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Sample records for mirror cherenkov telescope

  1. Roughness tolerances for Cherenkov telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayabaly, K.; Spiga, D.; Canestrari, R.; Bonnoli, G.; Lavagna, M.; Pareschi, G.

    2015-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a forthcoming international ground-based observatory for very high-energy gamma rays. Its goal is to reach sensitivity five to ten times better than existing Cherenkov telescopes such as VERITAS, H.E.S.S. or MAGIC and extend the range of observation to energies down to few tens of GeV and beyond 100 TeV. To achieve this goal, an array of about 100 telescopes is required, meaning a total reflective surface of several thousands of square meters. Thence, the optimal technology used for CTA mirrors' manufacture should be both low-cost (~1000 euros/m2) and allow high optical performances over the 300-550 nm wavelength range. More exactly, a reflectivity higher than 85% and a PSF (Point Spread Function) diameter smaller than 1 mrad. Surface roughness can significantly contribute to PSF broadening and limit telescope performances. Fortunately, manufacturing techniques for mirrors are now available to keep the optical scattering well below the geometrically-predictable effect of figure errors. This paper determines first order surface finish tolerances based on a surface microroughness characterization campaign, using Phase Shift Interferometry. That allows us to compute the roughness contribution to Cherenkov telescope PSF. This study is performed for diverse mirror candidates (MAGIC-I and II, ASTRI, MST) varying in manufacture technologies, selected coating materials and taking into account the degradation over time due to environmental hazards.

  2. Bokeh mirror alignment for Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Baack, D.; Balbo, M.; Bergmann, M.; Biland, A.; Blank, M.; Bretz, T.; Bruegge, K. A.; Buss, J.; Domke, M.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Mueller, S. A.; Neise, D.; Neronov, A.; Noethe, M.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Shukla, A.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Toscano, S.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Wilbert, A.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) need imaging optics with large apertures and high image intensities to map the faint Cherenkov light emitted from cosmic ray air showers onto their image sensors. Segmented reflectors fulfill these needs, and composed from mass production mirror facets they are inexpensive and lightweight. However, as the overall image is a superposition of the individual facet images, alignment remains a challenge. Here we present a simple, yet extendable method, to align a segmented reflector using its Bokeh. Bokeh alig nment does not need a star or good weather nights but can be done even during daytime. Bokeh alignment optimizes the facet orientations by comparing the segmented reflectors Bokeh to a predefined template. The optimal Bokeh template is highly constricted by the reflector's aperture and is easy accessible. The Bokeh is observed using the out of focus image of a near by point like light source in a distance of about 10 focal lengths. We introduce Bokeh alignment on segmented reflectors and demonstrate it on the First Geiger-mode Avalanche Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) on La Palma, Spain.

  3. Normalized and asynchronous mirror alignment for Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Baack, D.; Balbo, M.; Bergmann, M.; Biland, A.; Blank, M.; Bretz, T.; Bruegge, K. A.; Buss, J.; Domke, M.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Mueller, S. A.; Neise, D.; Neronov, A.; Noethe, M.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Shukla, A.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Toscano, S.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Wilbert, A.

    2016-09-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) need imaging optics with large apertures and high image intensities to map the faint Cherenkov light emitted from cosmic ray air showers onto their image sensors. Segmented reflectors fulfill these needs, and as they are composed from mass production mirror facets they are inexpensive and lightweight. However, as the overall image is a superposition of the individual facet images, alignment is a challenge. Here we present a computer vision based star tracking alignment method, which also works for limited or changing star light visibility. Our method normalizes the mirror facet reflection intensities to become independent of the reference star's intensity or the cloud coverage. Using two CCD cameras, our method records the mirror facet orientations asynchronously of the telescope drive system, and thus makes the method easy to integrate into existing telescopes. It can be combined with remote facet actuation, but does not require one to work. Furthermore, it can reconstruct all individual mirror facet point spread functions without moving any mirror. We present alignment results on the 4 m First Geiger-mode Avalanche Cherenkov Telescope (FACT).

  4. The Cherenkov Telescope Array single-mirror small size telescope project: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Bilnik, W.; Bogacz, L.; Bulik, T.; Christov, A.; della Volpe, D.; Dyrda, M.; Frankowski, A.; Grudzińska, M.; Grygorczuk, J.; Heller, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Janiak, M.; Jamrozy, M.; Karczewski, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lyard, E.; Marszalek, A.; Michalowski, J.; Rameez, M.; Moderski, R.; Montaruli, T.; Neronov, A.; Nicolau-Kukliński, J.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Płatos, Ł.; Prandini, E.; Rafalski, J.; Rajda, P. J.; Rataj, M.; Rupiński, M.; Rutkowskai, K.; Seweryn, K.; Sidz, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Tokarz, M.; Toscano, S.; Troyano Pujadas, I.; Walter, R.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Wiśniewski, L.; Winiarski, K.; Zietara, K.; Ziółkowski, P.; Źychowski, P.

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the next generation very high energy gamma-ray observatory, will consist of three types of telescopes: large (LST), medium (MST) and small (SST) size telescopes. The small size telescopes are dedicated to the observation of gamma-rays with energy between a few TeV and few hundreds of TeV. The single-mirror small size telescope (SST-1M) is one of several SST designs. It will be equipped with a 4 m-diameter segmented mirror dish and a fully digital camera based on Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. Currently, the first prototype of the mechanical structure is under assembly in Poland. In 2014 it will be equipped with 18 mirror facets and a prototype of the camera.

  5. On-site mirror facet condensation measurements for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipold, J.; Medina, M. C.; García, B.; Rasztocky, E.; Mancilla, A.; Maya, J.; Larrarte, J. J.; de Souza, V.

    2016-09-01

    The Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT) has provided very important discoveries in Very High Energy (VHE) γ-ray astronomy for the last two decades, being exploited mainly by experiments such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. The same technique will be used by the next generation of γ-ray telescopes, Cherenkov Telescope Array - CTA, which is conceived to be an Observatory composed by two arrays strategically placed in both hemispheres, one in the Northern and one in the Southern. Each site will consist of several tens of Cherenkov telescopes of different sizes and will be equipped with about 10000 m2 of reflective surface. Because of its large size, the reflector of a Cherenkov telescope is composed of many individual mirror facets. Cherenkov telescopes operate without any protective system from weather conditions therefore it is important to understand how the reflective surfaces behave under different environmental conditions. This paper describes a study of the behavior of the mirrors in the presence of water vapor condensation. The operational time of a telescope is reduced by the presence of condensation on the mirror surface, therefore, to control and to monitor the formation of condensation is an important issue for IACT observatories. We developed a method based on pictures of the mirrors to identify the areas with water vapor condensation. The method is presented here and we use it to estimate the time and area two mirrors had condensation when exposed to the environmental conditions in the Argentinean site. The study presented here shows important guidelines in the selection procedure of mirror technologies and shows an innovative monitoring tool to be used in future Cherenkov telescopes.

  6. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: primary mirror characterization by deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo

    2015-09-01

    In 2014 the ASTRI Collaboration, led by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, has constructed an end-to-end prototype of a dual-mirror imaging air Cherenkov telescope, proposed for the small size class of telescopes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, has been installed at the observing station located at Serra La Nave (Italy). In this project the Brera Astronomical Observatory was responsible for the production and the testing of the primary mirror. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope's primary mirror has an aperture of ~ 4 m, a polynomial design, and consists of 18 individual hexagonal facets. These characteristics require the production and testing of panels with a typical size of ~1 m vertex-to-vertex and with an aspheric component of up to several millimetres. The mirror segments were produced assembling a sandwich of thin glass foils bent at room temperature to reach the desired shape. For the characterization of the mirrors we developed an ad-hoc deflectometry facility that works as an inverse Ronchi test in combination with a ray-tracing code. In this contribution we report the results of the deflectometric measurements performed on the primary mirror segments of the ASTRI SST-2M dual mirror telescope. The expected point spread function and the contributions to the degradation of the image quality are studied.

  7. An overview on mirrors for Cherenkov telescopes manufactured by glass cold-shaping technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canestrari, Rodolfo; Sironi, Giorgia

    2015-09-01

    The cold glass-slumping technique is a low cost processing developed at INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera for the manufacturing of mirrors for Cherenkov telescopes. This technology is based on the shaping of thin glass foils by means of bending at room temperature. The glass foils are thus assembled into a sandwich structure for retaining the imposed shape by the use of a honeycomb core. The mirrors so manufactured employ commercial off-the-shelf materials thus allowing a competitive cost and production time. They show very low weight, rigidity and environmental robustness. In this contribution we give an overview on the most recent results achieved from the adoption of the cold-shaping technology to different projects of Cherenkov telescopes. We show the variety of optical shapes implemented ranging from those spherical with long radius of curvature up to the most curved free form ones.

  8. The glass cold-shaping technology for the mirrors of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canestrari, Rodolfo; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Crimi, Giuseppe; Fiorini, Mauro; Giro, Enrico; La Palombara, Nicola; Pareschi, Giovanni; Perri, Luca; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Sironi, Giorgia; Stringhetti, Luca; Toso, Giorgio; Pelliciari, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    The next generation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes will require the production of thousands of mirror segments; an unprecedented amount of optical surface. To accomplish this, the Italian Istituto Nazionale di AstroFisica (INAF) has recently developed a successful technique. This method, called glass cold-shaping, is mainly intended for the manufacturing of mirrors for optical systems with an angular resolution of a few arcminutes, intended to operate in extreme environments. Its principal mechanical features are very low weight and high rigidity of the resulting segments, and its cost and production time turn out to be very competitive as well. The process is based on the shaping of thin glass foils by means of forced bending at room temperature; a sandwich structure is then assembled for retaining the imposed shape. These mirrors are composted of commercial, off-the-shelf materials. In this contribution we give an overview of the latest results achieved in the manufacturing of the pre-production series of mirrors for the Medium Size and Small Size Telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory.

  9. A facility to evaluate the focusing performance of mirrors for Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canestrari, Rodolfo; Giro, Enrico; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Farisato, Giancarlo; Lessio, Luigi; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Spiga, Rossella; Toso, Giorgio; Pareschi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Cherenkov Telescopes are equipped with optical dishes of large diameter - in general based on segmented mirrors - with typical angular resolution of a few arc-minutes. To evaluate the mirror's quality specific metrological systems are required that possibly take into account the environmental conditions in which typically these telescopes operate (in open air without dome protection). For this purpose a new facility for the characterization of mirrors has been developed at the labs of the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera of the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. The facility allows the precise measurement of the radius of curvature and the distribution of the concentred light in terms of focused and scattered components and it works in open air. In this paper we describe the facility and report some examples of its measuring capabilities.

  10. Qualification and Testing of a Large Hot Slumped Secondary Mirror for Schwarzschild-Couder Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodeghiero, G.; Giro, E.; Canestrari, R.; Pernechele, C.; Sironi, G.; Pareschi, G.; Lessio, L.; Conconi, P.

    2016-05-01

    Dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) telescopes are based on highly aspherical optics, and they represent a novel design in the world of very high energy astrophysics. This work addresses the realization and the qualification of the secondary mirror for an SC telescope, named ASTRI, developed in the context of the Cherenkov Telescope Array Observatory. The discussion surveys the overall development from the early design concept to the final acceptance optical tests.

  11. SST-GATE telescope: an innovative dual-mirror prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Delphine; Huet, Jean-Michel; Dournaux, Jean-Laurent; Laporte, Philippe; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Fasola, Gilles; Zech, Andreas; Rulten, Cameron; Sol, Hélène; Blake, Simon; Schmoll, Jurgen

    2014-07-01

    The Observatoire de Paris is involved in the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project by designing and constructing on the site of Meudon a Small Size Telescope prototype, named SST-GATE, in collaboration with the CHEC team (Compact High Energy Camera) which is providing the camera. The telescope structure is based on the Schwarzschild- Couder optical design which has never been adopted before in the design of a ground-based telescope. This concept allows a larger field of view and cheaper and smaller telescope and camera design with improved performance compared to the Davies-Cotton design traditionally used in very high energy gamma-ray telescopes. The SST-GATE telescope has been designed with the prime objectives of being light, versatile and simple to assemble with a minimal maintenance cost. This papers aims at reviewing the SST-GATE telescope structure from mechanics to optics along with the control command architecture; several innovative developments implemented within the design are discussed. Updates of the project status and perspectives are made.

  12. Simulation of the ASTRI two-mirrors small-size telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigongiari, C.; Cusumano, G.; Di Pierro, F.; La Parola, V.; Stamerra, A.; Vallania, P.; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium, the

    2016-05-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a world-wide project to build a new generation ground-based gamma-ray instrument operating in the energy range from some tens of GeV to above 100 TeV. To ensure full sky coverage CTA will consist of two arrays of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs), one in the southern hemisphere and another one in the northern hemisphere. CTA has just completed the design phase and it is entering in the pre-production one that includes the development of telescope precursor mini-arrays. ASTRI is an ongoing project, to develop and install at the southern CTA site one of such mini-arrays composed by nine dual-mirror small size telescopes equipped with an innovative camera based on silicon photomultiplier sensors. The end-to-end telescope prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, has been recently inaugurated at the Serra La Nave observing station, on Mount Etna, Italy. ASTRI SST-2M expected performance has been carefully studied using a full Monte Carlo simulation of the shower development in the atmosphere and detector response. Simulated data have been analyzed using the traditional Hillas moment analysis to obtain the expected angular and energy resolution. Simulation results, together with the comparison with the available experimental measurements, are shown.

  13. Construction of prototype two-mirror Schwartzchild-Couder Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) for VHE gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieda, David; CTA-US Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Next generation ground-based VHE gamma-ray observatories such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will employ an array of different sized IACTs distributed across square kilometer areas. During 2015-2016, the CTA-US collaboration is constructing a prototype 9.6 m primary diameter Schwartzchild-Couder IACT (SCT) at the FL Whipple Observatory, Amado, AZ USA. The two-mirror SCT design provides 8 degree field of view with 0.067 degree pixel size. The SCT uses a high resolution (11,328 pixel) Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) camera to record atmospheric Cherenkov light images generated by gamma-ray and cosmic ray primaries. Incorporation of SCT telescopes into a CTA-type observatory can provide superior angular resolution (30 % improvement) and point source sensitivity (30-50 %). In this talk, I will describe the capabilities of the SCT telescope, and the construction and commissioning of the prototype SCT telescope during 2016.

  14. The ASTRI project: Prototype status and future plans for a Cherenkov dual-mirror small-telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercellone, S.; ASTRI Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    ASTRI ("Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana") is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing a wide field of view (9.6° in diameter) end-to-end prototype of the CTA smallsize telescope (SST), devoted to the investigation of the energy range from a fraction of TeV up to (possibly) hundreds of TeV, and scheduled to start data acquisition in 2014. For the first time, a dualmirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical design will be adopted on a Cherenkov telescope, in order to obtain a compact (FNo. = 0.5) optical configuration. A second challenging, but innovative technical solution consists of a focal plane camera based on Silicon photo-multipliers with a logical pixel size of 0.17° (6.2mm × 6.2mm). We will describe the current status of the project, the results obtained so far, the expected performance, and its possible evolution in terms of a SST mini-array (composed of 5-7 SSTs and developed in collaboration with CTA international partners), which could peruse not only the adopted technological solutions, but also address a few scientific test cases.

  15. Design, optimization and characterization of the light concentrators of the single-mirror small size telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, J. A.; Basili, A.; Boccone, V.; Cadoux, F.; Christov, A.; della Volpe, D.; Montaruli, T.; Płatos, Ł.; Rameez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The focal-plane cameras of γ -ray telescopes frequently use light concentrators in front of the light sensors. The purpose of these concentrators is to increase the effective area of the camera as well as to reduce the stray light coming at large incident angles. These light concentrators are usually based on the Winston cone design. In this contribution we present the design of a hexagonal hollow light concentrator with a lateral profile optimized using a cubic Bézier function to achieve a higher collection efficiency in the angular region of interest. The design presented here is optimized for a Davies-Cotton telescope with a primary mirror of about 4 m in diameter and a focal length of 5.6 m. The described concentrators are part of an innovative camera made up of silicon-photomultiplier sensors, although a similar approach can be used for other sizes of single-mirror telescopes with different camera sensors, including photomultipliers. The challenge of our approach is to achieve a cost-effective design suitable for standard industrial production of both the plastic concentrator substrate and the reflective coating. At the same time we maximize the optical performance. In this paper we also describe the optical set-up to measure the absolute collection efficiency of the light concentrators and demonstrate our good understanding of the measured data using a professional ray-tracing simulation.

  16. Pulsar prospects for the Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, T.; Bonnefoy, S.; López, M.; Mirabal, N.; Barrio, J. A.; Contreras, J. L.; de los Reyes, R.; Wilhelmi, E. O.; Rudak, B.; CTA Consortium

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, the Fermi-LAT telescope has discovered over a 100 pulsars at energies above 100 MeV, increasing the number of known gamma-ray pulsars by an order of magnitude. In parallel, imaging Cherenkov telescopes, such as MAGIC and VERITAS, have detected for the first time VHE pulsed gamma-rays from the Crab pulsar. Such detections have revealed that the Crab VHE spectrum follows a power-law up to at least 400 GeV, challenging most theoretical models, and opening wide possibilities of detecting more pulsars from the ground with the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). In this contribution, we study the capabilities of CTA for detecting Fermi pulsars. For this, we extrapolate their spectra with "Crab-like" power-law tails in the VHE range, as suggested by the latest MAGIC and VERITAS results.

  17. Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Redding, David; Lowman, Andrew; Cohen, David; Ohara, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts the planned Actuated Hybrid Mirror Telescope (AHMT), which is intended to demonstrate a new approach to the design and construction of wide-aperture spaceborne telescopes for astronomy and Earth science. This technology is also appropriate for Earth-based telescopes. The new approach can be broadly summarized as using advanced lightweight mirrors that can be manufactured rapidly at relatively low cost. More specifically, it is planned to use precise replicated metallic nanolaminate mirrors to obtain the required high-quality optical finishes. Lightweight, dimensionally stable silicon carbide (SiC) structures will support the nanolaminate mirrors in the required surface figures. To enable diffraction- limited telescope performance, errors in surface figures will be corrected by use of mirror-shape-control actuators that will be energized, as needed, by a wave-front-sensing and control system. The concepts of nanolaminate materials and mirrors made from nanolaminate materials were discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Nanolaminates constitute a relatively new class of materials that can approach theoretical limits of stiffness and strength. Nanolaminate mirrors are synthesized by magnetron sputter deposition of metallic alloys and/or compounds on optically precise master surfaces to obtain optical-quality reflector surfaces backed by thin shell structures. As an integral part of the deposition process, a layer of gold that will constitute the reflective surface layer is deposited first, eliminating the need for a subsequent and separate reflective-coating process. The crystallographic textures of the nanolaminate will be controlled to optimize the performance of the mirror. The entire deposition process for making a nanolaminate mirror takes less than 100 hours, regardless of the mirror diameter. Each nanolaminate mirror will be bonded to its lightweight SiC supporting structure. The lightweight nanolaminate mirrors and Si

  18. Catching GRBs with atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R. C.; Primack, J. R.; Bouvier, A.; Otte, A. N.

    2011-08-01

    Fermi has shown GRBs to be a source of >10 GeV photons. We present an estimate of the detection rate of GRBs with a next generation Cherenkov telescope. Our predictions are based on the observed properties of GRBs detected by Fermi, combined with the spectral properties and redshift determinations for the bursts population by instruments operating at lower energies. While detection of VHE emission from GRBs has eluded ground-based instruments thus far, our results suggest that ground-based detection may be within reach of the proposed Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), albeit with a low rate, 0.25-0.5/yr. Such a detection would help constrain the emission mechanism of gamma-ray emission from GRBs. Photons at these energies from distant GRBs are affected by the UV-optical background light, and a ground-based detection could also provide a valuable probe of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) in place at high redshift.

  19. Volcanoes muon imaging using Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Del Santo, M.; Mineo, T.; Cusumano, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Pareschi, G.

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of a volcano inner structure is one of the key-points for the volcanic hazards evaluation. To this aim, in the last decade, geophysical radiography techniques using cosmic muon particles have been proposed. By measuring the differential attenuation of the muon flux as a function of the amount of rock crossed along different directions, it is possible to determine the density distribution of the interior of a volcano. Up to now, a number of experiments have been based on the detection of the muon tracks crossing hodoscopes, made up of scintillators or nuclear emulsion planes. Using telescopes based on the atmospheric Cherenkov imaging technique, we propose a new approach to study the interior of volcanoes detecting of the Cherenkov light produced by relativistic cosmic-ray muons that survive after crossing the volcano. The Cherenkov light produced along the muon path is imaged as a typical annular pattern containing all the essential information to reconstruct particle direction and energy. Our new approach offers the advantage of a negligible background and an improved spatial resolution. To test the feasibility of our new method, we have carried out simulations with a toy-model based on the geometrical parameters of ASTRI SST-2M, i.e. the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope currently under installation onto the Etna volcano. Comparing the results of our simulations with previous experiments based on particle detectors, we gain at least a factor of 10 in sensitivity. The result of this study shows that we resolve an empty cylinder with a radius of about 100 m located inside a volcano in less than 4 days, which implies a limit on the magma velocity of 5 m/h.

  20. Seismic analysis of the 4-meter telescope SST-GATE for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dournaux, Jean-Laurent; Huet, Jean-Michel; Amans, Jean-Philippe; Dumas, Delphine; Blake, Simon; Sol, Hélène

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project aims to create a next generation Very High Energy (VHE)γ-ray telescope array, devoted to the observation in a wide band of energy, from a few tens of GeV to more than 100 TeV. Two sites are foreseen to view the whole sky, with the main one in the Southern Hemisphere where about 100 telescopes of three different classes, related to the specific energy region to be investigated, will be installed. Among these, the Small Size class of Telescopes, SSTs, are 4-meter telescopes and are devoted to the highest energy region, from 1 TeV to beyond 100 TeV. Some of these sites considered for CTA exhibit strong seismic constraints. At the Observatoire de Paris, we have designed a prototype of a Small Size Telescope named SST-GATE, based on the dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical formula, which was never before implemented in the design of a Cherenkov telescope. The integration of this telescope on the site of the Observatoire de Paris is currently in progress. Technical solutions exist in the literature to protect structures from dynamic loads caused by earthquakes without increasing the mass and cost of the structure. This paper presents a state of the art of these techniques by keeping in mind that the operational performance of the telescope should not be compromised. The preliminary seismic analysis of SSTGATE performed by the finite element method is described before.

  1. Active optics system of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiol, Daniele; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fantinel, Daniela; Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi; Loreggia, Davide; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Russo, Federico; Volpicelli, Antonio C.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) SST-2M is an end-to-end prototype of Small Size class of Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. It will apply a dual mirror configuration to Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. The 18 segments composing the primary mirror (diameter 4.3 m) are equipped with an active optics system enabling optical re-alignment during telescope slew. The secondary mirror (diameter 1.8 m) can be moved along three degrees of freedom to perform focus and tilt corrections. We describe the kinematic model used to predict the system performance as well as the hardware and software design solution that will be implemented for optics control.

  2. Representations and image classification methods for Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Malagon, C.; Parcerisa, D. S.; Barrio, J. A.; Nieto, D.

    2008-05-29

    The problem of identifying gamma ray events out of charged cosmic ray background (so called hadrons) in Cherenkov telescopes is one of the key problems in VHE gamma ray astronomy. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to this problem by implementing different classifiers relying on the information of each pixel of the camera of a Cherenkov telescope.

  3. Calibration strategies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaug, Markus; Berge, David; Daniel, Michael; Doro, Michele; Förster, Andreas; Hofmann, Werner; Maccarone, Maria C.; Parsons, Dan; de los Reyes Lopez, Raquel; van Eldik, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    The Central Calibration Facilities workpackage of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory for very high energy gamma ray astronomy defines the overall calibration strategy of the array, develops dedicated hardware and software for the overall array calibration and coordinates the calibration efforts of the different telescopes. The latter include LED-based light pulsers, and various methods and instruments to achieve a calibration of the overall optical throughput. On the array level, methods for the inter-telescope calibration and the absolute calibration of the entire observatory are being developed. Additionally, the atmosphere above the telescopes, used as a calorimeter, will be monitored constantly with state-of-the-art instruments to obtain a full molecular and aerosol profile up to the stratosphere. The aim is to provide a maximal uncertainty of 10% on the reconstructed energy-scale, obtained through various independent methods. Different types of LIDAR in combination with all-sky-cameras will provide the observatory with an online, intelligent scheduling system, which, if the sky is partially covered by clouds, gives preference to sources observable under good atmospheric conditions. Wide-field optical telescopes and Raman Lidars will provide online information about the height-resolved atmospheric extinction, throughout the field-of-view of the cameras, allowing for the correction of the reconstructed energy of each gamma-ray event. The aim is to maximize the duty cycle of the observatory, in terms of usable data, while reducing the dead time introduced by calibration activities to an absolute minimum.

  4. Detection of metagalactic and galactic sources of very high-energy gamma-quanta and neutrinos with the mirror Cherenkov telescope SHALON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyna, V. G.

    2006-08-01

    Gamma-astronomy and neutrino astronomy are unique experimental possibilities to search for sources of high-energy cosmic rays (10 10eV). Experimental data on sources of γ-quanta with the energy >1TeV are characterized by the fact that observed metagalactic sources (active galactic nuclei), being different in power from galactic sources by the factor of 10 10, do not differ in the energy spectrum, F(>E)∝Eγ-1.3±0.15. The power of the metagalactic sources and their unlimited number casts doubts on the assumption of a galactic origin of the observed cosmic-ray flux. It is possible to assume that the uniform cosmic-ray spectrum is formed by “braking” in multiple elastic or inelastic collisions with relict photons in intergalactic space. Thus, the observed distribution of protons and cosmic-ray nuclei with the spectral index 2.72±0.02 (=2.718…, the Napier's constant) may be a consequence of such a “braking” that warms up the relict photons. Problems in observation of extensive air showers generated by neutrinos are connected with an extremely small cross section of inelastic collisions of neutrinos with nuclei. However, two facts allow to search for showers generated by neutrinos: (1) a hadron cascade with the primary energy of more than 10eV leaves a mountain ridge to the atmosphere from the depth ˜300g/cm without an essential loss of the total energy in the hadron cascade, and (2) air Cherenkov radiation from such hadron cascades will be observed with a 7.5 km distant telescope over an area of more than 7×10m. This partially compensates the small cross section of inelastic neutrino collisions.

  5. Sensivity studies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Tarek Hassan

    2015-06-01

    Since the creation of the first telescope in the 17th century, every major discovery in astrophysics has been the direct consequence of the development of novel observation techniques, opening new windows in the electromagnetic spectrum. After Karl Jansky discovered serendipitously the first radio source in 1933, Grote Reber built the first parabolic radio telescope in his backyard, planting the seed of a whole new field in astronomy. Similarly, new technologies in the 1950s allowed the establishment of other fields, such as the infrared, ultraviolet or the X-rays. The highest energy end of the electromagnetic spectrum, the γ-ray range, represents the last unexplored window for astronomers and should reveal the most extreme phenomena that take place in the Universe. Given the technical complexity of γ-ray detection and the extremely relative low fluxes, γ-ray astronomy has undergone a slower development compared to other wavelengths. Nowadays, the great success of consecutive space missions together with the development and refinement of new detection techniques from the ground, has allowed outstanding scientific results and has brought gamma-ray astronomy to a worthy level in par with other astronomy fields. This work is devoted to the study and improvement of the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the next generation of ground based γ-ray detectors, designed to observe photons with the highest energies ever observed from cosmic sources.

  6. Energy calibration of Cherenkov Telescopes using GLAST data

    SciTech Connect

    Bastieri, D.; Busetto, G.; Piano, G.; Rando, R.; Saggion, A.; De Angelis, A.; Longo, F.

    2007-07-12

    We discuss the possibility of using the observations by GLAST of steady gamma sources, as the Crab Nebula and some selected AGNs, to calibrate the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) and improve their energy resolution, in particular. We show that at around 100 GeV, exploiting the features in the spectrum of the Crab Nebula, the absolute energy calibration uncertainty of Cherenkov telescopes can be reduced to < 10%.

  7. Cosmology with liquid mirror telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David W.; Gibson, Brad K.; Hickson, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Liquid mirrors provide an exciting means to obtain large optical telescopes for substantially lower costs than conventional technologies. The liquid mirror concept has been demonstrated in the lab with the construction of a diffraction limited 1.5 m mirror. The mirror surface, using liquid mercury, forms a perfect parabolic shape when the mirror cell is rotated at a uniform velocity. A liquid mirror must be able to support a heavy mercury load with minimal flexure and have a fundamental resonant frequency that is as high as possible, to suppress the amplitude of surface waves caused by small vibrations transmitted to the mirror. To minimize the transmission of vibrations to the liquid surface, the entire mirror rests on an air bearing. This necessitates the mirror cell being lightweight, due to the limited load capabilities of the air bearing. The mirror components must also have physical characteristics which minimize the effects of thermal expansion with ambient temperature fluctuations in the observatory. In addition, the 2.7 m mirror construction is designed so that the techniques used may be readily extended to the construction of large mirrors. To attain the goals of a lightweight, rigid mirror, a composite laminant construction was used. The mirror consists of a foam core cut to the desired parabolic shape, with an accuracy of a few mm. An aluminum hub serves as an anchor for the foam and skin, and allows precise centering of the mirror on the air bearing and drive system. Several plys of Kevlar, covered in an epoxy matrix, are then applied to the foam. A final layer of pure epoxy is formed by spin casting. This final layer is parabolic to within a fraction of a mm. An aluminum ring bonded to the circumference of the mirror retains the mercury, and incorporates stainless-steel hard-points for the attachment of balance weights.

  8. An autocollimator alignment system for a Schwarzschild-Couder Cherenkov telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, S. T.; Kaaret, P.; Smith, E.

    2016-08-01

    We present a digital autocollimator which will be used in the alignment system of a prototype medium-sized telescope, which is part of the U.S. contribution to the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The Schwarzschild-Couder optics in the prototype telescope (which is currently under construction) requires the precise alignment of three components: the primary and secondary segmented mirrors, and the gamma-ray camera. The approximately 9 meter separation between the mirrors necessitates remote optical measurement. Our autocollimator will measure the angle of a segment in one mirror relative to the center of the other mirror with a precision better than 5 arcsec over a range of ±0.126 °. We present a detailed description of the instrument and describe its performance in the laboratory.

  9. Wide-angle cherenkov telescope prototype preliminary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Lev; Anatoly, Ivanov

    2016-07-01

    This report presents an observation method of Cherenkov light from extensive air showers (EAS) generated by cosmic rays (CRs) above 10^16eV and preliminary observations. The interest in Cherenkov light differential detectors of EAS is caused by the possibility to measure the depth of cascade maximum, Xmax, and/or the shower age via angular and temporal distributions of the Cherenkov signal. In particular, it was shown using EAS model simulations that the pulse width measured at the periphery of the shower, r > 300 m, at sea level is pronouncedly connected with Xmax. Cherenkov detector is a wide-angle telescope working in coincidence with scintillation detectors, integral and differential Cherenkov detectors Yakutsk complex EAS.

  10. Detection of tau neutrinos by imaging air Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, D.; Bernardini, E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the potential to detect tau neutrinos in the energy range of 1-1000 PeV searching for very inclined showers with imaging Cherenkov telescopes. A neutrino induced tau lepton escaping from the Earth may decay and initiate an air shower which can be detected by a fluorescence or Cherenkov telescope. We present here a study of the detection potential of Earth-skimming neutrinos taking into account neutrino interactions in the Earth crust, local matter distributions at various detector sites, the development of tau-induced showers in air and the detection of Cherenkov photons with IACTs. We analyzed simulated shower images on the camera focal plane and implemented generic reconstruction chains based on Hillas parameters. We find that present IACTs can distinguish air showers induced by tau neutrinos from the background of hadronic showers in the PeV-EeV energy range. We present the neutrino trigger efficiency obtained for a few configurations being considered for the next-generation Cherenkov telescopes, i.e. the Cherenkov Telescope Array. Finally, for a few representative neutrino spectra expected from astrophysical sources, we compare the expected event rates at running IACTs to what is expected for the dedicated IceCube neutrino telescope.

  11. The ASTRI prototype and mini-array: precursor telescopes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Observatory, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) has recently inaugurated in Sicily (Italy), at the Serra La Nave astronomical site on the slopes of Mount Etna, a large field of view (9.6 degrees) dual-mirror prototype (ASTRI SST-2M) of the CTA small size class of telescopes. CTA plans to install about 70 small size telescopes in the southern site to allow the study of the gamma rays from a few TeV up to hundreds of TeV. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype has been developed following an end-to-end approach, since it includes the entire system of structure, mirror's optics (primary and secondary mirrors), camera, and control/acquisition software. Although it is a technological prototype, the ASTRI SST-2M prototype will be able to perform systematic monitoring of bright TeV sources. A remarkable improvement in terms of performance could come from the operation of the ASTRI mini-array, led by INAF in synergy with the Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil) and the North-West University (South Africa) and with also a contribution by INFN. The ASTRI mini-array will be composed of at least nine ASTRI SST-2M units. It is proposed as one of the CTA mini-array of telescope precursors and initial seeds of CTA, to be installed at the final CTA southern site. Apart from the assessment of a number of technological aspects related to CTA, the ASTRI mini-array will extend and improve the sensitivity, similar to the H.E.S.S. one in the 1-10 TeV energy range, up to about 100 TeV.

  12. The Alignment System for a Medium-Sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope Prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Deivid; Humensky, Brian; Nieto, Daniel; V Vassiliev Group in UCLA division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P Kaaret Group at Iowa University Department of Physics and Astronomy, CTA Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international project for a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. CTA, conceived as an array of tens of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, comprising small, medium and large-size telescopes, is aiming to improve on the sensitivity of current-generation experiments by an order of magnitude and provide energy coverage from 20 GeV to more than 300 TeV. The Schwarzschild-Couder design is a candidate 9-m diameter medium-sized telescope featuring a novel aplanatic two-mirror optical design capable of a wide field of view with significantly improved imaging resolution as compared to the traditional Davies-Cotton optical design. Achieving this imaging resolution imposes strict mirror alignment requirements that necessitate a sophisticated alignment system. This system uses a collection of position sensors between panels to determine the relative position of adjacent panels; each panel is mounted on a Stewart platform to allow motion control with six degrees of freedom, facilitating the alignment of the optical surface for the segmented primary and secondary mirrors. Alignments of the primary and secondary mirrors and the camera focal plane with respect to each other are performed utilizing a set of CCD cameras which image LEDs placed on the mirror panels to measure relative translation, and custom-built auto-collimators to measure relative tilt between the primary and secondary mirrors along the optical axis of the telescope. In this contribution we present the status of the development of the SC optical alignment system, soon to be materialized in a full-scale prototype SC medium-size telescope (pSCT) at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona.

  13. Hubble Space Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph shows the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Primary Mirror being polished at the the Perkin-Elmer Corporation's large optics fabrication facility. After the 8-foot diameter mirror was ground to shape and polished, the glass surface was coated with a reflective layer of aluminum and a protective layer of magnesium fluoride, 0.1- and 0.025-micrometers thick, respectively. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST and the Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph shows engineers inspecting the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Primary Mirror at the Perkin-Elmer Corporation's large optics fabrication facility. After the 8-foot diameter mirror was ground to shape and polished, the glass surface was coated with a reflective layer of aluminum and a protective layer of magnesium fluoride, 0.1- and 0.025- micrometers thick, respectively. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST and the Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This photograph shows the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) Primary Mirror being ground at the Perkin-Elmer Corporation's large optics fabrication facility. After the 8-foot diameter mirror was ground to shape and polished, the glass surface was coated with a reflective layer of aluminum and a protective layer of magnesium fluoride, 0.1- and 0.025-micrometers thick, respectively. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST and the Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  16. Simulating the optical performance of a small-sized telescope with secondary optics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulten, Cameron; Zech, Andreas; Okumura, Akira; Laporte, Philippe; Schmoll, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-ray Cherenkov Telescope (GCT) is a small-sized telescope (SST) that represents one of three novel designs that are based on Schwarzschild-Couder optics and are proposed for use within the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The GAmma-ray Telescope Elements (GATE) program has led an effort to build a prototype of the GCT at the Paris Observatory in Meudon, France. The mechanical structure of the prototype, known as the SST-GATE prototype telescope, is now complete along with the successful installation of the camera. We present the results of extensive simulation work to determine the optical performance of the SST-GATE prototype telescope. Using the ROBAST software and assuming an ideal optical system, we find the radius of the encircled point spread function (θ80) of the SST-GATE to be ∼1.3 arcmin (∼0.02°) for an on-axis (θfield =0∘) observation and ∼3.6 arcmin (∼0.06°) for an observation at the edge of the field of view (θfield = 4 .4∘). In addition, this research highlights the shadowing that results from the stopping of light rays by various telescope components such as the support masts and trusses. It is shown that for on-axis observations the effective collection area decreases by approximately 1 m2 as a result of shadowing components other than the secondary mirror. This is a similar loss (∼11%) to that seen with the current generation of conventional Davies-Cotton (DC) Cherenkov telescopes. An extensive random tolerance analysis was also performed and it was found that certain parameters, especially the secondary mirror z-position and the tip and tilt rotations of the mirrors, are critical in order to contain θ80 within the pixel limit radius for all field angles. In addition, we have studied the impact upon the optical performance of introducing a hole in the center of the secondary mirror for use with pointing and alignment instruments. We find that a small circular area (radius < 150 mm) at the center of the secondary mirror

  17. Detection of atmospheric Cherenkov radiation using solar heliostat mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, R. A.; Bhattacharya, D.; Covault, C. E.; Dixon, D. D.; Gregorich, D. T.; Hanna, D. S.; Oser, S.; Québert, J.; Smith, D. A.; Tümer, O. T.; Zych, A. D.

    1996-10-01

    There is considerable interest world-wide in developing large area atmospheric Cherenkov detectors for ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. This interest stems, in large part, from the fact that the gamma-ray energy region between 20 and 250 GeV is unexplored by any experiment. Atmospheric Cherenkov detectors offer a possible way to explore this region, but large photon collection areas are needed to achieve low energy thresholds. We are developing an experiment using the heliostat mirrors of a solar power plant as the primary collecting element. As part of this development, we built a detector using four heliostat mirrors, a secondary Fresnel lens, and a fast photon detection system. In November 1994, we used this detector to record atmospheric Cherenkov radiation produced by cosmic ray particles showering in the atmosphere. The detected rate of cosmic ray events was consistent with an energy threshold near 1 TeV. The data presented here represent the first detection of atmospheric Cherenkov radiation using solar heliostats viewed from a central tower.

  18. The mini-array of ASTRI SST-2M telescopes, precursors for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Vercellone, Stefano; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Observatory, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) has recently inaugurated in Sicily (Italy), at the Serra La Nave astronomical site on the slopes of Mount Etna, a large field of view (FoV, ~ 9.6°) dual-mirror prototype (ASTRI SST-2M) of the CTA small size class of telescopes (SST). The CTA plans to install about 70 SST in the southern site to allow the study of the gamma rays from a few TeV up to hundreds of TeV. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype has been developed following an end-to-end approach, since it includes the entire system of structure, mirrors optics (primary and secondary mirrors), camera, and control/acquisition software. A remarkable performance improvement could come from the operation of the ASTRI mini-array, led by INAF in synergy with the Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil) and the North-West University (South Africa). The ASTRI mini-array will be composed of nine ASTRI SST-2M units and it is proposed as a precursor and initial seed of the CTA to be installed at the final CTA southern site. Apart from the assessment of a number of technological aspects related to the CTA, the ASTRI mini-array will, if compared for instance to H.E.S.S., extend the point source sensitivity up to ~ 100 TeV, also improving it above 5-10 TeV. Moreover, the unprecedented width of the FoV, with its homogeneous acceptance and angular resolution, will significantly contribute to the achievement of original results during the early CTA science phase.

  19. The ASTRI project within Cherenkov Telescope Array: data analysis and archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Bastieri, Denis; Capalbi, Milvia; Carosi, Alessandro; Catalano, Osvaldo; Di Paola, Andrea; Gallozzi, Stefano; Lombardi, Saverio; Lucarelli, Fabrizio; Perri, Matteo; Testa, Vincenzo

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI is the flagship project of INAF (Italian National Institute for Astrophysics) mainly devoted to the development of Cherenkov small-size dual-mirror telescopes (SST-2M) in the framework of the international Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Project. ASTRI SST-2M is an end-to-end prototype including scientific and technical operations as well as the related data analysis and archiving activities. We present here the ASTRI data handling and archiving system: it is responsible for both the on-site and off-site data processing and archiving. All the scientific, calibration, and engineering ASTRI data will be stored and organized in dedicated archives aimed to provide access to both the monitoring and data analysis systems.

  20. Expected performance of the ASTRI mini-array in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pierro, F.; Bigongiari, C.; Stamerra, A.; Vallania, P.; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium, the

    2016-05-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Observatory is a world-wide project for the ground-based study of the sources of the highest energy photons. By adopting telescopes of three different size categories it will cover the wide energy range from tens of GeV up to hundreds of TeV, limited only by the source physical properties and the gamma absorption by the extragalactic background light. The full sky coverage will be assured by two arrays, one in each hemisphere. An array of small size telescopes (SSTs), covering the highest energy region (3-100 TeV), the region most flux limited for current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, is planned to be deployed at the southern CTA site in the first phase of the CTA project. The ASTRI collaboration has developed a prototype of a dual mirror SST equipped with a SiPM-based focal plane (ASTRI SST-2M) and has proposed to install a mini-array of nine of such telescopes at the CTA southern site (the ASTRI mini-array). In order to study the expected performance and the scientific capabilities of different telescope configurations, full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the shower development in the atmosphere for both gammas and hadronic background have been performed, followed by detailed simulations of the telescopes. In this work the expected performance of the ASTRI mini-array in terms of sensitivity, angular and energy resolution are presented and discussed.

  1. Data compression for the first G-APD Cherenkov Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Balbo, M.; Bergmann, M.; Biland, A.; Bretz, T.; Buß, J.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Freiwald, J.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Lustermann, W.; Lyard, E.; Mannheim, K.; Meier, K.; Mueller, S.; Neise, D.; Neronov, A.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Steinbring, T.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Toscano, S.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Wilbert, A.

    2015-09-01

    The FACT telescope on the Canaries island of La Palma is the first Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope (IACT) to use solid state photomultipliers. It generates up to 2 TB of data per night which motivated us to investigate how to reduce the volume of data. Reducing the throughput enables us to efficiently acquire, store and process the observations data. This document presents the conclusions of this work, along with the implementation of the custom compression algorithm and I/O layer that is currently in use to operate the telescope.

  2. Very-High-Energy Astrophysics with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Reshmi

    2016-04-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a new gamma-ray observatory in the energy band ~30 GeV to ~100 TeV, designed to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over the currently operating imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. CTA will probe known sources with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and spectral coverage, with the potential of detecting hundreds of new sources. The CTA Consortium will also conduct a number of Key Science Projects, including a Galactic Plane survey and a survey of one quarter of the extragalactic sky. Data taken by CTA will be accessible by members of the wider astronomical community, for the first time in this energy band. This presentation will give an overview of CTA, and its proposed key science program.Submitted with the CTA Consortium

  3. PyFACT: Python and FITS analysis for Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raue, Martin; Deil, Christoph

    2012-12-01

    Ground-based very-high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray astronomy is growing from being conducted by small teams in closed collaborations into a full-fledged branch of astronomy with open observatories. This is best illustrated by the number of known sources: it increased by one order of magnitude in the past ten years, from 10 in the year 2000 to more than 100 in 2010. It is expected that this trend will continue with the next-generation instrument Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). This transformation has a profound impact on the data format and analysis of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). Up to now, IACT data analysis was an internal task performed by specialists with no public access to the data or software. In the future, a large community of VHE astronomers from different scientific topics should be enabled to work with the data. Ease of use, compatibility, and integration with existing astronomy standards and tools will be key. In this contribution, a collection of Python tools for the analysis of data in FITS format (PyFACT; Python and FITS Analysis for Cherenkov Telescopes) is presented, which connects with existing tools like xspec, sherpa, and ds9. The package is available as open source (https://github.com/mraue/pyfact, comments and contributions welcome). Advantages of the chosen ansatz are discussed and implications for future observatories and data archival are presented.

  4. The Cherenkov Telescope Array For Very High-Energy Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2015-08-01

    The field of very high energy (VHE) astrophysics had been revolutionized by the results from ground-based gamma-ray telescopes, including the current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (IACT) arrays: HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS. A worldwide consortium of scientists from 29 countries has formed to propose the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) that will capitalize on the power of this technique to greatly expand the scientific reach of ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. CTA science will include key topics such as the origin of cosmic rays and cosmic particle acceleration, understanding extreme environments in regions close to neutron stars and black holes, and exploring physics frontiers through, e.g., the search for WIMP dark matter, axion-like particles and Lorentz invariance violation. CTA is envisioned to consist of two large arrays of Cherenkov telescopes, one in the southern hemisphere and one in the north. Each array will contain telescopes of different sizes to provide a balance between cost and array performance over an energy range from below 100 GeV to above 100 TeV. Compared to the existing IACT arrays, CTA will have substantially better angular resolution and energy resolution, will cover a much wider energy range, and will have up to an order of magnitude better sensitivity. CTA will also be operated as an open observatory and high-level CTA data will be placed into the public domain; these aspects will enable broad participation in CTA science from the worldwide scientific community to fully capitalize on CTA's potential. This talk will: 1) review the scientific motivation and capabilities of CTA, 2) provide an overview of the technical design and the status of prototype development, and 3) summarize the current status of the project in terms of its proposed organization and timeline. The plans for access to CTA data and opportunities to propose for CTA observing time will be highlighed.Presented on behalf of the CTA Consortium.

  5. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (Light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  6. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction and ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55-m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror.

  7. 3D DIC tests of mirrors for the single-mirror small-size telescope of CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rataj, M.; Malesa, M.; Kujawińska, M.; Płatos, Ł.; Wawer, P.; Seweryn, K.; Malowany, K.

    2015-10-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation very high energy gamma-ray observatory. Three classes of telescopes, of large, medium and small sizes are designed and developed for the observatory. The single-mirror option for the small-size telescopes (SST-1M), of 4 m diameter, dedicated to the observations of the highest energy gamma-rays above several TeV, consists of 18 hexagonal mirror facets of 78 cm flat-to-flat. The goal of the work described in this paper is the investigation of a surface shape quality of the mirror facets of the SST-1M CTA telescope. The mirrors measured are made of composite materials formed using sheet moulding compound (SMC) technology. This solution is being developed as an alternative to glass mirrors, to minimize the production cost of hundreds of mirrors for the network of telescopes, while retaining the optical quality of the telescope. To evaluate the progress of design, production technology and the mirrors' functionality in operating conditions, the three-dimensional (3D) Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method was selected and implemented for testing selected mirrors. The method and measurement procedure are described. The novel measurement approach based on 3D DIC has been proven to be well suited to the investigation of the mirrors' behavior with temperature, producing the necessary accuracy.

  8. Design constraints on Cherenkov telescopes with Davies-Cotton reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Ribordy, M.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the construction of high-performance ground-based gamma-ray Cherenkov telescopes with a Davies-Cotton reflector. For the design of such telescopes, usually physics constrains the field-of-view, while the photo-sensor size is defined by limited options. Including the effect of light-concentrators, it is demonstrated that these constraints are enough to mutually constrain all other design parameters. The dependability of the various design parameters naturally arises once a relationship between the value of the point-spread functions at the edge of the field-of-view and the pixel field-of-view is introduced. To be able to include this constraint into a system of equations, an analytical description for the point-spread function of a tessellated Davies-Cotton reflector is derived from Taylor developments and ray-tracing simulations. Including higher order terms renders the result precise on the percent level. Design curves are provided within the typical phase space of Cherenkov telescopes. The impact of all design parameters on the overall design is discussed. Allowing an immediate comparison of several options with identical physics performance allows the determination of the most cost efficient solution. Emphasis is given on the possible application of solid light concentrators with their typically about two times better concentration compared with hollow cones which allows the use of small photo sensors such as Geiger-mode avalanche photo diodes. This is discussed in more details in the context of possible design options for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. In particular, a solution for a 60 mm2 photo sensor with hollow cone is compared to a 36 mm2 with solid cone.

  9. Status of the Cherenkov Telescope Array project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barres de Almeida, U.

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy holds a great potential for astrophysics, particle physics, and cosmology. The CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation of ground-based gamma-ray observatories which will represent a factor of 5-10× improvement in the sensitivity of observations in the range 100 GeV-10 TeV, as well as an extension of the observational capabilities down to energies below 100 GeV and beyond 100 TeV. The array will consist of two telescope networks (one in the northern hemisphere and another in the south) so to achieve a full-sky coverage, and will be composed by a hybrid system of 4 different telescope types. It will operate as an observatory, granting open access to the community through calls for submission of proposals competing for observation time. The CTA will give us access to the non-thermal and high-energy universe at an unprecedented level, and will be one of the main instruments for high-energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics of the next 30 years. CTA has now entered its prototyping phase with the first, stand-alone instruments being built. Brazil is an active member of the CTA consortium, and the project is represented in Latin America also by Argentina, Mexico, and Chile. In the next few months the consortium will define the site for installation of CTA South, which might come to be hosted in the Chilean Andes, with important impact for the high-energy community in Latin America. In this talk we will present the basic concepts of the CTA and the detailed project of the observatory. Emphasis will be put on its scientific potential and on the Latin-American involvement in the preparation and construction of the observatory, whose first seed, the ASTRI mini-array, is currently being constructed in Sicily, in a cooperation between Italy, Brazil, and South Africa. ASTRI should be installed on the final CTA site in 2016, whereas the full CTA array is expected to be operational by the end of the decade.

  10. Status of the Cherenkov telescope array project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barres de Almeida, Ulisses

    2015-12-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy holds a great potential for Astrophysics, Particle Physics and Cosmology. The CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation of ground-based gamma-ray observatories, which will represent a factor of 5-10× improvement in the sensitivity of observations in the range 100 GeV - 10 TeV, as well as an extension of the observational capabilities down to energies below 100 GeV and beyond 100 TeV. The array will consist of two telescope networks (one in the Northern Hemisphere and another in the South) so to achieve a full-sky coverage, and will be composed by a hybrid system of 4 different telescope types. It will operate as an observatory, granting open access to the community through calls for submission of proposals competing for observation time. The CTA will give us access to the non-thermal and high-energy universe at an unprecedented level, and will be one of the main instruments for high-energy astrophysics and astroparticle physics of the next 30 years. CTA has now entered its prototyping phase with the first, stand-alone instruments being built. Brazil is an active member of the CTA consortium, and the project is represented in Latin America also by Argentina, Mexico and Chile. In the next few months the consortium will define the site for installation of CTA South, which might come to be hosted in the Chilean Andes, with important impact for the high-energy community in Latin America. In this talk we will present the basic concepts of the CTA and the detailed project of the observatory. Emphasis will be put on its scientific potential and on the Latin-American involvement in the preparation and construction of the observatory, whose first seed, the ASTRI mini-array, is currently being constructed in Sicily, in a cooperation between Italy, Brazil and South Africa. ASTRI should be installed on the final CTA site in 2016, whereas the full CTA array is expected to be operational by the end of the decade.

  11. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Bowers, Charles W.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Heaney, James B.; Gallagher, Benjamin; McKay, Andrew; Stevenson, Ian

    2012-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Telescope Element (OTE) mirror coating program has been completed. The science goals of the JWST mission require a uniform, low stress, durable optical coating with high reflectivity over the JWST spectral region. The coating has to be environmentally stable, radiation resistant and compatible with the cryogenic operating environment. The large size, 1.52 m point to point, light weight, beryllium primary mirror (PM) segments and flawless coating process during the flight mirror coating program that consisted coating of 21 flight mirrors were among many technical challenges. This paper provides an overview of the JWST telescope mirror coating program. The paper summarizes the coating development program and performance of the flight mirrors.

  12. Reproduction Of William Herschel's Metallic Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, N.; Hirabayashi, S.; Isida, A.; Komori, A.; Nishitani, M.

    2006-08-01

    Following the reproduction of Cassini's open-air telescope, which took us almost three years to complete, our club decided to reproduce the metallic mirror telescope invented by William Herschel, which is a telescope of the subsequent generation. We based our design on the 7-foot telescope by which he used to discover Uranus in 1781. The metallic mirror was casted and blended copper and tin in the ratio of seven to three, exactly like the mirrors in those days. The surface of the casted mirror had many imperfections such as hollow portions and bubbles. These were removed by using the rock grinder at our school and the mirror was later polished at the Hidaka Optical Institute. The tube of the mirror was also made up of eight polygons just like the original. When we observed the stars with the metallic mirror telescope, they were a little bit dark, but it was possible to observe them well and to observe the gap between Saturn and Cassini. We also succeeded in observing Uranus with this telescope last September. Reproduction of the telescope mount is being made in a nearly the same design as the original one. We have learned through the reproduction that the unique design of the mount allows us to make observations with precise tracking accuracy in a comfortable observing position.

  13. FACT - The first G-APD Cherenkov telescope (first results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Dorner, D.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Buß, J.; Commichau, V.; Djambazov, L.; Eisenacher, D.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H.; Hildebrand, D.; Krähenbühl, T.; Lustermann, W.; Lyard, E.; Mannheim, K.; Neise, D.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Röser, U.; Stucki, J.-P.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Tobler, S.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Weitzel, Q.; Zänglein, M.

    2012-12-01

    In October 2011, the first air-Cherenkov telescope utilizing Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes commenced operations. The silicon-based devices display several advantages compared to classical photomultiplier tubes allowing for a more compact camera design of higher reliability, lower power consumption and bias voltage, and better prospects for improving the photon detection efficiency. Here, the first physics results are presented from a few months of data taking. Although still preliminary, the results already show a superb fidelity of the data, demonstrating the potential of avalanche photodiodes for ground-based gamma ray astronomy. The stability and high sensitivity are ideal for remote monitoring observations of variable gamma-ray sources.

  14. The Multiple-Mirror Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, Nathaniel P.; Hoffmann, William F.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the basic design and principle of operating an optical-infrared telescope, the MMT. This third largest telescope in the world represents a new stage in telescope design; it uses a cluster of six reflecting telescopes, and relies on an automatic sensing and control system. (GA)

  15. Development of a mid-sized Schwarzschild-Couder Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.

    2012-06-28

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a ground-based observatory for very high-energy (10 GeV to 100 TeV) gamma rays, planned for operation starting in 2018. It will be an array of dozens of optical telescopes, known as Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (ACTs), of 8 m to 24 m diameter, deployed over an area of more than 1 square km, to detect flashes of Cherenkov light from showers initiated in the Earth's atmosphere by gamma rays. CTA will have improved angular resolution, a wider energy range, larger fields of view and an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over current ACT arrays such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Several institutions have proposed a research and development program to eventually contribute 36 medium-sized telescopes (9 m to 12 m diameter) to CTA to enhance and optimize its science performance. The program aims to construct a prototype of an innovative, Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (SCT) design that will allow much smaller and less expensive cameras and much larger fields of view than conventional Davies-Cotton designs, and will also include design and testing of camera electronics for the necessary advances in performance, reliability and cost. We report on the progress of the mid-sized SCT development program.

  16. Actuated Hybrid Mirrors for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory; Ealey, Mark; Redding, David

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes new, large, ultra-lightweight, replicated, actively controlled mirrors, for use in space telescopes. These mirrors utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. Called Actuated Hybrid Mirrors (AHMs), they use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. They enable an Active Optics space telescope architecture that uses periodic image-based wavefront sensing and control to assure diffraction-limited performance, while relaxing optical system fabrication, integration and test requirements. The proposed International Space Station Observatory seeks to demonstrate this architecture in space.

  17. A Deployable Primary Mirror for Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Phelps, James E.; Dyer, Jack E.; Caudle, David A.; Tam, Anthony; Escobedo, Javier; Kasl, Eldon P.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center, Composite Optics, Inc., and Nyma/ADF have developed jointly a deployable primary mirror for space telescopes that combines over five years of research on deployment of optical-precision structures and over ten years of development of fabrication techniques for optical-precision composite mirror panels and structures. The deployable mirror is directly applicable to a broad class of non-imaging "lidar" (light direction a nd ranging) telescopes whose figure-error requirements are in the range of one to ten microns RMS. Furthermore, the mirror design can be readily modified to accommodate imaging-quality reflector panels and active panel-alignment control mechanisms for application to imaging telescopes. The present paper: 1) describes the deployable mirror concept; 2) explains the status of the mirror development; and 3) provides some technical specifications for a 2.55- m-diameter, proof-of-concept mirror. Keywords: precision deployment, hinge joint, latch joint, deployable structures, fabrication, space telescopes, optical instruments, microdynamics.

  18. Unimorph piezoelectric deformable mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, P.; Verpoort, S.; Wittrock, U.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed, manufactured and tested a unimorph deformable mirror for space applications based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror was designed for the correction of low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of micrometers over a clear aperture of 50 mm. It was successfully tested in thermal vacuum, underwent lifetime tests, and was exposed to random vibrations, sinusoidal vibrations, and to ionizing radiation. We report on design considerations, manufacturing of the mirror, and present the test results. Furthermore, we discuss critical design parameters, and how our mirror could be adapted to serve recently proposed space telescopes such as HDST and TALC.

  19. Microsecond Time Resolution Optical Photometry using a H.E.S.S. Cherenkov Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Deil, Christoph; Domainko, Wilfried; Hermann, German

    2008-02-22

    We have constructed an optical photometer with microsecond time resolution, which is currently being operated on one of the H.E.S.S. telescopes. H.E.S.S. is an array of four Cherenkov telescopes, each with a 107 m{sup 2} mirror, located in the Khomas highland in Namibia. In its normal mode of operation H.E.S.S. observes Cherenkov light from air showers generated by very high energy gamma-rays in the upper atmosphere. Our detector consists of seven photomultipliers, one in the center to record the lightcurve from the target and six concentric photomultipliers as a veto system to reject disturbing signals e.g. from meteorites or lightning at the horizon. The data acquisition system has been designed to continuously record the signals with zero deadtime. The Crab pulsar has been observed to verify the performance of the instrument and the GPS timing system. Compact galactic targets were observed to search for flares on timescales of a few microseconds to {approx}100 ms. The design and sensitivity of the instrument as well as the data analysis method are presented.

  20. Monte Carlo studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, M.; Jogler, T.; Dumm, J.; Funk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parameters including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters representative of the proposed Davies-Cotton (DC) and Schwarzchild-Couder (SC) MST designs, we compare the performance of the arrays by examining the gamma-ray angular resolution and differential point-source sensitivity. We further investigate the array performance under a wide range of conditions, determining the impact of the number of telescopes, telescope separation, night sky background, and geomagnetic field. We find a 30-40% improvement in the gamma-ray angular resolution at all energies when comparing arrays with an equal number of SC and DC telescopes, significantly enhancing point-source sensitivity in the MST energy range. We attribute the increase in point-source sensitivity to the improved optical point-spread function and smaller pixel size of the SC telescope design.

  1. Monte Carlo studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    DOE PAGES

    Wood, M. D.; Jogler, T.; Dumm, J.; Funk, S.

    2015-06-07

    In this paper, we present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parametersmore » including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters representative of the proposed Davies–Cotton (DC) and Schwarzchild–Couder (SC) MST designs, we compare the performance of the arrays by examining the gamma-ray angular resolution and differential point-source sensitivity. We further investigate the array performance under a wide range of conditions, determining the impact of the number of telescopes, telescope separation, night sky background, and geomagnetic field. We find a 30–40% improvement in the gamma-ray angular resolution at all energies when comparing arrays with an equal number of SC and DC telescopes, significantly enhancing point-source sensitivity in the MST energy range. Finally, we attribute the increase in point-source sensitivity to the improved optical point-spread function and smaller pixel size of the SC telescope design.« less

  2. Monte Carlo studies of medium-size telescope designs for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M. D.; Jogler, T.; Dumm, J.; Funk, S.

    2015-06-07

    In this paper, we present studies for optimizing the next generation of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). Results focus on mid-sized telescopes (MSTs) for CTA, detecting very high energy gamma rays in the energy range from a few hundred GeV to a few tens of TeV. We describe a novel, flexible detector Monte Carlo package, FAST (FAst Simulation for imaging air cherenkov Telescopes), that we use to simulate different array and telescope designs. The simulation is somewhat simplified to allow for efficient exploration over a large telescope design parameter space. We investigate a wide range of telescope performance parameters including optical resolution, camera pixel size, and light collection area. In order to ensure a comparison of the arrays at their maximum sensitivity, we analyze the simulations with the most sensitive techniques used in the field, such as maximum likelihood template reconstruction and boosted decision trees for background rejection. Choosing telescope design parameters representative of the proposed Davies–Cotton (DC) and Schwarzchild–Couder (SC) MST designs, we compare the performance of the arrays by examining the gamma-ray angular resolution and differential point-source sensitivity. We further investigate the array performance under a wide range of conditions, determining the impact of the number of telescopes, telescope separation, night sky background, and geomagnetic field. We find a 30–40% improvement in the gamma-ray angular resolution at all energies when comparing arrays with an equal number of SC and DC telescopes, significantly enhancing point-source sensitivity in the MST energy range. Finally, we attribute the increase in point-source sensitivity to the improved optical point-spread function and smaller pixel size of the SC telescope design.

  3. A First EGRET-UNID-Related Agenda for Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petry, Dirk

    The next generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) will open the regime between ≈ 30 GeV and 200 GeV to ground-based gamma observations with unprecedented point source sensitivity and source location accuracy. I examine the prospects of observing the unidentified objects (UNIDs) of the Third EGRET Catalog using the IACT observatories currently under construction by the CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS collaborations. Assuming a modest spectral steepening similar to that observed in the inverse Compton component of the Crab Nebula spectrum and taking into account the sensitivity of the instruments and its zenith angle dependence, a detailed list of 78 observable objects is derived which is then further constrained to 38 prime candidates. The characteristics of this agenda are discussed.

  4. FACT—The first Cherenkov telescope using a G-APD camera for TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhub, H.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Commichau, S.; Commichau, V.; Domke, M.; Dorner, D.; Gendotti, A.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H.; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Köhne, J.-H.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Krumm, B.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Neise, D.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Rhode, W.; Rissi, M.; Ribordy, M.; Röser, U.; Stark, L. S.; Stucki, J.-P.; Tibolla, O.; Viertel, G.; Vogler, P.; Warda, K.; Weitzel, Q.

    2011-05-01

    Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes (G-APD) bear the potential to significantly improve the sensitivity of Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT). We are currently building the First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) by refurbishing an old IACT with a mirror area of 9.5 square meters and are constructing a new, fine-pixelized camera using novel G-APDs. The main goal is to evaluate the performance of a complete system by observing very high energy gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula. This is an important field test to check the feasibility of G-APD-based cameras to replace at some time the PMT-based cameras of planned future IACTs like AGIS and CTA. In this article, we present the basic design of such a camera as well as some important details.

  5. The telescope control of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov telescope Array: hardware and software design architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Cascone, Enrico; Schwarz, Joseph; Stringhetti, Luca; Tanci, Claudio; Tosti, Gino; Aisa, Damiano; Aisa, Simone; Bagaglia, Marco; Busatta, Andrea; Campeggi, Carlo; Cefala, Marco; Farnesini, Lucio; Giacomel, Stefano; Marchiori, Gianpiero; Marcuzzi, Enrico; Nucciarelli, Giuliano; Piluso, Antonfranco

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research and led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF). One of its aims is to develop, within the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) framework, an end-to-end small-sized telescope prototype in a dual-mirror configuration (SST-2M) in order to investigate the energy range E ~ 1-100 TeV. A long-term goal of the ASTRI program is the production of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array composed of seven SST-2M telescopes. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, is seen as a standalone system that needs only network and power connections to work. The software system that is being developed to control the prototype is the base for the Mini-Array Software System (MASS), which has the task to make possible the operation of both the ASTRI SST-2M prototype and the ASTRI/CTA mini-array. The scope of this contribution is to give an overview of the hardware and software architecture adopted for the ASTRI SST- 2M prototype, showing how to apply state of the art industrial technologies to telescope control and monitoring systems.

  6. New electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (NECTAr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, C. L.; Delagnes, E.; Bolmont, J.; Corona, P.; Dzahini, D.; Feinstein, F.; Gascón, D.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Guilloux, F.; Nayman, P.; Rarbi, F.; Sanuy, A.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Toussenel, F.; Vincent, P.; Vorobiov, S.

    2012-12-01

    The international CTA consortium has recently entered into its preparatory phase towards the construction of the next-generation Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA. This experiment will be a successor, and based on the return of experience from the three major current-generation arrays H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS, and aims to significantly improve upon the sensitivity as well as the energy range of its highly successful predecessors. Construction is planned to begin by 2013, and when finished, CTA will be able to explore the highest-energy gamma ray sky in unprecedented detail. To achieve this increase in sensitivity and energy range, CTA will employ the order of 100 telescopes of three different sizes on two sites, with around 1000-4000 channels per camera, depending on the telescope size. To equip and reliably operate the order of 100000 channels of photodetectors (compared to 6000 of the H.E.S.S. array), a new kind of flexible and powerful yet inexpensive front-end hardware will be required. One possible solution is pursued by the NECTAr (New Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array) project. Its main feature is the integration of as much as possible of the front-end electronics (amplifiers, fast analogue samplers, memory and ADCs) into a single ASIC, which will allow very fast readout performances while significantly reducing the cost and the power consumption per channel. Also included is a low-cost FPGA for digital treatment and online data processing, as well as an Ethernet connection. Other priorities of NECTAr are the modularity of the system, a high degree of flexibility in the trigger system as well as the possibility of flexible readout modes to optimise the signal-to-noise ratio while at the same time allowing a significant reduction of data rates, both of which could improve the sensitivity of CTA compared to current detection systems. This paper gives an overview over the development work for the Nectar system, with particular focus on its main

  7. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Primary Mirror Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Prior to installation, technicians inspect the primary mirror of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The first in a series of great observatories launched by NASA, the HST was designed to last approximately 15 years. The Marshall Space Flight Center had management responsibility for the development of the HST and played a major role in ground tests and orbital checkout of the telescope. The HST was launched April 24, 1990 aboard Space Shuttle Discovery's STS-31 mission.

  8. The ASTRI/CTA mini-array of Small Size Telescopes as a precursor of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareschi, Giovanni; Agnetta, Gaetano; Antolini, Elisa; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Bastieri, Denis; Bellassai, Giancarlo; Belluso, Massimiliano; Bigongiari, Ciro; Billotta, Sergio; Biondo , Benedetto; Boettcher, Markus; Bonanno, Giovanni; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Bruno , Pietro; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Capalbi, Milvia; Capobianco, G.; Caraveo, Patrizia; Carosi, Alòessandro; Cascone, Enrico; Catalano, Osvaldo; Cereda, Michele; Conconi, Paolo; Conforti, Vito; Cusumano, Giancarlo; De Caprio, Vincenzo; De Luca, Andrea; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Di Paola, Andrea; Di Pierro, Federico; Fantinel, Daniela; Fiorini, Mauro; Fugazza, Dino; Gardiol, Daniele; Gargano, Carmelo; Garozzo , Salvatore; Gianotti , Fulvio; Giarrusso , Salvatore; Giro, Enrico; Grillo, Aledssandro; Impiombato, Domenico; Incorvaia , Salvatore; La Barbera , Antonino; La Palombara , Nicola; La Parola , Valentina; La Rosa, Giovanni; Lessio, Luigi; Leto, Giuseppe; Lombardi , Saverio; Lucarelli, Fabrizio; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Malaspina, Giuseppe; Marano, Davide; Martinetti , Eugenio; Melioli, C.; Millul, Rachele; Mineo , Teresa; Morello, Carlo; Morlino, Giovanni; Nemmen, R.; Perri, Luca; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Romano, Patrizia; Romeo, Giuseppe; Russo, Francesco; Sacco, Bruno; Sartore, Nicola; Schwarz, Joseph; Alberto, Segreto; Selvestrel, Danilo; Sironi, Giorgia; Stamerra, Antonio; Strazzeri, Elisabetta; Stringhetti, Luca; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanci, Claudio; Testa, Vincenzo; Timpanaro , Maria Cristina; Toso, Giorgio; Tosti, Gino; Trifoglio, Massimo; Vallania, Piero; Vercellone, Stefano; Volpicelli, Antonio; Zitelli, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    ASTRI ("Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana") is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing a wide-field-of-view (9.6 degrees in diameter) end-to-end prototype of the small-size telescope (SST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA, sensitive in the energy band from a few TeV up to hundreds TeV. The ASTRI telescope is based on a dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (ASTRI SST-2M) optical design, with a compact (F# = 0.5) optical configuration named ASTRI SST-2M telescope. This allows us to adopt an innovative modular focal plane camera based on silicon photo-multipliers, with a logical pixel size of 6.2mm x 6.2mm. Moreover, planned, and already being developed, an SST mini-array based on 7 identical telescopes represents an evolution of the ASTRI SST-2M telescope. The ASTRI/CTA mini-array will be part of the CTA array, representing a precursor that will be included into the final array. With the mini-array, in addition to a technical assessment studies in the perpective of the full CTA implementation, it will be possible to perform an early scientific program. In particular we wish to start investigating the poorly known energy range between a few and 100 TeV, thus exploring e.g. the cut-off regime of cosmic accelerators. Apart from INAF, other international institutes will directly participate in the mini-array implementation, as the North-West University in South Africa and the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil. An interest about it has been expressed also by other international groups. In this talk we will report on the development status of the ASTRI prototype and ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  9. Solar optical telescope primary mirror controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Liu, D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a technique to control the articulated primary mirror (APM) of the solar optical telescope (SOT) is discussed. Program results indicate that a single, all digital controller has sufficient capability to totally handle the computational requirements for control of the SOT APM.

  10. Freeform Optical Design of Two Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Joseph; West, Garrett; Trumper, Isaac; Anderson, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Two Mirror telescopes composed of freeform optical surfaces are investigated and surveyed to explore the usable design space. F-number and field of view are evaluated and plotted. A case study is presented to show the benefits of volume reduction using freeform surfaces.

  11. Vibration damping for the Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Yingling, Adam J.; Griffin, Steven F.; Agrawal, Brij N.; Cobb, Richard G.; Chambers, Trevor S.

    2012-09-01

    The Segmented Mirror Telescope (SMT) at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) in Monterey is a next-generation deployable telescope, featuring a 3-meter 6-segment primary mirror and advanced wavefront sensing and correction capabilities. In its stowed configuration, the SMT primary mirror segments collapse into a small volume; once on location, these segments open to the full 3-meter diameter. The segments must be very accurately aligned after deployment and the segment surfaces are actively controlled using numerous small, embedded actuators. The SMT employs a passive damping system to complement the actuators and mitigate the effects of low-frequency (<40 Hz) vibration modes of the primary mirror segments. Each of the six segments has three or more modes in this bandwidth, and resonant vibration excited by acoustics or small disturbances on the structure can result in phase mismatches between adjacent segments thereby degrading image quality. The damping system consists of two tuned mass dampers (TMDs) for each of the mirror segments. An adjustable TMD with passive magnetic damping was selected to minimize sensitivity to changes in temperature; both frequency and damping characteristics can be tuned for optimal vibration mitigation. Modal testing was performed with a laser vibrometry system to characterize the SMT segments with and without the TMDs. Objectives of this test were to determine operating deflection shapes of the mirror and to quantify segment edge displacements; relative alignment of λ/4 or better was desired. The TMDs attenuated the vibration amplitudes by 80% and reduced adjacent segment phase mismatches to acceptable levels.

  12. Calibration of the Cherenkov telescope array using cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R. D.; Hinton, J. A.; Schoorlemmer, H.

    2016-11-01

    Cosmic ray electrons represent a background for gamma-ray observations with Cherenkov telescopes, initiating air-showers which are difficult to distinguish from photon-initiated showers. This similarity, however, and the presence of cosmic ray electrons in every field observed, makes them potentially very useful for calibration purposes. Here we study the precision with which the relative energy scale and collection area/efficiency for photons can be established using electrons for a major next generation instrument such as CTA. We find that variations in collection efficiency on hour timescales can be corrected to better than 1%. Furthermore, the break in the electron spectrum at ∼ 0.9 TeV can be used to calibrate the energy scale at the 3% level on the same timescale. For observations on the order of hours, statistical errors become negligible below a few TeV and allow for an energy scale cross-check with instruments such as CALET and AMS. Cosmic ray electrons therefore provide a powerful calibration tool, either as an alternative to intensive atmospheric monitoring and modelling efforts, or for independent verification of such procedures.

  13. Large size SiPM matrix for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, G.; Corti, D.; Ionica, M.; Manea, C.; Mariotti, M.; Rando, R.; Reichardt, I.; Schultz, C.

    2016-07-01

    SiPM photo detectors are nowadays commonly used in many applications. For large size telescopes like MAGIC or the future Large Size Telescope (LST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project, a pixel size of some square centimeters is needed. An analog amplifier and sum stage was built and characterized. A large and compact SiPM matrix prototype, with the associated focusing optics, was assembled into a monolithic light detector with an active area of 3 cm2. The performance of the electronics is tailored for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) applications, with fast signal and adequate signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio.

  14. Large Telescope Segmented Primary Mirror Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rud, Mayer

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a broadband (white light) point source, located at the telescope Cassegrain focus, which generates a cone of light limited by the hole in the secondary mirror (SM). It propagates to the aspheric null-mirror, which is optimized to make all the reflected rays to be normal to the primary mirror (PM) upon reflection. PM retro-reflects the rays back through the system for wavefront analysis. The point source and the wavefront analysis subsystems are all located behind the PM. The PM phasing is absolute (white light) and does not involve the SM. A relatively small, aspheric null-mirror located near the PM center of curvature has been designed to deliver the high level of optical wavefront correction. The phasing of the segments is absolute due to the use of a broadband source. The segmented PM is optically aligned independently and separately from the SM alignment. The separation of the PM segments alignment from the PM to the SM, and other telescope optics alignments, may be a significant advantage, eliminating the errors coupling. The point source of this concept is fully cooperative, unlike a star or laser-generated guide-star, providing the necessary brightness for the optimal S/N ratio, the spectral content, and the stable on-axis position. This concept can be implemented in the lab for the PM initial alignment, or made to be a permanent feature of the space-based or groundbased telescope.

  15. Primary mirror assemblies for large space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamed, Evgeny R.; Sokolsky, M. N.

    1995-09-01

    In this report are considered the basic problems which relate to developemnt, manufacture, experimental trying out, and usage of primary mirrors (PM) of the large space telescopes intended to perform distant sounding of the Earth. Attention is concentrated on development of weight-reduced passive mirrors which ensure more reliable operation of the telescope as a whole. In the report we expressed the opinion that it is quite possible to manufacture a passive weight-reduced PM if its diameter is equal approximately to 3 m. Materials which may be used for the manufacturing of PM are beryllium and silicon carbide, physical and mechanical parameters of which are the most preferable ones. But it should be taken into consideration that this is the glass ceramic of CO115M brand which has been mastered by the industry of Russia in the greatest extent. It was confirmed that parameters of this material remain unchanged during a long period of time. Constructions of the PM, made of glass ceramic, as well as constructions of holders intended to fix the mirror, are presented in this report. A holder is used first of all to prevent lowering of a PM surface quality after a mirror has been removed from a machine and fixed in a primary mirror assembly (PMA). At present two-layer construction of a PM is preferable. This construction consists of thick base including weight reduction structure, which is in a radius which is optimum from the standpoint of deformation of a mirror operating surface. In the process of manufacture a mirror is deprived of its weight with the use of special pneumatic off-loading elements. PMA is erected in vertical plane by means of using an interferometric inspection system. In the end of this report we expressed the views on an approach to engineering of a PM by taking into account potentialities both of space ships and of carrier rockets.

  16. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Primary Mirror Material Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Feinberg, Lee D.; Russell, Kevin; Texter, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) conducted a phase down select process via the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) project to assess the Technology Readiness Level of various candidate mirror materials. This process culminated in the selection of Beryllium as the JWST primary mirror material. This paper outlines the mirror evaluation process, defines the selection criteria and summarizes the candidate mirror's performances.

  17. An innovative SiPM-based camera for gamma-ray astronomy with the small size telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schioppa, E. J.; Heller, M.; Troyano Pujadas, I.; della Volpe, D.; Favre, Y.; Montaruli, T.; Zietara, K.; Kasperek, J.; Marszalek, A.; Rajda, P.

    2016-01-01

    A prototype camera for one of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) projects for the small size telescopes, the single mirror Small Size Telescope (SST-1M), has been designed and is under construction. The camera is a hexagonal matrix of 1296 large area (95 mm2) hexagonal silicon photomultipliers. The sensors are grouped into 108 modules of 12 pixels each, hosting a preamplifier board and a slow-control board. Among its various functions, this latter implements a compensation logic that adjusts the bias voltage of each sensor as a function of temperature. The fully digital readout and trigger system, DigiCam, is based on the latest generation of FPGAs, featuring a high number of high speed I/O interfaces, allowing high data transfer rates in an extremely compact design.

  18. Science with the ASTRI mini-array for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: blazars and fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnoli, Giacomo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Giuliani, Andrea; Bigongiari, Ciro; Di Pierro, Federico; Stamerra, Antonio; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; ASTRI Collaboration; CTA Consortium

    2016-05-01

    ASTRI (“Astronomia a Specchi con Tecnologia Replicante Italiana”) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research (MIUR), devoted to the realization, operation and scientific validation of an end-to-end prototype for the Small Size Telescope (SST) envisaged to become part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype is characterized by a dual mirror, Schwarzschild-Couder optical design and a compact camera based on silicon photo-multipliers. It will be sensitive to multi-TeV very high energy (VHE) gamma rays up to 100 TeV, with a PSF ~ 6’ and a wide (9.6°) unaberrated optical field of view. Right after validation of the design in single-dish observations at the Serra La Nave site (Sicily, Italy) during 2015, the ASTRI collaboration will be able to start deployment, at the final CTA southern site, of the ASTRI mini-array, proposed to constitute the very first CTA precursor. Counting 9 ASTRI SST-2M telescopes, the ASTRI mini-array will overtake current IACT systems in differential sensitivity above 5 TeV, thus allowing unprecedented observations of known and predicted bright TeV emitters in this band, including some extragalactic sources such as extreme high-peaked BL Lacs with hard spectra. We exploited the ASTRI scientific simulator ASTRIsim in order to understand the feasibility of observations tackling blazar and cosmic ray physics, including discrimination of hadronic and leptonic scenarios for the VHE emission from BL Lac relativistic jets and indirect measurements of the intergalactic magnetic field and of the extragalactic background light. We selected favorable targets, outlining observation modes, exposure times, multi-wavelength coverage needed and the results expected. Moreover, the perspectives for observation of effects due to the existence of axion-like particles or to Lorentz invariance violations have been investigated.

  19. Active optics control of VST telescope secondary mirror.

    PubMed

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent

    2010-06-01

    In telescopes based on active optics, defocus and coma are usually compensated for by secondary mirror movements. They are performed at the Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) with a hexapod--a parallel robot with six degrees of freedom positioning capability. We describe the application of the two-mirror telescope theory to the VST case and the solutions adopted for the hexapod control. We present the results of performance and reliability tests performed both in the laboratory and at the telescope.

  20. The ASTRI mini-array within the future Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vercellone, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a large collaborative effort aimed at the design and operation of an observatory dedicated to very high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics in the energy range from a few tens of GeV to above 100 TeV, which will yield about an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity with respect to the current major arrays (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS). Within this framework, the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics is leading the ASTRI project, whose main goals are the design and installation on Mt. Etna (Sicily) of an end-to-end dual-mirror prototype of the CTA small size telescope (SST) and the installation at the CTA Southern site of a dual-mirror SST mini-array composed of nine units with a relative distance of about 300 m. The innovative dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder optical solution adopted for the ASTRI Project allows us to substantially reduce the telescope plate-scale and, therefore, to adopt silicon photo-multipliers as light detectors. The ASTRI mini-array is a wider international effort. The mini-array, sensitive in the energy range 1-100 TeV and beyond with an angular resolution of a few arcmin and an energy resolution of about 10-15%, is well suited to study relatively bright sources (a few × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 at 10 TeV) at very high energy. Prominent sources such as extreme blazars, nearby well-known BL Lac objects, Galactic pulsar wind nebulae, supernovae remnants, micro-quasars, and the Galactic Center can be observed in a previously unexplored energy range. The ASTRI mini-array will extend the current IACTs sensitivity well above a few tens of TeV and, at the same time, will allow us to compare our results on a few selected targets with those of current (HAWC) and future high-altitude extensive air-shower detectors.

  1. A G-APD based Camera for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhub, H.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Commichau, S.; Commichau, V.; Dorner, D.; Gendotti, A.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H.; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Köhne, J.-H.; Krähenbühl, T.; Kranich, D.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Neise, D.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Rhode, W.; Rissi, M.; Ribordy, M.; Röser, U.; Stark, L. S.; Stucki, J.-P.; Tibolla, O.; Viertel, G.; Vogler, P.; Weitzel, Q.

    2011-02-01

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) for Gamma-ray astronomy are presently using photomultiplier tubes as photo sensors. Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) promise an improvement in sensitivity and, important for this application, ease of construction, operation and ruggedness. G-APDs have proven many of their features in the laboratory, but a qualified assessment of their performance in an IACT camera is best undertaken with a prototype. This paper describes the design and construction of a full-scale camera based on G-APDs realized within the FACT project (First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope).

  2. Design and operation of FACT - the first G-APD Cherenkov telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhub, H.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Boccone, V.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Buß, J.; Cadoux, F.; Commichau, V.; Djambazov, L.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Gendotti, A.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H.; Haller, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Huber, B.; Kim, K.-S.; Knoetig, M. L.; Köhne, J.-H.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krumm, B.; Lee, M.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Lyard, E.; Mannheim, K.; Meharga, M.; Meier, K.; Montaruli, T.; Neise, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Röser, U.; Stucki, J.-P.; Schneider, J.; Steinbring, T.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Tobler, S.; Viertel, G.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Warda, K.; Weitzel, Q.; Zänglein, M.

    2013-06-01

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) is designed to detect cosmic gamma-rays with energies from several hundred GeV up to about 10 TeV using the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique. In contrast to former or existing telescopes, the camera of the FACT telescope is comprised of solid-state Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes (G-APD) instead of photomultiplier tubes for photo detection. It is the first full-scale device of its kind employing this new technology. The telescope is operated at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain) since fall 2011. This paper describes in detail the design, construction and operation of the system, including hardware and software aspects. Technical experiences gained after one year of operation are discussed and conclusions with regard to future projects are drawn.

  3. NICHE: Using Cherenkov radiation to extend Telescope Array to sub-PeV energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Douglas; Krizmanic, John; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Abu-Zayyad, Tareq; Belz, John; Thomson, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    The Non-Imaging CHErenkov (NICHE) Array will measure the flux and nuclear composition evolution of cosmic rays (CRs) from below 1 PeV to 1 EeV. NICHE will be co-sited with the Telescope Array (TA) Low Energy (TALE) extension, and will observe events simultaneously with the TALE telescopes acting in imaging-Cherenkov mode. This will be the first hybrid-Cherenkov (simultaneous imaging and non-imaging Cherenkov) measurements of CRs in the Knee region of the CR energy spectrum. NICHE uses easily deployable detectors to measure the amplitude and time-spread of the air-shower Cherenkov signal to achieve an event-by-event measurement of Xmax and energy, each with excellent resolution. First generation detectors are under construction and will form an initial prototype array (j-NICHE) that will be deployed in Summer 2016. In this talk, the NICHE design, array performance, prototype development, and status will be discussed as well as NICHE's ability to measure the cosmic ray nuclear composition as a function of energy.

  4. Simulation of segmented mirror telescope and calculating asphericity of segmented mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhou; Qiu, Qi; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-09-01

    To determine parameters of the Segmented Mirror Telescope is quite essential for the design, manufacture, testing and construct of the telescope system, especially the F-number parameters and curvature radius of the primary mirror, as well as the asphericity. A model of Sub-segmented mirror was established in this paper, based on which, using the feature points combined with lagrange condition extreme, the asphericity calculation of the asymmetrical hexagon off-axis parabolic mirror in different central points is solved. The 8m and 11m segmented mirror telescope were taken for example in the calculation, and got the relation curve between F-number of primary mirror and Asphericity of segmented mirror, respectively. This work is useful for the design, manufacturing and testing of the large diameter Segmented Mirror Telescope.

  5. Mirror seeing control of large infrared solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying; Li, Xinnan; Meng, Xiaohui; Ni, Houkun

    2010-07-01

    To obtain high resolution infrared image, both low photon efficiency and long wavelength of infrared light requires enough large aperture telescope, but large aperture vacuum windows can hardly achieve high optical quality, so open structure becomes the only viable choice for large infrared solar telescope. In addition to the effects of atmospheric turbulence, open solar telescopes suffer from the heating of the optics by sunlight, especially primary mirror heating. These factors cause the image to shiver and become blurred, and increase infrared observing noise. Since blowing air across the front surface of the primary mirror doesn't have the necessary heat transfer coefficient to remove the absorbed heat load, it must be cooled down to maintained at a temperature between 0K and 2K below ambient air temperature to reduce the effects of turbulence. This paper will introduce some cooling methods and simulation results of primary mirror in large infrared solar telescope. On the other hand, mirror material with nice thermal conductivity can reduce the temperature difference between mirror surface and air, and mirror surface polishing at infrared wavelength can be comparatively easier than at visible wavelength, so it is possible to select low cost metal mirror as primary mirror of infrared solar telescope. To analyze the technical feasibility of metal mirror serving as primary mirror, this paper also give some polishing results of aluminum mirror with electroless nickel coating.

  6. Software for Alignment of Segments of a Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Drew P.; Howard, Richard T.; Ly, William C.; Rakoczy, John M.; Weir, John M.

    2006-01-01

    The Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMS) software is designed to maintain the overall focus and figure of the large segmented primary mirror of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. This software reads measurements made by sensors attached to the segments of the primary mirror and from these measurements computes optimal control values to send to actuators that move the mirror segments.

  7. Feasibility of utilizing Cherenkov Telescope Array gamma-ray telescopes as free-space optical communication ground stations.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Vilera, Mariafernanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Cabrero, Juan Francisco

    2013-04-10

    The signals that will be received on Earth from deep-space probes in future implementations of free-space optical communication will be extremely weak, and new ground stations will have to be developed in order to support these links. This paper addresses the feasibility of using the technology developed in the gamma-ray telescopes that will make up the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory in the implementation of a new kind of ground station. Among the main advantages that these telescopes provide are the much larger apertures needed to overcome the power limitation that ground-based gamma-ray astronomy and optical communication both have. Also, the large number of big telescopes that will be built for CTA will make it possible to reduce costs by economy-scale production, enabling optical communications in the large telescopes that will be needed for future deep-space links.

  8. Disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi-rui; Fan, Bin; Zhang, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The success of the large telescope is largely linked to the excellent performance and reliability of the primary mirror. In order to maintain the quality of its reflective surface at the high expectations of astronomers, the primary mirror after almost two or three years of astronomical observations, needs to be removed and reinstalled for its cleaning and re-coating operation. There are a series of procedures such as the primary mirror cell dissembling from telescope, mirror handling, transportation, reintegration, alignment and so on. This paper will describe the experiences of disassembling and reintegration of large telescope primary mirror, taking a two meter grade primary mirror for example. As with all advanced and complex opto-mechanical systems, there has been the usual problems and trouble shooting.

  9. A Trigger And Readout Scheme For Future Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, G.; Bauer, C.; Foehr, C.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.

    2008-12-24

    The next generation of ground-based gamma-ray observatories, such as e.g. CTA will consists of about 50-100 Telescopes, and cameras with in total {approx}100000 to {approx}200000 channels. The telescopes of the core array will cover and effective area of {approx}1 km{sup 2} and will be possibly accompanied by a large 'halo' of smaller telescopes spread over about 10 km{sup 2}. In order to make maximum use of the stereoscopic approach, a very flexible inter-telescope trigger scheme is needed which will allow to couple telescopes that located up to {approx}1 km apart. At the same time, the development of a cost effective readout scheme for the camera signals exhibits a major technological challenge. Here we present ideas on a new asynchronous inter-telescope trigger scheme, and a very cost-effective, high-bandwidth frontend to backend data transfer system, both based on standard Ethernet components and an Ethernet front-end interface based on mass production standard FPGAs.

  10. A Trigger And Readout Scheme For Future Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, G.; Bauer, C.; Föhr, C.; Hofmann, W.; Kihm, T.

    2008-12-01

    The next generation of ground-based gamma-ray observatories, such as e.g. CTA will consists of about 50-100 Telescopes, and cameras with in total ~100000 to ~200000 channels. The telescopes of the core array will cover and effective area of ~1 km2 and will be possibly accompanied by a large ``halo'' of smaller telescopes spread over about 10 km2. In order to make maximum use of the stereoscopic approach, a very flexible inter-telescope trigger scheme is needed which will allow to couple telescopes that located up to ~1 km apart. At the same time, the development of a cost effective readout scheme for the camera signals exhibits a major technological challenge. Here we present ideas on a new asynchronous inter-telescope trigger scheme, and a very cost-effective, high-bandwidth frontend to backend data transfer system, both based on standard Ethernet components and an Ethernet front-end interface based on mass production standard FPGAs.

  11. Manufacture of large glass honeycomb mirrors. [for astronomical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.; Hill, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of making very large glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes is examined, and the advantages of honeycomb mirrors made of borosilicate glass are discussed. Thermal gradients in the glass that degrade the figure of thick borosilicate mirrors during use can be largely eliminated in a honeycomb structure by internal ventilation (in air) or careful control of the radiation environment (in space). It is expected that ground-based telescopes with honeycomb mirrors will give better images than those with solid mirrors. Materials, techniques, and the experience that has been gained making trial mirrors and test castings as part of a program to develop 8-10-m-diameter lightweight mirrors are discussed.

  12. The camera of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, Osvaldo; Maccarone, Maria C.; Gargano, Carmelo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Segreto, Alberto; Sottile, Giuseppe; De Caprio, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Capalbi, Milvia; Sangiorgi, Pierluca; Bonanno, Giovanni; Grillo, Alessandro; Garozzo, Salvatore; Marano, Davide; Billotta, Sergio; Romeo, Giuseppe; Stringhetti, Luca; Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Incorvaia, Salvatore; Toso, Giorgio; Impiombato, Domenico; Giarrusso, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    In the context of the Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory project, the ASTRI SST-2M end-to-end prototype telescope, entirely supported by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics, is designed to detect cosmic primary gamma ray energies from few TeV up to hundreds of TeV. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera is part of the challenging synergy of novel optical design, camera sensors, front-end electronics and telescope structure design. The camera is devoted to imaging and recording the Cherenkov images of air showers induced by primary particles into the Earth's atmosphere. In order to match the energy range mentioned above, the camera must be able to trigger events within a few tens of nanoseconds with high detection efficiency. This is obtained by combining silicon photo-multiplier sensors and suitable front-end electronics. Due to the characteristic imprint of the Cherenkov image that is a function of the shower core distance, the signal dynamic range of the pixels and consequently of the front-end electronics must span three orders of magnitude (1:1000 photo-electrons). These and many other features of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera will be reported in this contribution together with a complete overview of the mechanical and thermodynamic camera system.

  13. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: camera DAQ software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Vito; Trifoglio, Massimo; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Fioretti, Valentina; Tacchini, Alessandro; Zoli, Andrea; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Capalbi, Milvia; Catalano, Osvaldo

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size dual-mirror Telescope. In a second phase the ASTRI project foresees the installation of the first elements of the array at CTA southern site, a mini-array of 7 telescopes. The ASTRI Camera DAQ Software is aimed at the Camera data acquisition, storage and display during Camera development as well as during commissioning and operations on the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype that will operate at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on the Mount Etna (Sicily). The Camera DAQ configuration and operations will be sequenced either through local operator commands or through remote commands received from the Instrument Controller System that commands and controls the Camera. The Camera DAQ software will acquire data packets through a direct one-way socket connection with the Camera Back End Electronics. In near real time, the data will be stored in both raw and FITS format. The DAQ Quick Look component will allow the operator to display in near real time the Camera data packets. We are developing the DAQ software adopting the iterative and incremental model in order to maximize the software reuse and to implement a system which is easily adaptable to changes. This contribution presents the Camera DAQ Software architecture with particular emphasis on its potential reuse for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  14. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishments include: Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry and government with expertise in science and space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications for monolithic primary mirror from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Pursuing long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Successfully demonstrated capability to make 0.5 m deep mirror substrate and polish it to UVOIR traceable figure specification.

  15. Alignment displacements of the solar optical telescope primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medenica, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Solar optical telescope is a space shuttle payload which is at the present time (1978) being planned. The selected alignment method for the telescope's primary mirror is such that the six inclined legs supporting the mirror are at the same time motorized alignment actuators, changing their own length according to the alignment requirement and command. The alignment displacements were described, including circumvention of some apparent NASTRAN limitations.

  16. MARS - CheObs ed. -- A flexible Software Framework for future Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Dorner, D.

    2010-04-01

    In gamma-ray astronomy, a new ground-based project named DWARF (Dedicated multiWavelength Agn Research Facility) is entering the field. It is a Cherenkov telescope project aimed at long-term monitoring of the brightest AGNs in the TeV energy range. One of the former HEGRA telescopes is being refurbished and upgraded with a Geigermode-APD camera. It is planned to be operated as a robotic telescope on the Canary Island of La Palma. Using new technologies, an improvement in sensitivity and an energy threshold of 400GeV are expected. Future plans foresee more small Cherenkov telescopes around the globe enabling for the first time 24 h monitoring in the VHE range. Long-term observations of the brightest AGNs provide the possibility to search for orbital modulation of blazar emission due to super-massive black hole binaries, to study the statistics of flares and their physical origin, and to correlate the data with corresponding data from the neutrino observatory IceCube to search for evidence of hadronic emission processes. For this project, a flexible and user friendly software package is available: Modular Analysis and Reconstruction Software - Cherenkov Observatory edition (MARS - CheObs ed.). The package provides a framework for any event-based analysis. For the application in the Imaging Air Cherenkov Technique, various methods and algorithms are available. Currently, it is being used for the MAGIC telescope. To allow for automatic analysis, MARS - CheObs ed. includes an automation concept which allows not only for automatic processing of the data, but also for automatic production of simulated data. For the DWARF project, a simulation program (ceres) has been developed and included in the software package. Using this, a design study for the technical upgrades of the telescope was performed. The simulation of the showers in the atmosphere is performed using the CORSIKA package. The output of this is fed into the telescope simulation ceres. Proper simulations are

  17. Keck telescope primary mirror segments: fabrication and support.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, T. S.; Nelson, J. E.

    1988-10-01

    The fabrication of the mirror segments and segment support systems for the Keck Telescope are currently in progress. High quality mirror blanks are being manufactured and delivered by Schott Optical Technologies on a regular schedule. The segment fabrication facilities at Itek Optical Systems are in the final stage of preparation for production.

  18. Progress in the Fabrication and Testing of Telescope Mirrors for The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Charles W.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Keski-Kuha, R.; McKay, A.; Chaney, D.; Gallagher, B.; Ha, K.

    2012-01-01

    The telescope of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an f/20, three mirror anastigmat design, passively cooled (40K) in an L2 orbit. The design provides diffraction limited performance (Strehl ≥ 0.8) at λ=2μm. To fit within the launch vehicle envelope (Arianne V), the 6.6 meter primary mirror and the secondary mirror support structure are folded for launch, then deployed and aligned in space. The primary mirror is composed of 18 individual, 1.3 meter (flat:flat) hexagonal segments, each adjustable in seven degrees of freedom (six rigid body + radius of curvature) provided by a set of high precision actuators. The actuated secondary mirror ( 0.74m) is similarly positioned in six degrees of rigid body motion. The .70x.51m, fixed tertiary and 0.17m, flat fine steering mirror complete the telescope mirror complement. The telescope is supported by a composite structure optimized for performance at cryogenic temperatures. All telescope mirrors are made of Be with substantial lightweighting (21kg for each 1.3M primary segment). Additional Be mounting and supporting structure for the high precision ( 10nm steps) actuators are attached to the primary segments and secondary mirror. All mirrors undergo a process of thermal stabilization to reduce stress. An extensive series of interferometric measurements guide each step of the polishing process. Final polishing must account for any deformation between the ambient temperature of polishing and the cryogenic, operational temperature. This is accomplished by producing highly precise, cryo deformation target maps of each surface which are incorporated into the final polishing cycle. All flight mirrors have now completed polishing, coating with protected Au and final cryo testing, and the telescope is on track to meet all system requirements. We here review the measured performance of the component mirrors and the predicted performance of the flight telescope.

  19. Progress in the Fabrication and Testing of Telescope Mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Charles

    2012-01-01

    The telescope of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an f/20, three mirror anastigmat design, passively cooled (40K) in an L2 orbit. The design provides diffraction limited performance (Strehl > or = 0.8) at .=2 m. To fit within the launch vehicle envelope (Arianne V), the 6.6 meter primary mirror and the secondary mirror support structure are folded for launch, then deployed and aligned in space. The primary mirror is composed of 18 individual, 1.3 meter (flat flat) hexagonal segments, each adjustable in seven degrees of freedom (six rigid body + radius of curvature) provided by a set of high precision actuators. The actuated secondary mirror (approx.0.74m) is similarly positioned in six degrees of rigid body motion. The approx..70x.51m, fixed tertiary and approx. 0.17m, flat fine steering mirror complete the telescope mirror complement. The telescope is supported by a composite structure optimized for performance at cryogenic temperatures. All telescope mirrors are made of Be with substantial light-weighting (21 kg for each 1.3M primary segment). Additional Be mounting and supporting structure for the high precision (approx.10nm steps) actuators are attached to the primary segments and secondary mirror. All mirrors undergo a process of thermal stabilization to reduce stress. An extensive series of interferometric measurements guide each step of the polishing process. Final polishing must account for any deformation between the ambient temperature of polishing and the cryogenic, operational temperature. This is accomplished by producing highly precise, cryo deformation target maps of each surface which are incorporated into the final polishing cycle. All flight mirrors have now completed polishing, coating with protected Au and final cryo testing, and the telescope is on track to meet all system requirements. We here review the measured performance of the component mirrors and the predicted performance of the flight telescope.

  20. Advanced High Reflector Coatings for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Phillips, A.; Brown, W.; Wallace, V.; Stillburn, James; Sabag, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    The Association of Universities for Research Astronomy’s (AURA) New Initiatives Office (NIO) is developing a Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT), a next generation telescope also known as the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). The telescope, whose present design consist of six hundred eighteen 1.2 m diameter mirrors, will have truly remarkable performance. It will be able to resolve crowded star fields into individual stars in galaxies as far away as 10 million light years. It will be able to image and analyze planets and dust clouds around hundreds of nearby stars. Imaging will range from the ultraviolet (UV) to long wavelength infrared (LWIR) wavelengths. The goal is to have the telescope operational by 2014. Figure 1 shows a conceptual picture of the GSMT compared to the 10-m Keck telescope and Figure 2 shows a conceptual picture of the observatory.

  1. Progress in the Fabrication and Testing of Telescope Mirrors for The James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, Charles W.; Clampin, M.; Feinberg, L.; Stahl, P.; McKay, A.; Chaney, D.; Gallagher, B.

    2010-01-01

    The telescope of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is an f/20, three mirror anastigmat design, passively cooled (40K) in an L2 orbit. The design provides diffraction limited performance (Strehl ≥ 0.8) at λ=2μm. To fit within the launch vehicle envelope (Arianne V), the 6.6 meter primary mirror and the secondary mirror support structure are folded for launch, then deployed and aligned in space. The primary mirror is composed of 18 individual, 1.3 meter (flat:flat) hexagonal segments, each adjustable in seven degrees of freedom (six rigid body + radius of curvature) provided by a set of high precision actuators. The actuated secondary mirror ( 0.74m) is similarly positioned in six degrees of rigid body motion. The 0.67m, fixed tertiary and 0.17m, flat fine steering mirror complete the telescope mirror complement. All telescope mirrors are made of Be with substantial lightweighting (21kg for each 1.3M primary segment). Additional Be mounting and supporting structure for the high precision ( 10nm steps) actuators are attached to the primary segments and secondary mirror. All mirrors undergo a process of thermal stabilization to reduce stress. An extensive series of interferometric measurements guide each step of the polishing process. Final polishing must account for any deformation between the ambient temperature of polishing and the cryogenic, operational temperature. This is accomplished by producing highly precise, cryo deformation target maps of each surface which are incorporated into the final polishing cycle. The flight mirrors are all close to readiness for this final step or have started cryo-testing at the X-Ray Calibration Facility. Each mirror will then be coated with a protected Au coating prior to attachment to the flight structure. We here review the process and status of the mirror fabrication program and discuss the predicted performance of the telescope based on initial results from cryogenic mirror measurements.

  2. The Topo-trigger: a new concept of stereo trigger system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, R.; Mazin, D.; Paoletti, R.; Blanch Bigas, O.; Cortina, J.

    2016-04-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) such as the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescopes endeavor to reach the lowest possible energy threshold. In doing so the trigger system is a key element. Reducing the trigger threshold is hampered by the rapid increase of accidental triggers generated by ambient light (the so-called Night Sky Background NSB). In this paper we present a topological trigger, dubbed Topo-trigger, which rejects events on the basis of their relative orientation in the telescope cameras. We have simulated and tested the trigger selection algorithm in the MAGIC telescopes. The algorithm was tested using MonteCarlo simulations and shows a rejection of 85% of the accidental stereo triggers while preserving 99% of the gamma rays. A full implementation of this trigger system would achieve an increase in collection area between 10 and 20% at the energy threshold. The analysis energy threshold of the instrument is expected to decrease by ~ 8%. The selection algorithm was tested on real MAGIC data taken with the current trigger configuration and no γ-like events were found to be lost.

  3. The secondary mirror concept for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Cayrel, Marc; Bonnet, Henri; Ciattaglia, Emanuela; Esselborn, Michael; Koch, Franz; Kurlandczyk, Herve; Pettazzi, Lorenzo; Rakich, Andrew; Sedghi, Babak

    2014-07-01

    The E-ELT is an active and adaptive 39-m telescope, with an anastigmat optical solution (5 mirrors including two flats), currently being developed by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The convex 4-metre-class secondary mirror (M2) is a thin Zerodur meniscus passively supported by an 18 point axial whiffletree. A warping harness system allows to correct low order deformations of the M2 Mirror. Laterally the mirror is supported on 12 points along the periphery by pneumatic jacks. Due to its high optical sensitivity and the telescope gravity deflections, the M2 unit needs to allow repositioning the mirror during observation. Considering its exposed position 30m above the primary, the M2 unit has to provide good wind rejection. The M2 concept is described and major performance characteristics are presented.

  4. ESO's New Technology Telescope (NTT) metallic primary mirror project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischung, K. N.

    A development status assessment is made of the European Southern Observatory's planned New Technology Telescope metallic primary mirror. It has thus far been established that a nickel-coated aluminum or aluminum alloy mirror can be manufactured within 15-18 months at costs which lie well below those projected for glass or ceramic primary mirrors of comparable figure and dimensions. Physical and mechanical property comparisons are conducted for a total of eight mirror material types, including titanium alloy, beryllium, and stainless steel; attention is given to the various casting technologies that may be employed.

  5. The 100 cm solar telescope primary mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The manufacturing impact of primary mirror configuration on the performance of a 100 cm aperture solar telescope was studied. Three primary mirror configurations were considered: solid, standard lightweight, and mushroom. All of these are of low expansion material. Specifically, the study consisted of evaluating the mirrors with regard to: manufacturing metrology, manufacturing risk factors and ultimate quality assessment. As a result of this evaluation, a performance comparison of the configurations was made, and a recommendation of mirror configuration is the final output. These evaluations, comparisons and recommendations are discussed in detail. Other investigations were completed and are documented in the appendices.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Mirror Development History and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinber, Lee D.; Clampin, Mark; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Atkinson, Charlie; Texter, Scott; Bergeland, Mark; Gallagher, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a little under a decade, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program has designed, manufactured, assembled and tested 21 flight beryllium mirrors for the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element. This paper will summarize the mirror development history starting with the selection of beryllium as the mirror material and ending with the final test results. It will provide an overview of the technological roadmap and schedules and the key challenges that were overcome. It will also provide a summary or the key tests that were performed and the results of these tests.

  7. Prototype Secondary Mirror Assembly For The Space Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, M.; Duffy, M.; Gullapalli, S.; Rockwell, R.; Sileo, F.; Krim, M.

    1988-04-01

    We describe our concept for a liquid helium temperature prototype secondary mirror assembly (PSMA) for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility. SIRTF, a NASA "Great Observatory" to be launched in the 1990's, is a superfluid heliumcooled 1-meter class telescope with much more stringent performance requirements than its precursor the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS). The SIRTF secondary mirror assembly must operate near 4 K and provide the functions of 2-axis dynamic tilting ("chopping") in addition to the conventional functions of focus and centering. The PSMA must be able to withstand random vibration testing and provide all of the functions needed by the SIRTF observatory. Our PSMA concept employs a fused quartz mirror kinematically attached at its center to an aluminum cruciform. The mirror/cruciform assembly is driven in tilt about its combined center of mass using a unique flexure pivot and a four-actuator control system with feed-back provided by pairs of eddy current position sensors. The actuators are mounted on a second flexure-pivoted mass providing angular momentum compensation and isolating the telescope from vibration-induced disturbances. The mirror/cruciform and the reaction mass are attached to opposite sides of an aluminum mounting plate whose AL/L characteristics are nominally identical to that of the aluminum flexure pivot material. The mounting plate is connected to the outer housing by a focus and centering mechanism based upon the six degree of freedom secondary mirror assembly developed for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the next generation of Cherenkov telescopes: a single framework approach from requirement analysis to integration and verification strategy definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Mauro; La Palombara, Nicola; Stringhetti, Luca; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Catalano, Osvaldo; Giro, Enrico; Leto, Giuseppe; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Pareschi, Giovanni; Tosti, Gino; Vercellone, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    ASTRI is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, which aims to develop an endto- end prototype of one of the three types of telescopes to be part of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), an observatory which will be the main representative of the next generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. The ASTRI project, led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF), has proposed an original design for the Small Size Telescope, which is aimed to explore the uppermost end of the Very High Energy domain up to about few hundreds of TeV with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution and imaging quality. It is characterized by challenging and innovative technological solutions which will be adopted for the first time in a Cherenkov telescope: a dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder configuration, a modular, light and compact camera based on silicon photomultipliers, and a front-end electronic based on a specifically designed ASIC. The end-to-end project is also including all the data-analysis software and the data archive. In this paper we describe the process followed to derive the ASTRI specifications from the CTA general requirements, a process which had to take into proper account the impact on the telescope design of the different types of the CTA requirements (performance, environment, reliability-availability-maintenance, etc.). We also describe the strategy adopted to perform the specification verification, which will be based on different methods (inspection, analysis, certification, and test) in order to demonstrate the telescope compliance with the CTA requirements. Finally we describe the integration planning of the prototype assemblies (structure, mirrors, camera, control software, auxiliary items) and the test planning of the end-to-end telescope. The approach followed by the ASTRI project is to have all the information needed to report the verification process along all project stages in a single

  9. Cryogenic testing of mirrors for infrared space telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. H.; Witteborn, F. C.; Garland, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Shuttle IR Telescope Facility (SIRTF) test apparatus can test candidate mirror materials as large as 66 cm in diameter, at temperatures as low as about 10 K, and is accurate enough to detect optical figure changes as small as a fraction of a wavelength from the room temperature figure. The fused silica mirrors currently undergoing testing in the SIRTF are sunk into a liquid He reservoir with copper straps, whose individual strands are soldered to small silver spots diffused throughout the unfigured side of the mirror to accomplish fast conductive cooling. Optical access to the cold mirror is by means of a small glass port in the vacuum chamber. An interferometer is used to examine the mirror figure throughout the cool-down. Interferograms are photographed, fringe patterns are digitized, and mirror figure contour plots are calculated by means of a computer.

  10. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  11. PROBING THE PULSAR ORIGIN OF THE ANOMALOUS POSITRON FRACTION WITH AMS-02 AND ATMOSPHERIC CHERENKOV TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2013-07-20

    Recent observations by PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, and AMS-02 have conclusively indicated a rise in the cosmic-ray positron fraction above 10 GeV, a feature which is impossible to mimic under the paradigm of secondary positron production with self-consistent Galactic cosmic-ray propagation models. A leading explanation for the positron fraction rise is an additional source of electron-positron pairs, for example one or more mature, energetic, and relatively nearby pulsars. We point out that any one of two well-known nearby pulsars, Geminga and Monogem, can satisfactorily provide enough positrons to reproduce AMS-02 observations. A smoking-gun signature of this scenario is an anisotropy in the arrival direction of the cosmic-ray electrons and positrons, which may be detectable by existing, or future, telescopes. The predicted anisotropy level is, at present, consistent with limits from Fermi-LAT and AMS-02. We argue that the large collecting area of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (ACTs) makes them optimal tools for detecting such an anisotropy. Specifically, we show that much of the proton and {gamma}-ray background which affects measurements of the cosmic-ray electron-positron spectrum with ACTs may be controlled in the search for anisotropies. We conclude that observations using archival ACT data could already constrain or substantiate the pulsar origin of the positron anomaly, while upcoming instruments (such as the Cherenkov Telescope Array) will provide strong constraints on the source of the rising positron fraction.

  12. Simulated gamma-ray pulse profile of the Crab pulsar with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtovoi, A.; Zampieri, L.

    2016-07-01

    We present simulations of the very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray light curve of the Crab pulsar as observed by the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The CTA pulse profile of the Crab pulsar is simulated with the specific goal of determining the accuracy of the position of the interpulse. We fit the pulse shape obtained by the Major Atmospheric Gamma-Ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) telescope with a three-Gaussian template and rescale it to account for the different CTA instrumental and observational configurations. Simulations are performed for different configurations of CTA and for the ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) mini-array. The northern CTA configuration will provide an improvement of a factor of ˜3 in accuracy with an observing time comparable to that of MAGIC (73 h). Unless the VHE spectrum above 1 TeV behaves differently from what we presently know, unreasonably long observing times are required for a significant detection of the pulsations of the Crab pulsar with the high-energy-range sub-arrays. We also found that an independent VHE timing analysis is feasible with Large Size Telescopes. CTA will provide a significant improvement in determining the VHE pulse shape parameters necessary to constrain theoretical models of the gamma-ray emission of the Crab pulsar. One of such parameters is the shift in phase between peaks in the pulse profile at VHE and in other energy bands that, if detected, may point to different locations of the emission regions.

  13. Comparison of the Response of the UV and visible Cherenkov Telescopes to the Atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badran, Hussein

    With atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes the experiment is totally at the mercy of the environment; particularly the atmospheric conditions. The effect of the atmospheric conditions on the Cherenkov light flashes is closely investigated for UV and visible cameras. The telescope response for light generated at different altitudes does not have the same variation with the wind speed or cloud thickness. For both cameras measurements can be carried out up to wind speed ~17 m/s without much change of the atmospheric transmittance from light generated close to the observing level and up to 12 m/s for higher elevation and higher zenith angles. The suggested limit for cloud thickness for both cameras is around 0.5 km. A cloud thickness of ~0.9 km can be tolerated for zenith angles less than 30°. The suggested limits are particularly important whenever the spectrum is to be determined from the data. No real change of the response function with the air pressure and temperature was found. The seasonal variation has a slight effect on the telescope response.

  14. The possibilities of Cherenkov telescopes to perform cosmic-ray muon imaging of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Catalano, Osvaldo; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Del Santo, Melania; Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Mineo, Teresa; Pareschi, Giovanni; Vercellone, Stefano; Zuccarello, Luciano

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic activity is regulated by the interaction of gas-liquid flow with conduit geometry. Hence, the quantitative understanding of the inner shallow structure of a volcano is mandatory to forecast the occurrence of dangerous stages of activity and mitigate volcanic hazards. Among the techniques used to investigate the underground structure of a volcano, muon imaging offers some advantages, as it provides a fine spatial resolution, and does not require neither spatially dense measurements in active zones, nor the implementation of cost demanding energizing systems, as when electric or active seismic sources are utilized. The principle of muon radiography is essentially the same as X-ray radiography: muons are more attenuated by higher density parts inside the target and thus information about its inner structure are obtained from the differential muon absorption. Up-to-date, muon imaging of volcanic structures has been mainly accomplished with detectors that employ planes of scintillator strips. These telescopes are exposed to different types of background noise (accidental coincidence of vertical shower particles, horizontal high-energy electrons, flux of upward going particles), whose amplitude is high relative to the tiny flux of interest. An alternative technique is based on the detection of the Cherenkov light produced by muons. The latter can be imaged as an annular pattern that contains the information needed to reconstruct both direction and energy of the particle. Cherenkov telescopes have never been utilized to perform muon imaging of volcanoes. Nonetheless, thanks to intrinsic features, they offer the possibility to detect the through-target muon flux with negligible levels of background noise. Under some circumstances, they would also provide a better spatial resolution and acceptance than scintillator-based telescopes. Furthermore, contrarily to the latter systems, Cherenkov detectors allow in-situ measurements of the open-sky energy spectrum of

  15. SiPM detectors for the ASTRI project in the framework of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billotta, Sergio; Marano, Davide; Bonanno, Giovanni; Belluso, Massimiliano; Grillo, Alessandro; Garozzo, Salvatore; Romeo, Giuseppe; Timpanaro, Maria Cristina; Maccarone, Maria Concetta C.; Catalano, Osvaldo; La Rosa, Giovanni; Sottile, Giuseppe; Impiombato, Domenico; Gargano, Carmelo; Giarrusso, Salavtore

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a worldwide new generation project aimed at realizing an array of a hundred ground based gamma-ray telescopes. ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is the Italian project whose primary target is the development of an end-to-end prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, of the CTA small size class of telescopes devoted to investigation of the highest energy region, from 1 to 100 TeV. Next target is the implementation of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array based on seven identical telescopes. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are the semiconductor photosensor devices designated to constitute the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescopes. SiPM photosensors are suitable for the detection of the Cherenkov flashes, since they are very fast and sensitive to the light in the 300-700nm wavelength spectrum. Their drawbacks compared to the traditional photomultiplier tubes are high dark count rates, after-pulsing and optical cross-talk contributions, and intrinsic gains strongly dependent on temperature. Nonetheless, for a single pixel, the dark count rate is well below the Night Sky Background, the effects of cross-talk and afterpulses are typically lower than 20%, and the gain can be kept stable against temperature variations by means of adequate bias voltage compensation strategies. This work presents and discusses some experimental results from a large set of measurements performed on the SiPM sensors to be used for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype camera and on recently developed detectors demonstrating outstanding performance for the future evolution of the project in the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  16. Articulated primary mirror /APM/ for the Solar Optical Telescope /SOT/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gowrinathan, S.; Gottesman, J.

    1981-01-01

    Allowing the location of the primary vs secondary mirrors to be movable in space, the articulated primary mirror (APM) was designed as an inexpensive alternative, providing stable imagery, for the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). Requirements of high resolution in the sub-arc-second region, and the ability to point the telescope through the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) were satisfied. Alignment sensors, contained within the subsystem, locate the points of coincidence of the foci of the primary and secondary optics (conic foci). These are utilized as inputs for subsystem actuators to correct via the digital controller algorithm.

  17. Spectroscopic survey telescope design. I - Primary mirror structure and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, F. B.; Krishnamachari, S. V.

    1988-09-01

    The present design for a spectroscopic survey telescope uses a spherical primary mirror whose figure requires that a secondary focus assembly be driven at the tracking rate in an attitude normal to the spherical focal surface, while the telescope, being tilted at a predetermined angular zenith distance, need only be 'set' (and clamped) occasionally in azimuth. The spherical primary mirror segments are configured to an identical radius-of-curvature and supported on a fully triangulated stainless steel space frame; a structural analysis using finite elements indicates that the expected static performance of both the individual segments and the overall space frame present reasonable goals for current engineering practice.

  18. Primary mirror support system for the SUBARU Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iye, Masanori; Kodaira, Keiichi

    1994-06-01

    The Japan National Large Telescope `SUBARU' will be completed on the summit of Mauna Kea by the end of the century. One of the major characteristics new to the SUBARU telescope is the active support system for its large monolithic primary mirror, which has 261 points of computer-controlled actuators to maintain a precise mirror figure. This paper describes the control principle, design concepts, results of engineering experiments and numerical simulations of the active support system to ensure the high imaging performance of this system.

  19. Fresnel phasing of segmented mirror telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chanan, Gary; Troy, Mitchell; Surdej, Isabelle; Gutt, Gary; Roberts, Lewis C

    2011-11-20

    Shack-Hartmann (S-H) phasing of segmented telescopes is based upon a physical optics generalization of the geometrical optics Shack-Hartmann test, in which each S-H lenslet straddles an intersegment edge. For the extremely large segmented telescopes currently in the design stages, one is led naturally to very large pupil demagnifications for the S-H phasing cameras. This in turn implies rather small Fresnel numbers F for the lenslets; the nominal design for the Thirty Meter Telescope calls for F=0.6. For such small Fresnel numbers, it may be possible to eliminate the lenslets entirely, replacing them with a simple mask containing a sparse array of clear subapertures and thereby also eliminating a number of manufacturing problems and experimental complications associated with lenslets. We present laboratory results that demonstrate the validity of this approach.

  20. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2016-01-25

    We have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror features 44 actuators, has an aperture of 50 mm, and is designed to reproduce low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of μm. We assessed the space compliance by operating the mirror in thermal vacuum, and exposing it to random and sinusoidal vibrations, as well as to ionizing irradiation. Additionally, the operational life time and the laser power handling capability were tested. The mirror was successfully operated in thermal vacuum at 100 K. We report on the conducted tests and the methods used to evaluate the mirror's performance, and discuss the compliance with the demanded requirements. PMID:26832532

  1. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: environmental testing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2016-01-25

    We have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror features 44 actuators, has an aperture of 50 mm, and is designed to reproduce low-order Zernike modes with a stroke of several tens of μm. We assessed the space compliance by operating the mirror in thermal vacuum, and exposing it to random and sinusoidal vibrations, as well as to ionizing irradiation. Additionally, the operational life time and the laser power handling capability were tested. The mirror was successfully operated in thermal vacuum at 100 K. We report on the conducted tests and the methods used to evaluate the mirror's performance, and discuss the compliance with the demanded requirements.

  2. Readout electronics for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/Fluorescence Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, R.; Bai, L.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Yang, C.; Cao, Z.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), supported by IHEP of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, is a multipurpose project with a complex detectors array for high energy gamma ray and cosmic ray detection. The Wide Field of view Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA), as one of the components of the LHAASO project, aim to tag each primary particle that causes an air shower. The WFCTA is a portable telescope array used to detect cosmic ray spectra. The design of the readout electronics of the WFCTA is described in this paper Sixteen photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), together with their readout electronics are integrated into a single sub-cluster. To maintain good resolution and linearity over a wide dynamic range, a dual-gain amplification configuration on an analog board is used The digital board contains two 16channel 14-bit, 50 Msps analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and its power consumption, noise level, and relative deviation are all tested.

  3. Optimal strategies for observation of active galactic nuclei variability with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Matteo; Gerard, Lucie; Maier, Gernot

    2016-07-01

    Variable emission is one of the defining characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). While providing precious information on the nature and physics of the sources, variability is often challenging to observe with time- and field-of-view-limited astronomical observatories such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In this work, we address two questions relevant for the observation of sources characterized by AGN-like variability: what is the most time-efficient way to detect such sources, and what is the observational bias that can be introduced by the choice of the observing strategy when conducting blind surveys of the sky. Different observing strategies are evaluated using simulated light curves and realistic instrument response functions of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future gamma-ray observatory. We show that strategies that makes use of very small observing windows, spread over large periods of time, allows for a faster detection of the source, and are less influenced by the variability properties of the sources, as compared to strategies that concentrate the observing time in a small number of large observing windows. Although derived using CTA as an example, our conclusions are conceptually valid for any IACTs facility, and in general, to all observatories with small field of view and limited duty cycle.

  4. Front-end electronics and data acquisition system for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. T.; de La Taille, C.; Suomijärvi, T.; Cao, Z.; Deligny, O.; Dulucq, F.; Ge, M. M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Nguyen Trung, T.; Wanlin, E.; Xiao, G.; Yin, L. Q.; Yun Ky, B.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a front-end electronics based on an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented for the future imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). To achieve this purpose, a 16-channel ASIC chip, PARISROC 2 (Photomultiplier ARray Integrated in SiGe ReadOut Chip) is used in the analog signal processing and digitization. The digitized results are sent to the server by a user-defined User Datagram Protocol/Internet Protocol (UDP/IP) hardcore engine through Ethernet that is managed by a FPGA. A prototype electronics fulfilling the requirements of the Wide Field of View Cherenkov Telescope Array (WFCTA) of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) project has been designed, fabricated and tested to prove the concept of the design. A detailed description of the development with the results of the test measurements are presented. By using a new input structure and a new configuration of the ASIC, the dynamic range of the circuit is extended. A highly precise-time calibrating algorithm is also proposed, verified and optimized for the mass production. The test results suggest that the proposed electronics design fulfills the general specification of the future IACTs.

  5. Light sensors selection for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: PMT and SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayduk, M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Kurz, M.; Knötig, M.; Bolmont, J.; Dickinson, H.; Lorenz, E.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Hose, J.; Teshima, M.; Vincent, P.

    2012-12-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is planned as the next generation ground-based instrument (after VERITAS, H.E.S.S. and MAGIC) for astrophysics by means of very high energy γ-rays. The CTA collaboration includes the MAGIC, the H.E.S.S. and the VERITAS collaborations. Also, a large number of astrophysicists from European institutions, from Japan and USA have joined the CTA. The CTA array will comprise about 100 imaging telescopes of three sizes that shall provide one order of magnitude higher sensitivity than the current generation of telescopes. Every telescope will use an imaging camera based on ∼2000 PMTs. We have set up a PMT development program with Hamamatsu (Japan) and Electron Tube Enterprises (England) aiming to produce 1.5 in. PMTs of optimized parameters for the CTA project. The entire scientific community, including the medicine and biology, as well as many industrial applications, where a low light level sensors are necessary, may profit from it. Together with PMTs also SiPMs are interesting sensor candidates for the CTA telescopes. One expects about two times higher photon detection efficiency for SiPM compared to PMT. A set of parameters like the photon detection efficiency, cross-talk, afterpulsing, dark rate together with other important factors were evaluated. Here we report on the progress of these developments, based on detailed measurements.

  6. EST Telescope: primary mirror, support, and cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmer, R.; Manni, F.; Giannuzzi, M.; Scotto, A.; Cavaller, L.; Scheiffelen, T.; Bettonvil, F.; Berrilli, F.

    2010-07-01

    The solar telescope EST is currently in the conceptual design phase. It is planned to be build on the Canary Islands until end of the decade. It is specialized on polarimetric observations and will provide high spatial and spectral observations of the different solar atmospheric layers. The diameter of the primary mirror blank is 4.2m. Different types of mirror shapes were investigated with respect to thermal and mechanical characteristics. To remove the absorbed heat an air cooling system from the back side will be applied. Additional an air flushing system will remove remaining warm air from the front side. A major problem of a large open telescope will be the wind load. Results of the investigations will be shown. To achieve optimal optical performance an active support system is planned. The primary mirror cell needs to be stiff enough to support the primary mirror without deformation at strong wind in case of the open telescope option, but sufficient room for the active support system and cooling system below the backside of the mirror is also required. Preliminary designs and analysis results will be presented.

  7. Designing a Telescope Mirror for Second-Semester Calculus Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Richard J.; Rogers, Robert R.; Parker, Andrew T.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an interdisciplinary project, developed as a collaborative effort by the authors, involving the design of a telescope mirror as it was given to second semester calculus students. The goals of the project are to provide an applied setting for the topics typically covered in this type of course including the…

  8. Calibration and performance of the photon sensor response of FACT — the first G-APD Cherenkov telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biland, A.; Bretz, T.; Buß, J.; Commichau, V.; Djambazov, L.; Dorner, D.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Freiwald, J.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H.; Haller, C.; Hempfling, C.; Hildebrand, D.; Hughes, G.; Horisberger, U.; Knoetig, M. L.; Krähenbühl, T.; Lustermann, W.; Lyard, E.; Mannheim, K.; Meier, K.; Mueller, S.; Neise, D.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Paravac, A.; Pauss, F.; Rhode, W.; Röser, U.; Stucki, J.-P.; Steinbring, T.; Temme, F.; Thaele, J.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Weitzel, Q.

    2014-10-01

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) is the first in-operation test of the performance of silicon photo detectors in Cherenkov Astronomy. For more than two years it is operated on La Palma, Canary Islands (Spain), for the purpose of long-term monitoring of astrophysical sources. For this, the performance of the photo detectors is crucial and therefore has been studied in great detail. Special care has been taken for their temperature and voltage dependence implementing a correction method to keep their properties stable. Several measurements have been carried out to monitor the performance. The measurements and their results are shown, demonstrating the stability of the gain below the percent level. The resulting stability of the whole system is discussed, nicely demonstrating that silicon photo detectors are perfectly suited for the usage in Cherenkov telescopes, especially for long-term monitoring purpose.

  9. IACT observations of gamma-ray bursts: prospects for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Rudy C.; Bouvier, Aurelien; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Otte, Nepomuk; Primack, Joel R.; Williams, David A.

    2013-04-01

    Gamma rays at rest frame energies as high as 90 GeV have been reported from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). There is considerable hope that a confirmed GRB detection will be possible with the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), which will have a larger effective area and better low-energy sensitivity than current-generation imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). To estimate the likelihood of such a detection, we have developed a phenomenological model for GRB emission between 1 GeV and 1 TeV that is motivated by the high-energy GRB detections of Fermi-LAT, and allows us to extrapolate the statistics of GRBs seen by lower energy instruments such as the Swift-BAT and BATSE on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. We show a number of statistics for detected GRBs, and describe how the detectability of GRBs with CTA could vary based on a number of parameters, such as the typical observation delay between the burst onset and the start of ground observations. We also consider the possibility of using GBM on Fermi as a finder of GRBs for rapid ground follow-up. While the uncertainty of GBM localization is problematic, the small field-of-view for IACTs can potentially be overcome by scanning over the GBM error region. Overall, our results indicate that CTA should be able to detect one GRB every 20-30 months with our baseline instrument model, assuming consistently rapid pursuit of GRB alerts, and provided that spectral breaks below ~100 GeV are not a common feature of the bright GRB population. With a more optimistic instrument model, the detection rate can be as high as 1 to 2 GRBs per year.

  10. The ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: prototype technologies goals and strategies for the future SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, Gianpietro; Busatta, Andrea; Giacomel, Stefano; Folla, Ivan; Valsecchi, Marco; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Cascone, Enrico; Conconi, Paolo; Fiorini, Mauro; Giro, Enrico; La Palombara, Nicola; Pareschi, Giovanni; Perri, Luca; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Sironi, Giorgia; Stringhetti, Luca; Toso, Giorgio; Tosti, Gino; Pellicciari, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will represent the next generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescope. Using a combination of large-, medium-, and small-scale telescopes (LST, MST, SST, respectively), it will explore the Very High Energy domain from a few tens of GeVup to about few hundreds of TeV with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution and imaging quality. In this framework, the Italian ASTRI program, led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF) developed a 4-meter class telescope, which will adopt an aplanatic, wide-field, double-reflection optical layout in a Schwarzschild- Couder configuration. Within this program INAF assigned to the consortium between Galbiati Group and EIE Group the construction, assembly and tests activities of the prototype named ASTRI SST-2M. On the basis of the lesson learnt from the prototype, other telescopes will be produced, starting from a re-design phase, in order to optimize performances and the overall costs and production schedule for the CTA-SST telescope. This paper will firstly give an overview of the concept for the SST prototype mount structure. In this contest, the technologies adopted for the design, manufacturing and tests of the entire system will be presented. Moreover, a specific focus on the challenges of the prototype and the strategies associated with it will be provided, in order to outline the near future performance goals for this type of Cherenkov telescopes employed for Gamma ray science.

  11. Thermal correction of deformations in a telescope mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Orbiting astronomical observatories have the potential for making observations far superior to those from earth-based mirrors. In order for this performance to be realized, the contour of the primary mirror must be very accurately controlled. A preliminary investigation of the use of thermally induced elastic strains for correcting axisymmetric deformations in space telescope mirrors has been presented. The relation between axial deformation and thermal inputs was determined by a finite difference solution of the equations for thin elastic shells. The use of this technique was demonstrated analytically on a beryllium paraboloid. This mirror had 10 equally spaced thermal inputs and results are presented which show the nature of the temperature distribution required to correct deformations due to an acceleration-type loading.

  12. Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae with Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eger, Peter

    2015-08-01

    The observation of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) gamma rays is an excellent tool to study the most energetic and violent environments in the Galaxy. This energy range is only accessible with ground-based instruments such as Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) that reconstruct the energy and direction of the primary gamma ray by observing the Cherenkov light from the induced extended air showers in Earths atmosphere. The main goals of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are the identification of individual sources of cosmic rays (CRs), such as supernova remnants (SNRs), and the study of other extreme astrophysical objects at the highest energies, such as gamma-ray binaries and pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). One of the main challenges is the discrimination between leptonic and hadronic gamma-ray production channels. To that end, the gamma-ray signal from each individual source needs to be brought into context with the multi-wavelength environment of the astrophysical object in question, particularly with observations tracing the density of the surrounding interstellar medium, or synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons. In this review presented at the European Cosmic Ray Symposium 2014 (ECRS2014), the most recent developments in the field of Galactic VHE gamma-ray science are highlighted, with particular emphasis on SNRs and PWNe.

  13. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this work is to define and initiate a long-term program to mature six inter-linked critical technologies for future UVOIR space telescope mirrors to TRL6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirrors: 4 to 8 m monolithic & 8 to 16 m segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, stiffer substrates. (2) Support System:Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error:A very smooth mirror is critical for producing a high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high-contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges:Edges impact PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects the total collecting aperture. (5) Segment-to-Segment Gap Phasing:Segment phasing is critical for producing a high-quality temporally stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation:On-orbit performance is determined by mechanical and thermal stability. Future systems require validated performance models. We are pursuing multiple design paths give the science community the option to enable either a future monolithic or segmented space telescope.

  14. An Aluminum Secondary Mirror for the SOFIA Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, E. F.; Kunz, N.; Brivkalns, C. A.; Brown, T. M.; Honaker, M.

    2002-12-01

    The secondary mirror for the SOFIA telescope is made from silicon carbide. It is 352 mm in diameter, weighs 1.8 kg, and is finished to good optical tolerances. The light weight is essential for chopping with the secondary support mechanism to suppress low frequency "sky" noise. To achieve the light weight, the back side of the mirror is structured with thin-walled pockets; the face plate is 2.3 mm thick. The material is stiff, has low density and high thermal conductance, but is brittle. The latter is a concern because failure of this mirror would render the telescope inoperable. For this reason we are designing a spare secondary mirror. The spare must match the mass and moments of inertia of the SiC mirror (to permit effective chopping), but should be more robust and much cheaper. The spare should permit continuation of much of the observing program, and since many of SOFIA's observations will be made in the far-infrared, the optical quality of the spare can be significantly lower than that of the SiC secondary. Currently it appears that a bare aluminum secondary can be made to meet the requirements, while achieving a diffraction-limited wavelength of 20 microns or less. The design details will be described and discussed in the paper. We gratefully acknowledge NASA support of this work.

  15. Cleaning the Southern African Large Telescope's M5 mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crause, Lisa A.; Gajjar, Hitesh; Love, Jonathan; Strümpfer, Francois; O'Connor, James E.; O'Donoghue, Darragh E.; Strydom, Ockert J.; Buckley, David A. H.; Gillingham, Peter

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the cleaning of M5, one of the four mirrors that make up the Southern African Large Telescope's Spherical Aberration Corrector. As the top upward-facing mirror in a relatively exposed environment, M5 had accumulated a considerable amount of dust and dirt during the six years it had been on the telescope. With the corrector on the ground for re-alignment and testing, we had the opportunity to remove, wash and replace the mirror. Various cleaning techniques were investigated, including an unsuccessful trial application of First Contact surface cleaning polymer film - fortunately only to a small region outside the mirror's clear aperture. Ultimately, "drag-wiping" with wads of cotton wool soaked in a 10g/l sodium lauryl sulphate solution proved highly effective in restoring the reflectivity of M5's optical surface. Following this success, we repeated the procedure for M3, the other upward-facing mirror in the corrector. The results for M3 were equally spectacular.

  16. Evaluation of Photo Multiplier Tube candidates for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, R.; Müller, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hose, J.; Menzel, U.; Nakajima, D.; Takahashi, M.; Teshima, M.; Toyama, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    2016-07-01

    Photo Multiplier Tubes (PMTs) are the most wide spread detectors for fast, faint light signals. Six years ago, an improvement program for the PMT candidates for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project was started with the companies Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. and Electron Tubes Enterprises Ltd. (ETE). For maximizing the performance of the CTA imaging cameras we need PMTs with outstanding good quantum efficiency, high photoelectron collection efficiency, short pulse width, very low afterpulse probability and transit time spread. We will report on the measurements of PMT R-12992-100 from Hamamatsu as their final product and the PMT D573KFLSA as one of the latest test versions from ETE as candidate PMTs for the CTA project.

  17. Beyond VERITAS: High-Energy Gamma-Rays with the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David A.; CTA Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be a new observatory for the study of very-high-energy gamma-ray sources, designed to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the ~30 GeV to ~100 TeV energy band compared to currently operating instruments: VERITAS, MAGIC, and H.E.S.S. CTA will probe known sources with unprecedented sensitivity, angular resolution, and spectral coverage, while also detecting hundreds of new sources. CTA will provide access to data in this energy band to members of the wider astronomical community for the first time. The CTA Consortium will also conduct a number of Key Science Projects, including a Galactic Plane survey and a survey of one quarter of the extragalactic sky, creating legacy data sets that will also be available to the public. This presentation will describe how CTA will bring new opportunities for the solution of astrophysical puzzles.

  18. Upper Limits from Five Years of Blazar Observations with the VERITAS Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Biteau, J.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Eisch, J. D.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Gillanders, G. H.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hütten, M.; Håkansson, N.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Johnson, C. A.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kelley-Hoskins, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Krennrich, F.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nguyen, T.; Nieto, D.; O'Faoláin de Bhróithe, A.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Vincent, S.; Wakely, S. P.; Weiner, O. M.; Weinstein, A.; Williams, D. A.; Zitzer, B.; VERITAS Collaboration; Fumagalli, M.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2016-06-01

    Between the beginning of its full-scale scientific operations in 2007 and 2012, the VERITAS Cherenkov telescope array observed more than 130 blazars; of these, 26 were detected as very-high-energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) γ-ray sources. In this work, we present the analysis results of a sample of 114 undetected objects. The observations constitute a total live-time of ˜570 hr. The sample includes several unidentified Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) sources (located at high Galactic latitude) as well as all the sources from the second Fermi-LAT catalog that are contained within the field of view of the VERITAS observations. We have also performed optical spectroscopy measurements in order to estimate the redshift of some of these blazars that do not have spectroscopic distance estimates. We present new optical spectra from the Kast instrument on the Shane telescope at the Lick observatory for 18 blazars included in this work, which allowed for the successful measurement or constraint on the redshift of four of them. For each of the blazars included in our sample, we provide the flux upper limit in the VERITAS energy band. We also study the properties of the significance distributions and we present the result of a stacked analysis of the data set, which shows a 4σ excess.

  19. Status of the photomultiplier-based FlashCam camera for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pühlhofer, G.; Bauer, C.; Eisenkolb, F.; Florin, D.; Föhr, C.; Gadola, A.; Garrecht, F.; Hermann, G.; Jung, I.; Kalekin, O.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kasperek, J.; Kihm, T.; Koziol, J.; Lahmann, R.; Manalaysay, A.; Marszalek, A.; Rajda, P. J.; Reimer, O.; Romaszkan, W.; Rupinski, M.; Schanz, T.; Schwab, T.; Steiner, S.; Straumann, U.; Tenzer, C.; Vollhardt, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Winiarski, K.; Zietara, K.

    2014-07-01

    The FlashCam project is preparing a camera prototype around a fully digital FADC-based readout system, for the medium sized telescopes (MST) of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The FlashCam design is the first fully digital readout system for Cherenkov cameras, based on commercial FADCs and FPGAs as key components for digitization and triggering, and a high performance camera server as back end. It provides the option to easily implement different types of trigger algorithms as well as digitization and readout scenarios using identical hardware, by simply changing the firmware on the FPGAs. The readout of the front end modules into the camera server is Ethernet-based using standard Ethernet switches and a custom, raw Ethernet protocol. In the current implementation of the system, data transfer and back end processing rates of 3.8 GB/s and 2.4 GB/s have been achieved, respectively. Together with the dead-time-free front end event buffering on the FPGAs, this permits the cameras to operate at trigger rates of up to several ten kHz. In the horizontal architecture of FlashCam, the photon detector plane (PDP), consisting of photon detectors, preamplifiers, high voltage-, control-, and monitoring systems, is a self-contained unit, mechanically detached from the front end modules. It interfaces to the digital readout system via analogue signal transmission. The horizontal integration of FlashCam is expected not only to be more cost efficient, it also allows PDPs with different types of photon detectors to be adapted to the FlashCam readout system. By now, a 144-pixel mini-camera" setup, fully equipped with photomultipliers, PDP electronics, and digitization/ trigger electronics, has been realized and extensively tested. Preparations for a full-scale, 1764 pixel camera mechanics and a cooling system are ongoing. The paper describes the status of the project.

  20. Improving the performance of the single-dish Cherenkov telescope MAGIC through the use of signal timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Anderhub, H.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Backes, M.; Baixeras, C.; Barrio, J. A.; Bartko, H.; Bastieri, D.; Becker, J. K.; Bednarek, W.; Berger, K.; Bernardini, E.; Biland, A.; Bock, R. K.; Bonnoli, G.; Bordas, P.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bosch-Ramon, V.; Bretz, T.; Britvitch, I.; Camara, M.; Carmona, E.; Chilingarian, A.; Commichau, S.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Costado, M. T.; Covino, S.; Curtef, V.; Dazzi, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Los Reyes, R.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, M.; de Sabata, F.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Dominguez, A.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Elsässer, D.; Errando, M.; Fagiolini, M.; Ferenc, D.; Fernández, E.; Firpo, R.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Galante, N.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Goebel, F.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Herrero, A.; Höhne, D.; Hose, J.; Hsu, C. C.; Huber, S.; Jogler, T.; Kranich, D.; La Barbera, A.; Laille, A.; Leonardo, E.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; Lorenz, E.; Majumdar, P.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Meucci, M.; Meyer, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moles, M.; Moralejo, A.; Nieto, D.; Nilsson, K.; Ninkovic, J.; Otte, N.; Oya, I.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Pasanen, M.; Pascoli, D.; Pauss, F.; Pegna, R. G.; Perez-Torres, M. A.; Persic, M.; Peruzzo, L.; Piccioli, A.; Prada, F.; Prandini, E.; Puchades, N.; Raymers, A.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rissi, M.; Robert, A.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T. Y.; Salvati, M.; Sanchez-Conde, M.; Sartori, P.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schweizer, T.; Shayduk, M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shore, S. N.; Sidro, N.; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamerra, A.; Stark, L. S.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Tluczykont, M.; Torres, D. F.; Turini, N.; Vankov, H.; Venturini, A.; Vitale, V.; Wagner, R. M.; Wittek, W.; Zabalza, V.; Zandanel, F.; Zanin, R.; Zapatero, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Cherenkov light flashes produced by extensive air showers are very short in time. A high bandwidth and fast digitizing readout, therefore, can minimize the influence of the background from the light of the night sky, and improve the performance in Cherenkov telescopes. The time structure of the Cherenkov image can further be used in single-dish Cherenkov telescopes as an additional parameter to reduce the background from unwanted hadronic showers. A description of an analysis method which makes use of the time information and the subsequent improvement on the performance of the MAGIC telescope (especially after the upgrade with an ultra fast 2 GSamples/s digitization system in February 2007) will be presented. The use of timing information in the analysis of the new MAGIC data reduces the background by a factor two, which in turn results in an enhancement of about a factor 1.4 of the flux sensitivity to point-like sources, as tested on observations of the Crab Nebula.

  1. Optimal glass-ceramic structures: Components of giant mirror telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eschenauer, Hans A.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed investigations are carried out on optimal glass-ceramic mirror structures of terrestrial space technology (optical telescopes). In order to find an optimum design, a nonlinear multi-criteria optimization problem is formulated. 'Minimum deformation' at 'minimum weight' are selected as contradictory objectives, and a set of further constraints (quilting effect, optical faults etc.) is defined and included. A special result of the investigations is described.

  2. A Research on the Primary Mirror Manipulator of Large Segmented-mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, H.

    2012-09-01

    Since Galileo firstly used the telescope to observe the sky 400 years ago, the aperture of the telescope has become larger and larger to observe the deeper universe, and the segmented-mirror telescope is becoming more and more popular with increasing aperture. In the early 21st century, a series of segmented-mirror telescopes have been constructed including the Large Sky Area Multi-object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) of China. LAMOST is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope, and the dimension of the primary mirror is about 6.7 m× 6 m, which is composed of 37 hexagonal sub-mirrors. However, a problem about the mirror installation appears with the increasing aperture. If there are hundreds of sub-mirrors in the telescope, it is a challenging job to mount and dismount them to the truss. This problem is discussed in this paper and a manipulator for the primary mirror of LAMOST is designed to perform the mount and dismount work. In chapter 1, all the segmented-mirror telescopes in the world are introduced and how the sub-mirrors of these telescopes are installed has been investigated. After comparing with the serial and the parallel robot, a serial robot manipulator proposal, which has several redundant degrees of freedom (DOFs), has been chosen from a series of design proposals. In chapter 2, the theoretical analysis has been carried out on the basis of the design proposal, which includes the forward kinematics and the inverse kinematics. Firstly the D-H coordinate is built according to the structure of the manipulator, so it is possible to obtain the end-effector position and orientation from the individual joint motion thanks to the forward kinematics. Because of the redundant DOFs of the manipulator, the inverse kinematics solution can be a very trick task, and the result may not be only, therefore a kind of simulation is carried out to get the numerical solution using ADAMS (Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical System). In the dynamics analysis the

  3. Advanced X-Ray Telescope Mirrors Provide Sharpest Focus Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Performing beyond expectations, the high- resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope have successfully completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility, Huntsville, AL. "We have the first ground test images ever generated by the telescope's mirror assembly, and they are as good as -- or better than -- expected," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Marshall's chief scientist for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The mirror assembly, four pairs of precisely shaped and aligned cylindrical mirrors, will form the heart of NASA's third great observatory. The X-ray telescope produces an image by directing incoming X-rays to detectors at a focal point some 30 feet beyond the telescope's mirrors. The greater the percentage of X-rays brought to focus and the smaller the size of the focal spot, the sharper the image. Tests show that on orbit, the mirror assembly of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will be able to focus approximately 70 percent of X-rays from a source to a spot less than one-half arc second in radius. The telescope's resolution is equivalent to being able to read the text of a newspaper from half a mile away. "The telescope's focus is very clear, very sharp," said Weisskopf. "It will be able to show us details of very distant sources that we know are out there, but haven't been able to see clearly." In comparison, previous X-ray telescopes -- Einstein and Rosat -- were only capable of focusing X- rays to five arc seconds. The Advanced X-ray Telescope's resolving power is ten times greater. "Images from the new telescope will allow us to make major advances toward understanding how exploding stars create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new solar systems and for life itself," said Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Advanced X- ray Astrophysics Facility Science Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA -- responsible for the telescope

  4. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2015-07-27

    Large space telescopes made of deployable and lightweight structures suffer from aberrations caused by thermal deformations, gravitational release, and alignment errors which occur during the deployment procedure. An active optics system would allow on-site correction of wave-front errors, and ease the requirements on thermal and mechanical stability of the optical train. In the course of a project funded by the European Space Agency we have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror is able to work in space environment and is designed to correct for large aberrations of low order with high surface fidelity. This paper discusses design, manufacturing and performance results of the deformable mirror. PMID:26367605

  5. Unimorph deformable mirror for space telescopes: design and manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Peter; Verpoort, Sven; Wittrock, Ulrich

    2015-07-27

    Large space telescopes made of deployable and lightweight structures suffer from aberrations caused by thermal deformations, gravitational release, and alignment errors which occur during the deployment procedure. An active optics system would allow on-site correction of wave-front errors, and ease the requirements on thermal and mechanical stability of the optical train. In the course of a project funded by the European Space Agency we have developed and manufactured a unimorph deformable mirror based on piezoelectric actuation. The mirror is able to work in space environment and is designed to correct for large aberrations of low order with high surface fidelity. This paper discusses design, manufacturing and performance results of the deformable mirror.

  6. Lightweight in-plane actuated deformable mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Michael J.

    This research focused on lightweight, in-plane actuated, deformable mirrors, with the ultimate goal of developing a 20-meter or larger diameter light gathering aperture for space telescopes. Membrane optics is the study of these structures which may be stowed compactly and unfurled in orbit. This effort comprised four research areas: modelling, analytical solutions, surface control strategy, and scaling. Initially, experimental results were compared to theory using a 0.127 meter diameter deformable mirror testbed. The mirror was modelled using finite elements with MSC.Nastran software, where a boundary tension field was determined using laser vibrometer data. A non-linear solution technique was used to incorporate the membrane stiffening from the applied tension. Statically obtained actuator influence functions were compared to experimentally achieved data, and then a least squares approach was used as the basis for creating a quasi-static control algorithm. Experimental simultaneous tracking of Zernike tip, tilt, and defocus modes was successfully demonstrated. The analytical solutions to plate-membrane and beam-string ordinary differential equation representing the deformable mirror equations were developed. A simplified approach to modelling the axisymmetric cases was also presented. Significantly, it was shown both analytically and through numerical analysis that static actuation for a mirror with a discrete electrode pattern and a high tension-to-stiffness ratio was simply a localized piston displacement in the region of the actuator. Next, a novel static control strategy, the Modal Transformation Method, was developed for membrane mirrors. The method was implemented in finite element simulation, and shows the capability of the in-plane actuated mirror to form Zernike surfaces within an interior, or clear aperture, region using a number of statically-actuated structural modes. Lastly, the scaling problem for membrane optics was addressed. Linear modelling was

  7. Alignment of two mirror astronomical telescopes (the astigmatic component)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Tobias; Thompson, Kevin; Rolland, Jannick

    2008-07-01

    The effects of alignment perturbations on the aberration fields of two mirror astronomical telescopes are discussed. It is demonstrated that expressions describing alignment induced field-linear astigmatism, published by McLeod based on the work of Schroeder, can be obtained using nodal aberration theory. Rather than merely providing a different derivation for alignment induced astigmatism, it is shown that nodal theory can provide several insights that are significant for the development of effective alignment techniques. In the example of a specific telescope sited on Mt. Hopkins (Ritchey- Chretien), two approaches to identify misalignments of the secondary mirror are demonstrated. One approach utilizes the eccentricity of defocused star images and their orientation angles to calculate the misalignment of the secondary mirror after axial coma is removed. A second approach based on the location of the two zeros of the astigmatic aberration field is then shown to give equivalent results, but at the same time ensuring a complete model of all possible effects of misalignment on the performance of the telescope.

  8. Imaging performance of telescope mirrors for far-ultraviolet astronomy.

    PubMed

    Ohl, R G; Saha, T T; Friedman, S D; Barkhouser, R H; Moos, H W

    2000-09-01

    We describe image testing, surface metrology, and modeling of telescope mirrors (0.5 m in diameter, f/4.3) for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. Laboratory image testing of wavelengths in the visible, vacuum, and midultraviolet validated a theoretical analysis by use of the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC). Our modeling is based on surface metrology, including measurements of figure, midfrequency error, and microroughness. This combination of metrology, out-of-band performance testing, and modeling verified that the mirrors would meet mission requirements. We use OSAC to predict the FUSE telescope's far-ultraviolet (90-120-nm) point-spread function and assess its effect on instrument efficiency. The mirrors have a 90% encircled energy diameter of 1.5 arc sec at lambda = 100 nm. Including the effects of spacecraft pointing error, the mirrors have a predicted average slit transmission at lambda = 100 nm of approximately 87% and 96% for the 1.25- and 4-arc sec-wide spectrograph slits, respectively, where the required transmissions are 50% and 95%.

  9. Monte-Carlo studies of the angular resolution of a future Cherenkov gamma-ray telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of this observational technique, providing high sensitivity and an angular resolution of {approx}0.1 deg. per event above an energy threshold of {approx}100 GeV. Planned future arrays of IACTs such as AGIS or CTA are aiming at significantly improving the angular resolution. Preliminary results have shown that values down to {approx}1' might be achievable. Here we present the results of Monte-Carlo simulations that aim to exploring the limits of angular resolution for next generation IACTs and investigate how the resolution can be optimised by changes to array and telescope parameters such as the number of pixel in the camera, the field of view of the camera, the angular pixel size, the mirror size, and also the telescope separation.

  10. Dynamic Pupil Masking for Phasing Telescope Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Fang; Redding, David; Ohara, Catherine; Troy, Mitchell

    2006-01-01

    A method that would notably include dynamic pupil masking has been proposed as an enhanced version of a prior method of phasing the segments of a primary telescope mirror. The method would apply, more specifically, to a primary telescope mirror that comprises multiple segments mounted on actuators that can be used to tilt the segments and translate them along the nominal optical axis to affect wavefront control in increments as fine as a fraction of a wavelength of light. An apparatus (see figure) for implementing the proposed method would be denoted a dispersed-fringe-sensor phasing camera system (DPCS). The prior method involves the use of a dispersed-fringe sensor (DFS). The prior method was reported as part of a more comprehensive method in Coarse Alignment of a Segmented Telescope Mirror (NPO-20770), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 4 (April 2001), page 15a. The pertinent parts of the prior method are the following: The telescope would be aimed at a bright distant point source of light (e.g., a star) and form a broadband image on an imaging detector array placed at the telescope focal plane. The construction and use of a dispersed-fringe sensor would begin with insertion of a grism (a right-angle prism with a transmission grating on the hypotenuse face) into the optical path. With other segments tilted away from the investigating region of the detector, a dispersed-fringe image would be formed by use of a designated reference segment and a selected mirror segment. The modulation period and orientation of the fringe would be analyzed to determine the magnitude and sign of the piston error (displacement along the nominal optical axis) between the two segments. The error would be used to perform a coarse-phase piston adjustment of the affected mirror segment. This determination and removing of piston error is what is meant by phasing as used above. The procedure as described thus far would be repeated until all segments had been phased.

  11. Structural Modeling of the Next Generation Space Telescope's Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulet, J. A. M.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, astronomical observations made with space telescopes have dramatically increased our understanding of the history of the universe. In particular, the cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have yielded observations that cannot be achieved at ground-based observatories. We now have views of the universe before galaxies existed (from COBE) and views of young galaxies (from HST). But none of the existing observatories can provide views of the period in which the galaxies were born, about 100 million to one billion years after the "big bang". NASA expects the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) to fill this gap. An investigation into the structural modeling of the primary mirror of the NGST, its methodology and results are presented.

  12. High Performances and Low Cost Front-End Electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P.; Nayman, P.; Toussenel, F.; Delagnes, E.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Hermann, G.

    2008-12-24

    The current Imaging Arrays of Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) show that this technique is mature. Front-end electronics based on analogue pipelines become a popular readout solution. Slow noise and low power consumption ASICs were developed with improved dynamical range and linearity. A large bandwidth preserves the characteristics of the signal and fast readout reduces dead time. Next generation of IACT should reach an order of magnitude in sensitivity in a wide energy band, ranging from 10 GeV to more than 100 TeV. This goal can be reached with an array of 50-100 telescopes of various sizes at various spacings. With about 2 000 channels per camera a significant effort must be done to lower the overall cost and improve the performances of the electronics. Mass production will be determinant for lowering the overall cost. A gain in cost and performances can be obtained by maximising the integration of the front-end electronics in an ASIC. The amplifiers, analogue memories, digitization and first level buffering can be embedded in the same component. The first stage of the first level trigger should be also considered in this integration. Integrated electronics leads to a more compact camera and an easier maintenance on site.

  13. Constraints on Extragalactic Background Light from Cherenkov telescopes: status and perspectives for the next 5 years

    SciTech Connect

    Mazin, Daniel

    2009-04-08

    Very high energy (VHE, E>30 GeV){gamma}-rays are absorbed via interaction with low-energy photons from the extragalactic background light (EBL) if the involved photon energies are above the threshold for electron-positron pair creation. The VHE {gamma}-ray absorption, which is energy dependent and increases strongly with redshift, distorts the VHE energy spectra observed from distant objects. The observed energy spectra of the AGNs carry therefore an imprint of the EBL. Recent detections of hard spectra of distant blazars (z = 0.11-0.54) by H.E.S.S. and MAGIC put strong constraints on the EBL density in the optical to near infrared waveband. It is, however, not yet possible to distinguish between an intrinsic softening of blazar spectra and a softening caused by the interaction with low energy EBL photons. In this paper, we give an overview of the EBL constraints, their limitations and perspectives for the joint efforts of the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space telescope and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes.

  14. Research on primary mirror lateral support structure of large-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang

    2010-05-01

    The primary mirror of large-aperture telescope is an important component of telescope system. The surface figure error of the primary mirror is a critical factor affecting the imaging quality of telescope system. With the augment of primary mirror aperture, the surface figure error of the primary mirror is affected by many factors, such as gravity, thermal deformation and so on. The factors that influence the surface figure error of the primary mirror are considered and analyzed roundly according to technical requirements of optical system. So the feasible project is researched on the lateral support structure of large-aperture telescope primary mirror. The primary mirror support system of large-aperture telescope is composed of axial support and lateral support. In traditional telescope, the contribution of lateral support to surface distortion is less than axial support. With increase of diameter to thickness ratio, lateral support is becoming more complicated and important than before. Lateral support is a key technology the same as axial support for the large-aperture telescope primary mirror. With the foundation of analysis, comparison and conclusion of related literature and monograph, according to primary mirror supporting principle of the large-aperture telescope. Lateral support methods, the influence of the primary mirror surface figure error due to primary mirror lateral support and lateral support structure of primary mirror are analyzed.

  15. High Precision Assembly of Thin Mirror X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark

    Lightweight high resolution x-ray telescope optics are one of the key technologies under development for next-generation x-ray telescopes. The ultimate goal of this effort is to realize optics with spatial resolution rivaling Chandra (<1 arc-sec) but with collecting areas that are larger by orders of magnitude. In the USA several institutions, including GSFC, MSFC, Harvard-SAO, MIT and Northwest University are working on a variety of approaches to this problem. An excellent example is the NuSTAR x-ray telescope, which teamed Cal Tech, GSFC, Columbia University and LLNL to produce a superb set of hard x-ray optics. The telescope was composed of thousands of 0.2 mm-thick glass mirrors which were epoxied into place around a spindle structure. While very light weight, this process resulted in ~1 arc min resolution. We want to achieve ~100 times better with similar mass. A group at NASA GSFC has recently demonstrated an alternative thin-glass assembly procedure that has achieved ~7 arc sec resolution with x-ray tests. Further progress towards 1 arc-sec will require mirrors with improved figure, lower stress coatings, improved alignment, better metrology, and low stress bonding. Many of the difficulties with current mirror assembly practice stem from the use of epoxy as a bonding agent. Epoxy has many disadvantages, including high shrinkage, large CTE and creep, resin aging effects, water absorption, outgassing, low tensile strength, exothermicity, and requiring large amounts of time and/or heat to cure. These effects can cause errors that become â€oefrozen in― to the bond with no possibility of correction. We propose to investigate replacing epoxy with low temperature, low shrinkage solder alloys. We use these solders in conjunction with high power, millisec-long pulses from a fiber IR laser to deliver controlled amounts of heat into the bond area. We have demonstrated that laser pulses can be used to actuate carefully designed bonds by permanently compressing

  16. Phase Sensor for Aligning a Segmented Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Philip; Walker, Chanda Barlett

    2006-01-01

    A phase sensor has been developed for use in aligning a segmented telescope mirror to within a fraction of a wavelength in piston. (As used here, piston signifies displacement of a mirror segment along the optical axis of the telescope.) Such precise alignment is necessary in order to realize the full benefit of the large aperture achievable through segmentation. This phase sensor is achromatic. It is based on two-wavelength shearing interferometry, and can be modified to utilize an extended or broad-band (e.g., white) light source. The sensor optics include a ruled diffraction grating and an imaging lens. The sensor can measure the piston shift between segments as well as aberrations of the segments. It can measure the surface error of an individual segment, making it possible to compensate for the error with optimal amount(s) of piston and/or tilt. The precise capture range of the sensor depends partly on the telescope design; the largest relative piston shifts measurable by use of this sensor are of the order of 100 m. The accuracy of the sensor also depends partly on the telescope design; in general, the accuracy is sufficient to enable alignment to within approximately half a wavelength. The interferometric image is digitized and processed by a simple algorithm in real time, and the output of the algorithm can be used to maintain alignment in real time, even in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The sensor is robust. Through calibration, it can be made insensitive to (and, hence, tolerant of) misalignments and aberrations of its own optics, most aberrations of the telescope as a whole (in contradistinction to aberrations of individual segments), and most aberrations introduced by atmospheric turbulence

  17. Large-Aperture, Three Mirror Telescopes for Near-Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J.

    In this era when Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is a national priority and optical-infrared telescopic sensor development is underway, cost-benefit analyses of competing approaches are necessary and appropriate. The DOD is presently investing in a new three-mirror telescope for SSA. At the same time, the Air Force, various universities and private research organizations are either studying or building wide-field telescopes with similar capabilities, but in most cases, at a significantly lower cost. Much of the expense for the DOD system appears driven by certain design choices which were advertised as necessary to fulfill the mission. Design details which would allow an independent analysis have not been published and no public comparison with other approaches is known to exist. Most telescope designs however, can be closely approximated from their optical configuration and imaging performance specifications. An optical designer will tell you that field curvature is one of the five monochromatic aberrations which they try to eliminate. The fact that one DOD development effort considers field curvature a design feature immediately draws attention to the project. This coupled with the paucity of published information and the very high development cost makes this program irresistible for comparison with competing approaches. This paper examines the likely design and performance of a proxy telescope intended to find NEOs, compares and contrasts that telescope with similar, but lower cost on-going projects, and examines the predictable impacts of reproducing such a telescope and placing multiple copies around the globe. The study primarily concentrates on performance measured in terms of search rate in square degrees per hour vs. object visual magnitude. Other considerations such as cost, transportability, availability of replacement components and ease of installation are also considered.

  18. Development of the quality control system of the readout electronics for the large size telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Masuda, S.; Paoletti, R.; Poulios, S.; Rugliancich, A.; Saito, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation VHE γ-ray observatory which will improve the currently available sensitivity by a factor of 10 in the range 100 GeV to 10 TeV. The array consists of different types of telescopes, called large size telescope (LST), medium size telescope (MST) and small size telescope (SST). A LST prototype is currently being built and will be installed at the Observatorio Roque de los Muchachos, island of La Palma, Canary islands, Spain. The readout system for the LST prototype has been designed and around 300 readout boards will be produced in the coming months. In this note we describe an automated quality control system able to measure basic performance parameters and quickly identify faulty boards.

  19. Control System Modeling for the Thirty Meter Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacMynowski, Douglas G.; Thompson, Peter M.; Shelton, J. Chris; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Colavita, M. Mark; Sirota, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope primary mirror is composed of 492 segments that are controlled to high precision in the presence of wind and vibration disturbances, despite the interaction with structural dynamics. The higher bandwidth and larger number of segments compared with the Keck telescopes requires greater attention to modeling to ensure success. We focus here on the development and validation of a suite of quasi-static and dynamic modeling tools required to support the design process, including robustness verification, performance estimation, and requirements flowdown. Models are used to predict the dynamic response due to wind and vibration disturbances, estimate achievable bandwidth in the presence of control-structure-interaction (CSI) and uncertainty in the interaction matrix, and simulate and analyze control algorithms and strategies, e.g. for control of focus-mode, and sensor calibration. Representative results illustrate TMT performance scaling with parameters, but the emphasis is on the modeling framework itself.

  20. Control of the California Extremely Large Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Chanan, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    The current design concept for the California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) includes 1080 segments in the primary mirror, with the out-of-plane degrees of freedom actively controlled. We construct the control matrix for this active control system, and describe its singular modes and sensor noise propagation. Data from the Keck telescopes are used to generate realistic estimates of the control system contributions to the CELT wavefront error and wavefront gradient error. Based on these estimates, control system noise will not significantly degrade either seeing-limited or diffraction-limited observations. The use of supplemental wavefront information for real-time control is therefore not necessary. We also comment briefly on control system bandwidth requirements and limitations.

  1. Prospects for annihilating Dark Matter towards Milky Way's dwarf galaxies by the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefranc, Valentin; Mamon, Gary A.; Panci, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    We derive the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) sensitivity to dark matter (DM) annihilation in several primary channels, over a broad range of DM masses. These sensitivities are estimated when CTA is pointed towards a large sample of Milky Way's dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) with promising J-factors and small statistical uncertainties. This analysis neglects systematic uncertainties, which we estimate at the level of at least 1 dex. We also present sensitivities on the annihilation cross section from a combined analysis of 4 dSphs. We assess the CTA sensitivity by: i) using, for each dSph, a recent determination of the J-factor and its statistical error; ii) considering the most up-to-date cosmic ray background; and iii) including both spatial and spectral terms in the likelihood analysis. We find that a joint spectral and spatial analysis improves the CTA sensitivity, in particular for primary channels with sharp features in the γ-ray energy spectrum and for dSphs with steep J-factor profiles, as deduced from the internal kinematics. The greatest sensitivities are obtained for observations of Ursa Minor among the classical dSphs and of Ursa Major II for ultra-faint dSphs.

  2. Sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to the Detection of Intergalactic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Manuel; Conrad, Jan; Dickinson, Hugh

    2016-08-01

    Very high energy (VHE; energy E ≳ 100 GeV) γ-rays originating from extragalactic sources undergo pair production with low-energy photons of background radiation fields. These pairs can inverse-Compton-scatter background photons, initiating an electromagnetic cascade. The spatial and temporal structure of this secondary γ-ray signal is altered as the {e}+{e}- pairs are deflected in an intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF). We investigate how VHE observations with the future Cherenkov Telescope Array, with its high angular resolution and broad energy range, can potentially probe the IGMF. We identify promising sources and simulate γ-ray spectra over a wide range of values of the IGMF strength and coherence length using the publicly available ELMAG Monte Carlo code. Combining simulated observations in a joint likelihood approach, we find that current limits on the IGMF can be significantly improved. The projected sensitivity depends strongly on the time a source has been γ-ray active and on the emitted maximum γ-ray energy.

  3. A prototype for the real-time analysis of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, Andrea; Fioretti, Valentina; Zoli, Andrea; Aboudan, Alessio; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Juan José; Maier, Gernot; Lyard, Etienne; Bastieri, Denis; Lombardi, Saverio; Tosti, Gino; De Rosa, Adriano; Bergamaschi, Sonia; Interlandi, Matteo; Beneventano, Domenico; Lamanna, Giovanni; Jacquemier, Jean; Kosack, Karl; Antonelli, Lucio Angelo; Boisson, Catherine; Burkowski, Jerzy; Buson, Sara; Carosi, Alessandro; Conforti, Vito; Contreras, Jose Luis; De Cesare, Giovanni; de los Reyes, Raquel; Dumm, Jon; Evans, Phil; Fortson, Lucy; Fuessling, Matthias; Graciani, Ricardo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Grandi, Paola; Hinton, Jim; Humensky, Brian; Knödlseder, Jürgen; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Marisaldi, Martino; Neyroud, Nadine; Nicastro, Luciano; Ohm, Stefan; Osborne, Julian; Rosen, Simon; Tacchini, Alessandro; Torresi, Eleonora; Testa, Vincenzo; Trifoglio, Massimo; Weinstein, Amanda

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will be one of the biggest ground-based very-high-energy (VHE) γ- ray observatory. CTA will achieve a factor of 10 improvement in sensitivity from some tens of GeV to beyond 100 TeV with respect to existing telescopes. The CTA observatory will be capable of issuing alerts on variable and transient sources to maximize the scientific return. To capture these phenomena during their evolution and for effective communication to the astrophysical community, speed is crucial. This requires a system with a reliable automated trigger that can issue alerts immediately upon detection of γ-ray flares. This will be accomplished by means of a Real-Time Analysis (RTA) pipeline, a key system of the CTA observatory. The latency and sensitivity requirements of the alarm system impose a challenge because of the anticipated large data rate, between 0.5 and 8 GB/s. As a consequence, substantial efforts toward the optimization of highthroughput computing service are envisioned. For these reasons our working group has started the development of a prototype of the Real-Time Analysis pipeline. The main goals of this prototype are to test: (i) a set of frameworks and design patterns useful for the inter-process communication between software processes running on memory; (ii) the sustainability of the foreseen CTA data rate in terms of data throughput with different hardware (e.g. accelerators) and software configurations, (iii) the reuse of nonreal- time algorithms or how much we need to simplify algorithms to be compliant with CTA requirements, (iv) interface issues between the different CTA systems. In this work we focus on goals (i) and (ii).

  4. Deployable telescope having a thin-film mirror and metering structure

    DOEpatents

    Krumel, Leslie J.; Martin, Jeffrey W.

    2010-08-24

    A deployable thin-film mirror telescope comprises a base structure and a metering structure. The base structure houses a thin-film mirror, which can be rolled for stowage and unrolled for deployment. The metering structure is coupled to the base structure and can be folded for stowage and unfolded for deployment. In the deployed state, the unrolled thin-film mirror forms a primary minor for the telescope and the unfolded metering structure positions a secondary minor for the telescope.

  5. Tomographic alignment algorithm for an extremely large three-mirror telescope: invisible modes.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Chanan, Gary

    2010-11-20

    We analyze the optical effects due to distortions of a three-mirror telescope that is sufficiently large that all three mirrors must be actively controlled. Numerical experiments on telescopes with both monolithic and segmented primary mirrors reveal the existence of telescope misalignment configurations (modes) that are invisible to a fixed focal station wavefront sensor, even for highly redundant multidirectional tomographic measurement schemes. We describe these modes and give a theoretical explanation for them.

  6. Development of CFRP Mirrors for Space Telescopes Using Replica Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Shin; Kamiya, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Ryuzo

    2012-07-01

    Ultra-lightweight and high-accuracy CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) mirrors for space telescopes have developed and their feasibility for ultrared applications was demonstrated. The CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) of the all-CFRP sandwich panels was tailored in ±1x10-7/K. The surface accuracy of mirrors of 150 mm in diameter was 0.8 μm RMS (Root Mean Square) as fabricated and the surface smoothness was improved to 5 nm RMS. The surface of front face skins of sandwich panels was coated with epoxy resin and surface accuracy and smoothness were transcribed from an optically-polished glass tool of λ/20 accuracy by replica technique. Surface preciseness was measured before and after replica coating using a 3D optical profiler of white light interferometer. Observed patterns of the asperity of mirror surfaces were classified into four categories, overall warping and line patterns of fiber tows and core patterns and print-through of individual fibers. Replica improved all kinds of asperity.

  7. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  8. Alignment test results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope mirrors in the cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James B.; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the Science Instrument (SI) detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  9. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  10. Evolution of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy from the early days to the Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillas, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Most of what we know of cosmic gamma rays has come from spacecraft, but at energies above tens of GeV it has become possible to make observations with ground-based detectors of enormously greater collecting area. In recent years one such detector type, the cluster of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, has reached a very productive state, whilst several alternative approaches have been explored, including converted solar power collectors and novel high-altitude particle shower detectors which promised to extend the energy range covered. Key examples of development from 1952 to 2011 are followed, noting the problems and discoveries that stimulated the current work, explaining the logic of the alternative approaches that were taken. The merits of the current major Cherenkov observatories and of other viable detectors are examined and compared, with examples of the astrophysical information they are beginning to provide. The detectors are still evolving, as we still do not understand the processes onto which the gamma rays provide a window. These include the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (in particular, the wide-band spectra of radiation from some individual supernova remnants are still hard to interpret), the highly relativistic and variable jets from active galactic nuclei, and aspects of the electrodynamics of pulsars. Larger groups of Cherenkov telescopes still offer the possibility of an increase in power of the technique for resolvable Galactic sources especially.

  11. A 4 V, ns-range pulse generator for the test of Cherenkov Telescopes readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoranz, P.; Vegas, I.; Miranda, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    We present in this paper the design, fabrication and verification of a ns-range pulse generator based on a Step Recovery Diode (SRD). This device needs only a 5 V DC power supply, delivers 1 ns pulses with peak amplitudes in excess of 4 V and features state of the art jitter figures. In addition, the pulser contains a trigger channel. The long standing problem of the SRD simulation via circuital analysis is addressed. It is shown that the dynamic properties of the Step Recovery Diode can accurately be reproduced via a small signal circuital simulation for the rise times needed in a ns-range pulser. It is also demonstrated that strong inaccuracies in the pulse shape prediction are obtained if the wave propagation through the lines typically used in this type of circuits is simulated by a simple Transverse Electromagnetic Mode (TEM) line model. Instead, it is necessary to account for non-TEM effects. By means of broadband resistive power splitters and high dynamic range amplifiers, a prototype of 4 channels was also fabricated. This prototype is particularly useful for testing the readout electronics of Cherenkov Telescopes, but additional applications to other large-scale experiments are expected, any of those where calibration or verification with compact ns-range pulsers featuring low jitter, large dynamic ranges and multichannel operation is needed. In addition, the fabrication cost of this pulser is almost negligible as compared with bulky, commercially available waveform generators, which rarely deliver ns pulses in excess of 3 V. Furthermore, the small size of the pulser presented here and its low power consumption allow an easy integration into more complex systems.

  12. ROBAST: Development of a ROOT-based ray-tracing library for cosmic-ray telescopes and its applications in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Akira; Noda, Koji; Rulten, Cameron

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a non-sequential ray-tracing simulation library, ROOT-basedsimulatorforraytracing (ROBAST), which is aimed to be widely used in optical simulations of cosmic-ray (CR) and gamma-ray telescopes. The library is written in C++, and fully utilizes the geometry library of the ROOT framework. Despite the importance of optics simulations in CR experiments, no open-source software for ray-tracing simulations that can be widely used in the community has existed. To reduce the dispensable effort needed to develop multiple ray-tracing simulators by different research groups, we have successfully used ROBAST for many years to perform optics simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Among the six proposed telescope designs for CTA, ROBAST is currently used for three telescopes: a Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) medium-sized telescope, one of SC small-sized telescopes, and a large-sized telescope (LST). ROBAST is also used for the simulation and development of hexagonal light concentrators proposed for the LST focal plane. Making full use of the ROOT geometry library with additional ROBAST classes, we are able to build the complex optics geometries typically used in CR experiments and ground-based gamma-ray telescopes. We introduce ROBAST and its features developed for CR experiments, and show several successful applications for CTA.

  13. Low-friction magnetically levitating support for telescope primary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakley, Rick D.

    2000-08-01

    A unit device for supporting a telescope primary mirror in its cell is described. It replaces the traditional roller- ball or oil-bellows support unit. The device utilizes the levitating field from opposing magnets to support the primary's weight above the cell's surface. This frees the bearings of the device so that the primary may expand or contract smoothly, unimpaired with `sticky', loaded bearings. The mechanics of the device restrain the opposing magnets from drifting inappropriately and work to isolate the primary from undesirable bending moments. Supplying the near-cell magnet, which may advance toward the near-primary magnet, with the standard counterweight and fulcrum commonly seen behind the cell assures the primary/device, weight/force balance remains for any orientation. Design, forces, and ongoing research for levitated support is discussed. A prototype is under construction.

  14. Active optics primary mirror support system for the 26m VST telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, Pietro; D'Orsi, Sergio; Ferragina, Luigi; Fierro, Davide; Marty, Laurent; Molfese, Cesare; Perrotta, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    The Very Large Telescope Survey Telescope (VST) is equipped with an active optics system in order to correct low-order aberrations. The 2.6 m primary mirror is supported both axially and laterally and is surrounded by several safety devices for earthquake protection. We describe the mirror support system and discuss the results of the qualification test campaign.

  15. Production of primary mirror segments for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, H. M.; Allen, R. G.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Davison, W. B.; Johns, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Lutz, R. D.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Su, P.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.; Zhou, P.

    2014-07-01

    Segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope is well underway, with the off-axis Segment 1 completed, off-axis Segments 2 and 3 already cast, and mold construction in progress for the casting of Segment 4, the center segment. All equipment and techniques required for segment fabrication and testing have been demonstrated in the manufacture of Segment 1. The equipment includes a 28 m test tower that incorporates four independent measurements of the segment's figure and geometry. The interferometric test uses a large asymmetric null corrector with three elements including a 3.75 m spherical mirror and a computer-generated hologram. For independent verification of the large-scale segment shape, we use a scanning pentaprism test that exploits the natural geometry of the telescope to focus collimated light to a point. The Software Configurable Optical Test System, loosely based on the Hartmann test, measures slope errors to submicroradian accuracy at high resolution over the full aperture. An enhanced laser tracker system guides the figuring through grinding and initial polishing. All measurements agree within the expected uncertainties, including three independent measurements of radius of curvature that agree within 0.3 mm. Segment 1 was polished using a 1.2 m stressed lap for smoothing and large-scale figuring, and a set of smaller passive rigid-conformal laps on an orbital polisher for deterministic small-scale figuring. For the remaining segments, the Mirror Lab is building a smaller, orbital stressed lap to combine the smoothing capability with deterministic figuring.

  16. Mirror illumination and spillover measurements of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Patricio; Dünner, Rolando; Wollack, Edward; Henriquez, Fernando; Jerez-Hanckes, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) is a 6 m telescope designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) simultaneously at 145 GHz, 220 GHz and 280GHz. The receiver in ACT, the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera, features 1000 TES bolometers in each band. The detector performance depends critically on the total optical loading, requiring the spillover contributions from the optics to be minimal. This inspired the use of a cold Lyot stop to limit the illumination of the primary and the use of guard rings surrounding the primary and secondary reflectors. Here, we present a direct measurement of the illumination aperture for both reflectors and of the attenuation level outside the main optical path. We used a 145 GHz, 1mW source and a chopper wheel to produce a time-varying signal with a broad beam profile. We sampled the response of the camera for different locations of the source, placed in front and beside the primary and secondary mirrors. The aperture of the primary was measured to be 5.72 ± 0.17m in diameter (95 ± 3% of its geometrical size), while the aperture of the secondary yielded 2 ± 0.12m in diameter. Both apertures are consistent with the optical design. Comparing to previous measurements of the beam solid angle from planet observations, we estimate an optical efficiency of 72.3 ± 4.8%. We found that the attenuation outside the primary aperture was -16 ± 2 dB, which is below the theoretical expectations, and -22 ± 1 dB outside the secondary aperture, which is consistent with simulations. These results motivated the extension of the baffles surrounding the secondary mirror, with the following reduction in detector optical loading from 2.24pW to 1.88 pW.

  17. Mirror Illumination and Spillover Measurements of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallardo, Patricio; Dunner, Rolando; Wollack, Ed; Jerez-Hanckes, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) is a 6 m telescope designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) simultaneously at 145 GHz, 220GHz and 280GHz, The receiver in ACT, the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera, features 1000 TES bolometers in each band, The detector performance depends critically on the total optical loading, requiring the spmover contributions from the optics to be minimal. This inspired the use of a cold Lyot stop to limit the illumination of the primary and the use of guard rings surrounding the primary and secondary reflectors. Here, we present a direct measurement of the illumination aperture for both reflectors and of the attenuation level outside the main optical path. We used a 145 GHz, 1 m W source and a chopper wheel to produce a time-varying signal with a broad heam proflle, We sampled the response of the camera for different locations of the source, placed in front and beside the primary and secondary mirrors. The aperture of the primary was measured to be 5,72 plus or minus 0,17m in diameter (95 plus or minus 3% of its geometrical size), while the aperture of the secondary yielded 2 plus or minus 0.12m in diameter. Both apertures are consistent with the optical design. Comparing to previous measurements of the beam solid angle from planet observations, we estimate an optical efficiency of 72.3 plus or minus 4,8%. We found that the attenuation outside the primary aperture was -16 plus or minus 2dB, which is below the theoretical expectations, and -22 plus or minus 1 dB outside the secondary aperture, which is consistent with simulations. These results motivated the extension of the baffles surrounding the secondary mirror, with the following reduction in detector optical loading from 2,24 pW to 188pW.

  18. Electronics for the camera of the First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) for ground based gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderhub, H.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Commichau, V.; Djambazov, L.; Dorner, D.; Farnier, C.; Gendotti, A.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H. P.; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Huber, B.; Kim, K.-S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krumm, B.; Lee, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Lyard, E.; Mannheim, K.; Meharga, M.; Neise, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rohlfs, R.; Röser, U.; Stucki, J.-P.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Viertel, G.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Warda, K.; Weitzel, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Within the FACT project, we construct a new type of camera based on Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APDs). Compared to photomultipliers, G-APDs are more robust, need a lower operation voltage and have the potential of higher photon-detection efficiency and lower cost, but were never fully tested in the harsh environments of Cherenkov telescopes. The FACT camera consists of 1440 G-APD pixels and readout channels, based on the DRS4 (Domino Ring Sampler) analog pipeline chip and commercial Ethernet components. Preamplifiers, trigger system, digitization, slow control and power converters are integrated into the camera.

  19. Design and analysis of supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror on a space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Chai, Wenyi; Feng, Liangjie; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xuewu

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical stability is a significant segment for an on-axis space telescope to assure its assembly accuracy as well as the image quality in the rigorous space environment, supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror as a main structure of the on-axis space telescope must be designed reasonably to meet the mission requirements of the space telescope. Meanwhile, in view of the limitation of the satellite launching cost, it is necessary to reduce the weight and power compensation during the supporting structure design based on the satisfaction of telescope performance. Two types of supporting structure for a space telescope are designed, one is three-tripod structure which has three tripods located on the optical bench to support the secondary mirror assemblies and keep the distance between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror, the other is barrel supporting structure which includes a tube and a secondary mirror support with four spider struts. To compare the mechanical performance and launching cost of the two kinds of supporting structure, both structural and thermal analysis model are established. The analysis results indicates that the three-tripod support is lighter, has better mechanical performance and needs less power compensation than the barrel support.

  20. Dark matter searches with Cherenkov telescopes: nearby dwarf galaxies or local galaxy clusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gómez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  1. COLIBRI: partial camera readout and sliding trigger for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, C. L.; Tejedor, L. A.; Martínez, G.

    2013-06-01

    Plans for the future Cherenkov telescope array CTA include replacing the monolithic camera designs used in H.E.S.S. and MAGIC-I by one that is built up from a number of identical segments. These so-called clusters will be relatively autonomous, each containing its own triggering and readout hardware. While this choice was made for reasons of flexibility and ease of manufacture and maintenance, such a concept with semi-independent sub-units lends itself quite naturally to the possibility of new, and more flexible, readout modes. In all previously-used concepts, triggering and readout of the camera is centralised, with a single camera trigger per event that starts the readout of all pixels in the camera at the same time and within the same integration time window. The limitations of such a trigger system can reduce the performance of a large array such as CTA, due to the huge amount of useless data created by night-sky background if trigger thresholds are set low enough to achieve the desired 20 GeV energy threshold, and to image losses at high energies due to the rigid readout window. In this study, an alternative concept (``COLIBRI'' = Concept for an Optimised Local Image Building and Readout Infrastructure) is presented, where only those parts of the camera which are likely to actually contain image data (usually a small percentage of the total pixels) are read out. This leads to a significant reduction of the expected data rate and the dead-times incurred in the camera. Furthermore, the quasi-independence of the individual clusters can be used to read different parts of the camera at slightly different times, thus allowing the readout to follow the slow development of the shower image across the camera field of view. This concept of flexible, partial camera readout is presented in the following, together with a description of Monte-Carlo studies performed to evaluate its performance as well as a hardware implementation proposed for CTA.

  2. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  3. Two-mirror telescope design with third-order coma insensitive to decenter misalignment.

    PubMed

    Scaduto, Lucimara Cristina Nakata; Sasian, Jose; Stefani, Mario Antonio; Neto, Jarbas Caiado de Castro

    2013-03-25

    Misalignments always occur in real optical systems. These misalignments do not generate new aberration forms, but they change the aberration field dependence. Two-mirror telescopes have been used in several applications. We analyze a two-mirror telescope configuration that has negligible sensitivity to decenter misalignments. By applying the wave aberration theory for plane-symmetric optical systems it is shown that the asphericity in the secondary mirror, if properly chosen, can compensate for any decenter perturbation allowing third-order coma unchanged across the field of view. For any two-mirror system it is possible to find a configuration in which decenter misalignments do not generate field-uniform coma.

  4. MACHETE: A transit imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope to survey half of the very high energy γ-ray sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortina, J.; López-Coto, R.; Moralejo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Current imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes for very high energy γ-ray astrophysics are pointing instruments with a field of view up to a few tens of sq deg. We propose to build an array of two non-steerable (drift) telescopes. Each of the telescopes would have a camera with a FOV of 5 × 60 sq deg oriented along the meridian. About half of the sky drifts through this FOV in a year. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the performance of this instrument. We expect it to survey this half of the sky with an integral flux sensitivity of ˜0.77% of the steady flux of the Crab Nebula in 5 years, an analysis energy threshold of ˜150 GeV and an angular resolution of ˜0.1°. For astronomical objects that transit over the telescope for a specific night, we can achieve an integral sensitivity of 12% of the Crab Nebula flux in a night, making it a very powerful tool to trigger further observations of variable sources using steerable IACTs or instruments at other wavelengths.

  5. The meter-class carbon fiber reinforced polymer mirror and segmented mirror telescope at the Naval Postgraduate School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Christopher; Fernandez, Bautista; Bagnasco, John; Martinez, Ty; Romeo, Robert; Agrawal, Brij

    2015-03-01

    The Adaptive Optics Center of Excellence for National Security at the Naval Postgraduate School has implemented a technology testing platform and array of facilities for next-generation space-based telescopes and imaging system development. The Segmented Mirror Telescope is a 3-meter, 6 segment telescope with actuators on its mirrors for system optical correction. Currently, investigation is being conducted in the use of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced polymer structures for large monolithic optics. Advantages of this material include lower manufacturing costs, very low weight, and high durability and survivability compared to its glass counterparts. Design and testing has begun on a 1-meter, optical quality CFRP parabolic mirror for the purpose of injecting collimated laser light through the SMT primary and secondary mirrors as well as the following aft optics that include wavefront sensors and deformable mirrors. This paper will present the design, testing, and usage of this CFRP parabolic mirror and the current path moving forward with this ever-evolving technology.

  6. Optomechanical analysis and testing of a fast steering secondary mirror prototype for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Andrew; Park, Won Hyun; Cho, Myung; Kim, Young-Soo

    2013-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be one of the next class of extremely large segmented mirror telescopes. The GMT will utilize two Gregorian secondary mirrors, and Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM) and a Fast-steering Secondary Mirror (FSM). The FSM consists of six off-axis mirrors surrounding a central on-axis circular segment. The segments are 1.1 m in diameter and conjugated 1:1 to the seven 8.4 m segments of the primary. A prototype of the FSM mirror (FSMP) has been developed, analyzed and tested in order to demonstrate the mechanical and optical responses of the mirror assembly when subjected to structural and thermal loadings. In this paper, the mechanical and thermal performances of the FSMP were evaluated by performing finite element analyses (FEA) in NX Nastran. The deformation of the mirror's lateral flexure was measured when the FSMP was axially loaded and the temperature response of the mirror assembly was measured when exposed to a sample thermal environment. In order to validate the mirror/lateral flexure design concept, the mechanical, optical and thermal measurements obtained from the tests conducted on mirrors having two different lateral flexures were compared to the responses calculated by FEA.

  7. Status of Mirror Technology for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, D. N.

    2000-10-01

    The NGST primary mirror is anticipated to be a segmented deployable optic with segment size being in the range of 1-3m depending on the details of the architecture. Over the past 4 years the NGST program has initiated and implemented an aggressive lightweight cryogenic mirror technology program. The program was designed to challenge and excite the optical community in reaching a new standard in production of lightweight optics. The goal was to develop optics at < 15 kg/m2, operational at ~ 40K and meeting the overall NGST observatory requirement for diffraction limited performance at 2 microns. In order to meet the NGST needs, technology efforts were initiated to investigate and develop mirrors in a variety of materials, which held promise for the program. The basic technology approaches have initially targeted the production of large mirrors in the 1.2-2.0m diameter range (or side-to-side distance in the case of hexagonal optics). Although this size may not be the final size of an NGST primary mirror segment, it was felt that a 1.2-2.0m optic would be of sufficient size to understand the mirror material and fabrication processes which drive the cost and schedule of mirror production. The ultimate goals of the technology program are both to demonstrate mirrors meeting the NGST performance requirements, and to establish cost and schedule credibility for producing and implementing the mirrors for the NGST flight system. Establishing cost and schedule credibility is essential to NGST which is a cost capped mission, with past program experience demonstrating that the optics will be a large portion of the total cost of the program. The first two years of the program were dedicated to understanding the various applicable materials, funding those materials to various levels of maturity and implementing the first large mirror procurement, the NGST Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD), in order to establish a benchmark for the state-of-the-art in lightweight optics and to

  8. Astroclimatic Characterization of Vallecitos: A Candidate Site for the Cherenkov Telescope Array at San Pedro Mártir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, Gagik; Hernandez, Mercedes-Stephania; Ochoa, Jose Luis; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Mandat, Dusan; Pech, Miroslav; Plauchu Frayn, Ilse; Colorado, Enrique; Murillo, Jose Manuel; Ceseña, Urania; Garcia, Benjamin; Lee, William H.; Bulik, Tomasz; Garczarczyk, Markus; Fruck, Christian; Costantini, Heide; Cieslar, Marek; Aune, Taylor; Vincent, Stephane; Carr, John; Serre, Natalia; Janecek, Petr; Haefner, Dennis

    2016-03-01

    We conducted an 18 month long study of the weather conditions of the Vallecitos, a proposed site in México to harbor the northern array of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). It is located in Sierra de San Pedro Mártir (SPM) a few kilometers away from Observatorio Astronómico Nacional. The study is based on data collected by the ATMOSCOPE, a multi-sensor instrument measuring the weather and sky conditions, which was commissioned and built by the CTA Consortium. Additionally, we compare the weather conditions of the optical observatory at SPM to the Vallecitos regarding temperature, humidity, and wind distributions. It appears that the excellent conditions at the optical observatory benefit from the presence of microclimate established in the Vallecitos.

  9. Unimorph-type deformable mirror for cryogenic telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinlein, Claudia; Goy, Matthias; Lange, Nicolas; Kinast, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Deformable mirrors can be used in cryogenic instruments to compensate for temperature-induced deformations. A unimorph-type deformable mirror consists of a mirror substrate and a piezoelectric layer bonded on substrates rear surface. A challenge in the design of the deformable mirror is the lack of knowledge about material properties. Therefore, we measured the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the substrate material TiAl6V4 between 295 K and 86 K. The manufactured mirror is characterized by an adaptive optical measurement setup in front of a test cryostat. The measured mirror deformations are feedback into a finite element model to calculate the CTE of the piezoelectric layer. We compare our obtained results to other published CTE-values for the piezoelectric material PIC151.

  10. Intermedium dumping liquids (IDL) technique for very large telescope mirrors development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Victor P.

    1994-06-01

    A technically simple modification of centrifugal moulding method for the solidifying and liquid very large telescope mirrors is described. The principal idea of this technique is the use of rotating containers floating freely in the intermedium dumping liquids (IDL). The results of testing experiments are discussed. The new type of telescope mount which is based on the IDL technique is presented.

  11. A new concept for large deformable mirrors for extremely large telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torben; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Ardeberg, Arne; Korhonen, Tapio

    2006-06-01

    For extremely large telescopes, there is strong need for thin deformable mirrors in the 3-4 m class. So far, feasibility of such mirrors has not been demonstrated. Extrapolation from existing techniques suggests that the mirrors could be highly expensive. We give a progress report on a study of an approach for construction of large deformable mirrors with a moderate cost. We have developed low-cost actuators and deflection sensors that can absorb mounting tolerances in the millimeter range, and we have tested prototypes in the laboratory. Studies of control laws for mirrors with thousands of sensors and actuators are in good progress and simulations have been carried out. Manufacturing of thin, glass mirror blanks is being studied and first prototypes have been produced by a slumping technique. Development of polishing procedures for thin mirrors is in progress.

  12. Temperature deformations of the mirror of a radio telescope antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avdeyev, V. I.; Grach, S. A.; Kozhakhmetov, K. K.; Kostenko, F. I.

    1979-01-01

    The stress informed state of the mirror of an antenna, with a diameter of 3 m, for a radio interferometer used in space, and located in a temperature field is examined. The mirror represents a parabolic shell, consisting of 19 identical parts. The problem is based on representations of the thermoelasticity of thin shells.

  13. The design and analysis of 2m telescope's K Mirror system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Zhang, Jingxu; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Yan

    2014-09-01

    During the alt-azimuth telescope tracking, due to the frame structure of tracking support and relative movement of each mirror in Coude optical path, image plane is rotating. To eliminate the effects of image rotation for imaging and subsequent image processing, dove prism or K mirror are generally used. A set of K mirror system designed for 2m telescope. Affected by various errors in the alignment process, the rotating axis K, the optical axis of the K mirror, and the optical axis of the telescope's optical system can't be fully coincide. This causes the track optical axis drawn on the image is not a point, but a Pascal's limacon. The impact caused by the various sources of error were analyzed in this paper and simulation results have important guiding significance for the alignment error distribution.

  14. Overview and Recent Accomplishments of Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2013-01-01

    AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach to define & execute a long-term strategy to mature technologies necessary to enable future large aperture space telescopes. Because we cannot predict the future, we are pursuing multiple technology paths including monolithic & segmented mirrors. Assembled outstanding team from academia, industry & government; experts in science & space telescope engineering. Derived engineering specifications from science measurement needs & implementation constraints. Maturing 6 critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast exoplanet imaging. AMTD achieving all its goals & accomplishing all its milestones.

  15. Optimization analysis of primary mirror in large aperture telescope based on workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengsen; Wang, Guomin

    2015-10-01

    With the diameter increasing for large aperture telescope primary mirror, the gravity caused by the increased of surface size will directly affect the quality of optical imaging, the adjustment of large aperture primary mirror will be frequent according to the requirement of observation. As the angle and the azimuth's transformation of primary mirror influences the surface shape accuracy immediately, the rational design of the primary mirror supporting structure is of crucial importance. Now the general method is to use ANSYS APDL programming, which is inconvenient and complex to fit for the different components, the calculation require much time and the analysis is lack of efficient. Taking the diameter of 1.12 m telescope primary mirror as the research objection, the paper combine the actual design parameters of SONG telescope, respectively using ANSYS WORKBENCH to employ the primary mirror axial and lateral support model in finite element method, the optimal solution is obtained by optimization design and the change rule of mirror surface deformation under inclined condition is studied. The optimization results according with the requirements of the primary mirror comprehensive error proves that the optimization analysis method is available and applicable.

  16. Effects of surface polishing on the microstrain behavior of telescope mirror materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eul, W. A.; Woods, W. W.

    1973-01-01

    Rough ground silicic mirror substrate materials were found in previous investigations to exhibit significant surface yield. This effect was removed by surface etching, a procedure not normally employed in the finishing of optical telescope mirrors. The effects of fine grinding and polishing techniques as well as graded etching are investigated. Torsional shear measurements of yield strain versus stress are made on four candidate mirror substrate materials: polycrystalline silicon, ULE silica 7971, CER-VIT 101, and fused silica 7940. Commonly employed fine grinding and polishing practices are shown to remove a major portion of the surface yield found in rough ground mirror substrate materials.

  17. A Novel Lateral Deployment Mechanism for Segmented Mirror/Solar Panel of Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesiya, Dignesh; Srinivas, A. R.; Shukla, Piyush

    2015-09-01

    Space telescopes require large aperture primary mirrors to capture High Definition (HD) ground image while orbiting around the Earth. Fairing Volume of launch vehicles is limited and thus the size of monolithic mirror is limited to fairing size and solar panels are arranged within a petal formation in order to provide a greater power to volume ratio. This generates need for deployable mirrors for space use. This brings out a method for designing new deployment mechanism for segmented mirror. Details of mechanism folding strategy, design of components, FE simulations, realization and Lab model validation results are discussed in order to demonstrate the design using prototype.

  18. Hubble Space Telescope primary-mirror characterization by measurement of the reflective null corrector.

    PubMed

    Furey, L; Dubos, T; Hansen, D; Samuels-Schwartz, J

    1993-04-01

    The reflective null corrector used to manufacture of the Hubble Space Telescope contains valuable information about the prescription of the primary mirror since an excellent null was achieved between the null-corrector wave front and the primary-mirror wave front. During the Phase I measurements, the leading cause of the spherical aberration, the field lens position error, was discovered and remeasured to an accuracy of +/-0.005 mm. To derive the conic constant of the primary mirror to an accuracy of +/-0.0003, we remeasured the parameters of the reflective null corrector that could contribute to the spherical aberration of the primary mirror.

  19. Large chopping secondary mirror for the 15-m submillimeter James Clerk Maxwell telescope.

    PubMed

    van de Stadt, H; Verkerk, J

    1987-08-15

    A 75-cm diam chopping secondary mirror has been developed for the 15-m diam James Clerk Maxwell telescope. The large focal ratio (D/F = 1:0.36) requires a highly convex secondary mirror, which was manufactured out of a solid slab of high-grade aluminum, consisting of a 3-mm thick shell with a support ring along the edge. The mirror surface approaches a predescribed hyperboloid with a rms precision better than 9 microm, which is adequate for use in the submillimeter wavelength region. The design aspects, the performance of a two-axis chopping mechanism, and the construction of the mirror are described.

  20. A Piezoelectric Unimorph Deformable Mirror Concept by Wafer Transfer for Ultra Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Shcheglov, Kirill

    2002-01-01

    Future concepts of ultra large space telescopes include segmented silicon mirrors and inflatable polymer mirrors. Primary mirrors for these systems cannot meet optical surface figure requirements and are likely to generate over several microns of wavefront errors. In order to correct for these large wavefront errors, high stroke optical quality deformable mirrors are required. JPL has recently developed a new technology for transferring an entire wafer-level mirror membrane from one substrate to another. A thin membrane, 100 mm in diameter, has been successfully transferred without using adhesives or polymers. The measured peak-to-valley surface error of a transferred and patterned membrane (1 mm x 1 mm x 0.016 mm) is only 9 nm. The mirror element actuation principle is based on a piezoelectric unimorph. A voltage applied to the piezoelectric layer induces stress in the longitudinal direction causing the film to deform and pull on the mirror connected to it. The advantage of this approach is that the small longitudinal strains obtainable from a piezoelectric material at modest voltages are thus translated into large vertical displacements. Modeling is performed for a unimorph membrane consisting of clamped rectangular membrane with a PZT layer with variable dimensions. The membrane transfer technology is combined with the piezoelectric bimorph actuator concept to constitute a compact deformable mirror device with a large stroke actuation of a continuous mirror membrane, resulting in a compact A0 systems for use in ultra large space telescopes.

  1. The History of Ground-Based Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics with the Atmospheric Air Cherenkov Telescope Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2013-06-01

    In the recent two decades the ground-based technique of imaging atmosphericescopes has established itself as a powerful new discipline in science. As of today some ˜ 150 sources of gamma rays of very different types, of both galactic and extragalactic origin, have been discovered due to this technique. The study of these sources is providing clues to many basic questions in astrophysics, astro-particle physics, physics of cosmic rays and cosmology. The current generation of telescopes, despite the young age of the technique, offers a solid performance. The technique is still maturing, leading to the next generation large instrument known under the name Cherenkov Telescope Array. The latter's sensitivity will be an order of magnitude higher than that of the currently best instruments VERITAS, H.E.S.S. and MAGIC. This article is devoted to outlining the milestones in a long history that step-by-step have given shape to this technique and have brought about today's successful source marathon.

  2. Design and development of a fast-steering secondary mirror for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung; Corredor, Andrew; Dribusch, Christoph; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Young-Soo; Moon, Il-Kweon

    2011-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be a 25m class telescope which is one of the extremely large telescope projects in the design and development phase. The GMT will have two Gregorian secondary mirrors, an adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) and a fast-steering secondary mirror (FSM). Both secondary mirrors are 3.2 m in diameter and built as seven 1.1 m diameter circular segments conjugated 1:1 to the seven 8.4m segments of the primary. The FSM has a tip-tilt feature to compensate image motions from the telescope structure jitters and the wind buffeting. The support system of the lightweight mirror consists of three axial actuators, one lateral support at the center, and a vacuum system. A parametric study and optimization of the FSM mirror blank and central lateral flexure design were performed. This paper reports the results of the trade study. The optical image qualities and structure functions for the axial and lateral gravity print-through cases, thermal gradient effects, and dynamic performances will be discussed for the case of a lightweighted segment with a center thickness of 140 mm weighing approximately 105 kg.

  3. The control, monitor, and alarm system for the ICT equipment of the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, Fulvio; Fioretti, Valentina; Tanci, Claudio; Conforti, Vito; Tacchini, Alessandro; Leto, Giuseppe; Gallozzi, Stefano; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Trifoglio, Massimo; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Zoli, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI is an Italian flagship project whose first goal is the realization of an end-to-end telescope prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The prototype will be installed in Italy during Fall 2014. A second goal will be the realization of the ASTRI/CTA mini-array which will be composed of seven SST-2M telescopes placed at the CTA Southern Site. The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) equipment necessary to drive the infrastructure for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype is being designed as a complete and stand-alone computer center. The design goal is to obtain basic ICT equipment that might be scaled, with a low level of redundancy, for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array, taking into account the necessary control, monitor and alarm system requirements. The ICT equipment envisaged at the Serra La Nave observing station in Italy, where the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype will operate, includes computers, servers and workstations, network devices, an uninterruptable power supply system, and air conditioning systems. Suitable hardware and software tools will allow the parameters related to the behavior and health of each item of equipment to be controlled and monitored. This paper presents the proposed architecture and technical solutions that integrate the ICT equipment in the framework of the Observatory Control System package of the ASTRI/CTA Mini- Array Software System, MASS, to allow their local and remote control and monitoring. An end-toend test case using an Internet Protocol thermometer is reported in detail.

  4. Finite Element Modeling of a Semi-Rigid Hybrid Mirror and a Highly Actuated Membrane Mirror as Candidates for the Next Generation Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Larry; Jacobson, Dave; Mosier, Gary; Nein, Max; Page, Timothy; Redding, Dave; Sutherlin, Steve; Wilkerson, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Advanced space telescopes, which will eventually replace the Hubble Space Telescope (HTS), will have apertures of 8 - 20 n. Primary mirrors of these dimensions will have to be foldable to fit into the space launcher. By necessity these mirrors will be extremely light weight and flexible and the historical approaches to mirror designs, where the mirror is made as rigid as possible to maintain figure and to serve as the anchor for the entire telescope, cannot be applied any longer. New design concepts and verifications will depend entirely on analytical methods to predict optical performance. Finite element modeling of the structural and thermal behavior of such mirrors is becoming the tool for advanced space mirror designs. This paper discusses some of the preliminary tasks and study results, which are currently the basis for the design studies of the Next Generation Space Telescope.

  5. Coarse alignment of thin-shell, segmented mirrors for Wolter-I telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Benjamin D.; Hertz, Edward; Marquez, Vanessa; McMuldroch, Stuart; Reid, Paul B.; Allured, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    The alignment of thin-shell, segmented mirrors for Wolter-I telescopes frequently involves the use of a Hartmann test. In order to get optical throughput in the Hartmann test, the mirrors must first be coarsely aligned to one another and to the metrology system. In the past, the coarse alignment of these mirrors at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory has largely relied upon component machine tolerances and contact measurements with a coordinate measurement machine (CMM). This process takes time and does not produce reliable nor repeatable results. Thus, methods were developed to allow for the quick and reliable coarse alignment of thin- shell, segmented mirrors at their final locations in the mirror assembly. We present the coarse alignment system developed at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and its use in the alignment of thin-shell, segmented mirrors for the adjustable X-ray optics program.

  6. Aligning, bonding, and testing mirrors for lightweight x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William W.; Saha, Timo T.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Biskach, Michael P.; Niemeyer, Jason; Schofield, Mark J.; Mazzarella, James R.; Kolos, Linette D.; Hong, Melinda M.; Numata, Ai; Sharpe, Marton V.; Solly, Peter M.; Riveros, Raul E.; Allgood, Kim D.; McKeon, Kevin P.

    2015-09-01

    High-resolution, high throughput optics for x-ray astronomy entails fabrication of well-formed mirror segments and their integration with arc-second precision. In this paper, we address issues of aligning and bonding thin glass mirrors with negligible additional distortion. Stability of the bonded mirrors and the curing of epoxy used in bonding them were tested extensively. We present results from tests of bonding mirrors onto experimental modules, and on the stability of the bonded mirrors tested in x-ray. These results demonstrate the fundamental validity of the methods used in integrating mirrors into telescope module, and reveal the areas for further investigation. The alignment and integration methods are applicable to the astronomical mission concept such as STAR-X, the Survey and Time-domain Astronomical Research Explorer.

  7. Aligning, Bonding, and Testing Mirrors for Lightweight X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William W.; Saha, Timo T.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Biskach, Michael P.; Niemeyer, Jason; Schofield, Mark J.; Mazzarella, James R.; Kolos, Linette D.; Hong, Melinda M.; Numata, Ai; Sharpe, Marton V.; Solly, Peter M.; Riveros, Raul E.; Allgood, Kim D.; McKeon, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution, high throughput optics for x-ray astronomy entails fabrication of well-formed mirror segments and their integration with arc-second precision. In this paper, we address issues of aligning and bonding thin glass mirrors with negligible additional distortion. Stability of the bonded mirrors and the curing of epoxy used in bonding them were tested extensively. We present results from tests of bonding mirrors onto experimental modules, and on the stability of the bonded mirrors tested in x-ray. These results demonstrate the fundamental validity of the methods used in integrating mirrors into telescope module, and reveal the areas for further investigation. The alignment and integration methods are applicable to the astronomical mission concept such as STAR-X, the Survey and Time-domain Astronomical Research Explorer.

  8. Precision Linear Actuators for the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope Demonstration Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinoff, Jason; Pfenning, David

    2006-01-01

    The Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) is an ongoing research effort at Goddard Space Flight Center developing wavefront sensing and control architectures for future space telescopes. The 03.5-m SPOT telescope primary mirror is comprise9 of six 0.86-m hexagonal mirror segments arranged in a single ring, with the central segment missing. The mirror segments are designed for laboratory use and are not lightweighted to reduce cost. Each primary mirror segment is actuated and has tip, tilt, and piston rigid-body motions. Additionally, the radius of curvature of each mirror segment may be varied mechanically. To provide these degrees of freedom, the SPOT mirror segment assembly requires linear actuators capable of mirror segment, which has a mass of -100 kg. A stepper motor driving a differential satellite roller screw was designed to meet these demanding requirements. Initial testing showed that the actuator is capable of sub-micron repeatability over the entire 6-mm range, and was limited by 100-200 nm measurement noise levels present in the facility. Further testing must be accomplished in an isolated facility with a measurement noise floor of <5 nm. Such a facility should be ready for use at GSFC in the early summer of 2006, and will be used to better characterize this actuator.

  9. Topology optimization-based lightweight primary mirror design of a large-aperture space telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shutian; Hu, Rui; Li, Quhao; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Zhigang; Kang, Renke

    2014-12-10

    For the large-aperture space telescope, the lightweight primary mirror design with a high-quality optical surface is a critical and challenging issue. This work presents a topology optimization-based design procedure for a lightweight primary mirror and a new mirror configuration of a large-aperture space telescope is obtained through the presented design procedure. Inspired by the topology optimization method considering cast constraints, an optimization model for the configuration design of the mirror back is proposed, through which the distribution and the heights of the stiffeners on the mirror back can be optimized simultaneously. For the purpose of minimizing the optical surface deviation due to self-weight and polishing pressure loadings, the objective function is selected as to maximize the mirror structural stiffness, which can be achieved by minimizing the structural compliance. The total mass of the primary mirror is assigned as the constraint. In the application example, results of the optimized design topology for two kinds of mass constraints are presented. Executing the design procedure for specific requirements and postprocessing the topology obtained of the structure, a new mirror configuration with tree-like stiffeners and a multiple-arch back in double directions is proposed. A verification model is constructed to evaluate the design results and the finite element method is used to calculate the displacement of the mirror surface. Then the RMS deviation can be obtained after fitting the deformed surface by Zernike polynomials. The proposed mirror is compared with two classical mirrors in the optical performance, and the comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the new mirror configuration. PMID:25608076

  10. Metrology for x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haizhang; Li, Xiaodan; Grindel, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Mirrors used in x-ray telescope systems for observations outside of the earth`s atmosphere are usually made of several thin nested shells, each formed by a pair of paraboloidal and hyperboloidal surfaces. The thin shells are very susceptible to self-weight deflection caused by gravity and are nearly impossible to test by conventional interferometric techniques. The metrology requirements for these mirrors are extremely challenging. This paper presents a prototype of a Vertical Scanning Long Trace Profiler (VSLTP) which is optimized to measure the surface figure of x-ray telescope mirrors in a vertical orientation. The optical system of the VSLTP is described. Experimental results from measurements on an x-ray telescope mandrel and tests of the accuracy and repeatability of the prototype VSLTP are presented. The prototype instrument has achieved a height measurement accuracy of about 50 nanometers with a repeatability of better than 20 nanometers, and a slope measurement accuracy of about 1 microradian.

  11. High volume production trial of mirror segments for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oota, Tetsuji; Negishi, Mahito; Shinonaga, Hirohiko; Gomi, Akihiko; Tanaka, Yutaka; Akutsu, Kotaro; Otsuka, Itaru; Mochizuki, Shun; Iye, Masanori; Yamashita, Takuya

    2014-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope is a next-generation optical/infrared telescope to be constructed on Mauna Kea, Hawaii toward the end of this decade, as an international project. Its 30 m primary mirror consists of 492 off-axis aspheric segmented mirrors. High volume production of hundreds of segments has started in 2013 based on the contract between National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and Canon Inc.. This paper describes the achievements of the high volume production trials. The Stressed Mirror Figuring technique which is established by Keck Telescope engineers is arranged and adopted. To measure the segment surface figure, a novel stitching algorithm is evaluated by experiment. The integration procedure is checked with prototype segment.

  12. The Large Binocular Telescope primary mirror support control system description and current performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; Kern, Jonathan; Hill, John M.; Davison, Warren B.; Cuerden, Brian; Brynnel, Joar G.; Biddick, Chris; Duffek, Kenneth

    2008-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is built around two lightweight borosilicate honeycomb mirrors which, at 8.4 meters in diameter, are the largest operational examples of this technology. Since the mirrors are relatively stiff, the LBT mirror support system relies on passive position control and active force control. Passive position control is performed by six extendable hardpoints organized as a truncated hexapod, which may be positioned as required by the active optics control loop. The hardpoints rely on their axial stiffness to maintain the mirror position against residual external disturbances. The active force control system minimizes the force exerted by the hardpoints on the glass. Additionally, the axial component of the nominally uniform active support forces can be perturbed to distort the mirror as required by the active optics control loop. Because of the relatively large CTE of borosilicate glass, the differential temperature of the mirror is critical. Thus, the force control system must support a 16 metric ton mirror using less than 100 Watts of electrical power. The authors present a description of the primary mirror support system as implemented at the LBT. Initial stability problems made the mirrors nearly unusable in freezing temperatures. The authors explain the reason for this instability and describe the solutions implemented. Data demonstrating the current performance of the primary mirror support system are also presented.

  13. Analysis of the dynamics of thin primary mirrors for large astronomical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Mccann, M.

    1973-01-01

    The NASTRAN structural analysis program was used to investigate the dynamic properties of thin primary mirrors suitable for use in large orbiting astronomical telescopes. An analysis is included of the mode shapes and modal frequencies for several thin, homogeneous, isotropic mirrors. Typical cases include two different mirror diameters, two different diameter-to-thickness ratios, and both a mirror without and a mirror with a central hole that is 22 percent of the mirror diameter. The finite-element structural model is evaluated by comparing the NASTRAN generated results with theoretical values for a simply supported, flat, circular mirror. The same model is then used for evaluating the spherical mirrors. The mode shapes and frequencies of a 0.762-meter-diameter mirror with a 60-to-1 diameter-to-thickness ratio and a three-point rigid kinematic (not overconstrained) mount are calculated and plotted for comparison with results obtained previously from the SAMIS structural analysis program for this same mirror. A static analysis is also shown for comparison with experimentally obtained influence coefficients.

  14. Primary mirror and mount technology for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melugin, Ramsey K.; Chang, L. S.; Mansfield, J. A.; Howard, Steven D.

    1989-01-01

    Candidate technologies for a lightweight primary mirror for the SOFIA telescope are evaluated for both mirror blank fabrication and polishing. Two leading candidates for the type mirror blank are considered: the frit-bonded, structured form, and the thin meniscus form. The feasible mirror is required to be very lightweight with an areal density of approximately 100 kg/sq m, have an f/ratio near 1.0, and have surface quality that permits imaging in the visible as well as the infrared. Also considered are the results of a study conducted to assess the feasibility of designing a suitable mounting system for the primary mirror. The requirements for the mount design are given both in terms of the environmental conditions and the expected optical performance. PATRAN and NASTRAN programs are used to model mirror and mounting. The sandwich-type mirror made of ultra low expansion silica with square cells in the core, is modeled using equivalent solid elements for the core. The design study produces primary mirror surface deflections in 1g as a function of mirror elevation angles. The surface is analyzed using an optical analysis program, FRINGE, to give a prediction of the mirror optical performance. Results from this analysis are included.

  15. Status of the eROSITA Telescope testing and calibrating the x-ray mirror assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwitz, Vadim; Predehl, Peter; Bräuninger, Heinrich; Burkert, Wolfgang; Dennerl, Konrad; Eder, Josef; Friedrich, Peter; Fürmetz, Maria; Grisoni, Gabriele; Hartner, Gisela; Marioni, Fabio; Menz, Benedikt; Pfeffermann, Elmar; Valsecchi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    The eROSITA X-ray observatory that will be launched on board the Russian Spectrum-RG mission comprises seven X-ray telescopes, each with its own mirror assembly (mirror module + X-ray baffle), electron deflector, filter wheel, and CCD camera with its control electronics. The completed flight mirror modules are undergoing many thorough X-ray tests at the PANTHER X-ray test facility after delivery, after being mated with the X-ray baffle, and again after both the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests. A description of the work done with mirror modules/assemblies and the test results obtained will be reported here. We report also on the environmental tests that have been performed on the eROSITA telescope qualification model.

  16. Structural design and mitigation of mirror deformations in lunar-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, Paul L.

    1993-09-01

    A driving concern of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) preliminary design study was the degradation of the LUTE optical figure due to thermal deformations, during a temperature cycle of 65 K to 265 K at the reference 40 deg latitude, 0 deg longitude landing site. A multidisciplinary analysis process was developed, temperature effects were characterized, and primary mirror thermal deformations calculated for use in the optical analyses. Trade studies evaluated the qualitative performance of various design schemes. Results indicated that kinematic mirror supports with bottom-mounted flexures rendered less optical disturbance under thermal loading than mirror supports at the inner or outer periphery. Another trade indicated that a telescope's baseplate should be athermalized by matching thermal distortion coefficients. A comparison of three materials for the primary mirror predicted that silicon carbide would be the best material for resisting thermally induced figure deformations on the moon.

  17. Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a multi-year effort to systematically mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. This technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. To accomplish our objective, We use a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system.

  18. Design and mathematical analysis of a three-mirror X-ray telescope based on ATM S-056 X-ray telescope hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foreman, J. W., Jr.; Cardone, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The mathematical design of the aspheric third mirror for the three-mirror X-ray telescope (TMXRT) is presented, along with the imaging characteristics of the telescope obtained by a ray trace analysis. The present design effort has been directed entirely toward obtaining an aspheric third mirror which will be compatible with existing S-056 paraboloidal-hyperboloidal mirrors. This compatability will facilitate the construction of a prototype model of the TMXRT, since it will only be necessary to fabricate one new mirror in order to obtain a working model.

  19. Active damping of the camera support mast of a Cherenkov Gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrz, M.; Bastaits, R.; Preumont, A.

    2011-04-01

    This paper explores the possibility of damping actively the camera support mast of Gamma-ray telescopes with a configuration similar to the MAGIC telescope, where the camera is supported by a curved mast and an array of cables. This is achieved by replacing a set of passive cables by a set of active ones, controlled by active tendons. Each active tendon consists of a displacement actuator collocated to a force sensor with independent force feedback control loops. The paper outlines the theory of decentralized active damping of cable-structures, points out the main design parameters, and evaluates the amount of damping that the control system can provide. The effect of the control on the wind response and on the transient response of the telescope is estimated.

  20. Hubble Space Telescope secondary mirror vertex radius/conic constant test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope backup secondary mirror was tested to determine the vertex radius and conic constant. Three completely independent tests (to the same procedure) were performed. Similar measurements in the three tests were highly consistent. The values obtained for the vertex radius and conic constant were the nominal design values within the error bars associated with the tests. Visual examination of the interferometric data did not show any measurable zonal figure error in the secondary mirror.

  1. Application of research for metal primary mirror of large-aperture infrared solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Xinnan

    2010-05-01

    Metal is an early telescope mirror material, it was later replaced by glass which has lower thermal expansion coefficient. However, for observing the sun, these glass materials in the primary mirror are affected by the sun's intense radiation, its temperature rises rapidly, but which conducts heat slowly. The temperature difference between mirror and ambient air is so large that causing the air turbulence which has affected the observation precision. While the metal material has better thermal conductivity characteristics, it can greatly improve the problems caused by air turbulence. This paper analyzes the characteristics of the various mirror materials, and then makes a rust-proof aluminum alloy 5A05 as the mirror substrate material. For the major deficiencies of the soft aluminum surface which is not suitable for polishing, this paper presents a method of electroless nickel plating to improve its surface properties. After the mirror go through a thermal shock, the upper and lower levels of metal CTE don't match with each other, which leads to mirror deformation and warping. The bimetallic effect has been illustrated by the theory of beam element and give a result of elementary approximated. The analysis shows that the displacement deformation of the upper and lower layers of metal which is caused by thermal shock is smaller when the CTE is closer. In the experiments, a spherical aluminum mirrors with the substrate of 5A05 aluminum alloy, diameter of 110mm, the radius of curvature of 258.672mm is manufactured in classical technique. And it ultimately achieves optical mirror-polished precision. Besides, the long-term thermal stability experimental study of the aluminum mirrors proved that Al-infrared solar telescope primary mirror meets the needs of the long-term observation during use.

  2. Electro-optical characterization of MPPC detectors for the ASTRI Cherenkov telescope camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, D.; Belluso, M.; Bonanno, G.; Billotta, S.; Grillo, A.; Garozzo, S.; Romeo, G.; Catalano, O.; La Rosa, G.; Sottile, G.; Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S.

    2014-12-01

    This work addresses a systematic and in-depth electro-optical characterization of the Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) sensors constituting the camera detection system at the focal plane of the ASTRI telescope prototype. The paper reports the experimental results of a large set of measurements on the MPPC devices in order to provide a reliable qualification of the detector performance and evaluate its compliance with the telescope focal plane requirements. In particular, breakdown voltage, internal gain, dark count rate, cross-talk and extra-charge probability, and absolute photon detection efficiency measurements are performed on the basic sensor device unit as a function of the detector operating conditions.

  3. Development of a fast steering secondary mirror prototype for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung K.; Corredor, Andrew; Dribusch, Christoph; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Young-Soo; Moon, Il-Kweon; Park, Won Hyun

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) will be a 25m class telescope currently in the design and development phase. The GMT will be a Gregorian telescope and equipped with a fast-steering secondary mirror (FSM). This secondary mirror is 3.2 m in diameter and built as seven 1.1 m diameter circular segments conjugated 1:1 to the seven 8.4m segments of the primary. The prototype of FSM (FSMP) development effort is led by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) with several collaborators in Korea, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in USA. The FSM has a tip-tilt feature to compensate image motions from the telescope structure jitters and the wind buffeting. For its dynamic performance, each of the FSM segments is designed in a lightweight mirror. Support system of the lightweight mirror consists of three axial actuators, one lateral support at the center, and a vacuum system. A parametric design study to optimize the FSM mirror configuration was performed. In this trade study, the optical image qualities and structure functions for the axial and lateral gravity print-through cases, thermal gradient effects, and dynamic performances will be discussed.

  4. An Automated SVD for Alignment and Control of James Webb Space Telescope Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiri, Sharam; Howard, Joseph M.; Aronstein, David L.; Ha, Kong; Smith, J. Scott; Dean, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope. The alignment of the segmented primary and secondary mirrors in the wavefront sensing and control process involves a series of actuators to control the six degrees-of-freedom motion on each surface in addition to the radius of curvature. The control matrix developed from the alignment parameters is over-determined and singular value decomposition (SVD) method is used to solve it in the least square sense. An automated SVD scheme has been developed to identify the most contributing modes in a typical alignment process and reduce the impact of error-prone modes from the control process.

  5. Variant of the anastigmatic telescope with three mirrors for back focal length.

    PubMed

    Herrera, J; Vázquez, S; Luna, E; Salas, L; Nuñez, J; Sohn, E; Ruiz, E

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, an optical design is presented for an anastigmatic telescope with back focal length corrected with exact ray tracing to eliminate spherical, coma, and astigmatism aberrations. The telescope is formed of three conical mirrors, two of them polished on the same substratum. The optical design is divided into three stages: we began the design obtaining the Gaussian parameters in a first-order solution; posteriorly, were obtained analytically the three mirrors' asphericity in a third-order design. The final design stage consists of the implementation of the Fermat's principle, the Abbe sine condition, and the Coddington equations for the exact correction for the three aforementioned aberrations. PMID:21532673

  6. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Abplanalp, Laura; Arnold, William

    2014-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies. AMTD is deliberately pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with op-tions to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  7. Design of three-mirror telescopes via a differential equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shao-Hua; Evans, Neal C.; Shealy, David L.; Johnson, R. Barry

    1996-11-01

    A differential equation method is applied to the design of a three-mirror telescope. The resulting system is mostly free of spherical aberration, coma and astigmatism. From caustic theory and a generalization of the Coddington Equations, the Abbe sine condition and the constant optical path length condition, three coupled differential equations, one for each reflecting surface, are generated. A system which satisfies these conditions will have a high resolution over a wide field of view. Analysis of this application is presented as a comparison to a similar three-mirror telescope system produced by conventional optimization techniques.

  8. Optical design for amateur reflecting telescopes based on tilted axial-symmetrical planoidal mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprakov, Sergey A.

    2012-09-01

    Two-mirrors aplanatic optical design for amateur telescopes up to 0.5m class is described. The optical system is low cost, easy for adjusting, fast and large field of view can be used for visual and astrophotography. The method for calculation of baffles for straight light protection is described. The optical performances and sample shots for the builted device are presented. Keywords: two-mirrors system, all-reflecting schmidt system, aplanatic system, protection from straight light, baffles, obscuration, wide-field, telescopes for amateurs.

  9. Common-pull, multiple-push, vacuum-activated telescope mirror cell.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elfego; Sohn, Erika; Salas, Luis; Luna, Esteban; Araiza-Durán, José A

    2014-11-20

    A new concept for push-pull active optics is presented, where the push-force is provided by means of individual airbag type actuators and a common force in the form of a vacuum is applied to the entire back of the mirror. The vacuum provides the pull-component of the system, in addition to gravity. Vacuum is controlled as a function of the zenithal angle, providing correction for the axial component of the mirror's weight. In this way, the push actuators are only responsible for correcting mirror deformations, as well as for supporting the axial mirror weight at the zenith, allowing for a uniform, full dynamic-range behavior of the system along the telescope's pointing range. This can result in the ability to perform corrections of up to a few microns for low-order aberrations. This mirror support concept was simulated using a finite element model and was tested experimentally at the 2.12 m San Pedro Mártir telescope. Advantages such as stress-free attachments, lighter weight, large actuator area, lower system complexity, and lower required mirror-cell stiffness could make this a method to consider for future large telescopes.

  10. Research on the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingxu

    2007-12-01

    Large-aperture telescope can be used in surveying battlefield, researching landform, searching object, real-time monitoring, imaging, detecting and identifying spatial targets and so on. A large-aperture telescope for achieving high resolution power is designed to monitor spatial target and image in real time. Real-time monitoring plays an important role in military conflicts. The orbit parameter of object, quantity, geometrical shape parameter and so on can be obtained by detect spatial target. With the development of optical technology, people require larger aperture in optics-electronic (O-E) system. By increasing optical aperture, the ability of collecting light and resolution power in the system can be enhanced. But the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope will be a very difficult problem. With the increase of primary mirror aperture, the weight of the primary mirror will become larger than before. The root mean square (rms) of the primary mirror is affected by many factors, such as deadweight, deformation of heat, environment and so on. Due to the primary mirror of telescope is an important component of telescope system. By reducing the weight of primary mirror, precision of the system is ensured. During the designing phase, one can consider the supporting project of the primary mirror synthetically and analyze it roundly according to technical requirement of optical system and the effect factors. The final structural design can be reasonable. In an astronomical telescope, the surface of reflector is an important part for collecting dark radiation of celestial bodies. Its surface shape will have an effect on collecting efficiency of telescope radiant energy directly. So the rms must be very high. Optical system of large aperture, small wavelength and small focus can receive maximal light intensity. For ground-based optical astronomical telescope, the design proposed in the paper can satisfy the requirement of the possible

  11. Design Study of an 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    This paper will review a recent NASA MSFC preliminary study that demonstrated the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. The study started with the unique capabilities of the Ares V vehicle and examined the feasibility of launching a large aperture low cost low risk telescope based on a conventional ground based glass primary mirror. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN & C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations & servicing, mass budget and system cost. The study telescope was an on-axis three-mirror anastigmatic design with a fine steering mirror. The observatory has a 100 arc-minute (8.4 X 12 arc-minutes) of diffraction limited field of view at a wavelength les than 500 nm. The study assumed that the primary mirror would be fabricated from an existing Schott Zerodur residual VLT blank edged to 6.2 meters, 175 mm thick at the edge with a mass of 11,000 kg. The entire mass budget for the observatory including primary mirror, structure, light baffle tube, instruments, space craft, avionics, etc. is less than 40,000 kg - a 33% mass margin on the Ares V's 60,000 kg Sun-Earth L2 capability. An 8 meter class observatory would have a total mass of less than 60,000 kg of which the primary mirror is the largest contributor.

  12. Optical very large array (OVLA) prototype telescope: status report and perspective for large mosaic mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejonghe, Julien; Arnold, Luc; Lardiere, Olivier; Berger, Jean-Pierre; Cazale, C.; Dutertre, S.; Kohler, D.; Vernet, D.

    1998-08-01

    The OVLA will be a kilometric-size interferometric array of N equals 27 or more 1.5 m telescopes. It is expected to provide visible to infra-red snap-shot images, containing in densified pupil mode N(superscript 2) 10(superscript -4) arc-second wide resolved elements in yellow light. The prototype telescope is under construction at Observatoire de Haute Provence and will be connected in 2000 to the GI2T, Grand Interferometre a 2 Telescopes, thus upgraded to a GI3T. The prototype telescope has a spherical mount, well suited for multi- aperture interferometric work, and a thin active 1.5 m f/1.7 mirror weighting only 180 kg with the active cell. This meniscus-shaped mirror, made of low-cost ordinary window glass, is only 24 mm thick and supported by 32 actuators. We describe the telescope optical concept with emphasis on opto-mechanical aspects and the test results of the active optics system. We also discuss the application of this mirror concept to large mosaic mirrors of moderate cost.

  13. Analysis of the characteristics of the Golay3 multiple-mirror telescope.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wu; Quanying, Wu; Lin, Qian

    2009-01-20

    The sparse aperture system gives a novel solution for the design of large telescopes with high angular resolution. Such systems utilize several smaller subapertures to simulate the full aperture but are more promising by virtue of their lighter weight and lower cost. Multiple-mirror telescopes (MMTs) and multiple-telescope telescopes (MTTs) are two types of sparse aperture systems. Here, the entrance pupil characteristics are derived for the Golay 3 MMT by studying the relationships between the submirrors on the primary mirror and the shapes of the subapertures on the entrance pupil with different relative apertures and conic constants of the primary mirror of the Golay 3 MMT. Overlay and efficiency factors are proposed in order to obtain the optimal fill factor on the entrance pupil. Expressions for the point spread function (PSF) and the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the Golay 3 MMT are deduced, and the characteristics of the PSF and MTF are explored based on the derived equations and Matlab simulation. Designs for two Cassegrain telescopes with the Golay3 configuration have been developed. Based on the relationships between the fill factor and the overlay factor, optimal parameters for the submirrors on the primary mirror can be selected. The PSF and MTF for both Cassegrain MMT designs have been obtained by Zemax simulation to prove that our theoretical results are consistent with those of practical simulation.

  14. Use of a Fourier transform spectrometer on a balloon-borne telescope and at the multiple mirror telescope (MMT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub, W. A.; Chance, K. V.; Brasunas, J. C.; Vrtilek, J. M.; Carleton, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    The design and use of an infrared Fourier transform spectrometer which has been used for observations of laboratory, stratospheric, and astronomical spectra are described. The spectrometer has a spectral resolution of 0.032/cm and has operated in the mid-infrared (12 to 13 microns) as well as the far-infrared (40 to 140 microns), using both bolometer and photoconductor cryogenic detectors. The spectrometer is optically sized to accept an f/9 beam from the multi-mirror telescope (MMT). The optical and electronic design are discussed, including remote operation of the spectrometer on a balloon-borne 102-cm telescope. The performance of the laser-controlled, screw-driven moving cat's-eye mirror is discussed. Segments of typical far-infrared balloon flight spectra, lab spectra, and mid-infrared MMT spectra are presented. Data reduction, interferogram processing, artifact removal, wavelength calibration, and intensity calibration methods are discussed. Future use of the spectrometer is outlined.

  15. Space ten-meter telescope (STMT) - Structural and thermal feasibility study of the primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bely, Pierre Y.; Bolton, John F.; Neeck, Steven P.; Tulkoff, Philip J.

    1987-01-01

    The structural and thermal behavior of a ten-meter primary mirror for a space optical/near-IR telescope in geosynchronous orbit is studied. The glass-type lightweighted mirror is monolithic, of the double arch type, and is supported at only three points. The computer programs SSPTA (thermal), NASTRAN (finite element), and ACCOS V (optical) are used in sequence to determine the temperature, deformation, and optical performance of the mirror. A mirror temperature of 130 K or less appears to be obtainable by purely passive means. With a fused silica or standard Zerodur blank, thermally-induced deformation is unacceptable and cannot be fully corrected by an active secondary mirror over the desired field. Either active thermal control or a blank of lower thermal expansion coefficient would be required.

  16. Experiment and modal analysis on the primary mirror structure of Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhiping; Yang, Shimo; Hu, Qiqian

    2006-06-01

    Primary mirror with Φ 1m and f 3.5m is the most important optical part in Space Solar Telescope (SST), which is designed to make observations of transient and steady state solar hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic processes and is being researched and manufactured by National Astronomical Observatories. The primary mirror structure(PMS), a crucial linker for the optical and other subsystems, includes primary mirror and its supporting frame. Therefore, this part must satisfy the optical sufficient strength, stiffness, and thermal stability requirements under the space environment and in the launching process. In this paper the primary mirror structure and its connection are described. The scheme of modal analysis and experiment is built, according to the specific dynamic requirements of the primary mirror structure in Space Solar Telescope. The dynamic response on the primary mirror structure is analyzed with MSC.NASTRAN software. Comparing these results with mode parameters obtained from modal experiment analysis. Modal experiment uses freely hanging primary mirror structure, simple input multi-output, and modal parameter identification through CADA-X software. Both results provide evidences to develop this satellite design.

  17. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  18. Thermal analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8-meter primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Hopkins, Randall C.; Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-07-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 point and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The objective is to maintain the primary mirror at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop®1. A detailed model of the primary mirror was required in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew and a 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the solar environment that influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model is used to predict gradients across and through the primary mirror using an idealized boundary temperature on the back and sides of the mirror of 280 K.

  19. Testing the James Webb Space Telescope Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    JWST in-process optical testing and cryogenic requirement compliance certification, verification andvalidation was probably the most difficult metrology job of our generation in astronomical optics. But, the challenge was met: by hard work of dozens of optical metrologists; development and qualification of multiple custom test setups; and several new inventions, including 4D PhaseCam and Leica Absolute Distance Meter. This paper summarizes the metrology tools, test setups and processes used to characterize the JWST primary mirror.

  20. Sensitivity of the Cherenkov Telescope Array to the detection of axion-like particles at high gamma-ray opacities

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Manuel; Conrad, Jan E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2014-12-01

    Extensions of the Standard Model of particles commonly predict the existence of axion(-like) particles (ALPs) that could be detected through their coupling to photons in external magnetic fields. This coupling could lead to modifications of γ-ray spectra from extragalactic sources. Above a certain energy, the γ-ray flux should be exponentially damped due to the interaction with photons of background radiations fields. ALPs, on the other hand, propagate unimpeded over cosmological distances and a reconversion into γ-rays could lead to an additional component in the spectra. Here, we present the sensitivity of the proposed Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) to detect this spectral hardening. Using the full instrumental response functions of CTA, a combined likelihood analysis of four γ-ray sources shows that a significant detection of the ALP signal is possible for couplings g{sub aγ} ≳ 2 × 10{sup −11} GeV{sup −1} and ALP masses m{sub a} ∼< 100 neV. We discuss the dependency of these values on different model assumptions and magnetic-field scenarios and identify the best observation strategy to search for an ALP induced boost of the γ-ray flux.

  1. Anisotropy test of the axion-like particle Universe opacity effect: a case for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, Denis; Brun, Pierre E-mail: pierre.brun@cea.fr

    2014-01-01

    The opacity of the Universe to gamma rays is still poorly measured, in particular anomalies may have been observed. Assuming that such anomalies find their origin in conventional physics like intrinsic source spectra or the density of the extragalactic background light, they would be evenly distributed over the sky. If they exist, axion-like particles (ALPs) would have a potential effect on the opacity of the Universe to gamma rays, possibly related to the anomalies in the spectral indices of distant gamma-ray sources. Under the assumption that distant sources offer suitable environments for their production, ALPs convert back to photons in the Galactic magnetic field and their effect on the opacity is expected to depend on the position of the sources. In that case the anomaly is expected to exhibit peculiar correlations on the sky. We propose a method to test the origin of the opacity anomaly, based on angular correlations of spectral softening anomalies. Such a diagnosis requires a wide-field survey of high-energy gamma-ray sources over a broad range of energy. The future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is perfectly suited to perform such a study. It is shown that while the current sample of sources is not large enough to base conclusions on, with this method CTA will be sensitive to ALP couplings to gamma rays of the order of 3 × 10{sup −11}GeV{sup −1} for ALP masses below 10{sup −8} eV.

  2. Pulsars at the Highest Energies: Questions for AGILE, Fermi (GLAST) and Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies of gamma-ray pulsars languished in recent years, while theoretical studies made significant strides. Now, with new and improved gamma-ray telescopes coming online, opportunities present themselves for dramatic improvements in our understanding of these objects. The new facilities and better modeling of processes at work in high-energy pulsars should address a number of important open questions, some of which are summarized.

  3. Development of the fast steering secondary mirror for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung; Corredor, Andrew; Dribusch, Christoph; Park, Won-Hyun; Muller, Gary; Johns, Matt; Hull, Charlie; Sheehan, Michael; Kern, Jonathan; Kim, Young Soo; Hansen, Eric; Kim, Seongdo

    2013-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) Fast Steering Secondary Mirror (FSM) is one of the GMT two Gregorian secondary mirrors. The FSM is 3.2 m in diameter and built as seven 1.06 m diameter circular segments. The conceiving philosophy used on the design of the FSM segment mirror is to minimize development and fabrication risks ensuring a set of secondary mirrors are available on schedule for telescope commissioning and early operations in a seeing limited mode, thereby mitigating risks associated with fabrication of the Adaptive Secondary Mirrors (ASM). This approach uses legacy design features from the Magellan Telescope secondary mirrors to reduce such risks. The final design of the substrate and support system configuration was optimized using finite element analyses and optical performance analyses. The optical performance predictions of the FSM are based on a substrate with a diameter of 1.058m (on-axis), 1.048m (off-axis), a depth of 120mm, and a face plate thickness of 20mm leading to a mass of approximately 90kg. The optical surface deformations, image qualities, and structure functions for the axial and lateral gravity print-through cases, thermal gradient effects, and dynamic performances were evaluated. The results indicated that the GMT FSM mirror and its support system will favorably meet the optical performance goals for residual surface error and the FSM surface figure accuracy requirement defined by encircled energy in the focal plane. The mirror cell assembly analysis indicated an excellent dynamic stiffness which will support the goal of 20 Hz tip-tilt motion.

  4. Structural design and mitigation of mirror deformations in lunar-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luz, Paul L.

    1994-11-01

    Structural design and analysis of the optical systems for lunar-based telescopes is a challenging task. A driving concern of the Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) preliminary design study was the degradation of the LUTE optical figure due to thermal deformations, during a temperature cycle of 65 to 265 K at the reference 40 deg latitude, 0 deg longitude landing site. In addressing this task, temperature effects were characterized, and primary-mirror thermal deformations calculated for use in the optical analyses. Trade studies evaluated the qualitative performance of various design schemes. Results indicated that statically determinate mirror supports with bottom-mounted flexures created less optical disturbance under thermal loading than mirror supports at the inner or outer periphery. Another trade indicated that a telescope's baseplate must be athermalized with respect to the mirrors by matching thermal distortion coefficients. A comparison of three materials for the primary mirror predicted that silicon carbide would be the best material for resisting thermally induced figure deformations on the moon.

  5. Shack-Hartmann mask/pupil registration algorithm for wavefront sensing in segmented mirror telescopes.

    PubMed

    Piatrou, Piotr; Chanan, Gary

    2013-11-10

    Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensing in general requires careful registration of the reimaged telescope primary mirror to the Shack-Hartmann mask or lenslet array. The registration requirements are particularly demanding for applications in which segmented mirrors are phased using a physical optics generalization of the Shack-Hartmann test. In such cases the registration tolerances are less than 0.1% of the diameter of the primary mirror. We present a pupil registration algorithm suitable for such high accuracy applications that is based on the one used successfully for phasing the segments of the Keck telescopes. The pupil is aligned in four degrees of freedom (translations, rotation, and magnification) by balancing the intensities of subimages formed by small subapertures that straddle the periphery of the mirror. We describe the algorithm in general terms and then in the specific context of two very different geometries: the 492 segment Thirty Meter Telescope, and the seven "segment" Giant Magellan Telescope. Through detailed simulations we explore the accuracy of the algorithm and its sensitivity to such effects as cross talk, noise/counting statistics, atmospheric scintillation, and segment reflectivity variations.

  6. Three mirror glancing incidence system for X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A telescope suitable for soft X-ray astronomical observations consists of a paraboloid section for receiving rays at a grazing angle and a hyperboloid section which receives reflections from the paraboloid at a grazing angle and directs them to a predetermined point of focus. A second hyperboloid section is centrally located from the other two surfaces and positioned to reflect from its outer surface radiation which was not first reflected by the paraboloid. A shutter is included to assist in calibration.

  7. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  8. Design Study of 8 Meter Monolithic Mirror UV/Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2008-01-01

    The planned Ares V launch vehicle with its 10 meter fairing shroud and 55,000 kg capacity to the Sun Earth L2 point enables entirely new classes of space telescopes. NASA MSFC has conducted a preliminary study that demonstrates the feasibility of launching a 6 to 8 meter class monolithic primary mirror telescope to Sun-Earth L2 using an Ares V. Specific technical areas studied included optical design; structural design/analysis including primary mirror support structure, sun shade and secondary mirror support structure; thermal analysis; launch vehicle performance and trajectory; spacecraft including structure, propulsion, GN&C, avionics, power systems and reaction wheels; operations and servicing; mass and power budgets; and system cost.

  9. A Novel Axial Foldable Mechanism for a Segmented Primary Mirror of Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thesiya, Dignesh; Srinivas, Arra; Shukla, Piyush

    2015-09-01

    Future space missions will have larger telescopes in order to look deeper into space while improvising on spatial resolution. The primary mirrors for these telescopes will be so large that using a monolithic mirror will be nearly impossible because of the difficulties associated with its fabrication, transportation, and installation on a launch vehicle. The feasibility of launching these huge mirrors is limited because of their small launch fairing diameter. The aerodynamic shape of the fairing requires a small diameter, but the height of the launch vehicle, which is available for designers to utilize, is larger than the fairing diameter. This paper presents the development of an axial deployment mechanism based on the screw jack principle. The mechanism was designed and developed, and a prototype was constructed in order to demonstrate a lab model.

  10. Preliminary numerical simulation of mirror seeing for the Chinese Future Giant Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, En-Peng; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Li, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2016-06-01

    Mirror seeing will be one of the key factors influencing image quality of an extremely large ground-based optical telescope (ELT). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to estimate the mirror seeing and the effects of ventilation. In this paper, we present a simplified approach to simulation of mirror seeing for the Chinese Future Giant Telescope (CFGT, 30 m in diameter) with the CFD software ANSYS Icepak. We get the FWHM of the image and the distribution of refractive index structure function (C 2 N) above the mirror. We demonstrate that thermal control and ventilation are effective ways to improve the image quality. Our simulation results agree with those of other authors for the ELT. To reduce the mirror seeing to a level of 0.5″, the suggested temperature excess of the primary mirror above the ambient air for thermal control of the CFGT is 0 - 2 K according to the present results of weakly forced convection. The limitations of the method are also discussed.

  11. Preliminary numerical simulation of mirror seeing for the Chinese Future Giant Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, En-Peng; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Li, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2016-06-01

    Mirror seeing will be one of the key factors influencing image quality of an extremely large ground-based optical telescope (ELT). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to estimate the mirror seeing and the effects of ventilation. In this paper, we present a simplified approach to simulation of mirror seeing for the Chinese Future Giant Telescope (CFGT, 30 m in diameter) with the CFD software ANSYS Icepak. We get the FWHM of the image and the distribution of refractive index structure function (C 2 N) above the mirror. We demonstrate that thermal control and ventilation are effective ways to improve the image quality. Our simulation results agree with those of other authors for the ELT. To reduce the mirror seeing to a level of 0.5″, the suggested temperature excess of the primary mirror above the ambient air for thermal control of the CFGT is 0 – 2 K according to the present results of weakly forced convection. The limitations of the method are also discussed.

  12. Misalignment-induced nodal aberration fields in two-mirror astronomical telescopes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Tobias; Thompson, Kevin P; Rolland, Jannick P

    2010-06-01

    We present the effects of misalignments on the field dependence of the third-order aberration fields of traditional, two-mirror astronomical telescopes in the context of nodal aberration theory, which we believe is the most general and extensible framework for describing and improving on-station performance. While many of the advantages of nodal aberration theory, compared to other, often power series expansion-based descriptions of misalignment effects on aberrations, become particularly important when analyzing telescopes with more than two mirrors, or in the presence of figure errors; this paper aims to provide and demonstrate the fundamental concepts needed to fully describe the state of correction of misaligned two-mirror telescopes. Importantly, it is shown that the assumption that perfect performance on axis ensures a fully aligned telescope is false, and we demonstrate that if Ritchey-Chrétien telescopes are aligned for zero coma on axis as the sole criterion, formidable misalignments will likely remain, leading to image quality degradation, particularly beyond midfield caused by astigmatism with binodal field dependence (i.e., astigmatism goes to zero at two points in the field).

  13. Application of zero-expansion pore-free ceramics to a mirror of an astronomical telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitaya, Hiroshi; Iye, Masanori; Okita, Kiichi; Sato, Motoyasu; Matsuo, Hiroyuki; Itazu, Takeshi; Uno, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Masao; Tanaka, Zen-ei; Yamashita, Takuya; Kawabata, Koji S.; Uemura, Makoto; Kurita, Mikio

    2008-07-01

    We developed an aspheric convex 33-cm diameter secondary mirror of the Hiroshima University 1.5-m Ritchy-Chretien telescope using Zero-expansion Pore-free ceramics, which has physical properties (thermal expansion, stiffness, thermal conductance, etc.) comparable with or better than existing zero-expansion glasses. After high-precision grinding, polishing, and coating aluminum and silicon monoxide, we obtained the sufficient optical reflecting surface with a figure error within λ/10 and a roughness of about 3 nm rms. The mirror has been attached on the telescope and we confirmed its sufficient performance through a Hartmann test. To date it has shown a good performance in our application and we suggest that this ceramic material has a potential to be used for astronomical telescopes and related area.

  14. LUNASKA experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for ultrahigh energy neutrinos and develop technology for the lunar Cherenkov technique

    SciTech Connect

    James, C. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Phillips, C. J.; Roberts, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Bray, J. D.; McFadden, R. A.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the design, performance, sensitivity and results of our recent experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) for lunar Cherenkov observations with a very wide (600 MHz) bandwidth and nanosecond timing, including a limit on an isotropic neutrino flux. We also make a first estimate of the effects of small-scale surface roughness on the effective experimental aperture, finding that contrary to expectations, such roughness will act to increase the detectability of near-surface events over the neutrino energy-range at which our experiment is most sensitive (though distortions to the time-domain pulse profile may make identification more difficult). The aim of our 'Lunar UHE Neutrino Astrophysics using the Square Kilometre Array' (LUNASKA) project is to develop the lunar Cherenkov technique of using terrestrial radio telescope arrays for ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) and neutrino detection, and, in particular, to prepare for using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its path-finders such as the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for lunar Cherenkov experiments.

  15. Simulation studies of the high-energy component of a future imaging Cherenkov telescope array

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-24

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of the technique in an energy range between {approx}100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. At the high-energy end, these instruments are limited by photon statistics. Future arrays of IACTs such as CTA or AGIS are planned to push into the energy range beyond 100 TeV. Scientifically, this region is very promising, providing a probe of particles up to the 'knee' in the cosmic ray spectrum and access to an unexplored region in the spectra of nearby extragalactic sources. We present first results from our simulation studies of the high-energy part of a future IACT array and discuss the design parameters of such an array.

  16. Simulation studies of the high-energy component of a future imaging Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, S.; Hinton, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The current generation of Imaging Atmospheric telescopes (IACTs) has demonstrated the power of the technique in an energy range between ~100 GeV up to several tens of TeV. At the high-energy end, these instruments are limited by photon statistics. Future arrays of IACTs such as CTA or AGIS are planned to push into the energy range beyond 100 TeV. Scientifically, this region is very promising, providing a probe of particles up to the `knee' in the cosmic ray spectrum and access to an unexplored region in the spectra of nearby extragalactic sources. We present first results from our simulation studies of the high-energy part of a future IACT array and discuss the design parameters of such an array.

  17. Structural evaluation of candidate designs for the large space telescope primary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.; Grin, R.; Furey, M.; Hamilton, J.

    1975-01-01

    Structural performance analyses were conducted on two candidate designs (Itek and Perkin-Elmer designs) for the large space telescope three-meter mirror. The mirror designs and the finite-element models used in the analyses evaluation are described. The results of the structural analyses for several different types of loading are presented in tabular and graphic forms. Several additional analyses are also reported: the evaluation of a mirror design concept proposed by the Boeing Co., a study of the global effects of local cell plate deflections, and an investigation of the fracture mechanics problems likely to occur with Cervit and ULE. Flexibility matrices were obtained for the Itek and Perkin-Elmer mirrors to be used in active figure control studies. Summary, conclusions, and recommendations are included.

  18. Displacement sensors for the primary mirror of the W. M. Keck Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, R.H.; Arthur, A.A.; Gabor, G.; Jackson, H.G.; Jared, R.C.; Mast, T.S.; Schaefer, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    The Primary Mirror of the Keck Observatory Telescope is made up of an array of 36 hexagonal mirror segments under active control. The measurement of the relative orientations of the mirror segments is fundamental to their control. The mechanical and electronic design of the sensors used to measure these relative positions is described along with the performance of the sensors under a variety of tests. In use, the sensors will measure relative positions with a resolution of a few nanometers. This resolution and the low noise, drift and thermal sensitivity of the sensors are adequate to stabilize the primary mirror figure to the precision required for optical and infrared astronomy. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Progress report on air bearing slumping of thin glass mirrors for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.; Chalifoux, Brandon; DeTienne, Michael D.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Zuo, Heng

    2015-09-01

    The successful NuSTAR telescope was fabricated with thin glass mirrors formed into conic shapes by thermal slumping of thin glass sheets onto high precision mandrels. While mirrors generated by this process have very good figure, the best mirrors to date have a resolution limited to ~7 arc sec, due primarily to mid-range scale spatial frequency errors. These mid-range errors are believed to be due to clumping and particulates in the anti-stick coatings used to prevent sticking between mandrel and mirrors. We have developed a new slumping process which avoids sticking and surface-induced mid-range error by floating hot glass substrates between a pair of porous air bearing mandrels through which compressed nitrogen is forced. We report on the design and testing of an improved air bearing slumping tool and show results of short and long slumping cycles.

  20. Performance prediction of the fast steering secondary mirror for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myung; Corredor, Andrew; Dribusch, Christoph; Park, Won-Hyun; Sheehan, Michael; Johns, Matt; Shectman, Stephen; Kern, Jonathan; Hull, Charlie; Kim, Young-Soo; Bagnasco, John

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) Fast-steering secondary mirror (FSM) is one of the GMT two Gregorian secondary mirrors. The FSM is 3.2 m in diameter and built as seven 1.1 m diameter circular segments conjugated 1:1 to the seven 8.4m segments of the primary. A parametric study and optimization of the FSM mirror blank and central lateral flexure design were performed. For the optimized FSM configuration, the optical image qualities and structure functions for the axial and lateral gravity print-through cases, thermal gradient effects, and dynamic performances will be discussed. This paper reports performance predictions of the optimized FSM. To validate our lateral flexure design concept, mechanical and optical tests were conducted on test mirrors installed with two different lateral flexures.

  1. Hybrid Electrostatic/Flextensional Mirror for Lightweight, Large-Aperture, and Cryogenic Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Brian; Moore, James; Hackenberger, Wesley; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2013-01-01

    A lightweight, cryogenically capable, scalable, deformable mirror has been developed for space telescopes. This innovation makes use of polymer-based membrane mirror technology to enable large-aperture mirrors that can be easily launched and deployed. The key component of this innovation is a lightweight, large-stroke, cryogenic actuator array that combines the high degree of mirror figure control needed with a large actuator influence function. The latter aspect of the innovation allows membrane mirror figure correction with a relatively low actuator density, preserving the lightweight attributes of the system. The principal components of this technology are lightweight, low-profile, high-stroke, cryogenic-capable piezoelectric actuators based on PMN-PT (piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate) single-crystal configured in a flextensional actuator format; high-quality, low-thermal-expansion polymer membrane mirror materials developed by NeXolve; and electrostatic coupling between the membrane mirror and the piezoelectric actuator assembly to minimize problems such as actuator print-through.

  2. Recent Enhancements of the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Telescope Testbed at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent incremental upgrades to the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope testbed have enabled the demonstration of phasing (with a monochromatic source) of clusters of primary mirror segments down to the diffraction limit. PAMELA upgrades include in improved Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, passive viscoelastic damping treatments for the voice-coil actuators, mechanical improvement of mirror surface figures, and optical bench baffling. This report summarizes the recent PAMELA upgrades, discusses the lessons learned, and presents a status of this unique testbed for wavefront sensing and control. The Marshall Space Flight Center acquired the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) telescope in 1993 after Kaman Aerospace was unable to complete integration and testing under the limited SDIO and DARPA funding. The PAMELA is a 36-segment, half-meter aperture, adaptive telescope which utilizes a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, inductive coil edge sensors, voice coil actuators, imaging CCD cameras and interferometry for figure alignment, wavefront sensing and control. MSFC originally obtained the PAMELA to supplement its research in the interactions of control systems with flexible structures. In August 1994, complete tip, tilt and piston control was successfully demonstrated using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the inductive edge sensors.

  3. Surface control techniques for the segmented primary mirror in the large lunar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleckler, Anthony D.; Pflibsen, Kent P.; Ulich, B. L.; Smith, Duane D.

    1991-01-01

    The large lunar telescope is a proposed moon-based telescope which incorporates a sixteen-meter segmented primary mirror. An error budget is developed for the active control system of the primary mirror. A control methodology for the primary mirror is then described which utilizes piston sensors for measuring the relative piston error between adjacent segments as well as a separate sensor which measures the tilt of each segment with respect to the pointing direction of the telescope. A trade study is conducted in which the following types of tilt sensors are examined to determine their applicability to this program: stellar wavefront sensors, such as a Hartmann-Shack or a shearing interferometer; holographic optical elements; interferometers; scanning systems; and some nonoptical systems which electronically measure the relative tilt between adjacent segments. In addition, two independent methods of quantitatively verifying the performance of the telescope using either a phase retrieval algorithm or an image sharpening technique, both of which are based on the quality of a stellar image, are presented.

  4. Test program on the contamination of ultraviolet region mirrors by Apollo Telescope Mount materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of testing performed to measure the effects of material outgas products on the reflectances of ultraviolet-region mirrors. These tests were to provide data on changes of ultraviolet reflectances of first-surface mirrors which had been exposed to the outgas products of selected materials under specific time and thermal-vacuum conditions. The requirement for such data was based on the extreme sensitivity of the sophisticated optical instruments in the Skylab mission's Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) to condensed outgas products from materials, and on the desire to insure that no serious hazard of contaminating these instruments existed.

  5. Position actuators for the primary mirror of the W. M. Keck Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, J.D.; Franck, J.; Gabor, G.; Jared, R.C.; Minor, R.H.; Schaefer, B.

    1989-07-01

    The pistons and tilts of the 36 segments of the W. M. Keck Telescope primary mirror are under active control. The mechanical and electronic designs of the actuators used to achieve this control are described along with the performance of the actuators under a variety of tests. In use, the actuators will move in four-nanometer increments. This resolution and the accuracy of the actuator moves are adequate for stabilizing the figure of the primary mirror to the precision required for optical and infrared astronomy.

  6. A swing arm profilometer for large telescope mirror element metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callender, M. J.; Efstathiou, A.; King, C. W.; Walker, D. D.; Gee, A. E.; Lewis, A. J.; Oldfield, S.; Steel, R. M.

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of ground-based extremely large telescopes of 30 m to 100 m aperture calls for the manufacture of several hundred sub-aperture segments of 1 m to 2 m diameter. Each annulus of the overall aperture is formed from separate elements of the appropriate off-axis conic section (usually a paraboloid). Manufacture of these segments requires a systematic approach to in- and post-process metrology for all stages of manufacture, including the grinding stage, despite the fact that the resulting ground surface is generally not amenable to optically reflective measurement techniques. To address the need for measurements on such 1 m to 2 m telescope segments, a swing arm profilometer has been constructed as part of a collaborative project between University College London (UCL) and the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). The current swing-arm profilometer is intended as a proof-of-concept device and has the capability to measure concave and convex surfaces of up to 1 m in diameter with a minimum radius of curvature of 1.75 m for concave and 1.25 m for convex surfaces. Results will be traceable to national length standards. Principles of the swing-arm instrument will be described together with the mechanics of the arm design, its bearing and adjustment arrangements and surface probe options. We assess the performance requirements of 20 nm RMS form measurement accuracy in the context of the tolerances of the selected profilometer components, the error budget, and preliminary system measurements. Initial results are presented with a Solartron linear encoder. We also plan to mount optical sensors on the end of the arm as an alternative to traditional contact probes. Initially these will include an Arden AWS-50 wavefront curvature sensor and a Fisba μ-phase interferometer. The method of attachment of the Arden AWS-50 is outlined. The swing arm profilometer is to be located at a specialised facility, the OPtiC Technium, Denbigh, North Wales, where it will form

  7. Algorithm for the identification of malfunctioning sensors in the control systems of segmented mirror telescopes.

    PubMed

    Chanan, Gary; Nelson, Jerry

    2009-11-10

    The active control systems of segmented mirror telescopes are vulnerable to a malfunction of a few (or even one) of their segment edge sensors, the effects of which can propagate through the entire system and seriously compromise the overall telescope image quality. Since there are thousands of such sensors in the extremely large telescopes now under development, it is essential to develop fast and efficient algorithms that can identify bad sensors so that they can be removed from the control loop. Such algorithms are nontrivial; for example, a simple residual-to-the-fit test will often fail to identify a bad sensor. We propose an algorithm that can reliably identify a single bad sensor and we extend it to the more difficult case of multiple bad sensors. Somewhat surprisingly, the identification of a fixed number of bad sensors does not necessarily become more difficult as the telescope becomes larger and the number of sensors in the control system increases.

  8. Primary Mirror Figure Maintenance of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope using the Segment Alignment Maintenance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Hall, Drew; Howard, Ricky; Ly, William; Weir, John; Montgomery, Edward; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMs) was installed on McDonald Observatory's Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) in August 2001. The SAMs became fully operational in October 2001. The SAMs uses a system of 480 inductive edge sensors to correct misalignments of the HET's 91 primary mirror segments when the segments are perturbed from their aligned reference positions. A special observer estimated and corrects for the global radius of curvature (GroC) mode, a mode unobservable by the edge sensors. The SAMs edge sensor system and (GroC) estimator are able to maintain HET's primary figure for much longer durations than previously had been observed. Telescope image quality has improved, and the amount of overhead time required from primary mirror alignment has been reduced. This paper gives a functional description of the SAMs control system and presents performance verification data. This paper also describes how the SAMs has improved the operational efficiency of the HET.

  9. Modeling and simulation of a 6-DOF parallel platform for telescope secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Zhongyu; Ye, Yu; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-07-01

    The 6-DOF parallel platform in this paper is a kind of Stewart platform. It can be used as supporting structure for telescope secondary mirror. In order to adapt the special dynamic environment of the telescope secondary mirror and to be installed in extremely narrow space, a unique parallel platform is designed. PSS Stewart platform and SPS Stewart platform are analyzed and compared. Then the PSS Stewart platform is chosen for detailed design. The virtual prototyping model of the parallel platform is built. The model is used for the analysis and calculation of multi-body dynamics. With the help of ANSYS, the finite element model of the platform is built and then the analysis is performed. According to the above analysis the experimental prototype of the platform is built.

  10. Thin Mirror Shaping Technology for High-Throughput X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark

    This proposal is submitted to the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences program (ROSES-2012) in response to NASA Research Announcement NNH12ZDA001N- APRA. It is targeted to the Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Analysis (APRA) program element under the Supporting Technology category. Powerful x-ray telescope mirrors are critical components of a raft of small-to-large mission concepts under consideration by NASA. The science questions addressed by these missions have certainly never been more compelling and the need to fulfill NASA s core missions of exploring the universe and strengthening our nation s technology base has never been greater. Unfortunately, budgetary constraints are driving NASA to consider the cost/benefit and risk factors of new missions more carefully than ever. New technology for producing x-ray telescopes with increased resolution and collecting area, while holding down cost, are key to meeting these goals and sustaining a thriving high-energy astrophysics enterprise in the US. We propose to develop advanced technology which will lead to thin-shell x-ray telescope mirrors rivaling the Chandra x-ray telescope in spatial resolution but with 10-100X larger area all at significantly reduced weight, risk and cost. The proposed effort builds on previous research at MIT and complements NASA-supported research at other institutions. We are currently pursuing two thin-mirror technology development tracks which we propose to extend and accelerate with NASA support. The first research track utilizes rapidly-maturing thermal glass slumping technology which uses porous ceramic air-bearing mandrels to shape glass mirrors without touching, thus avoiding surface-induced mid-range spatial frequency ripples. A second research track seeks to remove any remaining mid- to long-range errors in mirrors by using scanning ion-beam implant to impart small, highly deterministic and very stable amounts of stress into thin glass, utilizing local

  11. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  12. Nanostructure Secondary-Mirror Apodizing Mask for Transmitter Signal Suppression in a Duplex Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Livas, Jeffrey; Shiri, Shahram; Getty, Stephanie; Tveekrem, June; Butler, James

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a nanostructure apodizing mask, made of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, that is applied to the centers (or in and around the holes) of the secondary mirrors of telescopes that are used to interferometrically measure the strain of space-time in response to gravitational waves. The shape of this ultra-black mask can be adjusted to provide a smooth transition to the clear aperture of the secondary mirror to minimize diffracted light. Carbon nanotubes grown on silicon are a viable telescope mirror substrate, and can absorb significantly more light than other black treatments. The hemispherical reflectance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown at GSFC is approximately 3 to 10 times better than a standard aerospace paint used for stray light control. At the LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) wavelength of 1 micron, the advantage over paint is a factor of 10. Primarily, in the center of the secondary mirror (in the region of central obscuration, where no received light is lost) a black mask is applied to absorb transmitted light that could be reflected back into the receiver. In the LISA telescope, this is in the center couple of millimeters. The shape of this absorber is critical to suppress diffraction at the edge. By using the correct shape, the stray light can be reduced by approximately 10 to the 9 orders of magnitude versus no center mask. The effect of the nanotubes has been simulated in a stray-light model. The effect of the apodizing mask has been simulated in a near-field diffraction model. Specifications are geometry-dependent, but the baseline design for the LISA telescope has been modeled as well. The coatings are somewhat fragile, but work is continuing to enhance adhesion.

  13. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned, Active Mirror Telescope Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The Active Mirror Telescope (AMT) task adopted the Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  14. Ion implantation for figure correction of thin X-ray telescope mirror substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalifoux, Brandon; Wright, Graham; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    Figure correction of X-ray telescope mirrors will be critical for future missions that require high angular resolution and large collecting areas. In this paper, we show that ion implantation offers a method of correcting figure errors by imparting sub-surface in-plane stress in a controllable magnitude and location in Schott D-263 glass, Corning Eagle XG glass, and crystalline silicon substrates. In addition, we can in theory achieve nearly exact corrections in Schott D-263 glass, by controlling the direction of the stress. We show that sufficient stress may be applied to Schott D-263 glass to achieve figure correction in mirrors with simulated initial figure errors. We also report on progress of a system that will be capable of correcting conical shell mirror substrates.

  15. A technique for designing active control systems for astronomical telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.; Creedon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of designing a control system to achieve and maintain the required surface accuracy of the primary mirror of a large space telescope was considered. Control over the mirror surface is obtained through the application of a corrective force distribution by actuators located on the rear surface of the mirror. The design procedure is an extension of a modal control technique developed for distributed parameter plants with known eigenfunctions to include plants whose eigenfunctions must be approximated by numerical techniques. Instructions are given for constructing the mathematical model of the system, and a design procedure is developed for use with typical numerical data in selecting the number and location of the actuators. Examples of actuator patterns and their effect on various errors are given.

  16. Cryogenic Far-Infrared Laser Absorptivity Measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Jacqueline; Klaassen, Tjeerd; Hovenier, Niels; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-07-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 K to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit about the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope's equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared-submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the observatory if stray-light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184, and 496 μm. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities of 0.2-0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2-0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments.

  17. Cryogenic Far-IR Laser Absorptivity Measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J.; Klaassen, T. O.; Hovenier, J. N.; Jakob, G.; Poglitsch, A.; Sternberg, O.

    2004-05-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 Kelvin to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit around the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared/submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the Observatory, if stray light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184 and 496 μ m. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities in the range 0.2 -- 0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2 -- 0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments. This work was funded by the ESA Herschel/Planck Project Office, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Herschel/Planck Project Office at JPL.

  18. Stress manipulated coating for figure reshape of light weight X-ray telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Youwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon; Grogans, Shannon E.; Cao, Yifang; Ulmer, Melville P.

    2015-09-01

    We present our idea to correct the surface profile of X-ray telescope mirrors by employing a spatially distributed variable stress coating. Future X-ray telescope missions require light weight optics with an angular resolution ≤. 1" . However, the typical desired thickness of a light weight mirror shell is ≤ 0.4mm, and to date such thin shelled mirrors that have been fabricated cannot meet the required figure accuracy. Therefore most the common approach is to modify the figure of the initially produced mirror shell. In this paper, we describe one such approach. Our approach uses a DC magnetron sputtering process with a variable electrical bias. The end result is a locally variable stress which has the potential to improve the figure of the initially fabricated thin . In this work we report out first results. These include: reproducibility, important technical details of the coating process, and the results of stability tests on several samples monitored. Further, as a proof of concept, we applied a coating with a modulated bias to demonstrate the feasibility to manipulate the surface profile.

  19. Testing multilayer-coated polarizing mirrors for the LAMP soft X-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Salmaso, B.; She, R.; Tayabaly, K.; Wen, M.; Banham, R.; Costa, E.; Feng, H.; Giglia, A.; Huang, Q.; Muleri, F.; Pareschi, G.; Soffitta, P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Valsecchi, G.; Wang, Z.

    2015-09-01

    The LAMP (Lightweight Asymmetry and Magnetism Probe) X-ray telescope is a mission concept to measure the polarization of X-ray astronomical sources at 250 eV via imaging mirrors that reflect at incidence angles near the polarization angle, i.e., 45 deg. Hence, it will require the adoption of multilayer coatings with a few nanometers dspacing in order to enhance the reflectivity. The nickel electroforming technology has already been successfully used to fabricate the high angular resolution imaging mirrors of the X-ray telescopes SAX, XMM-Newton, and Swift/XRT. We are investigating this consolidated technology as a possible technique to manufacture focusing mirrors for LAMP. Although the very good reflectivity performances of this kind of mirrors were already demonstrated in grazing incidence, the reflectivity and the scattering properties have not been tested directly at the unusually large angle of 45 deg. Other possible substrates are represented by thin glass foils or silicon wafers. In this paper we present the results of the X-ray reflectivity campaign performed at the BEAR beamline of Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste on multilayer coatings of various composition (Cr/C, Co/C), deposited with different sputtering parameters on nickel, silicon, and glass substrates, using polarized X-rays in the spectral range 240 - 290 eV.

  20. Advanced UVOIR Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) for Very Large Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postman, Marc; Soummer, Remi; Sivramakrishnan, Annand; Macintosh, Bruce; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Stahl, H. Philip; Smith, W. Scott; Mosier, Gary; Kirk, Charles; Arnold, William

    2013-01-01

    ASTRO2010 Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. AMTD is the start of a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate and mature critical technologies to TRL-6 by 2018 so that a viable flight mission can be proposed to the 2020 Decadal Review. AMTD builds on the state of art (SOA) defined by over 30 years of monolithic & segmented ground & space-telescope mirror technology to mature six key technologies: (1) Large-Aperture, Low Areal Density, High Stiffness Mirror Substrates: Both (4 to 8 m) monolithic and (8 to 16 m) segmented primary mirrors require larger, thicker, and stiffer substrates. (2) Support System: Large-aperture mirrors require large support systems to ensure that they survive launch and deploy on orbit in a stress-free and undistorted shape. (3) Mid/High Spatial Frequency Figure Error: Very smooth mirror is critical for producing high-quality point spread function (PSF) for high contrast imaging. (4) Segment Edges: The quality of segment edges impacts PSF for high-contrast imaging applications, contributes to stray light noise, and affects total collecting aperture. (5) Segment to Segment Gap Phasing: Segment phasing is critical for producing high-quality temporally-stable PSF. (6) Integrated Model Validation: On-orbit performance is driven by mechanical & thermal stability. Compliance cannot be 100% tested, but relies on modeling. AMTD is pursuing multiple design paths to provide the science community with options to enable either large aperture monolithic or segmented mirrors with clear engineering metrics traceable to science requirements.

  1. A method on lightweight for the primary mirror of large space-based telescope based on neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Shuqing; Tan, Fanjiao; Zhi, Xiyang; Chu, Yongqiang; Lv, Hongdi; Zhen, Rongkai

    2014-11-01

    With the aperture of telescope becoming larger, the mass of primary mirror and other relevant structures will become heavier as well. Therefore, lighting weight for large space-based telescope is necessary. This paper purposed a method based on Neural Network aims to build a math model for primary mirror of large space-based telescope, which can reduce weight of the telescope and smaller mirror deformation caused by gravity release effectively. In the meantime, it can also improve stiffness of structure and reduce thermal strain caused by on orbit temperature variation effectively. The model describes the relationship between the structure of primary mirror of large space-based telescope and corresponding deformation, and describes the optical performance of mirror by using Zernike Polynomial. To optimize the structure of primary mirror lightweight, we take the deformation of mirror and its optical performance into consideration. To apply the structures parameters and its corresponding deformations to Neural Network training, we use the combination samples of different mirror lightweight structure parameters and corresponding deformation which caused by gravity release and thermal condition. Finally, by taking advantage of the Neural Network model to optimize the primary mirror lightweight of 1-meter rectangle space-based telescope, which can make the RMS 0.024λ (λ=632.8nm)and areal density under 15kg/m2. This method combines existing results and numerical simulation to establish numerical model based on Neural Network method. Research results can be applied to same processes of designing, analyzing, and processing of large space-based telescope directly.

  2. High Resolution Imaging with Adaptive Optics at the Multiple Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Hart, M.; McLeod, B. A.; Wittman, D.; Colucci, D.; McCarthy, D. W.; Angel, R.; Dekany, R.

    1992-12-01

    We present the latest results from an adaptive optics program being implemented at the MMT using a six element adaptive mirror. The tilt of the wavefront over each of the six telescopes is determined with a Shack-Hartmann type sensor using a 24times 24 pixel low-noise CCD. This system allows the MMT to operate at a resolution of 0.3'' at 2 microns -- near the diffraction limit of the individual 1.8-m telescopes. This resolution can be obtained within ~ 1' of any star with visual magnitude < 16, allowing high-resolution near-IR imaging with a NICMOS2 array of a wide variety of targets, including high-redshift galaxies and young and evolved stars. This system can also be used with the MMT operated as a phased array telescope. In this mode, the piston errors between the telescopes are determined by examining the Fourier transform of the combined 2-micron image of the natural guide star using a fast-readout InSb array. In this configuration we have achieved a resolution of 0.075''. In good seeing we expect to obtain images of interest within the isoplanatic patch of guide stars with K magnitude <7. We acknowledge financial support from the NSF (AST92-03336) and the Flintridge Foundation. The adaptive mirror was donated by ThermoTrex Corp.

  3. Polishing, coating, and integration of SiC mirrors for space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodolfo, Jacques

    2008-07-01

    In the last years, the technology of SiC mirrors took an increasingly significant part in the field of space telescopes. Sagem is involved in the JWST program to manufacture and test the optical components of the NIRSpec instrument. The instrument is made of 3 TMAs and 4 plane mirrors made of SiC. Sagem is in charge of the CVD cladding, the polishing, the coating of the mirrors and the integration and testing of the TMAs. The qualification of the process has been performed through the manufacturing and testing of the qualification model of the FOR TMA. This TMA has shown very good performances both at ambient and during the cryo test. The polishing process has been improved for the manufacturing of the flight model. This improvement has been driven by the BRDF performance of the mirror. This parameter has been deeply analysed and a model has been built to predict the performance of the mirrors. The existing Dittman model have been analysed and found to be optimistic.

  4. Optical design of off-axis Cassegrain telescope using freeform surface at the secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Suryakant; Gupta, Amit; Singh, Ganga Sharan

    2015-02-01

    Freeform surfaces enable imaginative optics by providing abundant degrees of freedom for an optical designer as compared to spherical surfaces. An off-axis two-mirror-based telescope design is presented, in which the primary mirror is a concave prolate spheroid and the secondary mirror is freeform surface-based. The off-axis configuration is employed here for removing the central obscuration problem which otherwise limits the central maxima in the point spread function. In this proposed design, an extended X-Y polynomial is used as a surface descriptor for the off-axis segment of the secondary mirror. The coefficients of this extended polynomial are directly related to the Seidel aberrations, and are thus optimized here for a better control of asymmetric optical aberrations at various field points. For this design, the aperture stop is located 500 mm before the primary mirror and the entrance pupil diameter is kept as 80 mm. The effective focal length is 439 mm and covers a full field of view of 2 deg. The image quality obtained here is near diffraction limited which can be inferred from metrics such as the spot diagram and modulation transfer function.

  5. Opto-thermal analysis of a lightweighted mirror for solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Banyal, Ravinder K; Ravindra, B; Chatterjee, S

    2013-03-25

    In this paper, an opto-thermal analysis of a moderately heated lightweighted solar telescope mirror is carried out using 3D finite element analysis (FEA). A physically realistic heat transfer model is developed to account for the radiative heating and energy exchange of the mirror with surroundings. The numerical simulations show the non-uniform temperature distribution and associated thermo-elastic distortions of the mirror blank clearly mimicking the underlying discrete geometry of the lightweighted substrate. The computed mechanical deformation data is analyzed with surface polynomials and the optical quality of the mirror is evaluated with the help of a ray-tracing software. The thermal print-through distortions are further shown to contribute to optical figure changes and mid-spatial frequency errors of the mirror surface. A comparative study presented for three commonly used substrate materials, namely, Zerodur, Pyrex and Silicon Carbide (SiC) is relevant to vast area of large optics requirements in ground and space applications.

  6. Characterization of EASIROC as front-end for the readout of the SiPM at the focal plane of the Cherenkov telescope ASTRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S.; Mineo, T.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Bonanno, G.; Catalano, O.; Grillo, A.; La Rosa, G.; Marano, D.; Sottile, G.

    2013-11-01

    The Extended Analogue Silicon Photo-multiplier Integrated Read Out Chip, EASIROC, is a chip proposed as front-end of the camera at the focal plane of the imaging Cherenkov ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype. This paper presents the results of the measurements performed to characterize EASIROC in order to evaluate its compliance with the ASTRI SST-2M focal plane requirements. In particular, we investigated the trigger time walk and the jitter effects as a function of the pulse amplitude. The EASIROC output signal is found to vary linearly as a function of the input pulse amplitude with very low level of electronic noise and cross-talk (<1%). Our results show that it is suitable as front-end chip for the camera prototype, although, specific modifications are necessary to adopt the device in the final version of the telescope.

  7. Multiconjugate adaptive optics for large telescopes: analytical control of the mirror shapes.

    PubMed

    Owner-Petersen, Mette; Goncharov, Alexander

    2002-03-01

    We present an analytical algorithm for deriving the shapes of the deformable mirrors to be used for multiconjugate adaptive correction on a large telescope. The algorithm is optimal in the limit where the overlap of the wave-front contributions from relevant atmospheric layers probed by the guide stars is close to the size of the pupil. The fundamental principle for correction is based on a minimization of the sum of the residual power spectra of the phase fluctuations seen by the guide stars after correction. On the basis of the expressions for the mirror shapes, so-called layer transfer functions describing the distribution of the correction of a single atmospheric layer among the deformable mirrors and the resulting correction of that layer have been derived. It is shown that for five guide stars distributed in a regular cross, two- and three-mirror correction will be possible only up to a maximum frequency defined by the largest separation of the conjugate altitudes of the mirrors and by the angular separation of the guide stars. The performance of the algorithm is investigated in the K band by using a standard seven-layer atmosphere. We present results obtained for two guide-star configurations: a continuous distribution within a given angular radius and a five-star cross pattern with a given angular arm length. The wave-front fluctuations are subjected to correction using one, two, and three deformable mirrors. The needed mirror dynamic range is derived as required root-mean-square stroke and actuator pitch. Finally the performance is estimated in terms of the Strehl ratio obtained by the correction as a function of field angle. No noise has been included in the present analysis, and the guide stars are assumed to be at infinity.

  8. Design of the Apache-Point Observatory 3.5-METER Telescope - Part Three - Primary Mirror Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannery, E. J.; Siegmund, W. A.; Hull, M. T.

    1986-01-01

    The authors describe a system of pneumatic piston mirror supports for use in an altitude over azimuth telescope which react to gravity and wind loading. A pressure controller provides dynamic compensation of variable wind loading and changes in the gravity loading as a result of altitude angle changes. An active air circulation system which ventilates every honeycomb cell can be implemented without interference from the mirror supports. The system can be expanded in principle to accomodate 8 m honeycomb mirrors.

  9. Metal mirror TMA, telescopes of the JSS product line: design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschstein, Steffen; Koch, Amelia; Schöneich, Jürgen; Döngi, Frank

    2005-09-01

    For the increasing market of low-cost multispectral pushbroom scanners for spaceborne Earth remote sensing the Jena-Optronik GmbH have developed the JSS product line. They are typically operated on micro-satellites with strong resources constraints. This leads to instrument designs optimised with respect to minimum size and mass, power consumption, and cost. From various customer requirements, Jena-Optronik has derived the JSS product line of low-cost optical spaceborne scanners in the visible wavelength range. Three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescope designs have become a widespread design solution for fields of view from 2 to 12 deg. The design solution chosen by Jena-Optronik is based on all-aluminium telescopes. Novel ultra-precision milling and polishing techniques now give the opportunity to achieve the necessary optical surface quality for applications in the visible range. The TMA telescope optics design of the JSS-56 imager will be accommodated onboard the RapidEye spacecraft. The JSS-56 TMA with a F-number of 4.3 realised a swath width of 78km with a Ground pixel resolution of 6.5m × 6.5m. The aluminium mirrors are Ni coated to achieve a suitable surface polish quality. This paper discusses typical requirements for the thermal design the bimetallic effects of the mirrors. To achieve a nearly diffracted limited imaging the typical surface irregularities due to the turning process have to be addressed in the ray tracing models. Analysis and integration of real mirror data in the ZEMAX design software are demonstrated here and compared with build-in standard tolerance concepts.

  10. Fabrication processes for MEMS deformable mirrors in the next generation telescope instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diouf, Alioune

    This dissertation advances three critical technology areas at the frontier of research for micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable minors (DMs) needed for next generation telescopes (NGTs). High actuator-count MEMS deformable minors are needed for future ground-based large astronomical telescopes. Scaling up the current MEMS DMs to unprecedented numbers of independent actuators---up to 10,000 on a single DM---will require new electrical connection architecture for the actuators in order to replace the wire-bonded scheme that has been used to date. A through-wafer via interconnection fabrication process for MEMS DMs is developed to offer a path to transform the frontier of high actuator count MEMS micromirrors. In a class of NGTs instrument known as the Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO), the correction made by the DM of the wavefront phase error over the entire telescope field view is not accessible to the sensing unit. To achieve compensation, precise, single step "open-loop" commands must be developed for the DM. Due to the nonlinear relationship between applied voltage and actuation displacement at each actuator, and the mechanical coupling among actuators through the mirror membrane, such open-loop control is a formidable task. A combination of mirror surface modeling and sparse actuator empirical calibration is used to demonstrate open-loop control of MEMS deformable minors to the accuracy of closed-loop control over the entire available DM stroke. Shapes at the limit of achievable minor spatial frequencies with up to 2.5microm amplitudes have been achieved within 20nm RMS error accuracy of closed-loop control. The calibration of a single actuator to be used for predicting shapes results in an additional 14nm RMS surface error compared to parallel calibration of all actuators in the deformable minor. The ubiquitous reflective coatings for MEMS deformable minors are gold and aluminum. Emerging adaptive optics application require broadband optical

  11. Development of mirrors made of chemically tempered glass foils for future X-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, Bianca; Civitani, Marta; Brizzolari, Claudia; Basso, Stefano; Ghigo, Mauro; Pareschi, Giovanni; Spiga, Daniele; Proserpio, Laura; Suppiger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    Thin slumped glass foils are considered good candidates for the realization of future X-ray telescopes with large effective area and high spatial resolution. However, the hot slumping process affects the glass strength, and this can be an issue during the launch of the satellite because of the high kinematical and static loads occurring during that phase. In the present work we have investigated the possible use of Gorilla® glass (produced by Corning®), a chemical tempered glass that, thanks to its strength characteristics, would be ideal. The un-tempered glass foils were curved by means of an innovative hot slumping technique and subsequently chemically tempered. In this paper we show that the chemical tempering process applied to Gorilla® glass foils does not affect the surface micro-roughness of the mirrors. On the other end, the stress introduced by the tempering process causes a reduction in the amplitude of the longitudinal profile errors with a lateral size close to the mirror length. The effect of the overall shape changes in the final resolution performance of the glass mirrors was studied by simulating the glass foils integration with our innovative approach based on glass reinforcing ribs. The preliminary tests performed so far suggest that this approach has the potential to be applied to the X-ray telescopes of the next generation.

  12. Investigation of Primary Mirror Segment's Residual Errors for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Nissly, Carl; Angeli, George; MacMynowski, Doug; Sigrist, Norbert; Troy, Mitchell; Williams, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The primary mirror segment aberrations after shape corrections with warping harness have been identified as the single largest error term in the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) image quality error budget. In order to better understand the likely errors and how they will impact the telescope performance we have performed detailed simulations. We first generated unwarped primary mirror segment surface shapes that met TMT specifications. Then we used the predicted warping harness influence functions and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor model to determine estimates for the 492 corrected segment surfaces that make up the TMT primary mirror. Surface and control parameters, as well as the number of subapertures were varied to explore the parameter space. The corrected segment shapes were then passed to an optical TMT model built using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems (MACOS) ray-trace simulator. The generated exit pupil wavefront error maps provided RMS wavefront error and image-plane characteristics like the Normalized Point Source Sensitivity (PSSN). The results have been used to optimize the segment shape correction and wavefront sensor designs as well as provide input to the TMT systems engineering error budgets.

  13. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  14. Reflectivity, polarization properties, and durability of metallic mirror coatings for the European Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, A.; Krishnappa, N.; Pleier, O.; Hirzberger, J.; Jobst, P. J.; Schürmann, M.

    2012-09-01

    In the context of the conceptual design study for the European Solar Telescope (EST) we have investigated different metallic mirror coatings in terms of reflectivity, polarization properties and durability. Samples of the following coating types have been studied: bare aluminum, silver with different dielectric layers for protection and UV enhancement, and an aluminum-silver combination. From 2009 to 2011 we have carried out a long-term durability test under realistic observing conditions at the VTT solar telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Spain), accompanied by repeated reflectivity measurements in the EST spectral working range (0.3 - 20 μm), and by polarization measurements in the visible range. The test results allow us to find the optimum coatings for the different mirrors in the EST beampath and to eventually assess aging effects and re-coating cycles. The results of the polarization measurements are a valuable input for an EST telescope polarization model, helping to meet the stringent requirements on polarimetric accuracy.

  15. Evaluation of control laws and actuator locations for control systems applicable to deformable astronomical telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the major difficulties associated with large orbiting astronomical telescopes are the cost of manufacturing the primary mirror to precise tolerances and the maintaining of diffraction-limited tolerances while in orbit. One successfully demonstrated approach for minimizing these problem areas is the technique of actively deforming the primary mirror by applying discrete forces to the rear of the mirror. A modal control technique, as applied to active optics, has previously been developed and analyzed. The modal control technique represents the plant to be controlled in terms of its eigenvalues and eigenfunctions which are estimated via numerical approximation techniques. The report includes an extension of previous work using the modal control technique and also describes an optimal feedback controller. The equations for both control laws are developed in state-space differential form and include such considerations as stability, controllability, and observability. These equations are general and allow the incorporation of various mode-analyzer designs; two design approaches are presented. The report also includes a technique for placing actuator and sensor locations at points on the mirror based upon the flexibility matrix of the uncontrolled or unobserved modes of the structure. The locations selected by this technique are used in the computer runs which are described. The results are based upon three different initial error distributions, two mode-analyzer designs, and both the modal and optimal control laws.

  16. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented.

  17. Active hexagonally segmented mirror to investigate new optical phasing technologies for segmented telescopes.

    PubMed

    Gonté, Frédéric; Dupuy, Christophe; Luong, Bruno; Frank, Christoph; Brast, Roland; Sedghi, Baback

    2009-11-10

    The primary mirror of the future European Extremely Large Telescope will be equipped with 984 hexagonal segments. The alignment of the segments in piston, tip, and tilt within a few nanometers requires an optical phasing sensor. A test bench has been designed to study four different optical phasing sensor technologies. The core element of the test bench is an active segmented mirror composed of 61 flat hexagonal segments with a size of 17 mm side to side. Each of them can be controlled in piston, tip, and tilt by three piezoactuators with a precision better than 1 nm. The context of this development, the requirements, the design, and the integration of this system are explained. The first results on the final precision obtained in closed-loop control are also presented. PMID:19904341

  18. A microprocessor-based position control system for a telescope secondary mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorell, K. R.; Barrows, W. F.; Clappier, R. R.; Lee, G. K.

    1983-01-01

    The pointing requirements for the Shuttle IR Telescope Facility (SIRTF), which consists of an 0.85-m cryogenically cooled IR telescope, call for an image stability of 0.25 arcsec. Attention is presently given to a microprocessor-based position control system developed for the control of the SIRTF secondary mirror, employing a special control law (to minimize energy dissipation), a precision capacitive position sensor, and a specially designed power amplifier/actuator combination. The microprocessor generates the command angular position and rate waveforms in order to maintain a 90 percent dwell time/10 percent transition time ratio independently of chop frequency or amplitude. Performance and test results of a prototype system designed for use with a demonstration model of the SIRTF focal plane fine guidance sensor are presented.

  19. Study of X-ray optics. [testing polished Kanigen coated beryllium mirror in X ray telescope on Skylark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The testing is reported of a polished Kanigen coated beryllium mirror in a soft X-ray telescope to be flown on a Skylark sounding rocket. This test involved inserting the telescope in a 220 foot long vacuum line and taking photographs of an X-ray resolution source. These photographs were then used to evaluate the performance of the telescope mirror as a function of distance from the focal plane and the angular distance off the telescope axis. A second test was made in which a point source was used to study the imaging characteristics by means of a pinhole and proportional counter placed in the telescope focal plane. A third test was conducted using a position sensitive detector. The efficiency and resolution was increased by polishing.

  20. Production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR mirror blank for the Advanced Technology Solar telescope (ATST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedamzik, Ralf; Werner, Thomas; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST) will be the most powerful solar telescope in the world. It is currently being built by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) in a height of 3000 m above sea level on the mountain Haleakala of Maui, Hawaii. The primary mirror blank of diameter 4.26 m is made of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR® of SCHOTT AG Advanced Optics. The DKIST primary mirror design is extremely challenging. With a mirror thickness of only 78 to 85 mm it is the smallest thickness ever machined on a mirror of 4.26 m in diameter. Additionally the glassy ZERODUR® casting is one of the largest in size ever produced for a 4 m class ZERODUR® mirror blank. The off axis aspherical mirror surface required sophisticated grinding procedures to achieve the specified geometrical tolerance. The small thickness of about 80 mm required special measures during processing, lifting and transport. Additionally acid etch treatment was applied to the convex back-surface and the conical shaped outer diameter surface to improve the strength of the blank. This paper reports on the challenging tasks and the achievements on the material property and dimensional specification parameter during the production of the 4.26 m ZERODUR® primary mirror blank for AURA.

  1. Fabrication of metal mirror modules for snap-together VIS telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Matthias; Hartung, Johannes; Kinast, Jan; Gebhardt, Andreas; Burmeister, Frank; Zeitner, Uwe D.; Risse, Stefan; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The assembly effort of an optical system naturally relies on the degrees of freedom and the maximum allowable tolerances each optical surface introduces into the overall budget. Snap-together approaches traditionally can be regarded as attractive solutions for IR systems having moderate tolerances, where the required precision is achieved by simultaneously machining optical surfaces and mounting interfaces in a single machine setup. Recent improvements in manufacturing and metrology enable a transfer of the assembly approach to shorter wavelength applications, where sub-aperture figuring techniques are used in combination with suitable amorphous polishing layers to achieve the increased requirements on figure and finish. A further decrease of the assembly effort is gained by machining several optical surfaces on common mechanical substrates and fixing the relative position with uncertainties as low as the machine precision. The article presents the fabrication of large electroless nickel coated aluminum mirror modules having two functional freeform surfaces and references for metrology and system integration. The modules are part of an all metal anamorphic imaging telescope operating in the visual spectral range. Presented methods open up a rapid and reliable assembly of metal mirror based VIS telescopes to be used in ground and space based astronomy or remote sensing applications.

  2. Upgrading and testing the 3D reconstruction of gamma-ray air showers as observed with an array of Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naumann-Godo, Melitta; Degrange, Bernard

    2008-12-24

    Stereoscopic arrays of Imaging Cherenkov Telescopes allow to reconstruct gamma-ray-induced showers in 3 dimensions. An analysis method based on a simple 3D-model of electromagnetic showers and implemented in the framework of the H.E.S.S. experiment was recently improved by an additional quality criterion which reduces the background contamination by a factor of about 2 in the case of extended sources, while hardly affecting gamma-ray selection efficiency. Moreover, the dramatic flares of PKS 2155-304 in July 2006, which provided H.E.S.S. data with an almost pure gamma-ray sample, offered the unique opportunity of a precision test of the 3D-reconstruction method as well as of the H.E.S.S. simulations used in its calibration. An agreement at a few percent level is found between data and simulations for the distributions of all 3D shower parameters.

  3. Characterization of a 6×6-mm2 75-μm cell MPPC suitable for the Cherenkov Telescope Array project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Bonanno, G.; Garozzo, S.; Grillo, A.; Marano, D.; Munari, M.; Timpanaro, M. C.; Catalano, O.; Giarrusso, S.; Impiombato, D.; La Rosa, G.; Sottile, G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the latest characterization results of a novel Low Cross-Talk (LCT) large-area (6×6-mm2) Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) detector manufactured by Hamamatsu, belonging to the recent LCT5 family and achieving a fill-factor enhancement and cross-talk reduction. In addition, the newly adopted resin coating is demonstrated to yield improved photon detection capabilities in the 290-350 nm spectral range, making the new LCT MPPC particularly suitable for emerging applications like Cherenkov Telescopes. For a 3×3-mm2 version of the new MPPC under test, a comparative analysis of the large pixel pitch (75-μm) detector versus the smaller pixel pitch (50-μm) detector is also undertaken. Furthermore, measurements of the 6×6-mm2 MPPC response versus the angle of incidence are provided for the characterized device.

  4. Design concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: an advanced facility for ground-based high-energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Actis, M.; Agnetta, G.; Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Aleksić, J.; Aliu, E.; Allan, D.; Allekotte, I.; Antico, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Aravantinos, A.; Arlen, T.; Arnaldi, H.; Artmann, S.; Asano, K.; Asorey, H.; Bähr, J.; Bais, A.; Baixeras, C.; Bajtlik, S.; Balis, D.; Bamba, A.; Barbier, C.; Barceló, M.; Barnacka, A.; Barnstedt, J.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Basso, S.; Bastieri, D.; Bauer, C.; Becerra, J.; Becherini, Y.; Bechtol, K.; Becker, J.; Beckmann, V.; Bednarek, W.; Behera, B.; Beilicke, M.; Belluso, M.; Benallou, M.; Benbow, W.; Berdugo, J.; Berger, K.; Bernardino, T.; Bernlöhr, K.; Biland, A.; Billotta, S.; Bird, T.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Blake, S.; Blanch, O.; Bobkov, A. A.; Bogacz, L.; Bogdan, M.; Boisson, C.; Boix, J.; Bolmont, J.; Bonanno, G.; Bonardi, A.; Bonev, T.; Borkowski, J.; Botner, O.; Bottani, A.; Bourgeat, M.; Boutonnet, C.; Bouvier, A.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Briggs, M. S.; Brun, P.; Brunetti, L.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Bühler, R.; Bulik, T.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Byrum, K.; Cailles, M.; Cameron, R.; Canestrari, R.; Cantu, S.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Carr, J.; Carton, P. H.; Casiraghi, M.; Castarede, H.; Catalano, O.; Cavazzani, S.; Cazaux, S.; Cerruti, B.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chiang, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cieślar, M.; Ciesielska, M.; Cillis, A.; Clerc, C.; Colin, P.; Colomé, J.; Compin, M.; Conconi, P.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, J. L.; Coppi, P.; Corlier, M.; Corona, P.; Corpace, O.; Corti, D.; Cortina, J.; Costantini, H.; Cotter, G.; Courty, B.; Couturier, S.; Covino, S.; Croston, J.; Cusumano, G.; Daniel, M. K.; Dazzi, F.; Angelis, A. De; de Cea Del Pozo, E.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; de Jager, O.; de La Calle Pérez, I.; de La Vega, G.; de Lotto, B.; de Naurois, M.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, B.; Deil, C.; Delagnes, E.; Deleglise, G.; Delgado, C.; Dettlaff, T.; di Paolo, A.; di Pierro, F.; Díaz, C.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, H.; Digel, S. W.; Dimitrov, D.; Disset, G.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Doert, M.; Domainko, W.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Dournaux, J.-L.; Dravins, D.; Drury, L.; Dubois, F.; Dubois, R.; Dubus, G.; Dufour, C.; Durand, D.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edy, E.; Egberts, K.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Elles, S.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Enomoto, R.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Errando, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcone, A. D.; Farakos, K.; Farnier, C.; Federici, S.; Feinstein, F.; Ferenc, D.; Fillin-Martino, E.; Fink, D.; Finley, C.; Finley, J. P.; Firpo, R.; Florin, D.; Föhr, C.; Fokitis, E.; Font, Ll.; Fontaine, G.; Fontana, A.; Förster, A.; Fortson, L.; Fouque, N.; Fransson, C.; Fraser, G. W.; Fresnillo, L.; Fruck, C.; Fujita, Y.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Gäbele, W.; Gabici, S.; Gadola, A.; Galante, N.; Gallant, Y.; García, B.; García López, R. J.; Garrido, D.; Garrido, L.; Gascón, D.; Gasq, C.; Gaug, M.; Gaweda, J.; Geffroy, N.; Ghag, C.; Ghedina, A.; Ghigo, M.; Gianakaki, E.; Giarrusso, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giro, E.; Giubilato, P.; Glanzman, T.; Glicenstein, J.-F.; Gochna, M.; Golev, V.; Gómez Berisso, M.; González, A.; González, F.; Grañena, F.; Graciani, R.; Granot, J.; Gredig, R.; Green, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grimm, O.; Grube, J.; Grudzińska, M.; Grygorczuk, J.; Guarino, V.; Guglielmi, L.; Guilloux, F.; Gunji, S.; Gyuk, G.; Hadasch, D.; Haefner, D.; Hagiwara, R.; Hahn, J.; Hallgren, A.; Hara, S.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Hassan, T.; Haubold, T.; Hauser, M.; Hayashida, M.; Heller, R.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Herrero, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hoffmann, D.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Horns, D.; Hrupec, D.; Huan, H.; Huber, B.; Huet, J.-M.; Hughes, G.; Hultquist, K.; Humensky, T. B.; Huppert, J.-F.; Ibarra, A.; Illa, J. M.; Ingjald, J.; Inoue, Y.; Inoue, S.; Ioka, K.; Jablonski, C.; Jacholkowska, A.; Janiak, M.; Jean, P.; Jensen, H.; Jogler, T.; Jung, I.; Kaaret, P.; Kabuki, S.; Kakuwa, J.; Kalkuhl, C.; Kankanyan, R.; Kapala, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Karczewski, M.; Karkar, S.; Karlsson, N.; Kasperek, J.; Katagiri, H.; Katarzyński, K.; Kawanaka, N.; Kȩdziora, B.; Kendziorra, E.; Khélifi, B.; Kieda, D.; Kifune, T.; Kihm, T.; Klepser, S.; Kluźniak, W.; Knapp, J.; Knappy, A. R.; Kneiske, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Köck, F.; Kodani, K.; Kohri, K.; Kokkotas, K.; Komin, N.; Konopelko, A.; Kosack, K.; Kossakowski, R.; Kostka, P.; Kotuła, J.; Kowal, G.; Kozioł, J.; Krähenbühl, T.; Krause, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Kretzschmann, A.; Kubo, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, N.; La Parola, V.; La Rosa, G.; López, A.; Lamanna, G.; Laporte, P.; Lavalley, C.; Le Flour, T.; Le Padellec, A.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lessio, L.; Lieunard, B.; Lindfors, E.; Liolios, A.; Lohse, T.; Lombardi, S.; Lopatin, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lubiński, P.; Luz, O.; Lyard, E.; Maccarone, M. C.; Maccarone, T.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; Maltezos, S.; Małkiewicz, P.; Mañá, C.; Manalaysay, A.; Maneva, G.; Mangano, A.; Manigot, P.; Marín, J.; Mariotti, M.; Markoff, S.; Martínez, G.; Martínez, M.; Mastichiadis, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Mattiazzo, S.; Mazin, D.; McComb, T. J. L.; McCubbin, N.; McHardy, I.; Medina, C.; Melkumyan, D.; Mendes, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meucci, M.; Michałowski, J.; Micolon, P.; Mineo, T.; Mirabal, N.; Mirabel, F.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mizuno, T.; Moal, B.; Moderski, R.; Molinari, E.; Monteiro, I.; Moralejo, A.; Morello, C.; Mori, K.; Motta, G.; Mottez, F.; Moulin, E.; Mukherjee, R.; Munar, P.; Muraishi, H.; Murase, K.; Murphy, A. Stj.; Nagataki, S.; Naito, T.; Nakamori, T.; Nakayama, K.; Naumann, C.; Naumann, D.; Nayman, P.; Nedbal, D.; Niedźwiecki, A.; Niemiec, J.; Nikolaidis, A.; Nishijima, K.; Nolan, S. J.; Nowak, N.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ochoa, I.; Ohira, Y.; Ohishi, M.; Ohka, H.; Okumura, A.; Olivetto, C.; Ong, R. A.; Orito, R.; Orr, M.; Osborne, J. P.; Ostrowski, M.; Otero, L.; Otte, A. N.; Ovcharov, E.; Oya, I.; Oziȩbło, A.; Paiano, S.; Pallota, J.; Panazol, J. L.; Paneque, D.; Panter, M.; Paoletti, R.; Papyan, G.; Paredes, J. M.; Pareschi, G.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pedaletti, G.; Pepato, A.; Persic, M.; Petrucci, P. O.; Peyaud, B.; Piechocki, W.; Pita, S.; Pivato, G.; Płatos, Ł.; Platzer, R.; Pogosyan, L.; Pohl, M.; Pojmański, G.; Ponz, J. D.; Potter, W.; Prandini, E.; Preece, R.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quel, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rajda, P.; Rando, R.; Rataj, M.; Raue, M.; Reimann, C.; Reimann, O.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Renner, S.; Reymond, J.-M.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Ribordy, M.; Rico, J.; Rieger, F.; Ringegni, P.; Ripken, J.; Ristori, P.; Rivoire, S.; Rob, L.; Rodriguez, S.; Roeser, U.; Romano, P.; Romero, G. E.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rovero, A. C.; Roy, F.; Royer, S.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Ruppel, J.; Russo, F.; Ryde, F.; Sacco, B.; Saggion, A.; Sahakian, V.; Saito, K.; Saito, T.; Sakaki, N.; Salazar, E.; Salini, A.; Sánchez, F.; Sánchez Conde, M. Á.; Santangelo, A.; Santos, E. M.; Sanuy, A.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Sarkar, S.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Scarcioffolo, M.; Schanz, T.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schmidt, T.; Schmoll, J.; Schroedter, M.; Schultz, C.; Schultze, J.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schweizer, T.; Seiradakis, J.; Selmane, S.; Seweryn, K.; Shayduk, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Shibata, T.; Sikora, M.; Silk, J.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Skole, C.; Smith, N.; Sobczyńska, D.; Sofo Haro, M.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spiga, D.; Spyrou, S.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Starling, R. L. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Steiner, S.; Stergioulas, N.; Sternberger, R.; Stinzing, F.; Stodulski, M.; Straumann, U.; Suárez, A.; Suchenek, M.; Sugawara, R.; Sulanke, K. H.; Sun, S.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutcliffe, P.; Szanecki, M.; Szepieniec, T.; Szostek, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Talbot, R. G.; Tam, P. H.; Tanaka, M.; Tanimori, T.; Tavani, M.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tchernin, C.; Tejedor, L. A.; Telezhinsky, I.; Temnikov, P.; Tenzer, C.; Terada, Y.; Terrier, R.; Teshima, M.; Testa, V.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tluczykont, M.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tokanai, F.; Tokarz, M.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Totani, T.; Toussenel, F.; Vallania, P.; Vallejo, G.; van der Walt, J.; van Eldik, C.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vankov, H.; Vasileiadis, G.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vegas, I.; Venter, L.; Vercellone, S.; Veyssiere, C.; Vialle, J. P.; Videla, M.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Vlahakis, N.; Vlahos, L.; Vogler, P.; Vollhardt, A.; Volpe, F.; von Gunten, H. P.; Vorobiov, S.; Wagner, S.; Wagner, R. M.; Wagner, B.; Wakely, S. P.; Walter, P.; Walter, R.; Warwick, R.; Wawer, P.; Wawrzaszek, R.; Webb, N.; Wegner, P.; Weinstein, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Welsing, R.; Wetteskind, H.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Williams, D. A.; Winde, M.; Wischnewski, R.; Wiśniewski, Ł.; Wolczko, A.; Wood, M.; Xiong, Q.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Yamazaki, R.; Yanagita, S.; Yoffo, B.; Yonetani, M.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshikoshi, T.; Zabalza, V.; Zagdański, A.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A.; Zech, A.; Ziȩtara, K.; Ziółkowski, P.; Zitelli, V.; Zychowski, P.

    2011-12-01

    Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has had a major breakthrough with the impressive results obtained using systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation instrument, with a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV-10 TeV range and the extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the north, one in the south) for full sky coverage and will be operated as open observatory. The design of CTA is based on currently available technology. This document reports on the status and presents the major design concepts of CTA.

  5. Design Concepts for the Cherenkov Telescope Array CTA: An Advanced Facility for Ground-Based High-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Actis, M

    2012-04-17

    Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has had a major breakthrough with the impressive results obtained using systems of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. Ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has a huge potential in astrophysics, particle physics and cosmology. CTA is an international initiative to build the next generation instrument, with a factor of 5-10 improvement in sensitivity in the 100 GeV-10 TeV range and the extension to energies well below 100 GeV and above 100 TeV. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the north, one in the south) for full sky coverage and will be operated as open observatory. The design of CTA is based on currently available technology. This document reports on the status and presents the major design concepts of CTA.

  6. On the potential of atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays for resolving TeV gamma-ray sources in the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogi, L.; De Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Aharonian, F.

    2016-07-01

    The potential of an array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to detect gamma-ray sources in complex regions has been investigated. The basic characteristics of the gamma-ray instrument have been parameterized using simple analytic representations. In addition to the ideal (Gaussian form) point spread function (PSF), the impact of more realistic non-Gaussian PSFs with tails has been considered. Simulations of isolated point-like and extended sources have been used as a benchmark to test and understand the response of the instrument. The capability of the instrument to resolve multiple sources has been analyzed and the corresponding instrument sensitivities calculated. The results are of particular interest for weak gamma-ray emitters located in crowded regions of the Galactic plane, where the chance of clustering of two or more gamma-ray sources within 1 deg is high.

  7. Photomultiplier tube selection for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Maomao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yingtao; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Shoushan; Wang, Chong; Bi, Baiyang

    2016-05-01

    For the purpose of selecting the most suitable photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array (WFCTA), we have performed extensive tests on seven models of 25.4 mm PMTs: Hamamatsu R1924A and R7899, Beijing Hamamatsu CR303, CR332A and CR364, and HZC Photonics XP3102 and XP3182. A dedicated test system has been developed to measure the PMT characteristics such as single photo-electron spectrum, gain, linearity, and spatial uniformity of anode output. The XP3182 and CR364 (R7899) tubes both meet the pivotal requirement due to their superior pulse linearity. The PMT test system, techniques used for these measurements, and their results are also reported.

  8. Support and Position Control of Primary and Secondary Mirrors for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Larry N.; Owen, Russell E.; Gunn, James E.; Siegmund, Walter A.; Mannery, Edward J.; Hull, Charles L.; Brown, Yorke J.

    2002-12-01

    The support and position control systems for both the primary and secondary mirror of the SDSS Telescope allow the mirrors up to 12 mm of precisely positioned axial motion, as well as limited tilt and transverse motion. This paper describes the final design and operation of these systems. Some relative strengths and limitations of the components and problems encountered with their implementation are also summarized.

  9. Design and tolerance analysis of two null corrector designs for the Space Telescope fine guidance aspheric collimating mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, I.; Casas, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The collimating mirror within the Fine Guidance Subsystem of the Space Telescope's Pointing Control System is aspherized in order to correct the pupil aberration. A null corrector is needed to test the collimating mirror in autocollimation. Triplet and doublet null corrector designs are subjected to tolerance sensitivity analyses, and the doublet design is chosen despite its more restricted tolerances because of its compactness and simplicity.

  10. Metrology Arrangement for Measuring the Positions of Mirrors of a Submillimeter Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovici, Alex; Bartman, Randall K.

    2011-01-01

    The position of the secondary mirror of a submillimeter telescope with respect to the primary mirror needs to be known .0.03 mm in three dimensions. At the time of this reporting, no convenient, reasonably priced arrangement that offers this capability exists. The solution proposed here relies on measurement devices developed and deployed for the GeoSAR mission, and later adapted for the ISAT (Innovative Space Based Radar Antenna Technology) demonstration. The measurement arrangement consists of four metrology heads, located on an optical bench, attached to the secondary mirror. Each metrology head has a dedicated target located at the edge of the primary mirror. One laser beam, launched from the head and returned by the target, is used to measure distance. Another beam, launched from a beacon on the target, is monitored by the metrology head and generates a measurement of the target position in the plane perpendicular to the laser beam. A 100-MHz modulation is carried by a collimated laser beam. The relevant wavelength is the RF one, 3 m, divided by two, because the light carries it to the target and back. The phase change due to travel to the target and back is measured by timing the zero-crossing of the RF modulation, using a 100-MHz clock. In order to obtain good resolution, the 100-MHz modulation signal is down-converted to 1 kHz. Then, the phase change corresponding to the round-trip to the target is carried by a 1-kHz signal. Since the 100-MHz clock beats 100,000 times during one period of the 1-kHz signal, the least-significant-bit (LSB) resolution is LSB = 0.015 mm.

  11. X-ray telescope onboard Astro-E: optical design and fabrication of thin foil mirrors.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, H; Ishida, M; Endo, T; Hidaka, Y; Honda, H; Imamura, K; Ishida, J; Maeda, M; Misaki, K; Shibata, R; Furuzawa, A; Haga, K; Ogasaka, Y; Okajima, T; Tawara, Y; Terashima, Y; Watanabe, M; Yamashita, K; Yoshioka, T; Serlemitsos, P J; Soong, Y; Chan, K W

    2001-02-01

    X-ray telescopes (XRT's) of nested thin foil mirrors are developed for Astro-E, the fifth Japanese x-ray astronomy satellite. Although the launch was not successful, the design concept, fabrication, and alignment procedure are summarized. The main purpose of the Astro-E XRT is to collect hard x rays up to 10 keV with high efficiency and to provide medium spatial resolution in limited weight and volume. Compared with the previous mission, Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), a slightly longer focal length of 4.5-4.75 m and a larger diameter of 40 cm yields an effective area of 1750 cm2 at 8 keV with five telescopes. The image quality is also improved to 2-arc min half-power diameter by introduction of a replication process. Platinum is used instead of gold for the reflectors of one of the five telescopes to enhance the high-energy response. The fabrication and alignment procedure is also summarized. Several methods for improvement are suggested for the reflight Astro-E II mission and for other future missions. Preflight calibration results will be described in a forthcoming second paper, and a detailed study of images will be presented in a third paper.

  12. Analytical expressions for field astigmatism in decentered two mirror telescopes and application to the collimation of the ESO VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noethe, L.; Guisard, S.

    2000-05-01

    We derive formulae for all parameters defining the field astigmatism of misaligned two mirror telescopes with arbitrary geometries and with stop positions anywhere on the line connecting the vertices of the two mirrors. The formulae show explicitly the dependence of the field astigmatism on the fundamental design parameters and characteristics of the telescope and on the stop position. Special attention is given to the particular case where such a schiefspiegler has been corrected for coma at the field center. In addition, we study the effects of the practical definition that the center of the field is the center of the adapter. Following a recent paper by McLeod, where the field dependence of astigmatism is used to collimate a Ritchey-Chretien telescope with the stop at the primary mirror, we apply our formulae to the Cassegrain focus of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), where the stop is at the secondary mirror and the telescope is only corrected for spherical aberration. We present measurements of the field astigmatism and discuss the accuracy of the collimation method.

  13. Design of a prototype primary mirror segment positioning actuator for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorell, Kenneth R.; Aubrun, Jean-Noël; Clappier, Robert R.; Miller, Scott W.; Sirota, Mark

    2006-06-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) is a collaborative project between the California Institute of Technology (CIT), the University of California (UC), the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), and the Association of Canadian Universities for Research in Astronomy (ACURA). In order for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to achieve the required optical performance, each of its 738 primary mirror segments must be positioned relative to adjacent segments with nanometer-level accuracy. Three in plane degrees of freedom are controlled via a passive Segment Support Assembly which is described in another paper presented at this conference (paper 6273-45). The remaining three out of plane degrees of freedom, tip, tilt, and piston, are controlled via three actuators for each segment. Because of its size and the shear number of actuators, TMT will require an actuator design, departing from that used on the Keck telescopes, its successful predecessor. Sensitivity to wind loads and structural vibrations, the large dynamic range, low operating power, and extremely reliable operation, all achieved at an affordable unit cost, are the most demanding design requirements. This paper describes a concept that successfully meets the TMT requirements, along with analysis and performance predictions. The actuator concept is based on a prototype actuator developed for the California Extremely Large Telescope (CELT) project. It relies on techniques that achieve the required accuracy while providing a substantial amount of vibration attenuation and damping. A development plan consisting of a series of prototype actuators is envisioned to verify cost, reliability, and performance before mass production is initiated. The first prototype (P I) of this development plan is now being built and should complete initial testing by the end of 2 nd QTR 06.

  14. Characterization of silver and aluminum custom mirror coatings for the MRO interferometric telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, Krista M.; Klinglesmith, Daniel A.; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Bakker, Eric J.; Schmell, Reed A.; Schmell, Rodney A.; Gartner, Darren; Jaramillo, Anthony; Romero, Kelly; Rael, Andres; Lewis, Jeff

    2009-08-01

    We report on the design, application, and testing of custom protected silver and aluminum coatings for use on the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometers (MROI) unit telescopes. The coatings were designed by Optical Surface Technologies (OST), and tested under normal observational conditions on Magdalena Ridge. Mirror coating samples fabricated by OST were given to MRO, and then placed in an insulated automated enclosure at the observatory site. Within the enclosure, environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity were continuously monitored. The automated enclosure was instructed to open during the night dependent upon weather conditions matching those that would occur under normal operations of the interferometer. This paper tracks the affect of the Magdalena Ridge environment on the performance of the coatings, specifically with regards to reflectivity.

  15. Development of the primary mirror segment support assemblies for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponslet, Eric; Blanco, Dan; Cho, Myung; Mast, Terry; Nelson, Jerry; Ponchione, R. J.; Sirota, Mark; Stephens, Vince; Stepp, Larry; Tubb, Alan; Williams, Eric C.

    2006-06-01

    This paper describes the studies performed to establish a baseline conceptual design of the Segment Support Assembly (SSA) for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) primary mirror. The SSA uses a combination of mechanical whiffletrees for axial support, a central diaphragm for lateral support, and a whiffletree-based remote-controlled warping harness for surface figure corrections. Axial support whiffletrees are numerically optimized to minimize the resulting gravityinduced deformation. Although a classical central diaphragm solution was eventually adopted, several lateral support concepts are considered. Warping harness systems are analyzed and optimized for their effectiveness at correcting second and third order optical aberrations. Thermal deformations of the optical surface are systematically analyzed using finite element analysis. Worst-case performance of the complete system as a result of gravity loading and temperature variations is analyzed as a function of zenith angle using an integrated finite element model.

  16. Deep UV to NIR Space Telescopes and Exoplanet Coronagraphs: A Trade Study on Throughput, Polarization, Mirror Coating Options and Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Shaklan, Stuart; Give'on, Amir; Cady, Eric; Marchen, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Exoplanet program and the Cosmic Origins program are exploring technical options to combine the visible to NIR performance requirements of a space coronagraph with the general astrophysics requirements of a space telescope covering the deep UV spectrum. Are there compatible options in terms of mirror coatings and telescope architecture to satisfy both goals? In this paper, we address some of the main concerns, particularly relating to polarization in the visible and throughput in the UV. Telescope architectures employing different coating options compatible with current technology are considered in this trade study.

  17. Toward a Complete Metrological Solution for the Mirrors for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehan, John; Owens, S.; Hadjimichael, T.; Hong, M.; Chan, K.-W.; Saha, T. T.; Reid, P.; Zhang, W. W.

    2007-01-01

    We present an overview update of the metrological approach to be employed for the segmented mirror fabrication for Constellation-X spectroscopy x-ray telescope. We compare results achieved to date with mission requirements. This is discussed in terms of inherent capability versus in-practice capability.

  18. A study on support structure of the one-meter primary mirror of the Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei; Hu, Qi-Qian

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, a reasonable support system of the one-meter primary mirror which is one of important components of the Space Solar Telescope is presented. This system can satisfy the optical calibration on the ground and launching mechanical environment, and guarantee a high precision state during the normal observation on the orbit.

  19. Analytical computation of stray light in nested mirror modules for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    Stray light in X-ray telescopes are a well-known issue. Unlike rays focused via a double reflection by usual grazing-incidence geometries such as the Wolter-I, stray rays coming from off-axis sources are reflected only once by either the parabolic or the hyperbolic segment. Although not focused, stray light may represent a major source of background and ghost images especially when observing a field of faint sources in the vicinities of another, more intense, just outside the field of view of the telescope. The stray light problem is faced by mounting a pre-collimator in front of the mirror module, in order to shade a part of the reflective surfaces that may give rise to singly-reflected rays. Studying the expected stray light impact, and consequently designing a pre-collimator, is a typical ray-tracing problem, usually time and computation consuming, especially if we consider that rays propagate throughout a densely nested structure. This in turn requires one to pay attention to all the possible obstructions, increasing the complexity of the simulation. In contrast, approaching the problems of stray light calculation from an analytical viewpoint largely simplifies the problem, and may also ease the task of designing an effective pre-collimator. In this work we expose an analytical formalism that can be used to compute the stray light in a nested optical module in a fast and effective way, accounting for obstruction effects.

  20. Alignment of a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope using nodal aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Changxiang; Wang, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Most computer-aided alignment methods for optical systems are based on numerical algorithms at present, which omit aberration theory. This paper presents a novel alignment algorithm for three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes using Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT). The aberration field decenter vectors and boresight error of misaligned TMA telescopes are derived. Two alignment models based on 3rd and 5th order NAT are established successively and compared in the same alignment example. It is found that the average and the maximum RMS wavefront errors in the whole field of view of 0.3° × 0.15° are 0.063 λ (λ = 1 μm) and 0.068 λ respectively after the 4th alignment action with the 3rd order model, and 0.011 λ and 0.025 λ (nominal values) respectively after the 3rd alignment action with the 5th order model. Monte-Carlo alignment simulations are carried out with the 5th order model. It shows that the 5th order model still has good performance even when the misalignment variables are large (-1 mm≤linear misalignment≤1 mm, -0.1°≤angular misalignment≤0.1°), and multiple iterative alignments are needed when the misalignment variables increase. PMID:26406716

  1. Prototyping results for a wide-field fiber positioner for the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; McGrath, Andrew J.

    2004-07-01

    Given the physical size of the GSMT prime focus field is approximately equivalent to that of the Subaru telescope it is possible to directly apply current technology developed for the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument (FMOS, to be commissioned in 2005) and substantially reduce the risk associated with developing a new solution for wide-field multi-object spectroscopy on an ELT. The Anglo-Australian Observatory has recently completed a design study for an ~1000 fiber, Echidna-style positioner for the prime focus of the Giant Segmented Mirror Telescope (GSMT). The positioner forms part of the wide-field Multi-Object Multi-Fiber Optical Spectrograph (MOMFOS), an ELT prime focus instrument offering a minimum of 800 fibers patrolling the corrected 20 arcmin field. The design study identified 2 components of an equivalent MOMFOS positioner design that required prototyping. Firstly, a higher spine packing density is required to satisfy the proposed scientific program. Secondly, the fiber position measurement system adopted for FMOS cannot be simply scaled and applied to MOMFOS given space constraints in the top end unit. As such a new and, if possible, simpler system was required. Prototyping results for both components are presented.

  2. Alignment of a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope using nodal aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Changxiang; Wang, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Most computer-aided alignment methods for optical systems are based on numerical algorithms at present, which omit aberration theory. This paper presents a novel alignment algorithm for three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes using Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT). The aberration field decenter vectors and boresight error of misaligned TMA telescopes are derived. Two alignment models based on 3rd and 5th order NAT are established successively and compared in the same alignment example. It is found that the average and the maximum RMS wavefront errors in the whole field of view of 0.3° × 0.15° are 0.063 λ (λ = 1 μm) and 0.068 λ respectively after the 4th alignment action with the 3rd order model, and 0.011 λ and 0.025 λ (nominal values) respectively after the 3rd alignment action with the 5th order model. Monte-Carlo alignment simulations are carried out with the 5th order model. It shows that the 5th order model still has good performance even when the misalignment variables are large (-1 mm≤linear misalignment≤1 mm, -0.1°≤angular misalignment≤0.1°), and multiple iterative alignments are needed when the misalignment variables increase.

  3. Medium-precision null-screen testing of off-axis parabolic mirrors for segmented primary telescope optics: the large millimeter telescope.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Uribe, R

    2000-06-01

    The feasibility of using null screens for testing the segments of a parabolic segmented telescope mirror for the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) is analyzed. An algorithm for designing the null screen for testing the off-axis segments of conic surfaces is described. Actual screen designs for the different classes of segments of the LMT are presented. The sensitivity of the test and the required accuracies for the fabrication and positioning of the screen are analyzed. A measuring accuracy of approximately 12 microm in surface sagitta is within the reach of the technique. PMID:18345203

  4. Mirror development for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Doro, M.; Brun, P.; Canestrari, R.; Chadwick, P.; Font, L.; Ghigo, M.; Lorenz, E.; Mariotti, M.; Michalowski, J.; Niemiec, J.; Pareschi, G.; Peyaud, B.; Seweryn, K.

    2009-08-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), currently in its early design phase, is a proposed new project for groundbased gamma-ray astronomy with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. CTA is planned to consist of several tens of large Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) with a combined reflective surface of up to 10,000 m2. The challenge for the future CTA array is to develop lightweight and cost efficient mirrors with high production rates, good longterm durability and adequate optical properties. The technologies currently under investigation comprise different methods of carbon fibre/epoxy based substrates, sandwich concepts with cold-slumped surfaces made of thin float glass and different structural materials like aluminum honeycomb, glass foam or PU foam inside, and aluminum sandwich structures with either diamond milled surfaces or reflective foils. The current status of the mirror development for CTA will be summarized together with investigations on the improvement of the reflective surfaces and their protection against degradation.

  5. Knee of the cosmic hydrogen and helium spectrum below 1 PeV measured by ARGO-YBJ and a Cherenkov telescope of LHAASO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cao, Z.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Guo, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Bai, Y. X.; Chen, M. J.; Feng, S. H.; Gao, B.; Gu, M. H.; Hou, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. L.; Wang, X.; Xiao, G.; Zhang, B. K.; Zhang, S. S.; Zhou, B.; Zuo, X.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum, in particular for individual species of nuclei, is an important tool to investigate cosmic ray production and propagation mechanisms. The determination of the "knees" in the spectra of different species remains one of the main challenges in cosmic ray physics. In fact, experimental results are still conflicting. In this paper we report a measurement of the mixed proton and helium energy spectrum, obtained with the combined data of the ARGO-YBJ experiment and a wide field of view Cherenkov telescope, a prototype of the future LHAASO experiment. By means of a multiparameter technique, we have selected a high-purity proton plus helium sample. The reconstructed energy resolution is found to be about 25% throughout the investigated energy range from 100 TeV to 3 PeV, with a systematic uncertainty in the absolute energy scale of 9.7%. The found energy spectrum can be fitted with a broken power-law function, with a break at the energy Ek =700 ±230 (stat )±70 (sys ) TeV , where the spectral index changes from -2.56 ±0.05 to -3.24 ±0.36 . The statistical significance of the observed spectral break is 4.2 standard deviations.

  6. HIGH-FREQUENCY-PEAKED BL LACERTAE OBJECTS AS SPECTRAL CANDLES TO MEASURE THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT IN THE FERMI AND AIR CHERENKOV TELESCOPES ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Mankuzhiyil, Nijil; Persic, Massimo; Tavecchio, Fabrizio

    2010-05-20

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is the integrated light from all the stars that have ever formed, and spans the IR-UV range. The interaction of very high-energy (VHE: E > 100 GeV) {gamma}-rays, emitted by sources located at cosmological distances, with the intervening EBL results in e {sup -} e {sup +} pair production that leads to energy-dependent attenuation of the observed VHE flux. This introduces a fundamental ambiguity into the interpretation of measured VHE {gamma}-ray spectra: neither the intrinsic spectrum nor the EBL are separately known-only their combination is. In this Letter, we propose a method to measure the EBL photon number density. It relies on using simultaneous observations of BL Lac objects in the optical, X-ray, high-energy (HE: E > 100 MeV) {gamma}-ray (from the Fermi telescope), and VHE {gamma}-ray (from Cherenkov telescopes) bands. For each source, the method involves best-fitting the spectral energy distribution from optical through HE {gamma}-rays (the latter being largely unaffected by EBL attenuation as long as z {approx_lt} 1) with a synchrotron self-Compton model. We extrapolate such best-fitting models into the VHE regime and assume they represent the BL Lacs' intrinsic emission. Contrasting measured versus intrinsic emission leads to a determination of the {gamma}{gamma} opacity to VHE photons. Using, for each given source, different states of emission will only improve the accuracy of the proposed method. We demonstrate this method using recent simultaneous multifrequency observations of the high-frequency-peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 and discuss how similar observations can more accurately probe the EBL.

  7. VALIDATION OF OBSERVATIONS OBTAINED WITH A LIQUID MIRROR TELESCOPE BY COMPARISON WITH SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2015-06-15

    The results of a search for peculiar astronomical objects using very low resolution spectra obtained with the NASA Orbital Debris Observatory (NODO) 3 m diameter liquid mirror telescope (LMT) are compared with results of spectra obtained with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The main purpose of this comparison is to verify whether observations taken with this novel type of telescope are reliable. This comparison is important because LMTs are an inexpensive novel type of telescope that is very useful for astronomical surveys, particularly surveys in the time domain, and validation of the data taken with an LMT by comparison with data from a classical telescope will validate their reliability. We start from a published data analysis that classified as peculiar only 206 of the 18,000 astronomical objects observed with the NODO LMT. A total of 29 of these 206 objects were found in the SDSS. The reliability of the NODO data can be seen through the results of the detailed analysis that, in practice, incorrectly identified less than 0.3% of the 18,000 spectra as peculiar objects, most likely because they are variable stars. We conclude that the LMT gave reliable observations, comparable to those that would have been obtained with a telescope using a glass mirror.

  8. Design Of A Support System For The Primary Mirror Of A Cryogenic Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiTolla, Robert; Richard, Ralph M.; Vukobratovich, Daniel

    1986-07-01

    The finite element method was used for the structural design of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) primary mirror and its support system in a cryogenic environment similar to space-shuttle cargo-bay launch conditions. Shuttle loads were specified by power spectral density functions (PSDF) obtained from previous shuttle launches. The primary goal in the development of a design to withstand this random loading was to ensure the structural integrity of the support system, which comprised an aluminum baseplate and three titanium flexures. This design was an extension of a support system previously developed for cryogenic static effects only. The displacements and stresses of the support system are greatly affected by the damping characteristics of the flexures, which are very difficult to quantify. A parametric study illustrates the behavior of the system over the range of the estimated damping values. Recommendations and techniques for modeling this type of structure are presented. The methods and approaches used in the analysis and the effect of model refinement upon solution accuracy are discussed.

  9. Active control of adaptive optics system in a large segmented mirror telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, M.; Agrawal, B. N.

    2014-02-01

    For a large adaptive optics system such as a large segmented mirror telescope (SMT), it is often difficult, although not impossible, to directly apply common multi-input multi-output (MIMO) controller design methods due to the computational burden imposed by the large dimension of the system model. In this article, a practical controller design method is proposed which significantly reduces the system dimension for a system where the dimension required to represent the dynamics of the plant is much smaller than the dimension of the full plant model. The proposed method decouples the dynamic and static parts of the plant model by a modal decomposition technique to separately design a controller for each part. Two controllers are then combined using the so-called sensitivity decoupling method so that the resulting feedback loop becomes the superposition of the two individual feedback loops of the dynamic and static parts. A MIMO controller was designed by the proposed method using the H ∞ loop-shaping technique for an SMT model to be compared with other controllers proposed in the literature. Frequency-domain analysis and time-domain simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed controller.

  10. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  11. Mirror Material Properties Compiled for Preliminary Design of the Next Generation Space Telescope (30 to 294 Kelvin)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luz, P. L.; Rice, T.

    1998-01-01

    This technical memorandum reports on the mirror material properties that were compiled by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) from April 1996 to June 1997 for preliminary design of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Study. The NGST study began in February 1996, when the Program Development Directorate at NASA MSFC studied the feasibility of the NGST and developed the pre-phase A program for it. After finishing some initial studies and concepts development work on the NGST, MFSC's Program Development Directorate handed this work to the Observatory Projects Office at MSFC and then to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This technical memorandum was written by MSFC's Preliminary Design Office and Materials and Processes Laboratory for the NGST Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) team, in Support of NASA GSFC. It contains material properties for 9 mirror Substrate materials, using information from at least 6 industrial Suppliers, 16 textbooks, 44 technical papers, and 130 technical abstracts.

  12. Slewing Mirror Telescope optics for the early observation of UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S; Nam, J W; Ahn, K B; Park, I H; Kim, S W; Lee, J; Lim, H; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jørgensen, C; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chen, P; Cho, M H; Choi, J N; Grossan, B; Huang, M A; Jung, A; Kim, J E; Kim, M B; Kim, Y W; Linder, E V; Min, K W; Na, G W; Panasyuk, M I; Ripa, J; Reglero, V; Smoot, G F; Suh, J E; Svertilov, S; Vedenkin, N; Yashin, I

    2013-01-28

    We report on design, manufacture, and testing of a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), the first of its kind and a part of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory-pathfinder (UFFO-p) for space-based prompt measurement of early UV/optical light curves from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Using a fast slewing mirror of 150 mm diameter mounted on a 2 axis gimbal stage, SMT can deliver the images of GRB optical counterparts to the intensified CCD detector within 1.5~1.8 s over ± 35 degrees in the slewing field of view. Its Ritchey-Chrétien telescope of 100 mm diameter provides a 17 × 17 arcmin² instantaneous field of view. Technical details of design, construction, the laboratory performance tests in space environments for this unique SMT are described in conjunction with the plan for in-orbit operation onboard the Lomonosov satellite in 2013.

  13. Mathematical Design Optimization of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald; O'Dell, Stephen; Ramsey, Brian; Weisskopf, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the mirror shell nodal positions and detector tilts that optimize the spatial resolution averaged over a field-of-view for a nested x-ray telescope, assuming known mirror segment surface prescriptions and known detector focal surface. The results are expressed in terms of ensemble averages over variable combinations of the ray positions and wavevectors in the flat focal plane intersecting the optical axis at the nominal on-axis focus, which can be determined by Monte-Carlo ray traces of the individual mirror shells. This work is part of our continuing efforts to provide analytical tools to aid in the design process for wide-field survey x-ray astronomy missions.

  14. Mathematical Design Optimization of Wide-Field X-ray Telescopes: Mirror Nodal Positions and Detector Tilts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mathematical formalism for determining the mirror shell nodal positions and detector tilts that optimize the spatial resolution averaged over a field-of-view for a nested x-ray telescope, assuming known mirror segment surface prescriptions and known detector focal surface. The results are expressed in terms of ensemble averages over variable combinations of the ray positions and wave vectors in the flat focal plane intersecting the optical axis at the nominal on-axis focus, which can be determined by Monte-Carlo ray traces of the individual mirror shells. This work is part of our continuing efforts to provide analytical tools to aid in the design process for wide-field survey x-ray astronomy missions.

  15. Experimental study and analytical model of deformation of magnetostrictive films as applied to mirrors for x-ray space telescopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Knapp, Peter; Vaynman, S; Graham, M E; Cao, Jian; Ulmer, M P

    2014-09-20

    The desire for continuously gaining new knowledge in astronomy has pushed the frontier of engineering methods to deliver lighter, thinner, higher quality mirrors at an affordable cost for use in an x-ray observatory. To address these needs, we have been investigating the application of magnetic smart materials (MSMs) deposited as a thin film on mirror substrates. MSMs have some interesting properties that make the application of MSMs to mirror substrates a promising solution for making the next generation of x-ray telescopes. Due to the ability to hold a shape with an impressed permanent magnetic field, MSMs have the potential to be the method used to make light weight, affordable x-ray telescope mirrors. This paper presents the experimental setup for measuring the deformation of the magnetostrictive bimorph specimens under an applied magnetic field, and the analytical and numerical analysis of the deformation. As a first step in the development of tools to predict deflections, we deposited Terfenol-D on the glass substrates. We then made measurements that were compared with the results from the analytical and numerical analysis. The surface profiles of thin-film specimens were measured under an external magnetic field with white light interferometry (WLI). The analytical model provides good predictions of film deformation behavior under various magnetic field strengths. This work establishes a solid foundation for further research to analyze the full three-dimensional deformation behavior of magnetostrictive thin films. PMID:25322105

  16. Experimental study and analytical model of deformation of magnetostrictive films as applied to mirrors for x-ray space telescopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Knapp, Peter; Vaynman, S; Graham, M E; Cao, Jian; Ulmer, M P

    2014-09-20

    The desire for continuously gaining new knowledge in astronomy has pushed the frontier of engineering methods to deliver lighter, thinner, higher quality mirrors at an affordable cost for use in an x-ray observatory. To address these needs, we have been investigating the application of magnetic smart materials (MSMs) deposited as a thin film on mirror substrates. MSMs have some interesting properties that make the application of MSMs to mirror substrates a promising solution for making the next generation of x-ray telescopes. Due to the ability to hold a shape with an impressed permanent magnetic field, MSMs have the potential to be the method used to make light weight, affordable x-ray telescope mirrors. This paper presents the experimental setup for measuring the deformation of the magnetostrictive bimorph specimens under an applied magnetic field, and the analytical and numerical analysis of the deformation. As a first step in the development of tools to predict deflections, we deposited Terfenol-D on the glass substrates. We then made measurements that were compared with the results from the analytical and numerical analysis. The surface profiles of thin-film specimens were measured under an external magnetic field with white light interferometry (WLI). The analytical model provides good predictions of film deformation behavior under various magnetic field strengths. This work establishes a solid foundation for further research to analyze the full three-dimensional deformation behavior of magnetostrictive thin films.

  17. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  18. Optical design for ATHENA X-ray telescope based on slumped mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proserpio, Laura; Breunig, Elias; Friedrich, Peter; Winter, Anita

    2014-07-01

    The Hot and Energetic Universe will be the focus of future ESA missions: in late 2013 the theme was selected for the second large-class mission in the Cosmic Vision science program. Fundamental questions on how and why ordinary matter assemble into galaxies and clusters, and how black holes grow and influence their surroundings can be addressed with an advanced X-ray observatory. The currently proposed ATHENA mission presents all the potentiality to answer the outstanding questions. It is based on the heritage of XMM-Newton and on the previous studies for IXO mission. The scientific payload will require state of the art instrumentations. In particular, the baseline for the X-ray optical system, delivering a combination of large area, high angular resolution, and large field of view, is the Silicon Pore Optics technology (SPO) developed by ESA in conjunction with the Cosine Measurement Systems. The slumping technology is also under development for the manufacturing of future X-ray telescopes: for several years the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial physics (MPE) has been involved in the analysis of the indirect slumping approach, which foresees the manufacturing of segmented X-ray shells by shaping thin glass foils at high temperatures over concave moulds so to avoid any contact of the optical surface with other materials during the process, preserving in this way the original X-ray quality of the glass surface. The paper presents an alternative optical design for ATHENA based on the use of thin glass mirror segments obtained through slumping.

  19. Active optics and the axisymmetric case: MINITRUST wide-field three-reflection telescopes with mirrors aspherized from tulip and vase forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulie, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires larger size telescopes. Compared to the catadioptric Schmidt, the optical properties of a three mirror telescope provides significant advantages. (1) The flat field design is anastigmatic at any wavelength, (2) the system is extremely compact -- four times shorter than a Schmidt -- and, (3) compared to a Schmidt with refractive corrector -- requiring the polishing of three optical surfaces --, the presently proposed Modified-Rumsey design uses all of eight available free parameters of a flat fielded anastigmatic three mirror telescope for mirrors generated by active optics methods. Compared to a Rumsey design, these parameters include the additional slope continuity condition at the primary-tertiary link for in-situ stressing and aspherization from a common sphere. Then, active optics allows the polishing of only two spherical surfaces: the combined primary-tertiary mirror and the secondary mirror. All mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. This compact system is of interest for space and ground-based astronomy and allows to built larger wide-field telescopes such as demonstrated by the design and construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° FOV, consisting of an in-situ stressed double vase form primary-tertiary and of a stress polished tulip form secondary. Optical tests of these telescopes, showing diffraction limited images, are presented.

  20. Cherenkov Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Barbero, Marlon

    2012-04-19

    When a charged particle passes through an optically transparent medium with a velocity greater than the phase velocity of light in that medium, it emits prompt photons, called Cherenkov radiation, at a characteristic polar angle that depends on the particle velocity. Cherenkov counters are particle detectors that make use of this radiation. Uses include prompt particle counting, the detection of fast particles, the measurement of particle masses, and the tracking or localization of events in very large, natural radiators such as the atmosphere, or natural ice fields, like those at the South Pole in Antarctica. Cherenkov counters are used in a number of different fields, including high energy and nuclear physics detectors at particle accelerators, in nuclear reactors, cosmic ray detectors, particle astrophysics detectors and neutrino astronomy, and in biomedicine for labeling certain biological molecules.

  1. Optimization design for the supporting system of 2m telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fu; Wang, Ping; Gong, Yanjue; Zhang, Li; Lin, Jianlong

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes the optimization solution improving the total quality of the primary mirror supporting type. With the methods of Finite element analysis(FEA), Orthogonal experiment and BP Neural Network, the relationship between the structure parameters in primary mirror supporting type and the deformation of the primary mirror is built. With this relationship and Genetic Algorithm(GA) optimization design, a group of reasonable technology parameters is found that can improve the static stiffness of the primary mirror supporting type so as to reduce the gravity deformation of the primary mirror. The modal analysis and random vibration analysis are also discussed in detail, and the results indicate that the dynamic stiffness of the primary mirror supporting type is also improved.

  2. Design, fabrication and testing of active carbon shell mirrors for space telescope applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, John; Laslandes, Marie; Pellegrino, Sergio; Redding, David; Bradford, Samuel Case; Wallace, James Kent; Barbee, Troy

    2014-07-01

    A novel active mirror concept based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) materials is presented. A nanolaminate facesheet, active piezoelectric layer and printed electronics are implemented in order to provide the reflective surface, actuation capabilities and electrical wiring for the mirror. Mirrors of this design are extremely thin (500-850 µm), lightweight (~ 2 kg/m2) and have large actuation capabilities (~ 100 µm peak- to-valley deformation per channel). Replication techniques along with simple bonding/transferring processes are implemented eliminating the need for grinding and polishing steps. An outline of the overall design, component materials and fabrication processes is presented. A method to size the active layer for a given mirror design, along with simulation predictions on the correction capabilities of the mirror are also outlined. A custom metrology system used to capture the highly deformable nature of the mirrors is demonstrated along with preliminary prototype measurements.

  3. ZnO thin film transistors and electronic connections for adjustable x-ray mirrors: SMART-X telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Wilke, R. L.; Wilke, R. H. T.; Wallace, M.; Ramirez, J. I.; Prieskorn, Z.; Nikoleyczik, J.; Cotroneo, V.; Allured, R.; Schwartz, D. A.; McMuldroch, S.; Reid, P. B.; Burrows, D. N.; Jackson, T. N.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.

    2014-09-01

    The proposed SMART-X telescope consists of a pixelated array of a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film deposited on flexible glass substrates. These cells or pixels are used to actively control the overall shape of the mirror surface. It is anticipated that the telescope will consist of 8,000 mirror panels with 400-800 cells on each panel. This creates an enormous number (6.4 million) of traces and contacts needed to address the PZT. In order to simplify the design, a row/column addressing scheme using ZnO thin film transistors (TFTs) is proposed. In addition, connection of the gate and drain lines on the mirror segment to an external supply via a flexible cable was investigated through use of an anisotropic conductive film (ACF). This paper outlines the design of the ZnO TFTs, use of ACF for bonding, and describes a specially designed electronics box with associated software to address the desired cells.

  4. Fabrication of electroless nickel plated aluminum freeform mirror for an infrared off-axis telescope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Chang, Seunghyuk; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Kwang Jo; Jeong, Byeongjoon; Lee, Gil-jae; Kim, Geon Hee; Shin, Sang Kyo; Yoo, Song Min

    2015-12-01

    Freeform mirrors can be readily fabricated by a single point diamond turning (SPDT) machine. However, this machining process often leaves mid-frequency errors (MFEs) that generate undesirable diffraction effects and stray light. In this work, we propose a novel thin electroless nickel plating procedure to remove MFE on freeform surfaces. The proposed procedure has a distinct advantage over a typical thick plating method in that the machining process can be endlessly repeated until the designed mirror surface is obtained. This is of great importance because the sophisticated surface of a freeform mirror cannot be optimized by a typical SPDT machining process, which can be repeated only several times before the limited thickness of the nickel plating is consumed. We will also describe the baking process of a plated mirror to improve the hardness of the mirror surface, which is crucial for minimizing the degradation of that mirror surface that occurs during the polishing process. During the whole proposed process, the changes in surface figures and textures are monitored and cross checked by two different types of measurements, as well as by an interference pattern test. The experimental results indicate that the proposed thin electroless nickel plating procedure is very simple but powerful for removing MFEs on freeform mirror surfaces. PMID:26836671

  5. Fused silica mirror evaluation for the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, W. P., Jr.; Melugin, R. K.

    The SIRTF optics are intended for operation at 20 K (or less); it will be extremely inconvenient, expensive, and time consuming if it becomes necessary to accomplish all of the optical element testing, assembly, and alignment at comparable temperatures. The thermal strain behavior, including potential anisotropies and inhomogeneities, of a mirror substrate between room temperature and 20 K thus becomes a major factor in the selection of the substrate material, structural configuration, and joining methods for lightweight structures. With support from Space Projects, NASA Ames Research Center, an optical figure evaluation of a 0.65-meter, lightweight, fused silica mirror at a low-temperature goal of 20 K is being conducted. The design details of a thermal shroud, provisions for extracting heat from the low-conductivity mirror, and wavefront error sources other than the mirror surface are discussed and preliminary test results presented.

  6. An alignment and integration technique for mirror segment pairs on the Constellation-X telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo; Owens, Scott; Lehan, John; Olsen, Larry; Saha, Timo; Wallace, Tom; Zhang, Will

    2007-09-01

    We present the concepts behind the current alignment and integration technique for a Constellation-X primary-secondary mirror segment pair prior to an x-ray beam line test. We examine the effects of a passive mount on thin glass x-ray mirror segments, and the issues of mount shape and environment on alignment. We also investigate how bonding and transfer to a permanent housing affects the quality of the final image.

  7. A view in the mirror - Or through the looking glass. [history of development of optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The development of optical telescopes from the age of astrology to those of today and the future is discussed. The rationales for changes in the design of telescopes during this time are explored. The cost drivers, and how to reduce them, are also discussed.

  8. Liquid metal actuators: correctable mounting and assembly of thin-shell x-ray telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Klingensmith, Martin; Chalifoux, Brandon; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2015-09-01

    An ideal bonding agent for thin-shell x-ray mirrors could be quickly applied to joints and set with deterministic and stable properties. Unfortunately, mirror assembly methods have typically utilized various epoxy formulations which are messy, slow to apply and cure, and far from deterministic or stable. Problems include shrinkage, creep and high thermal and humidity sensitivity. Once the bond is set errors are frozen in and cannot be corrected. We are developing a new method for bonding thin-foil mirrors that has the potential to solve these problems. Our process to bond mirrors to housing reference points is achieved via small beads of a low-melting-point bonding agent (such as solder or thermoset). The mirror is bonded to small contact surface points under real-time metrology. If the position of the mirror needs to be adjusted after bonding, a small force is applied normal or parallel to the contact surface and a pulsed fiber laser is used to melt an ultrathin layer of the solder for a very short time. The joint is then compressed, stretched or sheared while molten before refreezing in a new position, enabling repeatable and stable mirror position adjustments along the direction of the force in nm-level steps with minimal heat input. We present results from our prototype apparatus demonstrating proof of principle. The initial experiment includes developing a technique to bond D263 glass to Kovar, designing and building a one-dimensional stage to precisely apply force, and using an infrared laser pulse to heat the joint while measuring position and force.

  9. Rapid Maturation of Edge Sensor Technology and Potential Application in Large Space Telescopes with Segmented Primary Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Smith, W. Scott (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the history and results of the last two year's efforts to transition inductive edge sensor technology from Technology Readiness Level 2 to Technology Readiness Level 6. Both technical and programmatic challenges were overcome in the design, fabrication, test, and installation of over a thousand sensors making up the Segment Alignment Maintenance System (SAMs) for the 91 segment, 9.2-meter. Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET). The integration of these sensors with the control system will be discussed along with serendipitous leverage they provided for both initialization alignment and operational maintenance. The experience gained important insights into the fundamental motion mechanics of large segmented mirrors, the relative importance of the variance sources of misalignment errors, the efficient conduct of a program to mature the technology to the higher levels. Unanticipated factors required the team to develop new implementation strategies for the edge sensor information which enabled major segmented mirror controller design simplifications. The resulting increase in the science efficiency of HET will be shown. Finally, the on-going effort to complete the maturation of inductive edge sensor by delivering space qualified versions for future IR (infrared radiation) space telescopes.

  10. Computation of astigmatic and trefoil figure errors and misalignments for two-mirror telescopes using nodal-aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Ju, Guohao; Yan, Changxiang; Gu, Zhiyuan; Ma, Hongcai

    2016-05-01

    In active optics systems, one concern is how to quantitatively separate the effects of astigmatic and trefoil figure errors and misalignments that couple together in determining the total aberration fields when wavefront measurements are available at only a few field points. In this paper, we first quantitatively describe the impact of mount-induced trefoil deformation on the net aberration fields by proposing a modified theoretical formulation for the field-dependent aberration behavior of freeform surfaces based on the framework of nodal aberration theory. This formulation explicitly expresses the quantitative relationships between the magnitude of freeform surfaces and the induced aberration components where the freeform surfaces can be located away from the aperture stop and decentered from the optical axis. On this basis, and in combination with the mathematical presentation of nodal aberration theory for the effects of misalignments, we present the analytic expressions for the aberration fields of two-mirror telescopes in the presence of astigmatic primary mirror figure errors, mount-induced trefoil deformations on both mirrors, and misalignments. We quantitatively separate these effects using the analytical expressions with wavefront measurements at a few field points and pointing errors. Valuable insights are provided on how to separate these coupled effects in the computation process. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to demonstrate the correctness and accuracy of the analytic method presented in this paper. PMID:27140345

  11. Computation of astigmatic and trefoil figure errors and misalignments for two-mirror telescopes using nodal-aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Ju, Guohao; Yan, Changxiang; Gu, Zhiyuan; Ma, Hongcai

    2016-05-01

    In active optics systems, one concern is how to quantitatively separate the effects of astigmatic and trefoil figure errors and misalignments that couple together in determining the total aberration fields when wavefront measurements are available at only a few field points. In this paper, we first quantitatively describe the impact of mount-induced trefoil deformation on the net aberration fields by proposing a modified theoretical formulation for the field-dependent aberration behavior of freeform surfaces based on the framework of nodal aberration theory. This formulation explicitly expresses the quantitative relationships between the magnitude of freeform surfaces and the induced aberration components where the freeform surfaces can be located away from the aperture stop and decentered from the optical axis. On this basis, and in combination with the mathematical presentation of nodal aberration theory for the effects of misalignments, we present the analytic expressions for the aberration fields of two-mirror telescopes in the presence of astigmatic primary mirror figure errors, mount-induced trefoil deformations on both mirrors, and misalignments. We quantitatively separate these effects using the analytical expressions with wavefront measurements at a few field points and pointing errors. Valuable insights are provided on how to separate these coupled effects in the computation process. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to demonstrate the correctness and accuracy of the analytic method presented in this paper.

  12. Structural analysis of the mirror of the University of Texas 7.6 M Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, F. B.; Perroni, A.

    1982-10-01

    A finite element model using an assemblage of plate elements with membrane stress for a 7.6 meter diameter meniscus mirror is examined for aspect ratios in the range of 50 to 75 and for various materials. Analyses of the support forces necessary for the meniscus shape and a possible design of the mirror cell make clear the necessity of laterally suspending the mirror from a set of points in its midsurface. A map is presented of the heat distribution through the thickness of the meniscus for a typical ambient temperature change and an assumed air conditioning capacity. The map derives from the solution of a one-dimensional thermal analysis. An equivalent thermal gradient is then derived. A thermal edge effect is found, due mostly to the extreme aspect ratios involved, both for fused silica and for Pyrex. The analysis shows the extent to which edge control becomes necessary with a higher expansion coefficient.

  13. Performance of the primary mirror center-of-curvature optical metrology system during cryogenic testing of the JWST Pathfinder telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse and fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment and phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development and spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software and procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate and efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  14. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-curvature Optical Metrology System During Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) primary mirror (PM) is 6.6 m in diameter and consists of 18 hexagonal segments, each 1.5 m point-to-point. Each segment has a six degree-of-freedom hexapod actuation system and a radius-of-curvature (RoC) actuation system. The full telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. This testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The COCOA includes an interferometer, a reflective null, an interferometer-null calibration system, coarse & fine alignment systems, and two displacement measuring interferometer systems. A multiple-wavelength interferometer (MWIF) is used for alignment & phasing of the PM segments. The ADMA is used to measure, and set, the spacing between the PM and the focus of the COCOA null (i.e. the PM center-of-curvature) for determination of the ROC. The performance of these metrology systems was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC. This testing was performed using the JWST Pathfinder telescope, consisting mostly of engineering development & spare hardware. The Pathfinder PM consists of two spare segments. These tests provided the opportunity to assess how well the center-of-curvature optical metrology hardware, along with the software & procedures, performed using real JWST telescope hardware. This paper will describe the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance. The knowledge gained and the lessons learned during this testing will be of great benefit to the accurate & efficient cryogenic testing of the JWST flight telescope.

  15. ÔA large chunk of glassÕ: The 98-inch mirror of the Isaac Newton Telescope, 1945-1959

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, L. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) was completed in 1967 at Herstmonceux in southern England, headquarters of the Royal Greenwich Observatory, and was used there by professional astronomers for twelve years before being dismantled and moved to La Palma in the Canary Islands, where it remains a working telescope to this day. When it was moved to La Palma, the telescope was fitted with a new primary mirror. The original mirror, which was used throughout the Herstmonceux years, was obtained as a gift in the late 1940s from the University of Michigan in the United States. This paper records the troubled early history of this mirror and how it was nearly abandoned more than once, and tries to set its history in the political and economic context of mid-twentieth-century Britain as well as the history of astronomy.

  16. Aplanatic two-mirror telescopes; a systematic study. 3: the schwarzschild-couder configuration.

    PubMed

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1975-04-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Schwarzschild-Couder type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. The classic Schwarzschild and Couder designs were studied in detail. It was found that those types of telescopes, in contrast to the Gregorian [Appl. Opt. 13, 2402 (1974)] and the Cassegrainian [Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] configuration, suffered severely from higher order aberration. PMID:20135010

  17. Aplanatic two-mirror telescopes; a systematic study. 3: the schwarzschild-couder configuration.

    PubMed

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1975-04-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Schwarzschild-Couder type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. The classic Schwarzschild and Couder designs were studied in detail. It was found that those types of telescopes, in contrast to the Gregorian [Appl. Opt. 13, 2402 (1974)] and the Cassegrainian [Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] configuration, suffered severely from higher order aberration.

  18. Alignment and Integration Techniques for Mirror Segment Pairs on the Constellation X Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjimichael, Theo; Lehan, John; Olsen, Larry; Owens, Scott; Saha, Timo; Wallace, Tom; Zhang, Will

    2007-01-01

    We present the concepts behind current alignment and integration techniques for testing a Constellation-X primary-secondary mirror segment pair in an x-ray beam line test. We examine the effects of a passive mount on thin glass x-ray mirror segments, and the issues of mount shape and environment on alignment. We also investigate how bonding and transfer to a permanent housing affects the quality of the final image, comparing predicted results to a full x-ray test on a primary secondary pair.

  19. Optical figuring specifications for thin shells to be used in adaptive telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.

    2006-06-01

    The present work describes the guidelines to define the optical figuring specifications for optical manufacturing of thin shells in terms of figuring error power spectrum (and related rms vs scale distributon) to be used in adaptive optics correctors with force actuators like Deformable Secondary Mirrors (DSM). In particular the numerical example for a thin shell for a VLT DSM is considered.

  20. Active control of primary mirror of an orbiting telescope with thermal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. L.; Youngblood, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a study of the feasibility of an active method of surface error control using thermal elements are presented. It is shown that the control effort of the thermal elements is sufficient for the purpose, and that such benefits as low cost, low weight, and high reliability may be achieved in conjunction with a significant reduction in the mirror surface error figure.

  1. Active control of primary mirror of an orbiting telescope with thermal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. L.; Youngblood, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    The generalization is presented that was made to model a layered structure of a kind that represents a light-weighted mirror. This theory is presented along with the strategy for error suppression. The results of a variety of error-suppression studies are also presented. The computer programs for all parts of this study are included.

  2. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Lightweighted Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Correlating Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Marcus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  3. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Light-weight Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Carpenter, James R.; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Hogue, William D.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl. H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.; Kirk, Charles S.; Hanson, Craig; Burdick, Gregory; Maffett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A 40 cm diameter mirror assembly was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5 m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  4. Worthwhile optical method for free-form mirrors qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, G.; Canestrari, R.; Toso, G.; Pareschi, G.

    2013-09-01

    We present an optical method for free-form mirrors qualification developed by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF) in the context of the ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) Project which includes, among its items, the design, development and installation of a dual-mirror telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory. The primary mirror panels of the telescope prototype are free-form concave mirrors with few microns accuracy required on the shape error. The developed technique is based on the synergy between a Ronchi-like optical test performed on the reflecting surface and the image, obtained by means of the TraceIT ray-tracing proprietary code, a perfect optics should generate in the same configuration. This deflectometry test allows the reconstruction of the slope error map that the TraceIT code can process to evaluate the measured mirror optical performance at the telescope focus. The advantages of the proposed method is that it substitutes the use of 3D coordinates measuring machine reducing production time and costs and offering the possibility to evaluate on-site the mirror image quality at the focus. In this paper we report the measuring concept and compare the obtained results to the similar ones obtained processing the shape error acquired by means of a 3D coordinates measuring machine.

  5. Fabrication of Metallic Freefrom Mirrors for Wide-Field Space Infrared Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Byeongjoon; Pak, Soojong; kim, Sanghyuk; Lee, Kwangjo; Chang, Seunghyuk; KIM, GUN HEE; Hyun, Sangwon; Jeon, Min Woo

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an error compensation method for high form accuracy of metallic freeform mirrors. The technique is based on single point diamond turning on the rotational asymmetric surfaces. We compensate tool path by subtracting form error patterns which are converted into the polynomial expression. The experimental results illustrate that RMS form error value is reduced from 1.168um to 0.211um which is applicable in Near Infrared regions. We analyze that error compensation is also applicable to the rotational asymmetric tool path. We highlight that our approach is applied only diamond turning technique without additional manufacturing process like polishing and figuring. The proposed scheme is useful to enhance productivity of freeform mirrors.

  6. Coherent Detector for Near-Angle Scattering and Polarization Characterization of Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macenka, Steven A.; Chipman, Russell A.; Daugherty, Brian J.; McClain, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    A report discusses the difficulty of measuring scattering properties of coated mirrors extremely close to the specular reflection peak. A prototype Optical Hetero dyne Near-angle Scatterometer (OHNS) was developed. Light from a long-coherence-length (>150 m) 532-nm laser is split into two arms. Acousto-optic modulators frequency shift the sample and reference beams, establishing a fixed beat frequency between the beams. The sample beam is directed at very high f/# onto a mirror sample, and the point spread function (PSF) formed after the mirror sample is scanned with a pinhole. This light is recombined by a non-polarizing beam splitter and measured through heterodyne detection with a spectrum analyzer. Polarizers control the illuminated and analyzed polarization states, allowing the polarization dependent scatter to be measured. The bidirectional reflective or scattering distribution function is normally measured through use of a scattering goniometer instrument. The instrumental beam width (collection angle span) over which the scatterometer responds is typically many degrees. The OHNS enables measurement at angles as small as the first Airy disk diameter.

  7. Laser Metrology Sensing and Control for Large Segmented-Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng; Rao, Shanti; Ksendzov, Alex; Kadogawa, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Described an optical hexapod metrology concept: a) Can work together with edge sensors; b) Can measure M1 - M2 distance and M1 global curvature. Swept-frequency laser metrology system: a) Absolute optical path length measurement (approx.1 micron); b) Relative optical path length measurement (approx.nm) Air turbulence is a concern for ground-based telescopes and needs further study.

  8. Three-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography using a facet prism telescope and MEMS mirror for improved transversal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haindl, R.; Trasischker, W.; Baumann, B.; Pircher, M.; Hitzenberger, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    An improved three-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography system was developed. It utilizes a custom-made three-facet prism telescope to improve the transversal resolution at the sample. Furthermore, a two-axis gimbal-less MEMS mirror is used to minimize off-pivot beam movement at the pupil of the eye, enabling circular scanning for in vivo retinal measurements. We demonstrate the system's abilities for in vitro circular scanning to measure absolute flow and to reconstruct the full velocity vector on a bifurcation flow phantom. Moreover, in vivo retinal measurements using circular scanning around vessel bifurcations of healthy human volunteers were performed. Measurements of the absolute mean flow and its orientation are in good agreement with the expected values for in vitro measurements. For in vivo measurements, the in- and outflow of blood for retinal vessel bifurcations show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the reliability of the technique.

  9. Three-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography using a facet prism telescope and MEMS mirror for improved transversal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Haindl, R.; Trasischker, W.; Baumann, B.; Pircher, M.; Hitzenberger, C.K.

    2015-01-01

    An improved three-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography system was developed. It utilizes a custom-made three-facet prism telescope to improve the transversal resolution at the sample. Furthermore, a two-axis gimbal-less MEMS mirror is used to minimize off-pivot beam movement at the pupil of the eye, enabling circular scanning for in vivo retinal measurements. We demonstrate the system’s abilities for in vitro circular scanning to measure absolute flow and to reconstruct the full velocity vector on a bifurcation flow phantom. Moreover, in vivo retinal measurements using circular scanning around vessel bifurcations of healthy human volunteers were performed. Measurements of the absolute mean flow and its orientation are in good agreement with the expected values for in vitro measurements. For in vivo measurements, the in- and outflow of blood for retinal vessel bifurcations show an excellent agreement, demonstrating the reliability of the technique. PMID:26689672

  10. Method of and means for testing a glancing-incidence mirror system of an X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus was designed for measuring the resolution and efficiency of a glancing-incidence mirror system having an even number of coaxial and confocal reflecting surfaces for use in an X-ray telescope. A collimated beam of X-rays is generated by an X-ray laser and directed along the axis of the system so that the beam is incident on the reflecting surfaces and illuminates a predetermined area. An X-ray detector, such as a photographic film, is located at the common focus of the surfaces so that the image produced by the X-rays may be compared with a test pattern interposed between the laser and the system.

  11. Cyclotron-Cherenkov and Cherenkov instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kho, T.H.; Lin, A.T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-06-01

    The effect of the conventional Cherenkov instability on the cyclotron-Cherenkov maser is investigated for the case of a relativistic electron beam propagating along a background magnetic field in a dielectric using particle simulations. Both Cherenkov and cyclotron-Cherenkov instabilities are excited when the phase velocity of light in the dielectric is less than the beam velocity. It is demonstrated in the high-power regime, where the cyclotron-Cherenkov mode has the higher growth rate, that the Cherenkov mode has little effect on the nonlinear efficiency of the cyclotron-Cherenkov mode. High efficiency is possible, affirming previous predictions based on single mode calculations. The effect of beam momentum spread is studied.

  12. Illustration of the use of multimode deformable plane mirrors to record high-resolution concave gratings: results for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph gratings of the Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Duban, M; Dohlen, K; Lemaitre, G R

    1998-11-01

    To illustrate the efficiency of using a deformable plane mirror to record holographic gratings, we have computed the three gratings for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Their working conditions are severe, since they have to correct the residual spherical aberration of the Hubble Space Telescope. Nevertheless, all images obtained are largely diffraction limited with regard to the resolution.

  13. Illustration of the use of multimode deformable plane mirrors to record high-resolution concave gratings: results for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph gratings of the Hubble Space Telescope.

    PubMed

    Duban, M; Dohlen, K; Lemaitre, G R

    1998-11-01

    To illustrate the efficiency of using a deformable plane mirror to record holographic gratings, we have computed the three gratings for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. Their working conditions are severe, since they have to correct the residual spherical aberration of the Hubble Space Telescope. Nevertheless, all images obtained are largely diffraction limited with regard to the resolution. PMID:18301548

  14. Chopping secondary mirror control systems for the W. M. Keck Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, William

    1997-09-01

    The Keck 1 chopping secondary was built by the Palo Alto Research Laboratories of the Lockheed (now Lockheed Martin) Missiles and Space Company. The only software component of the delivered system is a proprietary error correction algorithm; Keck wrote software to generate acceleration-limited azimuth and elevation demands, to rotate these demands as a function of telescope position, to interact with the error correction system, and to mange hardware start-up and shutdown. The Keck 2 chopping secondary, also built by Lockheed, was originally conceived as an infrared fast steering mechanism (IFSM) and is simpler than the Keck 1 system, with lower power and acceleration limits and, therefore, lower chop amplitude and frequency specifications. As far as possible, it provides the same external interfaces as the Keck 1 system. A new EPICS- based telescope control system has been written for Keck 2 and was retrofitted on Keck 1 in March 1997. The Keck 1 chopper control software has been converted to the EPICS environment and, at the same time, altered so that the same software supports both choppers. This conversion has retained as much as possible of the complex real-time code of the old system while at the same time fully utilizing EPICS facilities. The paper presents more details of both the old and the new systems and illustrates how the new system is simpler than the old as well as being much better integrated into the overall telescope control system. Operational experience is presented.

  15. Terahertz calorimetry: an absolute power meter for terahertz radiation and the absorptivity of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, Tjeerd O.; Hovenier, J. Niels; Fischer, Jacqueline; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-04-01

    A new calorimetric absolute power meter has been developed for THz radiation. This broad band THz power meter measures average power at ambient temperature and pressure, does not use a window, and is insensitive to polarization and time structure of THz radiation. The operation of the power meter is based on the calorimetric method: in order to determine the power of a beam of THz radiation, the beam is used to illuminate a highly absorbing surface with known BRDF characteristics until a stable temperature is reached. The power in the incident beam can then be determined by measuring the electric power needed to cause the sample temperature rise. The new power meter was used with laser calorimetry to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 Kelvin to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit around the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. The absorptivity of both clean and dust-contaminated samples was measured at 70, 118, 184 and 496 mm and found to be in the range 0.2 - 0.8%.

  16. Readout of the UFFO Slewing Mirror Telescope to detect UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. E.; Lim, H.; Nam, J. W.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, H. S.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M. A.; Jeong, S.; Jung, A.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Lee, J.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Na, G. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Park, I. H.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Smoot, G. F.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Yashin, I.

    2013-07-01

    The Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) was proposed for rapid response to prompt UV/optical photons from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The SMT is a key component of the Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO)-pathfinder, which will be launched aboard the Lomonosov spacecraft at the end of 2013. The SMT utilizes a motorized mirror that slews rapidly forward to its target within a second after triggering by an X-ray coded mask camera, which makes unnecessary a reorientation of the entire spacecraft. Subsequent measurement of the UV/optical is accomplished by a 10 cm aperture Ritchey-Chrètien telescope and the focal plane detector of Intensified Charge-Coupled Device (ICCD). The ICCD is sensitive to UV/optical photons of 200-650 nm in wavelength by using a UV-enhanced S20 photocathode and amplifies photoelectrons at a gain of 104-106 in double Micro-Channel Plates. These photons are read out by a Kodak KAI-0340 interline CCD sensor and a CCD Signal Processor with 10-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter. Various control clocks for CCD readout are implemented using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The SMT readout is in charge of not only data acquisition, storage and transfer, but also control of the slewing mirror, the ICCD high voltage adjustments, power distribution, and system monitoring by interfacing to the UFFO-pathfinder. These functions are realized in the FPGA to minimize power consumption and to enhance processing time. The SMT readout electronics are designed and built to meet the spacecraft's constraints of power consumption, mass, and volume. The entire system is integrated with the SMT optics, as is the UFFO-pathfinder. The system has been tested and satisfies the conditions of launch and those of operation in space: those associated with shock and vibration and those associated with thermal and vacuum, respectively. In this paper, we present the SMT readout electronics: the design, construction, and performance, as well as the results of space environment test.

  17. Stress manipulated coating for fabricating lightweight X-ray telescope mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Ulmer, Melville

    2015-11-01

    In this paper wepresent a method to correct the surface profile of an X-ray mirror by using a stress manipulated coating on the back side of mirror shells. The ability to fabricate a thin walled mirror by some replication process is required if future affordable X-ray space missions are to have ~30 times the effective area of the current best X-ray observatory, i.e., the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). Thus, some process is necessary for using replicated X-ray optics to make the next generation X-ray observatory. However, although the surface roughness of sub-100 μm length scales can be replicated, no known replication technique can make 1 arc-second or better CXO-like optics. Yet, because the images produced by the CXO are so exquisite, many X-ray astronomers are not willing to settle for less in the future. Therefore, a post replication technique must be developed to make future major X-ray astronomy missions possible. In this paper, we describe a technique based on DC magnetron sputtering. For figure correction, we apply a controlled bias voltage on the surface during the sputtering. We show that we can produce, in 1-D, shape changes large enough (1 μm over 10 mm) to correct the typical figure errors in replicated optics. We demonstrate reproducibility on an order of 0.6%, and stability over weeks on a scale of less than 1 μm over 10 mm. For these tests, we used 200 μm thick pieces of D263 Schott glass, about 5 mm x 20 mm. In addition to the basic concept of controlling the stress with the coating, we describe a new optimization software design to calculate the stress distribution for a desired surface profile. We show that the combination of the stress optimization software coupled with the coating process, can reduce the slope error of a 5 mm x 20 mm glass sample by a factor of ten.

  18. Stress manipulated coating for fabricating lightweight X-ray telescope mirrors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Ulmer, Melville

    2015-11-01

    In this paper wepresent a method to correct the surface profile of an X-ray mirror by using a stress manipulated coating on the back side of mirror shells. The ability to fabricate a thin walled mirror by some replication process is required if future affordable X-ray space missions are to have ~30 times the effective area of the current best X-ray observatory, i.e., the Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO). Thus, some process is necessary for using replicated X-ray optics to make the next generation X-ray observatory. However, although the surface roughness of sub-100 μm length scales can be replicated, no known replication technique can make 1 arc-second or better CXO-like optics. Yet, because the images produced by the CXO are so exquisite, many X-ray astronomers are not willing to settle for less in the future. Therefore, a post replication technique must be developed to make future major X-ray astronomy missions possible. In this paper, we describe a technique based on DC magnetron sputtering. For figure correction, we apply a controlled bias voltage on the surface during the sputtering. We show that we can produce, in 1-D, shape changes large enough (1 μm over 10 mm) to correct the typical figure errors in replicated optics. We demonstrate reproducibility on an order of 0.6%, and stability over weeks on a scale of less than 1 μm over 10 mm. For these tests, we used 200 μm thick pieces of D263 Schott glass, about 5 mm x 20 mm. In addition to the basic concept of controlling the stress with the coating, we describe a new optimization software design to calculate the stress distribution for a desired surface profile. We show that the combination of the stress optimization software coupled with the coating process, can reduce the slope error of a 5 mm x 20 mm glass sample by a factor of ten. PMID:26561130

  19. Systematic study of aplanatic two-mirror telescopes. 2: the gregorian configuration.

    PubMed

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1974-10-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Gregorian type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. A comparison of the results with those of the first part of this article [C. L. Wyman and D. Korsch, Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] for aplanatic Cassegrains shows that the dependence of the performance on the system parameters is more complex for the Gregorian. Plots of the image curvatures as a function of the ray height ratio are shown for several secondary magnifications and a system focal length of 1000 cm. PMID:20134696

  20. Systematic study of aplanatic two-mirror telescopes. 2: the gregorian configuration.

    PubMed

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1974-10-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Gregorian type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. A comparison of the results with those of the first part of this article [C. L. Wyman and D. Korsch, Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] for aplanatic Cassegrains shows that the dependence of the performance on the system parameters is more complex for the Gregorian. Plots of the image curvatures as a function of the ray height ratio are shown for several secondary magnifications and a system focal length of 1000 cm.

  1. Battery-powered thin film deposition process for coating telescope mirrors in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum films manufactured in the vacuum of space may increase the broadband reflectance response of a space telescope operating in the EUV (50-nm to 115-nm) by eliminating absorbing metal-fluorides and metal-oxides, which significantly reduce aluminum's reflectance below 115-nm. Recent developments in battery technology allow small lithium batteries to rapidly discharge large amounts of energy. It is therefore conceivable to power an array of resistive evaporation filaments in a space environment, using a reasonable mass of batteries and other hardware. This paper presents modeling results for coating thickness as a function of position, for aluminum films made with a hexagonal array of battery powered evaporation sources. The model is based on measured data from a single battery-powered evaporation source.

  2. Influence of irregular gaps between primary mirror segments on telescope image quality.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia

    2007-09-01

    We study the effect of gaps between the segments on image quality of the extremely large ground-based telescope. We show that if the width of the gap changes arbitrarily from one intersegment boundary to another, the regular diffraction pattern is distorted and speckles appear. Two mechanisms producing irregularity in the gaps' distribution are considered: a random shift of the segment's center and an error in the segment's shape. The analytical approach allows an estimation of ensemble averaged characteristics of the point-spread function, such as a halo and high-order diffraction peaks. We deliver simple formulas for the quantitative estimation of the position and the intensity of the halo as well as the intensity of the diffraction peaks. PMID:17767227

  3. Preliminary design analysis for the solar optical telescope main mirror actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The resolution of the SOT Gregorian telescope was maintained if the conic foci of the elliptical secondary and parabolic primary were made to coincide within plus or minus 38 microns across the prime focus plane and to within 5 microns in focus. An error in coincidence across the focal plane caused all point images to show additional coma with all the comatic tails pointing in the same direction. An error in focus became magnified by the square of the magnification of the secondary and simply increased the diameter of the point source. Offsetting or rastering the sun may be accomplished by swinging the primary in an arc about the point of coincidence of the conic foci so long as the coincidence is kept to within the tolerance stated.

  4. Influence of irregular gaps between primary mirror segments on telescope image quality.

    PubMed

    Yaitskova, Natalia

    2007-09-01

    We study the effect of gaps between the segments on image quality of the extremely large ground-based telescope. We show that if the width of the gap changes arbitrarily from one intersegment boundary to another, the regular diffraction pattern is distorted and speckles appear. Two mechanisms producing irregularity in the gaps' distribution are considered: a random shift of the segment's center and an error in the segment's shape. The analytical approach allows an estimation of ensemble averaged characteristics of the point-spread function, such as a halo and high-order diffraction peaks. We deliver simple formulas for the quantitative estimation of the position and the intensity of the halo as well as the intensity of the diffraction peaks.

  5. Advancement of the segment support system for the Thirty Meter Telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Eric C.; Baffes, Curtis; Mast, Terry; Nelson, Jerry; Platt, Benjamin; Ponchione, R. J.; Ponslet, Eric; Setoodeh, Shahriar; Sirota, Mark; Stephens, Vince; Stepp, Larry; Tubb, Alan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents refinements to the design of the TMT primary mirror segment passive-support system that are effective in reducing gravity print-through and thermal distortion effects. First, a novel analytical method is presented for tuning the axial and lateral support systems in a manner that results in improved optical performance when subject to varying gravity fields. The method utilizes counterweights attached to the whiffletrees to cancel astigmatic and comatic errors normally resulting when the lateral support system resists transverse loads induced by gravity. Secondly, several central diaphragm designs are presented and analyzed to assess lateral-gravity and thermal distortion performance: 1) a simple flat diaphragm, 2) a stress-relieving diaphragm having a slotted outer rim and a circumferential convolution near the outside diameter, and 3) a flat diaphragm having a slotted outer rim. The latter design is chosen based on results from analytical studies which show it to have better overall optical performance in the presence of gravity and thermal environments.

  6. Evaluation of the optical cross talk level in the SiPMs adopted in ASTRI SST-2M Cherenkov Camera using EASIROC front-end electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impiombato, D.; Giarrusso, S.; Mineo, T.; Agnetta, G.; Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Gargano, C.; La Rosa, G.; Russo, F.; Sottile, G.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Bonanno, G.; Garozzo, S.; Marano, D.; Romeo, G.

    2014-02-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana), is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research whose main goal is the design and construction of an end-to-end prototype of the Small Size of Telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, will adopt a wide field dual mirror optical system in a Schwarzschild-Couder configuration to explore the VHE range of the electromagnetic spectrum. The camera at the focal plane is based on Silicon Photo-Multipliers detectors which is an innovative solution for the detection astronomical Cherenkov light. This contribution reports some preliminary results on the evaluation of the optical cross talk level among the SiPM pixels foreseen for the ASTRI SST-2M camera.

  7. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, David S.; Buckley, J. H.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Kaaret, P.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Konopelko, A.; Romani, R.; Vassilliev, V.; Optical System Working Group; AGIS Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV-200 TeV is based on an array of 50-200 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission we will focus on the optical system (OS) of AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime-focus telescope designs, as well as the novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. The emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We initially evaluate capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  8. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Vladimir; Buckley, Jim; Falcone, Abe; Fegan, Steven; Finley, John; Gaurino, Victor; Hanna, David; Kaaret, Philip; Konopelko, Alex; Krawczynski, Henric; Romani, Roger; Weekes, Trevor

    2008-04-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory based on an array of ˜100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) with a sensitivity to gamma-rays in the energy range 40 GeV-100 TeV. The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. In this submission we focus on the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes and consider options which include traditional Davies-Cotton and the other prime- focus telescope designs, as well as a novel two-mirror aplanatic OS originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the OS. We evaluate the capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project.

  9. Production of thin glass mirrors by hot slumping for x-ray telescopes: present process and ongoing development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmaso, B.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Civitani, M.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Spiga, D.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vecchi, G.

    2014-07-01

    Thin glass foils are considered good candidates to build a segmented X-ray telescope with effective area as large as 2 m2 and angular resolution better than 5 arcsec. In order to produce thin glass mirror segments, we developed a direct hot slumping technique assisted by pressure, in which the shape of a mould is replicated onto the optical surface of the glass. In this paper we present the result obtained with AF32 (by Schott) and EAGLE XG (by Corning) glass types. The selected mould material is Zerodur K20, as it does not require any anti-sticking layer and has a good matching, in terms of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion, with both glass types. Our group already produced a few prototypes, reaching angular resolution near 20 arcsec. In this work, relevant steps forward aimed at attaining a 5 arcsec angular resolution are described, along with the tuning of few key parameters in the slumping process. The results obtained on a newly procured cylindrical Zerodur K20 mould are presented.

  10. O-6 Optical Property Degradation of the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera-2 Pick Off Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen M.; Hughes, D. W.; Lauer, H. V.; Burkett, P. J.; Reed, B. B.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation in the performance of optical components can be greatly affected by exposure to the space environment. Many factors can contribute to such degradation including surface contaminants; outgassing; vacuum, UV, and atomic oxygen exposure; temperature cycling; or combinations of parameters. In-situ observations give important clues to degradation processes, but there are relatively few opportunities to correlate those observations with post-flight ground analyses. The return of instruments from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after its final servicing mission in May 2009 provided such an opportunity. Among the instruments returned from HST was the Wide-Field Planetary Camera-2 (WFPC-2), which had been exposed to the space environment for 16 years. This work focuses on the identifying the sources of degradation in the performance of the Pick-off mirror (POM) from WFPC-2. Techniques including surface reflectivity measurements, spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR (and ATR-FTIR) analyses, SEM/EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with and without ion milling, and wet and dry physical surface sampling were performed. Destructive and contact analyses took place only after completion of the non-destructive measurements. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was then repeated to determine the extent of contaminant removal by the destructive techniques, providing insight into the nature and extent of polymerization of the contaminant layer.

  11. Achromatic shearing phase sensor for generating images indicative of measure(s) of alignment between segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip (Inventor); Walker, Chanda Bartlett (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An achromatic shearing phase sensor generates an image indicative of at least one measure of alignment between two segments of a segmented telescope's mirrors. An optical grating receives at least a portion of irradiance originating at the segmented telescope in the form of a collimated beam and the collimated beam into a plurality of diffraction orders. Focusing optics separate and focus the diffraction orders. Filtering optics then filter the diffraction orders to generate a resultant set of diffraction orders that are modified. Imaging optics combine portions of the resultant set of diffraction orders to generate an interference pattern that is ultimately imaged by an imager.

  12. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  13. The BRAHMS ring imaging Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debbe, R.; Jørgensen, C. E.; Olness, J.; Yin, Z.

    2007-01-01

    A Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector built for the BRAHMS experiment at the Brookhaven RHIC is described. This detector has a high index of refraction gas radiator. Cherenkov light is focused on a photo-multiplier based photon detector with a large spherical mirror. The combination of momentum and ring radius measurement provides particle identification from 2.5 to 35 GeV/ c for pions and kaons and well above 40 GeV/ c for protons during runs that had the radiator index of refraction set at n-1=1700×10-6.

  14. Future water Cherenkov detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bergevin, Marc

    2015-05-15

    In these proceedings a review of the current proposed large-scale Warer Cherenkov experiments is given. An argument is made that future water Cherenkov detectors would benefit in the investment in neutron detection technology. A brief overview will be given of proposed water Cherenkov experiments such as HYPER-K and MEMPHYS and other R and D experiments to demonstrate neutron capture in water Cherenkov detectors. Finally, innovation developed in the context of the now defunct LBNE Water R and D option to improve Water Cherenkov technology will be described.

  15. PSD Determination using a Simultaneous-Phase Acquisition Interferometer for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope (SXT) Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehan, J. P.; Saha, T.; Zhang, W. W.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the use of a simultaneous-phase acquisition interferometer (a 4D FizCamTM 1500) for determining the PSD of the extremely-high aspect ratio (500: 1) glass mirrors for the Constellation-X SXT telescope. We found that the results obtained are strongly influenced by the methodology employed while collecting the data and outline a best method for this type of measurement.

  16. Discrete control of linear distributed systems with application to the deformable primary mirror of a large orbiting telescope. Ph.D. Thesis - Rhode Island Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creedon, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    The results are presented of a detailed study of the discrete control of linear distributed systems with specific application to the design of a practical controller for a plant representative of a telescope primary mirror for an orbiting astronomical observatory. The problem of controlling the distributed plant is treated by employing modal techniques to represent variations in the optical figure. Distortion of the mirror surface, which arises primarily from thermal gradients, is countered by actuators working against a backing structure to apply a corrective force distribution to the controlled surface. Each displacement actuator is in series with a spring attached to the mirror by means of a pad intentionally introduced to restrict the excitation of high-order modes. Control is exerted over a finite number of the most significant modes.

  17. Testing of the Mirrors for the Constellation-X Spectroscopy X-ray Telescope with a Refractive Null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehan, John; Hadimichael, T.; Skocik, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present an introduction to the use of a refractive null lens for testing grazing incidence x-ray mirrors for the Constellation-X mission. The singular role of mirror mounting in glass shell mirror metrology is also touched upon. We compare results achieved to date with mission requirements along with some of the unique properties of the null lens. Additionally, uses beyond mirror metrology are briefly discussed.

  18. Mirror-concentrator for space telescope with wide field of view and "high" angular resolution for observation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and other atmospheric flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharakin, Sergey A.; Khrenov, Boris A.; Klimov, Pavel A.; Panasyuk, Mikhail I.; Potanin, Sergey A.; Yashin, Ivan V.

    2012-09-01

    Idea of ultrahigh cosmic rays (UHECR) measurement from satellites was suggested by Linsley in 1981 and since has being developed into projects of cosmic rays telescopes for International Space Station (ISS): JEM-EUSO - to be installed on the Japanese experimental module and KLYPVE - on the Russian ISS segment. A series of space-based detectors for measurements of background phenomena in those telescopes were developed in Russia (Universitetsky-Tatiana, Universitetsky-Tatiana-2 , Chibis satellites). The satellite Lomonosov with UHECR detector TUS on its board will be launched in 2013. TUS contains multi-channel photo receiver and Fresnel-type mirror manufactured with use of special multi-layer carbon plastic technology in RSC “Energia". In this paper one and two component optical systems with 360 cm entrance diameter and 400 cm focal distance for wide angle detector KLYPVE are studied. In one component case using generalized Davies-Cotton systems (Fresnel-type mirror with ellipsoidal gross surface) it is possible to obtain 8-10° field of view (FoV) with focal spot size less than pixel size equal to 15 x 15 mm. In two component system (parabolic mirror and a Fresnel lens, mounted close to photo receiver) it is possible to increase FoV up to 10-12° and significantly simplify the primary mirror construction.

  19. On the construction of a 2-metre mirror blank for the universal reflecting telescope in Tautenburg (German Title: Über die Fertigung eines 2-Meter-Spiegelträgers für das Universal-Spiegelteleskop in Tautenburg )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lödel, Wolfgang

    The astronomers' desire to penetrate deeper into space transforms into a demand for larger telescopes. The primary mirror constitutes the main part of a reflecting telescope, and it determines all subsequent activities. Already in the 1930s activities existed in the Schott company to manufacture mirror blanks up to diameters of 2 metres, which could not be pursued because of political constraints. This ambitious goal was again picked up a few years after the war. At a time when the procurement of raw materials was extremely difficult, the glass workers of Schott in Jena attacked this large project. After some failures, a good mirror blank could be delivered to the Carl Zeiss Company in 1951 for further processing and for the construction of the first 2-metre reflecting telescope. From 1960 to 1986, this mirror made from optical glass ZK7 served its purpose at the Karl Schwarzschild Observatory in Tautenburg. lt was then replaced by a zero expansion glass ceramics mirror.

  20. Chiral mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2015-06-01

    Mirrors are used in telescopes, microscopes, photo cameras, lasers, satellite dishes, and everywhere else, where redirection of electromagnetic radiation is required making them arguably the most important optical component. While conventional isotropic mirrors will reflect linear polarizations without change, the handedness of circularly polarized waves is reversed upon reflection. Here, we demonstrate a type of mirror reflecting one circular polarization without changing its handedness, while absorbing the other. The polarization-preserving mirror consists of a planar metasurface with a subwavelength pattern that cannot be superimposed with its mirror image without being lifted out of its plane, and a conventional mirror spaced by a fraction of the wavelength from the metasurface. Such mirrors enable circularly polarized lasers and Fabry-Pérot cavities with enhanced tunability, gyroscopic applications, polarization-sensitive detectors of electromagnetic waves, and can be used to enhance spectroscopies of chiral media.

  1. First Avalanche-photodiode camera test (FACT): A novel camera using G-APDs for the observation of very high-energy γ-rays with Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, I.; Commichau, S. C.; Rissi, M.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Bretz, T.; Britvitch, I.; Commichau, V.; von Gunten, H.; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Kranich, D.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Mannheim, K.; Neise, D.; Pauss, F.; Pohl, M.; Renker, D.; Rhode, W.; Röser, U.; Straumann, U.; Viertel, G.

    2009-10-01

    We present a project for a novel camera using Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiodes (G-APDs), to be installed in a small telescope (former HEGRA CT3) on the MAGIC site in La Palma (Canary Island, Spain). This novel type of semiconductor photon detector provides several superior features compared to conventional photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The most promising one is a much higher Photon Detection Efficiency.

  2. Deflectometric measurement of large mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesch, Evelyn; Häusler, Gerd; Wörnlein, André; Stinzing, Friedrich; van Eldik, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the inspection of large-sized, spherical mirror tiles by `Phase Measuring Deflectometry' (PMD). About 10 000 of such mirror tiles, each satisfying strict requirements regarding the spatial extent of the point-spread-function (PSF), are planned to be installed on the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), a future ground-based instrument to observe the sky in very high energy gamma-rays. Owing to their large radii of curvature of up to 60 m, a direct PSF measurement of these mirrors with concentric geometry requires large space. We present a PMD sensor with a footprint of only 5×2×1.2 m3 that overcomes this limitation. The sensor intrinsically acquires the surface slope; the shape data are calculated by integration. In this way, the PSF can be calculated for real case scenarios, e.g., when the light source is close to infinity and off-axis. The major challenge is the calibration of the PMD sensor, specifically because the PSF data have to be reconstructed from different camera views. The calibration of the setup is described, and measurements presented and compared to results obtained with the direct approach.

  3. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B. C., Jr.; Allen, Max J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed seven compact soft X-ray/EUV (XUV) multilayer coated and two compact FUV interference film coated Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes for a rocket borne observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. We report here on extensive measurements of the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the XUV telescopes carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  4. Deflectometry for optics evaluation: free form segments of polynomial mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Giorgia; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Pareschi, Giovanni; Pelliciari, Carlo

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometry is a well-known method for astronomical mirror metrology. This paper describes the method we developed for the characterization of free-form concave mirrors. Our technique is based on the synergy between deflectometry and ray-tracing. The deflectometrical test is performed by illuminating the reflecting surface with a known light pattern in a Ronchi - like configuration and retrieving the slope errors by the observed rays deflection. The ray-tracing code allows us to measure the slopes and to evaluate the mirror optical performance. This technique has two main advantages: it is fast and it is applicable on-site, as an intermediate step in the manufacturing process, preventing that out-of-specification mirrors may proceed towards further production steps. Thus, we obtain a considerable time and cost reduction. As an example, we describe the results obtained measuring the primary mirror segments of the Cherenkov prototypal telescope manufactured by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics in the context of the ASTRI Project. This specific case is challenging because the segmentation of the polynomial primary mirror lead to individual mirrors with deviations from the spherical optical design up to a few millimeters.

  5. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Multispectral Solar Telescope Array is a rocket-borne observatory which encompasses seven compact soft X-ray/EUV, multilayer-coated, and two compact far-UV, interference film-coated, Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes. Extensive measurements are presented on the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the X-ray/EUV telescopes. Attention is given to systematic errors and measurement errors.

  6. The Case for Aggressive Segmentation of the Primary Mirror of the Next Generation Space Telescope and Future ORIGINS Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Zelders, Glenn W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Optical performance variations are considered from several factors including the gap between regular hexagonal mirror segments, the relative ability of segments of different size to be manufactured with low wavefront error, and expected mirror deformations. Additionally a weight variation function will be driven by recently postulated relationships which can be expressed so as to determine thickness of the mirror segment to satisfy: (1) polishing pressures (2) 1-g sage deflection, and (3) thermal induced stress as well as ancillary masses including actuators, wiring, and electronics. The result will be to survey the trade space of segment number and size for a range of apertures from 4 to 20 meters.

  7. NASA James Webb Space Telescope Engineering of the Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA) and the Primary Mirror Backplane Support Structure (PMBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Lester M.

    2015-01-01

    The design, engineering tests of the PMSAs PMBSS show that we have a robust system that not only meets but exceeds (better than) the design requirements for these components. In the next 2 years the Telescope Observatory will be subjected to a simulated launch environment (sine vibeacoustics) and operations tests at cryogenic temperatures. Launch is schedule for the last quarter of 2018.

  8. Diseño de montura Davies-Cotton de telescopio Cherenkov de 6m de diámetro para el proyecto CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Actis, M.; Ringegni, P.; Antico, F.; Bottani, A.; Vallejo, G.; Ochoa, I.; Marconi, D.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Rovero, A. C.

    For the next generation of ground-based instruments for the observation of gamma-rays, the construction of 6 m diameter Cherenkov telescopes is foreseen. We have proposed a design of Davies-Cotton mount for such a telescope, within Cherenkov Telescope Array specifications, and evaluated its mechanical and optical performance. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  9. Moisture barrier and chemical corrosion protection of silver-based telescope mirrors using aluminum oxide films by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryauf, David M.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2013-09-01

    An urgent demand remains in astronomy for high-reflectivity silver mirrors that can withstand years of exposure in observatory environments. The University of California Observatories Astronomical Coatings Lab has undertaken development of protected silver coatings suitable for telescope mirrors that maintain high reflectivity at wavelengths from 340 nm through the mid-infrared spectrum. We present initial results of an investigation into whether plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) can produce superior protective layers of transparent dielectrics. Several novel coating recipes have been developed with ion-assisted electron beam deposition (IAEBD) of materials including yttrium fluoride, and oxides of yttrium, hafnium, and titanium. Samples of these mirror coatings were covered with conformal layers of aluminum oxide (AlOx) deposited by PEALD using trimethylaluminum as a metal precursor and oxygen as an oxidant gas activated by remote plasma. Samples of coating recipes with and without PEALD oxide undergo aggressive environmental testing, including high temperature/high humidity (HTHH), in which samples were exposed to an environment of 80% humidity at 80°C for ten days in a simple test set-up. HTHH testing show visible results suggesting that the PEALD oxide offers enhanced robust protection against chemical corrosion and moisture from an accelerated aging environment. Mirror samples are further characterized by reflectivity/absorption and atomic force microscopy before and after deposition of oxide coatings. AlOx is suitable for many applications and has been the initial material choice for this study, although we also tried TiOx and HfOx. Further experimentation based on these initial results is on-going.

  10. Two-mirror, three-reflection telescopes as candidates for sky surveys in ground and space applications. The MINITRUST: an active optics warping telescope for wide-field astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, Roberto F.; La Padula, Cesare D.; Vignato, Agostino; Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Dohlen, Kjetil

    2002-12-01

    A concept based on a two-mirror, three-reflection telescope has been investigated. Its anastigmatism and flat fielded properties, the compactness and optical performances over 2-2.5 arc deg field of view, make this optical system of high interest for the development of much larger telescopes than with Schmidt designs. The 2MTRT concept is a potential candidate for sky surveys with 2-3 meter class telescopes and particularily well adapted for UV space surveys. Preliminary developments have been carried out with the construction of a 30-cm prototype on Amoretti's design, providing encouraging results. At present, a 45-cm 2MTRT prototype has been realized for ground based sky survey of NEOs, based on active optics (MINITRUST), in order to overcome the difficulty of obtaining three aspherical surfaces. The primary and tertiary lie on the same double vase substrate, and have a rest profile. The hyperbolization is carried out in situ by air depressure. The secondary, in a tulip form substrate, has been hyperbolized by elastic relaxation. The project is planned for operation in 2003.

  11. Toward the construction of a medium size prototype Schwarzschild-Couder telescope for CTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousselle, J.; Byrum, K.; Cameron, R.; Connaughton, V.; Errando, M.; Griffiths, S.; Guarino, V.; Humensky, T. B.; Jenke, P.; Kaaret, P.; Kieda, D.; Limon, M.; Mognet, I.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; Okumura, A.; Peck, A.; Petrashyk, A.; Ribeiro, D.; Stevenson, B.; Vassiliev, V.; Yu, P.

    2015-09-01

    The construction of a prototype Schwarzschild-Couder telescope (pSCT) started in early June 2015 at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Southern Arizona, as a candidate medium-sized telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Compared to current Davies-Cotton telescopes, this novel instrument with an aplanatic two-mirror optical system will offer a wider field-of-view and improved angular resolution. In addition, the reduced plate scale of the camera allows the use of highly-integrated photon detectors such as silicon photo multipliers. As part of CTA, this design has the potential to greatly improve the performance of the next generation ground-based observatory for very high-energy (E>60 GeV) gamma-ray astronomy. In this contribution we present the design and performance of both optical and alignment systems of the pSCT.

  12. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Diegel, S.; Romani, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Ramsey, B.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-24

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of {approx}20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  13. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Diegel, S.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Ramsey, B.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-01

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of ~20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  14. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  15. Detecting EHE Cosmic Rays Using Cherenkov Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Douglas

    2011-04-01

    Cherenkov light has been used to detect gamma rays in the TeV energy range using an imaging technique and cosmic rays in the PeV energy range using a non-imaging technique. We would like to extend the use of the non-imaging technique up to nearly 1 EeV. At these energies the technique can be used in conjunction with fluorescence detection of cosmic rays, allowing for hybrid reconstruction of shower geometries and cross calibration of energy scales. We envision using an array of Cherenkov detectors as part of the Telescope Array (TA) Low Energy extension (TALE), extending the energy range of the detector down to the Knee of the cosmic ray energy spectrum.

  16. Point Spread Function and Transmittance Analyses for Conical and Hexapod Secondary Mirror Support Towers for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Gary W.; Pitalo, Stephen K.

    1999-01-01

    Different secondary mirror support towers were modeled on the CODE V optical design/analysis program for the NGST Optical Telescope Assembly (OTA) B. The vertices of the NGST OTA B primary and secondary mirrors were separated by close to 9.0 m. One type of tower consisted of a hollow cone 6.0 m long, 2.00 m in diameter at the base, and 0.704 m in diameter at its top. The base of the cone was considered attached to the primary's reaction structure through a hole in the primary. Extending up parallel to the optical axis from the top of this cylinder were eight blades (pyramidal struts) 3.0 m long. A cross section of each these long blades was an isosceles triangle with a base of 0.010 m and a height of 0.100 m with the sharpest part of each triangle pointing inward. The eight struts occurred every 45 deg. The other type of tower was purely a hexapod arrangement and had no blades or cones. The hexapod consisted simply of six, very thin, circular struts, leaving in pairs at 12:00, 4:00, and 8:00 at the primary and traversing to the outer edge of the back of the secondary mount. At this mount, two struts arrived at each of 10:00, 2:00, and 6:00. The struts were attached to the primary mirror in a ring 3.5 m in diameter. They reached the back of the secondary mount, a circle 0.704 m in diameter. Transmittance analyses at two levels were performed on the secondary mirror support towers. Detailed transmittances were accomplished by the use of the CODE V optical design/analysis program and were compared to transmittance calculations that were almost back-of-the-envelope. Point spread function (PSF) calculations, including both diffraction and aberration effects, were performed on CODE V. As one goes out from the center of the blur (for a point source), the two types of support towers showed little difference between their PSF intensities until one reaches about the 3% level. Contours can be delineated on CODE V down to about 10 (exp -8) times the peak intensity, fine

  17. Update to an application using magnetic smart materials to modify the shape of an x-ray telescope mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon

    2013-09-01

    We describe a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled (˜100-400 μm thickness) electroformed replicated optics or glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the midfrequency (˜2-10 mm length scales) ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a magnetically hard material (i.e., one that retains a magnetic field, e.g., the material in hard disk drives). Since the previous report, we have made extensive measurements of the deflection versus magnetic field strength and direction. Here we report those results along with detailed finite element analysis modeling.

  18. Extreme ultraviolet reflection efficiencies of diamond-turned aluminum, polished nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces. [for telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Cash, W.

    1978-01-01

    Measured reflection efficiencies are presented for flat samples of diamond-turned aluminum, nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces fabricated by techniques suited for EUV telescopes. The aluminum samples were 6.2-cm-diameter disks of 6061-T6, the electroless nickel samples were formed by plating beryllium disks with 7.5-microns of Kanigen. Gold samples were produced by coating the aluminum and nickel samples with 5 strips of evaporated gold. Reflection efficiencies are given for grazing angles in the 5-75 degree range. The results indicate that for wavelengths over about 100 A, the gold-coated nickel samples yield highest efficiencies. For shorter wavelengths, the nickel samples yield better efficiencies. 500 A is found to be the optimal gold thickness.

  19. Silica aerogel threshold Cherenkov counters for the JLab Hall A spectrometers: improvements and proposed modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Luigi Lagamba; Evaristo Cisbani; S. Colilli; R. Crateri; R. De Leo; Salvatore Frullani; Franco Garibaldi; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; Mauro Iodice; Riccardo Iommi; A. Leone; M. Lucentini; A. Mostarda; E. Nappi; Roberto Perrino; L. Pierangeli; F. Santavenere; Guido M. Urciuoli

    2001-10-01

    Recently approved experiments at Jefferson Lab Hall A require a clean kaon identification in a large electron, pion, and proton background environment. To this end, improved performance is required of the silica aerogel threshold Cherenkov counters installed in the focal plane of the two Hall A spectrometers. In this paper we propose two strategies to improve the performance of the Cherenkov counters which presently use a hydrophilic aerogel radiator, and convey Cherenkov photons towards the photomultipliers by means of mirrors with a parabolic shape in one direction and flat in the other. The first strategy is aerogel baking. In the second strategy we propose a modification of the counter geometry by replacing the mirrors with a planar diffusing surface and by displacing in a different way the photomultipliers. Tests at CERN with a 5GeV/c multiparticle beam revealed that both the strategies are able to increase significantly the number of the detected Cherenkov photons and, therefore, the detector performance.

  20. JWST Mirror Installation

    NASA Video Gallery

    The first six of 18 hexagonal shaped segments that will form NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s primary mirror for space observations were readied this week to begin final cryogenic testing at...

  1. The space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers concerning the development of the Space Telescope which were presented at the Twenty-first Annual Meeting of the American Astronautical Society in August, 1975 are included. Mission planning, telescope performance, optical detectors, mirror construction, pointing and control systems, data management, and maintenance of the telescope are discussed.

  2. SST-GATE: an innovative telescope for very high energy astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laporte, Philippe; Dournaux, Jean-Laurent; Sol, Hélène; Blake, Simon; Boisson, Catherine; Chadwick, Paula; Dumas, Delphine; Fasola, Gilles; de Frondat, Fatima; Greenshaw, Tim; Hervet, Olivier; Hinton, James; Horville, David; Huet, Jean-Michel; Jégouzo, Isabelle; Schmoll, Jürgen; White, Richard; Zech, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is an international collaboration that aims to create the world's largest (ever) Very High Energy gamma-ray telescope array, consisting of more than 100 telescopes covering an area of several square kilometers to observe the electromagnetic showers generated by incoming cosmic gamma-rays with very high energies (from a few tens of GeV up to over 100 TeV). Observing such sources requires - amongst many other things - a large FoV (Field of View). In the framework of CTA, SST-GATE (Small Size Telescope - GAmma-ray Telescope Elements) aims to investigate and to build one of the two first CTA prototypes based on the Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) optical design that delivers a FoV close to 10 degrees in diameter. To achieve the required performance per unit cost, many improvements in mirror manufacturing and in other technologies are required. We present in this paper the current status of our project. After a brief introduction of the very high energy context, we present the opto-mechanical design, discuss the technological tradeoffs and explain the electronics philosophy that will ensure the telescopes cost is minimised without limiting its capabilities. We then describe the software nedeed to operate the telescope and conclude by presenting the expected telescope performance and some management considerations.

  3. Development of the ACS+OPC UA based control system for a CTA medium size telescope prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Bagmeet; Oya, Igor; Birsin, Emrah; Köppel, Hendryk; Melkumyan, David; Schlenstedt, Stefan; Schmidt, Torsten; Schwanke, Ullrich; Wegner, Peter; Wiesand, Stephan; Winde, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the next generation Very High Energy (VHE, defined as > 50GeV to several 100TeV) telescope facility, currently in the design and prototyping phase, and expected to come on-line around 2016. The array would have both a Northern and Southern hemisphere site, together delivering nearly complete sky coverage. The CTA array is planned to have ~100 telescopes of several different sizes to fulfill the sensitivity and energy coverage needs. Each telescope has a number of subsystems with varied hardware and control mechanisms; a drive system that gets commands and inputs via OPC UA (OPC Unified Architecture), mirror alignment systems based on XBee/ZigBee protocol and/or CAN bus, weather monitor accessed via serial/Ethernet ports, CCD cameras for calibration, Cherenkov camera, and the data read out electronics, etc. Integrating the control and data-acquisitions of such a distributed heterogeneous system calls for a framework that can handle such a multi-platform, multi-protocol scenario. The CORBA based ALMA Common software satisfies these needs very well and is currently being evaluated as the base software for developing the control system for CTA. A prototype for a Medium Size Telescope (MST, ~12m) is being developed and will be deployed in Berlin, by end of 2012. We present the development being carried out to integrate and control the various hardware subsystems of this MST prototype using ACS.

  4. Gemini primary mirror support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Larry M.; Huang, Eugene W.; Cho, Myung K.

    1994-06-01

    The primary mirror selected for the Gemini 8-m Telescopes is a thin meniscus made of Corning ULE(superscript TM) glass. The conceptual design of the Gemini support system has evolved in response to the properties of the meniscus mirror and the functional requirements of the Gemini Telescopes. This paper describes the design requirements, the design features, and predicted performance of this system.

  5. SNAP telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis,R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar,A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland,S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kim, A.G.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder, E.V.; Loken,S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi,H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto,E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will require a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction limited images spanning a one degree field in the visible and near infrared wavelength regime. This requirement, equivalent to nearly one billion pixel resolution, places stringent demands on its optical system in terms of field flatness, image quality, and freedom from chromatic aberration. We discuss the advantages of annular-field three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) telescopes for applications such as SNAP, and describe the features of the specific optical configuration that we have baselined for the SNAP mission. We discuss the mechanical design and choice of materials for the telescope. Then we present detailed ray traces and diffraction calculations for our baseline optical design. We briefly discuss stray light and tolerance issues, and present a preliminary wavefront error budget for the SNAP Telescope. We conclude by describing some of tasks to be carried out during the upcoming SNAP research and development phase.

  6. Transforming Cherenkov radiation in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginis, Vincent; Danckaert, Jan; Veretennicoff, Irina; Tassin, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    In this contribution, we explore the generation of light in transformation-optical media. When charged particles move through a transformation-optical material with a speed larger than the phase velocity of light in the medium, Cherenkov light is emitted. We show that the emitted Cherenkov cone can be modified with longitudinal and transverse stretching of the coordinates. Transverse coordinates stretching alters only the dimensions of the cone, whereas longitudinal stretching also changes the apparent velocity of the charged particle. These results demonstrate that the geometric formalism of transformation optics can be used not only for the manipulation of light beam trajectories, but also for controlling the emission of light, here for describing the Cherenkov cone in an arbitrary anisotropic medium. Subsequently, we illustrate this point by designing a radiator for a ring imaging Cherenkov radiator. Cherenkov radiators are used to identify unknown elementary particles by determining their mass from the Cherenkov radiation cone that is emitted as they pass through the detector apparatus. However, at higher particle momentum, the angle of the Cherenkov cone saturates to a value independent of the mass of the generating particle, making it difficult to effectively distinguish between different particles. Using our transformation optics description, we show how the Cherenkov cone and the cut-off can be controlled to yield a radiator medium with enhanced sensitivity for particle identification at higher momentum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 167402 (2014)].

  7. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) telescope overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schember, Helene; Manhart, Paul; Guiar, Cecilia; Stevens, James H.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will be the first true infrared observatory in space, building upon the technical and scientific experience gained through its two NASA survey-oriented predecessors: the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer. During its minimum five year lifetime, the SIRTF will perform pointed scientific observations at wavelengths from 1.8 to 1200 microns with an increase in sensitivity over previous missions of several orders of magnitude. This paper discusses a candidate design for the SIRTF telescope, encompassing optics, cryostat, and instrument accommodation, which has been undertaken to provide a fulcrum for the development of functional requirements, interface definition, risk assessment and cost. The telescope optics employ a baffled Ritchey-Chretien Cassegrain system with a 1-m class primary mirror, an active secondary mirror, and a stationary facetted tertiary mirror. The optics are embedded in a large superfluid He cryostat designed to maintain the entire telescope-instrument system at temperatures below 3 K.

  8. Webb Telescope: Planetary Evolution

    NASA Video Gallery

    Stars and planets form in the dark, inside vast, cold clouds of gas and dust. The James Webb Space Telescope's large mirror and infrared sensitivity will let astronomers peer inside dusty knots whe...

  9. Coherent array telescopes as a fifteen meter optical telescope equivalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odgers, G. J.

    1982-10-01

    The potential benefits of using a mirror array to form a large optical telescope equivalent to a 15 m monolithic mirror telescope are discussed. The concept comprises 25 three meter telescopes in a circular array or 13 double unit telescopes, also in a circular array. The double-units would have individual 4.2 m instruments. Meniscus-shaped mirrors with F/2 aperture ratios would allow lightweight construction. A smaller, four double unit telescope would be equivalent to an 8.4 m telescope, larger than any existing in the world. The viewing capabilities could also be extended to the IR. Each sector of the compound telescopes, if built with 3 m apertures, could be controlled with 1/20th arsec acccuracy. Finally, the inherent long baseline of an array telescope would permit enhanced interferometric viewing.

  10. Cherenkov infrared laser

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.; Walsh, J.

    1985-01-01

    Successful production of microwave radiation by Cherenkov masers has prompted an investigation into their feasibility for submillimeter and far-infrared wavelength generation. A theoretical examination of output parameters such as frequency and small signal gain was conducted for an easily fabricated resonator geometry. The resonator consists of two parallel plates, each with a thin (0.5 to 3 ..mu..m) dielectric coating, separated by 2 mm. This waveguide will support TM modes which are coupled to a relativistic electron beam propagating between the plates. While the interaction of the electrons with the dielectric causes spontaneous Cherenkov emission, the difference between the beam velocity and the phase velocity of the mode causes a bunching of the electrons which is responsible for further stimulated emission. The frequency of the generated radiation is determined by the dispersion relation of the waveguide mode. Gain is calculated assuming the effects of space-charge modes are negligible i.e., operation is in the Compton regime. Results indicate that such a double-slab resonator will provide detectable levels of infrared radiation from a mildly relativistic (3-10 MeV) electron beam. The theoretical analysis is undertaken in preparation for a series of experiments to be conducted at the ENEA facility in Frascati, Italy where a 5 MeV microtron accelerator will be used to produce radiation in the 10- to 100 ..mu..m range. A suitable choice for the dielectric material would be polyethylene, both because of its low dielectric constant (2.2) and its relatively low loss in the infrared. A detailed discussion of the design choices will be presented.

  11. LOXT mirror design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L.; Antrim, W.; Boyd, D.; Giacconi, R.; Sinnamon, G.; Stille, F.

    1972-01-01

    The final report for the large orbiting X-ray telescope (LOXT) high resolution mirror design study is presented. The following tasks were performed: (1) Generation of a reference and alternate preliminary design for the LOXT high resolution mirror assembly, which will meet the LOXT scientific requirements, and are within the present state of the art of materials and fabrication techniques. (2) Measurement, in X-rays, of the scattering properties of a variety of optical flats, embodying materials, coatings, and polishing techniques which might be applicable to the flight configuration LOXT high resolution mirror. (3) Preparation of a procurement specification for a paraboloid test mirror of the size of the innermost paraboloid of the high resolution mirror assembly, including the design requirements for the reference design evolved from this preliminary design study. The results of the engineering and scientific analysis and the conclusions drawn are presented. The procurement specification for the test mirror is included.

  12. Double arch mirror study. Part 3: Fabrication and test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of mounting a cryogenically cooled, lightweight, double arch, glass mirror was developed for infrared, astronomical telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). A 50 cm, fused silica mirror which was previously fabricated was modified for use with a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed. The modification of the mirror, the fabrication of the mirror mount, and the room temperature testing of the mounted mirror are reported. A design for a SIRTF class primary mirror is suggested.

  13. The CLAS Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    G. Adams; V. Burkert; R. Carl; T. Carstens; V. Frolov; L. Houghtlin; G. Jacobs; M. Kossov; M. Klusman; B. Kross; M. Onuk; J. Napolitano; J. W. Price; C. Riggs; Y. Sharabian; A. Stavinsky; L. C. Smith; W. A. Stephens; P. Stoler; W. Tuzel; K. Ullrich; A. Vlassovc; A. Weisenberger; M. Witkowski; B. Wojtekhowski; P. F. Yergin; C. Zorn

    2001-06-01

    The design, construction, and performance of the CLAS Cerenkov threshold gas detector at Jefferson Lab is described. The detector consists of 216 optical modules. Each module consists of 3 adjustable mirrors, of lightweight composite construction, a Winston light collecting cone, a 5-inch photomultiplier tube, and specially designed magnetic shielding.

  14. JWST pathfinder telescope integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI and T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  15. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  16. Research study to determine critical optical/mechanical properties of materials considered for selection as substrates for the primary mirror on a large telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slomba, A. F.; Goggin, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the stability of a specific low expansion glass-ceramic material relative to its use as a large, lightweight mirror substrate for diffraction-limited spaceborne optical applications. These evaluations were made on a segment (0.44 meter diameter by 0.31 meter thick) of a 2 to 3 meter diameter mirror blank. The dimensional stability of this mirror was measured interferometrically before and after lightweighting, as a function of rough machining, etching, thermal environment, and support configuration. A special computer analysis program was used to plot the coefficients corresponding to aberrations with sixfold symmetry (caused by the mirror's self-weight deflection on a three point support). The objective was to enhance the test sensitivity. Results indicate that any such effects due to self-weight deflection are of the order of 0.015 lambda rms. The rms and peak-to-peak figure changes associated with each processing operation are summarized.

  17. A ring imaging Cherenkov detector for CLAS12

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Rachel A.

    2013-12-01

    The energy increase of Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) to 12 GeV promises to greatly extend the physics reach of its experiments. This will include an upgrade of the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to CLAS12, offering unique possibilities to study internal nucleon dynamics. For this excellent hadron identification over the full kinematical range of 3–8 GeV/c is essential. This will be achieved by the installation of a Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector. A novel hybrid imaging design incorporating mirrors, aerogel radiators and Hamamatsu H8500 multianode photomultiplier tubes is proposed. Depending on the incident particle track angle, Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly or after two reflections and passes through the aerogel. The detector design is described, along with preliminary results on individual detector components tests and from recent testbeam studies.

  18. Design and construction of the VLT primary mirror cell: support of the large, thin primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Stefano; Legrand, P.; Baty, A.; Hovsepian, T.

    1997-03-01

    The primary mirror cell of the very large telescope supports the primary mirror, the tertiary tower and mirror, and the Cassegrain instrumentation. Stringent requirements have been set to achieve the desired image quality, flexibility of use, and the necessary mirror safety. This paper describes the most important requirements set on the system and some of the design solutions which were chosen.

  19. JWST Secondary Mirror Deploy Timelapse

    NASA Video Gallery

    Setting up NASA's James Webb Space Telescope's secondary mirror in space will require special arms that resemble a tripod that was recently demonstrated in a NASA cleanroom. TRT: 1:25 / Credit: NAS...

  20. LUTE telescope structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthven, Gregory

    1993-01-01

    The major objective of the Lunar Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (LUTE) Telescope Structural Design Study was to investigate the feasibility of designing an ultralightweight 1-m aperture system within optical performance requirements and mass budget constraints. This study uses the results from our previous studies on LUTE as a basis for further developing the LUTE structural architecture. After summarizing our results in Section 2, Section 3 begins with the overall logic we used to determine which telescope 'structural form' should be adopted for further analysis and weight estimates. Specific telescope component analysis showing calculated fundamental frequencies and how they compare with our derived requirements are included. 'First-order' component stress analyses to ensure telescope optical and structural component (i.e. mirrors & main bulkhead) weights are realistic are presented. Layouts of both the primary and tertiary mirrors showing dimensions that are consistent with both our weight and frequency calculations also form part of Section 3. Section 4 presents our calculated values for the predicted thermally induced primary-to-secondary mirror despace motion due to the large temperature range over which LUTE must operate. Two different telescope design approaches (one which utilizes fused quartz metering rods and one which assumes the entire telescope is fabricated from beryllium) are considered in this analysis. We bound the secondary mirror focus mechanism range (in despace) based on these two telescope configurations. In Section 5 we show our overall design of the UVTA (Ultraviolet Telescope Assembly) via an 'exploded view' of the sub-system. The 'exploded view' is annotated to help aid in the understanding of each sub-assembly. We also include a two view layout of the UVTA from which telescope and telescope component dimensions can be measured. We conclude our study with a set of recommendations not only with respect to the LUTE structural architecture

  1. Stimulated Cherenkov emission in gas dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V. Rukhadze, A. A.

    2008-11-15

    A linear theory is developed for stimulated Cherenkov emission from planar and cylindrical gas flows in gaseous environments. An analogy is demonstrated between Cherenkov emission in gas dynamics and stimulated Cherenkov electromagnetic emission from a charged particle beam in a medium.

  2. G-APDs in Cherenkov astronomy: The FACT camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krähenbühl, T.; Anderhub, H.; Backes, M.; Biland, A.; Boller, A.; Braun, I.; Bretz, T.; Commichau, V.; Djambazov, L.; Dorner, D.; Farnier, C.; Gendotti, A.; Grimm, O.; von Gunten, H.; Hildebrand, D.; Horisberger, U.; Huber, B.; Kim, K.-S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Krumm, B.; Lee, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lorenz, E.; Lustermann, W.; Lyard, E.; Mannheim, K.; Meharga, M.; Neise, D.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Overkemping, A.-K.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rohlfs, R.; Röser, U.; Stucki, J.-P.; Schneider, J.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Viertel, G.; Vogler, P.; Walter, R.; Warda, K.; Weitzel, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD, SiPM) are a much discussed alternative to photomultiplier tubes in Cherenkov astronomy. The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope (FACT) collaboration builds a camera based on a hexagonal array of 1440 G-APDs and has now finalized its construction phase. A light-collecting solid PMMA cone is glued to each G-APD to eliminate dead space between the G-APDs by increasing the active area, and to restrict the light collection angle of the sensor to the reflector area in order to reduce the amount of background light. The processing of the signals is integrated in the camera and includes the digitization using the domino ring sampling chip DRS4.

  3. First detection of Cherenkov light from cosmic-particle-induced air showers by Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biland, A.; Britvitch, I.; Lorenz, E.; Otte, N.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Ritt, S.; Roeser, U.; Schneebeli, M.

    2007-10-01

    We report on first tests of Geiger-mode APDs (G-APD) to detect Cherenkov light from cosmic particle induced air showers. The motivation for this study stems from the requirement to improve the sensitivity of large imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) by replacing the photomultipliers (PMT) by high detection efficiency G-APDs. Three tests have been carried out, confirming sufficiently high light sensitivity of blue-sensitive G-APDs as future replacement of PMTs in IACTs.

  4. Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Snapiro, I.B.

    1995-10-01

    We predict the Josephson-vortex Cherenkov radiation of an electromagnetic wave. We treat a long one-dimensional Josephson junction. We consider the wavelength of the radiated electromagnetic wave to be much less than the Josephson penetration depth. We use for calculations the nonlocal Josephson electrodynamics. We find the expression for the radiated power and for the radiation friction force acting on a Josephson vortex and arising due to the Cherenkov radiation. We calculate the relation between the density of the bias current and the Josephson vortex velocity.

  5. Cherenkov radiation oscillator without reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, Y.; Yang, Z.; Hangyo, M.; Miyamoto, S.

    2014-05-12

    This Letter presents a Cherenkov radiation oscillator with an electron beam travelling over a finitely thick plate made of negative-index materials. In such a scheme, the external reflectors required in the traditional Cherenkov oscillators are not necessary, since the electromagnetic energy flows backward in the negative-index materials, leading to inherent feedback. We theoretically analyzed the interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic wave, and worked out the growth rate and start current through numerical calculations. With the help of particle-in-cell simulation, the theoretical predictions are well demonstrated.

  6. Polishing technique for beryllium mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Performance tests, accomplished by inserting entire X ray telescope and polished mirror into vacuum line 67 m long and taking photographs of an X ray resolution source, indicate that polishing increases mirror efficiency from 0.06 percent for X rays at 0.8 nm and increases resolution from 15 to 3.75 arc-seconds.

  7. Techniques for the manufacturing of stiff and lightweight optical mirror panels based on slumping of glass sheets: concepts and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canestrari, R.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Basso, S.; Motta, G.; Doro, M.; Giro, E.; Lessio, L.

    2009-08-01

    In the last decade Very High Energy (VHE) gamma-ray astronomy has improved rapidly opening a new window for ground-based astronomy with surprising implications in the theoretical models. Nowadays, it is possible to make imaging, photometry and spectroscopy of sources with good sensitivity and angular resolution using new facilities as MAGIC, HESS and VERITAS. The latest results of astronomy in the TeV band obtained using such facilities demonstrate the essential role of this window for high energy astrophysics. For this reason new projects (e.g. CTA and AGIS) have been started with the aim to increase the sensitivity and expand the energy band coverage. For such telescopes arrays probably tens of thousands of optical mirror panels must be manufactured with an adequate industrial process, then tested and mounted into the telescopes. Because of the high number of mirrors it is mandatory to perform feasibility studies to test various techniques to meet the technical and cost-effectiveness requirements for the next generation TeV telescopes as CTA and AGIS. In this context at the Astronomical Observatory of Brera (INAF-OAB) we have started the investigation of different techniques for the manufacturing of stiff and lightweight optical glass mirror panels. These panels show a sandwich-like structure with two thin glass skins on both sides, the reflective one being optically shaped using an ad-hoc slumping procedure. The technologies here presented can be addressed both for primary or secondary mirrors for the next generation of Cherenkov telescopes. In this paper we present and discuss the different techniques we are investigating with some preliminary results obtained from test panels realized.

  8. Paranal Receives New Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    A 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror, a vital part of the world's newest and fastest survey telescope, VISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) has been delivered to its new mountaintop home at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The mirror will now be coupled with a small camera for initial testing prior to installing the main camera in June. Full scientific operations are due to start early next year. VISTA will form part of ESO's Very Large Telescope facility. ESO PR Photo 10d/08 ESO PR Photo 10d/08 The VISTA Mirror The mirror arrived over the Easter weekend at the Paranal Observatory where the telescope is being assembled at an altitude of 2518m, in Chile's Atacama Desert. VISTA Project Manager Alistair McPherson from STFC's UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC) accompanied the mirror on its journey to Chile: "This is a major milestone for the VISTA project. The precious mirror was loaded on to a plane in a special cradle that used tennis balls to cushion it from impact for its arduous journey across three continents. " "The mirror had a difficult four-day journey, by air and by road. It arrived in perfect condition and now that it has been coated, we will install the mirror in the telescope with a small test camera for about four weeks testing. We plan to install the main camera in June," said the Project Scientist on VISTA, Will Sutherland of Queen Mary, University of London, UK. The VISTA 4.1-metre diameter primary mirror is the most strongly curved large mirror ever polished to such a precise and exacting surface accuracy - deviations from a perfect surface of less than 1/3000th of the thickness of a human hair. On arrival at Cerro Paranal it was safely craned into the telescope dome where it was washed and coated with a thin layer of protected silver in the facility's coating plant. Silver is the best metal for the purpose since it reflects over 98% of near-infrared light, better than the more commonly used aluminium. To date, the reflectivity

  9. Alignment and phasing of deployable telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolf, N. J.; Ulich, B. L.

    1983-01-01

    The experiences in coaligning and phasing the Multi-Mirror Telescope (MMT), together with studies in setting up radio telescopes, are presented. These experiences are discussed, and on the basis they furnish, schemes are suggested for coaligning and phasing four large future telescopes with complex primary mirror systems. These telescopes are MT2, a 15-m-equivalent MMT, the University of California Ten Meter Telescope, the 10 m sub-mm wave telescope of the University of Arizona and the Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, and the Large Deployable Reflector, a future space telescope for far-IR and sub-mm waves.

  10. JWST Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial Design Studies leading to JWST, Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to enable the next generation of large aperture space telescopes required to achieve the science goals of imaging the earliest galaxies and proto-galaxies after the big bang. Specific telescope architectures were explored via three independent design concept studies conducted during the summer of 1996. Achieving the desired science objectives required a never before demonstrated space telescope capability, one with an 8 meter class primary mirror that is diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operating in deep space at temperatures well below 70K. Beryllium was identified in the NASA "Yardstick" design as the preferred material because of its ability to provide stable optical performance in the anticipated thermal environment as well as its excellent specific stiffness. Because of launch vehicle constraints, two very significant architectural constraints were placed upon the telescope: segmentation and areal density. Each of these directly resulted in specific technology capability requirements. First, because the maximum launch vehicle payload fairing diameter is approximately 4.5 meters, the only way to launch an 8 meter class mirror is to segment it, fold it and deploy it on orbit - resulting in actuation and control requirements. Second, because of launch vehicle mass limits, the primary mirror allocation was only 1000 kg - resulting in a maximum areal density specification of 20 kilograms per square meter.

  11. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) Telescope Mechanical and Optical System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarino, V.; Vassiliev, V.; Buckley, J.; Byrum, K.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Finley, J.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Romani, R.; Wagner, R.; Woods, M.

    2009-05-01

    The concept of a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory, AGIS, in the energy range 20 GeV to 200 TeV is based on an array of 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The anticipated improvement of AGIS sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of IACTs. In this submission, we focus on the optical and mechanical systems for a novel Schwarzschild-Couder two-mirror aplanatic optical system originally proposed by Schwarzschild. Emerging new mirror production technologies based on replication processes, such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured CFRP, and electroforming, provide new opportunities for cost effective solutions for the design of the optical system. We explore capabilities of these mirror fabrication methods for the AGIS project and alignment methods for optical systems. We also study a mechanical structure which will provide support points for mirrors and camera design driven by the requirement of minimizing the deflections of the mirror support structures.

  12. Cherenkov Source for PMT Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ at UC Berkeley Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    My research is focused on building a deployable source for PMT calibrations in the SNO+ detector. I work for the SNO+ group at UC Berkeley headed by Gabriel Orebi Gann. SNO+ is an addition to the SNO project, and its main goal is to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be monitored by over 9500 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to characterize the PMTs, several calibration sources are being constructed. One of which, the Cherenkov Source, will provide a well-understood source of non-isotropic light for calibrating the detector response. My goal is to design and construct multiple aspects of the Cherenkov Source. However, there are multiple questions that arose with its design. How do we keep the scintillation light inside the Cherenkov source so it does not contaminate calibration? How do we properly build the Cherenkov source: a hollow acrylic sphere with a neck? Can we maintain a clean source throughout these processes? These are some of the problems I have been working on, and will continue to work on, until the deployment of the source. Additionally, I have worked to accurately simulate the physics inside the source, mainly the energy deposition of alphas.

  13. Structural materials for space mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitanio, C.

    1990-06-01

    Work leading to the development of XMM telescope mirrors is described. Although a carbon/epoxy composite structure was specified, a hot type of material was proposed. The further use of such technology in the development of substrates for space mirrors is discussed. The specifications for the plane plates used for the XMM telescope are presented. The advantages and disadvantages of various other materials in producing substrates for space mirrors are discussed. The potential uses of glass matrix ceramics reinforced with carbon or silicon carbide fibers is given particular attention.

  14. Design of optical mirror structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soosaar, K.

    1971-01-01

    The structural requirements for large optical telescope mirrors was studied with a particular emphasis placed on the three-meter Large Space Telescope primary mirror. Analysis approaches through finite element methods were evaluated with the testing and verification of a number of element types suitable for particular mirror loadings and configurations. The environmental conditions that a mirror will experience were defined and a candidate list of suitable mirror materials with their properties compiled. The relation of the mirror mechanical behavior to the optical performance is discussed and a number of suitable design criteria are proposed and implemented. A general outline of a systematic method to obtain the best structure for the three-meter diffraction-limited system is outlined. Finite element programs, using the STRUDL 2 analysis system, were written for specific mirror structures encompassing all types of active and passive mirror designs. Parametric studies on support locations, effects of shear deformation, diameter to thickness ratios, lightweight and sandwich mirror configurations, and thin shell active mirror needs were performed.

  15. The Athena Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Athena mission (Advanced Telescope for High Energy Astrophysics) requires lightweight X-ray Wolter optics with a high angular resolution and large effective area. For achieving an effective area of 2 m^2 (at 1 keV) and an angular resolution of below 5 arcsec, the Silicon Pore Optics technology was developed by ESA together with a consortium of European industry. Silicon Pore Optics are made of commercial Si wafers using process technology adapted from the semiconductor industry. We present the current design of the Athena mirror concentrating on the technology development status of the Silicon Pore Optics, ranging from the manufacturing of single mirror plates towards complete focusing mirror modules and their integration into the mirror structure.

  16. Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    The Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will combine high sensitivity with the flexibility offered by the Space Transportation System. A recently completed study has generated a preliminary design which demonstrates the feasibility of SIRTF. The 1.0 to 1.5 meter aperture, f/8 Gregorian telescope will be cooled to 20 K by a stored supercritical helium system. The telescope will be pointed and stabilized at two levels: the European-developed Instrument Pointing System provides primary pointing and stabilization; and an internal star tracker senses residual errors and drives a folding mirror inside the telescope to null the errors. The folding mirror can also be driven by square or triangular waves to provide space chopping or small-area scanning.

  17. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  18. Virtual Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The multiple-reflection photograph in Fig. 1 was taken in an elevator on board the cruise ship Norwegian Jade in March 2008. Three of the four walls of the elevator were mirrored, allowing me to see the combination of two standard arrangements of plane mirrors: two mirrors set at 90 degrees to each other and two parallel mirrors. Optical phenomena…

  19. Evaluating the control software for CTA in a medium size telescope prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, I.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Koeppel, H.; Melkumyan, D.; Schmidt, T.; Schwanke, U.; Wegner, P.; Wiesand, S.; Winde, M.; Consortium, CTA

    2012-12-01

    CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array) is one of the largest ground-based astronomy projects being pursued and will be the largest facility for ground-based γ-ray observations ever built. CTA will consist of two arrays (one in the Northern hemisphere and one in the Southern hemisphere) composed of telescopes of several sizes. A prototype for the Medium Size Telescope (MST) of a diameter of 12 m will be installed in Berlin by the end of 2012. This MST prototype will be composed of the mechanical structure, drive system and mirror facets mounted with powered actuators to enable active control. Five Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) cameras and a weather station will allow the measurement of the performance of the instrument. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) distributed control framework is currently being considered by the CTA consortium to serve as the array control middleware. In order to evaluate the ACS software, it has been decided to implement an ACS-based readout and control system for the MST prototype. The design of the control software is following the concepts and tools under evaluation within the CTA consortium, like the use of a Unified Modeling Language (UML) based code generation framework for ACS component modeling, and the use of OPen Connectivity-Unified Architecture (OPC UA) for hardware access. In this contribution, the progress in the implementation of the control system for this CTA prototype telescope is described.

  20. Deployment of a Pair of 3 M telescopes in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Finnegan, G.; Adams, B.; Butler, K.; Cardoza, J.; Colin, P.; Hui, C. M.; Kieda, D.; Kirkwood, D.; Kress, D.; Kress, M.; LeBohec, S.; McGuire, C.; Newbold, M.; Nunez, P.; Pham, K.

    2008-12-24

    Two 3 m telescopes are being installed in Grantsville Utah. They are intended for the testing of various approaches to the implementation of intensity interferometry using Cherenkov Telescopes in large arrays as receivers as well as for the testing of novel technology cameras and electronics for ground based gamma-ray astronomy.

  1. Hubble Space Telescope prescription retrieval.

    PubMed

    Redding, D; Dumont, P; Yu, J

    1993-04-01

    Prescription retrieval is a technique for directly estimating optical prescription parameters from images. We apply it to estimate the value of the Hubble Space Telescope primary mirror conic constant. Our results agree with other studies that examined primary-mirror test fixtures and results. In addition they show that small aberrations exist on the planetary-camera repeater optics.

  2. Milestone reached for James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The primary mirror for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope - is complete after engineers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, US, put in place the craft's 18th and final mirror segment.

  3. Fused silica mirror development for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, W. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An advanced design, lightweight, fuse-quartz mirror of sandwich construction was evaluated for optical figure performance at cryogenic temperatures. A low temperature shroud was constructed with an integral mirror mount and interface to a cryostat for use in a vacuum chamber. The mirror was tested to 13 K. Cryogenic distortion of the mirror was measured interferometrically. Separate interferometry of the chamber window during the test permitted subtraction of the small window distortions from the data. Results indicate that the imaging performance of helium cooled, infrared telescopes will be improved using this type of mirror without correction of cryogenic distortion of the primary mirror.

  4. Development of high refractive index Cherenkov detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazzal, Samah Suheil

    High refractive index materials have been investigated for use as Cherenkov media in order to develop a Cherenkov detector with a lower energy threshold. Several materials were surveyed and cubic zirconium was selected for further study. Samples of cubic zirconium were prepared and mated with photomultiplier tubes to form Cherenkov detectors. These detectors were tested using radioactive sources and muons in the laboratory and using protons at the Indiana Cyclotron in order to determine the Cherenkov light yield and to investigate contamination of the Cherenkov signal by scintillation. The results of the experimental tests were analyzed and compared to detailed numerical simulations. It was found that while some scintillation light was produced by ionizing particles in the cubic zirconium, Cherenkov light was detected at levels that make cubic zirconium usable as a Cherenkov detector. During this investigation, it was discovered that while the Cherenkov light signal was prompt with a rapid decay time, the scintillation light signal was slower both in rise time and in decay. This discovery offers the possibility to distinguish the Cherenkov and Scintillation signals.

  5. JWST Mirror Technology Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2007-01-01

    Mirror technology is a critical enabling capability for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST requires a Primary Mirror Segment Assembly (PMSA) that can survive launch, deploy and align itself to form a 25 square meter collecting area 6.5 meter diameter primary mirror with a 131 nm rms wavefront error at temperatures less than 50K and provide stable optical performance. At the inception of JWST in 1996, such a capability did not exist. A highly successful technology development program was initiated including the Sub-scale Beryllium Mirror Demonstrator (SBMD) and Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator (AMSD) projects. These projects along with flight program activities have matured and demonstrated mirror technology for JWST. Directly traceable prototypes or flight hardware has been built, tested and operated in a relevant environment. This paper summarizes that technology development effort.

  6. Cooled infrared telescope development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the design concept for a 1-m-aperture, cryogenically cooled telescope for Spacelab is assessed. The device makes use of double-folded Gregorian reflective optics. The planned cryogen is helium, and beryllium will be used for the 1.2 m primary mirror. Results of studies based on smaller instruments indicate that no new technology will be required to construct a Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility which will offer improvement over the sensitivity of conventional telescopes by a factor of 1000 at 10 micrometers.

  7. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  8. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  9. SXI Prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the work performed from June 1993 to January 1995. The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule.

  10. The large binocular telescope.

    PubMed

    Hill, John M

    2010-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory is a collaboration among institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, and Virginia. The telescope on Mount Graham in Southeastern Arizona uses two 8.4 m diameter primary mirrors mounted side by side. A unique feature of the LBT is that the light from the two Gregorian telescope sides can be combined to produce phased-array imaging of an extended field. This cophased imaging along with adaptive optics gives the telescope the diffraction-limited resolution of a 22.65 m aperture and a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8 m circular aperture. This paper describes the design, construction, and commissioning of this unique telescope. We report some sample astronomical results with the prime focus cameras. We comment on some of the technical challenges and solutions. The telescope uses two F/15 adaptive secondaries to correct atmospheric turbulence. The first of these adaptive mirrors has completed final system testing in Firenze, Italy, and is planned to be at the telescope by Spring 2010. PMID:20517352

  11. The large binocular telescope.

    PubMed

    Hill, John M

    2010-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) Observatory is a collaboration among institutions in Arizona, Germany, Italy, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, and Virginia. The telescope on Mount Graham in Southeastern Arizona uses two 8.4 m diameter primary mirrors mounted side by side. A unique feature of the LBT is that the light from the two Gregorian telescope sides can be combined to produce phased-array imaging of an extended field. This cophased imaging along with adaptive optics gives the telescope the diffraction-limited resolution of a 22.65 m aperture and a collecting area equivalent to an 11.8 m circular aperture. This paper describes the design, construction, and commissioning of this unique telescope. We report some sample astronomical results with the prime focus cameras. We comment on some of the technical challenges and solutions. The telescope uses two F/15 adaptive secondaries to correct atmospheric turbulence. The first of these adaptive mirrors has completed final system testing in Firenze, Italy, and is planned to be at the telescope by Spring 2010.

  12. Progress report on using magneto-strictive sputtered thin films to modify the shape of a x-ray telescope mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Savoie, Julia; Bellavia, Bridget; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon

    2012-10-01

    There is a basic need both in X-ray astronomy and in synchrotron X-ray and neutron beam optics to be able to modify the shape of an optic via an external source of actuation. We describe a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled (˜ 100-400 micron thickness) electroformed replicated optics or glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the mid-frequency (˜ 2-10 mm length scales) ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a magnetically hard material (i.e., one that retains a magnetic field, e.g. the material in hard disk drives). The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback, locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. We describe the results of our current progress toward our ultimate goal of improving the angular resolution of grazing incidence optics.

  13. Progress report on using magneto-strictive sputtered thin films to modify the shape of a x-ray telescope mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Jian; Savoie, Julia; Bellavia, Bridget; Graham, Michael E.; Vaynman, Semyon

    2012-09-01

    There is a basic need both in X-ray astronomy and in synchrotron X-ray optics to be able to modify the shape of an optic via an external source of actuation. We describe a technique of shape modification that can be applied to thin walled (~ 100-400 micron thickness) electroformed replicated optics or glass optics to improve the near net shape of the mirror as well as the mid-frequency (~ 2-10 mm length scales) ripple. The process involves sputter deposition of a magnetic smart material (MSM) film onto a magnetically hard material (i.e., one that retains a magnetic field, e.g. the material in hard disk drives). The MSM material exhibits strains about 400 times stronger than ordinary ferromagnetic materials. The deformation process involves a magnetic write head which traverses the surface, and under the guidance of active metrology feedback, locally magnetizes the surface to impart strain where needed. We describe the results of our current progress toward our ultimate goal of improving the angular resolution of grazing incidence optics.

  14. Giant Magellan Telescope: overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, Matt; McCarthy, Patrick; Raybould, Keith; Bouchez, Antonin; Farahani, Arash; Filgueira, Jose; Jacoby, George; Shectman, Steve; Sheehan, Michael

    2012-09-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) is a 25-meter optical/infrared extremely large telescope that is being built by an international consortium of universities and research institutions. It will be located at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The GMT primary mirror consists of seven 8.4-m borosilicate honeycomb mirror segments made at the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab (SOML). Six identical off-axis segments and one on-axis segment are arranged on a single nearly-paraboloidal parent surface having an overall focal ratio of f/0.7. The fabrication, testing and verification procedures required to produce the closely-matched off-axis mirror segments were developed during the production of the first mirror. Production of the second and third off-axis segments is underway. GMT incorporates a seven-segment Gregorian adaptive secondary to implement three modes of adaptive-optics operation: natural-guide star AO, laser-tomography AO, and ground-layer AO. A wide-field corrector/ADC is available for use in seeing-limited mode over a 20-arcmin diameter field of view. Up to seven instruments can be mounted simultaneously on the telescope in a large Gregorian Instrument Rotator. Conceptual design studies were completed for six AO and seeing-limited instruments, plus a multi-object fiber feed, and a roadmap for phased deployment of the GMT instrument suite is being developed. The partner institutions have made firm commitments for approximately 45% of the funds required to build the telescope. Project Office efforts are currently focused on advancing the telescope and enclosure design in preparation for subsystem- and system-level preliminary design reviews which are scheduled to be completed in the first half of 2013.

  15. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.; Bender, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for "X" and "Y" tilts of the mirror only. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time.

  16. Einstein's Mirror

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjurchinovski, Aleksandar; Skeparovski, Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Reflection of light from a plane mirror in uniform rectilinear motion is a century-old problem, intimately related to the foundations of special relativity. The problem was first investigated by Einstein in his famous 1905 paper by using the Lorentz transformations to switch from the mirror's rest frame to the frame where the mirror moves at a…

  17. SOFIA Mirror Cleaned to Prepare for Next Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    The 2.5-meter mirror on NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy telescope was cleaned recently in preparation for its first full cycle of science observations. Telescope technicians...

  18. The Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi

    2011-08-01

    We present the status of the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) project, a new general purpose, fully steerable 64 m diameter parabolic radio telescope under construction in Sardinia. The instrument is funded by Italian Ministry of University and Research (MIUR), by the Sardinia Regional Government (RAS), and by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and it is charge to three research structures of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF): the Institute of Radio Astronomy of Bologna, the Cagliari Astronomical Observatory (in Sardinia), and the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Florence. The radio telescope has a shaped Gregorian optical configuration with a 8 m diameter secondary mirror and additional Beam-Wave Guide (BWG) mirrors. One of the most challenging feature of SRT is the active surface of the primary reflector which provides good efficiency up to about 100 GHz. This paper reports on the most recent advances of the construction.

  19. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2011-02-15

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  20. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  1. Smart materials optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional or `smart' composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation as well. Moreover, since the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and 3D printing. The technology therefore holds promise for development of a new generation of lightweight, compact `smart' telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  2. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Gayde, J. Ch.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-12-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM) photogrammetry-based method has been implemented to measure the alignment of individual mirrors which can be characterized by the center of curvature. The mirror wall reflects a regular grid of retroreflective strips placed inside the detector vessel. Then, the position of each mirror is determined from the image of the grid reflection. The images are collected by four cameras. Any small mirror misalignment results in changes of the grid lines' positions in the image. The accuracy limits of the CLAM method were checked by laser interferometry and are below 0.1 mrad.

  3. Recent multiwave Cherenkov generator experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.; Richter-Sand, R.; Hacker, F.; Walsh, J.; Arman, M.

    1994-12-31

    The initial operating characteristics of the North Star Research Corporation (NSRC) multiwave generator experiment are discussed. The first radiation from the NSRC apparatus has now been observed and the immediate goal is to optimize the power output by providing a beam which is better matched to the field profile (a thinner beam propagating closer to the vanes). When this has been accomplished a detailed comparison of the performance of MWCG/MWDG (multiwave diffraction generator/multiwave Cherenkov generator) structures with BWO structures of the same interaction length will be undertaken.

  4. Cherenkov maser at millimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Garate, E.P.; Walsh

    1985-12-01

    The dispersion relation for the transverse magnetic modes (TM/sub 0n/) of a partially filled, dielectric-lined, cylindrical waveguide driven by a cold relativistic electron beam is derived. The effect of a gap between the electron beam and the dielectric liner is included. The dispersion relation is then used to calculate the growth rate for the Cherenkov instability in the collective tenuous-beam limit. Expressions are developed for the minimum current necessary for oscillation threshold and for the power output of the Cerenkov maser in the collective regime.

  5. Development of lightweight mirror elements for the Euro50 mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Harold E.; Romeo, Robert C.; Shaffer, Joseph J.; Chen, Peter C.

    2004-07-01

    New, very large telescopes with apertures of 30, 50, and 100 meters are being proposed by the astronomical community. Superpolished or ultrapolished mirrors with low scattered light levels and the use of adaptive optics for near-diffraction-limited performance would make such large telescopes a turning point in astronomy. The secondary mirror for the Euro50 will be a four meter adaptive optic made of a low expansion graphite-filled cyanate ester resin composite produced using a replica transfer technique. We have made three 1/3rd meter diameter prototype composite adaptive optic mirrors of this cyanate ester composite material. Because of the embedded graphite fibers, the composite material has a measured expansion coefficient in the 10-8 range, as has Zerodur or ULE glass. It is very much lighter, more rugged and more economical than Zerodur or ULE, and can be fabricated in weeks, not months. The Zerodur mandrels upon which these replica transfer mirrors are made are superpolished using centrifugal elutriation, so the replica surface has an rms roughness of 0.6 to 0.8 nm. It thus scatters about an order of magnitude less light than typical conventionally polished astronomical mirrors. In adaptive optic mirrors with sub-mm thick faceplates the number of plies used is insufficient to produce an isotropic surface. For mirrors 2 mm thick, with more plies, the surfaces are isotropic, and the slight astigmatism sometimes resulting from the mesh in the ply can be corrected by actuators to make them attractive mirrors. They must be supported to maintain a good optical figure over a meter diameter mirror. The support requirement may be met by using a new type of mechanical/piezoelectric actuator adjustable to a fraction of a wavelength. The mechanical actuators have a coarse adjust of over an mm and a fine adjust of less than a wavelength of light. They can be used in series with a novel type of piezoelectric actuator for final static adjustment. The low voltage, up to 2

  6. Composite telescope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2014-07-01

    We report the development of optical mirrors based on polymer matrix composite materials. Advantages of this technology are low cost and versatility. By using appropriate combinations of polymers and various metallic and nonmetallic particles and fibers, the properties of the materials can be tailored to suit a wide variety of applications. We report the fabrication and testing of flat and curved mirrors made with metal powders, multiple mirrors replicated with high degree of uniformity from the same mandrels, cryogenic testing, mirrors made of ferromagnetic materials that can be actively or adaptively controlled by non-contact actuation, optics with very smooth surfaces made by replication, and by spincasting. We discuss development of a new generation of ultra-compact, low power active optics and 3D printing of athermal telescopes.

  7. World atlas of large optical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    By 1980 there will be approximately 100 large optical telescopes in the world with mirror or lens diameters of one meter (39 inches) and larger. This atlas gives information on these telescopes and shows their locations on continent-sized maps. Observatory locations considered suitable for the construction of future large telescopes are also shown.

  8. The Hubble Space Telescope: Problems and Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villard, Ray

    1990-01-01

    Presented is the best understanding of the flaw discovered in the optics of the Hubble Space Telescope and the possible solutions to the problems. The spherical aberration in the telescope's mirror and its effect on the quality of the telescope's imaging ability is discussed. (CW)

  9. GIRL: German Infrared Laboratory. Telescope study, phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegelmilch, R.; Zeiss, C.

    1981-01-01

    The construction and mounting of mirrors for an infrared telescope are described. Tests conducted to determine the thermal and stress characteristics of various types of mounting for main and collection mirrors are also discussed.

  10. Applied physics: Optical trapping for space mirrors.

    PubMed

    McGloin, David

    2014-02-27

    Might it be possible to create mirrors for space telescopes, using nothing but microscopic particles held in place by light? A study that exploits a technique called optical binding provides a step towards this goal.

  11. JWST NIRCam flight mirror assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Holmes, Howard C.; Huff, Lynn; Jacoby, Mike S.; Lopez, Frank

    2011-10-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an optical prescription which includes numerous fold mirror assemblies. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at ~293K. The optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain exceptional optical quality during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) conceived, designed, analyzed, assembled, tested, and integrated the mirror assemblies for the NIRCam instrument. This paper covers the design, analysis, assembly, and test of two of the instruments key fold mirrors.

  12. SIRTF primary mirror design, analysis, and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver, George L., III; Maa, Scott; Chang, LI

    1990-01-01

    The primary mirror assembly (PMA) requirements and concepts for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) program are discussed. The PMA studies at NASA/ARC resulted in the design of two engineering test articles, the development of a mirror mount cryogenic static load testing system, and the procurement and partial testing of a full scale spherical mirror mounting system. Preliminary analysis and testing of the single arch mirror with conical mount design and the structured mirror with the spherical mount design indicate that the designs will meet all figure and environmental requirements of the SIRTF program.

  13. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  14. Alignment of the James Webb Space Telescope optical telescope element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Tiffany; Levi, Joshua; Liepmann, Till; Hahn, Walter; Bisson, Gary; Porpora, Dan; Hadjimichael, Theo

    2016-07-01

    The optical telescope element (OTE) of the James Webb Space Telescope has now been integrated and aligned. The OTE comprises the flight mirrors and the structure that supports them - 18 primary mirror segments, the secondary mirror, and the tertiary and fine steering mirrors (both housed in the aft optics subsystem). The primary mirror segments and the secondary mirror have actuators to actively control their positions during operations. This allows the requirements for aligning the OTE subsystems to be in the range of microns rather than nanometers. During OTE integration, the alignment of the major subsystems of the OTE structure and optics were controlled to ensure that, when the telescope is on orbit and at cryogenic temperatures, the active mirrors will be within the adjustment range of the actuators. Though the alignment of this flagship mission was complex and intricate, the key to a successful integration process turned out to be very basic: a clear, concise series of steps employing advanced planning, backup measurements, and cross checks that this multi-organizational team executed with a careful and methodical approach. This approach was not only critical to our own success but has implications for future space observatories.

  15. Progress and commissioning of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Yuta, H. . Dept. of Physics); Antilogus, P.; Aston, D.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; Dasu, S.; Dolinsky, S.; Dunwoodie, W.; Hallewell, G.: Kawahara, H.; Kwon, Y.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Pavel, T.J.; Ratcliff, B.; Rensing, P.; Schultz, D.; Shapiro, S.; Simopoulos, C.; Solodov, E.; Toge, N.; Va'vra, J.; Williams, S.H. (Stanford Linear Accelerator

    1991-11-01

    We report the recent progress of the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector. All of the individual components of the device (TPC's, mirrors, liquid radiator trays) have been completed and installed. Almost half of the electronics packages are installed and operational, and the data acquisition system has been commissioned. The liquid C{sub 6}F{sub 14} recirculation system is functioning. The drift gas supply systems are operating well with TMAE, and the gaseous Freon C{sub 5}F{sub 12} recirculator is being brought on-line. Our monitor and control systems are fully functional. The commissioning of all 40 TPCs at full operating voltage has gone very smoothly. The system shows a remarkable immunity to the SLC backgrounds, and yields very clean events, while operating with a single electron sensitivity.

  16. Cherenkov and Scintillation Properties of Cubic Zirconium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M.J.; Adams, J.H.; Parnell, T.A.; Kuznetsov, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconium (CZ) is a high index of refraction (n =2.17) material that we have investigated for Cherenkov counter applications. Laboratory and proton accelerator tests of an 18cc sample of CZ show that the expected fast Cherenkov response is accompanied by a longer scintillation component that can be separated by pulse shaping. This presents the possibility of novel particle spectrometers which exploits both properties of CZ. Other high index materials being examined for Cherenkov applications will be discussed. Results from laboratory tests and an accelerator exposure will be presented and a potential application in solar energetic particle instruments will be discussed

  17. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-04-16

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths.

  18. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.; Bender, D.A.

    1994-10-04

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for ''X'' and ''Y'' tilts of the mirror only is disclosed. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time. 4 figs.

  19. Digital FDIRC: A focused differential internal reflection Cherenkov imaged by SiPM arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, P. S.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Basti, A.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S.; Brogi, P.; Checchia, C.; Collazuol, G.; Maestro, P.; Morsani, F.; Piemonte, C.; Stolzi, F.; Suh, J. E.; Sulaj, A.

    2016-07-01

    A prototype of an Internal Reflection Cherenkov, equipped with a SiO2 (fused silica) radiator bar optically connected to a cylindrical mirror, was tested at CERN SPS in March 2015 with a beam of relativistic ions obtained from fragmentation of primary argon nuclei at energies 13, 19 and 30 GeV/n. The detector, designed to identify cosmic nuclei, features an imaging focal plane of dimensions ~ 4 cm × 3 cm equipped with 16 arrays of NUV-SiPM (near-ultraviolet sensitive silicon photon avalanche detector) for a total of 1024 sensitive elements. The outstanding performance of the photodetectors (with negligible background in between adjacent photopeaks) allowed us to apply the technique of photon counting to the Cherenkov light collected on the focal plane. Thanks to the fine granularity of the array elements, the Cherenkov pattern was recorded together with the total number of detected photoelectrons increasing as Z2 as a function of the atomic number Z. In this paper, we report the performance of the SiPM arrays and the excellent resolution achieved by the digital Cherenkov prototype in the charge identification of the elements present in the beam.

  20. Visual comparisons between Cherenkov radiation from water and fluorescence from a scintillator.

    PubMed

    Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Tamiya, Tadashi; Maruhashi, Akira; Koyama, Shuji; Homma, Mitsuhiko; Obata, Yasunori; Shimomura, Kouhei; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    A system for observing blue light of Cherenkov radiation was constructed using a Co-60 gamma-ray irradiation unit. However, there was some doubt that the observed light was not Cherenkov light, but scintillation. Therefore, the radiation from water was compared with that from a scintillator. The difference between both luminosities was examined using photographs taken in a dark irradiation room with mirrors and a camera. The radiation from the scintillator was much stronger than that from water. The differences between luminosities of the light radiated in the beam direction, at right angles to the beam and in the reverse beam direction were examined for both radiations. The luminosity from water showed very definite anisotropy, while that from the scintillator was almost isotropic. Furthermore, the light radiated in the beam direction from water was the strongest, and the strengths of the light radiated in the three directions from the scintillator were almost equivalent to each other. It was confirmed that the radiation from water irradiated by Co-60 gamma-rays was indeed Cherenkov light. The anisotropy of the radiated Cherenkov light and the isotropy of the scintillation were clearly observed in the photographs.