dvorak, Dino; Hen, René

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral studies have established a role for adult-born dentate granule cells in discriminating between similar memories. However, it is unclear how these cells mediate memory discrimination. Excitability is enhanced in maturing adult-born neurons, spurring the hypothesis that the activity of these cells “directly” encodes and stores memories. An alternative hypothesis posits that maturing neurons “indirectly” contribute to memory encoding by regulating excitation–inhibition balance. We evaluated these alternatives by using dentate-sensitive active place avoidance tasks to assess experience-dependent changes in dentate field potentials in the presence and absence of neurogenesis. Before training, X-ray ablation of adult neurogenesis-reduced dentate responses to perforant-path stimulation and shifted EPSP-spike coupling leftward. These differences were unchanged after place avoidance training with the shock zone in the initial location, which both groups learned to avoid equally well. In contrast, sham-treated mice decreased dentate responses and shifted EPSP-spike coupling leftward after the shock zone was relocated, whereas X-irradiated mice failed to show these changes in dentate function and were impaired on this test of memory discrimination. During place avoidance, excitation–inhibition coupled neural synchrony in dentate local field potentials was reduced in X-irradiated mice, especially in the θ band. The difference was most prominent during conflict learning, which is impaired in the X-irradiated mice. These findings indicate that maturing adult-born neurons regulate both functional network plasticity in response to memory discrimination and dentate excitation–inhibition coordination. The most parsimonious interpretation of these results is that adult neurogenesis indirectly regulates hippocampal information processing. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Adult-born neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus are important for flexibly using memories, but

  1. Stress Regulation in Adolescents: Physiological Reactivity during the Adult Attachment Interview and Conflict Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beijersbergen, Marielle D.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Juffer, Femmie

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined whether adolescents' attachment representations were associated with differences in emotion regulation during the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; C. George, N. Kaplan, & M. Main, 1996) and during a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task (Family Interaction Task [FIT]; J. P. Allen et al., 2003). Participants were…

  2. Affective Self-Regulation Trajectories during Secondary School Predict Substance Use among Urban Minority Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kenneth W.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Acevedo, Bianca P.; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between trajectories of affective self-regulation skills during secondary school and young adult substance use in a large multiethnic, urban sample (N = 995). During secondary school, participants completed a measure of cognitive and behavioral skills used to control negative, unpleasant emotions or perceived…

  3. Self-Regulation, Self-Efficacy and Health Behavior Change in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdie, Nola; McCrindle, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Presents an overview of self-regulation models: theory of planned behavior, protection motivation theory, health belief model, action control theory, transtheoretical model of behavior change, health action process, and precaution adoption process. Applies models to health behavior change in older adults with cardiovascular disease or diabetes.…

  4. IFN gamma regulates proliferation and neuronal differentiation by STAT1 in adult SVZ niche.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Leticia; Medina, Rebeca; Baena, Miguel; Planas, Anna M; Pozas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is the main neurogenic niche in normal adult brains of mice and rats. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has somewhat controversially been associated with SVZ progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis. The in vivo involvement of IFNγ in the physiology of the adult SVZ niche is not fully understood and its intracellular mediators are unknown. Here we show that IFNγ, through activation of its canonical signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) pathway, acts specifically on Nestin+ progenitors by decreasing both progenitor proliferation and the number of cycling cells. In addition, IFNγ increases the number of neuroblasts generated without shifting glial fate determination. The final result is deficient recruitment of newborn neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB), indicating that IFNγ-induced stimulation of neuronal differentiation does not compensate for its antiproliferative effect. We conclude that IFNγ signaling via STAT1 in the SVZ acts dually as an antiproliferative and proneurogenic factor, and thereby regulates neurogenesis in normal adult brains.

  5. Ephrins as negative regulators of adult neurogenesis in diverse regions of the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jian-wei; Feldheim, David A.; Chen, Dong Feng

    2008-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammals, neurogenesis occurs in only two restricted areas, the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from other CNS regions suggests that their neurogenic potential is dictated by local environmental cues. Here, we report that astrocytes in areas outside of the SGZ and SVZ of adult mice express high levels of ephrin-A2 and -A3, which present an inhibitory niche, negatively regulating neural progenitor cell growth. Adult mice lacking both ephrin-A2 and -A3 display active ongoing neurogenesis throughout the CNS. These findings suggest that neural cell replacement therapies for neurodegeneration or injury in the adult CNS may be achieved by manipulating ephrin signaling pathways. PMID:18562299

  6. Prohibition or coffee shops: regulation of amphetamine and methylphenidate for enhancement use by healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dubljević, Veljko

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes appropriate public policies for enhancement use of two most important stimulant drugs: Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts). The author argues that appropriate regulation of cognition enhancement drugs cannot be a result of a general discussion on cognitive enhancements as such, but has to be made on a case-by-case basis. Starting from the recently proposed taxation approach to cognition enhancement drugs, the author analyzes available, moderately permissive models of regulation. After a thorough analysis of relevant characteristics of methylphenidate and amphetamine, the author concludes that a moderately liberal permissive regulation of enhancement use by healthy adults might be appropriate for extended release forms of methylphenidate. However, due to their danger profile, amphetamine and instant release forms of methylphenidate should not be made readily available to healthy adults and would need to be prohibited. PMID:23767434

  7. Prohibition or coffee shops: regulation of amphetamine and methylphenidate for enhancement use by healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dubljević, Veljko

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes appropriate public policies for enhancement use of two most important stimulant drugs: Ritalin (methylphenidate) and Adderall (mixed amphetamine salts). The author argues that appropriate regulation of cognition enhancement drugs cannot be a result of a general discussion on cognitive enhancements as such, but has to be made on a case-by-case basis. Starting from the recently proposed taxation approach to cognition enhancement drugs, the author analyzes available, moderately permissive models of regulation. After a thorough analysis of relevant characteristics of methylphenidate and amphetamine, the author concludes that a moderately liberal permissive regulation of enhancement use by healthy adults might be appropriate for extended release forms of methylphenidate. However, due to their danger profile, amphetamine and instant release forms of methylphenidate should not be made readily available to healthy adults and would need to be prohibited.

  8. [Regulation of neurogenesis: factors affecting of new neurons formation in adult mammals brain].

    PubMed

    Respondek, Michalina; Buszman, Ewa

    2015-12-31

    Neurogenesis is a complex and multi-step process of generating completely functional neurons. This process in adult brain is based on pluripotentional neuronal stem cells (NSC), which are able to proliferation and differentiation into mature neurons or glial cells. NSC are located in subgranular zone inside hippocampus and in subventricular zone. The new neurons formation depends on many endo- and exogenous factors which modulate each step of neurogenesis. This article describes the most important regulators of adult neurogenesis, mainly: neurotrophins, growth factors, hormones, neurotransmitters and microenvironment of NSC. Some drugs, especially antipsychotics, antidepressants and normothymics may affect the neurogenic properties of adult brain. Moreover pathological processes such as neuroinflammation, stroke or epilepsy are able to induce proliferation of NSC. The proneurogenic effects of psychotropic drugs and pathological processes are associated with their ability to increase some hormones and neurotrophins level, as well as with rising the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein and metalloproteinase MMP-2. Additionaly, some drugs, for example haloperidol, are able to block prolactin and dopaminergic neuroblasts receptors. Down-regulation of adult neurogenesis is associated with alcohol abuse and high stress level. Negative effect of many drugs, such as cytostatics, COX-2 inhibitors and opioides was also observed. The proneurogenic effect of described factors suggest their broad therapeutic potential and gives a new perspective on an effective and modern treatment of many neuropsychiatric disorders. This effect can also help to clarify the pathogenesis of disorders associated with proliferation and degeneration of adult brain cells.

  9. Homeostatic regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in aging rats: long-term effects of early exercise

    PubMed Central

    Merkley, Christina M.; Jian, Charles; Mosa, Adam; Tan, Yao-Fang; Wojtowicz, J. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is highly responsive to environmental and physiological factors. The majority of studies to date have examined short-term consequences of enhancing or blocking neurogenesis but long-term changes remain less well understood. Current evidence for age-related declines in neurogenesis warrant further investigation into these long-term changes. In this report we address the hypothesis that early life experience, such as a period of voluntary running in juvenile rats, can alter properties of adult neurogenesis for the remainder of the animal's life. The results indicate that the number of proliferating and differentiating neuronal precursors is not altered in runners beyond the initial weeks post-running, suggesting homeostatic regulation of these processes. However, the rate of neuronal maturation and survival during a 4 week period after cell division was enhanced up to 11 months of age (the end of the study period). This study is the first to show that a transient period of physical activity at a young age promotes changes in neurogenesis that persist over the long-term, which is important for our understanding of the modulation of neurogenesis by exercise with age. Functional integration of adult-born neurons within the hippocampus that resist homeostatic regulation with aging, rather than the absolute number of adult-born neurons, may be an essential feature of adult neurogenesis that promotes the maintenance of neural plasticity in old age. PMID:25071426

  10. GATAe regulates intestinal stem cell maintenance and differentiation in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takashi; Takeda, Koji; Kuchiki, Megumi; Akaishi, Marie; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Adachi-Yamada, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Adult intestinal tissues, exposed to the external environment, play important roles including barrier and nutrient-absorption functions. These functions are ensured by adequately controlled rapid-cell metabolism. GATA transcription factors play essential roles in the development and maintenance of adult intestinal tissues both in vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the roles of GATAe, the Drosophila intestinal GATA factor, in adult midgut homeostasis with its first-generated knock-out mutant as well as cell type-specific RNAi and overexpression experiments. Our results indicate that GATAe is essential for proliferation and maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Also, GATAe is involved in the differentiation of enterocyte (EC) and enteroendocrine (ee) cells in both Notch (N)-dependent and -independent manner. The results also indicate that GATAe has pivotal roles in maintaining normal epithelial homeostasis of the Drosophila adult midgut through interaction of N signaling. Since recent reports showed that mammalian GATA-6 regulates normal and cancer stem cells in the adult intestinal tract, our data also provide information on the evolutionally conserved roles of GATA factors in stem-cell regulation. PMID:26719127

  11. Steroidogenic factor 1 differentially regulates fetal and adult leydig cell development in male mice.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Tatiana; Ravichandiran, Kumarasamy; Insisienmay, Lovella; Rice, Daren; Agbor, Valentine; Heckert, Leslie L

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1, AD4BP, NR5A1) is a key regulator of the endocrine axes and is essential for adrenal and gonad development. Partial rescue of Nr5a1(-/-) mice with an SF-1-expressing transgene caused a hypomorphic phenotype that revealed its roles in Leydig cell development. In contrast to controls, all male rescue mice (Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0)) showed varying signs of androgen deficiency, including spermatogenic arrest, cryptorchidism, and poor virilization. Expression of various Leydig cell markers measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR indicated fetal and adult Leydig cell development were differentially impaired. Whereas fetal Leydig cell development was delayed in Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0) embryos, it recovered to control levels by birth. In contrast, Sult1e1, Vcam1, and Hsd3b6 transcript levels in adult rescue testes indicated complete blockage in adult Leydig cell development. In addition, between Postnatal Days 8 and 12, peritubular cells expressing PTCH1, SF-1, and CYP11A1 were observed in control testes but not in rescue testes, indicating SF-1 is needed for either survival or differentiation of adult Leydig cell progenitors. Cultured prepubertal rat peritubular cells also expressed SF-1 and PTCH1, but Cyp11a1 was expressed only after treatment with cAMP and retinoic acid. Together, data show SF-1 is needed for proper development of fetal and adult Leydig cells but with distinct primary functions; in fetal Leydig cells, it regulates differentiation, whereas in adult Leydig cells it regulates progenitor cell formation and/or survival. PMID:26269506

  12. Steroidogenic factor 1 differentially regulates fetal and adult leydig cell development in male mice.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Tatiana; Ravichandiran, Kumarasamy; Insisienmay, Lovella; Rice, Daren; Agbor, Valentine; Heckert, Leslie L

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1, AD4BP, NR5A1) is a key regulator of the endocrine axes and is essential for adrenal and gonad development. Partial rescue of Nr5a1(-/-) mice with an SF-1-expressing transgene caused a hypomorphic phenotype that revealed its roles in Leydig cell development. In contrast to controls, all male rescue mice (Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0)) showed varying signs of androgen deficiency, including spermatogenic arrest, cryptorchidism, and poor virilization. Expression of various Leydig cell markers measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR indicated fetal and adult Leydig cell development were differentially impaired. Whereas fetal Leydig cell development was delayed in Nr5a1(-/-);tg(+/0) embryos, it recovered to control levels by birth. In contrast, Sult1e1, Vcam1, and Hsd3b6 transcript levels in adult rescue testes indicated complete blockage in adult Leydig cell development. In addition, between Postnatal Days 8 and 12, peritubular cells expressing PTCH1, SF-1, and CYP11A1 were observed in control testes but not in rescue testes, indicating SF-1 is needed for either survival or differentiation of adult Leydig cell progenitors. Cultured prepubertal rat peritubular cells also expressed SF-1 and PTCH1, but Cyp11a1 was expressed only after treatment with cAMP and retinoic acid. Together, data show SF-1 is needed for proper development of fetal and adult Leydig cells but with distinct primary functions; in fetal Leydig cells, it regulates differentiation, whereas in adult Leydig cells it regulates progenitor cell formation and/or survival.

  13. Regulation of stroke-induced neurogenesis in adult brain--recent scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Kokaia, Zaal; Thored, Pär; Arvidsson, Andreas; Lindvall, Olle

    2006-07-01

    Stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in adult rodents induces the formation of new neurons in the damaged striatum, a region that normally does not show neurogenesis. Here we describe recent findings on the regulation of neurogenesis after stroke, in particular regarding the duration of the neurogenic response and the influence of age, as well as the molecular mechanisms influencing migration and survival of the new neurons. We also discuss some crucial issues that need to be addressed in the further exploration of this potential self-repair mechanism after damage to the adult brain. PMID:16766702

  14. Understanding deficient emotional self-regulation in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Biederman, Joseph; Spencer, Thomas; Miller, Carolyn A.; McDermott, Katie M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2014-01-01

    While symptoms of deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) such as low frustration tolerance, temper outbursts, emotional impulsivity, and mood lability are commonly associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about their nature. The main aim of this post hoc study was to examine the correlates of DESR in a large sample of adults with and without ADHD. Subjects were 206 adults with ADHD and 123 adults without ADHD from a family study of ADHD. Emotional impulsivity was operationalized using items from the Barkley Current Behavior Scale. Subjects were comprehensively assessed for psychiatric comorbidity using structured diagnostic interview methodology. We used the Quality of Life, Enjoyment, and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (QLES-Q-SF) and Social Adjustment Scale-Self-report (SAS-SR) to assess quality of life and psychosocial functioning. DESR was more common among ADHD compared with non-ADHD adults, and 55 % of adults with ADHD reported extreme DESR of greater severity than 95 % of control subjects. The association of ADHD and DESR was not entirely accounted for by either current or lifetime comorbid disorders. DESR was also associated with significant functional impairment as evaluated by the QLES-Q-SF and SAS-SR, and with reduced marital status, as well as higher risk for traffic accidents and arrests. DESR adversely impacts quality of life in adults with ADHD. More work is needed to further evaluate DESR in clinical and investigational studies of subjects with ADHD. PMID:23413201

  15. Sterilization Effects of Adult-targeted Baits Containing Insect Growth Regulators on Delia antiqua.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Zhu, Guodong; Zhao, Haipeng; Wang, Zheng; Xue, Ming; Li, Xianxian; Xu, Huaqiang; Ma, Xiaodan; Liu, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    The onion maggot, Delia antiqua, is a devastating pest of liliaceous crops and current control measures fail to avert pesticide residues, threats to agroecosystem, and costly expenditures. Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are used as trypetid pest chemosterilants for their suppression on adult fertility and fecundity, but their effects on onion flies are unknown. Here, three IGRs (lufenuron, cyromazine, pyriproxyfen) were incorporated into baits to evaluate their effects on onion fly survival, fecundity, fertility, susceptibility of adults in different ages and offspring development. Lufenuron and cyromazine did not affect survival of new-emerged adults, but lufenuron inhibited adult fertility without affecting fecundity, and cyromazine reduced fertility and fecundity. Differently, pyriproxyfen enhanced fecundity within 10 days after treatment, while it reduced adult survival without affecting fertility. The fertility of younger adults was affected by lufenuron and cyromazine whereas the fecundity was affected with cyromazine and pyriproxyfen. For offspring of onion flies treated with lufenuron or cyromazine, most of larvae died within 5 days after hatch, but surviving larvae pupated and emerged normally. Pyriproxyfen did not affect offspring larval survival or pupation but affected pupal emergence. Thus, lufenuron and cyromazine could be potential chemosterilants for onion flies. PMID:27619006

  16. Sterilization Effects of Adult-targeted Baits Containing Insect Growth Regulators on Delia antiqua

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Zhu, Guodong; Zhao, Haipeng; Wang, Zheng; Xue, Ming; Li, Xianxian; Xu, Huaqiang; Ma, Xiaodan; Liu, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    The onion maggot, Delia antiqua, is a devastating pest of liliaceous crops and current control measures fail to avert pesticide residues, threats to agroecosystem, and costly expenditures. Insect growth regulators (IGRs) are used as trypetid pest chemosterilants for their suppression on adult fertility and fecundity, but their effects on onion flies are unknown. Here, three IGRs (lufenuron, cyromazine, pyriproxyfen) were incorporated into baits to evaluate their effects on onion fly survival, fecundity, fertility, susceptibility of adults in different ages and offspring development. Lufenuron and cyromazine did not affect survival of new-emerged adults, but lufenuron inhibited adult fertility without affecting fecundity, and cyromazine reduced fertility and fecundity. Differently, pyriproxyfen enhanced fecundity within 10 days after treatment, while it reduced adult survival without affecting fertility. The fertility of younger adults was affected by lufenuron and cyromazine whereas the fecundity was affected with cyromazine and pyriproxyfen. For offspring of onion flies treated with lufenuron or cyromazine, most of larvae died within 5 days after hatch, but surviving larvae pupated and emerged normally. Pyriproxyfen did not affect offspring larval survival or pupation but affected pupal emergence. Thus, lufenuron and cyromazine could be potential chemosterilants for onion flies. PMID:27619006

  17. A Sodium Leak Current Regulates Pacemaker Activity of Adult Central Pattern Generator Neurons in Lymnaea Stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tom Z.; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel) and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na+ (ILeak-Na). The ILeak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals. PMID:21526173

  18. New tools for the identification of developmentally regulated enhancer regions in embryonic and adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Mitchell P; Krauss, Jana; Koehler, Carla; Boden, Cindy; Harris, Matthew P

    2013-03-01

    We have conducted a screen to identify developmentally regulated enhancers that drive tissue-specific Gal4 expression in zebrafish. We obtained 63 stable transgenic lines with expression patterns in embryonic or adult zebrafish. The use of a newly identified minimal promoter from the medaka edar locus resulted in a relatively unbiased set of expression patterns representing many tissue types derived from all germ layers. Subsequent detailed characterization of selected lines showed strong and reproducible Gal4-driven GFP expression in diverse tissues, including neurons from the central and peripheral nervous systems, pigment cells, erythrocytes, and peridermal cells. By screening adults for GFP expression, we also isolated lines expressed in tissues of the adult zebrafish, including scales, fin rays, and joints. The new and efficient minimal promoter and large number of transactivating driver-lines we identified will provide the zebrafish community with a useful resource for further enhancer trap screening, as well as precise investigation of tissue-specific processes in vivo.

  19. Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis: Regulation, Functional Implications, And Contribution to Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Darrick T.; Lucki, Irwin

    2009-01-01

    It is now well established that the mammalian brain has the capacity to produce new neurons into adulthood. One such region that provides the proper milieu to sustain progenitor cells and is permissive to neuronal fate determination is located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. This review will discuss in detail the complex process of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, including proliferation, differentiation, survival, and incorporation into neuronal networks. The regulation of this phenomenon by a number of factors is described, including neurotransmitter systems, growth factors, paracrine signaling molecules, neuropeptides, transcription factors, endogenous psychotropic systems, sex hormones, stress, and others. This review also addresses the functional significance of adult born hippocampal granule cells with regard to hippocampal circuitry dynamics and behavior. Furthermore, the relevance of perturbations in adult hippocampal neurogenesis to the pathophysiology of various disease states, including depression, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and diabetes are examined. Finally, this review discusses the potential of using hippocampal neurogenesis as a therapeutic target for these disorders. PMID:18786562

  20. Gender differences in self-regulation patterns and attitudes toward driving among older adults.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Lisa A; Donorfio, Laura K M; Coughlin, Joseph F; Mohyde, Maureen; Meyer, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    The automobile is essential for many older adults to fulfill their daily needs, especially since many live where they lack access to public transit or other acceptable modes of transportation. Increased self-regulation is one way older drivers continue to drive safely and maintain mobility. This research considers whether self-regulation attitudes and patterns differ by gender. Results indicate that women and men report distinct patterns of self-regulation behaviors. Age, health status, and household status also interact with gender, influencing the extent of self-regulation. The results also show that women report lower levels of confidence in their driving skills than men, although the difference varies based on whether or not a woman lives alone. Implications of these results are considered for an aging population--particularly women--that over the coming decades will be more reliant on the automobile for transportation than ever before.

  1. miR-17-92 Cluster Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Anxiety, and Depression.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junghee; Kim, Seung-Nam; Liu, Xuqing; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Chao; Seo, Ji-Seon; Kim, Yong; Sun, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs (miRNAs), contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and anxiety disorders, although the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that altered levels of miR-17-92 in adult hippocampal neural progenitors have a significant impact on neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-related behaviors in mice. miR-17-92 deletion in adult neural progenitors decreases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, while its overexpression increases neurogenesis. miR-17-92 affects neurogenesis by regulating genes in the glucocorticoid pathway, especially serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (Sgk1). miR-17-92 knockout mice show anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, whereas miR-17-92 overexpressing mice exhibit anxiolytic and antidepression-like behaviors. Furthermore, we show that miR-17-92 expression in the adult mouse hippocampus responds to chronic stress, and miR-17-92 rescues proliferation defects induced by corticosterone in hippocampal neural progenitors. Our study uncovers a crucial role for miR-17-92 in adult neural progenitors through regulation of neurogenesis and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. PMID:27477270

  2. Regulation of sadness via acceptance or suppression in adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Matthies, Swantje; Philipsen, Alexandra; Lackner, Helmut Karl; Sadohara, Chiharu; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2014-12-15

    Emotion dysregulation is a recognized symptom of adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The aim of this study is to induce sadness in adults suffering from ADHD and to investigate the impact of emotion regulation strategies on sadness intensity, and psychophysiological measures. Thirty-six adults diagnosed with ADHD were randomly assigned to either expressive suppression (SUPP) or acceptance (ACC) of emotion. Sadness was induced using a film clip. Participants estimated the intensity of sadness and the perception of being overwhelmed with emotion before (T1), immediately after (T2) and 2 min after the film (T3). Physiological measures were obtained. Sadness induction was effective in both conditions. The perception of being overwhelmed with emotion increased between T1 and T2 in both conditions, but persisted until T3 only in the expressive suppression condition whereas a decrease was observed in the acceptance condition. In ADHD expressive suppression of sadness seems to be associated to a prolonged recovery from the perception of being overwhelmed with emotion. Emotion-regulation via acceptance in contrast appears to allow faster recovery from the perception of being overwhelmed with emotion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify suppression as a critical mediator between an induced emotion and delayed recovery from emotional reactions in adult ADHD.

  3. Cortisol-treated zebrafish embryos develop into pro-inflammatory adults with aberrant immune gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, Ellen I.; Zhu, Shusen; King, Benjamin L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic early-life stress increases adult susceptibility to numerous health problems linked to chronic inflammation. One way that this may occur is via glucocorticoid-induced developmental programming. To gain insight into such programming we treated zebrafish embryos with cortisol and examined the effects on both larvae and adults. Treated larvae had elevated whole-body cortisol and glucocorticoid signaling, and upregulated genes associated with defense response and immune system processes. In adulthood the treated fish maintained elevated basal cortisol levels in the absence of exogenous cortisol, and constitutively mis-expressed genes involved in defense response and its regulation. Adults derived from cortisol-treated embryos displayed defective tailfin regeneration, heightened basal expression of pro-inflammatory genes, and failure to appropriately regulate those genes following injury or immunological challenge. These results support the hypothesis that chronically elevated glucocorticoid signaling early in life directs development of a pro-inflammatory adult phenotype, at the expense of immunoregulation and somatic regenerative capacity. PMID:27444789

  4. Longitudinal association between adolescent attachment, adult romantic attachment, and emotion regulation strategies.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzo, Katherine; Cyr, Chantal; Moss, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Attachment security towards parents and peers in adolescence, and romantic attachment styles and emotion regulation strategies in young adulthood, were evaluated using an eight-year longitudinal design. Fifty-six young adults completed the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA) at age 14, and then, at age 22, the Experience in Close Relationships (ECR) and the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS), an emotion regulation questionnaire concerning coping strategies, including task-oriented versus emotion-oriented foci. Results indicated that greater insecurity to parents and peers in adolescence predicted a more anxious romantic attachment style and greater use of emotion-oriented strategies in adulthood. Concurrently, anxious adult attachment style was related to more emotion-oriented strategies, whereas an avoidant attachment style was related to less support-seeking. Analyses also identified emotion-oriented coping strategies as a partial mediator of the link between adolescent attachment insecurity to parents and adult anxious attachment, and a complete mediator of the association between adolescent attachment insecurity to peers and adult anxious attachment. These findings support the core assumption of continuity in attachment theory, where relationships to parents influence close romantic relationships in adulthood.

  5. Hepatitis C virus suppresses Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha, a key regulator of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Dafou, Dimitra; Vassilaki, Niki; Mavromara, Penelope; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection presents with a disturbed lipid profile and can evolve to hepatic steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) is the most abundant transcription factor in the liver, a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and a critical determinant of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and hepatic development. We have previously shown that transient inhibition of HNF4α initiates transformation of immortalized hepatocytes through a feedback loop consisting of miR-24, IL6 receptor (IL6R), STAT3, miR-124 and miR-629, suggesting a central role of HNF4α in HCC. However, the role of HNF4α in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-related hepatocarcinoma has not been evaluated and remains controversial. In this study, we provide strong evidence suggesting that HCV downregulates HNF4α expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. The observed decrease of HNF4α expression correlated with the downregulation of its downstream targets, HNF1α and MTP. Ectopic overexpression of HCV proteins also exhibited an inhibitory effect on HNF4α levels. The inhibition of HNF4α expression by HCV appeared to be mediated at transcriptional level as HCV proteins suppressed HNF4α gene promoter activity. HCV also up-regulated IL6R, activated STAT3 protein phosphorylation and altered the expression of acute phase genes. Furthermore, as HCV triggered the loss of HNF4α a consequent change of miR-24, miR-629 or miR-124 was observed. Our findings demonstrated that HCV-related HCC could be mediated through HNF4α-microRNA deregulation implying a possible role of HNF4α in HCV hepatocarcinogenesis. HCV inhibition of HNF4α could be sustained to promote HCC. PMID:27477312

  6. FDA regulation of adult stem cell therapies as used in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Chirba, Mary Ann; Sweetapple, Berkley; Hannon, Charles P; Anderson, John A

    2015-02-01

    In sports medicine, adult stem cells are the subject of great interest. Several uses of stem cells are under investigation including cartilage repair, meniscal regeneration, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and tendinopathy. Extensive clinical and basic science research is warranted as stem cell therapies become increasingly common in clinical practice. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for regulating the use of stem cells through its "Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products" regulations. This report provides a brief overview of FDA regulation of adult stem cells. Several common clinical case scenarios are then presented that highlight how stem cells are currently being used in sports medicine and how current FDA regulations are likely to affect the physicians who use them. In the process, it explains how a variety of factors in sourcing and handling these cells, particularly the extent of cell manipulation, will affect what a physician can and cannot do without first obtaining the FDA's express approval.

  7. MicroRNA-124 suppresses growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yanxin; Yue, Xupeng; Cui, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, KeWei

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •miR-124 is down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. •Over-expression of miR-124 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells. •miR-124 inhibits xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. •STATs function as a novel target of miR-124 in HCC HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: The aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with development and progression of cancers. Down-regulation of miR-124 has been demonstrated in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but the underlying mechanism by which miR-124 suppresses tumorigenesis in HCC remains elusive. In this study, we found that miR-124 suppresses the tumor growth of HCC through targeting the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Overexpression of miR-124 suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in HepG-2 cells. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-124 binding to the 3′-UTR region of STAT3 inhibited the expression of STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins in HepG-2 cells. Knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA in HepG-2 cells mimicked the effect induced by miR-124. Overexpression of STAT3 in miR-124-transfected HepG-2 cells effectively rescued the inhibition of cell proliferation caused by miR-124. Furthermore, miR-124 suppressed xenograft tumor growth in nude mice implanted with HepG-2 cells by reducing STAT3 expression. Taken together, our findings show that miR-124 functions as tumor suppressor in HCC by targeting STAT3, and miR-124 may therefore serve as a biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutics in HCC.

  8. Professionalisation as development and as regulation: Adult education in Germany, the United Kingdom and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Lesley; Egetenmeyer, Regina; Singai, Chetan; Devi, Uma

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the authors seek to disentangle what they see as contradictory uses of the term "professionalisation" with reference to adult educator development and training (AEDT). They set out to distinguish professionalisation from professionalism, and to identify the locus of control of AEDT in Germany, the UK and India. In these three countries, all of which have a long tradition of adult education, "professionalisation" and "professionalism" are used interchangeably to describe conflicting purposes. The authors aim to identify and critically explore the organisations and policies which control and support AEDT in their own countries using American sociologist Eliot Freidson's "third logic" model, and drawing on his juxtaposition of "professions", "the market" and "bureaucracy". Applying Freidson's models to the organisations highlights the role of bureaucracy and that where adult education is concerned, national governments, the European Union and aid organisations not only serve bureaucracy but also support the market rather than operating separately from it. While the term "professionalisation" continues to be used to mean professional development, either by adult educators and representative organisations (as in the UK) or by organisations acting on their behalf (as in Germany and India), it is also used to denote regulation and standardisation issuing from bureaucratic institutions and adult education provider organisations in the interests of the market. The authors suggest that Freidson's model provides a useful tool for adult educators in other countries to reflect on their professional position and to engage in the development of their own professional standards, both in their own interests and in the interests of those they educate.

  9. Neuronal Splicing Regulator RBFOX3 (NeuN) Regulates Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Ying; Chou, Chih-Hsuan; Wu, I-Ju; Huang, Guo-Jen; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of RBFOX3 has been identified in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder, cognitive impairments and epilepsy and a causal relationship with these diseases has been previously demonstrated with Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice. Despite the importance of RBFOX3 during neurodevelopment, the function of RBFOX3 regarding neurogenesis and synaptogenesis remains unclear. To address this critical question, we profiled the developmental expression pattern of Rbfox3 in the brain of wild-type mice and analyzed brain volume, disease-relevant behaviors, neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and synaptogenesis in Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice and their corresponding wild-type counterparts. Here we report that expression of Rbfox3 differs developmentally for distinct brain regions. Moreover, Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice exhibited cold hyperalgesia and impaired cognitive abilities. Focusing on hippocampal phenotypes, we found Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice displayed deficits in neurogenesis, which was correlated with cognitive impairments. Furthermore, RBFOX3 regulates the exons of genes with synapse-related function. Synaptic plasticity and density, which are related to cognitive behaviors, were altered in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice; synaptic plasticity decreased and the density of synapses increased. Taken together, our results demonstrate the important role of RBFOX3 during neural development and maturation. In addition, abnormalities in synaptic structure and function occur in Rbfox3 homozygous knockout mice. Our findings may offer mechanistic explanations for human brain diseases associated with dysfunctional RBFOX3. PMID:27701470

  10. Autonomic regulation predicts performance on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in adults with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, Karen J; Jetha, Michelle K; Goldberg, Joel O; Schmidt, Louis A

    2012-12-01

    Although executive functions have been associated with autonomic regulatory capacity in healthy adults, there appear to be no reports of these relations in adults with schizophrenia to date. We tested whether baseline autonomic regulation was associated with performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in a group of 42 stable community outpatients with schizophrenia. Patients exhibited faster resting heart rates and lower respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) than age-matched controls, consistent with previous research. Patients also completed relatively few WCST categories and made many perseverative errors, replicating prior studies. Within the patient group, relatively better WCST performance was associated with slower resting heart rate and higher RSA, suggesting that inefficient executive and autonomic functioning in schizophrenia may be linked. WCST performance and autonomic regulatory capacity were further reduced in a subset of patients receiving clozapine, but relations between WCST performance and autonomic regulatory parameters did not differ from those of other patients. Findings extend the neurovisceral integration model of autonomic regulation to adults with schizophrenia and attest to the reliability of the model.

  11. Flt3 Ligand Regulates the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells in Fetal and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Baerenwaldt, Anne; von Burg, Nicole; Kreuzaler, Matthias; Sitte, Selina; Horvath, Edit; Peter, Annick; Voehringer, David; Rolink, Antonius G; Finke, Daniela

    2016-03-15

    Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) promotes survival of lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs), but its role in regulating innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) during fetal and adult life is not understood. By using Flt3L knockout and transgenic mice, we demonstrate that Flt3L controls ILC numbers by regulating the pool of α4β7(-) and α4β7(+) lymphoid tissue inducer cell progenitors in the fetal liver and common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow. Deletion of flt3l severely reduced the number of fetal liver progenitors and lymphoid tissue inducer cells in the neonatal intestine, resulting in impaired development of Peyer's patches. In the adult intestine, NK cells and group 2 and 3 ILCs were severely reduced. This effect occurred independently of DCs as ILC numbers were normal in mice in which DCs were constitutively deleted. Finally, we could show that administration of Flt3L increased the number of NKp46(-) group 3 ILCs in wild-type and even in Il7(-/-) mice, which generally have reduced numbers of ILCs. Taken together, Flt3L significantly contributes to ILC and Peyer's patches development by targeting lymphoid progenitor cells during fetal and adult life.

  12. Reelin Exerts Structural, Biochemical and Transcriptional Regulation Over Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Elements in the Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Muhaisen, Ashraf; Pujadas, Lluís; Soriano, Eduardo; Martínez, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Reelin regulates neuronal positioning and synaptogenesis in the developing brain, and adult brain plasticity. Here we used transgenic mice overexpressing Reelin (Reelin-OE mice) to perform a comprehensive dissection of the effects of this protein on the structural and biochemical features of dendritic spines and axon terminals in the adult hippocampus. Electron microscopy (EM) revealed both higher density of synapses and structural complexity of both pre- and postsynaptic elements in transgenic mice than in WT mice. Dendritic spines had larger spine apparatuses, which correlated with a redistribution of Synaptopodin. Most of the changes observed in Reelin-OE mice were reversible after blockade of transgene expression, thus supporting the specificity of the observed phenotypes. Western blot and transcriptional analyses did not show major changes in the expression of pre- or postsynaptic proteins, including SNARE proteins, glutamate receptors, and scaffolding and signaling proteins. However, EM immunogold assays revealed that the NMDA receptor subunits NR2a and NR2b, and p-Cofilin showed a redistribution from synaptic to extrasynaptic pools. Taken together with previous studies, the present results suggest that Reelin regulates the structural and biochemical properties of adult hippocampal synapses by increasing their density and morphological complexity and by modifying the distribution and trafficking of major glutamatergic components. PMID:27303269

  13. The transcriptional coactivator Cbp regulates self-renewal and differentiation in adult hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai-In; Hannah, Rebecca L; Dawson, Mark A; Pridans, Clare; Foster, Donna; Joshi, Anagha; Göttgens, Berthold; Van Deursen, Jan M; Huntly, Brian J P

    2011-12-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Cbp plays an important role in a wide range of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Although studies have shown its requirement for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, its role in adult HSC maintenance, as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Cbp function, is not clear. Here, we demonstrate a gradual loss of phenotypic HSCs and differentiation defects following conditional ablation of Cbp during adult homeostasis. In addition, Cbp-deficient HSCs reconstituted hematopoiesis with lower efficiency than their wild-type counterparts, and this response was readily exhausted under replicative stress. This phenotype relates to an alteration in cellular fate decisions for HSCs, with Cbp loss leading to an increase in differentiation, quiescence, and apoptosis. Genome-wide analyses of Cbp occupancy and differential gene expression upon Cbp deletion identified HSC-specific genes regulated by Cbp, providing a molecular basis for the phenotype. Finally, Cbp binding significantly overlapped at genes combinatorially bound by 7 major hematopoietic transcriptional regulators, linking Cbp to a critical HSC transcriptional regulatory network. Our data demonstrate that Cbp plays a role in adult HSC homeostasis by maintaining the balance between different HSC fate decisions, and our findings identify a putative HSC-specific transcriptional network coordinated by Cbp.

  14. IFN gamma regulates proliferation and neuronal differentiation by STAT1 in adult SVZ niche

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Leticia; Medina, Rebeca; Baena, Miguel; Planas, Anna M.; Pozas, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is the main neurogenic niche in normal adult brains of mice and rats. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has somewhat controversially been associated with SVZ progenitor proliferation and neurogenesis. The in vivo involvement of IFNγ in the physiology of the adult SVZ niche is not fully understood and its intracellular mediators are unknown. Here we show that IFNγ, through activation of its canonical signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) pathway, acts specifically on Nestin+ progenitors by decreasing both progenitor proliferation and the number of cycling cells. In addition, IFNγ increases the number of neuroblasts generated without shifting glial fate determination. The final result is deficient recruitment of newborn neurons to the olfactory bulb (OB), indicating that IFNγ-induced stimulation of neuronal differentiation does not compensate for its antiproliferative effect. We conclude that IFNγ signaling via STAT1 in the SVZ acts dually as an antiproliferative and proneurogenic factor, and thereby regulates neurogenesis in normal adult brains. PMID:26217191

  15. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44(-/-) mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells.

  16. Self-Regulation, Metacognition and Child- and Adult-Initiated Activity: Does It Matter Who Initiates the Task?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Debate about the balance between child- and adult-initiated activities in early childhood settings is long standing. This article reports a study of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a London state school, on the influences of child- and adult-initiated activities on children's self-regulation and metacognition. Whilst both contexts were supportive,…

  17. Adult plant development in triticale (× triticosecale wittmack) is controlled by dynamic genetic patterns of regulation.

    PubMed

    Würschum, Tobias; Liu, Wenxin; Alheit, Katharina V; Tucker, Matthew R; Gowda, Manje; Weissmann, Elmar A; Hahn, Volker; Maurer, Hans Peter

    2014-09-01

    Many biologically and agronomically important traits are dynamic and show temporal variation. In this study, we used triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack) as a model crop to assess the genetic dynamics underlying phenotypic plasticity of adult plant development. To this end, a large mapping population with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four partially connected families from crosses among six parents was scored for developmental stage at three different time points. Using genome-wide association mapping, we identified main effect and epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) at all three time points. Interestingly, some of these QTL were identified at all time points, whereas others appear to only contribute to the genetic architecture at certain developmental stages. Our results illustrate the temporal contribution of QTL to the genetic control of adult plant development and more generally, the temporal genetic patterns of regulation that underlie dynamic traits. PMID:25237110

  18. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in the Adult Mammalian Brain: Multiple roles in Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Farah D.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) is one of numerous gene products necessary for long-term memory formation and dysregulation of bdnf has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cognitive and mental disorders. Recent work indicates that epigenetic-regulatory mechanisms including the markings of histone proteins and associated DNA remain labile throughout the lifespan and represent an attractive molecular process contributing to gene regulation in the brain. In this review, important information will be discussed on epigenetics as a set of newly identified dynamic transcriptional mechanisms serving to regulate gene expression changes in the adult brain with particular emphasis on bdnf transcriptional readout in learning and memory formation. This review will also highlight evidence for the role of epigenetics in aberrant bdnf gene regulation in the pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunction associated with seizure disorders, Rett syndrome, Schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Such research offers novel concepts for understanding epigenetic transcriptional mechanisms subserving adult cognition and mental health, and furthermore promises novel avenues for therapeutic approach in the clinic. PMID:21419233

  19. Regulation of cpg15 expression during single whisker experience in the barrel cortex of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey; Burbach, Barry; Svoboda, Karel; Nedivi, Elly

    2005-10-01

    Regulation of gene transcription by neuronal activity is thought to be key to the translation of sensory experience into long-term changes in synaptic structure and function. Here we show that cpg15, a gene encoding an extracellular signaling molecule that promotes dendritic and axonal growth and synaptic maturation, is regulated in the somatosensory cortex by sensory experience capable of inducing cortical plasticity. Using in situ hybridization, we monitored cpg15 expression in 4-week-old mouse barrel cortex after trimming all whiskers except D1. We found that cpg15 expression is depressed in the deprived barrels and enhanced in the barrel column corresponding to the spared D1 whisker. Changes in cpg15 mRNA levels first appear in layer IV, peak 12 h after deprivation, and then decline rapidly. In layers II/III, changes in cpg15 expression appear later, peak at 24 h, and persist for days. Induction of cpg15 expression is significantly diminished in adolescent as well as adult CREB knockout mice. cpg15's spatio-temporal expression pattern and its regulation by CREB are consistent with a role in experience-dependent plasticity of cortical circuits. Our results suggest that local structural and/or synaptic changes may be a mechanism by which the adult cortex can adapt to peripheral manipulations. PMID:16010668

  20. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Hanson, Linda M.; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  1. The master negative regulator REST/NRSF controls adult neurogenesis by restraining the neurogenic program in quiescent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhengliang; Ure, Kerstin; Ding, Peiguo; Nashaat, Mostafa; Yuan, Laura; Ma, Jing; Hammer, Robert E; Hsieh, Jenny

    2011-06-29

    Transcriptional regulation is a critical mechanism in the birth, specification, and differentiation of granule neurons in the adult hippocampus. One of the first negative-acting transcriptional regulators implicated in vertebrate development is repressor element 1-silencing transcription/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF)--thought to regulate hundreds of neuron-specific genes--yet its function in the adult brain remains elusive. Here we report that REST/NRSF is required to maintain the adult neural stem cell (NSC) pool and orchestrate stage-specific differentiation. REST/NRSF recruits CoREST and mSin3A corepressors to stem cell chromatin for the regulation of pro-neuronal target genes to prevent precocious neuronal differentiation in cultured adult NSCs. Moreover, mice lacking REST/NRSF specifically in NSCs display a transient increase in adult neurogenesis that leads to a loss in the neurogenic capacity of NSCs and eventually diminished granule neurons. Our work identifies REST/NRSF as a master negative regulator of adult NSC differentiation and offers a potential molecular target for neuroregenerative approaches. PMID:21715642

  2. An Annotated Bibliography: Using Theories of Self-Regulation to Understand How Adults Learn in Various Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artino, Anthony R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The present report presents an annotated bibliography of peer-reviewed articles that employed theories of self-regulation to understand how adults learn in various contexts. Seven scholarly articles, published between 2000 and 2006, were reviewed and summarized. Articles reviewed include (1) Self-regulation in a Web-based Course: A Case Study (J.…

  3. Energy Density, Energy Intake, and Body Weight Regulation in Adults12345

    PubMed Central

    Karl, J. Philip; Roberts, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    The role of dietary energy density (ED) in the regulation of energy intake (EI) is controversial. Methodologically, there is also debate about whether beverages should be included in dietary ED calculations. To address these issues, studies examining the effects of ED on EI or body weight in nonelderly adults were reviewed. Different approaches to calculating dietary ED do not appear to alter the direction of reported relations between ED and body weight. Evidence that lowering dietary ED reduces EI in short-term studies is convincing, but there are currently insufficient data to determine long-term effectiveness for weight loss. The review also identified key barriers to progress in understanding the role of ED in energy regulation, in particular the absence of a standard definition of ED, and the lack of data from multiple long-term clinical trials examining the effectiveness of low-ED diet recommendations for preventing both primary weight gain and weight regain in nonobese individuals. Long-term clinical trials designed to examine the impact of dietary ED on energy regulation, and including multiple ED calculation methods within the same study, are still needed to determine the importance of ED in the regulation of EI and body weight. PMID:25398750

  4. Semaphorin7A regulates neuroglial plasticity in the adult hypothalamic median eminence.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Jyoti; Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Cimino, Irene; Loyens, Anne; Mazur, Danièle; Gallet, Sarah; Balland, Eglantine; Malone, Samuel A; Pralong, François; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Schellino, Roberta; De Marchis, Silvia; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive competence in mammals depends on the projection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) and the timely release of GnRH into the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In adult rodents, GnRH neurons and the specialized glial cells named tanycytes periodically undergo cytoskeletal plasticity. However, the mechanisms that regulate this plasticity are still largely unknown. We demonstrate that Semaphorin7A, expressed by tanycytes, plays a dual role, inducing the retraction of GnRH terminals and promoting their ensheathment by tanycytic end feet via the receptors PlexinC1 and Itgb1, respectively. Moreover, Semaphorin7A expression is regulated during the oestrous cycle by the fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids. Genetic invalidation of Semaphorin7A receptors in mice induces neuronal and glial rearrangements in the ME and abolishes normal oestrous cyclicity and fertility. These results show a role for Semaphorin7A signalling in mediating periodic neuroglial remodelling in the adult ME during the ovarian cycle.

  5. Semaphorin7A regulates neuroglial plasticity in the adult hypothalamic median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Jyoti; Messina, Andrea; Langlet, Fanny; Cimino, Irene; Loyens, Anne; Mazur, Danièle; Gallet, Sarah; Balland, Eglantine; Malone, Samuel A.; Pralong, François; Cagnoni, Gabriella; Schellino, Roberta; De Marchis, Silvia; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Tamagnone, Luca; Prevot, Vincent; Giacobini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive competence in mammals depends on the projection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons to the hypothalamic median eminence (ME) and the timely release of GnRH into the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis. In adult rodents, GnRH neurons and the specialized glial cells named tanycytes periodically undergo cytoskeletal plasticity. However, the mechanisms that regulate this plasticity are still largely unknown. We demonstrate that Semaphorin7A, expressed by tanycytes, plays a dual role, inducing the retraction of GnRH terminals and promoting their ensheathment by tanycytic end feet via the receptors PlexinC1 and Itgb1, respectively. Moreover, Semaphorin7A expression is regulated during the oestrous cycle by the fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids. Genetic invalidation of Semaphorin7A receptors in mice induces neuronal and glial rearrangements in the ME and abolishes normal oestrous cyclicity and fertility. These results show a role for Semaphorin7A signalling in mediating periodic neuroglial remodelling in the adult ME during the ovarian cycle. PMID:25721933

  6. Executive function and self-regulated exergaming adherence among older adults.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J; Barcelos, Nicole; Nimon, Joseph; Rocha, Tracey; Thurin, Marisa; Maloney, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The rise in dementia and the evidence of cognitive benefits of exercise for the older adult population together make salient the research into variables affecting cognitive benefit and exercise behavior. One promising avenue for increasing exercise participation has been the introduction of exergaming, a type of exercise that works in combination with virtual reality to enhance both the exercise experience and health outcomes. Past research has revealed that executive function (EF) was related to greater use of self-regulatory strategies, which in turn was related to greater adherence to exercise following an intervention (McAuley et al., 2011). Best et al. (2014) found improvement in EF related to adherence to exercise post- intervention. Anderson-Hanley et al. (2012) found that for older adults aerobic exergaming yielded greater cognitive benefit than traditional exercise alone; however, questions remain as to the possible impact of greater cognitive benefit and other factors on participants' involvement in exercise following the end of an intervention. The current study presents follow-up data exploring the relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behavior in the post-intervention (naturalistic) period. Herein, it was predicted that higher EF at the start of the naturalistic window, would predict subsequent exercise with an exergame. Contrary to expectations, results suggest that those with poorer EF are likely to exergame more frequently. The results of this study contradict previous literature, but suggest an interesting relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behaviors when exergaming is employed, particularly with older adults with some cognitive decline. We hypothesize that other factors may be at work, perhaps expectation of cognitive benefit might act as a unique motivator. PMID:25538608

  7. Executive function and self-regulated exergaming adherence among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J.; Barcelos, Nicole; Nimon, Joseph; Rocha, Tracey; Thurin, Marisa; Maloney, Molly

    2014-01-01

    The rise in dementia and the evidence of cognitive benefits of exercise for the older adult population together make salient the research into variables affecting cognitive benefit and exercise behavior. One promising avenue for increasing exercise participation has been the introduction of exergaming, a type of exercise that works in combination with virtual reality to enhance both the exercise experience and health outcomes. Past research has revealed that executive function (EF) was related to greater use of self-regulatory strategies, which in turn was related to greater adherence to exercise following an intervention (McAuley et al., 2011). Best et al. (2014) found improvement in EF related to adherence to exercise post- intervention. Anderson-Hanley et al. (2012) found that for older adults aerobic exergaming yielded greater cognitive benefit than traditional exercise alone; however, questions remain as to the possible impact of greater cognitive benefit and other factors on participants’ involvement in exercise following the end of an intervention. The current study presents follow-up data exploring the relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behavior in the post-intervention (naturalistic) period. Herein, it was predicted that higher EF at the start of the naturalistic window, would predict subsequent exercise with an exergame. Contrary to expectations, results suggest that those with poorer EF are likely to exergame more frequently. The results of this study contradict previous literature, but suggest an interesting relationship between EF, self-regulation, and exercise behaviors when exergaming is employed, particularly with older adults with some cognitive decline. We hypothesize that other factors may be at work, perhaps expectation of cognitive benefit might act as a unique motivator. PMID:25538608

  8. Executive function is necessary for the regulation of the stepping activity when stepping in place in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Christopher; Sciadas, Ria; Nantel, Julie

    2016-10-01

    To determine the effect of age on stepping performance and to compare the cognitive demand required to regulate repetitive stepping between older and younger adults while performing a stepping in place task (SIP). Fourteen younger (25.4 ± 6.5) and 15 older adults (71.0 ± 9.0) participated in this study. They performed a seated category fluency task and Stroop test, followed by a 60 s SIP task. Following this, both the cognitive and motor tasks were performed simultaneously. We assessed cognitive performance, SIP cycle duration, asymmetry, and arrhythmicity. Compared to younger adults, older adults had larger SIP arrhythmicity both as a single task and when combined with the Category (p < 0.001) and Stroop (p < 0.01) tasks. Older adults also had larger arrhythmicity when dual tasking compared to SIP alone (p < 0.001). Older adults showed greater SIP asymmetry when combined with Category (p = 0.006) and Stroop (p = 0.06) tasks. Finally, they had lower cognitive performance than younger adults in both single and dual tasks (p < 0.01). Age and type of cognitive task performed with the motor task affected different components of stepping. While SIP arrhythmicity was larger for all conditions in older compared to younger adults, cycle duration was not different, and asymmetry tended to be larger during SIP when paired with a verbal fluency task. SIP does not require a high level of control for dynamic stability, therefore demonstrating that higher-level executive function is necessary for the regulation of stepping activity independently of the regulation of postural balance. Furthermore, older adults may lack the cognitive resources needed to adequately regulate stepping activity while performing a cognitive task relying on the executive function.

  9. The chromatin remodeler CHD7 regulates adult neurogenesis via activation of SoxC transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weijun; Khan, Muhammad Amir; Bellvis, Pablo; Zhu, Zhe; Bernhardt, Olga; Herold-Mende, Christel; Liu, Hai-Kun

    2013-07-01

    Chromatin factors that regulate neurogenesis in the central nervous system remain to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that the chromatin remodeler chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7), a protein frequently mutated in human CHARGE syndrome, is a master regulator of neurogenesis in mammalian brain. CHD7 is selectively expressed in actively dividing neural stem cells (NSCs) and progenitors. Genetic inactivation of CHD7 in NSCs leads to a reduction of neuronal differentiation and aberrant dendritic development of newborn neurons. Strikingly, physical exercise can rescue the CHD7 mutant phenotype in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. We further show that in NSCs, CHD7 stimulates the expression of Sox4 and Sox11 genes via remodeling their promoters to an open chromatin state. Our study demonstrates an essential role of CHD7 in activation of the neuronal differentiation program in NSCs, thus providing insights into epigenetic regulation of stem cell differentiation and molecular mechanism of human CHARGE syndrome. PMID:23827709

  10. Venous Endothelial Marker COUP-TFII Regulates the Distinct Pathologic Potentials of Adult Arteries and Veins.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Lu, Yao Wei; Lee, Vivian; Kim, Diana; Dorsey, Taylor; Wang, Qingjie; Lee, Young; Vincent, Peter; Schwarz, John; Dai, Guohao

    2015-11-05

    Arteries and veins have very different susceptibility to certain vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. The molecular mechanisms of these differences are not fully understood. In this study, we discovered that COUP-TFII, a transcription factor critical for establishing the venous identity during embryonic vascular development, also regulates the pathophysiological functions of adult blood vessels, especially those directly related to vascular diseases. Specifically, we found that suppression of COUP-TFII in venous ECs switched its phenotype toward pro-atherogenic by up-regulating the expression of inflammatory genes and down-regulating anti-thrombotic genes. ECs with COUP-TFII knockdown also readily undergo endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) and subsequent osteogenic differentiation with dramatically increased osteogenic transcriptional program and calcium deposition. Consistently, over-expression of COUP-TFII led to the completely opposite effects. In vivo validation of these pro-atherogenic and osteogenic genes also demonstrates a broad consistent differential expression pattern in mouse aorta vs. vena cava ECs, which cannot be explained by the difference in hemodynamic flow. These data reveal phenotypic modulation by different levels of COUP-TFII in arterial and venous ECs, and suggest COUP-TFII may play an important role in the different susceptibilities of arteries and veins to vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and vascular calcification.

  11. TAM receptors affect adult brain neurogenesis by negative regulation of microglial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Tian, Shifu; Lu, Helen J; Lu, Qingjun; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Xiaomin; Ding, Jixiang; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2013-12-15

    TAM tyrosine kinases play multiple functional roles, including regulation of the target genes important in homeostatic regulation of cytokine receptors or TLR-mediated signal transduction pathways. In this study, we show that TAM receptors affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and loss of TAM receptors impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, largely attributed to exaggerated inflammatory responses by microglia characterized by increased MAPK and NF-κB activation and elevated production of proinflammatory cytokines that are detrimental to neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Injection of LPS causes even more severe inhibition of BrdU incorporation in the Tyro3(-/-)Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) triple-knockout (TKO) brains, consistent with the LPS-elicited enhanced expression of proinflammatory mediators, for example, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and inducible NO synthase, and this effect is antagonized by coinjection of the anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in wild-type but not TKO brains. Conditioned medium from TKO microglia cultures inhibits neuron stem cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. IL-6 knockout in Axl(-/-)Mertk(-/-) double-knockout mice overcomes the inflammatory inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IL-6 is a major downstream neurotoxic mediator under homeostatic regulation by TAM receptors in microglia. Additionally, autonomous trophic function of the TAM receptors on the proliferating neuronal progenitors may also promote progenitor differentiation into immature neurons.

  12. The thioredoxin TRX-1 regulates adult lifespan extension induced by dietary restriction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Fierro-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez-Barrios, Maria; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} First in vivo data for thioredoxin in dietary-restriction-(DR)-induced longevity. {yields} Thioredoxin (trx-1) loss suppresses longevity of eat-2 mutant, a genetic DR model. {yields} trx-1 overexpression extends wild-type longevity, but not that of eat-2 mutant. {yields} Longevity by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic DR model, requires trx-1. {yields} trx-1 expression in ASJ neurons of aging adults is increased in response to DD. -- Abstract: Dietary restriction (DR) is the only environmental intervention known to extend adult lifespan in a wide variety of animal models. However, the genetic and cellular events that mediate the anti-aging programs induced by DR remain elusive. Here, we used the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to provide the first in vivo evidence that a thioredoxin (TRX-1) regulates adult lifespan extension induced by DR. We found that deletion of the gene trx-1 completely suppressed the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2, a genetic surrogate of DR in the worm. However, trx-1 deletion only partially suppressed the long lifespan caused by mutation of the insulin-like receptor gene daf-2 or by mutation of the sensory cilia gene osm-5. A trx-1::GFP translational fusion expressed from its own promoter in ASJ neurons (Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP) rescued the trx-1 deletion-mediated suppression of the lifespan extension caused by mutation of eat-2. This rescue was not observed when trx-1::GFP was expressed from the ges-1 promoter in the intestine. In addition, overexpression of Ptrx-1::trx-1::GFP extended lifespan in wild type, but not in eat-2 mutants. trx-1 deletion almost completely suppressed the lifespan extension induced by dietary deprivation (DD), a non-genetic, nutrient-based model of DR in the worm. Moreover, DD upregulated the expression of a trx-1 promoter-driven GFP reporter gene (Ptrx-1::GFP) in ASJ neurons of aging adults, but not that of control Pgpa-9::GFP (which is also expressed in ASJ neurons). We propose

  13. Antithetical regulation of α-myosin heavy chain between fetal and adult heart failure though shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Li, Yifei; Zhou, Kaiyu; Hua, Yimin; Wang, Chuan; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular switches of myosin isoforms are known to occur in various conditions. Here, we demonstrated the result from fetal heart failure and its potential mechanisms. Fetal and adult heart failure rat models were induced by injections of isoproterenol as previously described, and Go6976 was given to heart failing fetuses. Real-time PCR and Western blot were adopted to measure the expressions of α-MHC, β-MHC and YY-1. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analysis whether YY-1 interacts with HDAC5. Besides, histological immunofluorescence assessment was carried out to identify the location of HDAC5. α-MHC was recorded elevated in fetal heart failure which was decreased in adult heart failure. Besides, YY-1 was observed elevated both in fetal and adult failing hearts, but YY-1 could co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC5 only in adult hearts. Nuclear localization of HDAC5 was identified in adult cardiomyocytes, while cytoplasmic localization was identified in fetuses. After Go6976 supplied, HDAC5 shuttled into nucleuses interacted with YY-1. The myosin molecular switches were reversed with worsening cardiac functions and higher mortalities. Regulation of MHC in fetal heart failure was different from adult which provided a better compensation with increased α-MHC. This kind of transition was involved with shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

  14. miRNA-124 in Immune System and Immune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, miR-124 has emerged as a critical modulator of immunity and inflammation. Here, we summarize studies on the function and mechanism of miR-124 in the immune system and immunity-related diseases. They indicated that miR-124 exerts a crucial role in the development of immune system, regulation of immune responses, and inflammatory disorders. It is evident that miR-124 may serve as an informative diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in the future. PMID:27757114

  15. Sox2-mediated regulation of adult neural crest precursors and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Adam P W; Naska, Sibel; Jones, Karen; Jinno, Hiroyuki; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D

    2013-01-01

    Nerve-derived neural crest cells are essential for regeneration in certain animals, such as newts. Here, we asked whether they play a similar role during mammalian tissue repair, focusing on Sox2-positive neural crest precursors in skin. In adult skin, Sox2 was expressed in nerve-terminal-associated neural crest precursor cells (NCPCs) around the hair follicle bulge, and following injury was induced in nerve-derived cells, likely dedifferentiated Schwann cell precursors. At later times postinjury, Sox2-positive cells were scattered throughout the regenerating dermis, and lineage tracing showed that these were all neural-crest-derived NCPCs. These Sox2-positive NCPCs were functionally important, since acute deletion of Sox2 prior to injury caused a decrease of NCPCs in the wound and aberrant skin repair. These data demonstrate that Sox2 regulates skin repair, likely by controlling NCPCs, and raise the possibility that nerve-derived NCPCs may play a general role in mammalian tissue repair.

  16. Regulation of adult cardiocyte growth: effects of active and passive mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, M. L.; Janes, D. M.; Barclay, M. M.; Harger, L.; Decker, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in hemodynamic load have been documented to modulate contractile protein turnover and myofibrillar structure in the heart; however, the relative importance of active and passive loading in regulating adult cardiocyte growth remains unresolved. To address this issue at the cellular level, adult feline cardiocytes were cultured either on Silastic membranes or plastic surfaces. Cardiocyte-laden membranes were stretched 10% of their rest length to enhance passive loading, whereas heart cells cultured on plastic or Silastic were field stimulated at 1 Hz to mimic active loading. Turnover of contractile proteins and structural integrity of the contractile-cytoskeletal apparatus were monitored for periods ranging from 4 to 72 h. Active and passive loading elevated contractile protein synthesis nearly equally (approximately 50%) and promoted the attachment of remodeled myofibrils to vinculin-positive focal contacts and/or costameres during the first 24 h of loading. Thereafter, rates of contractile protein synthesis returned to control values in passively stretched heart cells but remained elevated in field-stimulated cultures. The fractional rate of growth was increased significantly (approximately 8%/day) in electrically paced cells, whereas in passively stretched cardiocytes the growth rate rose only modestly (approximately 2%/day). Changes in the rate of myocyte growth appeared more closely correlated with the development of focal contacts and myofibril remodeling than with changes in myofibrillar protein turnover per se. 2,3-Butanedione monoxime, nifedipine, and, to a lesser extent, ryanodine blocked field-stimulated contractile protein synthesis and myofibrillar remodeling but had no impact on protein turnover or myofibril reassembly in passively loaded cardiocytes. The results of these experiments imply that both active and passive loading stimulate contractile protein turnover and myofibril remodeling, but the generation of active tension accelerates

  17. Post-error adjustments and ADHD symptoms in adults: The effect of laterality and state regulation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh M H; Börger, Norbert A; Geuze, Reint H; van der Meere, Jaap J

    2016-10-01

    Evidence is accumulating that individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) do not adjust their responses after committing errors. Post-error response adjustments are taken to reflect, among others, error monitoring that is essential for learning, flexible behavioural adaptation, and achieving future goals. Many behavioural studies have suggested that atypical lateral brain functions and difficulties in allocating effort to protect performance against stressors (i.e., state regulation) are key factors in ADHD. Whether these factors contribute to the absence of post-error response adjustments in ADHD is unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the contribution of the left and right hemispheres and the deficiency in effort allocation to deviant post-error processing in adults with high ADHD symptoms. From a pool of 87 university students, two groups were formed: a group with higher (n=30) and a group with lower (n=26) scores on the ADHD index subscale of the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales. The groups performed a lateralized lexical decision task with a fast and slower stimulus presentation rate. Post-error slowing and post-error response accuracy to stimuli presented in the left and right visual field were measured in each stimulus presentation rate. Results indicated that subjects with the lower ADHD scores slowed down and improved their response accuracy after errors, especially when stimuli were presented in the right visual field at the slower rate. In contrast, subjects with the higher ADHD scores showed no post-error adjustments. Results suggest that during lexical decision performance, impaired error processing in adults with ADHD is associated with affected ability of the left hemisphere to compensate for errors, especially when extra effort allocation is needed to meet task demands.

  18. A WNT1-regulated developmental gene cascade prevents dopaminergic neurodegeneration in adult En1(+/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhong; Götz, Sebastian; Vogt Weisenhorn, Daniela M; Simeone, Antonio; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima

    2015-10-01

    The protracted and age-dependent degeneration of dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of the Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) in the mammalian midbrain is a hallmark of human Parkinson's Disease (PD) and of certain genetic mouse models of PD, such as mice heterozygous for the homeodomain transcription factor Engrailed 1 (En1(+/-) mice). Neurotoxin-based animal models of PD, in contrast, are characterized by the fast and partly reversible degeneration of the SNc and VTA DA neurons. The secreted protein WNT1 was previously shown to be strongly induced in the neurotoxin-injured adult ventral midbrain (VM), and to protect the SNc and VTA DA neurons from cell death in this context. We demonstrate here that the sustained and ectopic expression of Wnt1 in the SNc and VTA DA neurons of En1(+/Wnt1) mice also protected these genetically affected En1 heterozygote (En1(+/-)) neurons from their premature degeneration in the adult mouse VM. We identified a developmental gene cascade that is up-regulated in the adult En1(+/Wnt1) VM, including the direct WNT1/β-catenin signaling targets Lef1, Lmx1a, Fgf20 and Dkk3, as well as the indirect targets Pitx3 (activated by LMX1A) and Bdnf (activated by PITX3). We also show that the secreted neurotrophin BDNF and the secreted WNT modulator DKK3, but not the secreted growth factor FGF20, increased the survival of En1 mutant dopaminergic neurons in vitro. The WNT1-mediated signaling pathway and its downstream targets BDNF and DKK3 might thus provide a useful means to treat certain genetic and environmental (neurotoxic) forms of human PD.

  19. Post-error adjustments and ADHD symptoms in adults: The effect of laterality and state regulation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh M H; Börger, Norbert A; Geuze, Reint H; van der Meere, Jaap J

    2016-10-01

    Evidence is accumulating that individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) do not adjust their responses after committing errors. Post-error response adjustments are taken to reflect, among others, error monitoring that is essential for learning, flexible behavioural adaptation, and achieving future goals. Many behavioural studies have suggested that atypical lateral brain functions and difficulties in allocating effort to protect performance against stressors (i.e., state regulation) are key factors in ADHD. Whether these factors contribute to the absence of post-error response adjustments in ADHD is unknown. The aim of the present study is to investigate the contribution of the left and right hemispheres and the deficiency in effort allocation to deviant post-error processing in adults with high ADHD symptoms. From a pool of 87 university students, two groups were formed: a group with higher (n=30) and a group with lower (n=26) scores on the ADHD index subscale of the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales. The groups performed a lateralized lexical decision task with a fast and slower stimulus presentation rate. Post-error slowing and post-error response accuracy to stimuli presented in the left and right visual field were measured in each stimulus presentation rate. Results indicated that subjects with the lower ADHD scores slowed down and improved their response accuracy after errors, especially when stimuli were presented in the right visual field at the slower rate. In contrast, subjects with the higher ADHD scores showed no post-error adjustments. Results suggest that during lexical decision performance, impaired error processing in adults with ADHD is associated with affected ability of the left hemisphere to compensate for errors, especially when extra effort allocation is needed to meet task demands. PMID:27429094

  20. Subacute toxicity assessment of diflubenzuron, an insect growth regulator, in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Aline Lima; Cavalheiro, Gabriela Finoto; de Souza, Alexsandra Vila Maior; Traesel, Giseli Karenina; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Kassuya, Cândida Aparecida Leite; Arena, Arielle Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Diflubenzuron (DFB), an insecticide and acaricide insect growth regulator, can be used in agriculture against insect predators and in public health programs, to control insects and vectors, mainly Aedes aegypti larvae. Due to the lack of toxicological assessments of this compound, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the toxicological effects of subacute exposure to the DFB insecticide in adult male rats. Adult male rats were exposed (gavage) to 0, 2, 4, or 8 mg/kg of DFB for 28 days. No clinical signs of toxicity were observed in the DFB-treated animals of the experimental groups. However, there was an increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase in the group that received 8 mg/kg/DFB/day and urea at doses of 4 and 8 mg/kg/DFB/day, without altering other biochemical or hematological parameters. The subacute exposure to the lowest dose of DFB caused significant decrease in testis weight, daily sperm production, and in number of sperm in the epididymis in relation to the control group. However, no alterations were observed in the sperm morphology, testicular, epididymis, liver and kidney histology, or testosterone levels. These findings unveiled the hazardous effects of DFB on male reproduction after the subacute exposure and special attention should be addressed to the effects of low doses of this pesticide.

  1. Differential genomic imprinting regulates paracrine and autocrine roles of IGF2 in mouse adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrón, S. R.; Radford, E. J.; Domingo-Muelas, A.; Kleine, I.; Ramme, A.; Gray, D.; Sandovici, I.; Constancia, M.; Ward, A.; Menheniott, T. R.; Ferguson-Smith, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is implicated in the control of gene dosage in neurogenic niches. Here we address the importance of Igf2 imprinting for murine adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus in vivo. In the SVZ, paracrine IGF2 is a cerebrospinal fluid and endothelial-derived neurogenic factor requiring biallelic expression, with mutants having reduced activation of the stem cell pool and impaired olfactory bulb neurogenesis. In contrast, Igf2 is imprinted in the hippocampus acting as an autocrine factor expressed in neural stem cells (NSCs) solely from the paternal allele. Conditional mutagenesis of Igf2 in blood vessels confirms that endothelial-derived IGF2 contributes to NSC maintenance in SVZ but not in the SGZ, and that this is regulated by the biallelic expression of IGF2 in the vascular compartment. Our findings indicate that a regulatory decision to imprint or not is a functionally important mechanism of transcriptional dosage control in adult neurogenesis. PMID:26369386

  2. Neuregulin 1 as an endogenous regulator of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adult major pelvic ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han-Gyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Lee, Choong-Ku; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether endogenous neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is released in a soluble form (called sNRG1) and upregulates expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in autonomic major pelvic ganglion (MPG) neurons of adult rats. To elicit the release of sNRG1, either the hypogastric nerve or the pelvic nerve was electrically stimulated. Then, the MPG-conditioned medium (CM) was subjected to western blotting using an antibody directed against the N-terminal ectodomain of NRG1. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activation elicited the release of sNRG1 from MPG neurons in a frequency-dependent manner. The sNRG1 release was also induced by treatment of MPG neurons with either high KCl or neurotrophic factors. The biological activity of the released sNRG1 was detected by tyrosine phosphorylation (p185) of the ErbB2 receptors in MPG neurons. When MPG neurons were incubated for 6 h in the CM, the protein level of the nAChR α3 subunit and ACh-induced current (IACh) density were significantly increased. The CM-induced changes in IACh was abolished by a selective ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Taken together, these data suggest that NRG1 functions as an endogenous regulator of nAChR expression in adult MPG neurons.

  3. Endogenous cGMP regulates adult longevity via the insulin signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Sunhee; Paik, Young-Ki

    2009-08-01

    G-proteins, including GPA-3, play an important role in regulating physiological responses in Caenorhabditis elegans. When confronted with an environmental stimulus such as dauer pheromone, or poor nutrients, C. elegans receives and integrates external signals through its nervous system (i.e. amphid neurons), which interprets and translates them into biological action. Here it is shown that a suppressed neuronal cGMP level caused by GPA-3 activation leads to a significant increase (47.3%) in the mean lifespan of adult C. elegans through forkhead transcription factor family O (FOXO)-mediated signal. A reduced neuronal cGMP level was found to be caused by an increased cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity at the transcriptional level. Our results using C. elegans mutants with specific deficits in TGF-beta and FOXO RNAi system suggest a mechanism in that cGMP, TGF-beta, and FOXO signaling interact to differentially produce the insulin-like molecules, ins-7 and daf-28, causing suppression of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway and promoting lifespan extension. Our findings provide not only a new mechanism of cGMP-mediated induction of longevity in adult C. elegans but also a possible therapeutic strategy for neuronal disease, which has been likened to brain diabetes. PMID:19489741

  4. Long-term rearrangements of hippocampal mossy fiber terminal connectivity in the adult regulated by experience.

    PubMed

    Galimberti, Ivan; Gogolla, Nadine; Alberi, Stefano; Santos, Alexandre Ferrao; Muller, Dominique; Caroni, Pico

    2006-06-01

    We investigated rearrangements of connectivity between hippocampal mossy fibers and CA3 pyramidal neurons. We found that mossy fibers establish 10-15 local terminal arborization complexes (LMT-Cs) in CA3, which exhibit major differences in size and divergence in adult mice. LMT-Cs exhibited two types of long-term rearrangements in connectivity in the adult: progressive expansion of LMT-C subsets along individual dendrites throughout life, and pronounced increases in LMT-C complexities in response to an enriched environment. In organotypic slice cultures, subsets of LMT-Cs also rearranged extensively and grew over weeks and months, altering the strength of preexisting connectivity, and establishing or dismantling connections with pyramidal neurons. Differences in LMT-C plasticity reflected properties of individual LMT-Cs, not mossy fibers. LMT-C maintenance and growth were regulated by spiking activity, mGluR2-sensitive transmitter release from LMTs, and PKC. Thus, subsets of terminal arborization complexes by mossy fibers rearrange their local connectivities in response to experience and age throughout life.

  5. Emotion regulation difficulties, youth-adult relationships, and suicide attempts among high school students in underserved communities.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Anthony R; Wyman, Peter A; Petrova, Mariya; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Goldston, David B; Xia, Yinglin; Gould, Madelyn S

    2013-06-01

    To develop and refine interventions to prevent youth suicide, knowledge is needed about specific processes that reduce risk at a population level. Using a cross-sectional design, the present study tested hypotheses regarding associations between self-reported suicide attempts, emotion regulation difficulties, and positive youth-adult relationships among 7,978 high-school students (48.6% male, 49.9% female) in 30 high schools from predominantly rural, low-income communities. 683 students (8.6%) reported a past-year suicide attempt. Emotion regulation difficulties and a lack of trusted adults at home and school were associated with increased risk for making a past-year suicide attempt, above and beyond the effects of depressive symptoms and demographic factors. The association between emotion regulation difficulties and suicide attempts was modestly lower among students who perceived themselves as having higher levels of trusted adults in the family, consistent with a protective effect. Having a trusted adult in the community (outside of school and family) was associated with fewer suicide attempts in models that controlled only for demographic covariates, but not when taking symptoms of depression into account. These findings point to adolescent emotion regulation and relationships with trusted adults as complementary targets for suicide prevention that merit further intervention studies. Reaching these targets in a broad population of adolescents will require new delivery systems and "option rich" (OR) intervention designs.

  6. NF-κB mediated regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis: relevance to mood disorders and antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Bortolotto, Valeria; Cuccurazzu, Bruna; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Grilli, Mariagrazia

    2014-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a peculiar form of process of neuroplasticity that in recent years has gained great attention for its potential implication in cognition and in emotional behavior in physiological conditions. Moreover, a vast array of experimental studies suggested that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be altered in various neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression, where its disregulation may contribute to cognitive impairment and/or emotional aspects associated with those diseases. An intriguing area of interest is the potential influence of drugs on adult neurogenesis. In particular, several psychoactive drugs, including antidepressants, were shown to positively modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Among molecules which could regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis the NF- κ B family of transcription factors has been receiving particular attention from our and other laboratories. Herein we review recent data supporting the involvement of NF- κ B signaling pathways in the regulation of adult neurogenesis and in the effects of drugs that are endowed with proneurogenic and antidepressant activity. The potential implications of these findings on our current understanding of the process of adult neurogenesis in physiological and pathological conditions and on the search for novel antidepressants are also discussed. PMID:24678511

  7. Protein kinase C regulates mood-related behaviors and adult hippocampal cell proliferation in rats.

    PubMed

    Abrial, Erika; Etievant, Adeline; Bétry, Cécile; Scarna, Hélène; Lucas, Guillaume; Haddjeri, Nasser; Lambás-Señas, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology and therapeutics of bipolar disorder are still unknown. In recent years, protein kinase C (PKC) has emerged as a potential key player in mania. To further investigate the role of this signaling system in mood regulation, we examined the effects of PKC modulators in behavioral tests modeling several facets of bipolar disorder and in adult hippocampal cell proliferation in rats. Our results showed that a single injection of the PKC inhibitors tamoxifen (80 mg/kg, i.p.) and chelerythrine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) attenuated amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion and decreased risk-taking behavior, supporting the efficacy of PKC blockade in acute mania. Moreover, chronic exposure to tamoxifen (10 mg/kg/day, i.p., for 14 days) or chelerythrine (0.3 mg/kg/day, s.c., for 14 days) caused depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test, and resulted in a reduction of cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Finally, we showed that, contrary to the PKC inhibitors, the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) enhanced risk-taking behavior and induced an antidepressant-like effect. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of PKC in regulating opposite facets of bipolar disorder, and emphasize a major role for PKC in this disease. PMID:23228462

  8. Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy 2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis, browning, and energy balance in adult animals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyi; Lei, Xinnuo; Benson, Tyler; Mintz, James; Xu, Xiaojing; Harris, Ruth B; Weintraub, Neal L; Wang, Xiaoling; Chen, Weiqin

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in BSCL2/SEIPIN cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (BSCL2), but the mechanisms whereby Bscl2 regulates adipose tissue function are unclear. Here, we generated adipose tissue (mature) Bscl2 knockout (Ad-mKO) mice, in which Bscl2 was specifically ablated in adipocytes of adult animals, to investigate the impact of acquired Bscl2 deletion on adipose tissue function and energy balance. Ad-mKO mice displayed reduced adiposity and were protected against high fat diet-induced obesity, but not insulin resistance or hepatic steatosis. Gene expression profiling and biochemical assays revealed increased lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue , as well as browning of WAT, owing to induction of cAMP/protein kinase A signaling upon Bscl2 deletion. Interestingly, Bscl2 deletion reduced food intake and downregulated adipose β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) expression. Impaired ADRB3 signaling partially offsets upregulated browning-induced energy expenditure and thermogenesis in Ad-mKO mice housed at ambient temperature. However, this counter-regulatory response was abrogated under thermoneutral conditions, resulting in even greater body mass loss in Ad-mKO mice. These findings suggest that Bscl2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis and β-adrenergic signaling to produce complex effects on adipose tissues and whole-body energy balance.

  9. Gain-of-function microRNA screens identify miR-193a regulating proliferation and apoptosis in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Haruo; Yamada, Yoji; Miyazawa, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a small class of non‑coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, and are considered as new therapeutic targets for treating cancer. In this study, we performed a gain-of-function screen using miRNA mimic library (319 miRNA species) to identify those affecting cell proliferation in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (A2780). We discovered a number of miRNAs that increased or decreased the cell viability of A2780 cells. Pro-proliferative and anti-proliferative miRNAs include oncogenic miR-372 and miR-373, and tumor suppressive miR-124a, miR-7, miR-192 and miR-193a, respectively. We found that overexpression of miR-124a, miR-192, miR-193a and miR‑193b inhibited BrdU incorporation in A2780 cells, indicating that these miRNAs affected the cell cycle. Overexpression of miR‑193a and miR-193b induced an activation of caspase 3/7, and resulted in apoptotic cell death in A2780 cells. A genome‑wide gene expression analysis with miR-193a-transfected A2780 cells led to identification of ARHGAP19, CCND1, ERBB4, KRAS and MCL1 as potential miR-193a targets. We demonstrated that miR-193a decreased the amount of MCL1 protein by binding 3'UTR of its mRNA. Our study suggests the potential of miRNA screens to discover miRNAs as therapeutic tools to treat ovarian cancer.

  10. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα.

  11. Reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Singal, Tushi; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2010-06-01

    By employing a pharmacological approach, we have shown that phospholipase C (PLC) activity is involved in the regulation of gene expression of transcription factors such as c-Fos and c-Jun in cardiomyocytes in response to norepinephrine (NE). However, there is no information available regarding the identity of specific PLC isozymes involved in the regulation of c-Fos and c-Jun or on the involvement of these transcription factors in PLC isozyme gene expression in adult cardiomyocytes. In this study, transfection of cardiomyocytes with PLC isozyme specific siRNA was found to prevent the NE-mediated increases in the corresponding PLC isozyme gene expression, protein content and activity. Unlike PLC gamma(1) gene, silencing of PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) genes with si RNA prevented the increases in c-Fos and c-Jun gene expression in response to NE. On the other hand, transfection with c-Jun si RNA suppressed the NE-induced increase in c-Jun as well as PLC beta(1), beta(3) and delta(1) gene expression, but had no effect on PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Although transfection of cardiomyocytes with c-Fos si RNA prevented NE-induced expression of c-Fos, PLC beta(1) and PLC beta(3) genes, it did not affect the increases in PLC delta(1) and PLC gamma(1) gene expression. Silencing of either c-Fos or c-Jun also depressed the NE-mediated increases in PLC beta(1), beta(3) and gamma(1) protein content and activity in an isozyme specific manner. Furthermore, silencing of all PLC isozymes as well as of c-Fos and c-Jun resulted in prevention of the NE-mediated increase in atrial natriuretic factor gene expression. These findings, by employing gene silencing techniques, demonstrate that there occurs a reciprocal regulation of transcription factors and specific PLC isozyme gene expression in cardiomyocytes.

  12. Fluid cognitive ability is a resource for successful emotion regulation in older and younger adults.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Philipp C; Lee, Ihno A; Gross, James J; Urry, Heather L

    2014-01-01

    The Selection, Optimization, and Compensation with Emotion Regulation (SOC-ER) framework suggests that (1) emotion regulation (ER) strategies require resources and that (2) higher levels of relevant resources may increase ER success. In the current experiment, we tested the specific hypothesis that individual differences in one internal class of resources, namely cognitive ability, would contribute to greater success using cognitive reappraisal (CR), a form of ER in which one reinterprets the meaning of emotion-eliciting situations. To test this hypothesis, 60 participants (30 younger and 30 older adults) completed standardized neuropsychological tests that assess fluid and crystallized cognitive ability, as well as a CR task in which participants reinterpreted the meaning of sad pictures in order to alter (increase or decrease) their emotions. In a control condition, they viewed the pictures without trying to change how they felt. Throughout the task, we indexed subjective emotional experience (self-reported ratings of emotional intensity), expressive behavior (corrugator muscle activity), and autonomic physiology (heart rate and electrodermal activity) as measures of emotional responding. Multilevel models were constructed to explain within-subjects variation in emotional responding as a function of ER contrasts comparing increase or decrease conditions with the view control condition and between-subjects variation as a function of cognitive ability and/or age group (older, younger). As predicted, higher fluid cognitive ability-indexed by perceptual reasoning, processing speed, and working memory-was associated with greater success using reappraisal to alter emotional responding. Reappraisal success did not vary as a function of crystallized cognitive ability or age group. Collectively, our results provide support for a key tenet of the SOC-ER framework that higher levels of relevant resources may confer greater success at emotion regulation. PMID:24987387

  13. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα. PMID:25533124

  14. Emotion Regulation Difficulties, Youth-Adult Relationships, and Suicide Attempts among High School Students in Underserved Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisani, Anthony R.; Wyman, Peter A.; Petrova, Mariya; Schmeelk-Cone, Karen; Goldston, David B.; Xia, Yinglin; Gould, Madelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    To develop and refine interventions to prevent youth suicide, knowledge is needed about specific processes that reduce risk at a population level. Using a cross-sectional design, the present study tested hypotheses regarding associations between self-reported suicide attempts, emotion regulation difficulties, and positive youth-adult relationships…

  15. Self-Regulation and Metacognition in Young Children: Does It Matter if Adults Are Present or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, Sue

    2016-01-01

    This paper brings together two areas of considerable interest to researchers, practitioners and policy makers: young children's developing self-regulation and metacognition, and the impact of adult (practitioner) presence or absence on their behaviour and learning. One hundred and twenty-eight observations of 29 children aged 4-5 years in a…

  16. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  17. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Duan, Haiping; Tan, Qihua; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Objective The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, cultural, social-economic backgrounds and geographical environments. Materials and Methods The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins followed up for a long period of 12 years with a mean age at intake of 38 years (range: 18–65) and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs traced for about 7 years with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years (range: 23–64). The classical twin models were fitted to the longitudinal change in each phenotype (Δphenotype) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the variation in Δphenotype. Results Moderate to high contributions by the unique environment were estimated for all phenotypes in both Danish (from 0.51 for low density lipoprotein cholesterol up to 0.72 for triglycerides) and Chinese (from 0.41 for triglycerides up to 0.73 for diastolic blood pressure) twins; low to moderate genetic components were estimated for long-term change in most of the phenotypes in Danish twins except for triglycerides and hip circumference. Compared with Danish twins, the Chinese twins tended to have higher genetic control over the longitudinal changes in lipids (except high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose, higher unique environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. Conclusion Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples. PMID:26862898

  18. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  19. The Mammalian Adult Neurogenesis Gene Ontology (MANGO) Provides a Structural Framework for Published Information on Genes Regulating Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Overall, Rupert W.; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Kempermann, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is not a single phenotype, but consists of a number of sub-processes, each of which is under complex genetic control. Interpretation of gene expression studies using existing resources often does not lead to results that address the interrelatedness of these processes. Formal structure, such as provided by ontologies, is essential in any field for comprehensive interpretation of existing knowledge but, until now, such a structure has been lacking for adult neurogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We have created a resource with three components 1. A structured ontology describing the key stages in the development of adult hippocampal neural stem cells into functional granule cell neurons. 2. A comprehensive survey of the literature to annotate the results of all published reports on gene function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis (257 manuscripts covering 228 genes) to the appropriate terms in our ontology. 3. An easy-to-use searchable interface to the resulting database made freely available online. The manuscript presents an overview of the database highlighting global trends such as the current bias towards research on early proliferative stages, and an example gene set enrichment analysis. A limitation of the resource is the current scope of the literature which, however, is growing by around 100 publications per year. With the ontology and database in place, new findings can be rapidly annotated and regular updates of the database will be made publicly available. Conclusions/Significance The resource we present allows relevant interpretation of gene expression screens in terms of defined stages of postnatal neuronal development. Annotation of genes by hand from the adult neurogenesis literature ensures the data are directly applicable to the system under study. We believe this approach could also serve as an example to other fields in a ‘bottom-up’ community effort complementing the already successful

  20. Effects of H2S on the central regulation of respiration in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hou, Xuefei; Ding, Yan; Nie, Lihong; Zhou, Hua; Nie, Zheng; Tang, Yuhong; Chen, Li; Zheng, Yu

    2014-04-16

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gasotransmitter synthesized from cysteine (Cys) by pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes. We investigated the potential roles of H2S in the regulation of central rhythmic respiration in adult rats in vivo. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS: 2.5 mM, 10 mM, and 5 mM) as a source of exogenous H2S, Cys (2.5 mM, 10 mM and 5 mM) as a source of endogenous H2S, 2.5 mM Cys+10 mM hydroxylamine (NH2OH), and 10 mM NH2OH, respectively, were intracerebroventricularly injected into rats. The rhythmic discharge of the diaphragm, including burst duration (BD), burst interval (BI), burst frequency (BF), and integrated amplitude (IA), and arterial blood pressure (BP) were measured at different time points. The results were analyzed by analysis of variance. A total of 2.5 mM NaHS did not significantly affect changes in BD, BI, BF, IA, or BP (P>0.05), whereas 2.5 mM Cys significantly altered BD, BI, and BF (P<0.05); however, there was no change in IA and BP (P>0.05). A concentration of 5 mM Cys had effects similar to those of 5 mM NaHS; both induced biphasic respiratory responses and changed the BF (P<0.05). A concentration of 10 mM NH2OH irreversibly inhibited rhythmic discharge of the diaphragm except for IA. No change was seen in BI, BF, IA, or BP (P>0.05) except for BD was temporarily decreased (P<0.05) in the 2.5 mM Cys+10 mM NH2OH group. These results suggest that exogenous and endogenous H2S may participate in the regulation of respiratory activity in adult rats.

  1. Mindfulness predicts less texting while driving among young adults: Examining attention- and emotion-regulation motives as potential mediators

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Greg; Greeson, Jeff; Renna, Megan; Robbins-Monteith, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    Many young adult drivers read and send text messages while driving despite clear safety risks. Understanding predictors of texting-while-driving may help to indentify relevant targets for interventions to reduce this dangerous behavior. The present study examined whether individual differences in mindfulness is associated with texting-while-driving in a sample of young-adult drivers. Using path analysis, we tested whether this relationship would be mediated by the degree to which individuals use text-messaging as a means of reducing unpleasant emotions (emotion-regulation motives) and the degree to which individuals limit texting in order to focus on present-moment experiences (attention-regulation motives). Individuals lower in mindfulness reported more frequent texting-while-driving and this relationship appeared to be mediated primarily by emotion-regulation motives. Results may help inform the development of mindfulness-based interventions to prevent texting-while-driving. PMID:22031789

  2. YAP Regulates Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Steroidogenesis in Adult Granulosa Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, David; Lv, Xiangmin; Hua, Guohua; He, Chunbo; Dong, Jixin; Lele, Subodh M.; Li, David Wan-Cheng; Zhai, Qiongli; Davis, John S.; Wang, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway has been implicated as a conserved regulator of organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Yes associated protein (YAP), the central component of the Hippo signaling cascade, functions as an oncogene in several malignancies. Ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCT) are characterized by enlargement of ovary, excess production of estrogen, high frequency of recurrence and potential of malignancy and metastasis. Whether the Hippo pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis of GCT is unknown. This study was conducted to examine the expression of YAP in human adult GCTs and to determine the role of YAP in the proliferation and steroidogenesis of GCT cells. Compared with age-matched normal human ovaries, GCT tissues exhibited higher levels of YAP expression. YAP protein was predominantly expressed in the nucleus of tumor cells, whereas the non-tumor ovarian stromal cells expressed very low levels of YAP. YAP was also expressed in cultured primary human granulosa cells and in KGN and COV434 GCT cell lines. siRNA-mediated knockdown of YAP in KGN cells resulted in a significant reduction in cell proliferation (P<0.001). Conversely, overexpression of wild-type YAP or a constitutively active YAP mutant resulted in a significant increase in KGN cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, YAP knockdown reduced FSH-induced aromatase (CYP19A1) protein expression and estrogen production in KGN cells. These results demonstrate that YAP plays an important role in regulating GCT cell proliferation, migration and steroidogenesis. Targeting the Hippo/YAP pathway may provide a novel therapeutic approach for GCT. PMID:24389730

  3. Novel function of Tau in regulating the effects of external stimuli on adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pallas-Bazarra, Noemí; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Navarrete, Marta; Esteban, Jose A; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús; Llorens-Martín, María

    2016-07-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated neuronal protein found mainly in axons. However, its presence in dendrites and dendritic spines is particularly relevant due to its involvement in synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. Here, we show that Tau plays a novel in vivo role in the morphological and synaptic maturation of newborn hippocampal granule neurons under basal conditions. Furthermore, we reveal that Tau is involved in the selective cell death of immature granule neurons caused by acute stress. Also, Tau deficiency protects newborn neurons from the stress-induced dendritic atrophy and loss of postsynaptic densities (PSDs). Strikingly, we also demonstrate that Tau regulates the increase in newborn neuron survival triggered by environmental enrichment (EE). Moreover, newborn granule neurons from Tau(-/-) mice did not show any stimulatory effect of EE on dendritic development or on PSD generation. Thus, our data demonstrate that Tau(-/-) mice show impairments in the maturation of newborn granule neurons under basal conditions and that they are insensitive to the modulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis exerted by both stimulatory and detrimental stimuli.

  4. CPG15 regulates synapse stability in the developing and adult brain.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tadahiro; Leslie, Jennifer H; Eavri, Ronen; Chen, Jerry L; Lin, Walter C; Flanders, Genevieve H; Borok, Erzsebet; Horvath, Tamas L; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-12-15

    Use-dependent selection of optimal connections is a key feature of neural circuit development and, in the mature brain, underlies functional adaptation, such as is required for learning and memory. Activity patterns guide circuit refinement through selective stabilization or elimination of specific neuronal branches and synapses. The molecular signals that mediate activity-dependent synapse and arbor stabilization and maintenance remain elusive. We report that knockout of the activity-regulated gene cpg15 in mice delays developmental maturation of axonal and dendritic arbors visualized by anterograde tracing and diolistic labeling, respectively. Electrophysiology shows that synaptic maturation is also delayed, and electron microscopy confirms that many dendritic spines initially lack functional synaptic contacts. While circuits eventually develop, in vivo imaging reveals that spine maintenance is compromised in the adult, leading to a gradual attrition in spine numbers. Loss of cpg15 also results in poor learning. cpg15 knockout mice require more trails to learn, but once they learn, memories are retained. Our findings suggest that CPG15 acts to stabilize active synapses on dendritic spines, resulting in selective spine and arbor stabilization and synaptic maturation, and that synapse stabilization mediated by CPG15 is critical for efficient learning. PMID:22190461

  5. Regulation of starvation-induced hyperactivity by insulin and glucagon signaling in adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Huang, Rui; Ye, Jie; Zhang, Vivian; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Guo; Jia, Junling; Wang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Starvation induces sustained increase in locomotion, which facilitates food localization and acquisition and hence composes an important aspect of food-seeking behavior. We investigated how nutritional states modulated starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila. The receptor of the adipokinetic hormone (AKHR), the insect analog of glucagon, was required for starvation-induced hyperactivity. AKHR was expressed in a small group of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. Silencing AKHR+ neurons and blocking octopamine signaling in these neurons eliminated starvation-induced hyperactivity, whereas activation of these neurons accelerated the onset of hyperactivity upon starvation. Neither AKHR nor AKHR+ neurons were involved in increased food consumption upon starvation, suggesting that starvation-induced hyperactivity and food consumption are independently regulated. Single cell analysis of AKHR+ neurons identified the co-expression of Drosophila insulin-like receptor (dInR), which imposed suppressive effect on starvation-induced hyperactivity. Therefore, insulin and glucagon signaling exert opposite effects on starvation-induced hyperactivity via a common neural target in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15693.001 PMID:27612383

  6. P53 regulates disruption of neuronal development in the adult hippocampus after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y-Q; Cheng, ZW-C; Liu, SK-W; Aubert, I; Wong, C S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in neurocognitive dysfunction after cranial irradiation for brain tumors. How irradiation results in impaired neuronal development remains poorly understood. The Trp53 (p53) gene is known to regulate cellular DNA damage response after irradiation. Whether it has a role in disruption of late neuronal development remains unknown. Here we characterized the effects of p53 on neuronal development in adult mouse hippocampus after irradiation. Different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms and a transplantation study were used for cell fate mapping. Compared with wild-type mice, we observed profound inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after irradiation in mice deficient in p53 despite the absence of acute apoptosis of neuroblasts. The putative neural stem cells were apoptosis resistant after irradiation regardless of p53 genotype. Cell fate mapping using different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms revealed enhanced activation of neural stem cells and their consequential exhaustion in the absence of p53 after irradiation. Both p53-knockout and wild-type mice demonstrated similar extent of microglial activation in the hippocampus after irradiation. Impairment of neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors transplanted in irradiated hippocampus was not altered by p53 genotype of the recipient mice. We conclude that by inhibiting neural progenitor activation, p53 serves to mitigate disruption of neuronal development after irradiation independent of apoptosis and perturbation of the neural stem cell niche. These findings suggest for the first time that p53 may have a key role in late effects in brain after irradiation. PMID:27752364

  7. Six1 regulates MyoD expression in adult muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yubing; Chakroun, Imane; Yang, Dabo; Horner, Ellias; Liang, Jieyi; Aziz, Arif; Chu, Alphonse; De Repentigny, Yves; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Kothary, Rashmi; Blais, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent satellite cells are myogenic progenitors that enable regeneration of skeletal muscle. One of the early events of satellite cell activation following myotrauma is the induction of the myogenic regulatory factor MyoD, which eventually induces terminal differentiation and muscle function gene expression. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which MyoD is induced during activation of satellite cells in mouse muscle undergoing regeneration. We show that Six1, a transcription factor essential for embryonic myogenesis, also regulates MyoD expression in muscle progenitor cells. Six1 knock-down by RNA interference leads to decreased expression of MyoD in myoblasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays reveal that Six1 binds the Core Enhancer Region of MyoD. Further, transcriptional reporter assays demonstrate that Core Enhancer Region reporter gene activity in myoblasts and in regenerating muscle depends on the expression of Six1 and on Six1 binding sites. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that Six1 is required for the proper chromatin structure at the Core Enhancer Region, as well as for MyoD binding at its own enhancer. Together, our results reveal that MyoD expression in satellite cells depends on Six1, supporting the idea that Six1 plays an important role in adult myogenesis, in addition to its role in embryonic muscle formation. PMID:23840772

  8. Emotion regulation in disordered eating: Psychometric properties of the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale among Spanish adults and its interrelations with personality and clinical severity

    PubMed Central

    Wolz, Ines; Agüera, Zaida; Granero, Roser; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Gratz, Kim L.; Menchón, José M.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the study were to (1) validate the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in a sample of Spanish adults with and without eating disorders, and (2) explore the role of emotion regulation difficulties in eating disorders (ED), including its mediating role in the relation between key personality traits and ED severity. Methods: One hundred and thirty four patients (121 female, mean age = 29 years) with anorexia nervosa (n = 30), bulimia nervosa (n = 54), binge eating (n = 20), or Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorders (n = 30) and 74 healthy control participants (51 female, mean age = 21 years) reported on general psychopathology, ED severity, personality traits and difficulties in emotion regulation. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to examine the psychometrics of the DERS in this Spanish sample (Aim 1). Additionally, to examine the role of emotion regulation difficulties in ED (Aim 2), differences in emotion regulation difficulties across eating disorder subgroups were examined and structural equation modeling was used to explore the interrelations among emotion regulation, personality traits, and eating disorder severity. Results: Results support the validity and reliability of the DERS within this Spanish adult sample and suggest that this measure has a similar factor structure in this sample as in the original sample. Moreover, emotion regulation difficulties were found to differ as a function of eating disorder subtype and to mediate the relation between two specific personality traits (i.e., high harm avoidance and low self-directedness) and ED severity. Conclusions: Personality traits of high harm avoidance and low self-directedness may increase vulnerability to ED pathology indirectly, through emotion regulation difficulties. PMID:26175710

  9. Makorin ortholog LEP-2 regulates LIN-28 stability to promote the juvenile-to-adult transition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Herrera, R Antonio; Kiontke, Karin; Fitch, David H A

    2016-03-01

    The heterochronic genes lin-28, let-7 and lin-41 regulate fundamental developmental transitions in animals, such as stemness versus differentiation and juvenile versus adult states. We identify a new heterochronic gene, lep-2, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mutations in lep-2 cause a delay in the juvenile-to-adult transition, with adult males retaining pointed, juvenile tail tips, and displaying defective sexual behaviors. In both sexes, lep-2 mutants fail to cease molting or produce an adult cuticle. We find that LEP-2 post-translationally regulates LIN-28 by promoting LIN-28 protein degradation. lep-2 encodes the sole C. elegans ortholog of the Makorin (Mkrn) family of proteins. Like lin-28 and other heterochronic pathway members, vertebrate Mkrns are involved in developmental switches, including the timing of pubertal onset in humans. Based on shared roles, conservation and the interaction between lep-2 and lin-28 shown here, we propose that Mkrns, together with other heterochronic genes, constitute an evolutionarily ancient conserved module regulating switches in development.

  10. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Wissink, Erin M; Smith, Norah L; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  11. MicroRNAs and Their Targets Are Differentially Regulated in Adult and Neonatal Mouse CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wissink, Erin M.; Smith, Norah L.; Spektor, Roman; Rudd, Brian D.; Grimson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory, which protects organisms from re-infection, is a hallmark of the mammalian adaptive immune system and the underlying principle of vaccination. In early life, however, mice and other mammals are deficient at generating memory CD8+ T cells, which protect organisms from intracellular pathogens. The molecular basis that differentiates adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are both developmentally regulated and required for normal adult CD8+ T cell functions. We used next-generation sequencing to identify mouse miRNAs that are differentially regulated in adult and neonatal CD8+ T cells, which may contribute to the impaired development of neonatal memory cells. The miRNA profiles of adult and neonatal cells were surprisingly similar during infection; however, we observed large differences prior to infection. In particular, miR-29 and miR-130 have significant differential expression between adult and neonatal cells before infection. Importantly, using RNA-Seq, we detected reciprocal changes in expression of messenger RNA targets for both miR-29 and miR-130. Moreover, targets that we validated include Eomes and Tbx21, key genes that regulate the formation of memory CD8+ T cells. Notably, age-dependent changes in miR-29 and miR-130 are conserved in human CD8+ T cells, further suggesting that these developmental differences are biologically relevant. Together, these results demonstrate that miR-29 and miR-130 are likely important regulators of memory CD8+ T cell formation and suggest that neonatal cells are committed to a short-lived effector cell fate prior to infection. PMID:26416483

  12. Knowledge About E-Cigarette Constituents and Regulation: Results From a National Survey of U.S. Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Andy S. L.; Bigman, Cabral A.; Henriksen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine young adults’ knowledge of e-cigarette constituents and regulation and its association with product use and self-reported exposure to marketing. Methods: Young adults (18–34 years, N = 1,247) from a U.S. web panel were surveyed in March 2014. Using multinomial logistic regressions, self-reported exposure to marketing was examined as a predictor of whether participants responded correctly (reference category), incorrectly, or “don’t know” to four knowledge items—whether e-cigarettes contain nicotine, contain toxic chemicals, are regulated by government for safety, and are regulated for use as a cessation aid. Analyses adjusted for demographics and smoking status and were weighted to match the U.S. young adult population. Results: Most respondents did not know if e-cigarettes, contain toxic chemicals (48%), are regulated for safety (61%), and are regulated as cessation aids (68%); fewer than 37% answered all of these items correctly. Current users of e-cigarettes (past 30 days) had a lower likelihood of being incorrect about safety testing (p = .006) and being regulated as a cessation aid (p = .017). Higher exposure to e-cigarette marketing was associated with a lower likelihood of responding “don’t know” than being correct, and with a higher likelihood of being incorrect as opposed to correct about e-cigarettes containing nicotine. Conclusions: Knowledge about e-cigarette constituents and regulation was low among young adults, who are the largest consumer group for these products. Interventions, such as warning labels or information campaigns, may be necessary to educate and correct misinformation about these products. PMID:25542915

  13. A self-regulation resource model of self-compassion and health behavior intentions in emerging adults

    PubMed Central

    Sirois, Fuschia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study tested a self-regulation resource model (SRRM) of self-compassion and health-promoting behavior intentions in emerging adults. The SRRM posits that positive and negative affect in conjunction with health self-efficacy serve as valuable self-regulation resources to promote health behaviors. Methods An online survey was completed by 403 emerging adults recruited from the community and a Canadian University in late 2008. Multiple meditation analyses with bootstrapping controlling for demographics and current health behaviors tested the proposed explanatory role of the self-regulation resource variables (affect and self-efficacy) in linking self-compassion to health behavior intentions. Results Self-compassion was positively associated with intentions to engage in health-promoting behaviors. The multiple mediation model explained 23% of the variance in health behavior intentions, with significant indirect effects through health self-efficacy and low negative affect. Conclusion Interventions aimed at increasing self-compassion in emerging adults may help promote positive health behaviors, perhaps through increasing self-regulation resources. PMID:26844074

  14. MicroRNA-124 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Ets-1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Zang, Wenqiao; Liu, Pei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Deng, Meng; Sun, Wencong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhai, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that, by targeting certain messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression or cleavage, can regulate the expression of these genes. In addition, miRNAs may also function as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, as the abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with various human tumors. However, the effects of the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer remain unclear. The present study was conducted to study the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer, paying particular attention to miR-124's relation to the proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis in breast cancer cell MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to identify miR-124 that was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. We also showed E26 transformation specific-1 (Ets-1) and miR-124 expression levels in breast cancer tissues that were associated with lymph node metastases. With transfected synthetic miR-124 agomir into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony forming potential was observed after treatment with miR-124. Apoptosis and migration rates were found to be significantly higher in two breast-derived cell lines transfected with a miR-124 agomir (P < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay and Western blot were used to verify Ets-1 as a potential major target gene of miR-124, and the result showed that miR-124 can bind to putative binding sites within the Ets-1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR) to reduce its expression. Based on these findings, we propose that miR-124 and Ets-1 may serve as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer.

  15. Dietary adenine controls adult lifespan via adenosine nucleotide biosynthesis and AMPK, and regulates the longevity benefit of caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Stenesen, Drew; Suh, Jae Myoung; Seo, Jin; Yu, Kweon; Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Seok; Min, Kyung-Jin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A common thread among conserved lifespan regulators lies within intertwined roles in metabolism and energy homeostasis. We show that heterozygous mutations of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) biosynthetic enzymes extend Drosophila lifespan. The lifespan benefit of these mutations depends upon increased AMP to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to ATP ratios and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transgenic expression of AMPK in adult fat body or adult muscle, key metabolic tissues, extended lifespan, while AMPK RNAi reduced lifespan. Supplementing adenine, a substrate for AMP biosynthesis, to the diet of long-lived AMP biosynthesis mutants reversed lifespan extension. Remarkably, this simple change in diet also blocked the pro-longevity effects of dietary restriction. These data establish AMP biosynthesis, adenosine nucleotide ratios, and AMPK as determinants of adult lifespan, provide a mechanistic link between cellular anabolism and energy sensing pathways, and indicate that dietary adenine manipulations might alter metabolism to influence animal lifespan. PMID:23312286

  16. Primary cilia regulate proliferation of amplifying progenitors in adult hippocampus: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Elliott, Jimmy; Miller, Amber; Ginbey, Ashley; Pazour, Gregory J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Roberts, Amanda J; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-07-01

    Integration of new neurons into the adult hippocampus has been linked to specific types of learning. Primary cilia were found to be required for the formation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus during development. However, the requirement of cilia in maintenance of adult NSCs is unknown. We developed a genetic mouse model in which fetal/perinatal brain development is unaffected, but adult hippocampal neurogenesis is constantly reduced by conditional ablation of primary cilia in adult GFAP(+) neural stem/progenitor cells. We found that this approach specifically reduces the number of hippocampal amplifying progenitors (also called type 2a cells) without affecting the number of radial NSCs (or type 1 cells). Constant reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis produced a delay rather than a permanent deficiency in spatial learning without affecting the retention of long-term memories. Decreased neurogenesis also altered spatial novelty recognition and hippocampus-independent cue conditioning. Here, we propose that adult hippocampal newborn neurons increase the efficiency of generating the new representations of spatial memories and that reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be biased toward cue-based strategies. This novel mouse model provides evidences that cognitive deficits associated with ciliary defects (ciliopathies) might be, in part, mediated by the deficiency of primary cilia in adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells. PMID:21734285

  17. Hippocampal adult neurogenesis: Its regulation and potential role in spatial learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Pan, Yongliang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-08-01

    Adult neurogenesis, defined here as progenitor cell division generating functionally integrated neurons in the adult brain, occurs within the hippocampus of numerous mammalian species including humans. The present review details various endogenous (e.g., neurotransmitters) and environmental (e.g., physical exercise) factors that have been shown to influence hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In addition, the potential involvement of adult-generated neurons in naturally-occurring spatial learning behavior is discussed by summarizing the literature focusing on traditional animal models (e.g., rats and mice), non-traditional animal models (e.g., tree shrews), as well as natural populations (e.g., chickadees and Siberian chipmunk). PMID:27174001

  18. Primary cilia regulate proliferation of amplifying progenitors in adult hippocampus: implications for learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Amador-Arjona, Alejandro; Elliott, Jimmy; Miller, Amber; Ginbey, Ashley; Pazour, Gregory J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Roberts, Amanda J; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2011-07-01

    Integration of new neurons into the adult hippocampus has been linked to specific types of learning. Primary cilia were found to be required for the formation of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus during development. However, the requirement of cilia in maintenance of adult NSCs is unknown. We developed a genetic mouse model in which fetal/perinatal brain development is unaffected, but adult hippocampal neurogenesis is constantly reduced by conditional ablation of primary cilia in adult GFAP(+) neural stem/progenitor cells. We found that this approach specifically reduces the number of hippocampal amplifying progenitors (also called type 2a cells) without affecting the number of radial NSCs (or type 1 cells). Constant reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis produced a delay rather than a permanent deficiency in spatial learning without affecting the retention of long-term memories. Decreased neurogenesis also altered spatial novelty recognition and hippocampus-independent cue conditioning. Here, we propose that adult hippocampal newborn neurons increase the efficiency of generating the new representations of spatial memories and that reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be biased toward cue-based strategies. This novel mouse model provides evidences that cognitive deficits associated with ciliary defects (ciliopathies) might be, in part, mediated by the deficiency of primary cilia in adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells.

  19. HIPPOCAMPAL ADULT NEUROGENESIS: ITS REGULATION AND POTENTIAL ROLE IN SPATIAL LEARNING AND MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Pan, Yongliang; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhibin; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis, defined here as progenitor cell division generating functionally integrated neurons in the adult brain, occurs within the hippocampus of numerous mammalian species including humans. The present review details various endogenous (e.g., neurotransmitters) and environmental (e.g., physical exercise) factors that have been shown to influence hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In addition, the potential involvement of adult-generated neurons in naturally-occurring spatial learning behavior is discussed by summarizing the literature focusing on traditional animal models (e.g., rats and mice), non-traditional animal models (e.g., tree shrews), as well as natural populations (e.g., chickadees and Siberian chipmunk). PMID:27174001

  20. Coregulation, dysregulation, self-regulation: an integrative analysis and empirical agenda for understanding adult attachment, separation, loss, and recovery.

    PubMed

    Sbarra, David A; Hazan, Cindy

    2008-05-01

    An integrative framework is proposed for understanding how multiple biological and psychological systems are regulated in the context of adult attachment relationships, dysregulated by separation and loss experiences, and, potentially, re-regulated through individual recovery efforts. Evidence is reviewed for a coregulatory model of normative attachment, defined as a pattern of interwoven physiology between romantic partners that results from the conditioning of biological reward systems and the emergence of felt security within adult pair bonds. The loss of coregulation can portend a state of biobehavioral dysregulation, ranging from diffuse psychophysiological arousal and disorganization to a full-blown (and highly organized) stress response. The major task for successful recovery is adopting a self-regulatory strategy that attenuates the dysregulating effects of the attachment disruption. Research evidence is reviewed across multiple levels of analysis, and the article concludes with a series of testable research questions on the interconnected nature of attachment, loss, and recovery processes.

  1. Acute changes in sleep duration on eating behaviors and appetite-regulating hormones in overweight/obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Chantelle N.; Carskadon, Mary A.; Demos, Kathryn E.; Van Reen, Eliza; Sharkey, Katherine M.; Raynor, Hollie A.; Considine, Robert V.; Jones, Richard N.; Wing, Rena R.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the role of sleep in weight regulation, yet few studies have examined this relationship in overweight/obese (OW/OB) adults. Using a within-subject, counterbalanced design, 12 OW/OB women were studied in lab with two nights of short (5 hours time in bed [TIB]) and two nights of long (9 hours TIB) sleep. Hunger, consumption at a buffet, and fasting hormone levels were obtained. Significant polysomnographic differences occurred between conditions in total sleep time and sleep architecture (p's < .001). Percent energy from protein at the buffet increased following short sleep. No differences were observed for total energy intake or measured hormones. Further research is needed to determine how lengthening sleep impacts weight regulation in OW/OB adults. PMID:25105727

  2. Regulation of adult neurogenesis by stress, sleep disruption, exercise and inflammation: Implications for depression and antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Lucassen, P J; Meerlo, P; Naylor, A S; van Dam, A M; Dayer, A G; Fuchs, E; Oomen, C A; Czéh, B

    2010-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a once unorthodox concept, has changed into one of the most rapidly growing fields in neuroscience. The present report results from the ECNP targeted expert meeting in 2007 during which cellular plasticity changes were addressed in the adult brain, focusing on neurogenesis and apoptosis in hippocampus and frontal cortex. We discuss recent studies investigating factors that regulate neurogenesis with special emphasis on effects of stress, sleep disruption, exercise and inflammation, a group of seemingly unrelated factors that share at least two unifying properties, namely that they all regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis and have all been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We conclude that although neurogenesis has been implicated in cognitive function and is stimulated by antidepressant drugs, its functional impact and contribution to the etiology of depression remains unclear. A lasting reduction in neurogenesis following severe or chronic stress exposure, either in adult or early life, may represent impaired hippocampal plasticity and can contribute to the cognitive symptoms of depression, but is, by itself, unlikely to produce the full mood disorder. Normalization of reductions in neurogenesis appears at least partly, implicated in antidepressant action.

  3. State Regulation of Medication Administration by Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Residential Care and Adult Day Services Settings.

    PubMed

    Carder, Paula C; O'Keeffe, Janet

    2016-09-01

    Residential care settings and adult day services are two community-based care options used by older adults with chronic health conditions. Most states have regulatory provisions that allow unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) to administer medications. The current national policy study examined state regulations to identify which states permit UAP to administer medications, as well as staffing and training requirements. Key findings include states lack clear and adequate provisions for nurse oversight of UAP who administer medications, although adult day service regulations provide a greater level of nurse oversight than residential care settings. Specifically, 32 states require residential care to hire a nurse, but only six include provisions regarding nurse availability (e.g., on-call, on-site, number of hours). In contrast, 10 of 20 states that require adult day service programs to hire a nurse provide availability provisions. Nurse oversight of UAP is an important means of assuring quality care and reducing errors; thus, state regulatory agencies might need to strengthen nurse oversight provisions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(5):209-222.]. PMID:27054368

  4. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  5. Dnmt3a in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Regulates Anxiety-Like Behavior in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Evan; Manashirov, Sharon; Zwang, Raaya; Gil, Shosh; Tsoory, Michael; Shemesh, Yair; Chen, Alon

    2016-01-20

    Recently, it has been suggested that alterations in DNA methylation mediate the molecular changes and psychopathologies that can occur following trauma. Despite the abundance of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) in the brain, which are responsible for catalyzing DNA methylation, their roles in behavioral regulation and in response to stressful challenges remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that adult mice which underwent chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) displayed elevated anxiety-like behavior that was accompanied by a reduction in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and a subsequent decrease in mPFC-global DNA methylation. To explore the role of mPFC-Dnmt3a in mediating the behavioral responses to stressful challenges we established lentiviral-based mouse models that express lower (knockdown) or higher (overexpression) levels of Dnmt3a specifically within the mPFC. Nonstressed mice injected with knockdown Dnmt3a lentiviruses specifically into the mPFC displayed the same anxiogenic phenotype as the CSDS mice, whereas overexpression of Dnmt3a induced an opposite, anxiolytic, effect in wild-type mice. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of CSDS mice attenuated stress-induced anxiety. Our results indicate a central role for mPFC-Dnmt3a as a mediator of stress-induced anxiety. Significance statement: DNA methylation is suggested to mediate the molecular mechanisms linking environmental challenges, such as chronic stress or trauma, to increased susceptibility to psychopathologies. Here, we show that chronic stress-induced increase in anxiety-like behavior is accompanied by a reduction in DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and global DNA methylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Overexpression or knockdown of mPFC-Dnmt3a levels induces decrease or increase in anxiety-like behavior, respectively. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of chronic stressed mice attenuated

  6. Dnmt3a in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Regulates Anxiety-Like Behavior in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Evan; Manashirov, Sharon; Zwang, Raaya; Gil, Shosh; Tsoory, Michael; Shemesh, Yair; Chen, Alon

    2016-01-20

    Recently, it has been suggested that alterations in DNA methylation mediate the molecular changes and psychopathologies that can occur following trauma. Despite the abundance of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) in the brain, which are responsible for catalyzing DNA methylation, their roles in behavioral regulation and in response to stressful challenges remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that adult mice which underwent chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) displayed elevated anxiety-like behavior that was accompanied by a reduction in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and a subsequent decrease in mPFC-global DNA methylation. To explore the role of mPFC-Dnmt3a in mediating the behavioral responses to stressful challenges we established lentiviral-based mouse models that express lower (knockdown) or higher (overexpression) levels of Dnmt3a specifically within the mPFC. Nonstressed mice injected with knockdown Dnmt3a lentiviruses specifically into the mPFC displayed the same anxiogenic phenotype as the CSDS mice, whereas overexpression of Dnmt3a induced an opposite, anxiolytic, effect in wild-type mice. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of CSDS mice attenuated stress-induced anxiety. Our results indicate a central role for mPFC-Dnmt3a as a mediator of stress-induced anxiety. Significance statement: DNA methylation is suggested to mediate the molecular mechanisms linking environmental challenges, such as chronic stress or trauma, to increased susceptibility to psychopathologies. Here, we show that chronic stress-induced increase in anxiety-like behavior is accompanied by a reduction in DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) mRNA levels and global DNA methylation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Overexpression or knockdown of mPFC-Dnmt3a levels induces decrease or increase in anxiety-like behavior, respectively. In addition, overexpression of Dnmt3a in the mPFC of chronic stressed mice attenuated

  7. Effects of tamoxifen on autosomal genes regulating ovary maintenance in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingxi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jingyun; Qin, Junwen; Wang, Yongan; Wang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), known to bind to estrogen/androgen receptors and mimic native estrogens, have been implicated as a main source for increasing human reproductive and developmental deficiencies and diseases. Tamoxifen (TAM) is one of the most well-known antiestrogens with defined adverse effects on the female reproductive tract, but the mechanisms related to autosomal gene regulation governing ovary maintenance in mammals remain unclear. The expression pattern and levels of key genes and proteins involved in maintaining the ovarian phenotype in mice were analyzed. The results showed that TAM induced significant upregulation of Sox9, which is the testis-determining factor gene. The results showed that TAM induced significant upregulation of Sox9, the testis-determining factor gene, and the expression level of Sox9 mRNA in the ovaries of mice exposed to 75 or 225 mg/kg bw TAM was 2- and 10-fold that in the control group, respectively (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the testicular fibroblast growth factor gene, Fgf9, was also elevated in TAM-treated ovaries. Accordingly, expression of the ovary development marker, forkhead transcription factor (FOXL2), and WNT4/FST signaling, were depressed. The levels of protein expression changed consistently with the target genes. Moreover, the detection of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) in TAM-treated ovaries suggested the formation of vascular endothelial cells, which is a further evidence for the differentiation of the ovaries to a testis-like phenotype. During this period, the level of 17β-estradiol, progesterone, and luteinizing hormone decreased, while that of testosterone increased by 3.3-fold (p = 0.013). The activation of a testis-specific molecular signaling cascade was a potentially important mechanism contributing to the gender disorder induced by TAM, which resulted in the differentiation of the ovaries to a testis-like phenotype in adult mice. Limited with

  8. Effects of tamoxifen on autosomal genes regulating ovary maintenance in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mingxi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jingyun; Qin, Junwen; Wang, Yongan; Wang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    Environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), known to bind to estrogen/androgen receptors and mimic native estrogens, have been implicated as a main source for increasing human reproductive and developmental deficiencies and diseases. Tamoxifen (TAM) is one of the most well-known antiestrogens with defined adverse effects on the female reproductive tract, but the mechanisms related to autosomal gene regulation governing ovary maintenance in mammals remain unclear. The expression pattern and levels of key genes and proteins involved in maintaining the ovarian phenotype in mice were analyzed. The results showed that TAM induced significant upregulation of Sox9, which is the testis-determining factor gene. The results showed that TAM induced significant upregulation of Sox9, the testis-determining factor gene, and the expression level of Sox9 mRNA in the ovaries of mice exposed to 75 or 225 mg/kg bw TAM was 2- and 10-fold that in the control group, respectively (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the testicular fibroblast growth factor gene, Fgf9, was also elevated in TAM-treated ovaries. Accordingly, expression of the ovary development marker, forkhead transcription factor (FOXL2), and WNT4/FST signaling, were depressed. The levels of protein expression changed consistently with the target genes. Moreover, the detection of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) in TAM-treated ovaries suggested the formation of vascular endothelial cells, which is a further evidence for the differentiation of the ovaries to a testis-like phenotype. During this period, the level of 17β-estradiol, progesterone, and luteinizing hormone decreased, while that of testosterone increased by 3.3-fold (p = 0.013). The activation of a testis-specific molecular signaling cascade was a potentially important mechanism contributing to the gender disorder induced by TAM, which resulted in the differentiation of the ovaries to a testis-like phenotype in adult mice. Limited with

  9. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose p53 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in preventing cancer development. p53 participates in relevant aspects of cell biology, including apoptosis and cell cycle control and must be strictly regulated to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mdm2 regulates p53 in vivo in the adult lens. Methods We analyzed mice expressing human p53 transgene (Tgp53) selectively in the lens in the presence or absence of Mdm2. Mice with the required genotypes were obtained by crossing transgenic, mdm2+/−, and p53−/− mice. Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. Results In a wild-type genetic background (mdm2+/+), lens damage and microphthalmia were observed only in mice homozygous for Tgp53 (t/t). However, in an mdm2 null background, just one allele of Tgp53 (mdm2−/−/Tgp53t/0 mice) was sufficient to cause lens damage and microphthalmia. Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2+/−/Tgp53t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. Conclusions Mdm2 regulates p53 in the adult lens in vivo. This information may have relevance for analyzing normal and pathological conditions of the lens, and designing cancer therapies targeting Mdm2–p53 interaction. PMID:24339722

  10. Phosphatase and actin regulator 4 is associated with intermediate filaments in adult neural stem cells and their progenitor astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyo Min; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2014-10-01

    Phosphatase and actin regulator 4 (Phactr4) is a newly discovered protein that inhibits protein phosphatase 1 and shows actin-binding activity. We previously found that Phactr4 is expressed in the neurogenic niche in adult mice, although its precise subcellular localization and possible function in neural stem cells (NSCs) is not yet understood. Here, we show that Phactr4 formed punctiform clusters in the cytosol of subventricular zone-derived adult NSCs and their progeny in vitro. These Phactr4 signals were not associated with F-actin fibers but were closely associated with intermediate filaments such as nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) fibers. Direct binding of Phactr4 with nestin and GFAP filaments was demonstrated using Duolink protein interaction analyses and immunoprecipitation assays. Interestingly, when nestin fibers were de-polymerized during the mitosis or by the phosphatase inhibitor, Phactr4 appeared to be dissociated from nestin, suggesting that their protein interaction is regulated by the protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that Phactr4 forms functional associations with intermediate filament networks in adult NSCs.

  11. Site-specific regulation of adult neurogenesis by dietary fatty acid content, vitamin E and flight exercise in European starlings.

    PubMed

    Hall, Zachary J; Bauchinger, Ulf; Gerson, Alexander R; Price, Edwin R; Langlois, Lillie A; Boyles, Michelle; Pierce, Barbara; McWilliams, Scott R; Sherry, David F; Macdougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2014-03-01

    Exercise is known to have a strong effect on neuroproliferation in mammals ranging from rodents to humans. Recent studies have also shown that fatty acids and other dietary supplements can cause an upregulation of neurogenesis. It is not known, however, how exercise and diet interact in their effects on adult neurogenesis. We examined neuronal recruitment in multiple telencephalic sites in adult male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) exposed to a factorial combination of flight exercise, dietary fatty acids and antioxidants. Experimental birds were flown in a wind tunnel following a training regime that mimicked the bird's natural flight behaviour. In addition to flight exercise, we manipulated the composition of dietary fatty acids and the level of enrichment with vitamin E, an antioxidant reported to enhance neuronal recruitment. We found that all three factors - flight exercise, fatty acid composition and vitamin E enrichment - regulate neuronal recruitment in a site-specific manner. We also found a robust interaction between flight training and vitamin E enrichment at multiple sites of neuronal recruitment. Specifically, flight training was found to enhance neuronal recruitment across the telencephalon, but only in birds fed a diet with a low level of vitamin E. Conversely, dietary enrichment with vitamin E upregulated neuronal recruitment, but only in birds not flown in the wind tunnel. These findings indicate conserved modulation of adult neurogenesis by exercise and diet across vertebrate taxa and indicate possible therapeutic interventions in disorders characterized by reduced adult neurogenesis.

  12. A Case Study on the Impacts of Connective Technology on Self-Efficacy and Self-Regulated Learning of Female Adult Students Managing Work-Life Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheetz, Tracey L.

    2014-01-01

    Adults frequently define their lives as "hectic" and "overextended;" yet, many make the decision to return to school and add the role of student into their busy lives. This research study explored and explained the impact of connective technology on self-efficacy and self-regulated learning of female adult students balancing…

  13. REGULATION OF NETRIN-1 RECEPTORS BY AMPHETAMINE IN THE ADULT BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    YETNIKOFF, L.; LABELLE-DUMAIS, C.; FLORES, C.

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1 is a guidance cue molecule fundamental to the organization of neuronal connectivity during development. Netrin-1 and its receptors, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) and UNC-5 homologues (UNC-5), continue to be expressed in the adult brain, although neither their function nor the kinds of events that activate their expression are known. Two lines of evidence suggest a role for netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced dopamine plasticity in the adult. First, DCC is highly expressed by adult dopamine neurons. Second, adult mice with reduced DCC levels do not develop amphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization. To explore the role of netrin-1 in amphetamine-induced plasticity, we examined the effects of sensitizing treatment regimens of amphetamine on DCC and/or UNC-5 protein expression in the adult rat. These treatments produced striking and enduring increases in DCC and UNC-5 expression in the cell body, but not terminal regions, of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Notably, neuroadaptations in the cell body region of mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons underlie the development of sensitization to the effects of amphetamine. Furthermore, these localized amphetamine-induced changes were prevented by co-treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, a treatment known to block the development of amphetamine-induced sensitization of behavioral activation, dopamine release and motivated behavior. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that both DCC and UNC-5 receptors are highly expressed by adult mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons. These results provide the first evidence that repeated exposure to a stimulant drug such as amphetamine affects netrin-1 receptor expression in the adult brain. Taken together, our findings suggest that changes in netrin-1 receptor expression may play a role in the lasting effects of exposure to amphetamine and other stimulant drugs. PMID:17996376

  14. Variability of doublecortin-associated dendrite maturation in adult hippocampal neurogenesis is independent of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Plümpe, Tobias; Ehninger, Dan; Steiner, Barbara; Klempin, Friederike; Jessberger, Sebastian; Brandt, Moritz; Römer, Benedikt; Rodriguez, Gerardo Ramirez; Kronenberg, Golo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    Background In the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis most regulation takes place during the phase of doublecortin (DCX) expression, either as pro-proliferative effect on precursor cells or as survival-promoting effect on postmitotic cells. We here obtained quantitative data about the proliferative population and the dynamics of postmitotic dendrite development during the period of DCX expression. The question was, whether any indication could be obtained that the initiation of dendrite development is timely bound to the exit from the cell cycle. Alternatively, the temporal course of morphological maturation might be subject to additional regulatory events. Results We found that (1) 20% of the DCX population were precursor cells in cell cycle, whereas more than 70% were postmitotic, (2) the time span until newborn cells had reached the most mature stage associated with DCX expression varied between 3 days and several weeks, (3) positive or negative regulation of precursor cell proliferation did not alter the pattern and dynamics of dendrite development. Dendrite maturation was largely independent of close contacts to astrocytes. Conclusion These data imply that dendrite maturation of immature neurons is initiated at varying times after cell cycle exit, is variable in duration, and is controlled independently of the regulation of precursor cell proliferation. We conclude that in addition to the major regulatory events in cell proliferation and selective survival, additional micro-regulatory events influence the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:17105671

  15. Sonic hedgehog acts as a negative regulator of {beta}-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Fabian T; Schänzer, Anne; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Thom, Sonja; Engels, Knut; Schmidt, Mirko H H; Plate, Karl H; Liebner, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in taste papilla development; however, its role in epithelial maintenance and tumor progression in the adult tongue remains elusive. We show Wnt/beta-catenin pathway activation in reporter mice and by nuclear beta-catenin staining in the epithelium and taste papilla of adult mouse and human tongues. beta-Catenin activation in APC(min/+) mice, which carry a mutation in adenomatous poliposis coli (APC), up-regulates Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Jagged-2 (JAG2) in the tongue epithelium without formation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We demonstrate that Shh suppresses beta-catenin transcriptional activity in a signaling-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. A similar regulation and function was observed for JAG2, suggesting that both pathways negatively regulate beta-catenin, thereby preventing SCC formation in the tongue. This was supported by reduced nuclear beta-catenin in the tongue epithelium of Patched(+/-) mice, exhibiting dominant active Shh signaling. At the invasive front of human tongue cancer, nuclear beta-catenin and Shh were increased, suggesting their participation in tumor progression. Interestingly, Shh but not JAG2 was able to reduce beta-catenin signaling in SCC cells, arguing for a partial loss of negative feedback on beta-catenin transcription in tongue cancer. We show for the first time that the putative Wnt/beta-catenin targets Shh and JAG2 control beta-catenin signaling in the adult tongue epithelium, a function that is partially lost in lingual SCC. PMID:20508033

  16. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 is a novel regulator of collagen synthesis in adult human cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Karen M; Malhotra, Ricky; Philip, Jennifer L; Staron, Michelle L; Theccanat, Tiju; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Akhter, Shahab A

    2011-04-29

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) make up 60-70% of the total cell number in the heart and play a critical role in regulating normal myocardial function and in adverse remodeling following myocardial infarction and the transition to heart failure. Recent studies have shown that increased intracellular cAMP can inhibit CF transformation and collagen synthesis in adult rat CF; however, mechanisms by which cAMP production is regulated in CF have not been elucidated. We investigated the potential role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) in modulating collagen synthesis by adult human CF isolated from normal and failing left ventricles. Baseline collagen synthesis was elevated in failing CF and was not inhibited by β-agonist stimulation in contrast to normal controls. β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling was markedly uncoupled in the failing CF, and expression and activity of GRK2 were increased 3-fold. Overexpression of GRK2 in normal CF recapitulated a heart failure phenotype with minimal inhibition of collagen synthesis following β-agonist stimulation. In contrast, knockdown of GRK2 expression in normal CF enhanced cAMP production and led to greater β-agonist-mediated inhibition of basal and TGFβ-stimulated collagen synthesis versus control. Inhibition of GRK2 activity in failing CF by expression of the GRK2 inhibitor, GRK2ct, or siRNA-mediated knockdown restored β-agonist-stimulated inhibition of collagen synthesis and decreased collagen synthesis in response to TGFβ stimulation. GRK2 appears to play a significant role in regulating collagen synthesis in adult human CF, and increased activity of this kinase may be an important mechanism of maladaptive ventricular remodeling as mediated by cardiac fibroblasts.

  17. Professionalisation as Development and as Regulation: Adult Education in Germany, the United Kingdom and India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Lesley; Egetenmeyer, Regina; Singai, Chetan; Devi, Uma

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the authors seek to disentangle what they see as contradictory uses of the term "professionalisation" with reference to adult educator development and training (AEDT). They set out to distinguish "professionalisation" from "professionalism," and to identify the locus of control of AEDT in Germany, the…

  18. Oversight for clinical uses of autologous adult stem cells: lessons from international regulations.

    PubMed

    Lysaght, Tamra; Kerridge, Ian; Sipp, Douglas; Porter, Gerard; Capps, Benjamin J

    2013-12-01

    Autologous adult stem cells (ASCs) are being administered by physicians for indications that have not been demonstrated as safe and effective in formal clinical trials. Examination of regulatory frameworks across five countries suggests that balancing the demands of research with clinical freedom has created structural weaknesses that are being exploited.

  19. The Association among Difficulties in Emotion Regulation, Hostility, and Empathy in a Sample of Young Italian Adults.

    PubMed

    Contardi, Anna; Imperatori, Claudio; Penzo, Ilaria; Del Gatto, Claudia; Farina, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the role of empathy in mediating the association between difficulties in emotion regulation and hostility. Three hundred and sixty young Italian adults (220 women and 140 men) were enrolled in the study. Psychopathological assessments included the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI). Perspective taking (PT) and Personal distress (PD) are significantly associated with both DERS total score and BDHI total score. A mediational model analyzing the direct and indirect effects of DERS on BDHI through the mediating role of PT and PD showed that the relation between DERS and BDHI was partially mediated by PT total score (b = 0.16; se = 0.01; p = 0.02). Taken together our findings support the possibility that PT skills could play a crucial role in inhibiting hostility behaviors. PMID:27486417

  20. The Association among Difficulties in Emotion Regulation, Hostility, and Empathy in a Sample of Young Italian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Contardi, Anna; Imperatori, Claudio; Penzo, Ilaria; Del Gatto, Claudia; Farina, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the role of empathy in mediating the association between difficulties in emotion regulation and hostility. Three hundred and sixty young Italian adults (220 women and 140 men) were enrolled in the study. Psychopathological assessments included the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Interpersonal Reactivity Index and the Buss–Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI). Perspective taking (PT) and Personal distress (PD) are significantly associated with both DERS total score and BDHI total score. A mediational model analyzing the direct and indirect effects of DERS on BDHI through the mediating role of PT and PD showed that the relation between DERS and BDHI was partially mediated by PT total score (b = 0.16; se = 0.01; p = 0.02). Taken together our findings support the possibility that PT skills could play a crucial role in inhibiting hostility behaviors. PMID:27486417

  1. The use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques can predict health goal attainment in adults: an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Verloigne, Maite; Crombez, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation tools are not always used optimally, and implementation intention plans often lack quality. Therefore, this study explored participants’ use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques and their impact on goal attainment. Methods. Data were obtained from 452 adults in a proof of concept (POC) intervention of ‘MyPlan’, an eHealth intervention using self-regulation techniques to promote three healthy behaviours (physical activity (PA), fruit intake, or vegetable intake). Participants applied self-regulation techniques to a self-selected health behaviour, and evaluated the self-regulation techniques. The quality of implementation intentions was rated by the authors as a function of instrumentality (instrumental and non-instrumental) and specificity (non-specific and medium to highly specific). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict goal attainment. Results. Goal attainment was significantly predicted by the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:1.86), by the specificity of the implementation intentions (OR:3.5), by the motivational value of the action plan (OR:1.86), and by making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:4.10). Interaction-effects with behaviour showed that the specificity score of the implementation intention plans (OR:4.59), the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:2.38), selecting hindering factors and solutions(OR:2.00) and making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:7.54) were predictive of goal attainment only for fruit or vegetable intake. Also, when participants in the fruit and vegetable group made more than three plans, they were more likely to attain their goal (OR:1.73), whereas the reverse was the case in the PA group (OR:0.34). Discussion. The chance that adults reach fruit and vegetable goals can be increased by including motivating personal advice, self-formulated action plans, and instructions/strategies to make specific implementation intentions into eHealth interventions

  2. The use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques can predict health goal attainment in adults: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Plaete, Jolien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Verloigne, Maite; Crombez, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation tools are not always used optimally, and implementation intention plans often lack quality. Therefore, this study explored participants' use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques and their impact on goal attainment. Methods. Data were obtained from 452 adults in a proof of concept (POC) intervention of 'MyPlan', an eHealth intervention using self-regulation techniques to promote three healthy behaviours (physical activity (PA), fruit intake, or vegetable intake). Participants applied self-regulation techniques to a self-selected health behaviour, and evaluated the self-regulation techniques. The quality of implementation intentions was rated by the authors as a function of instrumentality (instrumental and non-instrumental) and specificity (non-specific and medium to highly specific). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict goal attainment. Results. Goal attainment was significantly predicted by the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:1.86), by the specificity of the implementation intentions (OR:3.5), by the motivational value of the action plan (OR:1.86), and by making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:4.10). Interaction-effects with behaviour showed that the specificity score of the implementation intention plans (OR:4.59), the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:2.38), selecting hindering factors and solutions(OR:2.00) and making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:7.54) were predictive of goal attainment only for fruit or vegetable intake. Also, when participants in the fruit and vegetable group made more than three plans, they were more likely to attain their goal (OR:1.73), whereas the reverse was the case in the PA group (OR:0.34). Discussion. The chance that adults reach fruit and vegetable goals can be increased by including motivating personal advice, self-formulated action plans, and instructions/strategies to make specific implementation intentions into eHealth interventions. To

  3. The use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques can predict health goal attainment in adults: an explorative study.

    PubMed

    Plaete, Jolien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Verloigne, Maite; Crombez, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation tools are not always used optimally, and implementation intention plans often lack quality. Therefore, this study explored participants' use and evaluation of self-regulation techniques and their impact on goal attainment. Methods. Data were obtained from 452 adults in a proof of concept (POC) intervention of 'MyPlan', an eHealth intervention using self-regulation techniques to promote three healthy behaviours (physical activity (PA), fruit intake, or vegetable intake). Participants applied self-regulation techniques to a self-selected health behaviour, and evaluated the self-regulation techniques. The quality of implementation intentions was rated by the authors as a function of instrumentality (instrumental and non-instrumental) and specificity (non-specific and medium to highly specific). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to predict goal attainment. Results. Goal attainment was significantly predicted by the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:1.86), by the specificity of the implementation intentions (OR:3.5), by the motivational value of the action plan (OR:1.86), and by making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:4.10). Interaction-effects with behaviour showed that the specificity score of the implementation intention plans (OR:4.59), the motivational value of the personal advice (OR:2.38), selecting hindering factors and solutions(OR:2.00) and making a new action plan at follow-up (OR:7.54) were predictive of goal attainment only for fruit or vegetable intake. Also, when participants in the fruit and vegetable group made more than three plans, they were more likely to attain their goal (OR:1.73), whereas the reverse was the case in the PA group (OR:0.34). Discussion. The chance that adults reach fruit and vegetable goals can be increased by including motivating personal advice, self-formulated action plans, and instructions/strategies to make specific implementation intentions into eHealth interventions. To

  4. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST

  5. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 controls adult neural stem cell expansion by regulating Sox2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Torrejón, M Ángeles; Porlan, Eva; Banito, Ana; Gómez-Ibarlucea, Esther; Lopez-Contreras, Andrés J; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Vidal, Anxo; Gil, Jesús; Torres, Josema; Fariñas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain, continual neurogenesis of olfactory neurons is sustained by the existence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subependymal niche. Elimination of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) leads to premature exhaustion of the subependymal NSC pool, suggesting a relationship between cell cycle control and long-term self-renewal, but the molecular mechanisms underlying NSC maintenance by p21 remain unexplored. Here we identify a function of p21 in the direct regulation of the expression of pluripotency factor Sox2, a key regulator of the specification and maintenance of neural progenitors. We observe that p21 directly binds a Sox2 enhancer and negatively regulates Sox2 expression in NSCs. Augmented levels of Sox2 in p21 null cells induce replicative stress and a DNA damage response that leads to cell growth arrest mediated by increased levels of p19(Arf) and p53. Our results show a regulation of NSC expansion driven by a p21/Sox2/p53 axis.

  7. Gender difference in older adult's utilization of gravitational and ground reaction force in regulation of angular momentum during stair descent.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    Angular momentum of the body is a highly controlled quantity signifying stability, therefore, it is essential to understand its regulation during stair descent. The purpose of this study was to investigate how older adults use gravity and ground reaction force to regulate the angular momentum of the body during stair descent. A total of 28 participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 years and 69.0 years of mean age respectively) performed stair descent from a level walk in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were used to calculate angular momentum, gravitational moment, and ground reaction force moment about the stance foot center of pressure. Women show a significantly greater change in normalized angular momentum (0.92Nms/Kgm; p=.004) as compared to men (0.45Nms/Kgm). Women produce higher normalized GRF (p=.031) during the double support phase. The angular momentum changes show largest backward regulation for Step 0 and forward regulation for Step 2. This greater difference in overall change in the angular momentum in women may explain their increased risk of fall over the stairs.

  8. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits. PMID:27782186

  9. Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Daniel E; Ho, Jaclyn J; Reddien, Peter W

    2012-03-01

    Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types and identify genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system.

  10. Brief Report: The Deletion of the Phosphatase Regulator NIPP1 Causes Progenitor Cell Expansion in the Adult Liver.

    PubMed

    Boens, Shannah; Verbinnen, Iris; Verhulst, Stefaan; Szekér, Kathelijne; Ferreira, Monica; Gevaert, Thomas; Baes, Myriam; Roskams, Tania; van Grunsven, Leo A; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2016-08-01

    The Ppp1r8 gene encodes NIPP1, a nuclear interactor of protein phosphatase PP1. The deletion of NIPP1 is embryonic lethal at the gastrulation stage, which has hampered its functional characterization in adult tissues. Here, we describe the effects of a conditional deletion of NIPP1 in mouse liver epithelial cells. Ppp1r8(-/-) livers developed a ductular reaction, that is, bile-duct hyperplasia with associated fibrosis. The increased proliferation of biliary epithelial cells was at least partially due to an expansion of the progenitor cell compartment that was independent of liver injury. Gene-expression analysis confirmed an upregulation of progenitor cell markers in the liver knockout livers but showed no effect on the expression of liver-injury associated regulators of cholangiocyte differentiation markers. Consistent with an inhibitory effect of NIPP1 on progenitor cell proliferation, Ppp1r8(-/-) livers displayed an increased sensitivity to diet-supplemented 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine, which also causes bile-duct hyperplasia through progenitor cell expansion. In contrast, the liver knockouts responded normally to injuries (partial hepatectomy, single CCl4 administration) that are restored through proliferation of differentiated parenchymal cells. Our data indicate that NIPP1 does not regulate the proliferation of hepatocytes but is a suppressor of biliary epithelial cell proliferation, including progenitor cells, in the adult liver. Stem Cells 2016;34:2256-2262. PMID:27068806

  11. Wnt signaling mediates experience-related regulation of synapse numbers and mossy fiber connectivities in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gogolla, Nadine; Galimberti, Ivan; Deguchi, Yuichi; Caroni, Pico

    2009-05-28

    We investigated how experience regulates the structure of a defined neuronal circuit in adult mice. Enriched environment (EE) produced a robust and reversible increase in hippocampal stratum lucidum synapse numbers, mossy fiber terminal (LMT) numbers, and spine plus synapse densities at LMTs, whereas a distinct mechanism depending on Rab3a promoted LMT volume growth. In parallel, EE increased postsynaptic CA3 pyramidal neuron Wnt7a/b levels. Inhibiting Wnt signaling through locally applied sFRP-1 suppressed the effects of EE on synapse numbers and further reduced synapse numbers in control mice. Wnt7 applied to CA3 mimicked the effects of EE on synapse and LMT numbers. CA3 Wnt7a/b levels were enhanced by excitatory activity and reduced by sFRP-1. Synapse numbers and Wnt7a/b levels peaked in mice aged 6-12 months; a decline in aged mice was reversed by EE. Therefore, behavioral experience specifically regulates adult global stratum lucidum synapse numbers and hippocampal network structure through Wnt signaling.

  12. Relaxation therapy and anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation among adults with intellectual disabilities: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bouvet, Cyrille; Coulet, Aurélie

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study is a randomized controlled trial on the effects of relaxation on anxiety, self-esteem, and emotional regulation in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) working in a center of supported employment in France. We studied 30 adults with mild or moderate ID who were split at random into a relaxation group (RG, 15 subjects), who completed 10 sessions of relaxation therapy, and a control group (CG, 15 subjects), who were on a waiting list. The method used is the pretest and posttest. Variables were assessed by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory form Y scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale, and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire. We found that in the RG, relaxation significantly reduced state anxiety, t(14, 15) = 17.8***, d = -0.72, and improved self-esteem, t(14, 15) = -7.7***, d = 1.03, and cognitive reappraisal, t(14, 15) = -6.3***, d = 1.3, while the CG showed no change for these variables. We conclude that relaxation seems to be an interesting therapeutic option for reducing anxiety in people with ID in a supported employment setting.

  13. Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Daniel E.; Ho, Jaclyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types, and identify novel genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system. PMID:22385657

  14. Perception of Self-Motion and Regulation of Walking Speed in Young-Old Adults.

    PubMed

    Lalonde-Parsi, Marie-Jasmine; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2015-07-01

    Whether a reduced perception of self-motion contributes to poor walking speed adaptations in older adults is unknown. In this study, speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual task) and walking speed adaptations (walking task) were compared between young (19-27 years) and young-old individuals (63-74 years), and the relationship between the performance on the two tasks was examined. Participants were evaluated while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Speed discrimination thresholds were determined using a staircase procedure. Walking speed modulation was assessed on a self-paced treadmill while exposed to different self-motion speeds ranging from 0.25 to 2 times the participants' comfortable speed. For each speed, participants were instructed to match the self-motion speed described by the moving corridor. On the walking task, participants displayed smaller walking speed errors at comfortable walking speeds compared with slower of faster speeds. The young-old adults presented larger speed discrimination thresholds (perceptual experiment) and larger walking speed errors (walking experiment) compared with young adults. Larger walking speed errors were associated with higher discrimination thresholds. The enhanced performance on the walking task at comfortable speed suggests that intersensory calibration processes are influenced by experience, hence optimized for frequently encountered conditions. The altered performance of the young-old adults on the perceptual and walking tasks, as well as the relationship observed between the two tasks, suggest that a poor perception of visual motion information may contribute to the poor walking speed adaptations that arise with aging.

  15. Myogenin Regulates Exercise Capacity but Is Dispensable for Skeletal Muscle Regeneration in Adult mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myogflox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myogflox/flox mice (mdx), Myogflox/flox mice (wild-type), and mdx:MyogfloxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted). mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function. PMID:21264243

  16. Paternal relatedness and age proximity regulate social relationships among adult female rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Widdig, A; Nürnberg, P; Krawczak, M; Streich, W J; Bercovitch, F B

    2001-11-20

    Kin selection promotes the evolution of social behavior that increases the survival and reproductive success of close relatives. Among primates, maternal kinship frequently coincides with a higher frequency of grooming and agonistic aiding, but the extent to which paternal kinship influences adult female social relationships has not yet been investigated. Here, we examine the effect of both maternal and paternal kinship, as well as age proximity, on affiliative interactions among semifree-ranging adult female rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta. Kinship was assessed by using both microsatellites and DNA-fingerprinting. Our study confirms that the closest affiliative relationships characterize maternal half-sisters. We provide evidence that adult females are significantly more affiliative with paternal half-sisters than with nonkin. Furthermore, paternal kin discrimination was more pronounced among peers than among nonpeers, indicating that age proximity has an additional regulatory effect on affiliative interactions. We propose that kin discrimination among cercopithecine primates emerges from ontogenetic processes that involve phenotype matching based on shared behavioral traits, such as inherited personality profiles, rather than physiological or physical characteristics.

  17. Localization and regulation of PML bodies in the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hall, Małgorzata H; Magalska, Adriana; Malinowska, Monika; Ruszczycki, Błażej; Czaban, Iwona; Patel, Satyam; Ambrożek-Latecka, Magdalena; Zołocińska, Ewa; Broszkiewicz, Hanna; Parobczak, Kamil; Nair, Rajeevkumar R; Rylski, Marcin; Pawlak, Robert; Bramham, Clive R; Wilczyński, Grzegorz M

    2016-06-01

    PML is a tumor suppressor protein involved in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic leukemia. In non-neuronal cells, PML is a principal component of characteristic nuclear bodies. In the brain, PML has been implicated in the control of embryonic neurogenesis, and in certain physiological and pathological phenomena in the adult brain. Yet, the cellular and subcellular localization of the PML protein in the brain, including its presence in the nuclear bodies, has not been investigated comprehensively. Because the formation of PML bodies appears to be a key aspect in the function of the PML protein, we investigated the presence of these structures and their anatomical distribution, throughout the adult mouse brain. We found that PML is broadly expressed across the gray matter, with the highest levels in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. In the cerebral cortex PML is present exclusively in neurons, in which it forms well-defined nuclear inclusions containing SUMO-1, SUMO 2/3, but not Daxx. At the ultrastructural level, the appearance of neuronal PML bodies differs from the classic one, i.e., the solitary structure with more or less distinctive capsule. Rather, neuronal PML bodies have the form of small PML protein aggregates located in the close vicinity of chromatin threads. The number, size, and signal intensity of neuronal PML bodies are dynamically influenced by immobilization stress and seizures. Our study indicates that PML bodies are broadly involved in activity-dependent nuclear phenomena in adult neurons.

  18. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity.

  19. Skeletal myofiber VEGF regulates contraction-induced perfusion and exercise capacity but not muscle capillarity in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Amy E; Goldberg, Daniel; Delavar, Hamid; Trisko, Breanna M; Tang, Kechun; Hogan, Michael C; Wagner, Peter D; Breen, Ellen C

    2016-07-01

    A single bout of exhaustive exercise signals expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the exercising muscle. Previous studies have reported that mice with life-long deletion of skeletal myofiber VEGF have fewer capillaries and a severe reduction in endurance exercise. However, in adult mice, VEGF gene deletion conditionally targeted to skeletal myofibers limits exercise capacity without evidence of capillary regression. To explain this, we hypothesized that adult skeletal myofiber VEGF acutely regulates skeletal muscle perfusion during muscle contraction. A tamoxifen-inducible skeletal myofiber-specific VEGF gene deletion mouse (skmVEGF-/-) was used to reduce skeletal muscle VEGF protein by 90% in adult mice. Three weeks after inducing deletion of the skeletal myofiber VEGF gene, skmVEGF-/- mice exhibited diminished maximum running speed (-10%, P < 0.05) and endurance capacity (-47%; P < 0.05), which did not persist after 8 wk. In skmVEGF-/- mice, gastrocnemius complex time to fatigue measured in situ was 71% lower than control mice. Contraction-induced perfusion measured by optical imaging during a period of electrically stimulated muscle contraction was 85% lower in skmVEGF-/- than control mice. No evidence of capillary rarefication was detected in the soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) up to 8 wk after tamoxifen-induced VEGF ablation, and contractility and fatigue resistance of the soleus measured ex vivo were also unchanged. The force-frequency of the EDL showed a small right shift, but fatigue resistance did not differ between EDL from control and skmVEGF-/- mice. These data suggest myofiber VEGF is required for regulating perfusion during periods of contraction and may in this manner affect endurance capacity. PMID:27225953

  20. Microvillar size and espin expression in principal cells of the adult rat epididymis are regulated by androgens.

    PubMed

    Primiani, Nadia; Gregory, Mary; Dufresne, Julie; Smith, Charles E; Liu, Ye Lauren; Bartles, James R; Cyr, Daniel G; Hermo, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Principal cells of the epididymis are the most prominent cell type and are noted for an apical cell surface studded with microvilli. The latter contain channel proteins that condition the microenvironment of epididymal lumen and promote sperm maturation; however, the regulation of the structure and integrity of microvilli is not well known. Espins are a family of proteins implicated in microvillar growth. The objectives of this study were to assess the regulation of espin in epididymal principal cells both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of immortalized rat caput epididymal (RCE) cells with increasing doses of a homogenized testicular extract revealed a dose-dependent increase in the size of microvilli. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of adult rat epididymal RNA using espin-specific primers indicated the presence of a band at about 290 base pairs (bp) in all regions. Western blot analysis using affinity-purified espin antibody confirmed the presence of an approximately 110-kDa band in the epididymis, corresponding to espin isoform 1. In adult rats, immunocytochemistry revealed espin expression over principal cells. In orchidectomized rats, espin expression was significantly reduced, whereas ligation of the efferent ducts resulted in a decrease of espin expression but not to the extent of orchidectomy. The fact that espin expression was restored to control levels in orchidectomized rats supplemented with high levels of testosterone indicated that its expression was dependent on androgens and not on other lumicrine factors derived from the testis. Taken together, these data indicate that espin is expressed in the epididymis and is regulated by androgens. PMID:17409466

  1. Parvalbumin-expressing basket-cell network plasticity induced by experience regulates adult learning.

    PubMed

    Donato, Flavio; Rompani, Santiago Belluco; Caroni, Pico

    2013-12-12

    Learning and memory processes can be influenced by recent experience, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Enhanced plasticity during critical periods of early life is linked to differentiating parvalbumin (PV)-interneuron networks, suggesting that recent experience may modulate learning by targeting the differentiation state of PV neurons in the adult. Here we show that environmental enrichment and Pavlovian contextual fear conditioning induce opposite, sustained and reversible hippocampal PV-network configurations in adult mice. Specifically, enrichment promotes the emergence of large fractions of low-differentiation (low PV and GAD67 expression) basket cells with low excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic-density ratios, whereas fear conditioning leads to large fractions of high-differentiation (high PV and GAD67 expression) basket cells with high excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic-density ratios. Pharmacogenetic inhibition or activation of PV neurons was sufficient to induce such opposite low-PV-network or high-PV-network configurations, respectively. The low-PV-network configuration enhanced structural synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation and retrieval, whereas these were reduced by the high-PV-network configuration. We then show that maze navigation learning induces a hippocampal low-PV-network configuration paralleled by enhanced memory and structural synaptic plasticity throughout training, followed by a shift to a high-PV-network configuration after learning completion. The shift to a low-PV-network configuration specifically involved increased vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-positive GABAergic boutons and synaptic transmission onto PV neurons. Closely comparable low- and high-PV-network configurations involving VIP boutons were specifically induced in primary motor cortex upon rotarod motor learning. These results uncover a network plasticity mechanism induced after learning through VIP-PV microcircuit modulation, and involving

  2. Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Seizures (ECS) Differentially Regulate the Expression of Epigenetic Machinery in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pusalkar, Madhavi; Ghosh, Shreya; Jaggar, Minal; Husain, Basma Fatima Anwar; Galande, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive seizure treatment is a fast-acting antidepressant therapy that evokes rapid transcriptional, neurogenic, and behavioral changes. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to altered gene regulation, which underlies the neurogenic and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. We hypothesized that electroconvulsive seizure may modulate the expression of epigenetic machinery, thus establishing potential alterations in the epigenetic landscape. Methods: We examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on the gene expression of histone modifiers, namely histone acetyltransferases, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases, and histone (lysine) demethylases as well as DNA modifying enzymes, including DNA methyltransferases, DNA demethylases, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins in the hippocampi of adult male Wistar rats using quantitative real time-PCR analysis. Further, we examined the influence of acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure on global and residue-specific histone acetylation and methylation levels within the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in the cellular and behavioral effects of electroconvulsive seizure. Results: Acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure induced a primarily unique, and in certain cases bidirectional, regulation of histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins, with an overlapping pattern of gene regulation restricted to Sirt4, Mll3, Jmjd3, Gadd45b, Tet2, and Tet3. Global histone acetylation and methylation levels were predominantly unchanged, with the exception of a significant decline in H3K9 acetylation in the hippocampus following chronic electroconvulsive seizure. Conclusions: Electroconvulsive seizure treatment evokes the transcriptional regulation of several histone and DNA modifiers, and methyl-CpG-binding proteins within the hippocampus, with a predominantly distinct pattern of regulation induced by acute and chronic electroconvulsive seizure. PMID

  3. Changes in self-efficacy for exercise and improved nutrition fostered by increased self-regulation among adults with obesity.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J; Johnson, Ping H; McEwen, Kristin L

    2015-10-01

    Behavioral theory suggests that treatments that increase participants' use of self-regulatory skills and/or their feelings of ability (self-efficacy) will improve exercise and nutrition behaviors. In addition, psychosocial factors associated with increased exercise may carry over to improved eating. Self-regulation might enhance self-efficacy through feelings of ability to manage barriers to maintaining weight-loss behaviors. Sedentary adults with severe or morbid obesity (M age = 43 years; M BMI = 40.1 kg/m(2)) participated in a 6-month study within a community-based YMCA center. We randomly assigned participants to one of the two groups that incorporated the same cognitive-behavioral support of exercise paired with methods for controlled, healthy eating emphasizing either (a) self-efficacy (n = 138), or (b) self-regulation (n = 136) methods. Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant improvements in exercise- and eating-related self-regulation over 3 months, and exercise- and eating-related self-efficacy over 6 months. The Self-Regulation Treatment Group demonstrated greater improvements in self-regulation for eating and fruit and vegetable intake than the Self-Efficacy Group. Regression analyses indicated that for both exercise and eating, self-regulation change significantly predicted self-efficacy change. In separate equations, changes in exercise and fruit and vegetable intake mediated those relationships, and change in self-efficacy and the corresponding behavioral changes demonstrated reciprocal, mutually reinforcing, relationships. There was evidence of carry-over, or generalization, of both self-regulation and self-efficacy changes from an exercise context to an eating context. We discussed findings in terms of leveraging self-regulation to improve self-efficacy, and provide a rationale for why exercise is the strongest predictor of success with weight loss. Results may be used to inform future behavioral weight

  4. Changes in self-efficacy for exercise and improved nutrition fostered by increased self-regulation among adults with obesity.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J; Johnson, Ping H; McEwen, Kristin L

    2015-10-01

    Behavioral theory suggests that treatments that increase participants' use of self-regulatory skills and/or their feelings of ability (self-efficacy) will improve exercise and nutrition behaviors. In addition, psychosocial factors associated with increased exercise may carry over to improved eating. Self-regulation might enhance self-efficacy through feelings of ability to manage barriers to maintaining weight-loss behaviors. Sedentary adults with severe or morbid obesity (M age = 43 years; M BMI = 40.1 kg/m(2)) participated in a 6-month study within a community-based YMCA center. We randomly assigned participants to one of the two groups that incorporated the same cognitive-behavioral support of exercise paired with methods for controlled, healthy eating emphasizing either (a) self-efficacy (n = 138), or (b) self-regulation (n = 136) methods. Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant improvements in exercise- and eating-related self-regulation over 3 months, and exercise- and eating-related self-efficacy over 6 months. The Self-Regulation Treatment Group demonstrated greater improvements in self-regulation for eating and fruit and vegetable intake than the Self-Efficacy Group. Regression analyses indicated that for both exercise and eating, self-regulation change significantly predicted self-efficacy change. In separate equations, changes in exercise and fruit and vegetable intake mediated those relationships, and change in self-efficacy and the corresponding behavioral changes demonstrated reciprocal, mutually reinforcing, relationships. There was evidence of carry-over, or generalization, of both self-regulation and self-efficacy changes from an exercise context to an eating context. We discussed findings in terms of leveraging self-regulation to improve self-efficacy, and provide a rationale for why exercise is the strongest predictor of success with weight loss. Results may be used to inform future behavioral weight

  5. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rigby, Peter W J; Carvajal, Jaime J; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  6. Photoperiodic regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days (SD) with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine at multiple time points across 10 weeks of SD exposure. Compared with counterparts held in long day (LD) lengths, across the first 8 weeks of SD exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at 10 weeks in SD lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in LD lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function and behavior at multiple levels. PMID:24893623

  7. Neural stem cells in the adult ciliary epithelium express GFAP and are regulated by Wnt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ani V.; Zhao Xing; James, Jackson; Kim, Min; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Ahmad, Iqbal . E-mail: iahmad@unmc.edu

    2006-01-13

    The identification of neural stem cells with retinal potential in the ciliary epithelium (CE) of the adult mammals is of considerable interest because of their potential for replacing or rescuing degenerating retinal neurons in disease or injury. The evaluation of such a potential requires characterization of these cells with regard to their phenotypic properties, potential, and regulatory mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that rat CE stem cells/progenitors in neurosphere culture display astrocytic nature in terms of expressing glial intermediate neurofilament protein, GFAP. The GFAP-expressing CE stem cells/progenitors form neurospheres in proliferating conditions and generate neurons when shifted to differentiating conditions. These cells express components of the canonical Wnt pathway and its activation promotes their proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the activation of the canonical Wnt pathway influences neuronal differentiation of CE stem cells/progenitors in a context dependent manner. Our observations suggest that CE stem cells/progenitors share phenotypic properties and regulatory mechanism(s) with neural stem cells elsewhere in the adult CNS.

  8. Photoperiodic regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Leuner, Benedetta; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-08-01

    Photoperiodic organisms monitor environmental day length to engage in seasonally appropriate adaptions in physiology and behavior. Among these adaptations are changes in brain volume and neurogenesis, which have been well described in multiple species of birds, yet few studies have described such changes in the brains of adult mammals. White-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) are an excellent species in which to investigate the effects of day length on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as males, in addition to having reduced hippocampal volume in short days (SD) with concomitant impairments in hippocampus-mediated behaviors, have photoperiod-dependent changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. We performed the current experiment to assess the effects of photoperiod on hippocampal neurogenesis longitudinally, using the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine at multiple time points across 10 weeks of SD exposure. Compared with counterparts held in long day (LD) lengths, across the first 8 weeks of SD exposure hippocampal neurogenesis was reduced. However, at 10 weeks in SD lengths neurogenic levels in the hippocampus were elevated above those levels in mice held in LD lengths. The current findings are consistent with the natural photoperiodic cycle of hippocampal function in male white-footed mice, and may help to inform research on photoperiodic plasticity in neurogenesis and provide insight into how the complex interplay among the environment, genes and adaptive responses to changing day lengths affects brain structure, function and behavior at multiple levels.

  9. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  10. A planarian p53 homolog regulates proliferation and self-renewal in adult stem cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Bret J.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2010-01-01

    The functions of adult stem cells and tumor suppressor genes are known to intersect. However, when and how tumor suppressors function in the lineages produced by adult stem cells is unknown. With a large population of stem cells that can be manipulated and studied in vivo, the freshwater planarian is an ideal system with which to investigate these questions. Here, we focus on the tumor suppressor p53, homologs of which have no known role in stem cell biology in any invertebrate examined thus far. Planaria have a single p53 family member, Smed-p53, which is predominantly expressed in newly made stem cell progeny. When Smed-p53 is targeted by RNAi, the stem cell population increases at the expense of progeny, resulting in hyper-proliferation. However, ultimately the stem cell population fails to self-renew. Our results suggest that prior to the vertebrates, an ancestral p53-like molecule already had functions in stem cell proliferation control and self-renewal. PMID:20040488

  11. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  12. Stress and serial adult metamorphosis: multiple roles for the stress axis in socially regulated sex change

    PubMed Central

    Solomon-Lane, Tessa K.; Crespi, Erica J.; Grober, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Socially regulated sex change in teleost fishes is a striking example of social status information regulating biological function in the service of reproductive success. The establishment of social dominance in sex changing species is translated into a cascade of changes in behavior, physiology, neuroendocrine function, and morphology that transforms a female into a male, or vice versa. The hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI, homologous to HP-adrenal axis in mammals and birds) has been hypothesized to play a mechanistic role linking status to sex change. The HPA/I axis responds to environmental stressors by integrating relevant external and internal cues and coordinating biological responses including changes in behavior, energetics, physiology, and morphology (i.e., metamorphosis). Through actions of both corticotropin-releasing factor and glucocorticoids, the HPA/I axis has been implicated in processes central to sex change, including the regulation of agonistic behavior, social status, energetic investment, and life history transitions. In this paper, we review the hypothesized roles of the HPA/I axis in the regulation of sex change and how those hypotheses have been tested to date. We include original data on sex change in the bluebanded goby (Lythyrpnus dalli), a highly social fish capable of bidirectional sex change. We then propose a model for HPA/I involvement in sex change and discuss how these ideas might be tested in the future. Understanding the regulation of sex change has the potential to elucidate evolutionarily conserved mechanisms responsible for translating pertinent information about the environment into coordinated biological changes along multiple body axes. PMID:24265604

  13. Induced multipotency in adult keratinocytes through down-regulation of ΔNp63 or DGCR8

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deepavali; Su, Xiaohua; Cho, Min Soon; Bui, Ngoc Hoang Bao; Coarfa, Cristian; Venkatanarayan, Avinashnarayan; Benham, Ashley L.; Flores González, Ramón E.; Alana, Jennifer; Xiao, Weimin; Leung, Marco L.; Vin, Harina; Chan, Io Long; Aquino, Arianexys; Müller, Nicole; Wang, Hongran; Cooney, Austin J.; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) and the miRNA processing machinery in the regulation of stem cell biology are not well understood. Here, we show that the p53 family member and p63 isoform, ΔNp63, is a transcriptional activator of a cofactor critical for miRNA processing (DGCR8). This regulation gives rise to a unique miRNA signature resulting in reprogramming cells to multipotency. Strikingly, ΔNp63−/− epidermal cells display profound defects in terminal differentiation and express a subset of markers and miRNAs present in embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts induced to pluripotency using Yamanaka factors. Moreover, ΔNp63−/− epidermal cells transduced with an inducible DGCR8 plasmid can differentiate into multiple cell fates in vitro and in vivo. We found that human primary keratinocytes depleted of ΔNp63 or DGCR8 can be reprogrammed in 6 d and express a unique miRNA and gene expression signature that is similar but not identical to human induced pluripotent stem cells. Our data reveal a role for ΔNp63 in the transcriptional regulation of DGCR8 to reprogram adult somatic cells into multipotent stem cells. PMID:24449888

  14. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  15. Mechanism of Regulation of Adipocyte Numbers in Adult Organisms Through Differentiation and Apoptosis Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bozec, Aline; Hannemann, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Considering that adipose tissue (AT) is an endocrine organ, it can influence whole body metabolism. Excessive energy storage leads to the dysregulation of adipocytes, which in turn induces abnormal secretion of adipokines, triggering metabolic syndromes such as obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, investigating the molecular mechanisms behind adipocyte dysregulation could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Our protocol describes methods for evaluating the molecular mechanism affected by hypoxic conditions of the AT, which correlates with adipocyte apoptosis in adult mice. This protocol describes how to analyze AT in vivo through gene expression profiling as well as histological analysis of adipocyte differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis during hypoxia exposure, ascertained through staining of hypoxic cells or HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, in vitro analysis of adipocyte differentiation and its responses to various stimuli completes the characterization of the molecular pathways behind possible adipocyte dysfunction leading to metabolic syndromes. PMID:27284940

  16. Brain apoptosis signaling pathways are regulated by methylphenidate treatment in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Jeremias, Gabriela C; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Mello-Santos, Lis Maira; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-10-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for children who have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, the action mechanisms of methylphenidate have not been fully elucidated. Studies have shown a relationship between apoptosis signaling pathways and psychiatric disorders, as well as in therapeutic targets for such disorders. So, we investigated if chronic treatment with MPH at doses of 1, 2 and 10mg/kg could alter the levels of pro-apoptotic protein, Bax, anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and cytochrome c in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH at all doses increased Bax in the cortex; the Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were increased with MPH (1mg/kg) and were reduced with MPH (2 and 10mg/kg); the cytochrome c was reduced in the cortex after treatment with MPH at all doses; in the cerebellum there was an increase of Bax with MPH at all doses, however, there was a reduction of Bcl-2, caspase-3, and cytochrome c with MPH (2 and 10mg/kg); in the striatum the treatment with MPH (10mg/kg) decreased caspase-3 and cytochrome c; treatment with MPH (2 and 10mg/kg) increased Bax and decreased Bcl-2 in the hippocampus; and the caspase-3 and cytochrome c were reduced in the hippocampus with MPH (10mg/kg). In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH influences plasticity in the brain of young and adult rats; however, the effects were dependent of age and brain area, on the one hand activating the initial cascade of apoptosis, increasing Bax and reducing Bcl-2, but otherwise inhibiting apoptosis by reduction of caspase-3 and cytochrome c. PMID:25128604

  17. Regulating Availability: How Access to Alcohol Affects Drinking and Problems in Youth and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gruenewald, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Regulations on the availability of alcohol have been used to moderate alcohol problems in communities throughout the world for thousands of years. In the latter half of the 20th century, quantitative studies of the effects of these regulations on drinking and related problems began in earnest as public health practitioners began to recognize the full extent of the harmful consequences related to drinking. This article briefly outlines the history of this work over four areas, focusing on the minimum legal drinking age, the privatization of alcohol control systems, outlet densities, and hours and days of sale. Some historical background is provided to emphasize the theoretical and empirical roots of this work and to highlight the substantial progress that has been made in each area. In general, this assessment suggests that higher minimum legal drinking ages, greater monopoly controls over alcohol sales, lower outlet numbers and reduced outlet densities, and limited hours and days of sale can effectively reduce alcohol sales, use, and problems. There are, however, substantial gaps in the research literature and a near absence of the quantitative theoretical work needed to direct alcohol-control efforts. Local community responses to alcohol policies are complex and heterogeneous, sometimes reinforcing and sometimes mitigating the effects of availability regulations. Quantitative models of policy effects are essential to accelerate progress toward the formulation and testing of optimal control strategies for the reduction of alcohol problems. PMID:22330225

  18. p73 is an essential regulator of neural stem cell maintenance in embryonal and adult CNS neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talos, F; Abraham, A; Vaseva, A V; Holembowski, L; Tsirka, S E; Scheel, A; Bode, D; Dobbelstein, M; Brück, W; Moll, U M

    2010-12-01

    The p53 family member p73 is essential for brain development, but its precise role and scope remain unclear. Global p73 deficiency determines an overt and highly penetrant brain phenotype marked by cortical hypoplasia with ensuing hydrocephalus and hippocampal dysgenesis. The ΔNp73 isoform is known to function as a prosurvival factor of mature postmitotic neurons. In this study, we define a novel essential role of p73 in the regulation of the neural stem cell compartment. In both embryonic and adult neurogenesis, p73 has a critical role in maintaining an adequate neurogenic pool by promoting self-renewal and proliferation and inhibiting premature senescence of neural stem and early progenitor cells. Thus, products of the p73 gene locus are essential maintenance factors in the central nervous system, whose broad action stretches across the entire differentiation arch from stem cells to mature postmitotic neurons.

  19. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-01

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake.

  20. PPARγ mRNA in the adult mouse hypothalamus: distribution and regulation in response to dietary challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Ying; Lee, Syann; Bookout, Angie L.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Wu, Hua; Gautron, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that was originally identified as a regulator of peroxisome proliferation and adipocyte differentiation. Emerging evidence suggests that functional PPARγ signaling also occurs within the hypothalamus. However, the exact distribution and identities of PPARγ-expressing hypothalamic cells remains under debate. The present study systematically mapped PPARγ mRNA expression in the adult mouse brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. PPARγ mRNA was found to be expressed at high levels outside the hypothalamus including the neocortex, the olfactory bulb, the organ of the vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (VOLT), and the subfornical organ. Within the hypothalamus, PPARγ was present at moderate levels in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and the ependymal of the 3rd ventricle. In all examined feeding-related hypothalamic nuclei, PPARγ was expressed at very low levels that were close to the limit of detection. Using qPCR techniques, we demonstrated that PPARγ mRNA expression was upregulated in the SCh in response to fasting. Double in situ hybridization further demonstrated that PPARγ was primarily expressed in neurons rather than glia. Collectively, our observations provide a comprehensive map of PPARγ distribution in the intact adult mouse hypothalamus. PMID:26388745

  1. The development of emotion regulation: an fMRI study of cognitive reappraisal in children, adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Gross, James J.; Weber, Jochen; Robertson, Elaine R.; Sokol-Hessner, Peter; Ray, Rebecca D.; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to use cognitive reappraisal to regulate emotions is an adaptive skill in adulthood, but little is known about its development. Because reappraisal is thought to be supported by linearly developing prefrontal regions, one prediction is that reappraisal ability develops linearly. However, recent investigations into socio-emotional development suggest that there are non-linear patterns that uniquely affect adolescents. We compared older children (10–13), adolescents (14–17) and young adults (18–22) on a task that distinguishes negative emotional reactivity from reappraisal ability. Behaviorally, we observed no age differences in self-reported emotional reactivity, but linear and quadratic relationships between reappraisal ability and age. Neurally, we observed linear age-related increases in activation in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, previously identified in adult reappraisal. We observed a quadratic pattern of activation with age in regions associated with social cognitive processes like mental state attribution (medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, anterior temporal cortex). In these regions, we observed relatively lower reactivity-related activation in adolescents, but higher reappraisal-related activation. This suggests that (i) engagement of the cognitive control components of reappraisal increases linearly with age and (ii) adolescents may not normally recruit regions associated with mental state attribution, but (iii) this can be reversed with reappraisal instructions. PMID:22228751

  2. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  3. Fractalkine and CX3CR1 regulate hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Bachstetter, Adam D.; Morganti, Josh M.; Jernberg, Jennifer; Schlunk, Andrea; Mitchell, Staten H.; Brewster, Kaelin W.; Hudson, Charles E.; Cole, Michael J; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Bickford, Paula C.; Gemma, Carmelina

    2010-01-01

    Microglia have neuroprotective capacities, yet chronic activation can promote neurotoxic inflammation. Neuronal fractalkine (FKN), acting on CX3CR1, has been shown to suppress excessive microglia activation. We found that disruption in FKN/ CX3CR1 signaling in young adult rodents decreased survival and proliferation of neural progenitor cells through IL-1β. Aged rats were found to have decreased levels of hippocampal FKN protein; moreover, interruption of CX3CR1 function in these animals did not affect neurogenesis. The age-related loss of FKN could be restored by exogenous FKN reversing the age-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis. There were no measureable changes in young animals by the addition of exogenous FKN. The results suggest that FKN/ CX3CR1 signaling has a regulatory role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis via mechanisms that involve indirect modification of the niche environment. As elevated neuroinflammation is associated with many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, enhancing FKN/ CX3CR1 interactions could provide an alternative therapeutic approach to slow age-related neurodegeneration. PMID:20018408

  4. Nerve growth factor in the urinary bladder of the adult regulates neuronal form and function.

    PubMed Central

    Steers, W D; Kolbeck, S; Creedon, D; Tuttle, J B

    1991-01-01

    Urethral obstruction produces increased voiding frequency (0.7 +/- 0.06 to 1.1 +/- 0.08 h-1) and hypertrophy of the urinary bladder (89 +/- 1.7 to 708 +/- 40 mg) with profound increments in the dimensions of afferent (4, 6) and efferent neurons (299 +/- 4.7 to 573 +/- 8.6 microns2) supplying this organ in the rat. We discovered that hypertrophied bladders of rat and human contain significantly more nerve growth factor (NGF) per milligram wet weight, protein, and DNA than normal bladders. The temporal correlation between NGF content, neuronal hypertrophy, and bladder weight was consistent with a role for this growth factor in the neurotrophic effects associated with obstruction. Autoimmunity to NGF abolished the hypertrophy of NGF-sensitive bladder neurons in the pelvic ganglion after obstruction. Relief of urethral obstruction reduced bladder size (349 +/- 78 mg), but neuronal hypertrophy (460.2 +/- 10.2 microns2) and elevated NGF levels were only partially reversed. Bladder hypertrophy (133 +/- 4.3 mg) induced by osmotic diuresis slightly increased ganglion cell area (365.2 +/- 6.1 microns2) and only doubled NGF content of the bladder. These findings provide important new evidence that parenchymal cells in the hypertrophied bladder can synthesize NGF and possibly other molecular messengers that act to alter the size and function of neurons in adult animals and man. Images PMID:1939656

  5. Radial glia-mediated up-regulation of somatostatin in the regenerating adult fish brain.

    PubMed

    Zupanc, G K; Clint, S C

    2001-08-31

    Adult teleost fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus, exhibit an enormous regenerative capability after application of mechanical lesions to the dorsalmost subdivision of the cerebellum, the corpus cerebelli. Restoration of the neural tissue is achieved by a cascade of processes, including the guidance of migrating new neurons to the site of injury by radial glial fibers. These fibers are characterised by the expression of immunoreactive glial fibrillary acidic protein and by several morphological features. Within 12 h following the lesion, the fraction of radial glial fibers expressing the neuropeptide somatostatin (SRIF) dramatically increased from approximately 1%, as found in the intact brain, to roughly 27% 12-24 h post-lesion. Subsequently, the percentage of SRIF-expressing radial glial fibers gradually declined, until it reached background levels at about 10 days following the injury. We hypothesise that the expression of SRIF is related to the generation and/or differentiation of the new neurons produced in response to the lesion, rather than to the later guidance of these cells along their migratory pathway.

  6. Neural regulation of acid maltase in an unusual adult onset deficiency.

    PubMed

    Meola, G; Sansone, V; Rotondo, G; Radice, S; Sterlicchio, M; Mauri, M; Bresolin, N; Moggio, M

    1994-01-01

    In a 48-year-old female, the first symptoms apparently manifested themselves 18 years before, with occasional tripping and weakness in both legs. During the next 18 years, weakness progressed and the patient developed a waddling gait; she became unable to rise from a lying or seated position unassisted and the shoulder girdle also became affected. Neurological examination revealed limb and shoulder girdle predominantly involving the lower extremities. We established cell cultures from muscle biopsy specimens obtained from our patient and carried out morphological analysis which, although aspecific, demonstrated clear signs of neurogenic suffering. This was confirmed in EMG studies performed. Biochemical analysis revealed very low acid maltase residual activity. We describe an unusual case of adult-onset acid maltase deficiency (AMD) with neurogenic atrophy and low residual activity. Innervated myofibres prepared by co-culturing the patient's myoblasts, with spinal cord foetal mouse explants were not associated with an abnormal in vitro maturation of the innervated myofibres as expected by the very low residual enzymatic activity found both in the muscle biopsy specimens and in the muscle cultures. There is strong suggestion that factors other than the amount of residual activity must be involved to determine the clinical manifestation of this disease.

  7. STAT3 Regulates Self-Renewal of Adult Muscle Satellite Cells during Injury-Induced Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Han; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wei, Xiuqing; Jiang, Lei; Chen, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Wang, Haixia; Diao, Yarui; Wang, Huating; Ip, Nancy Y; Cheung, Tom H; Wu, Zhenguo

    2016-08-23

    Recent studies have shown that STAT3 negatively regulates the proliferation of muscle satellite cells (MuSCs) and injury-induced muscle regeneration. These studies have been largely based on STAT3 inhibitors, which may produce off-target effects and are not cell type-specific in vivo. Here, we examine the role of STAT3 in MuSCs using two different mouse models: a MuSC-specific Stat3 knockout line and a Stat3 (MuSC-specific)/dystrophin (Dmd) double knockout (dKO) line. Stat3(-/-) MuSCs from both mutant lines were defective in proliferation. Moreover, in both mutant strains, the MuSC pool shrank, and regeneration was compromised after injury, with defects more pronounced in dKO mice along with severe muscle inflammation and fibrosis. We analyzed the transcriptomes of MuSCs from dKO and Dmd(-/-) control mice and identified multiple STAT3 target genes, including Pax7. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of STAT3 in adult MuSCs that regulates their self-renewal during injury-induced muscle regeneration. PMID:27524611

  8. Regulation of differentiation flux by Notch signalling influences the number of dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-Paredes, Niurka; Valencia, Concepción; Guerrero-Flores, Gilda; Arzate, Dulce-María; Baizabal, José-Manuel; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Fuentes-Hernández, Ayari; Zea-Armenta, Iván; Covarrubias, Luis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Notch signalling is a well-established pathway that regulates neurogenesis. However, little is known about the role of Notch signalling in specific neuronal differentiation. Using Dll1 null mice, we found that Notch signalling has no function in the specification of mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells (NPCs), but plays an important role in regulating their expansion and differentiation into neurons. Premature neuronal differentiation was observed in mesencephalons of Dll1-deficient mice or after treatment with a Notch signalling inhibitor. Coupling between neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation was indicated from the coincident emergence of neuronal and dopaminergic markers. Early in differentiation, decreasing Notch signalling caused a reduction in NPCs and an increase in dopaminergic neurons in association with dynamic changes in the proportion of sequentially-linked dopaminergic NPCs (Msx1/2+, Ngn2+, Nurr1+). These effects in differentiation caused a significant reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons produced. Accordingly, Dll1 haploinsufficient adult mice, in comparison with their wild-type littermates, have a consistent reduction in neuronal density that was particularly evident in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Our results are in agreement with a mathematical model based on a Dll1-mediated regulatory feedback loop between early progenitors and their dividing precursors that controls the emergence and number of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:26912775

  9. Up-regulation of vimentin expression during regeneration in the adult fish brain.

    PubMed

    Clint, Sorcha C; Zupanc, Günther K H

    2002-03-01

    In contrast to mammals, the brains of teleost fish exhibit an enormous regenerative capacity following injury. Here, we have examined the potential role of vimentin in this wound healing. Fifteen days after application of a mechanical lesion to the corpus cerebelli in the teleost fish Apteronotus leptoryhnchus, the areal density of vimentin-positive fibres increased significantly at the lesion site and in the remaining ipsilateral molecular layer. This density remained elevated throughout the time period of up to 100 days examined. Based on this spatio-temporal pattern of vimentin up-regulation we propose that this intermediate filament protein is involved in the survival, differentiation, and/or dendritic growth of the new cells that replace damaged cells in the injury zone.

  10. The Effects of Self-Regulated Strategy Development on the Writing of Expository Essays for Adults with Written Expression Difficulties: Preparing for the GED

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Ann Bassett; Mason, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    A multiple-probe, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used to examine the writing performance of four low-achieving adult students with and without disabilities enrolled in general equivalency diploma (GED) preparatory classes. Students' writing was evaluated before instruction and after self-regulated strategy development (SRSD)…

  11. Transitions to Competence: An Investigation of Adult Mediation in Preschoolers' Self-Regulation with a Microcomputer-Based Problem-Solving Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samaras, Anastasia P.

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of specific dimensions of adult mediation on preschoolers' self-regulation of a model consultation strategy was evaluated using microcomputer puzzle tasks. Findings suggest that children's acquisition of the model consultation can improve over a short period of time with culturally mediated instruction. (Author/GLR)

  12. Dual and opposing roles of microRNA-124 in epilepsy are mediated through inflammatory and NRSF-dependent gene networks

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gary P.; Dey, Deblina; Chen, Yuncai; Patterson, Katelin P.; Magnetta, Eric J.; Hall, Alicia M.; Dube, Celine M.; Mei, Yu-Tang; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2016-01-01

    Insult-provoked transformation of neuronal networks into epileptic ones involves multiple mechanisms. Intervention studies have identified both dysregulated inflammatory pathways and NRSF-mediated repression of crucial neuronal genes as contributors to epileptogenesis. However, it remains unclear how epilepsy-provoking insults (e.g., prolonged seizures) induce both inflammation and NRSF, and whether common mechanisms exist. We examined miR-124 as a candidate dual regulator of NRSF- and inflammatory-pathways. Status epilepticus (SE) led to reduced miR-124 expression via SIRT1, and in turn MiR-124 repression, via C/EBPα, upregulated NRSF. We tested whether augmenting miR-124 after SE would abort epileptogenesis by preventing inflammation and NRSF upregulation. SE-sustaining animals developed epilepsy but supplementing miR-124 did not modify epileptogenesis. Examining this result further, we found that synthetic miR-124 effectively blocked NRSF upregulation and rescued NRSF target genes, but also augmented microglia activation and inflammatory cytokines. Thus, miR-124 attenuates epileptogenesis via NRSF while promoting epilepsy via inflammation. PMID:26947066

  13. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (p<0.05) and blood glucose levels were significantly (p<0.001) decreased after short term fasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in adult male rhesus monkeys which were fasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after 48h fasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons.

  14. Developmental fluoxetine exposure increases behavioral despair and alters epigenetic regulation of the hippocampal BDNF gene in adult female offspring.

    PubMed

    Boulle, Fabien; Pawluski, Jodi L; Homberg, Judith R; Machiels, Barbie; Kroeze, Yvet; Kumar, Neha; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Kenis, Gunter; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-04-01

    A growing number of infants are exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications during the perinatal period. Perinatal exposure to SSRI medications alter neuroplasticity and increase depressive- and anxiety-related behaviors, particularly in male offspring as little work has been done in female offspring to date. The long-term effects of SSRI on development can also differ with previous exposure to prenatal stress, a model of maternal depression. Because of the limited work done on the role of developmental SSRI exposure on neurobehavioral outcomes in female offspring, the aim of the present study was to investigate how developmental fluoxetine exposure affects anxiety and depression-like behavior, as well as the regulation of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the hippocampus of adult female offspring. To do this female Sprague-Dawley rat offspring were exposed to prenatal stress and fluoxetine via the dam, for a total of four groups of female offspring: 1) No Stress+Vehicle, 2) No Stress+Fluoxetine, 3) Prenatal Stress+Vehicle, and 4) Prenatal Stress+Fluoxetine. Primary results show that, in adult female offspring, developmental SSRI exposure significantly increases behavioral despair measures on the forced swim test, decreases hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels, and increases levels of the repressive histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylated mark at the corresponding promoter. There was also a significant negative correlation between hippocampal BDNF exon IV mRNA levels and immobility in the forced swim test. No effects of prenatal stress or developmental fluoxetine exposure were seen on tests of anxiety-like behavior. This research provides important evidence for the long-term programming effects of early-life exposure to SSRIs on female offspring, particularily with regard to affect-related behaviors and their underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:26844865

  15. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (p<0.05) and blood glucose levels were significantly (p<0.001) decreased after short term fasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (p<0.05) reduced in adult male rhesus monkeys which were fasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (p<0.05) reduced after 48h fasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons. PMID:26138506

  16. BDNF deficiency and young-adult methamphetamine induce sex-specific effects on prepulse inhibition regulation

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Elizabeth E.; van den Buuse, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, yet its role in the development of specific symptoms is unclear. Methamphetamine (METH) users have an increased risk of psychosis and schizophrenia, and METH-treated animals have been used extensively as a model to study the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated whether METH treatment in BDNF heterozygous (HET) mutant mice has cumulative effects on sensorimotor gating, including the disruptive effects of psychotropic drugs. BDNF HETs and wildtype (WT) littermates were treated during young adulthood with METH and, following a 2-week break, prepulse inhibition (PPI) was examined. At baseline, BDNF HETs showed reduced PPI compared to WT mice irrespective of METH pre-treatment. An acute challenge with amphetamine (AMPH) disrupted PPI but male BDNF HETs were more sensitive to this effect, irrespective of METH pre-treatment. In contrast, female mice treated with METH were less sensitive to the disruptive effects of AMPH, and there were no effects of BDNF genotype. Similar changes were not observed in the response to an acute apomorphine (APO) or MK-801 challenge. These results show that genetically-induced reduction of BDNF caused changes in a behavioral endophenotype relevant to the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, major sex differences were observed in the effects of a psychotropic drug challenge on this behavior. These findings suggest sex differences in the effects of BDNF depletion and METH treatment on the monoamine signaling pathways that regulate PPI. Given that these same pathways are thought to contribute to the expression of positive symptoms in schizophrenia, this work suggests that there may be significant sex differences in the pathophysiology underlying these symptoms. Elucidating these sex differences may be important for our understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and developing better treatments strategies for the

  17. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  18. O-GlcNAcylation Negatively Regulates Cardiomyogenic Fate in Adult Mouse Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zafir, Ayesha; Bradley, James A.; Long, Bethany W.; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar; Li, Qianhong; Hill, Bradford G.; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Bolli, Roberto; Jones, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    In both preclinical and clinical studies, cell transplantation of several cell types is used to promote repair of damaged organs and tissues. Nevertheless, despite the widespread use of such strategies, there remains little understanding of how the efficacy of cell therapy is regulated. We showed previously that augmentation of a unique, metabolically derived stress signal (i.e., O-GlcNAc) improves survival of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells; however, it is not known whether enhancing O-GlcNAcylation affects lineage commitment or other aspects of cell competency. In this study, we assessed the role of O-GlcNAc in differentiation of cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells. Exposure of these cells to routine differentiation protocols in culture increased markers of the cardiomyogenic lineage such as Nkx2.5 and connexin 40, and augmented the abundance of transcripts associated with endothelial and fibroblast cell fates. Differentiation significantly decreased the abundance of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. To determine if O-GlcNAc is involved in stromal cell differentiation, O-GlcNAcylation was increased pharmacologically during the differentiation protocol. Although elevated O-GlcNAc levels did not significantly affect fibroblast and endothelial marker expression, acquisition of cardiomyocyte markers was limited. In addition, increasing O-GlcNAcylation further elevated smooth muscle actin expression. In addition to lineage commitment, we also evaluated proliferation and migration, and found that increasing O-GlcNAcylation did not significantly affect either; however, we found that O-GlcNAc transferase—the protein responsible for adding O-GlcNAc to proteins—is at least partially required for maintaining cellular proliferative and migratory capacities. We conclude that O-GlcNAcylation contributes significantly to cardiac mesenchymal stromal cell lineage and function. O-GlcNAcylation and pathological conditions that may affect O-GlcNAc levels (such as diabetes) should be

  19. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca2+-dependent using the Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  20. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  1. Interactions with the young down-regulate adult olfactory neurogenesis and enhance the maturation of olfactory neuroblasts in sheep mothers

    PubMed Central

    Brus, Maïna; Meurisse, Maryse; Keller, Matthieu; Lévy, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the olfactory bulb of mammalian brain. While numerous environmental factors controlling survival of newborn neurons have been extensively studied, regulation by social interactions is less documented. We addressed this question by investigating the influence of parturition and interactions with the young on neurogenesis in sheep mothers. Using Bromodeoxyuridine, a marker of cell division, in combination with markers of neuronal maturation, the percentage of neuroblasts and new mature neurons in the olfactory bulb and the DG was compared between groups of parturient ewes which could interact or not with their lamb, and virgins. In addition, a morphological analysis was performed by measuring the dendritic arbor of neuroblasts in both structures. We showed that the postpartum period was associated with a decrease in olfactory and hippocampal adult neurogenesis. In the olfactory bulb, the suppressive effect on neuroblasts was dependent on interactions with the young whereas in the DG the decrease in new mature neurons was associated with parturition. In addition, dendritic length and number of nodes of neuroblasts were significantly enhanced by interactions with the lamb in the olfactory bulb but not in the DG. Because interactions with the young involved learning of the olfactory signature of the lamb, we hypothesize that this learning is associated with a down-regulation in olfactory neurogenesis and an enhancement of olfactory neuroblast maturation. Our assumption is that fewer new neurons decrease cell competition in the olfactory bulb and enhance maturation of those new neurons selected to participate in the learning of the young odor. PMID:24600367

  2. The Drosophila Prosecretory Transcription Factor dimmed Is Dynamically Regulated in Adult Enteroendocrine Cells and Protects Against Gram-Negative Infection.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Katherine; Park, Dongkook; Taghert, Paul H; Micchelli, Craig A

    2015-05-20

    The endocrine system employs peptide hormone signals to translate environmental changes into physiological responses. The diffuse endocrine system embedded in the gastrointestinal barrier epithelium is one of the largest and most diverse endocrine tissues. Furthermore, it is the only endocrine tissue in direct physical contact with the microbial environment of the gut lumen. However, it remains unclear how this sensory epithelium responds to specific pathogenic challenges in a dynamic and regulated manner. We demonstrate that the enteroendocrine cells of the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut display a transient, sensitive, and systemic induction of the prosecretory factor dimmed (dimm) in response to the Gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila (Pe). In enteroendocrine cells, dimm controls the levels of the targets Phm, dcat-4, and the peptide hormone, Allatostatin A. Finally, we identify dimm as a host factor that protects against Pe infection and controls the expression of antimicrobial peptides. We propose that dimm provides "gain" in enteroendocrine output during the adaptive response to episodic pathogen exposure.

  3. Synthetic Cannabis Overdose and Withdrawal in a Young Adult: A Case Report, Commentary on Regulation, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Gerardo F.; Akinyemi, Boye; Junquera, Patricia; Oms, Juan; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Marijuana has been used for its psychotropic effects including enhanced relaxation and perceptual alterations. However, the use of synthetic marijuana (SM) leads to more frequent and drastic side effects than the typical use of regular marijuana, owing to the fact that SM has a shorter duration and an earlier peak of action. Despite all the potential adverse health effects associated with SM use, current health policies on SM are very limited. It is believed that the popularity of SM has increased, due to its easy accessibility in the US and lack of detection in typical urine drug screens for THC. Case Report. One case presented is of a young adult patient, with histories of recurrent synthetic cannabis and recreational cannabis use, who had developed drastic physiological and psychiatric symptoms, including the development of acute-onset psychosis. Conclusion/Discussion. This case, as many others nationwide, exemplifies the impact of synthetic cannabinoid use and abuse in adolescents. Side effects and adverse health consequences of synthetic cannabinoid use warrant stricter regulations and policies in order to decrease psychiatric hospital admissions and associated healthcare costs. PMID:27777807

  4. The effect of opioid antagonists in local regulation of testicular response to acute stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Kostić, T; Andrić, S; Kovacević, R; Marić, D

    1997-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of naloxone (N) and naltrexone-methobromide (NMB; an opioid receptor antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier) on testicular steroidogenesis during acute immobilization stress (IMO; 2 h) in adult rats. Unstressed rats as well as IMO rats were treated by unilateral intratesticular injection of N (20 micrograms/testis), NMB (36 micrograms/testis), or vehicle at the beginning of and at 1 h of the IMO period. In IMO rats serum T levels were significantly reduced, while serum luteinizing hormone levels were not affected. N and NMB normalized serum T levels in IMO rats and had no effects in controls. In IMO rats the activities of 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and P450(17 alpha, lyase) were significantly reduced, while the activity of 17 beta-HSD was not affected. N and NMB antagonized the inhibitory effect of IMO on 3 beta-HSD and P450(17 alpha, lyase) but did not alter enzyme activity in freely moving rats. Acute IMO decreased basal and human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated androgen production by hemitestis preparation, but N (10(-4) M) added directly to the incubation medium blocked the decrease and had no effect on testes from freely moving control rats. These results support the conclusion that endogenous opioid peptides are potentially important paracrine regulators of testicular steroidogenesis under stress conditions. PMID:9366009

  5. N-cadherin regulates molecular organization of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic circuits in adult hippocampus in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nikitczuk, Jessica S.; Patil, Shekhar B.; Matikainen-Ankney, Bridget A.; Scarpa, Joseph; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    N-cadherin and β-catenin form a transsynaptic adhesion complex required for spine and synapse development. In adulthood, N-cadherin mediates persistent synaptic plasticity, but whether the role of N-cadherin at mature synapses is similar to that at developing synapses is unclear. To address this, we conditionally ablated N-cadherin from excitatory forebrain synapses in mice starting in late postnatal life and examined hippocampal structure and function in adulthood. In the absence of N-cadherin, β-catenin levels were reduced, but numbers of excitatory synapses were unchanged, and there was no impact on number or shape of dendrites or spines. However, the composition of synaptic molecules was altered. Levels of GluA1 and its scaffolding protein PSD95 were diminished and the density of immunolabeled puncta was decreased, without effects on other glutamate receptors and their scaffolding proteins. Additionally, loss of N-cadherin at excitatory synapses triggered increases in the density of markers for inhibitory synapses and decreased severity of hippocampal seizures. Finally, adult mutant mice were profoundly impaired in hippocampal-dependent memory for spatial episodes. These results demonstrate a novel function for the N-cadherin/β-catenin complex in regulating ionotropic receptor composition of excitatory synapses, an appropriate balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic proteins and the maintenance of neural circuitry necessary to generate flexible yet persistent cognitive and synaptic function. PMID:24753442

  6. N-cadherin regulates molecular organization of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic circuits in adult hippocampus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nikitczuk, Jessica S; Patil, Shekhar B; Matikainen-Ankney, Bridget A; Scarpa, Joseph; Shapiro, Matthew L; Benson, Deanna L; Huntley, George W

    2014-08-01

    N-Cadherin and β-catenin form a transsynaptic adhesion complex required for spine and synapse development. In adulthood, N-cadherin mediates persistent synaptic plasticity, but whether the role of N-cadherin at mature synapses is similar to that at developing synapses is unclear. To address this, we conditionally ablated N-cadherin from excitatory forebrain synapses in mice starting in late postnatal life and examined hippocampal structure and function in adulthood. In the absence of N-cadherin, β-catenin levels were reduced, but numbers of excitatory synapses were unchanged, and there was no impact on number or shape of dendrites or spines. However, the composition of synaptic molecules was altered. Levels of GluA1 and its scaffolding protein PSD95 were diminished and the density of immunolabeled puncta was decreased, without effects on other glutamate receptors and their scaffolding proteins. Additionally, loss of N-cadherin at excitatory synapses triggered increases in the density of markers for inhibitory synapses and decreased severity of hippocampal seizures. Finally, adult mutant mice were profoundly impaired in hippocampal-dependent memory for spatial episodes. These results demonstrate a novel function for the N-cadherin/β-catenin complex in regulating ionotropic receptor composition of excitatory synapses, an appropriate balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic proteins and the maintenance of neural circuitry necessary to generate flexible yet persistent cognitive and synaptic function.

  7. Investigation into the regulation of the circadian system by dopamine and melatonin in the adult Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Duffield, G E; Hastings, M H; Ebling, F J

    1998-11-01

    Dopamine and melatonin have both been implicated in mediating maternal influences on the developing circadian system of altricial rodents. The aim of these studies was to investigate their role in the entrainment of the circadian system of the adult Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). In-situ hybridization revealed that D1-dopamine receptor (D1-R) mRNA was expressed in the adult suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) at levels comparable to neonates. As dopamine has been postulated to mimic photic stimulation during early development, experiment 1 compared the effects of a D1-R agonist and a light pulse on free-running wheel running rhythms in hamsters maintained in constant dim red light. A phase response curve to light was generated, revealing clear phase delays early in the subjective night, and large phase advances in the late subjective night. However, the D1-R agonist (SKF 81297, 2 mg/kg, s.c.) did not produce consistent phase shifts at any circadian phase. Experiment 2 tested the ability of this dopaminergic agonist to modulate photic responses of the circadian system. Free-running animals were pre-treated with SKF 81297 (2 mg/kg, s.c.) 30 min before a 15 min light pulse given early or late in the subjective night. This agonist had no effect on the magnitude of phase shifts at either circadian time. In experiment 3, light pulses at CT13-15 induced expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in the SCN, as assessed by immunocytochemistry for the protein product. In contrast, SKF 81297 (2 mg/kg, s.c.) at the same phase did not induce c-fos in the SCN, despite marked c-fos induction in the caudate-putamen, nor did it affect photic induction of c-fos in the SCN. To investigate whether dopamine might be involved in nonphotic regulation of the circadian system in adult hamsters, experiment 4 compared the response of free-running hamsters to a series of injections of SKF 81297 (2 mg/kg, s.c.) or melatonin (1 mg/kg, s.c.), since melatonin receptor expression in the SCN

  8. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 kip1 regulates radial stem cell quiescence and neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Zoraida; Khan, Muhammad Amir; González-Gómez, Pilar; Negueruela, Santiago; Hortigüela, Rafael; San Emeterio, Juana; Ferrón, Sacri R; Martínez, Gloria; Vidal, Anxo; Fariñas, Isabel; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Mira, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-inhibitory protein (CIP)/kinase-inhibitory protein (KIP) family of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors regulate proliferation and cell cycle exit of mammalian cells. In the adult brain, the CIP/KIP protein p27(kip1) has been related to the regulation of intermediate progenitor cells located in neurogenic niches. Here, we uncover a novel function of p27(kip1) in the adult hippocampus as a dual regulator of stem cell quiescence and of cell-cycle exit of immature neurons. In vivo, p27(kip1) is detected in radial stem cells expressing SOX2 and in newborn neurons of the dentate gyrus. In vitro, the Cdkn1b gene encoding p27(kip1) is transcriptionally upregulated by quiescence signals such as BMP4. The nuclear accumulation of p27(kip1) protein in adult hippocampal stem cells encompasses the BMP4-induced quiescent state and its overexpression is able to block proliferation. p27(kip1) is also expressed in immature neurons upon differentiation of adult hippocampal stem cell cultures. Loss of p27(kip1) leads to an increase in proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus, which results from both a decrease in the percentage of radial stem cells that are quiescent and a delay in cell cycle exit of immature neurons. Analysis of animals carrying a disruption in the cyclin-CDK interaction domain of p27(kip1) indicates that the CDK inhibitory function of the protein is necessary to control the activity of radial stem cells. Thus, we report that p27(kip1) acts as a central player of the molecular program that keeps adult hippocampal stem cells out of the cell cycle.

  9. Susceptibility of juvenile and adult blood–brain barrier to endothelin-1: regulation of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein expression and transport activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) play a critical role in keeping neurotoxic substances from entering the brain. We and others have previously reported an impact of inflammation on the regulation of adult blood–brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters. However, studies in children have not been done. From the pediatric clinical perspective, it is important to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) and BBB drug efflux transporters differ in childhood from those of adults under normal and inflammatory conditions. Therefore, we examined and compared the regulation of P-gp and BCRP expression and transport activity in young and adult BBB and investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying inflammatory responses. Methods Rats at postnatal day (P) P21 and P84, corresponding to the juvenile and adult stages of human brain maturation, respectively, were treated with endothelin-1 (ET-1) given by the intracerebroventricular (icv) route. Twenty-four hours later, we measured P-gp and BCRP protein expression in isolated brain capillary by immunoblotting as well as by transport activity in vivo by measuring the unbound drug partitioning coefficient of the brain (Kp,uu,brain) of known efflux transporter substrates administered intravenously. Glial activation was measured by immunohistochemistry. The release of cytokines/chemokines (interleukins-1α, 1-β (IL-1β), -6 (IL-6), -10 (IL-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1/CCL2), fractalkine and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1)) were simultaneously measured in brain and serum samples using the Agilent Technology cytokine microarray. Results We found that juvenile and adult BBBs exhibited similar P-gp and BCRP transport activities in the normal physiological conditions. However, long-term exposure of the juvenile brain to low-dose of ET-1 did not change BBB P-gp transport activity but tended to decrease BCRP transport activity in the juvenile brain, while a

  10. Differential expression of id genes and their potential regulator znf238 in zebrafish adult neural progenitor cells and neurons suggests distinct functions in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Diotel, Nicolas; Beil, Tanja; Strähle, Uwe; Rastegar, Sepand

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish display a remarkable ability to generate new neurons and to repair brain lesions during adulthood. They are, therefore, a very popular model to investigate the molecular mechanisms of constitutive and induced neurogenesis in adult vertebrates. In this study, we investigated the expression patterns of inhibitor of DNA binding (id) genes and of their potential transcriptional repressor, znf238, in the whole brain of adult zebrafish. We show that while id1 is exclusively expressed in ventricular cells in the whole brain, id2a, id3 and id4 genes are expressed in broader areas. Interestingly, znf238 was also detected in these regions, its expression overlapping with id2a, id3 and id4 expression. Further detailed characterization of the id-expressing cells demonstrated that (a) id1 is expressed in type 1 and type 2 neural progenitors as previously published, (b) id2a in type 1, 2 and 3 neural progenitors, (c) id3 in type 3 neural progenitors and (d) id4 in postmitotic neurons. Our data provide a detailed map of id and znf238 expression in the brain of adult zebrafish, supplying a framework for studies of id genes function during adult neurogenesis and brain regeneration in the zebrafish.

  11. Differential regulation of proliferation and neuronal differentiation in adult rat spinal cord neural stem/progenitors by ERK1/2, Akt, and PLCγ

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Si; Sideris, Alexandra; Sutachan, Jhon J.; Montoya G, Jose V.; Blanck, Thomas J. J.; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has been identified in both normal and injured adult mammalian spinal cord. Yet the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulation of adult spinal cord NSPCs proliferation and commitment toward a neuronal lineage remain undefined. In this study, the role of three growth factor-mediated signaling pathways in proliferation and neuronal differentiation was examined. Adult spinal cord NSPCs were enriched in the presence of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). We observed an increase in the number of cells expressing the microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) over time, indicating neuronal differentiation in the culture. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase 1 and 2/ERK 1 and 2 (MEK/ERK1/2) or the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways suppressed active proliferation in adult spinal cord NSPC cultures; whereas neuronal differentiation was negatively affected only when the ERK1/2 pathway was inhibited. Inhibition of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) pathway did not affect proliferation or neuronal differentiation. Finally, we demonstrated that the blockade of either the ERK1/2 or PLCγ signaling pathways reduced neurite branching of MAP2+ cells derived from the NSPC cultures. Many of the MAP2+ cells expressed synaptophysin and had a glutamatergic phenotype, indicating that over time adult spinal cord NSPCs had differentiated into mostly glutamatergic neurons. Our work provides new information regarding the contribution of these pathways to the proliferation and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from adult spinal cord cultures, and emphasizes that the contribution of these pathways is dependent on the origin of the NSPCs. PMID:23986655

  12. GABA-cAMP response element-binding protein signaling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D Chichung

    2009-06-24

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signaling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous manner impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule-associated protein, doublecortin (DCX), and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects after loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signaling. These results indicate that CREB signaling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation.

  13. Relationships between self-regulation skills and physical activity and fruit and vegetable consumption in obese adults: mediation of mood and self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J

    2011-02-01

    In cognitive-behavioral treatments for obesity, self-regulation is thought to be a strong predictor of behavioral change, but it is rarely directly measured in intervention research. Thus, how self-regulation interacts with other psychological variables regarding treatment effects is largely unknown. In this preliminary field study, self-regulatory skills were directly measured and were found to be significantly associated with both volume of exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption in severely obese adults (N=116) enrolled in a behavioral weight management program. Significant partial and complete mediation of the relationship between self-regulation for physical activity and physical activity, and self-regulation for appropriate eating and fruit and vegetable intake, respectively, were found by reported negative mood. Self-efficacy was not found to be a significant mediator of these relationships. The bivariate relationship between baseline scores of self-regulation for physical activity and self-regulation for appropriate eating was significant (r = .46), which supported the premise that self-regulation is a trait-like personal characteristic. Volume of exercise and fruit and vegetable consumption significantly predicted weight loss over 6 months (R2 = .35). Results were consistent with the few laboratory-based findings available and, after replication, may extend theory related to obesity treatment.

  14. Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p < .001, η (2) = .24] and self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p < .05, η (2) = .266] with increases in the intervention group. The intervention resulted in short-term increases in physical activity (d = .76, p < .01), which were partially maintained at the 6-month follow-up (d = .35, p < .01). The intervention increased short-term physical activity but was not successful at maintaining increases in physical activity. Similar intervention effects were observed in self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change.

  15. The heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone, GPA2/GPB5, regulates ion transport across the hindgut of the adult mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Jean-Paul; Vanderveken, Mark; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    A family of evolutionarily old hormones is the glycoprotein cysteine knot-forming heterodimers consisting of alpha- (GPA) and beta-subunits (GPB), which assemble by noncovalent bonds. In mammals, a common glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPA1) pairs with unique beta-subunits that establish receptor specificity, forming thyroid stimulating hormone (GPA1/TSHβ) and the gonadotropins luteinizing hormone (GPA1/LHβ), follicle stimulating hormone (GPA1/FSHβ), choriogonadotropin (GPA1/CGβ). A novel glycoprotein heterodimer was identified in vertebrates by genome analysis, called thyrostimulin, composed of two novel subunits, GPA2 and GPB5, and homologs occur in arthropods, nematodes and cnidarians, implying that this neurohormone system existed prior to the emergence of bilateral metazoans. In order to discern possible physiological roles of this hormonal signaling system in mosquitoes, we have isolated the glycoprotein hormone genes producing the alpha- and beta-subunits (AedaeGPA2 and AedaeGPB5) and assessed their temporal expression profiles in the yellow and dengue-fever vector, Aedes aegypti. We have also isolated a putative receptor for this novel mosquito hormone, AedaeLGR1, which contains features conserved with other glycoprotein leucine-rich repeating containing G protein-coupled receptors. AedaeLGR1 is expressed in tissues of the alimentary canal such as the midgut, Malpighian tubules and hindgut, suggesting that this novel mosquito glycoprotein hormone may regulate ionic and osmotic balance. Focusing on the hindgut in adult stage A. aegypti, where AedaeLGR1 was highly enriched, we utilized the Scanning Ion-selective Electrode Technique (SIET) to determine if AedaeGPA2/GPB5 modulated cation transport across this epithelial tissue. Our results suggest that AedaeGPA2/GPB5 does indeed participate in ionic and osmotic balance, since it appears to inhibit natriuresis and promote kaliuresis. Taken together, our findings imply this hormone may play an important

  16. Dietary macronutrients and feeding frequency affect fasting and postprandial concentrations of hormones involved in appetite regulation in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Lubbs, D C; Vester Boler, B M; Ridge, T K; Spears, J K; Graves, T K; Swanson, K S

    2010-12-01

    Identifying dietary effects on appetite-regulating hormones will enhance our understanding of appetite control. Before complex diets are tested, effects of specific macronutrients or feeding frequency should be identified. The objectives of this nutrition study were to identify differences in endocrine response with feeding frequency (Exp. 1) and after a single dose of a sole macronutrient (Exp. 2). A control diet supplying similar energy content from carbohydrate, protein, and fat was fed to maintain ideal BW. In Exp. 1, 8 healthy adult (1.9 ± 0.1 yr old) female hound cross dogs with an average BW of 22 kg (4.8 ± 0.8 BCS based on a 9-point scale) were randomly allotted to 1 of 2 treatments (fed once or twice daily) in a crossover design. After a 14-d adaptation period, a blood sample was taken (10 mL) before feeding, and samples were collected every 2 h postprandially for 24 h. In Exp. 2, dogs were randomly allotted to 1 of 4 treatments in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. After a 6-d adaptation period, the normal meal on d 7 was replaced with a bolus of maltodextrin (50 g in water; CARB), canned chicken (50 g; PROT), lard (25 g; fat), or water (200 mL). A blood sample (10 mL) was taken at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 240, 300, and 360 min postprandial. Total ghrelin, active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, and glucose concentrations were measured. Data were analyzed to compare changes from baseline and area under the curve (AUC) among treatments. In Exp. 1, all hormones were quite variable throughout the day, with a few insulin and GLP-1 differences because of feeding frequency. In Exp. 2, CARB produced a marked peak in glucose and insulin concentrations compared with PROT, fat, or water, resulting in increased glucose (P < 0.001) and insulin (P = 0.07) incremental AUC values. On the other hand, the fat treatment led to increased GLP-1 concentrations over time. Ghrelin AUC was not different among treatments. The circulating hormone data were highly

  17. Reduced Expression of Brain-Enriched microRNAs in Glioblastomas Permits Targeted Regulation of a Cell Death Gene

    PubMed Central

    Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive malignant tumor involving glial cells in the human brain. We used high-throughput sequencing to comprehensively profile the small RNAs expressed in glioblastoma and non-tumor brain tissues. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) made up the large majority of small RNAs, and we identified over 400 different cellular pre-miRNAs. No known viral miRNAs were detected in any of the samples analyzed. Cluster analysis revealed several miRNAs that were significantly down-regulated in glioblastomas, including miR-128, miR-124, miR-7, miR-139, miR-95, and miR-873. Post-transcriptional editing was observed for several miRNAs, including the miR-376 family, miR-411, miR-381, and miR-379. Using the deep sequencing information, we designed a lentiviral vector expressing a cell suicide gene, the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene, under the regulation of a miRNA, miR-128, that was found to be enriched in non-tumor brain tissue yet down-regulated in glioblastomas, Glioblastoma cells transduced with this vector were selectively killed when cultured in the presence of ganciclovir. Using an in vitro model to recapitulate expression of brain-enriched miRNAs, we demonstrated that neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells transduced with the miRNA-regulated HSV-TK vector are protected from killing by expression of endogenous miR-128. Together, these results provide an in-depth analysis of miRNA dysregulation in glioblastoma and demonstrate the potential utility of these data in the design of miRNA-regulated therapies for the treatment of brain cancers. PMID:21912681

  18. Reduced expression of brain-enriched microRNAs in glioblastomas permits targeted regulation of a cell death gene.

    PubMed

    Skalsky, Rebecca L; Cullen, Bryan R

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive malignant tumor involving glial cells in the human brain. We used high-throughput sequencing to comprehensively profile the small RNAs expressed in glioblastoma and non-tumor brain tissues. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) made up the large majority of small RNAs, and we identified over 400 different cellular pre-miRNAs. No known viral miRNAs were detected in any of the samples analyzed. Cluster analysis revealed several miRNAs that were significantly down-regulated in glioblastomas, including miR-128, miR-124, miR-7, miR-139, miR-95, and miR-873. Post-transcriptional editing was observed for several miRNAs, including the miR-376 family, miR-411, miR-381, and miR-379. Using the deep sequencing information, we designed a lentiviral vector expressing a cell suicide gene, the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene, under the regulation of a miRNA, miR-128, that was found to be enriched in non-tumor brain tissue yet down-regulated in glioblastomas, Glioblastoma cells transduced with this vector were selectively killed when cultured in the presence of ganciclovir. Using an in vitro model to recapitulate expression of brain-enriched miRNAs, we demonstrated that neuronally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells transduced with the miRNA-regulated HSV-TK vector are protected from killing by expression of endogenous miR-128. Together, these results provide an in-depth analysis of miRNA dysregulation in glioblastoma and demonstrate the potential utility of these data in the design of miRNA-regulated therapies for the treatment of brain cancers.

  19. Curbing craving: Behavioral and brain evidence that children regulate craving when instructed to do so but have higher baseline craving than adults

    PubMed Central

    Silvers, Jennifer A.; Insel, Catherine; Powers, Alisa; Franz, Peter; Weber, Jochen; Mischel, Walter; Casey, B.J.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Although one-third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese, developmental changes in food craving and the ability to regulate craving remain poorly understood. We addressed this knowledge gap by examining behavioral and neural responses to images of appetizing unhealthy foods in individuals aged 6-23 years. On “Close” trials (assessing unregulated craving), participants focused on a pictured food's appetitive features. On “Far” trials (assessing effortful regulation), participants focused on a food's visual features and imagined it was farther away. Across conditions, age predicted less craving, less striatal recruitment, greater prefrontal activity and stronger frontostriatal coupling. When effortfully regulating, all participants reported less craving and exhibited greater lateral prefrontal and less vmPFC recruitment. Body mass predicted less regulation-related prefrontal activity, particularly among children. These results suggest that children experience stronger craving than adults but can also effectively regulate craving. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying regulation may differ for heavy and lean children. PMID:25193941

  20. Curbing craving: behavioral and brain evidence that children regulate craving when instructed to do so but have higher baseline craving than adults.

    PubMed

    Silvers, Jennifer A; Insel, Catherine; Powers, Alisa; Franz, Peter; Weber, Jochen; Mischel, Walter; Casey, B J; Ochsner, Kevin N

    2014-10-01

    Although one third of children and adolescents are overweight or obese, developmental changes in food craving and the ability to regulate craving remain poorly understood. We addressed this knowledge gap by examining behavioral and neural responses to images of appetizing unhealthy foods in individuals ages 6 through 23 years. On close trials (assessing unregulated craving), participants focused on a pictured food's appetitive features. On far trials (assessing effortful regulation), participants focused on a food's visual features and imagined that it was farther away. Across conditions, older age predicted less craving, less striatal recruitment, greater prefrontal activity, and stronger frontostriatal coupling. When effortfully regulating their responses to the images, all participants reported less craving and exhibited greater recruitment of lateral prefrontal cortex and less recruitment of ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Greater body mass predicted less regulation-related prefrontal activity, particularly among children. These results suggest that children experience stronger craving than adults but can also effectively regulate craving. Moreover, the mechanisms underlying regulation may differ for heavy and lean children.

  1. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-05-10

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30-50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  2. miRNA array screening reveals cooperative MGMT-regulation between miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Susanna; Fabbri, Enrica; Santangelo, Alessandra; Bezzerri, Valentino; Cantù, Cinzia; Gennaro, Gianfranco Di; Finotti, Alessia; Ghimenton, Claudio; Eccher, Albino; Dechecchi, Maria; Scarpa, Aldo; Hirshman, Brian; Chen, Clark; Ferracin, Manuela; Negrini, Massimo; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The levels of expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) are relevant in predicting the response to the alkylating chemotherapy in patients affected by glioblastoma. MGMT promoter methylation and the published MGMT regulating microRNAs (miRNAs) do not completely explain the expression pattern of MGMT in clinical glioblastoma specimens. Here we used a genome-wide microarray-based approach to identify MGMT regulating miRNAs. Our screen unveiled three novel MGMT regulating miRNAs, miR-127-3p, miR-409-3p, and miR-124-3p, in addition to the previously identified miR-181d-5p. Transfection of these three novel miRNAs into the T98G glioblastoma cell line suppressed MGMT mRNA and protein expression. However, their MGMT- suppressive effects are 30–50% relative that seen with miR-181d-5p transfection. In silico analyses of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) revealed that miR-181d-5p is the only miRNA that consistently exhibited inverse correlation with MGMT mRNA expression. However, statistical models incorporating both miR-181d-5p and miR-409-3p expression better predict MGMT expression relative to models involving either miRNA alone. Our results confirmed miR-181d-5p as the key MGMT-regulating miRNA. Other MGMT regulating miRNAs, including the miR-409-3p identified in this report, modify the effect of miR-181d-5p on MGMT expression. MGMT expression is, thus, regulated by cooperative interaction between key MGMT-regulating miRNAs. PMID:27057640

  3. Testicular hormones do not regulate sexually dimorphic Pavlovian fear conditioning or perforant-path long-term potentiation in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Anagnostaras, S G; Maren, S; DeCola, J P; Lane, N I; Gale, G D; Schlinger, B A; Fanselow, M S

    1998-04-01

    We recently reported that Pavlovian fear conditioning and hippocampal perforant-path long-term potentiation (LTP) are sexually dimorphic in rats. Males show greater contextual fear conditioning, which depends on the hippocampus, as well as greater hippocampal LTP. In order to examine the role of circulating gonadal hormones in adult male rats, animals were castrated in two experiments, and Pavlovian fear conditioning and in vivo perforant-path LTP were examined. It was found that sexually-dimorphic LTP and fear conditioning are not regulated by the activational effects of testicular hormones in adult male rats. That is, in every respect, castrated male rats were similar to intact male rats in Pavlovian fear conditioning and hippocampal LTP. It is likely that sexual dimorphism in this system is established earlier in development by the organizational effects of gonadal hormones.

  4. MiRNA-Mediated Macrophage Polarization and its Potential Role in the Regulation of Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Kobina; Li, Yutian; Huo, Jiuzhou; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are important components of the immune system, specialized in either removing pathogens as part of innate immunity or contributing to adaptive immunity through antigen presentation. Essential to such functions is classical activation (M1) and alternative activation (M2) of macrophages. M1 polarization of macrophages is characterized by production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, antimicrobial and tumoricidal activity, whereas M2 polarization of macrophages is linked to immunosuppression, tumorigenesis, wound repair, and elimination of parasites. MiRNAs are small non-coding RNAs with the ability to regulate gene expression and network of cellular processes. A number of studies have determined miRNA expression profiles in M1 and M2 polarized human and murine macrophages using microarray and RT-qPCR arrays techniques. More specifically, miR-9, miR-127, miR-155, and miR-125b have been shown to promote M1 polarization while miR-124, miR-223, miR-34a, let-7c, miR-132, miR-146a, and miR-125a-5p induce M2 polarization in macrophages by targeting various transcription factors and adaptor proteins. Further, M1 and M2 phenotypes play distinctive roles in cell growth and progression of inflammation-related diseases such as sepsis, obesity, cancer, and multiple sclerosis. Hence, miRNAs that modulate macrophage polarization may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of inflammation-related diseases. This review highlights recent findings in miRNA expression profiles in polarized macrophages from murine and human sources, and summarizes how these miRNAs regulate macrophage polarization. Last, therapeutic potential of miRNAs in inflammation-related diseases through modulation of macrophage polarization is also discussed.

  5. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate. PMID:25691247

  6. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  7. Regulation of Stem Cell Proliferation and Cell Fate Specification by Wingless/Wnt Signaling Gradients Enriched at Adult Intestinal Compartment Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Wang, Zhenghan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal stem cell (ISC) self-renewal and proliferation are directed by Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mammals, whereas aberrant Wnt pathway activation in ISCs triggers the development of human colorectal carcinoma. Herein, we have utilized the Drosophila midgut, a powerful model for ISC regulation, to elucidate the mechanisms by which Wingless (Wg)/Wnt regulates intestinal homeostasis and development. We provide evidence that the Wg signaling pathway, activation of which peaks at each of the major compartment boundaries of the adult intestine, has essential functions. Wg pathway activation in the intestinal epithelium is required not only to specify cell fate near compartment boundaries during development, but also to control ISC proliferation within compartments during homeostasis. Further, in contrast with the previous focus on Wg pathway activation within ISCs, we demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which Wg signaling regulates ISC proliferation during homeostasis is non-autonomous. Activation of the Wg pathway in absorptive enterocytes is required to suppress JAK-STAT signaling in neighboring ISCs, and thereby their proliferation. We conclude that Wg signaling gradients have essential roles during homeostasis and development of the adult intestine, non-autonomously controlling stem cell proliferation inside compartments, and autonomously specifying cell fate near compartment boundaries. PMID:26845150

  8. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate.

  9. Identification of singles bar as a direct transcriptional target of Drosophila Myocyte enhancer factor-2 and a regulator of adult myoblast fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Tonya M; Fremin, Brayon J; Cripps, Richard M

    2015-05-15

    In Drosophila, myoblast fusion is a conserved process in which founder cells (FCs) and fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs) fuse to form a syncytial muscle fiber. Mutants for the myogenic regulator Myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) show a failure of myoblast fusion, indicating that MEF2 regulates the fusion process. Indeed, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that several genes involved in myoblast fusion are bound by MEF2 during embryogenesis. Of these, the MARVEL domain gene singles bar (sing), is down-regulated in MEF2 knockdown pupae, and has five consensus MEF2 binding sites within a 9000-bp region. To determine if MEF2 is an essential and direct regulator of sing during pupal muscle development, we identified a 315-bp myoblast enhancer of sing. This enhancer was active during myoblast fusion, and mutation of two MEF2 sites significantly decreased enhancer activity. We show that lack of sing expression resulted in adult lethality and muscle loss, due to a failure of fusion during the pupal stage. Additionally, we sought to determine if sing was required in either FCs or FCMs to support fusion. Interestingly, knockdown of sing in either population did not significantly affect fusion, however, knockdown in both FCs and FCMs resulted in muscles with significantly reduced nuclei numbers, provisionally indicating that sing function is required in either cell type, but not both. Finally, we found that MEF2 regulated sing expression at the embryonic stage through the same 315-bp enhancer, indicating that sing is a MEF2 target at both critical stages of myoblast fusion. Our studies define for the first time how MEF2 directly controls fusion at multiple stages of the life cycle, and provide further evidence that the mechanisms of fusion characterized in Drosophila embryos is also used in the formation of the more complex adult muscles.

  10. Flow management and fish density regulate salmonid recruitment and adult size in tailwaters across western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dibble, Kimberly L.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Budy, Phaedra E.

    2015-01-01

    The mean lengths of adult rainbow and brown trout were influenced by similar flow and catch metrics. Length in both species was positively correlated with high annual flow but declined in tailwaters with high daily fluctuations in flow, high catch rates of conspecifics, and when large cohorts recruited to adult size. Whereas brown trout did not respond to the proportion of water allocated between seasons, rainbow trout length increased in rivers that released more water during winter than in spring. Rainbow trout length was primarily related to high catch rates of conspecifics, whereas brown trout length was mainly related to large cohorts recruiting to the adult size class. Species-specific responses to flow management are likely attributable to differences in seasonal timing of key life history events such as spawning, egg hatching, and fry emergence.

  11. Despite Differences in Cytosolic Calcium Regulation, Lidocaine Toxicity Is Similar in Adult and Neonatal Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Lisa V.; Eydlin, Olga; Piskoun, Boris; Kline, Richard P; Recio-Pinto, Esperanza; Rosenberg, Andrew D; Blanck, Thomas JJ; Xu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuraxial local anesthetics may have neurological complications thought to be due to neurotoxicity. A primary site of action for local anesthetics is the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neuron. Physiologic differences have been noted between young and adult DRG neurons; hence, we examined whether there were differences in lidocaine-induced changes in calcium and lidocaine toxicity in neonatal and adult rat DRG neurons. Methods DRG neurons were cultured from postnatal day 7 (P7) and adult rats. Lidocaine-induced changes in cytosolic calcium were examined with the calcium indicator Fluo-4. Cells were incubated with varying concentrations of lidocaine and examined for viability using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining. Live imaging of caspase-3/7 activation was performed after incubation with lidocaine. Results The mean KCl-induced calcium transient was greater in P7 neurons (p < 0.05), and lidocaine significantly inhibited KCl-induced calcium responses in both ages (p < 0.05). Frequency distribution histograms of KCl-evoked calcium increases were more heterogeneous in P7 than in adult neurons. With lidocaine, KCl-induced calcium transients in both ages became more homogeneous but remained different between the groups. Interestingly cell viability was decreased by lidocaine in a dose-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Lidocaine treatment also activated caspase-3/7 in a dose- and time-dependent manner similarly in both ages. Conclusions Despite physiological differences in P7 and adult DRG neurons, lidocaine cytotoxicity is similar in P7 and adult DRG neurons in vitro. Differences in lidocaine- and KCl-evoked calcium responses suggest the similarity in lidocaine cytotoxicity involves other actions in addition to lidocaine-evoked effects on cytosolic calcium responses. PMID:23851347

  12. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE ANDROGENIC REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN INTACT AND CASTRATE ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An abstract that provides understanding for a mathematical model by Barton and Anderson, for the dynamics of androgenic synthesis, transport, metabolism, and regulation of the rodent ventral prostate.

  13. Migration depths of adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss in relation to dissolved gas supersaturation in a regulated river system

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric L.; Clabough, Tami S.; Caudill, Christopher C.; keefer, matthew L.; Peery, Christopher A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-04-01

    Adult steelhead tagged with archival transmitters primarily migrated through a large river corridor at depths > 2 m, interspersed with frequent but short (< 5 min) periods closer to the surface. The recorded swimming depths and behaviours probably provided adequate hydrostatic compensation for the encountered supersaturated dissolved gas conditions and probably limited development of gas bubble disease (GBD). Results parallel those from a concurrent adult Chinook salmon study, except steelhead experienced greater seasonal variability and were more likely to have depth-uncompensated supersaturation exposure in some dam tailraces, perhaps explaining the higher incidence of GBD in this species.

  14. PGE2 maintains self-renewal of human adult stem cells via EP2-mediated autocrine signaling and its production is regulated by cell-to-cell contact

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Shin, Tae-Hoon; Kang, Insung; Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Jae-Jun; Kang, Hyun Kyoung; Seo, Yoojin; Lee, Seunghee; Yu, Kyung-Rok; Choi, Soon Won; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess unique immunomodulatory abilities. Many studies have elucidated the clinical efficacy and underlying mechanisms of MSCs in immune disorders. Although immunoregulatory factors, such as Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and their mechanisms of action on immune cells have been revealed, their effects on MSCs and regulation of their production by the culture environment are less clear. Therefore, we investigated the autocrine effect of PGE2 on human adult stem cells from cord blood or adipose tissue, and the regulation of its production by cell-to-cell contact, followed by the determination of its immunomodulatory properties. MSCs were treated with specific inhibitors to suppress PGE2 secretion, and proliferation was assessed. PGE2 exerted an autocrine regulatory function in MSCs by triggering E-Prostanoid (EP) 2 receptor. Inhibiting PGE2 production led to growth arrest, whereas addition of MSC-derived PGE2 restored proliferation. The level of PGE2 production from an equivalent number of MSCs was down-regulated via gap junctional intercellular communication. This cell contact-mediated decrease in PGE2 secretion down-regulated the suppressive effect of MSCs on immune cells. In conclusion, PGE2 produced by MSCs contributes to maintenance of self-renewal capacity through EP2 in an autocrine manner, and PGE2 secretion is down-regulated by cell-to-cell contact, attenuating its immunomodulatory potency. PMID:27230257

  15. Amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex are inversely coupled during regulation of negative affect and predict the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion among older adults.

    PubMed

    Urry, Heather L; van Reekum, Carien M; Johnstone, Tom; Kalin, Ned H; Thurow, Marchell E; Schaefer, Hillary S; Jackson, Cory A; Frye, Corrina J; Greischar, Lawrence L; Alexander, Andrew L; Davidson, Richard J

    2006-04-19

    Among younger adults, the ability to willfully regulate negative affect, enabling effective responses to stressful experiences, engages regions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the amygdala. Because regions of PFC and the amygdala are known to influence the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, here we test whether PFC and amygdala responses during emotion regulation predict the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol secretion. We also test whether PFC and amygdala regions are engaged during emotion regulation in older (62- to 64-year-old) rather than younger individuals. We measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging as participants regulated (increased or decreased) their affective responses or attended to negative picture stimuli. We also collected saliva samples for 1 week at home for cortisol assay. Consistent with previous work in younger samples, increasing negative affect resulted in ventral lateral, dorsolateral, and dorsomedial regions of PFC and amygdala activation. In contrast to previous work, decreasing negative affect did not produce the predicted robust pattern of higher PFC and lower amygdala activation. Individuals demonstrating the predicted effect (decrease < attend in the amygdala), however, exhibited higher signal in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) for the same contrast. Furthermore, participants displaying higher VMPFC and lower amygdala signal when decreasing compared with the attention control condition evidenced steeper, more normative declines in cortisol over the course of the day. Individual differences yielded the predicted link between brain function while reducing negative affect in the laboratory and diurnal regulation of endocrine activity in the home environment.

  16. Automaticity of exercise self-regulatory efficacy beliefs in adults with high and low experience in exercise self-regulation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jude; Cameron, Linda D

    2011-06-01

    Guided by social cognitive theory (SCT), we investigated whether exercise self-regulatory efficacy beliefs can be activated nonconsciously in individuals experienced and inexperienced in exercise self-regulation, and whether these beliefs are automatically associated with exercise self-regulation processes. The study used a 2 (Exercise Self-Regulation Experience Group) × 3 (Prime Condition) between-subjects design in which individuals experienced and inexperienced in exercise self-regulation were randomly assigned to receive subliminal, supraliminal, or no priming of exercise self-regulatory efficacy beliefs. Participants completed hypothetical diary entries, which were assessed for exercise self-regulatory efficacy and self-regulation expressions using content analyses with a SCT coding system and the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) text analysis program. For both exercise self-regulation experience groups, self-efficacy priming led to more expressions of low exercise self-regulatory efficacy and dysfunctional exercise self-regulation strategies compared with the control prime. For participants experienced in exercise self-regulation, supraliminal priming (vs. control priming) led to more expressions of high exercise self-regulatory efficacy and functional exercise self-regulation strategies. For the experienced groups, priming led to automaticity of exercise expressions compared with the control condition. For inexperienced participants in the subliminal prime condition, priming led to automaticity of self-regulatory efficacy beliefs and work-related goals compared with the control condition. Automatic activation of exercise self-regulatory efficacy and exercise self-regulation processes suggests that self-regulation of exercise behavior can occur nonconsciously.

  17. The Impact of Feedback on Self-Rated Driving Ability and Driving Self-Regulation among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Michelle L.; Crowe, Michael; Vance, David E.; Wadley, Virginia G.; Owsley, Cynthia; Ball, Karlene K.

    2011-01-01

    In 129 community-dwelling older adults, feedback regarding qualification for an insurance discount (based on a visual speed of processing test; Useful Field of View) was examined as a prospective predictor of change in self-reported driving ability, driving avoidance, and driving exposure over 3 months, along with physical, visual, health, and…

  18. Volunteer Client Adult Attachment, Memory for In-Session Emotion, and Mood Awareness: An Affect Regulation Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodhouse, Susan S.; Gelso, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined relations between volunteer client adult attachment and both (a) memory for negative affect occurring within the first session of therapy and (b) mood awareness (mood labeling and mood monitoring). Participants were 80 volunteer clients (students with a personal issue who volunteered to participate in the…

  19. The Osa-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex regulates stem cell commitment in the adult Drosophila intestine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiankun; Lin, Xinhua; Hou, Steven X

    2013-09-01

    The proportion of stem cells versus differentiated progeny is well balanced to maintain tissue homeostasis, which in turn depends on the balance of the different signaling pathways involved in stem cell self-renewal versus lineage-specific differentiation. In a screen for genes that regulate cell lineage determination in the posterior midgut, we identified that the Osa-containing SWI/SNF (Brahma) chromatin-remodeling complex regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis. Mutations in subunits of the Osa-containing complex result in intestinal stem cell (ISC) expansion as well as enteroendocrine (EE) cell reduction. We further demonstrated that Osa regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation into enterocytes by elaborating Notch signaling, and ISC commitment to differentiation into EE cells by regulating the expression of Asense, an EE cell fate determinant. Our data uncover a unique mechanism whereby the commitment of stem cells to discrete lineages is coordinately regulated by chromatin-remodeling factors.

  20. Association of Self-Efficacy and Self-Regulation with Nutrition and Exercise Behaviors in a Community Sample of Adults.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Carol; Weaver, Michael T; Hanna, Kathleen M; Newsome, Kathleen; Mogos, Mulubrhan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the association of self-efficacy and self-regulation with nutrition and exercise behaviors. The study used a cross-sectional design and included 108 participants (54 men, 54 women). Nutrition behaviors (fruit/vegetable consumption, dinner cooking, and restaurant eating) and exercise were measured using total days in last week a behavior was reported. Instruments measuring self-efficacy and self-regulation demonstrated excellent Cronbach's alphas (.93-.95). Path analysis indicated only fruit/vegetable consumption and exercise were associated with self-efficacy and self-regulation. Self-regulation showed direct association with fruit/vegetable consumption and exercise, but self-efficacy had direct association only with exercise. Self-efficacy and self-regulation should be strategically used to promote health behaviors. PMID:26529105

  1. Proteomic identification of non-erythrocytic alpha-spectrin-1 down-regulation in the pre-optic area of neonatally estradiol-17β treated female adult rats.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Vijayakumar; Rao, Addicam Jagannadha

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that sexually dimorphic brain regions, which are critical for reproductive physiology and behavior, are organized by steroid hormones during the first 2 weeks after birth in the rodents. In our recent observation, neonatal exposure to estradiol-17β (E2) in the female rat revealed increase in cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) level, sexually dimorphic nucleus (SDN)-pre-optic area (POA) size and down-regulation of synaptogenesis related genes in POA in the adult stage. In the present study, using the same animal model, the protein profile of control and neonatally E2-treated POA was compared by 1D-SDS-PAGE, and the protein that shows a change in abundance was identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. Results indicated that there was a single protein band, which was down-regulation in E2-treated POA and it was identified as spectrin alpha chain, non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTAN1). Consistently, the down-regulation of SPTAN1 expression was also confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. The SPTAN1 was identified as a cytoskeletal protein that is involved in stabilization of the plasma membrane and organizes intracellular organelles, and it has been implicated in cellular functions including DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. The evidence shows that any mutation in spectrins causes impairment of synaptogenesis and other neurological disorders. Also, protein-protein interaction analysis of SPTAN1 revealed a strong association with proteins such as kirrel, actinin, alpha 4 (ACTN4) and vinculin (VCL) which are implicated in sexual behavior, masculinization and defeminization. Our results indicate that SPTAN1 expression in the developing rat brain is sexually dimorphic, and we suggest that this gene may mediate E2-17β-induced masculinization and defeminization, and disrupted reproductive function in the adult stage. PMID:27166725

  2. Wnt Regulates Proliferation and Neurogenic Potential of Müller Glial Cells via a Lin28/let-7 miRNA-Dependent Pathway in Adult Mammalian Retinas.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai; Qiu, Suo; Tian, Lin; Snider, William D; Flannery, John G; Schaffer, David V; Chen, Bo

    2016-09-27

    In cold-blooded vertebrates such as zebrafish, Müller glial cells (MGs) readily proliferate to replenish lost retinal neurons. In mammals, however, MGs lack regenerative capability as they do not spontaneously re-enter the cell cycle unless the retina is injured. Here, we show that gene transfer of β-catenin in adult mouse retinas activates Wnt signaling and MG proliferation without retinal injury. Upstream of Wnt, deletion of GSK3β stabilizes β-catenin and activates MG proliferation. Downstream of Wnt, β-catenin binds to the Lin28 promoter and activates transcription. Deletion of Lin28 abolishes β-catenin-mediated effects on MG proliferation, and Lin28 gene transfer stimulates MG proliferation. We further demonstrate that let-7 miRNAs are critically involved in Wnt/Lin28-regulated MG proliferation. Intriguingly, a subset of cell-cycle-reactivated MGs express markers for amacrine cells. Together, these results reveal a key role of Wnt-Lin28-let7 miRNA signaling in regulating proliferation and neurogenic potential of MGs in the adult mammalian retina. PMID:27681429

  3. Questionnaires for outcome expectancy, self-regulation, and behavioral expectation for resistance training among young-old adults: development and preliminary validity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Savla, Jyoti; Davy, Brenda M; Kelleher, Sarah A; Marinik, Elaina L; Winett, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present research was to develop questionnaires to assess outcome expectancy for resistance training (RT), behavioral expectation in the context of perceived barriers to RT, and self-regulation strategies for RT among young-old adults (50-69 years). Measurement development included (a) item generation through elicitation interviews (N = 14) and open-ended questionnaires (N = 56), (b) expert feedback on a preliminary draft of the questionnaires (N = 4), and (c) a quantitative longitudinal study for item-reduction and psychometric analyses (N = 94). Elicitation procedures, expert feedback, and item reduction yielded four questionnaires with a total of 33 items. Positive outcome expectancy (α = .809), negative outcome expectancy (α = .729), behavioral expectation (α = .925), and self-regulation (α = .761) had-with one exception-moderate bivariate associations with two different indicators of self-reported RT behavior at one-month follow-up (r = .298 to .506). The present research provides preliminary support for newly developed questionnaires to facilitate understanding of the psychosocial determinants of RT among young-old adults.

  4. The circadian molecular clock regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis by controlling the timing of cell-cycle entry and exit.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Cannon, Pascale; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Yuen, Andrew; Kærn, Mads; Cheng, Hai-Ying M

    2013-11-27

    The subgranular zone (SGZ) of the adult hippocampus contains a pool of quiescent neural progenitor cells (QNPs) that are capable of entering the cell cycle and producing newborn neurons. The mechanisms that control the timing and extent of adult neurogenesis are not well understood. Here, we show that QNPs of the adult SGZ express molecular-clock components and proliferate in a rhythmic fashion. The clock proteins PERIOD2 and BMAL1 are critical for proper control of neurogenesis. The absence of PERIOD2 abolishes the gating of cell-cycle entrance of QNPs, whereas genetic ablation of bmal1 results in constitutively high levels of proliferation and delayed cell-cycle exit. We use mathematical model simulations to show that these observations may arise from clock-driven expression of a cell-cycle inhibitor that targets the cyclin D/Cdk4-6 complex. Our findings may have broad implications for the circadian clock in timing cell-cycle events of other stem cell populations throughout the body.

  5. Translational control of myelin basic protein expression by ERK2 MAP kinase regulates timely remyelination in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Michel, Kelly; Zhao, Tianna; Karl, Molly; Lewis, Katherine; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2015-05-20

    Successful myelin repair in the adult CNS requires the robust and timely production of myelin proteins to generate new myelin sheaths. The underlying regulatory mechanisms and complex molecular basis of myelin regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of ERK MAP kinase signaling in this process. Conditional deletion of Erk2 from cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage resulted in delayed remyelination following demyelinating injury to the adult mouse corpus callosum. The delayed repair occurred as a result of a specific deficit in the translation of the major myelin protein, MBP. In the absence of ERK2, activation of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its downstream target, ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP), was impaired at a critical time when premyelinating oligodendrocytes were transitioning to mature cells capable of generating new myelin sheaths. Thus, we have described an important link between the ERK MAP kinase signaling cascade and the translational machinery specifically in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results suggest an important role for ERK2 in the translational control of MBP, a myelin protein that appears critical for ensuring the timely generation of new myelin sheaths following demyelinating injury in the adult CNS.

  6. Direct Regulation of Aromatase B Expression by 17β-Estradiol and Dopamine D1 Receptor Agonist in Adult Radial Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lei; Esau, Crystal; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2016-01-01

    Aromatase cytochrome P450arom (cyp19) is the only enzyme that has the ability to convert androgens into estrogens. Estrogens, which are produced locally in the vertebrate brain play many fundamental roles in neuroendocrine functions, reproductive functions, socio-sexual behaviors, and neurogenesis. Radial glial cells (RGCs) are neuronal progenitor cells that are abundant in fish brains and are the exclusive site of aromatase B expression and neuroestrogen synthesis. Using a novel in vitro RGC culture preparation we studied the regulation of aromatase B by 17β-estradiol (E2) and dopamine (DA). We have established that activation of the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) by SKF 38393 up-regulates aromatase B gene expression most likely through the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). This up-regulation can be enhanced by low concentration of E2 (100 nM) through increasing the expression of D1R and the level of p-CREB protein. However, a high concentration of E2 (1 μM) and D1R agonist together failed to up-regulate aromatase B, potentially due to attenuation of esr2b expression and p-CREB levels. Furthermore, we found the up-regulation of aromatase B by E2 and DA both requires the involvement of esr1 and esr2a. The combined effect of E2 and DA agonist indicates that aromatase B in the adult teleost brain is under tight control by both steroids and neurotransmitters to precisely regulate neuroestrogen levels. PMID:26793050

  7. Flow management and fish density regulate salmonid recruitment and adult size in tailwaters across western North America.

    PubMed

    Dibble, Kimberly L; Yackulic, Charles B; Kennedy, Theodore A; Budy, Phaedra

    2015-12-01

    Rainbow and brown trout have been intentionally introduced into tailwaters downriver of dams globally and provide billions of dollars in economic benefits. At the same time, recruitment and maximum length of trout populations in tailwaters often fluctuate erratically, which negatively affects the value of fisheries. Large recruitment events may increase dispersal downriver where other fish species may be a priority (e.g., endangered species). There is an urgent need to understand the drivers of trout population dynamics in tailwaters, in particular the role of flow management. Here, we evaluate how flow, fish density, and other physical factors of the river influence recruitment and mean adult length in tailwaters across western North America, using data from 29 dams spanning 1-19 years. Rainbow trout recruitment was negatively correlated with high annual, summer, and spring flow and dam latitude, and positively correlated with high winter flow, subadult brown trout catch, and reservoir storage capacity. Brown trout recruitment was negatively correlated with high water velocity and daily fluctuations in flow (i.e., hydropeaking) and positively correlated with adult rainbow trout catch. Among these many drivers, rainbow trout recruitment was primarily correlated with high winter flow combined with low spring flow, whereas brown trout recruitment was most related to high water velocity. The mean lengths of adult rainbow and brown trout were influenced by similar flow and catch metrics. Length in both species was positively correlated with high annual flow but declined in tailwaters with high daily fluctuations in flow, high catch rates of conspecifics, and when large cohorts recruited to adult size. Whereas brown trout did not respond to the proportion of water allocated between seasons, rainbow trout length increased in rivers that released more water during winter than in spring. Rainbow trout length was primarily related to high catch rates of conspecifics

  8. Spatiotemporally Regulated Ablation of Klf4 in Adult Mouse Corneal Epithelial Cells Results in Altered Epithelial Cell Identity and Disrupted Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Delp, Emili E.; Swamynathan, Sudha; Kao, Winston W.; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In previous studies, conditional disruption of Klf4 in the developing mouse ocular surface from embryonic day 10 resulted in corneal epithelial fragility, stromal edema, and loss of conjunctival goblet cells, revealing the importance of Klf4 in ocular surface maturation. Here, we use spatiotemporally regulated ablation of Klf4 to investigate its functions in maintenance of adult corneal epithelial homeostasis. Methods. Expression of Cre was induced in ternary transgenic (Klf4LoxP/LoxP/Krt12rtTA/rtTA/Tet-O-Cre) mouse corneal epithelium by doxycycline administered through intraperitoneal injections and drinking water, to generate corneal epithelium–specific deletion of Klf4 (Klf4Δ/ΔCE). Corneal epithelial barrier function was tested by fluorescein staining. Expression of selected Klf4-target genes was determined by quantitative PCR (QPCR), immunoblotting, and immunofluorescent staining. Results. Klf4 was efficiently ablated within 5 days of doxycycline administration in adult Klf4Δ/ΔCE corneal epithelium. The Klf4Δ/ΔCE corneal epithelial barrier function was disrupted, and the basal cells were swollen and rounded after 15 days of doxycycline treatment. Increased numbers of cell layers and Ki67-positive proliferating cells suggested deregulated Klf4Δ/ΔCE corneal epithelial homeostasis. Expression of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin, desmosomal Dsg and Dsp, basement membrane laminin-332, and corneal epithelial–specific keratin-12 was decreased, while that of matrix metalloproteinase Mmp9 and noncorneal keratin-17 increased, suggesting altered Klf4Δ/ΔCE corneal epithelial cell identity. Conclusions. Ablation of Klf4 in the adult mouse corneas resulted in the absence of characteristic corneal epithelial cell differentiation, disrupted barrier function, and squamous metaplasia, revealing that Klf4 is essential for maintenance of the adult corneal epithelial cell identity and homeostasis. PMID:26047041

  9. Effects of Estrogen Receptor Agonists on Regulation of the Inflammatory Response in Astrocytes from Young Adult and Middle-Aged Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Danielle K; Johnson, Adam B.; Stohlgren, Shannon; Simpson, Ashley; Sohrabji, Farida

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen has been shown to attenuate the inflammatory response following injury or lipopolysaccharide treatment in several organ systems. Estrogen's actions are transduced through two estrogen receptor sub-types, estrogen receptor (ER) -alpha and estrogen receptor-beta, whose actions may be overlapping or independent of each other. The present study examined the effects of ERα- and ERβ-specific ligands in regulating the inflammatory response in primary astrocyte cultures. Pre-treatment with 17β-estradiol (ERα/ERβ agonist), HPTE (ERα agonist/ERβ antagonist) and DPN (ERβ agonist) led to attenuation of IL-1β, TNFα, and MMP-9 in astrocyte media derived from young adult (3-4 mos.) and reproductive senescent female (9-11 mos., acyclic) astrocyte cultures, while pretreatment with PPT (ERα agonist) attenuated IL-1β (but not TNFα or MMP-9) in both young and senescent-derived astrocyte cultures. Our previous work determined that 17β-estradiol was unable to attenuate the LPS-induced increase in IL-1β in olfactory bulb primary microglial cultures derived from either young adult or reproductive senescent females. In young adult-derived microglial cultures, the LPS-induced increase in IL-1β was not attenuated by pre-treatment with 17β-estradiol, PPT or HPTE. Interestingly, the ERβ agonist, DPN significantly decreased IL-1β following LPS treatment in young adult-derived microglia. Thus while both microglia and astrocytes synthesize and release inflammatory mediators, the present data shows that compounds which bind ERβ are more effective in attenuating proinflammatory cytokines in both cell types and may therefore be a more effective agent for future therapeutic use. PMID:18328572

  10. Monodehydroascorbate reductase gene, regulated by the wheat PN-2013 miRNA, contributes to adult wheat plant resistance to stripe rust through ROS metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hao; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Qiong; Fu, Yanping; Feng, Chuanxin; Wang, Bing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2014-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive wheat diseases worldwide. Varieties with adult plant resistance (APR) maintain effective and durable disease resistance. APR to stripe rust in wheat cultivar XZ9104 (XZ) is associated with extensive hypersensitive cell death and production of reactive oxygen species in the host. MDHAR is an important gene in the AsA-GSH cycle, and it plays an important role in maintaining the reduced pool of AsA scavenging hydrogen peroxide. microRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to engage in post-transcriptional regulation by degrading target mRNAs or repressing gene translation in plants responding to abiotic/biotic stresses. Previously, two novel miRNAs (1136-P3 and PN-2013) were isolated in wheat and the target gene of them was determined using degradome sequencing technology. In this study, the target gene was isolated and characterized as TaMDHAR, a monodehydroascorbate reductase gene. We first demonstrated that the target gene could be cleaved by these two miRNAs in tobacco leaves experimentally. However, TaMDHAR was regulated by PN-2013, not 1136-P3, in wheat-Pst adult incompatible interaction according to the expression patterns. The TaMDHAR knockdown resulted in improved wheat resistance to Pst at the seedling stage, with no influence on 1136-P3 and PN-2013 expression. The TaMDHAR knockdown resulted in a much greater H2O2 accumulation and lower APX and CAT activities together with higher expression in several PR genes. We deduced that TaMDHAR could contribute to the APR of XZ through ROS metabolism as regulated by the AsA-GSH cycle.

  11. Tis21 is required for adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and for olfactory behavior regulating cyclins, BMP4, Hes1/5 and Ids.

    PubMed

    Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Saraulli, Daniele; Micheli, Laura; Cannas, Sara; D'Alessandro, Francesca; Scardigli, Raffaella; Leonardi, Luca; Cinà, Irene; Costanzi, Marco; Mattera, Andrea; Cestari, Vincenzo; Tirone, Felice

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and the Notch pathway regulate quiescence and self-renewal of stem cells of the subventricular zone (SVZ), an adult neurogenic niche. Here we analyze the role at the intersection of these pathways of Tis21 (Btg2/PC3), a gene regulating proliferation and differentiation of adult SVZ stem and progenitor cells. In Tis21-null SVZ and cultured neurospheres, we observed a strong decrease in the expression of BMP4 and its effectors Smad1/8, while the Notch anti-neural mediators Hes1/5 and the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) inhibitors Id1-3 increased. Consistently, expression of the proneural bHLH gene NeuroD1 decreased. Moreover, cyclins D1/2, A2, and E were strongly up-regulated. Thus, in the SVZ Tis21 activates the BMP pathway and inhibits the Notch pathway and the cell cycle. Correspondingly, the Tis21-null SVZ stem cells greatly increased; nonetheless, the proliferating neuroblasts diminished, whereas the post-mitotic neuroblasts paradoxically accumulated in SVZ, failing to migrate along the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. The ability, however, of neuroblasts to migrate from SVZ explants was not affected, suggesting that Tis21-null neuroblasts do not migrate to the olfactory bulb because of a defect in terminal differentiation. Notably, BMP4 addition or Id3 silencing rescued the defective differentiation observed in Tis21-null neurospheres, indicating that they mediate the Tis21 pro-differentiative action. The reduced number of granule neurons in the Tis21-null olfactory bulb led to a defect in olfactory detection threshold, without effect on olfactory memory, also suggesting that within olfactory circuits new granule neurons play a primary role in odor sensitivity rather than in memory.

  12. Linking an Anxiety-Related Personality Trait to Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Well-Defined Healthy Adults: Harm Avoidance and Resting Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Lien-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Wen; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Kuo, Terry B. J.; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anxiety trait, anxiety and depression states have all been reported to increase risks for cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly through altering cardiac autonomic regulation. Our aim was to investigate whether the relationship between harm avoidance (HA, an anxiety-related personality trait) and cardiac autonomic regulation is independent of anxiety and depression states in healthy adults. Methods We recruited 535 physically and mentally healthy volunteers. Participants completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Tri-dimensional Personality Questionnaire. Participants were divided into high or low HA groups as discriminated by the quartile value. Cardiac autonomic function was evaluated by measuring heart rate variability (HRV). We obtained the time and frequency-domain indices of HRV including variance (total HRV), the low-frequency power (LF; 0.05–0.15 Hz), which may reflect baroreflex function, the high-frequency power (HF; 0.15–0.40 Hz), which reflects cardiac parasympathetic activity, as well as the LF/HF ratio. Results The BDI and HA scores showed associations with HRV parameters. After adjustment for the BDI scores and other control variables, HA is still associated with reduced variance, LF and HF power. Compared with the participants with low HA, those with high HA displayed significant reductions in variance, LF and HF power and a significant increase in their LF/HF ratio. Conclusion This study highlights the independent role of HA in contributing to decreased autonomic cardiac regulation in healthy adults and provides a potential underlying mechanism for anxiety trait to confer increased risk for CVD. PMID:27482240

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Scheving, Lawrence A; Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A; Wang, Rebecca F; Stevenson, Mary C; Threadgill, David W; Russell, William E

    2014-03-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies.

  14. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Scheving, Lawrence A; Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A; Wang, Rebecca F; Stevenson, Mary C; Threadgill, David W; Russell, William E

    2014-03-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays a role in the regulation of liver and plasma lipid levels in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiuqi; Garcia, Oscar A.; Wang, Rebecca F.; Stevenson, Mary C.; Threadgill, David W.; Russell, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Dsk5 mice have a gain of function in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), caused by a point mutation in the kinase domain. We analyzed the effect of this mutation on liver size, histology, and composition. We found that the livers of 12-wk-old male Dsk5 heterozygotes (+/Dsk5) were 62% heavier compared with those of wild-type controls (+/+). The livers of the +/Dsk5 mice compared with +/+ mice had larger hepatocytes with prominent, polyploid nuclei and showed modestly increased cell proliferation indices in both hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells. An analysis of total protein, DNA, and RNA (expressed relative to liver weight) revealed no differences between the mutant and wild-type mice. However, the livers of the +/Dsk5 mice had more cholesterol but less phospholipid and fatty acid. Circulating cholesterol levels were twice as high in adult male +/Dsk5 mice but not in postweaned young male or female mice. The elevated total plasma cholesterol resulted mainly from an increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The +/Dsk5 adult mouse liver expressed markedly reduced protein levels of LDL receptor, no change in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, and a markedly increased fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase. Increased expression of transcription factors associated with enhanced cholesterol synthesis was also observed. Together, these findings suggest that the EGFR may play a regulatory role in hepatocyte proliferation and lipid metabolism in adult male mice, explaining why elevated levels of EGF or EGF-like peptides have been positively correlated to increased cholesterol levels in human studies. PMID:24407590

  16. Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NFκB signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-β (Aβ) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse Aβ plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NFκB, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders. PMID:21955814

  17. Age Shall Not Weary Us: Deleterious Effects of Self-Regulation Depletion Are Specific to Younger Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Theresa; Neshat-Doost, Hamid Taher; Golden, Ann-Marie; Horn, Elizabeth; Hagger, Martin; Dalgleish, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation depletion (SRD), or ego-depletion, refers to decrements in self-regulation performance immediately following a different self-regulation-demanding activity. There are now over a hundred studies reporting SRD across a broad range of tasks and conditions. However, most studies have used young student samples. Because prefrontal brain regions thought to subserve self-regulation do not fully mature until 25 years of age, it is possible that SRD effects are confined to younger populations and are attenuated or disappear in older samples. We investigated this using the Stroop color task as an SRD induction and an autobiographical memory task as the outcome measure. We found that younger participants (<25 years) were susceptible to depletion effects, but found no support for such effects in an older group (40–65 years). This suggests that the widely-reported phenomenon of SRD has important developmental boundary conditions casting doubt on claims that it represents a general feature of human cognition. PMID:22039469

  18. Gap Junctions Contribute to the Regulation of Walking-Like Activity in the Adult Mudpuppy (Necturus Maculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, Igor; Fox, Lyle; Shen, Jun; Han, Yingchun; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Although gap junctions are widely expressed in the developing central nervous system, the role of electrical coupling of neurons and glial cells via gap junctions in the spinal cord in adults is largely unknown. We investigated whether gap junctions are expressed in the mature spinal cord of the mudpuppy and tested the effects of applying gap junction blocker on the walking-like activity induced by NMDA or glutamate in an in vitro mudpuppy preparation. We found that glial and neural cells in the mudpuppy spinal cord expressed different types of connexins that include connexin 32 (Cx32), connexin 36 (Cx36), connexin 37 (Cx37), and connexin 43 (Cx43). Application of a battery of gap junction blockers from three different structural classes (carbenexolone, flufenamic acid, and long chain alcohols) substantially and consistently altered the locomotor-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, these blockers did not significantly change the amplitude of the dorsal root reflex, indicating that gap junction blockers did not inhibit neuronal excitability nonselectively in the spinal cord. Taken together, these results suggest that gap junctions play a significant modulatory role in the spinal neural networks responsible for the generation of walking-like activity in the adult mudpuppy. PMID:27023006

  19. Lmx1a and Lmx1b regulate mitochondrial functions and survival of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Doucet-Beaupré, Hélène; Gilbert, Catherine; Profes, Marcos Schaan; Chabrat, Audrey; Pacelli, Consiglia; Giguère, Nicolas; Rioux, Véronique; Charest, Julien; Deng, Qiaolin; Laguna, Ariadna; Ericson, Johan; Perlmann, Thomas; Ang, Siew-Lan; Cicchetti, Francesca; Parent, Martin; Trudeau, Louis-Eric; Lévesque, Martin

    2016-07-26

    The LIM-homeodomain transcription factors Lmx1a and Lmx1b play critical roles during the development of midbrain dopaminergic progenitors, but their functions in the adult brain remain poorly understood. We show here that sustained expression of Lmx1a and Lmx1b is required for the survival of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Strikingly, inactivation of Lmx1a and Lmx1b recreates cellular features observed in Parkinson's disease. We found that Lmx1a/b control the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial functions, and their ablation results in impaired respiratory chain activity, increased oxidative stress, and mitochondrial DNA damage. Lmx1a/b deficiency caused axonal pathology characterized by α-synuclein(+) inclusions, followed by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. These results reveal the key role of these transcription factors beyond the early developmental stages and provide mechanistic links between mitochondrial dysfunctions, α-synuclein aggregation, and the survival of dopaminergic neurons. PMID:27407143

  20. Gap Junctions Contribute to the Regulation of Walking-Like Activity in the Adult Mudpuppy (Necturus Maculatus).

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Igor; Fox, Lyle; Shen, Jun; Han, Yingchun; Cheng, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Although gap junctions are widely expressed in the developing central nervous system, the role of electrical coupling of neurons and glial cells via gap junctions in the spinal cord in adults is largely unknown. We investigated whether gap junctions are expressed in the mature spinal cord of the mudpuppy and tested the effects of applying gap junction blocker on the walking-like activity induced by NMDA or glutamate in an in vitro mudpuppy preparation. We found that glial and neural cells in the mudpuppy spinal cord expressed different types of connexins that include connexin 32 (Cx32), connexin 36 (Cx36), connexin 37 (Cx37), and connexin 43 (Cx43). Application of a battery of gap junction blockers from three different structural classes (carbenexolone, flufenamic acid, and long chain alcohols) substantially and consistently altered the locomotor-like activity in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, these blockers did not significantly change the amplitude of the dorsal root reflex, indicating that gap junction blockers did not inhibit neuronal excitability nonselectively in the spinal cord. Taken together, these results suggest that gap junctions play a significant modulatory role in the spinal neural networks responsible for the generation of walking-like activity in the adult mudpuppy. PMID:27023006

  1. Comparative insights into the regulation of inflammation: Levels and predictors of interleukin 6 and interleukin 10 in young adults in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Tallman, Paula S.; Adair, Linda S.; Judith, Borja; Kuzawa, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a central part of innate immunity, but its role in anti-pathogen defenses has been overshadowed by recent interest in the contribution of inflammation to a wide range of chronic degenerative diseases. Current research on chronic inflammation is conducted primarily in affluent populations with low levels of infectious disease; comparative research in different ecological settings is needed to advance understandings of the causes and consequences of variation in the regulation of inflammation. This paper investigates the levels and predictors of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-10 (IL-10)–two cytokines important to the regulation of inflammation—in a large, population-based study in the Philippines. Concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10 were determined in N=1569 healthy young adults (20-22 yrs) in Metro Cebu, Philippines. IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were positively correlated, and body mass index and symptoms of infectious disease were both associated with higher concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10. Median concentrations of IL-6 (1.0 pg/mL) and IL-10 (7.56 pg/mL) were substantially lower and higher, respectively, than levels reported for other populations based on a systematic review of prior research. This study contributes to a growing body of research in human ecological immunology, and suggests that there may be substantial population differences in the regulation of inflammation that has implications for the association between inflammation and disease. PMID:21994014

  2. Role of the neuronal histaminergic system in the regulation of somatotropic function: comparison between the neonatal and the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Grilli, R; Sibilia, V; Torsello, A; Pagani, F; Guidi, M; Luoni, M; Netti, C; Müller, E E

    1996-11-01

    To study possible age-related differences in the role of neuronal histaminergic pathways in the control of GH secretion, the effects of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH), an irreversible inhibitor of histamine (HA) synthesis, were examined on basal and opioid-induced GH release in neonatal and adult rats. The mechanisms involved in such effects were evaluated by measuring pituitary GH mRNA levels and hypothalamic levels of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SRIF) mRNAs. Daily injection of alpha-FMH (20 mg/kg, s.c.) in pups of either sex, from birth until 10 days of age, caused a significant increase in baseline plasma GH and potentiated the GH response to the [Met5]-enkephalin analog FK 33-824 (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administered 3 h after the last alpha-FMH injection. GH and SRIF mRNA levels were significantly higher in alpha-FMH-treated pups than in controls, whereas no difference was observed in GHRH mRNA levels. In young adult male rats, acute administration of alpha-FMH (100 mg/kg, s.c., 3 h before) did not change significantly basal GH levels but potentiated FK 33-824 (0.3 mg/kg, intracarotid)-induced stimulation of GH secretion. Repeated administration of alpha-FMH (200 micrograms/rat, i.c.v., for 3 days) failed to modify basal and FK 33-824-induced GH secretion, caused a significant reduction in hypothalamic GHRH mRNA levels and left SRIF and GH mRNAs unchanged. These findings indicate that HA exerts an inhibitory effect on GH secretion in both neonatal and adult rats. The different effects of short-term HA depletion on hypothalamic and pituitary indices of somatotropic function observed at the two age periods may be ascribed to the immaturity of the HA system in early postnatal life and to a different functional role of GH-regulatory factors during ontogeny.

  3. Chronic MDMA induces neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adolescent and young adult rats: Down-regulation of apoptotic markers.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrerizo, Rubén; García-Fuster, M Julia

    2015-07-01

    While hippocampus is a brain region particularly susceptible to the effects of MDMA, the cellular and molecular changes induced by MDMA are still to be fully elucidated, being the dosage regimen, the species and the developmental stage under study great variables. This study compared the effects of one and four days of MDMA administration following a binge paradigm (3×5 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h) on inducing hippocampal neurochemical changes in adolescent (PND 37) and young adult (PND 58) rats. The results showed that chronic MDMA caused hippocampal protein deficits in adolescent and young adult rats at different levels: (1) impaired serotonergic (5-HT2A and 5-HT2C post-synaptic receptors) and GABAergic (GAD2 enzyme) signaling, and (2) decreased structural cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). Interestingly, these effects were not accompanied by an increase in apoptotic markers. In fact, chronic MDMA inhibited proteins of the apoptotic pathway (i.e., pro-apoptotic FADD, Bax and cytochrome c) leading to an inhibition of cell death markers (i.e., p-JNK1/2, cleavage of PARP-1) and suggesting regulatory mechanisms in response to the neurochemical changes caused by the drug. The data, together with the observed lack of GFAP activation, support the view that chronic MDMA effects, regardless of the rat developmental age, extends beyond neurotransmitter systems to impair other hippocampal structural cell markers. Interestingly, inhibitory changes in proteins from the apoptotic pathway might be taking place to overcome the protein deficits caused by MDMA.

  4. Prenatal Stress Down-Regulates Reelin Expression by Methylation of Its Promoter and Induces Adult Behavioral Impairments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-García, Ismael; Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Montiel, Juan F.; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela F.; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Utreras, Elías; Montecino, Martín; González-Billault, Christian; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal stress causes predisposition to cognitive and emotional disturbances and is a risk factor towards the development of neuropsychiatric conditions like depression, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. The extracellular protein Reelin, expressed by Cajal-Retzius cells during cortical development, plays critical roles on cortical lamination and synaptic maturation, and its deregulation has been associated with maladaptive conditions. In the present study, we address the effect of prenatal restraint stress (PNS) upon Reelin expression and signaling in pregnant rats during the last 10 days of pregnancy. Animals from one group, including control and PNS exposed fetuses, were sacrificed and analyzed using immunohistochemical, biochemical, cell biology and molecular biology approaches. We scored changes in the expression of Reelin, its signaling pathway and in the methylation of its promoter. A second group included control and PNS exposed animals maintained until young adulthood for behavioral studies. Using the optical dissector, we show decreased numbers of Reelin-positive neurons in cortical layer I of PNS exposed animals. In addition, neurons from PNS exposed animals display decreased Reelin expression that is paralleled by changes in components of the Reelin-signaling cascade, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, PNS induced changes in the DNA methylation levels of the Reelin promoter in culture and in histological samples. PNS adult rats display excessive spontaneous locomotor activity, high anxiety levels and problems of learning and memory consolidation. No significant visuo-spatial memory impairment was detected on the Morris water maze. These results highlight the effects of prenatal stress on the Cajal-Retzius neuronal population, and the persistence of behavioral consequences using this treatment in adults, thereby supporting a relevant role of PNS in the genesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. We also propose an in vitro model that can yield new

  5. Chronic MDMA induces neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adolescent and young adult rats: Down-regulation of apoptotic markers.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrerizo, Rubén; García-Fuster, M Julia

    2015-07-01

    While hippocampus is a brain region particularly susceptible to the effects of MDMA, the cellular and molecular changes induced by MDMA are still to be fully elucidated, being the dosage regimen, the species and the developmental stage under study great variables. This study compared the effects of one and four days of MDMA administration following a binge paradigm (3×5 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h) on inducing hippocampal neurochemical changes in adolescent (PND 37) and young adult (PND 58) rats. The results showed that chronic MDMA caused hippocampal protein deficits in adolescent and young adult rats at different levels: (1) impaired serotonergic (5-HT2A and 5-HT2C post-synaptic receptors) and GABAergic (GAD2 enzyme) signaling, and (2) decreased structural cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). Interestingly, these effects were not accompanied by an increase in apoptotic markers. In fact, chronic MDMA inhibited proteins of the apoptotic pathway (i.e., pro-apoptotic FADD, Bax and cytochrome c) leading to an inhibition of cell death markers (i.e., p-JNK1/2, cleavage of PARP-1) and suggesting regulatory mechanisms in response to the neurochemical changes caused by the drug. The data, together with the observed lack of GFAP activation, support the view that chronic MDMA effects, regardless of the rat developmental age, extends beyond neurotransmitter systems to impair other hippocampal structural cell markers. Interestingly, inhibitory changes in proteins from the apoptotic pathway might be taking place to overcome the protein deficits caused by MDMA. PMID:26068050

  6. Prenatal stress down-regulates Reelin expression by methylation of its promoter and induces adult behavioral impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Palacios-García, Ismael; Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Montiel, Juan F; Díaz-Véliz, Gabriela F; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Utreras, Elías; Montecino, Martín; González-Billault, Christian; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal stress causes predisposition to cognitive and emotional disturbances and is a risk factor towards the development of neuropsychiatric conditions like depression, bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. The extracellular protein Reelin, expressed by Cajal-Retzius cells during cortical development, plays critical roles on cortical lamination and synaptic maturation, and its deregulation has been associated with maladaptive conditions. In the present study, we address the effect of prenatal restraint stress (PNS) upon Reelin expression and signaling in pregnant rats during the last 10 days of pregnancy. Animals from one group, including control and PNS exposed fetuses, were sacrificed and analyzed using immunohistochemical, biochemical, cell biology and molecular biology approaches. We scored changes in the expression of Reelin, its signaling pathway and in the methylation of its promoter. A second group included control and PNS exposed animals maintained until young adulthood for behavioral studies. Using the optical dissector, we show decreased numbers of Reelin-positive neurons in cortical layer I of PNS exposed animals. In addition, neurons from PNS exposed animals display decreased Reelin expression that is paralleled by changes in components of the Reelin-signaling cascade, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, PNS induced changes in the DNA methylation levels of the Reelin promoter in culture and in histological samples. PNS adult rats display excessive spontaneous locomotor activity, high anxiety levels and problems of learning and memory consolidation. No significant visuo-spatial memory impairment was detected on the Morris water maze. These results highlight the effects of prenatal stress on the Cajal-Retzius neuronal population, and the persistence of behavioral consequences using this treatment in adults, thereby supporting a relevant role of PNS in the genesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. We also propose an in vitro model that can yield new

  7. Ecdysone Receptor-based Singular Gene Switches for Regulated Transgene Expression in Cells and Adult Rodent Tissues.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoghyun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Won, Minho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Ju, Sung-Kyu; Kang, Kidong; Bae, Young-Ki; Hur, Gang Min; Ro, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    Controlled gene expression is an indispensable technique in biomedical research. Here, we report a convenient, straightforward, and reliable way to induce expression of a gene of interest with negligible background expression compared to the most widely used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated system. Exploiting a Drosophila ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene regulatory system, we generated nonviral and adenoviral singular vectors designated as pEUI(+) and pENTR-EUI, respectively, which contain all the required elements to guarantee regulated transgene expression (GAL4-miniVP16-EcR, termed GvEcR hereafter, and 10 tandem repeats of an upstream activation sequence promoter followed by a multiple cloning site). Through the transient and stable transfection of mammalian cell lines with reporter genes, we validated that tebufenozide, an ecdysone agonist, reversibly induced gene expression, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with negligible background expression. In addition, we created an adenovirus derived from the pENTR-EUI vector that readily infected not only cultured cells but also rodent tissues and was sensitive to tebufenozide treatment for regulated transgene expression. These results suggest that EcR-based singular gene regulatory switches would be convenient tools for the induction of gene expression in cells and tissues in a tightly controlled fashion. PMID:27673563

  8. Ecdysone Receptor-based Singular Gene Switches for Regulated Transgene Expression in Cells and Adult Rodent Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seoghyun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Choi, Dae-Kyoung; Won, Minho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Ju, Sung-Kyu; Kang, Kidong; Bae, Young-Ki; Hur, Gang Min; Ro, Hyunju

    2016-01-01

    Controlled gene expression is an indispensable technique in biomedical research. Here, we report a convenient, straightforward, and reliable way to induce expression of a gene of interest with negligible background expression compared to the most widely used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated system. Exploiting a Drosophila ecdysone receptor (EcR)-based gene regulatory system, we generated nonviral and adenoviral singular vectors designated as pEUI(+) and pENTR-EUI, respectively, which contain all the required elements to guarantee regulated transgene expression (GAL4-miniVP16-EcR, termed GvEcR hereafter, and 10 tandem repeats of an upstream activation sequence promoter followed by a multiple cloning site). Through the transient and stable transfection of mammalian cell lines with reporter genes, we validated that tebufenozide, an ecdysone agonist, reversibly induced gene expression, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with negligible background expression. In addition, we created an adenovirus derived from the pENTR-EUI vector that readily infected not only cultured cells but also rodent tissues and was sensitive to tebufenozide treatment for regulated transgene expression. These results suggest that EcR-based singular gene regulatory switches would be convenient tools for the induction of gene expression in cells and tissues in a tightly controlled fashion. PMID:27673563

  9. Effects of exogenous plant growth regulator abscisic acid-induced resistance in rice on the expression of vitellogenin mRNA in Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) adult females.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Lan; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Yang, Xia; Wong, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recent study showed that exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) acts as a regulator of plant resistance. This study investigated average injury scale and callose contents of rice, and vitellogenin (Nlvg) mRNA expression in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) adult females after third instar nymphs fed on exogenous ABA-treated susceptible [Taichung Native one (TN1)] and moderately resistant (IR42) rice cultivars. The results showed that exogenous ABA significantly decreased average injury scale of rice and Nlvg mRNA expression in N. lugens adults compared with the control (without ABA spraying). Nlvg mRNA expression in N. lugens adults decreased significantly after third instar nymphs fed on ABA-treated (5, 20, and 40 mg/liter) TN1 for 1 and 2 d, and for IR42, after fed on ABA-treated (20 and 40 mg/liter) rice plants for 1 d and after fed on ABA-treated (5, 20, and 40 mg/liter) rice for 2 d decreased significantly. The callose contents showed no significant change for TN1, while for IR42, significantly increased in roots and sheathes after N. lugens infestation under ABA treatments (20 and 40 mg/liter) compared with the control. The decrease of Nlvg mRNA expression may be partially attributed to the increase of callose content of plants. The results provide a profile for concerning the effects of ABA-induced rice plants' defenses on phloem-feeding insects.

  10. Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulation of p53 in Brown Fat at Adult But Not Embryonic Stages Regulates Thermogenesis and Body Weight in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Massadi, Omar; Porteiro, Begoña; Kuhlow, Doreen; Köhler, Markus; Gonzalez-Rellan, María J; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Quiñones, Mar; Senra, Ana; Alvarez, Clara V; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Schulz, Tim J; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor that plays multiple biological roles, including the capacity to modulate metabolism at different levels. However, its metabolic role in brown adipose tissue (BAT) remains largely unknown. Herein we sought to investigate the physiological role of endogenous p53 in BAT and its implication on BAT thermogenic activity and energy balance. To this end, we generated and characterized global p53-null mice and mice lacking p53 specifically in BAT. Additionally we performed gain-and-loss-of-function experiments in the BAT of adult mice using virogenetic and pharmacological approaches. BAT was collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, thermography, real-time PCR, and Western blot. p53-deficient mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure and BAT activity. However, the deletion of p53 in BAT using a Myf5-Cre driven p53 knockout did not show any changes in body weight or the expression of thermogenic markers. The acute inhibition of p53 in the BAT of adult mice slightly increased body weight and inhibited BAT thermogenesis, whereas its overexpression in the BAT of diet-induced obese mice reduced body weight and increased thermogenesis. On the other hand, pharmacological activation of p53 improves body weight gain due to increased BAT thermogenesis by sympathetic nervous system in obese adult wild-type mice but not in p53(-/-) animals. These results reveal that p53 regulates BAT metabolism by coordinating body weight and thermogenesis, but these metabolic actions are tissue specific and also dependent on the developmental stage.

  11. Pharmacological and Genetic Manipulation of p53 in Brown Fat at Adult But Not Embryonic Stages Regulates Thermogenesis and Body Weight in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Massadi, Omar; Porteiro, Begoña; Kuhlow, Doreen; Köhler, Markus; Gonzalez-Rellan, María J; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Díaz-Rodríguez, Esther; Quiñones, Mar; Senra, Ana; Alvarez, Clara V; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Schulz, Tim J; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-07-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor that plays multiple biological roles, including the capacity to modulate metabolism at different levels. However, its metabolic role in brown adipose tissue (BAT) remains largely unknown. Herein we sought to investigate the physiological role of endogenous p53 in BAT and its implication on BAT thermogenic activity and energy balance. To this end, we generated and characterized global p53-null mice and mice lacking p53 specifically in BAT. Additionally we performed gain-and-loss-of-function experiments in the BAT of adult mice using virogenetic and pharmacological approaches. BAT was collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, thermography, real-time PCR, and Western blot. p53-deficient mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure and BAT activity. However, the deletion of p53 in BAT using a Myf5-Cre driven p53 knockout did not show any changes in body weight or the expression of thermogenic markers. The acute inhibition of p53 in the BAT of adult mice slightly increased body weight and inhibited BAT thermogenesis, whereas its overexpression in the BAT of diet-induced obese mice reduced body weight and increased thermogenesis. On the other hand, pharmacological activation of p53 improves body weight gain due to increased BAT thermogenesis by sympathetic nervous system in obese adult wild-type mice but not in p53(-/-) animals. These results reveal that p53 regulates BAT metabolism by coordinating body weight and thermogenesis, but these metabolic actions are tissue specific and also dependent on the developmental stage. PMID:27183316

  12. Induction of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes: regulation by vitamin A

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    In order to develop a cellular model for studying mechanisms of enzyme induction and the effects of this induction on xenobiotic metabolism and cytotoxicity, the induction of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) metabolism by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was investigated in primary hepatocyte cultures prepared from adult male rats and maintained in chemically-defined medium containing hormones. A derepression of induction was observed during the first 3 days in culture. Addition of 0.8 to 2.0 ..mu..g/ml of retinol acetate (RA) prevented about half of the derepression of induction occurring between 36 and 60 h in culture. Horse serum (10%) also blocked up to half of the observed derepression. Serum, however, also led to a 40% reduction in the partitioning of (/sup 3/H)TCDD from the medium into the hepatocytes. The derepresion of MFO induction in primary adult hepatocyte cultures may occur partly as a result of a deficiency of retinol. RA is hypothesized to slow the time course of induction by reducing the rate of protein turnover. RA may also partially block the shift in the dose-response curve for induction by TCDD by maintaining the normal metabolic regulation of the cytosolic receptor for TCDD. Addition of a physiological level of RA to the culture medium may therefore help to maintain the hepatocytes at a level of genetic expression more nearly representative of the intact liver.

  13. The alpha1 isoform of the Na+/K+ ATPase is up-regulated in dedifferentiated progenitor cells that mediate lens and retina regeneration in adult newts.

    PubMed

    Vergara, M Natalia; Smiley, Laura K; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2009-02-01

    Adult newts are able to regenerate their retina and lens after injury or complete removal through transdifferentiation of the pigmented epithelial tissues of the eye. This process needs to be tightly controlled, and several different mechanisms are likely to be recruited for this function. The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase is a transmembrane protein that establishes electrochemical gradients through the transport of Na(+) and K(+) and has been implicated in the modulation of key cellular processes such as cell division, migration and adhesion. Even though it is expressed in all cells, its isoform composition varies with cell type and is tightly controlled during development and regeneration. In the present study we characterize the expression pattern of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase alpha1 in the adult newt eye and during the process of lens and retina regeneration. We show that this isoform is up-regulated in undifferentiated cells during transdifferentiation. Such change in composition could be one of the mechanisms that newt cells utilize to modulate this process.

  14. Identification of a Sustained Neurogenic Zone at the Dorsal Surface of the Adult Mouse Hippocampus and Its Regulation by the Chemokine SDF-1

    PubMed Central

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J.; Rothwangl, Katharina B.; Hope, Thomas J.; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the “subhippocampal zone,” SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology. PMID:25656357

  15. Identification of a sustained neurogenic zone at the dorsal surface of the adult mouse hippocampus and its regulation by the chemokine SDF-1.

    PubMed

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J; Rothwangl, Katharina B; Hope, Thomas J; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the "subhippocampal zone," SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology.

  16. 26S Proteasome regulation of Ankrd1/CARP in adult rat ventricular myocytes and human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samaras, Susan E.; Chen, Billy; Koch, Stephen R.; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Lim, Chee Chew; Davidson, Jeffrey M.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 26S proteasome regulates Ankrd1 levels in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ankrd1 protein degrades 60-fold faster in endothelial cells than cardiomyocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential degradation appears related to nuclear vs. sarcolemmal localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cell density shows uncoupling of Ankrd1 mRNA and protein levels. -- Abstract: Ankyrin repeat domain 1 protein (Ankrd1), also known as cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), increases dramatically after tissue injury, and its overexpression improves aspects of wound healing. Reports that Ankrd1/CARP protein stability may affect cardiovascular organization, together with our findings that the protein is crucial to stability of the cardiomyocyte sarcomere and increased in wound healing, led us to compare the contribution of Ankrd1/CARP stability to its abundance. We found that the 26S proteasome is the dominant regulator of Ankrd1/CARP degradation, and that Ankrd1/CARP half-life is significantly longer in cardiomyocytes (h) than endothelial cells (min). In addition, higher endothelial cell density decreased the abundance of the protein without affecting steady state mRNA levels. Taken together, our data and that of others indicate that Ankrd1/CARP is highly regulated at multiple levels of its expression. The striking difference in protein half-life between a muscle and a non-muscle cell type suggests that post-translational proteolysis is correlated with the predominantly structural versus regulatory role of the protein in the two cell types.

  17. A plasma membrane protein is involved in cell contact-mediated regulation of tissue-specific genes in adult hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have identified the liver-regulating protein (LRP), a cell surface protein involved in the maintenance of hepatocyte differentiation when cocultured with rat liver epithelial cells (RLEC). LRP was defined by immunoreactivity to a monoclonal antibody (mAb L8) prepared from RLEC. mAb L8 specifically detected two polypeptides of 85 and 73 kD in immunoprecipitation of both hepatocyte- and RLEC-iodinated plasma membranes. The involvement of these polypeptides, which are integral membrane proteins, in cell interaction-mediated regulation of hepatocytes was assessed by evaluating the perturbing effects of the antibody on cocultures with RLEC. Several parameters characteristic of differentiated hepatocytes were studied, such as liver-specific and house-keeping gene expression, cytoskeletal organization and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). An early cytoskeletal disturbance was evidenced and a marked alteration of hepatocyte functional capacity was observed in the presence of the antibody, together with a loss of ECM deposition. By contrast, cell-cell aggregation or cell adhesion to various extracellular matrix components were not affected. These findings suggest that LRP is distinct from an extracellular matrix receptor. The fact that early addition of mAb L8 during cell contact establishment was necessary to be effective may indicate that LRP is a novel plasma membrane protein that plays an early pivotal role in the coordinated metabolic changes which lead to the differentiated phenotype of mature hepatocytes. PMID:1918151

  18. RhoB controls coordination of adult angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis following injury by regulating VEZF1-mediated transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerald, Damien; Adini, Irit; Shechter, Sharon; Perruzzi, Carole; Varnau, Joseph; Hopkins, Benjamin; Kazerounian, Shiva; Kurschat, Peter; Blachon, Stephanie; Khedkar, Santosh; Bagchi, Mandrita; Sherris, David; Prendergast, George C.; Klagsbrun, Michael; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Rigby, Alan C.; Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura E.

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms governing the distinct temporal dynamics that characterize post-natal angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis elicited by cutaneous wounds and inflammation remain unclear. RhoB, a stress-induced small GTPase, modulates cellular responses to growth factors, genotoxic stress and neoplastic transformation. Here we show, using RhoB null mice, that loss of RhoB decreases pathological angiogenesis in the ischaemic retina and reduces angiogenesis in response to cutaneous wounding, but enhances lymphangiogenesis following both dermal wounding and inflammatory challenge. We link these unique and opposing roles of RhoB in blood versus lymphatic vasculatures to the RhoB-mediated differential regulation of sprouting and proliferation in primary human blood versus lymphatic endothelial cells. We demonstrate that nuclear RhoB-GTP controls expression of distinct gene sets in each endothelial lineage by regulating VEZF1-mediated transcription. Finally, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of VEZF1-DNA interaction that recapitulates RhoB loss in ischaemic retinopathy. Our findings establish the first intra-endothelial molecular pathway governing the phased response of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis following injury.

  19. RhoB controls coordination of adult angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis following injury by regulating VEZF1-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Gerald, Damien; Adini, Irit; Shechter, Sharon; Perruzzi, Carole; Varnau, Joseph; Hopkins, Benjamin; Kazerounian, Shiva; Kurschat, Peter; Blachon, Stephanie; Khedkar, Santosh; Bagchi, Mandrita; Sherris, David; Prendergast, George C; Klagsbrun, Michael; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Rigby, Alan C; Nagy, Janice A; Benjamin, Laura E

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms governing the distinct temporal dynamics that characterize post-natal angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis elicited by cutaneous wounds and inflammation remain unclear. RhoB, a stress-induced small GTPase, modulates cellular responses to growth factors, genotoxic stress and neoplastic transformation. Here we show, using RhoB null mice, that loss of RhoB decreases pathological angiogenesis in the ischaemic retina and reduces angiogenesis in response to cutaneous wounding, but enhances lymphangiogenesis following both dermal wounding and inflammatory challenge. We link these unique and opposing roles of RhoB in blood versus lymphatic vasculatures to the RhoB-mediated differential regulation of sprouting and proliferation in primary human blood versus lymphatic endothelial cells. We demonstrate that nuclear RhoB-GTP controls expression of distinct gene sets in each endothelial lineage by regulating VEZF1-mediated transcription. Finally, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of VEZF1-DNA interaction that recapitulates RhoB loss in ischaemic retinopathy. Our findings establish the first intra-endothelial molecular pathway governing the phased response of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis following injury. PMID:24280686

  20. A cross-sectional study of glucose regulation in young adults with very low birth weight: impact of male gender on hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shirai, Kenji; Ohki, Shigeru; Genma, Rieko; Morita, Hiroshi; Inoue, Eisuke; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Maekawa, Masato; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate glucose regulation in young adults with very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) in an Asian population. Design Cross-sectional observational study. Setting A general hospital in Hamamatsu, Japan. Participants 111 young adults (42 men and 69 women; aged 19–30 years) born with VLBW between 1980 and 1990. Participants underwent standard 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcomes were glucose and insulin levels during OGTT and risk factors for a category of hyperglycaemia defined as follows: diabetes mellitus, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) and non-diabetes/IGT/IFG with elevated 1 h glucose levels (>8.6 mmol/l). The secondary outcomes were the pancreatic β cell function (insulinogenic index and homeostasis model of assessment for beta cell (HOMA-β)) and insulin resistance (homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)). Results Of 111 young adults with VLBW, 21 subjects (19%) had hyperglycaemia: one had type 2 diabetes, six had IGT, one had IFG and 13 had non-diabetes/IGT/IFG with elevated 1 h glucose levels. In logistic regression analysis, male gender was an independent risk factor associated with hyperglycaemia (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.08 to 10.3, p=0.036). Male subjects had significantly higher levels of glucose and lower levels of insulin during OGTT than female subjects (p<0.001 for glucose and p=0.005 for insulin by repeated measures analysis of variance). Pancreatic β cell function was lower in men (insulinogenic index: p=0.002; HOMA-β: p=0.001), although no gender difference was found in insulin resistance (HOMA-IR: p=0.477). In male subjects, logistic regression analysis showed that small for gestational age was an independent risk factor associated with hyperglycaemia (OR 33.3, 95% CI 1.67 to 662.6, p=0.022). Conclusions 19% of individuals with VLBW already had hyperglycaemia in young adulthood, and male gender

  1. Up-regulation of the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-R during axonal reorganization and astrogliosis in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Brenneke, Franziska; Schachner, Melitta; Elger, Christian E; Lie, Ailing A

    2004-02-01

    Interactions between cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules play a crucial role during brain development. The ECM glycoprotein tenascin-R (TN-R) has been implicated in the control of axon targeting, neural cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. Here, we have focused on the putative role of TN-R in chronic brain diseases involving increased neuronal excitability, as found in epilepsy. An episode of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) led over a period of 3-30 days to neuron loss in the hippocampal hilus, CA3 and CA1 with reactive mossy fiber sprouting and astrogliosis in these regions. We found a focal up-regulation of granular TN-R immunoreactivity within the neuropil of segments of the CA3 pyramidal cell layer, the extent of this up-regulation paralleled the degree of pyramidal cell loss, mossy fiber sprouting and astrogliosis in these CA3 segments. In contrast, parvalbumin immunoreactivity and Wisteria floribundi agglutinin (WFA)-labeled perineuronal nets were reduced in CA3 segments with neuronal cell loss. The parallel development of increase in focal granular TN-R immunoreactivity, reactive mossy fiber sprouting and astrogliosis in CA3 implies a role for TN-R in axon targeting and synapse formation and/or in astrocytic targeting and interactions with the ECM during lesion-induced sprouting in the adult brain.

  2. Snoo and Dpp Act as Spatial and Temporal Regulators Respectively of Adult Progenitor Cells in the Drosophila Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Djabrayan, Nareg J.-V.; Casanova, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Clusters of differentiated cells contributing to organ structures retain the potential to re-enter the cell cycle and replace cells lost during development or upon damage. To do so, they must be designated spatially and respond to proper activation cues. Here we show that in the case of Drosophila differentiated larval tracheal cells, progenitor potential is conferred by the spatially restricted activity of the Snoo transcription cofactor. Furthermore, Dpp signalling regulated by endocrine hormonal cues provides the temporal trigger for their activation. Finally, we elucidate the genetic network elicited by Snoo and Dpp activity. These results illustrate a regulatory mechanism that translates intrinsic potential and extrinsic cues into the facultative stem cell features of differentiated progenitors. PMID:26942411

  3. Biologically active substances-enriched diet regulates gonadotrope cell activation pathway in liver of adult and old rats.

    PubMed

    Oszkiel, Hanna; Wilczak, Jacek; Jank, Michał

    2014-09-01

    According to the Hippocrates' theorem "Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food", dietary interventions may induce changes in the metabolic and inflammatory state by modulating the expression of important genes involved in the chronic disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of long-term (14 months) use of biologically active substances-enriched diet (BASE-diet) on transcriptomic profile of rats' liver. The experiment was conducted on 36 Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two experimental groups (fed with control or BASE-diet, both n = 18). Control diet was a semi-synthetic diet formulated according to the nutritional requirements for laboratory animals. The BASE-diet was enriched with a mixture of polyphenolic compounds, β-carotene, probiotics, and n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In total, n = 3,017 differentially expressed (DE) genes were identified, including n = 218 DE genes between control and BASE groups after 3 months of feeding and n = 1,262 after 14 months. BASE-diet influenced the expression of genes involved particularly in the gonadotrope cell activation pathway and guanylate cyclase pathway, as well as in mast cell activation, gap junction regulation, melanogenesis and apoptosis. Especially genes involved in regulation of GnRH were strongly affected by BASE-diet. This effect was stronger with the age of animals and the length of diet use. It may suggest a link between the diet, reproductive system function and aging. PMID:25156242

  4. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  5. Thought suppression, impaired regulation of urges, and Addiction-Stroop predict affect-modulated cue-reactivity among alcohol dependent adults.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Carter, Kristin; Ropes, Katie; Howard, Matthew O

    2012-01-01

    Abstinent alcohol dependent individuals commonly employ thought suppression to cope with stress and intrusive cognitions about alcohol. This strategy may inadvertently bias attention towards alcohol-related stimuli while depleting neurocognitive resources needed to regulate urges, manifested as decreased heart rate variability (HRV) responsivity to alcohol cues. The present study tested the hypothesis that trait and state thought suppression, impaired regulation of urges, and alcohol attentional bias as measured by the Addiction-Stroop would have significant effects on the HRV responsivity of 58 adults in residential treatment for alcohol dependence (mean age=39.6 ± 9.4, 81% female) who participated in an affect-modulated cue-reactivity protocol. Regression analyses controlling for age, level of pre-treatment alcohol consumption, and baseline HRV indicated that higher levels of trait thought suppression, impaired regulation of alcohol urges, and attentional fixation on alcohol cues were associated with lower HRV responsivity during stress-primed alcohol cue-exposure. Moreover, there was a significant state × trait suppression interaction on HRV cue-responsivity, such that alcohol dependent persons reporting high levels of state and trait suppression exhibited less HRV during cue-exposure than persons reporting low levels of state and trait suppression. Results suggest that chronic thought suppression taxes regulatory resources reflected in reduced HRV responsivity, an effect that is particularly evident when high trait suppressors engage in intensive suppression of drinking-related thoughts under conditions of stress. Treatment approaches that offer effective alternatives to the maladaptive strategy of suppressing alcohol urges may be crucial for relapse prevention.

  6. High-Fat Diet During Mouse Pregnancy and Lactation Targets GIP-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Adult Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Michael; Keyhani-Nejad, Farnaz; Isken, Frank; Nitz, Barbara; Kretschmer, Anja; Reischl, Eva; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Osterhoff, Martin A; Grallert, Harald; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2016-03-01

    Maternal obesity is a worldwide problem associated with increased risk of metabolic diseases in the offspring. Genetic deletion of the gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor (GIPR) prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice due to specific changes in energy and fat cell metabolism. We investigated whether GIP-associated pathways may be targeted by fetal programming and mimicked the situation by exposing pregnant mice to control or HFD during pregnancy (intrauterine [IU]) and lactation (L). Male wild-type (WT) and Gipr(-/-) offspring received control chow until 25 weeks of age followed by 20 weeks of HFD. Gipr(-/-) offspring of mice exposed to HFD during IU/L became insulin resistant and obese and exhibited increased adipose tissue inflammation and decreased peripheral tissue substrate utilization after being reintroduced to HFD, similar to WT mice on regular chow during IU/L. They showed decreased hypothalamic insulin sensitivity compared with Gipr(-/-) mice on control diet during IU/L. DNA methylation analysis revealed increased methylation of CpG dinucleotides and differential transcription factor binding of promoter regions of genes involved in lipid oxidation in the muscle of Gipr(-/-) offspring on HFD during IU/L, which were inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Our data identify GIP-regulated metabolic pathways that are targeted by fetal programming.

  7. Regulation of DM-20 mRNA expression and intracellular translocation of glutathione-S-transferase pi isoform during oligodendrocyte differentiation in the adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Masaaki; Takeda, Kazuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that NG2-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) do not express DM-20 mRNA and identified a distinct DM-20 mRNA-positive cell population expressing glutathione-S-transferase pi isoform (GST-pi) in the nucleus (GST-pi(Nuc)) of the adult rat spinal cord. As GST-pi intranuclear localization correlates with progenitor cell properties, we examined the differentiation status of this cell population under the intensive 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) administration method, consisting of intraperitoneal BrdU injections every 2 h for 48 h. We observed that a certain population of proliferating/proliferated cells expressed DM-20 mRNA, and sometimes two proliferating/proliferated cells were observed still attached to each other. We performed triple staining for BrdU, DM-20 mRNA, and NG2 and found pairs of neighboring BrdU-positive cells, which were considered to originate from the same progenitor cells and where both cells expressed DM-20 mRNA. Triple staining for BrdU, DM-20 mRNA, and GST-pi detected proliferating/proliferated cells exhibiting the GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-positive expression pattern. These findings suggested the presence of a GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-positive oligodendrocyte-lineage progenitor cell population in the adult rat spinal cord. However, we did not find any pair of neighboring BrdU-positive cells with this expression pattern. These observations collectively support the idea that GST-pi(Nuc)/DM-20 mRNA-expressing cells are the progeny of NG2-positive OPCs rather than a novel type of oligodendrocyte-lineage progenitor cells and that DM-20 mRNA expression is dynamically regulated during differentiation of OPCs into oligodendrocytes.

  8. Expression of DNA methyltransferases in adult dorsal root ganglia is cell-type specific and up regulated in a rodent model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Pollema-Mays, Sarah L.; Centeno, Maria V.; Apkarian, A. V.; Martina, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is associated with hyperexcitability and intrinsic firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. These phenotypical changes can be long lasting, potentially spanning the entire life of animal models, and depend on altered expression of numerous proteins, including many ion channels. Yet, how DRGs maintain long-term changes in protein expression in neuropathic conditions remains unclear. DNA methylation is a well-known mechanism of epigenetic control of gene expression and is achieved by the action of three enzymes: DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1, 3a, and 3b, which have been studied primarily during development. We first performed immunohistochemical analysis to assess whether these enzymes are expressed in adult rat DRGs (L4–5) and found that DNMT1 is expressed in both glia and neurons, DNMT3a is preferentially expressed in glia and DNMT3b is preferentially expressed in neurons. A rat model of neuropathic pain was then used to determine whether nerve injury may induce epigenetic changes in DRGs at multiple time points after pain onset. Real-time RT PCR analysis revealed robust and time-dependent changes in DNMT transcript expression in ipsilateral DRGs from spared nerve injury (SNI) but not sham rats. Interestingly, DNMT3b transcript showed a robust upregulation that appeared already 1 week after surgery and persisted at 4 weeks (our endpoint); in contrast, DNMT1 and DNMT3a transcripts showed only moderate upregulation that was transient and did not appear until the second week. We suggest that DNMT regulation in adult DRGs may be a contributor to the pain phenotype and merits further study. PMID:25152711

  9. Molecular regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in adult male guinea pigs after prenatal stress at different stages of gestation

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Amita; Leen, Jason; Matthews, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    Studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that maternal stress during fetal development can lead to altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function and behaviour postnatally. We have previously shown adult male guinea pigs that were born to mothers exposed to a stressor during the phase of rapid fetal brain growth (gestational days (GD) 50, 51 and 52; prenatal stress (PS)50) exhibit significantly increased basal plasma cortisol levels. In contrast, male guinea pig offspring whose mothers were exposed to stress later in gestation (GD60, 61 and 62; PS60) exhibited a significantly higher plasma cortisol response to activation of the HPA axis. In the present study, we hypothesized that the endocrine changes in HPA axis function observed in male guinea pig offspring would be reflected by altered molecular regulation of the HPA axis. Corticosteroid receptors in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and pituitary were measured, as well as corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and adrenal enzymes in the paraventricular nucleus, pituitary and adrenal cortex, respectively, by in situ hybridization and Western blot. PS50 male offspring exhibited a significant reduction in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA (P <0.01) in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and significantly increased POMC mRNA (P <0.05) in the pituitary, consistent with the increase in basal HPA axis activity observed. In line with elevated activity of the HPA axis, both PS50 and PS60 male offspring exhibited significantly higher steroidogenic factor (SF)-1 (P <0.001) and melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2-R) mRNA (P <0.001) in the adrenal cortex. This study demonstrates that short periods of prenatal stress during critical windows of neuroendocrine development affect the expression of key regulators of HPA axis activity leading to the changes in endocrine function observed in prenatally stressed male offspring. Further, these changes are dependent on the timing of the maternal

  10. Expression profile of a Caenorhabditis elegans model of adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis reveals down regulation of ubiquitin E3 ligase components

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Hannah V.; Chen, Xi; Barclay, Jeff W.; Morgan, Alan; Burgoyne, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine string protein (CSP) is a chaperone of the Dnaj/Hsp40 family of proteins and is essential for synaptic maintenance. Mutations in the human gene encoding CSP, DNAJC5, cause adult neuronal ceroid lipofucinosis (ANCL) which is characterised by progressive dementia, movement disorders, seizures and premature death. CSP null models in mice, flies and worms have been shown to also exhibit similar neurodegenerative phenotypes. Here we have explored the mechanisms underlying ANCL disease progression using Caenorhaditis elegans mutant strains of dnj-14, the worm orthologue of DNAJC5. Transcriptional profiling of these mutants compared to control strains revealed a broad down-regulation of ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS)-related genes, in particular, components of multimeric RING E3 ubiquitin ligases including F-Box, SKR and BTB proteins. These data were supported by the observation that dnj-14 mutant worm strains expressing a GFP-tagged ubiquitin fusion degradation substrate exhibited decreased ubiquitylated protein degradation. The results indicate that disruption of an essential synaptic chaperone leads to changes in expression levels of UPS-related proteins which has a knock-on effect on overall protein degradation in C. elegans. The specific over-representation of E3 ubiquitin ligase components revealed in our study, suggests that proteins and complexes upstream of the proteasome itself may be beneficial therapeutic targets. PMID:26395859

  11. Evidence that estrogen regulation of testosterone secretion in adult rams is mediated by both indirect (gonadotropin dependent) and direct (gonadotropin independent) means.

    PubMed

    Sanford, L M

    1985-01-01

    Involvement of endogenous estrogen in the regulation of gonadotropin and testosterone secretion was investigated in adult rams. Groups of four rams were either passively immunized against estradiol or treated with the antiestrogen tamoxifen for 2 weeks during the breeding season (October). Circulating testosterone levels in immunized rams increased eight-fold to supraphysiologic values as episodic elevations and baseline levels increased in magnitude; only moderate increases in LH peak frequency and magnitude occurred, and prolactin fell to undetectable levels. Tamoxifen treatment was not associated with changes in mean hormone levels, although there was a tendency toward reductions in the magnitude of episodic LH and testosterone secretion. When rams were challenged with exogenous GnRH and LH, a greater testicular endocrine response was observed in the immunized rams and the pituitary endocrine response was delayed in the tamoxifen-treated rams. Results indicate that in the ram 1) circulating levels of estradiol provide negative feedback signals of different intensities to the testis and the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and 2) tamoxifen exerts a mild estrogenic effect when administered at the dose of 25 mg/day.

  12. Spontaneous Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Expression in the Cochlea of Adult Albino Rat and Its Up-Regulation after Cisplatin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Almudena; Ramil, Elvira; Sánchez-López, Antonio J.; Coronado, Maria José; Martínez-Martínez, Esther; García, José Miguel; García-Berrocal, José Ramón; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We provide evidence for the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors in some cellular types of the cochlea of the adult albino rat. Cannabinoids and their receptors are increasingly being studied because of their high potential for clinical use. As a hyperspecialized portion of the peripheral nervous system, study of the expression and function of cannabinoid receptors in the hearing organ is of high interest. Stria vascularis and inner hair cells express CB2 receptor, as well as neurites and cell bodies of the spiral ganglion. Cellular types such as supporting cells and outer hair cells, in which the expression of other types of functional receptors has been reported, do not significantly express CB2 receptors in this study. An up-regulation of CB2 gene expression was detected after an ototoxic event such as cisplatin treatment, probably due to pro-inflammatory events triggered by the drug. That fact suggests promising potential of CB2 receptor as a therapeutic target for new treatments to palliate cisplatin-induced hearing loss and other ototoxic events which triggers inflammatory pathways. PMID:27564061

  13. Mrp4, a new mitogen-regulated protein/proliferin gene; unique in this gene family for its expression in the adult mouse tail and ear.

    PubMed

    Fassett, J T; Hamilton, R T; Nilsen-Hamilton, M

    2000-05-01

    Mitogen-regulated proteins (also known as proliferin; mrp/plf) are nonclassical members of the PRL/GH family. They are expressed at high levels during midgestation when they are thought to induce angiogenesis and uterine growth. There are between four and six mrp/plf genes, and three different complementary DNAs have been cloned. Here we identify a fourth mrp/plf gene (mrp4) that we have cloned and characterized. MRP4 is 91% identical in amino acid sequence with the other MRP/PLF proteins but is missing two glycosylation sites that are present in the other forms. Consistent with the loss of two of three glycosylation sites, the expressed form of MRP4 has a lower apparent molecular weight compared with other MRP/PLFs. In vivo, mrp4 is expressed in the placenta and the adult skin. Expression of mrp4 messenger RNA peaks in the placenta on day 12. In the skin, mrp4 expression is specific to the ears and tails of mice. Our results suggest that, as well as having growth and angiogenic effects during pregnancy, the MRP/PLFs may have functions in nonreproductive tissues. Unique among the members of the mrp/plf family for its expression in the hair follicles of the tail and ear, MRP4 is expected to have a singular role in the growth and development of these follicles.

  14. Muscle-Derived Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 Are Required for the Maintenance of Adult Myofibers and Their Neuromuscular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Seaberg, Bonnie; Henslee, Gabrielle; Wang, Shuo; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Landreth, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    The Ras–extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathway appears to be important for the development, maintenance, aging, and pathology of mammalian skeletal muscle. Yet no gene targeting of Erk1/2 in muscle fibers in vivo has been reported to date. We combined a germ line Erk1 mutation with Cre-loxP Erk2 inactivation in skeletal muscle to produce, for the first time, mice lacking ERK1/2 selectively in skeletal myofibers. Animals lacking muscle ERK1/2 displayed stunted postnatal growth, muscle weakness, and a shorter life span. Their muscles examined in this study, sternomastoid and tibialis anterior, displayed fragmented neuromuscular synapses and a mixture of modest fiber atrophy and loss but failed to show major changes in fiber type composition or absence of cell surface dystrophin. Whereas the lack of only ERK1 had no effects on the phenotypes studied, the lack of myofiber ERK2 explained synaptic fragmentation in the sternomastoid but not the tibialis anterior and a decrease in the expression of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit gene mRNA in both muscles. A reduction in AChR protein was documented in line with the above mRNA results. Evidence of partial denervation was found in the sternomastoid but not the tibialis anterior. Thus, myofiber ERK1/2 are differentially required for the maintenance of myofibers and neuromuscular synapses in adult mice. PMID:25605336

  15. Spontaneous Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2) Expression in the Cochlea of Adult Albino Rat and Its Up-Regulation after Cisplatin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Martín-Saldaña, Sergio; Trinidad, Almudena; Ramil, Elvira; Sánchez-López, Antonio J; Coronado, Maria José; Martínez-Martínez, Esther; García, José Miguel; García-Berrocal, José Ramón; Ramírez-Camacho, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We provide evidence for the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors in some cellular types of the cochlea of the adult albino rat. Cannabinoids and their receptors are increasingly being studied because of their high potential for clinical use. As a hyperspecialized portion of the peripheral nervous system, study of the expression and function of cannabinoid receptors in the hearing organ is of high interest. Stria vascularis and inner hair cells express CB2 receptor, as well as neurites and cell bodies of the spiral ganglion. Cellular types such as supporting cells and outer hair cells, in which the expression of other types of functional receptors has been reported, do not significantly express CB2 receptors in this study. An up-regulation of CB2 gene expression was detected after an ototoxic event such as cisplatin treatment, probably due to pro-inflammatory events triggered by the drug. That fact suggests promising potential of CB2 receptor as a therapeutic target for new treatments to palliate cisplatin-induced hearing loss and other ototoxic events which triggers inflammatory pathways. PMID:27564061

  16. Adult Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Considers the differences between young adult and adult books and maintains that teachers must be familiar with young adults' tastes for both. Suggests that traffic between these publishing divisions is a two-way street, with young adults reading adult books and adults reading young adult books. (TB)

  17. Magnetic resonance beacon to detect intracellular microRNA during neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Jin, Yeon A; Ko, Hae Young; Lee, Yong Seung; Heo, Hyejung; Cho, Sujeong; Kim, Soonhag

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers great spatial resolution for viewing deep tissues and anatomy. We developed a self-assembling signal-on magnetic fluorescence nanoparticle to visualize intracellular microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) during neurogenesis using MRI. The self-assembling nanoparticle (miR124a MR beacon) was aggregated by the incubation of three different oligonucleotides: a 3' adaptor, a 5' adaptor, and a linker containing miR124a-binding sequences. The T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) signal of the self-assembled nanoparticle was quenched when miR124a was absent from test tubes or was minimally expressed in cells and tissues. When miR124a was present in test tubes or highly expressed in vitro and in vivo during P19 cell neurogenesis, it hybridized with the miR124a MR beacon, causing the linker to detach, resulting in increased signal-on MRI intensity. This MR beacon can be used as a new imaging probe to monitor the miRNA-mediated regulation of cellular processes.

  18. Surface expression of hippocampal NMDA GluN2B receptors regulated by fear conditioning determines its contribution to memory consolidation in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-Yan; Cai, Wei; Yu, Jie; Liu, Shu-Su; Zhuo, Min; Li, Bao-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Han

    2016-01-01

    The number and subtype composition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) at synapses determines their functional properties and role in learning and memory. Genetically increased or decreased amount of GluN2B affects hippocampus-dependent memory in the adult brain. But in some experimental conditions (e.g., memory elicited by a single conditioning trial (1 CS-US)), GluN2B is not a necessary factor, which indicates that the precise role of GluN2B in memory formation requires further exploration. Here, we examined the role of GluN2B in the consolidation of fear memory using two training paradigms. We found that GluN2B was only required for the consolidation of memory elicited by five conditioning trials (5 CS-US), not by 1 CS-US. Strikingly, the expression of membrane GluN2B in CA1was training-strength-dependently increased after conditioning, and that the amount of membrane GluN2B determined its involvement in memory consolidation. Additionally, we demonstrated the increases in the activities of cAMP, ERK, and CREB in the CA1 after conditioning, as well as the enhanced intrinsic excitability and synaptic efficacy in CA1 neurons. Up-regulation of membrane GluN2B contributed to these enhancements. These studies uncover a novel mechanism for the involvement of GluN2B in memory consolidation by its accumulation at the cell surface in response to behavioral training. PMID:27487820

  19. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase HmLAR1 is up-regulated in the CNS of the adult medicinal leech following injury and is required for neuronal sprouting and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Jasmine; Zhao, Bailey; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Salzet, Michel; Macagno, Eduardo R; Baker, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    LAR-like receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), which are abundantly expressed in the nervous systems of most if not all bilaterian animals thus far examined, have been implicated in regulating a variety of critical neuronal processes. These include neuronal pathfinding, adhesion and synaptogenesis during development and, in adult mammals, neuronal regeneration. Here we explored a possible role of a LAR-like RPTP (HmLAR1) in response to mechanical trauma in the adult nervous system of the medicinal leech. In situ hybridization and QPCR analyses of HmLAR1 expression in individual segmental ganglia revealed a significant up-regulation in receptor expression following CNS injury, both in situ and following a period in vitro. Furthermore, we observed up-regulation in the expression of the leech homologue of the Abelson tyrosine kinase, a putative signaling partner to LAR receptors, but not among other tyrosine kinases. The effects on neuronal regeneration were assayed by comparing growth across a nerve crush by projections of individual dorsal P neurons (P(D)) following single-cell injection of interfering RNAs against the receptor or control RNAs. Receptor RNAi led to a significant reduction in HmLAR1 expression by the injected cells and resulted in a significant decrease in sprouting and regenerative growth at the crush site relative to controls. These studies extend the role of the HmLARs from leech neuronal development to adult neuronal regeneration and provide a platform to investigate neuronal regeneration and gene regulation at the single cell level. PMID:20708686

  20. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase HmLAR1 is up-regulated in the CNS of the adult medicinal leech following injury and is required for neuronal sprouting and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Jasmine; Zhao, Bailey; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Salzet, Michel; Macagno, Eduardo R; Baker, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    LAR-like receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs), which are abundantly expressed in the nervous systems of most if not all bilaterian animals thus far examined, have been implicated in regulating a variety of critical neuronal processes. These include neuronal pathfinding, adhesion and synaptogenesis during development and, in adult mammals, neuronal regeneration. Here we explored a possible role of a LAR-like RPTP (HmLAR1) in response to mechanical trauma in the adult nervous system of the medicinal leech. In situ hybridization and QPCR analyses of HmLAR1 expression in individual segmental ganglia revealed a significant up-regulation in receptor expression following CNS injury, both in situ and following a period in vitro. Furthermore, we observed up-regulation in the expression of the leech homologue of the Abelson tyrosine kinase, a putative signaling partner to LAR receptors, but not among other tyrosine kinases. The effects on neuronal regeneration were assayed by comparing growth across a nerve crush by projections of individual dorsal P neurons (P(D)) following single-cell injection of interfering RNAs against the receptor or control RNAs. Receptor RNAi led to a significant reduction in HmLAR1 expression by the injected cells and resulted in a significant decrease in sprouting and regenerative growth at the crush site relative to controls. These studies extend the role of the HmLARs from leech neuronal development to adult neuronal regeneration and provide a platform to investigate neuronal regeneration and gene regulation at the single cell level.

  1. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  2. Cocaine exposure prior to pregnancy alters the psychomotor response to cocaine and transcriptional regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor in adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Aya; Constantinof, Andrea; Pan, Pauline; Kupferschmidt, Dave A; McGowan, Patrick O; Erb, Suzanne

    2014-05-15

    There is evidence that maternal experience prior to pregnancy can play an important role in behavioral, physiological, and genetic programming of offspring. Likewise, exposure to cocaine in utero can result in marked changes in central nervous system function of offspring. In this study, we examined whether exposure of rat dams to cocaine prior to pregnancy subsequently alters indices of behavior, physiology, and gene expression in offspring. Multiple outcome measures were examined in adult male offspring: (1) behavioral expression of cocaine-induced psychomotor activation; (2) levels of corticosterone in response to immobilization stress; and (3) expression of multiple genes, including dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1) and D2 (DRD2), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), in functionally relevant brain regions. Adult Sprague-Dawley females were exposed to cocaine (15-30 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 10 days, and were then mated to drug naïve males of the same strain. Separate groups of adult male offspring were tested for their acute psychomotor response to cocaine (0, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), corticosterone responsivity to 20 min of immobilization stress, and expression of multiple genes using quantitative PCR. Offspring of dams exposed to cocaine prior to conception exhibited increased psychomotor sensitivity to cocaine, and upregulated gene expression of DRD1 in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Neither stress-induced corticosterone levels nor gene expression of GR or CRF genes were altered. These data suggest that cocaine exposure before pregnancy can serve to enhance psychomotor sensitivity to cocaine in offspring, possibly via alterations in dopamine function that include upregulation of the DRD1. PMID:24583058

  3. Vibrio parahaemolyticus ToxRS regulator is required for stress tolerance and colonization in a novel orogastric streptomycin-induced adult murine model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a marine bacterium, is the causative agent of gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of seafood. It contains a homologue of the toxRS operon that in V. cholerae is the key regulator of virulence gene expression. We examined a non-polar mutation in toxRS to determi...

  4. Effect of cocoa and green tea on biomarkers of glucose regulation, oxidative stress, inflammation and hemostasis in obese adults at risk for insulin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavanols may provide protection against insulin resistance, but little is known about the amounts and types of flavanols that may be efficacious. This study was designed to determine whether cocoa flavanols, over a range of intakes, improve biomarkers of glucose regulation, inflammation and hemost...

  5. Adult immunization

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Chawla, Sumit; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequel. The primary focus of vaccination programs has historically been directed to childhood immunizations. For adults, chronic diseases have been the primary focus of preventive and medical health care, though there has been increased emphasis on preventing infectious diseases. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most of the routinely recommended vaccines. Though adults are less susceptible to fall prey to traditional infectious agents, the probability of exposure to infectious agents has increased manifold owing to globalization and increasing travel opportunities both within and across the countries. Thus, there is an urgent need to address the problem of adult immunization. The adult immunization enterprise is more complex, encompassing a wide variety of vaccines and a very diverse target population. There is no coordinated public health infrastructure to support an adult immunization program as there is for children. Moreover, there is little coordination among adult healthcare providers in terms of vaccine provision. Substantial improvement in adult vaccination is needed to reduce the health consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Routine assessment of adult patient vaccination needs, recommendation, and offer of needed vaccines for adults should be incorporated into routine clinical care of adults. PMID:24128707

  6. Regulating Pornography: A Public Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Margaret E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward sex and pornography by means of a telephone survey of Dane County, Wisconsin, adults. Describes survey questions about sexual attitudes, perceived effects of pornography, and pornography regulation. Concludes that adults who feel more strongly that pornography has negative effects are more opposed to its regulation. (SG)

  7. LeMYC2 acts as a negative regulator of blue light mediated photomorphogenic growth, and promotes the growth of adult tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis ZBF1/MYC2bHLH transcription factor is a repressor of photomorphogenesis, and acts as a point of cross talk in light, abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. MYC2 also functions as a positive regulator of lateral root development and flowering time under long day conditions. However, the function of MYC2 in growth and development remains unknown in crop plants. Results Here, we report the functional analyses of LeMYC2 in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The amino acid sequence of LeMYC2 showed extensive homology with Arabidopsis MYC2, containing the conserved bHLH domain. To study the function of LeMYC2 in tomato, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) LeMYC2 tomato transgenic plants were generated. Examination of seedling morphology, physiological responses and light regulated gene expression has revealed that LeMYC2 works as a negative regulator of blue light mediated photomorphogenesis. Furthermore, LeMYC2 specifically binds to the G-box of LeRBCS-3A promoter. Overexpression of LeMYC2 has led to increased root length with more number of lateral roots. The tomato plants overexpressing LeMYC2 have reduced internode distance with more branches, and display the opposite morphology to RNAi transgenic lines. Furthermore, this study shows that LeMYC2 promotes ABA and JA responsiveness. Conclusions Collectively, this study highlights that working in light, ABA and JA signaling pathways LeMYC2 works as an important regulator for growth and development in tomato plants. PMID:24483714

  8. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP.

  9. Effectiveness of the self-regulation eHealth intervention 'MyPlan1.0.' on physical activity levels of recently retired Belgian adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Delfien; Plaete, Jolien; Cardon, Greet; Crombez, Geert; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-10-01

    The study purpose was to test the effectiveness of the self-regulation eHealth intervention 'MyPlan1.0.' to increase physical activity (PA) in recently retired Belgian adults. This study was a randomized controlled trial with three points of follow-up/modules (baseline to 1-week to 1-month follow-up). In total, 240 recently retired adults (intervention group [IG]: n = 89; control group [CG]: n = 151) completed all three modules. The IG filled in evaluation questionnaires and received 'MyPlan1.0.', an intervention focusing on both pre- and post-intentional processes for behavioural change. The CG only filled in evaluation questionnaires. Self-reported PA was assessed using the long International Physical Activity Questionnaire, usual week version. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variances were conducted in SPSS 22.0. On the short-term (baseline to 1 week), the intervention significantly increased walking for transport (IG: +11 min/week, CG: -6 min/week; P < 0.01). On the intermediate-term (baseline to 1 month), the intervention increased transport-related walking (IG: +14 min/week, CG: +6 min/week; P < 0.01), leisure-time walking (IG: +26 min/week, CG: -14 min/week; P < 0.10), leisure-time vigorous PA (IG: +16 min/week, CG: -4 min/week; P < 0.01), moderate-intensity gardening (IG: +4 min/week, CG: -34 min/week; P < 0.10) and voluntary work-related vigorous PA (IG: +28 min/week, CG: +13 min/week; P < 0.10). Results show that our eHealth intervention is effective in recently retired adults. Future studies should include long-term follow-up to examine whether the effects persist over a longer period.

  10. Effectiveness of the self-regulation eHealth intervention 'MyPlan1.0.' on physical activity levels of recently retired Belgian adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Dyck, Delfien; Plaete, Jolien; Cardon, Greet; Crombez, Geert; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2016-10-01

    The study purpose was to test the effectiveness of the self-regulation eHealth intervention 'MyPlan1.0.' to increase physical activity (PA) in recently retired Belgian adults. This study was a randomized controlled trial with three points of follow-up/modules (baseline to 1-week to 1-month follow-up). In total, 240 recently retired adults (intervention group [IG]: n = 89; control group [CG]: n = 151) completed all three modules. The IG filled in evaluation questionnaires and received 'MyPlan1.0.', an intervention focusing on both pre- and post-intentional processes for behavioural change. The CG only filled in evaluation questionnaires. Self-reported PA was assessed using the long International Physical Activity Questionnaire, usual week version. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variances were conducted in SPSS 22.0. On the short-term (baseline to 1 week), the intervention significantly increased walking for transport (IG: +11 min/week, CG: -6 min/week; P < 0.01). On the intermediate-term (baseline to 1 month), the intervention increased transport-related walking (IG: +14 min/week, CG: +6 min/week; P < 0.01), leisure-time walking (IG: +26 min/week, CG: -14 min/week; P < 0.10), leisure-time vigorous PA (IG: +16 min/week, CG: -4 min/week; P < 0.01), moderate-intensity gardening (IG: +4 min/week, CG: -34 min/week; P < 0.10) and voluntary work-related vigorous PA (IG: +28 min/week, CG: +13 min/week; P < 0.10). Results show that our eHealth intervention is effective in recently retired adults. Future studies should include long-term follow-up to examine whether the effects persist over a longer period. PMID:27422898

  11. Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) of changed Brain Function Provoked by Pro-Dopamine Regulator (KB220z) in one Adult ADHD case

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Bruce; Blum, Kenneth; McLaughlin, Thomas; Lubar, Joel; Febo, Marcelo; Braverman, Eric R.; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2016-01-01

    Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often continues into adulthood. Recent neuroimaging studies found lowered baseline dopamine tone in the brains of affected individuals that may place them at risk for Substance Use Disorder (SUD). This is an observational case study of the potential for novel management of Adult ADHD with a non-addictive glutaminergic-dopaminergic optimization complex KB200z. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was used to evaluate the effects of KB220z on a 72-year-old male with ADHD, at baseline and one hour following administration. The resultant z-scores, averaged across Eyes Closed, Eyes Open and Working Memory conditions, increased for each frequency band, in the anterior, dorsal and posterior cingulate regions, as well as the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during Working Memory, with KB220z. These scores are consistent with other human and animal neuroimaging studies that demonstrated increased connectivity volumes in reward circuitry and may offer a new approach to ADHD treatment. However, larger randomized trials to confirm these results are required.

  12. Buttressing a balanced brain: Target-derived FGF signaling regulates excitatory/inhibitory tone and adult neurogenesis within the maturating hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Ania; Umemori, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Brain development involves multiple levels of molecular coordination in forming a functional nervous system. The hippocampus is a brain area that is important for memory formation and spatial reasoning. During early postnatal development of the hippocampal circuit, Fibroblast growth factor 22 (FGF22) and FGF7 act to establish a balance of excitatory and inhibitory tone. Both FGFs are secreted from CA3 dendrites, acting on excitatory or inhibitory axon terminals formed onto CA3 dendrites, respectively. Mechanistically, FGF22 utilizes FGFR2b and FGFR1b to induce synaptic vesicle recruitment within axons of dentate granule cells (DGCs), and FGF7 utilizes FGFR2b to induce synaptic vesicle recruitment within interneuron axons. FGF signaling eventually induces gene expression in the presynaptic neurons; however, the effects of FGF22-induced gene expression within DGCs and FGF7-induced gene expression within interneurons in the context of a developing hippocampal circuit have yet to be explored. Here, we propose one hypothetical mechanism of FGF22-induced gene expression in controlling adult neurogenesis. PMID:27605441

  13. DNA-methylation dependent regulation of embryo-specific 5S ribosomal DNA cluster transcription in adult tissues of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and recently, demonstrated the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA. In this paper, we show some important distinctive data on 5S rRNA transcription for this organism. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of 5S rRNA, one which is embryo-specific and encoded by the smallest (700 bp) cluster and the other which is expressed at every stage and encoded by longer clusters (900 and 950 bp). We also demonstrate that the embryo-specific class of 5S rRNA is expressed in oocytes and embryonic stages and is silenced in adult tissue and that this phenomenon appears to be due exclusively to DNA methylation, as indicated by sensitivity to 5-azacytidine, unlike Xenopus where this mechanism is necessary but not sufficient to maintain the silenced status.

  14. Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) of changed Brain Function Provoked by Pro-Dopamine Regulator (KB220z) in one Adult ADHD case

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Bruce; Blum, Kenneth; McLaughlin, Thomas; Lubar, Joel; Febo, Marcelo; Braverman, Eric R.; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2016-01-01

    Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often continues into adulthood. Recent neuroimaging studies found lowered baseline dopamine tone in the brains of affected individuals that may place them at risk for Substance Use Disorder (SUD). This is an observational case study of the potential for novel management of Adult ADHD with a non-addictive glutaminergic-dopaminergic optimization complex KB200z. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was used to evaluate the effects of KB220z on a 72-year-old male with ADHD, at baseline and one hour following administration. The resultant z-scores, averaged across Eyes Closed, Eyes Open and Working Memory conditions, increased for each frequency band, in the anterior, dorsal and posterior cingulate regions, as well as the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during Working Memory, with KB220z. These scores are consistent with other human and animal neuroimaging studies that demonstrated increased connectivity volumes in reward circuitry and may offer a new approach to ADHD treatment. However, larger randomized trials to confirm these results are required. PMID:27610420

  15. DNA-methylation dependent regulation of embryo-specific 5S ribosomal DNA cluster transcription in adult tissues of sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Daniele; Dimarco, Eufrosina; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and recently, demonstrated the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA. In this paper, we show some important distinctive data on 5S rRNA transcription for this organism. Using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, we demonstrate the existence of two classes of 5S rRNA, one which is embryo-specific and encoded by the smallest (700 bp) cluster and the other which is expressed at every stage and encoded by longer clusters (900 and 950 bp). We also demonstrate that the embryo-specific class of 5S rRNA is expressed in oocytes and embryonic stages and is silenced in adult tissue and that this phenomenon appears to be due exclusively to DNA methylation, as indicated by sensitivity to 5-azacytidine, unlike Xenopus where this mechanism is necessary but not sufficient to maintain the silenced status. PMID:23933480

  16. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  17. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... to the hospital if you: Are an older adult Have kidney stones or changes in the anatomy ...

  18. Oestradiol Regulates Neuropeptide Y Release and Gene Coupling with the GABAergic and Glutamatergic Synapses in the Adult Female Rat Dentate Gyrus.

    PubMed

    Velíšková, J; Iacobas, D; Iacobas, S; Sidyelyeva, G; Chachua, T; Velíšek, L

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an endogenous modulator of neuronal activity affecting both GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission. Previously, we found that oestradiol modifies the number of NPY immunoreactive neurones in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study, we investigated which oestrogen receptor type is responsible for these changes in the number of NPY-positive neurones. Furthermore, we determined the effects of oestrogen receptor activation on NPY release. Finally, we examined the contribution of oestrogen toward the remodelling of the GABAergic and glutamatergic gene networks in terms of coupling with Npy gene expression in ovariectomised rats. We found that activation of either oestrogen receptor type (ERα or ERβ) increases the number of NPY-immunopositive neurones and enhances NPY release in the dentate gyrus. We also found that, compared to oestrogen-lacking ovariectomised rats, oestrogen replacement increases the probability of synergistic/antagonistic coupling between the Npy and GABAergic synapse genes, whereas the glutamatergic synapse genes are less likely to be coupled with Npy under similar conditions. The data together suggest that oestrogens play a critical role in the regulation of NPY system activity and are also involved in the coupling/uncoupling of the Npy gene with the GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses in the female rat dentate gyrus.

  19. Developmental regulation of ecdysone receptor (EcR) and EcR-controlled gene expression during pharate-adult development of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Mello, Tathyana R P; Aleixo, Aline C; Pinheiro, Daniel G; Nunes, Francis M F; Bitondi, Márcia M G; Hartfelder, Klaus; Barchuk, Angel R; Simões, Zilá L P

    2014-01-01

    Major developmental transitions in multicellular organisms are driven by steroid hormones. In insects, these, together with juvenile hormone (JH), control development, metamorphosis, reproduction and aging, and are also suggested to play an important role in caste differentiation of social insects. Here, we aimed to determine how EcR transcription and ecdysteroid titers are related during honeybee postembryonic development and what may actually be the role of EcR in caste development of this social insect. In addition, we expected that knocking-down EcR gene expression would give us information on the participation of the respective protein in regulating downstream targets of EcR. We found that in Apis mellifera females, EcR-A is the predominantly expressed variant in postembryonic development, while EcR-B transcript levels are higher in embryos, indicating an early developmental switch in EcR function. During larval and pupal stages, EcR-B expression levels are very low, while EcR-A transcripts are more variable and abundant in workers compared to queens. Strikingly, these transcript levels are opposite to the ecdysteroid titer profile. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) application experiments revealed that low 20E levels induce EcR expression during development, whereas high ecdysteroid titers seem to be repressive. By means of RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of both EcR transcript variants we detected the differential expression of 234 poly-A(+) transcripts encoding genes such as CYPs, MRJPs and certain hormone response genes (Kr-h1 and ftz-f1). EcR-KD also promoted the differential expression of 70 miRNAs, including highly conserved ones (e.g., miR-133 and miR-375), as well honeybee-specific ones (e.g., miR-3745 and miR-3761). Our results put in evidence a broad spectrum of EcR-controlled gene expression during postembryonic development of honeybees, revealing new facets of EcR biology in this social insect.

  20. Developmental regulation of ecdysone receptor (EcR) and EcR-controlled gene expression during pharate-adult development of honeybees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Tathyana R. P.; Aleixo, Aline C.; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Nunes, Francis M. F.; Bitondi, Márcia M. G.; Hartfelder, Klaus; Barchuk, Angel R.; Simões, Zilá L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Major developmental transitions in multicellular organisms are driven by steroid hormones. In insects, these, together with juvenile hormone (JH), control development, metamorphosis, reproduction and aging, and are also suggested to play an important role in caste differentiation of social insects. Here, we aimed to determine how EcR transcription and ecdysteroid titers are related during honeybee postembryonic development and what may actually be the role of EcR in caste development of this social insect. In addition, we expected that knocking-down EcR gene expression would give us information on the participation of the respective protein in regulating downstream targets of EcR. We found that in Apis mellifera females, EcR-A is the predominantly expressed variant in postembryonic development, while EcR-B transcript levels are higher in embryos, indicating an early developmental switch in EcR function. During larval and pupal stages, EcR-B expression levels are very low, while EcR-A transcripts are more variable and abundant in workers compared to queens. Strikingly, these transcript levels are opposite to the ecdysteroid titer profile. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) application experiments revealed that low 20E levels induce EcR expression during development, whereas high ecdysteroid titers seem to be repressive. By means of RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of both EcR transcript variants we detected the differential expression of 234 poly-A+ transcripts encoding genes such as CYPs, MRJPs and certain hormone response genes (Kr-h1 and ftz-f1). EcR-KD also promoted the differential expression of 70 miRNAs, including highly conserved ones (e.g., miR-133 and miR-375), as well honeybee-specific ones (e.g., miR-3745 and miR-3761). Our results put in evidence a broad spectrum of EcR-controlled gene expression during postembryonic development of honeybees, revealing new facets of EcR biology in this social insect. PMID:25566327

  1. Adult intussusception.

    PubMed Central

    Azar, T; Berger, D L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives were to review adult intussusception, its diagnosis, and its treatment. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Adult intussusception represents 1% of all bowel obstructions, 5% of all intussusceptions, and 0.003%-0.02% of all hospital admissions. Intussusception is a different entity in adults than it is in children. METHODS: The records of all patients 18 years and older with the postoperative diagnosis of intussusception at the Massachusetts General Hospital during the years 1964 through 1993 were reviewed retrospectively. The 58 patients were divided into those with benign enteric, malignant enteric, benign colonic, and malignant colonic lesions associated with their intussusception. The diagnosis and treatment of each were reviewed. RESULTS: In 30 years at the Massachusetts General Hospital, there are 58 cases of surgically proven adult intussusception. The patients' mean age was 54.4 years. Most patients presented with symptoms consistent with bowel obstruction. There were 44 enteric and 14 colonic intussusceptions. Ninety-three percent of the intussusceptions were associated with a pathologic lesion. Forty-eight percent of the enteric lesions were malignant and 52% were benign. Forty-three percent of the colonic lesions were malignant and 57% were benign. CONCLUSIONS: Intussusception occurs rarely in adults. It presents with a variety of acute, intermittent, and chronic symptoms, thus making its preoperative diagnosis difficult. Computed tomography scanning proved to be the most useful diagnostic radiologic method. The diagnosis and treatment of adult intussusception are surgical. Surgical resection of the intussusception without reduction is the preferred treatment in adults, as almost half of both colonic and enteric intussusceptions are associated with malignancy. PMID:9296505

  2. Adult Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Billie H.

    This document contains a brief bibliography of peer-reviewed literature, with abstracts, on adult children. It is one of 12 bibliographies on aging prepared by the National Agricultural Library for its "Pathfinders" series of publications. Topics covered by the other 11 bibliographies include aging parents, dementia and Alzheimer's disease in the…

  3. Adult Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bischof, Ledford J.

    This volume comprehensively reviews the research on the psychology of the middle aged (ages 40-65). Topics include the concept of maturity and maturation models, the measurement and influences of adult self image; marriage and sexual patterns; intergenerational relationships between and children; vocations and avocations (work, retirement, play,…

  4. Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.8 in the regulation of the release and synthesis of substance P in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Tang, He-Bin; Shiba, Eri; Li, Yu-Sang; Morioka, Norimitsu; Zheng, Tai-Xing; Ogata, Nobukuni; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2008-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Na(v)1.8 contributes to the release and/or synthesis of substance P (SP) in adult mice dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The SP released from cultured DRG neurons of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice exposed to either capsaicin or KCl was significantly lower than that from wild-type (C57BL/6) mice based on a radioimmunoassay. The SP level of L6 DRG in Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice was also lower than that in wild-type mice. After chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, the level of SP decreased in the L6 ipsilateral DRG of wild-type but not Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. The preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) mRNAs in L4 - 6 DRGs of Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice also fell to half their normally abundant levels of expression. There were significant increases in Na(v)1.8 expression of the L6 contralateral DRG from wild-type mice and in the percentage of neurons expressing neurokinin-1 receptor in the cytosol of L6 DRGs from wild-type or Na(v)1.8 knock-out mice. These findings suggest that Na(v)1.8 is involved in the regulation of the release and synthesis of SP in the DRG neurons of wild-type mice. PMID:18845912

  5. ADULT EDUCATION OF MIGRANT ADULTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BEAL, CATHERINE; AND OTHERS

    UNITS ON MIGRANT ADULT EDUCATION, AND A UNIT ON ORGANIZING INFORMAL GROUPS OF MIGRANT WOMEN TO DISCUSS MAINTAINING AND IMPROVING THEIR TEMPORARY HOMES, ARE PRESENTED. THE GOALS OF THE UNIT ON EDUCATION FOR MIGRANT MEN ARE ECONOMIC INDEPENDENCE, BETTER HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, AND BETTER HANDLING OF RESPONSIBILITIES. THE MAIN DIVISIONS OF THE…

  6. Role of hypothalamic neurogenesis in feeding regulation.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2014-02-01

    The recently described generation of new neurons in the adult hypothalamus, the center for energy regulation, suggests that hypothalamic neurogenesis is a crucial part of the mechanisms that regulate food intake. Accordingly, neurogenesis in both the adult and embryonic hypothalamus is affected by nutritional cues and metabolic disorders such as obesity, with consequent effects on energy-balance. This review critically discusses recent findings on the contribution of adult hypothalamic neurogenesis to feeding regulation, the impact of energy-balance disorders on adult hypothalamic neurogenesis, and the influence of embryonic hypothalamic neurogenesis upon feeding regulation in the adult. Understanding how hypothalamic neurogenesis contributes to food intake control will change the paradigm on how we perceive energy-balance regulation.

  7. [Adult twins].

    PubMed

    Charlemaine, Christiane

    2006-12-31

    This paper explores the deep roots of closeness that twins share in their youngest age and their effect on their destiny at the adult age. Psychologists believe the bond between twins begins in utero and develops throughout the twins' lives. The four patterns of twinship described show that the twin bond is determined by the quality of parenting that twins receive in their infancy and early childhood. Common problems of adult twins bring about difficulties to adapt in a non-twin world. The nature versus nurture controversy has taken on new life focusing on inter-twin differences and the importance of parent-child interaction as fundamental to the growth and development of personality. PMID:17352324

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  9. Teaching Adults. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan

    The question of how adult educators can make their teaching of adults more effective is explored in the context of recent work on adult lifelong learning. The following are among the topics discussed: (1) modes of adult education and the shift in focus from adult education to lifelong learning; (2) the contract between adult student and adult…

  10. Strategy Instruction in Writing for Adult Literacy Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacArthur, Charles A.; Lembo, Leah

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cognitive strategy instruction in writing with adult literacy learners. Three middle-aged African-American adults participating in adult education with the goal of passing the GED received tutoring in a strategy for planning, writing, and revising persuasive essays along with self-regulation strategies.…

  11. Immunological control of adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of adult central nervous system: the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone. These areas are populated by adult neural stem cells (aNSC) that are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways, which control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. For a long time, it was believed that the immune system did not exert any control on neural proliferative niches. However, it has been observed that many pathological and inflammatory conditions significantly affect NSC niches. Even more, increasing evidence indicates that chemokines and cytokines play an important role in regulating proliferation, cell fate choices, migration and survival of NSCs under physiological conditions. Hence, the immune system is emerging is an important regulator of neurogenic niches in the adult brain, which may have clinical relevance in several brain diseases. PMID:20861925

  12. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis and aging.

    PubMed

    Klempin, Friederike; Kempermann, Gerd

    2007-08-01

    The demographic changes in the foreseeable future stress the need for research on successful cognitive aging. Advancing age constitutes a primary risk factor for disease of the central nervous system most notably neurodegenerative disorders. The hippocampus is one of the brain regions that is prominently affected by neurodegeneration and functional decline even in what is still considered "normal aging". Plasticity is the basis for how the brain adapts to changes over time. The discovery of adult hippocampal neurogenesis has added a whole new dimension to research on structural plasticity in the adult and aging hippocampus. In this article, we briefly summarize and discuss recent findings on the regulation of adult neurogenesis with relevance to aging. Aging is an important co-variable for many regulatory mechanisms affecting adult neurogenesis but so far, only few studies have specifically addressed this interaction. We hypothesize that adult neurogenesis contributes to a neural reserve, i.e. the maintained potential for structural plasticity that allows compensation in situations of functional losses with aging. As such we propose that adult neurogenesis might contribute to the structural correlates of successful aging. PMID:17401726

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; Chronic bronchitis - adults - discharge; Emphysema - adults - ...

  14. Adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Toullec, E

    2015-02-01

    Adult flatfoot is defined as a flattening of the medial arch of the foot in weight-bearing and lack of a propulsive gait. The 3 lesion levels are the talonavicular, tibiotarsal and midfoot joints. The subtalar joint is damaged by the consequent rotational defects. Clinical examination determines deformity and reducibility, and assesses any posterior tibialis muscle deficit, the posterior tibialis tendon and spring ligament being frequently subject to degenerative lesions. Radiographic examination in 3 incidences in weight-bearing is essential, to determine the principal level of deformity. Tendon (posterior tibialis tendon) and ligamentous lesions (spring ligament and interosseous ligament) are analyzed on MRI or ultrasound. In fixed deformities, CT explores for arthritic evolution or specific etiologies. 3D CT reconstruction can analyze bone and joint morphology and contribute to the planning of any osteotomy. Medical management associates insoles and physiotherapy. Acute painful flatfoot requires strict cast immobilization. Surgical treatment associates numerous combinations of procedures, currently under assessment for supple flatfoot: for the hindfoot: medial slide calcaneal osteotomy, calcaneal lengthening osteotomy, or arthroereisis; for the midfoot: arthrodesis on one or several rays, or first cuneiform or first metatarsal osteotomy; for the ankle: medial collateral ligament repair with tendon transfer. Fixed deformities require arthrodesis of one or several joint-lines in the hindfoot; for the ankle, total replacement after realignment of the foot, or tibiotalocalcaneal fusion or ankle and hindfoot fusion; and, for the midfoot, cuneonavicular or cuneometatarsal fusion. Tendinous procedures are often associated. Specific etiologies may need individualized procedures. In conclusion, adult flatfoot tends to be diagnosed and managed too late, with consequent impact on the ankle, the management of which is complex and poorly codified.

  15. Adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Toullec, E

    2015-02-01

    Adult flatfoot is defined as a flattening of the medial arch of the foot in weight-bearing and lack of a propulsive gait. The 3 lesion levels are the talonavicular, tibiotarsal and midfoot joints. The subtalar joint is damaged by the consequent rotational defects. Clinical examination determines deformity and reducibility, and assesses any posterior tibialis muscle deficit, the posterior tibialis tendon and spring ligament being frequently subject to degenerative lesions. Radiographic examination in 3 incidences in weight-bearing is essential, to determine the principal level of deformity. Tendon (posterior tibialis tendon) and ligamentous lesions (spring ligament and interosseous ligament) are analyzed on MRI or ultrasound. In fixed deformities, CT explores for arthritic evolution or specific etiologies. 3D CT reconstruction can analyze bone and joint morphology and contribute to the planning of any osteotomy. Medical management associates insoles and physiotherapy. Acute painful flatfoot requires strict cast immobilization. Surgical treatment associates numerous combinations of procedures, currently under assessment for supple flatfoot: for the hindfoot: medial slide calcaneal osteotomy, calcaneal lengthening osteotomy, or arthroereisis; for the midfoot: arthrodesis on one or several rays, or first cuneiform or first metatarsal osteotomy; for the ankle: medial collateral ligament repair with tendon transfer. Fixed deformities require arthrodesis of one or several joint-lines in the hindfoot; for the ankle, total replacement after realignment of the foot, or tibiotalocalcaneal fusion or ankle and hindfoot fusion; and, for the midfoot, cuneonavicular or cuneometatarsal fusion. Tendinous procedures are often associated. Specific etiologies may need individualized procedures. In conclusion, adult flatfoot tends to be diagnosed and managed too late, with consequent impact on the ankle, the management of which is complex and poorly codified. PMID:25595429

  16. Adult Still's disease

    MedlinePlus

    Still's disease - adult; AOSD ... than 1 out of 100,000 people develop adult-onset Still's disease each year. It affects women more often than men. The cause of adult Still's disease is unknown. No risk factors for ...

  17. Panic Disorder among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  18. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  19. Major Depression Among Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hyperactivity Disorder Among Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among ...

  20. Adult neural stem cells stake their ground

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel A.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    The birth of new neurons in the walls of the adult brain lateral ventricles has captured the attention of many neuroscientists for over two decades, yielding key insights into the identity and regulation of neural stem cells (NSCs). In the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), NSCs are a specialized form of astrocyte that generates several types of neurons for the olfactory bulb. Here we discuss recent findings regarding the unique organization of the V-SVZ NSCs niche, the multiple regulatory controls of neuronal production, the distinct regional identities of adult NSCs, and the epigenetic mechanisms that maintain adult neurogenesis. Understanding how V-SVZ NSCs establish and maintain lifelong neurogenesis continues to provide surprising insights into the cellular and molecular regulation of neural development. PMID:25223700

  1. Testing Solutions for Adult Film Performers.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Zachary R

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the nation's adult films are produced in California, and within California, most production occurs in Los Angeles. In order to regulate that content, the County of Los Angeles passed the Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry Act (Measure B) by way of referendum in November 2012. Measure B requires that adult film producers wishing to film in Los Angeles County obtain permits from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and it also mandates that adult film performers use condoms while filming and "engaging in anal or vaginal sexual intercourse." Nevertheless, between August 2013 and January 2014, several adult film performers in California tested positive for HIV, and the threat of infection remains. Although Measure B is not the best way forward for Los Angeles County, elements of the ordinance should be incorporated into future legislative efforts. Given the economic ramifications of industry flight due to more localized regulations, this Note concludes that California should pass statewide comprehensive reform. Any such new legislation must treat "independent contractors," the classification generally used for adult film performs, as if they were regular employees. Legislation should also couple mandatory testing mechanisms with provisions granting performers the right to choose whether they use condoms. Finally, legislation must include mechanisms that ensure performers' preferences are not improperly tainted by outside forces and pressures. While there will always be risks associated with the production of adult content, if undertaken, these reforms could significantly mitigate those hazards. PMID:26809162

  2. Adult Recruitment Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Juliet, Ed.; And Others

    Findings of an American College Testing Program 1981 survey on college recruitment of adult students are summarized, and 12 articles on adult recruitment are presented. Titles and authors are as follows: "Adult Recruitment Practices: A Report of a National Survey" (Patricia Spratt, Juliet Kaufmann, Lee Noel); "Three Programs for Adults in Shopping…

  3. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  4. Adult Cancers in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Valérie; Marples, Maria; Stark, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of cancer seen in young people changes with increasing age, transitioning from childhood- to adult-type cancer in adolescence and the third decade. The risk factors, presentation and biology of cancer in young adults differ from those in the older adult population. Factors of particular significance in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) include genetic predisposition to adult-type cancer, diagnostic uncertainty, long-term morbidity and considerations of fertility. New systemic therapies are being introduced that can prolong life and even increase the chance of cure, but the impact on AYAs is uncertain, as these patients are often under-represented in clinical trials. Here, we discuss the management of AYAs with 3 of the most common cancers affecting adults, when they emerge in the AYA populations, and therefore are currently met by medical oncologists - breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma. PMID:27595357

  5. Rapid Emotion Regulation After Mood Induction: Age and Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Larcom, Mary Jo

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that emotion regulation improves with age. This study examined both age and individual differences in online emotion regulation after a negative mood induction. We found evidence that older adults were more likely to rapidly regulate their emotions than were younger adults. Moreover, older adults who rapidly regulated had lower trait anxiety and depressive symptoms and higher levels of optimism than their same-age peers who did not rapidly regulate. Measuring mood change over an extended time revealed that older rapid regulators still reported increased levels of positive affect over 20 min later, whereas young adult rapid regulators’ moods had declined. These results highlight the importance of considering individual differences when examining age differences in online emotion regulation. PMID:19808810

  6. 34 CFR 401.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... following regulations apply to the Indian Vocational Education Program: (a) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400 (except that 34 CFR parts 79 and 82 do not apply to this program). (b) The regulations in this... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT...

  7. 34 CFR 401.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... following regulations apply to the Indian Vocational Education Program: (a) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400 (except that 34 CFR parts 79 and 82 do not apply to this program). (b) The regulations in this... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT...

  8. 34 CFR 410.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply? 410.4 Section 410.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... Vocational Institutions Program: (a) The regulations in this part 410. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part...

  9. 34 CFR 406.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply? 406.4 Section 406.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in this part 406. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2394-2394e)...

  10. 34 CFR 410.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 410.4 Section 410.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... Vocational Institutions Program: (a) The regulations in this part 410. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part...

  11. 34 CFR 402.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply? 402.4 Section 402.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (b) The regulations in this part 402. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2313(c))...

  12. 34 CFR 406.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply? 406.4 Section 406.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in this part 406. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2394-2394e)...

  13. 34 CFR 410.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply? 410.4 Section 410.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... Vocational Institutions Program: (a) The regulations in this part 410. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part...

  14. 34 CFR 401.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... following regulations apply to the Indian Vocational Education Program: (a) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400 (except that 34 CFR parts 79 and 82 do not apply to this program). (b) The regulations in this... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT...

  15. 34 CFR 406.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply? 406.4 Section 406.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in this part 406. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2394-2394e)...

  16. 34 CFR 402.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply? 402.4 Section 402.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (b) The regulations in this part 402. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2313(c))...

  17. 34 CFR 402.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 402.4 Section 402.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (b) The regulations in this part 402. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2313(c))...

  18. 34 CFR 402.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply? 402.4 Section 402.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (b) The regulations in this part 402. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2313(c))...

  19. 34 CFR 406.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 406.4 Section 406.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in this part 406. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2394-2394e)...

  20. 34 CFR 406.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply? 406.4 Section 406.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in this part 406. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2394-2394e)...

  1. 34 CFR 402.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply? 402.4 Section 402.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (b) The regulations in this part 402. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2313(c))...

  2. 34 CFR 401.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... following regulations apply to the Indian Vocational Education Program: (a) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400 (except that 34 CFR parts 79 and 82 do not apply to this program). (b) The regulations in this... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT...

  3. 34 CFR 410.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply? 410.4 Section 410.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... Vocational Institutions Program: (a) The regulations in this part 410. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part...

  4. 34 CFR 401.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... following regulations apply to the Indian Vocational Education Program: (a) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400 (except that 34 CFR parts 79 and 82 do not apply to this program). (b) The regulations in this... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT...

  5. 34 CFR 410.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply? 410.4 Section 410.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... Vocational Institutions Program: (a) The regulations in this part 410. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part...

  6. 34 CFR 461.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE-ADMINISTERED BASIC GRANT PROGRAM General § 461.4 What...) The regulations in 34 CFR part 460. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.)...

  7. 34 CFR 461.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE-ADMINISTERED BASIC GRANT PROGRAM General § 461.4 What...) The regulations in 34 CFR part 460. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.)...

  8. 34 CFR 461.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE-ADMINISTERED BASIC GRANT PROGRAM General § 461.4 What...) The regulations in 34 CFR part 460. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.)...

  9. 34 CFR 461.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 34 CFR part 460. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.) ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE-ADMINISTERED BASIC GRANT PROGRAM General § 461.4...

  10. 34 CFR 461.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The regulations in 34 CFR part 460. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1201 et seq.) ... Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE-ADMINISTERED BASIC GRANT PROGRAM General § 461.4...

  11. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Carina; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F.; Rocha, Susana; Herrera-Solís, Andrea; Salas-Pacheco, José; García-García, Fabio; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called adult neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of adult neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview on how rhythms and sleep cycles regulate hippocampal and subventricular zone neurogenesis, discussing some potential underlying mechanisms. In addition, our review highlights some interacting points between sleep and adult neurogenesis in brain function, such as learning, memory, and mood states, and provides some insights on the effects of antidepressants and hypnotic drugs on adult neurogenesis. PMID:25926773

  12. Detrimental role of prolonged sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Carina; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F; Rocha, Susana; Herrera-Solís, Andrea; Salas-Pacheco, José; García-García, Fabio; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian brains continuously generate new neurons, a phenomenon called adult neurogenesis. Both environmental stimuli and endogenous factors are important regulators of adult neurogenesis. Sleep has an important role in normal brain physiology and its disturbance causes very stressful conditions, which disrupt normal brain physiology. Recently, an influence of sleep in adult neurogenesis has been established, mainly based on sleep deprivation studies. This review provides an overview on how rhythms and sleep cycles regulate hippocampal and subventricular zone neurogenesis, discussing some potential underlying mechanisms. In addition, our review highlights some interacting points between sleep and adult neurogenesis in brain function, such as learning, memory, and mood states, and provides some insights on the effects of antidepressants and hypnotic drugs on adult neurogenesis. PMID:25926773

  13. Isolation of diapause-regulated transcripts by differential display from the Colorado potato beetle, and their expression in prediapausing and nondiapausing adults. GenBank. Accessions: FG591137-FG591192

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using differential display, 56 putatively diapause regulated transcripts were isolated from the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata. The clones insert sizes range from 114 to 795 bp with mean length of 392 ± SD of 191 bp. Fourteen of the transcripts were confirmed by northern blot anal...

  14. Effect of Opioid on Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Loh, Horace H.; Law, Ping-Yee

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functional implications of adult neurogenesis has significantly progressed. Many studies focus on the factors that regulate proliferation and fate determination of adult neural stem/progenitor cells, including addictive drugs such as opioid. Here, we review the most recent works on opiate drugs' effect on different developmental stages of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. We conclude that opiate drugs in general cause a loss of newly born neural progenitors in the subgranular zone of dentate gyrus, by either modulating proliferation or interfering with differentiation and maturation. We also discuss the consequent impact of regulation of adult neurogenesis in animal's opioid addiction behavior. We further look into the future directions in studying the convergence between the adult neurogenesis field and opioid addiction field, since the adult-born granular cells were shown to play a role in neuroplasticity and may help to reduce the vulnerability to drug craving and relapse. PMID:27127799

  15. Year Book of Adult Education, 1969-70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Adult Education, London (England).

    The directory of the National Institute of Adult Education (NIAE) reviews major events in British adult education during 1968-69, followed by principles and functions of the NIAE, abstracts of legislation and regulations, listings of addresses and principal staff members for organizations throughout Great Britain, and overseas contacts through…

  16. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  17. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  18. The Social Environment and Neurogenesis in the Adult Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis – the formation of new neurons in adulthood – has been shown to be modulated by a variety of endogenous (e.g., trophic factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones) as well as exogenous (e.g., physical activity and environmental complexity) factors. Research on exogenous regulators of adult neurogenesis has focused primarily on the non-social environment. More recently, however, evidence has emerged suggesting that the social environment can also affect adult neurogenesis. The present review details the effects of adult–adult (e.g., mating and chemosensory interactions) and adult–offspring (e.g., gestation, parenthood, and exposure to offspring) interactions on adult neurogenesis. In addition, the effects of a stressful social environment (e.g., lack of social support and dominant–subordinate interactions) on adult neurogenesis are reviewed. The underlying hormonal mechanisms and potential functional significance of adult-generated neurons in mediating social behaviors are also discussed. PMID:22586385

  19. Liberal Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toiviainen, Timo

    1988-01-01

    Discusses providers of and the concept of liberal adult education in Finland. Providers include (1) folk high schools, (2) adult education centers, (3) voluntary popular organizations, (4) public libraries, (5) evening schools, (6) cooperative groups formed of universities and other adult education providers, (7) summer universities, and (8)…

  20. Comparing Adult Education Worldwide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, Alexander N.; And Others

    Comparative international adult education, defined as that field in which adult educators from various countries compare their own institutions and practices with those of their counterparts in other nations, is examined. Provided is an account of adult education in nine European socialist countries (including the Soviet Union), as well as…

  1. Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeds, Andrew, Ed.

    Designed primarily for adult literacy teachers and tutors, this curriculum describes the content of what should be taught in numeracy programs in order to meet the individual needs of adults through the selection and teaching of skills appropriate to those adults' needs. An introduction describes national standards and qualifications, learners,…

  2. Adult Educators' Core Competences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned…

  3. Adults Learning. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jenny

    Aimed at anyone who wants to know how to teach adults, this guide aims to build confidence, offer practical advice, and give the real-life flavor of helping fellow adults develop. Chapter 1 addresses adult learners: mindsets, motivation, and learning (learning cycle, learning styles, relevance, reinforcement and practice, experience, learning to…

  4. Adult Education in Hungary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csoma, Gyula; And Others

    Beginning with a brief survey of the national system, this work covers provisions since 1945 for adult education in Hungary. Educational objectives and other theoretical aspects of adult education in Hungarian society are described, together with the eight year elementary program, technical and vocational adult schools, general and professional…

  5. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  6. Dimensions of Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Griff, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This broad introduction to adult and postcompulsory education offers an overview of the field for students, adult educators and workplace trainers. The book establishes an analytical framework to emphasize the nature of learning and agency of learners; examines the core knowledge and skills that adult educators need; discusses policy, research and…

  7. Canadian Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooke, W. Michael, Comp.

    "Trends," a publication of the Canadian Association for Adult Education, is a collection of abstracts on selected subjects affecting adult education; this issue is on adult basic education (ABE). It covers teachers and teacher training, psychological factors relating to the ABE teacher and students, manuals for teachers, instructional materials,…

  8. Adult Learning Assumptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine Knowles' theory of andragogy and his six assumptions of how adults learn while providing evidence to support two of his assumptions based on the theory of andragogy. As no single theory explains how adults learn, it can best be assumed that adults learn through the accumulation of formal and informal…

  9. Adult Education in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkos, Alexios

    2008-01-01

    The central aim of this article is to analyse the current situation of adult education in Greece. The article focuses on the following points: (a) the degree of participation in programmes of continuing professional training and general adult education courses, (b) the quality and the outcomes of the adult education provision in Greece, and (c)…

  10. Adults Role in Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notar, Charles E.; Padgett, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Do adults play a role in bullying? Do parents, teachers, school staff, and community adult leaders influence bullying behavior in children and teenagers? This article will focus on research regarding all adults who have almost daily contact with children and teens and their part in how bullying is identified, addressed, and prevented. This article…

  11. Adult Survival Skills Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsko, Gregory M.

    The purpose of this instrument is to supplement data from the Adult Basic Learning Examination in assessing the functional level of adults in daily situations. It may also be used as a teaching tool for adults requesting tutoring in specific concepts and skills presented in the instrument. This instrument is an informal assessment instrument and…

  12. Adult Learning: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter, Ed.

    This book on adult learning is divided into six sections. Section 1, Cognitive Processes, includes the following chapters: "Cognitive Processes: Contemporary Paradigms of Learning" (Jack Mezirow); "Information Processing, Memory, Age and Adult Learning" (Gillian Boulton-Lewis); "Adult Learners' Metacognitive Behaviour in Higher Education" (Barry…

  13. Kids Who Outwit Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seita, John R.; Brendtro, Larry K.

    Kids who distrust adults are highly skilled at hiding their real nature and resisting change. Most adults shun such youths or get mired in conflict with them. Punitive get tough practices as well as traditional flaw-fixing treatment are reactive strategies that often drive these youths further from adult bonds and reinforce oppositional and…

  14. Adults Learning for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Alan

    This book, drawing on 30 years of adult education experience in England, Ireland, India, and other countries, contrasts the individualistic approach to adult education in the West with the social responsibility view of adult education in the developing world. The book's thesis is that the gulf between the approach of the West and that of…

  15. Young Adult Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boegen, Anne, Ed.

    Designed to offer guidelines, ideas and help to those who provide library service to young adults, this manual includes information about the provision of young adult (YA) services in six sections. The first section, which addresses planning and administration, includes a definition of a young adult and a checklist for determining community needs…

  16. The Adult Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Janet

    The 14 chapters of this textbook chronicle adult development from youth through old age, emphasizing both research and interviews with adults at various stages in their lives. Topics covered include the following: (1) the academic field of adult development; (2) theories and research methods; (3) aging and disease prevention; (4) sexuality and…

  17. Adult Education in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miser, Rifat; Ural, Ozana; Ünlühisarýklý, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the situation and practices of adult education in Turkey in terms of (a) participants, (b) providers, and (c) program areas. The data were derived from published statistical data and one-to-one interaction with adult education providers when such data are unavailable. Turkey has a long tradition of adult education with…

  18. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  19. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  20. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  1. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  2. Challenging the FDA's authority to regulate autologous adult stem cells for therapeutic use: Celltex therapeutics' partnership with RNL Bio, substantial medical risks, and the implications of United States v. Regenerative Sciences.

    PubMed

    Drabiak-Syed, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This Article examines the convergence of three corporations that have attempted to capitalize on translating emerging research into clinical procedures by manufacturing and facilitating the process for patients to obtain mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injections. Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has asserted its authority to regulate somatic cell therapy products like MSCs under the Public Health Service Act and the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, some manufacturers have attempted to circumvent FDA regulation through various mechanisms and argue that their products do not fall within the definition of a biological product or drug. However, scientific knowledge of using MSCs for clinical therapy remains in its infancy, and MSCs pose a number of serious risks to patients. This Article focuses on the development of Celltex, a company based in Sugar Land, Texas that manufactures and facilitates the injection of autologous MSCs; RNL Bio, a company that licenses its operations technology to Celltex; and Regenerative Sciences, a company based in Broomfield, Colorado that was recently involved in litigation with the FDA. Corporate circumvention of intended regulatory oversight exposes patients to potentially inefficacious products that could contribute to serious medical injuries such as viruses, myocardial infarction, cancer, or death.

  3. Regulation of binding proteins for insulin-like growth factors (IGF) in humans. Increased expression of IGF binding protein 2 during IGF I treatment of healthy adults and in patients with extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia.

    PubMed Central

    Zapf, J; Schmid, C; Guler, H P; Waldvogel, M; Hauri, C; Futo, E; Hossenlopp, P; Binoux, M; Froesch, E R

    1990-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in blood form two complexes with specific binding proteins (BPs): a large, growth hormone (GH)-dependent complex with restricted capillary permeability, and a smaller complex, inversely related to GH, with high turnover of its IGF pool and free capillary permeability. The distribution of BPs and of IGFs I and II between these complexes was studied in sera from healthy adults treated with IGF I or/and GH and from patients with extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia. Like GH, IGF I administration raises IGF I and two glycosylation variants of IGFBP-3 in the large complex, but unlike GH drastically reduces IGF II. During IGF I infusion, IGFBP-3 appears in the small complex whose IGFBP-2 and IGF I increase three- to fivefold and fivefold, respectively. GH treatment, associated with elevated insulin levels, suppresses IGFBP-2 and inhibits its increase owing to infused IGF I. The small complex of tumor sera contains increased amounts of IGFBP-2 and -3, and two- to threefold elevated IGF II. Conclusions: low GH and/or insulin during IGF I infusion and in extrapancreatic tumor hypoglycemia enhance expression of IGFBP-2 and favor partition of IGFBP-3 into the small complex. Free capillary passage and high turnover of its increased IGF I or II pools may contribute to compensate for suppressed insulin secretion during IGF I infusion or to development of tumor hypoglycemia. Images PMID:1697608

  4. Adult Neurogenesis and Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunchai; Wen, Zhexing; Song, Hongjun; Christian, Kimberly M; Ming, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders continue to be among the most challenging disorders to diagnose and treat because there is no single genetic or anatomical locus that is causative for the disease. Current treatments are often blunt tools used to ameliorate the most severe symptoms, at the risk of disrupting functional neural systems. There is a critical need to develop new therapeutic strategies that can target circumscribed functional or anatomical domains of pathology. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be one such domain. Here, we review the evidence suggesting that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in emotional regulation and forms of learning and memory that include temporal and spatial memory encoding and context discrimination, and that its dysregulation is associated with psychiatric disorders, such as affective disorders, schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Further, adult neurogenesis has proven to be an effective model to investigate basic processes of neuronal development and converging evidence suggests that aberrant neural development may be an etiological factor, even in late-onset diseases. Constitutive neurogenesis in the hippocampus of the mature brain reflects large-scale plasticity unique to this region and could be a potential hub for modulation of a subset of cognitive and affective behaviors that are affected by multiple psychiatric disorders. PMID:26801682

  5. Why Do Adults Learn? Developing a Motivational Typology across 12 European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeren, Ellen; Holford, John; Nicaise, Ides; Baert, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Participation in adult education is today generally considered an individual responsibility. However, participation is the result of a complex bounded agency between individuals, educational institutions and regulating governments. This paper explores the motives of 12,000 European adult learners in formal adult education in 12 European countries.…

  6. "If I Tell Them Then I Can." Ways of Relating to Adult Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Gisela

    2004-01-01

    This article explores how Swedish children relate to adult discussions and rules concerning children's play and television habits. It is argued that the children interviewed are well aware of adult ideas concerning children, TV and play. In accounting for these rules, the children present themselves as regulated by adults, but also as valuable to…

  7. Roles for Hedgehog signaling in adult organ homeostasis and repair

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Ralitsa; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2014-01-01

    The hedgehog (HH) pathway is well known for its mitogenic and morphogenic functions during development, and HH signaling continues in discrete populations of cells within many adult mammalian tissues. Growing evidence indicates that HH regulates diverse quiescent stem cell populations, but the exact roles that HH signaling plays in adult organ homeostasis and regeneration remain poorly understood. Here, we review recently identified functions of HH in modulating the behavior of tissue-specific adult stem and progenitor cells during homeostasis, regeneration and disease. We conclude that HH signaling is a key factor in the regulation of adult tissue homeostasis and repair, acting via multiple different routes to regulate distinct cellular outcomes, including maintenance of plasticity, in a context-dependent manner. PMID:25183867

  8. Adult neurogenesis and the ischemic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Parent, Jack M

    2006-01-01

    The recent identification of endogenous neural stem cells and persistent neuronal production in the adult brain suggests a previously unrecognized capacity for self-repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis not only continues in discrete regions of the adult mammalian brain, but new evidence also suggests that neural progenitors form new neurons that integrate into existing circuitry after certain forms of brain injury in the adult. Experimental stroke in adult rodents and primates increases neurogenesis in the persistent forebrain subventricular and hippocampal dentate gyrus germinative zones. Of greater relevance for regenerative potential, ischemic insults stimulate endogenous neural progenitors to migrate to areas of damage and form neurons in otherwise dormant forebrain regions, such as the neostriatum and hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, of the mature brain. This review summarizes the current understanding of adult neurogenesis and its regulation in vivo, and describes evidence for stroke-induced neurogenesis and neuronal replacement in the adult. Current strategies used to modify endogenous neurogenesis after ischemic brain injury also will be discussed, as well as future research directions with potential for achieving regeneration after stroke and other brain insults. PMID:15959458

  9. 34 CFR 421.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply? 421.4 Section 421.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... part 421. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2416)...

  10. 34 CFR 411.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply? 411.4 Section 411.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... 411. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2401 and 2402)...

  11. 34 CFR 426.8 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply? 426.8 Section 426.8 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION.... (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2420a)...

  12. 34 CFR 426.8 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply? 426.8 Section 426.8 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION.... (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2420a)...

  13. 34 CFR 411.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What regulations apply? 411.4 Section 411.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... 411. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2401 and 2402)...

  14. 34 CFR 426.8 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply? 426.8 Section 426.8 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION.... (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2420a)...

  15. 34 CFR 421.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply? 421.4 Section 421.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... part 421. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2416)...

  16. 34 CFR 421.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply? 421.4 Section 421.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... part 421. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2416)...

  17. 34 CFR 411.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply? 411.4 Section 411.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... 411. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2401 and 2402)...

  18. 34 CFR 426.8 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 426.8 Section 426.8 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION.... (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2420a)...

  19. 34 CFR 421.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 421.4 Section 421.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... part 421. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2416)...

  20. 34 CFR 426.8 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What regulations apply? 426.8 Section 426.8 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION.... (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2420a)...

  1. 34 CFR 411.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 411.4 Section 411.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... 411. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2401 and 2402)...

  2. 34 CFR 421.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What regulations apply? 421.4 Section 421.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... part 421. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2416)...

  3. 34 CFR 411.4 - What regulations apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What regulations apply? 411.4 Section 411.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION... 411. (b) The regulations in 34 CFR part 400. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 2401 and 2402)...

  4. Childhood poverty and recruitment of adult emotion regulatory neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Liberzon, Israel; Ma, Sean T; Okada, Go; Ho, S Shaun; Swain, James E; Evans, Gary W

    2015-11-01

    One in five American children grows up in poverty. Childhood poverty has far-reaching adverse impacts on cognitive, social and emotional development. Altered development of neurocircuits, subserving emotion regulation, is one possible pathway for childhood poverty's ill effects. Children exposed to poverty were followed into young adulthood and then studied using functional brain imaging with an implicit emotion regulation task focused. Implicit emotion regulation involved attention shifting and appraisal components. Early poverty reduced left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex recruitment in the context of emotional regulation. Furthermore, this emotion regulation associated brain activation mediated the effects of poverty on adult task performance. Moreover, childhood poverty also predicted enhanced insula and reduced hippocampal activation, following exposure to acute stress. These results demonstrate that childhood poverty can alter adult emotion regulation neurocircuitry, revealing specific brain mechanisms that may underlie long-term effects of social inequalities on health. The role of poverty-related emotion regulatory neurocircuitry appears to be particularly salient during stressful conditions.

  5. pH regulation in adult rat carotid body glomus cells. Importance of extracellular pH, sodium, and potassium [published erratum appears in J Gen Physiol 1993 Jan;101(1):following 144

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The course of intracellular pH (pHi) was followed in superfused (36 degrees C) single glomus (type I) cells of the freshly dissociated adult rat carotid body. The cells had been loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye 2',7'-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and -6)-carboxyfluorescein. The high K(+)-nigericin method was used for calibration. The pHi of the glomus cell at pHo 7.40, without CO2, was 7.23 +/- 0.02 (n = 70); in 5% CO2/25 mM HCO3-, pHi was 7.18 +/- 0.08 (n = 9). The pHi was very sensitive to changes in pHo. Without CO2, delta pHi/delta pHo was 0.85 (pHo 6.20-8.00; 32 cells), while in CO2/HCO3- this ratio was 0.82 irrespective of whether pHo (6.80-7.40; 14 cells) was changed at constant PCO2 or at constant [HCO3-]o. The great pHi sensitivity of the glomus cell to pHo is matched only by that of the human red cell. An active Na+/H+ exchanger (apparent Km = 58 +/- 6 mM) is present in glomus cells: Na+ removal or addition of the amiloride derivative 5- (N,N-hexamethylene)-amiloride induced pHi to fall by as much as 0.9. The membrane of these cells also contains a K+/H+ exchanger. Raising [K+]o from 4.7 to 25, 50, or 140 mM reversibly raised pHi by 0.2, 0.3, and 0.6, respectively. Rb+ had no effect, but in corresponding concentrations of Tl+ alkalinization was much faster than in K+. Reducing [K+]o to 1.5 mM lowered pHi by 0.1. These pHi changes were shown not to be due to changes in membrane voltage, and were even more striking in the absence of Na+. Intrinsic buffering power (amount of strong base required to produce, in the nominal absence of CO2, a small pHi rise) increased from 3 to approximately 21 mM as pHi was lowered, but remained nearly unchanged below pHi 6.60. The fitted expression assumed the presence of one "equivalent" intracellular buffer (pK 6.41, 41 mM). The exceptional pHi sensitivity to pHo suggests that the pHi of the glomus cell is a link in the chemoreceptor's response to external acidity. PMID:1294152

  6. Recruiting Adult Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Resources Network, Manhattan, KS.

    This document is the first nationwide compilation of successful recruiting techniques for students in adult basic education, literacy, General Educational Development classes, and adult high school degree programs. Information for the publication was gathered from a literature search and other sources, especially "Reaching the Least Educated," a…

  7. Provision for Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Edward

    1970-01-01

    Comments on the report recently issued by the National Institute of Adult Education as a result of inquiries made into provision for adult education in six areas in England and one in Wales between the years 1967 and 1969. (Author/EB)

  8. Counseling Adult Adoptees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review presents various resources about working with adult adoptees in order to inform counselors in their practice. Topics covered include basics of adoption, including types of adoption and adoption statistics; possible issues adult adoptees may face; and suggestions and implications for counselors. The article addresses some of the serious…

  9. Adult Counseling Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Phil; Davis, Sandy A.

    In order to determine the specific counseling needs of the adult learner, staff of the Adult Counseling Project began by conducting a literature search pertaining to the problems of returning students and those considering a return to school. The review revealed that little is known about the educational and vocational needs of the returning…

  10. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  11. Today's Adult Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Who are the adult students in career and technical education (CTE) today? There is not one simple answer to that question. Some are young with little life experience, while others are returning to the workforce and learning new skills to reinvent themselves. Whatever the case, educating adult students is an integral part of ACTE's mission, and the…

  12. Toward Transpersonal Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    2016-01-01

    As a foundation for discussing transpersonal adult development, the author traces her trajectory, involvement in, and contribution to the modern transpersonal movement and her introduction of it to the adult learning literature, beginning during the early 1980s. Highlighted are the transpersonal domain and a differentiation between transpersonal…

  13. Adult Education Regional Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2015

    2015-01-01

    For more than one hundred and fifty years, until 2008, California was an undisputed national leader in its commitment to adult education. The state's investment in adult learners topped $750 million, a sum greater than the combined total of every other state in the nation. However, for the past several years recession and fiscal crisis have left…

  14. Adult Education in Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Harry G.; Torricelli, James

    To develop background for examining the past, present, and future of adult education in Thailand, the author initially sketches an economic and geographic profile of the country. In the second of five sections, Thailand's adult education movement is traced by examining the influences of kings, the Buddhist religion, various governments, and the…

  15. Authenticity in Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Sam

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the relationship between authenticity and adult learning and prompted by some studies in which adult "authentic learning" is a central concept. The implication revealed by them is that real-worldness of learning contexts, learning content and learning tasks is perceived as conferring authenticity on learning. Here,…

  16. Nutrition in older adults.

    PubMed

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Amella, Elaine

    2005-03-01

    Both physiologic and psychosocial changes affect the nutritional status of adults over the age of 65. Malnutrition is, in fact, a greater threat to this population than obesity. This article reviews the intake requirements of older adults and discusses the risk factors that can lead to malnutrition, including diet, limited income, isolation, chronic illness, and physiologic changes. Assessment and nursing interventions are also addressed.

  17. Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Ernestine P., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    The major articles in this journal issue deal with various aspects of young adult literature. Specific topics covered in the articles are (1) questions worth asking students about young adult novels, (2) the five major functions of adolescent literature in high school literature programs, (3) Southwestern literature for adolescents, (4) teaching…

  18. Career Advising for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Johnnie H., Ed.; Clouse, James, Ed.

    This manual is designed to provide information and structural exercises for teachers who assist adults in career advising and career development. The materials, which can be shared with students individually or in small groups, are based on needs of adult students identified from the literature and from local needs assessment surveys. Topics…

  19. Libraries and Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josey, E. J., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Of the 13 essays presented in this special issue on libraries and adult education, 8 focus on programs and services from the public library for adult learners. These essays provide information on: (1) an Education Information Centers Program (EIC) designed to complement employment skills training provided under the Comprehensive Employment and…

  20. Constructing Adult Identities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter Magolda, Marcia B.

    1999-01-01

    Stories from a longitudinal study of 39 adults illuminate the complex journey from external to internal self-definition. Explores the dynamics of constructing an internal adult identity from age 22 to 30 and translates into recommendations for effective student affairs practice. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/GCP)