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Sample records for miscible flood processes

  1. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  2. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  3. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    The current project is a systematic research effort to quantify relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: (a) Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems, (b) Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements, (c) Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs (d), Compositional flow visualization experiments, and (e) Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

  4. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, 1 January--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems; design estimates for nearly miscible displacements; design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs; compositional flow visualization experiments; simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section. From this work, we can make the following conclusions: (1) We demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that a linear combination of gravity and viscous forces can be used to correlate residual nonwetting phase saturations for both gravity-favorable and gravity-unfavorable displacements. (2) When gravity forces are comparable to or larger than the viscous forces) gravity unfavorable displacements have significantly higher residual nonwetting phase saturation than gravity-favorable displacements. (3) Because soils have much higher permeabilities than oil reservoirs, gravity effects on residual nonwetting phase saturations are much more significant in spilled-oil clean-up than in oil recovery processes. (4) The effective correlation length for a percolation process can be related to a linear combination of the gravity and viscous forces.

  5. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Use of streamtube to model multiphase flow is demonstrated to be a fast and accurate approach for displacements that are dominated by reservoir heterogeneity. The streamtube technique is particularly powerful for multiphase compositional displacements because it represents the effects of phase behavior with a one-dimensional flow and represents the effects of heterogeneity through the locations of streamtubes. A new approach for fast calculations of critical tie-lines directly from criticality conditions is reported. A global triangular structure solution for four-component flow systems, whose tie-lies meet at the edge of a quaternary phase diagram or lie in planes is presented. Also demonstrated is the extension of this solution to multicomponent systems under the same assumptions. The interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces on final residual oil saturation is examined experimentally and theoretically. The analysis of vertical equilibrium conditions for three-phase gravity drainage shows that almost all oil can be recovered from the top part of a reservoir. The prediction of spreading and stability of thin film is performed to investigate three-phase gravity drainage mechanisms. Finally, experimental results from gravity drainage of crude oil in the presence of CO{sub 2} suggest that gravity drainage could be an efficient oil recovery process for vertically fractured reservoirs.

  6. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO(2) Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO(2) Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

    1997-08-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve the efficiency of miscible C0{sub 2} floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This objective was accomplished through experimental and modeling research in three task areas: (1) foams for selective mobility control in heterogeneous reservoirs,( 2) reduction of the amount of C0{sub 2} required in C0{sub 2} floods, and (3) low IFT processe and the possibility of C0{sub 2} flooding in fractured reservoirs. This report provides results from the three-year project for each of the three task areas.

  7. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

    1999-10-15

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging study on near miscible supercritical CO2 flooding in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongchen; Zhu, Ningjun; Zhao, Yuechao; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lanlan; Wang, Tonglei

    2013-05-01

    CO2 flooding is one of the most popular secondary or tertiary recoveries for oil production. It is also significant for studying the mechanisms of the two-phase and multiphase flow in porous media. In this study, an experimental study was carried out by using magnetic resonance imaging technique to examine the detailed effects of pressure and rates on CO2/decane flow in a bead-pack porous media. The displacing processes were conducted under various pressures in a region near the minimum miscibility pressure (the system tuned from immiscible to miscible as pressure is increasing in this region) and the temperature of 37.8 °C at several CO2 injection volumetric rates of 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 ml/min (or linear rates of 3.77, 7.54, and 11.3 ft/day). The evolution of the distribution of decane and the characteristics of the two phase flow were investigated and analyzed by considering the pressure and rate. The area and velocity of the transition zone between the two phases were calculated and analyzed to quantify mixing. The area of transition zone decreased with pressure at near miscible region and a certain injection rate and the velocity of the transition zone was always less than the "volumetric velocity" due to mutual solution and diffusion of the two phases. Therefore, these experimental results give the fundamental understanding of tertiary recovery processes at near miscible condition.

  9. Origin of Scale-Dependent Dispersivity and Its Implications For Miscible Gas Flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Bryant; Russ Johns; Larry Lake; Thomas Harmon

    2008-09-30

    Dispersive mixing has an important impact on the effectiveness of miscible floods. Simulations routinely assume Fickian dispersion, yet it is well established that dispersivity depends on the scale of measurement. This is one of the main reasons that a satisfactory method for design of field-scale miscible displacement processes is still not available. The main objective of this project was to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of dispersion and mixing, particularly at the pore scale. To this end, microsensors were developed and used in the laboratory to measure directly the solute concentrations at the scale of individual pores; the origin of hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated from first principles of laminar flow and diffusion at the grain scale in simple but geometrically completely defined porous media; techniques to use flow reversal to distinguish the contribution to dispersion of convective spreading from that of true mixing; and the field scale impact of permeability heterogeneity on hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated numerically. This project solved a long-standing problem in solute transport in porous media by quantifying the physical basis for the scaling of dispersion coefficient with the 1.2 power of flow velocity. The researchers also demonstrated that flow reversal uniquely enables a crucial separation of irreversible and reversible contributions to mixing. The interpretation of laboratory and field experiments that include flow reversal provides important insight. Other advances include the miniaturization of long-lasting microprobes for in-situ, pore-scale measurement of tracers, and a scheme to account properly in a reservoir simulator (grid-block scale) for the contributions of convective spreading due to reservoir heterogeneity and of mixing.

  10. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, F.M.

    1991-06-01

    This report describes recent progress in a research effort to quantify the scaling of interactions of phase behavior of multicomponent mixtures with unstable flow in heterogeneous porous media. Results are presented in three areas: Phase behavior, fluid properties and characterization of crude oils; interactions of phase behavior and flow; viscous fingering and reservoir heterogeneity. In the first area, results of phase behavior experiments are reported for mixtures of CO{sub 2} with crude oil from the Means field. Detailed analyses of phase compositions are also reported for samples taken during the PVT experiments. Also reported are results of an investigation of crude oil compositions and phase compositions by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. In the second area, the first detailed comparison is reported for displacements with and without volume change as components change phase. The solutions described were obtained by the method of characteristics. Also described is a transformation that allows radial flow solutions to be obtained from the linear solutions presented previously. Results of experiments and numerical computations that described the growth of viscous fingers are described in the third area. Results and simulations show clearly that even mild permeability heterogeneity can have a dramatic effect on the form and location of viscous fingers. They also show that the simulations reproduce with good accuracy the transition from flow dominated by viscous forces to flow dominated by the permeability distribution. The agreement between simulation and experiment is good enough that the particle-tracking simulation approach can be used with confidence to explore scaling questions. 54 refs., 126 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. Improved efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhanced prospects for CO{sub 2} flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Annual report, April 14, 1994--April 13, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.; Heller, J.; Schechter, D.

    1995-09-01

    The overall goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This objective is being accomplished by extending experimental research in three task areas: (1) foams for selective mobility control in heterogeneous reservoirs, (2) reduction of the amount of CO{sub 2} required in CO{sub 2} floods, and (3) miscible CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured reservoirs. This report provides results of the first year of the three-year project for each of the three task areas.

  12. Tertiary application of a hydrocarbon miscible flood; Rainbow Keg River B Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, R.G.; Hunter, B.E.; Peggs, J.K.; Fong, D.K. ); Mazzocchi, E. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rainbow Keg River B pool EOR scheme calls for placement of a 12% (net after recycle)-original-HCPV miscible bank in the crestal region of the pool. This bank will be chased vertically downward with more than 1 PV of dry gas. The injected solvent and chase gas will push the oil/water contact (OWC) downward as the previously injected water is produced. A tertiary oil bank will be formed in the region previously occupied by the water. This paper reports tertiary flood performance, results of the 1987 reservoir simulation study, and the operational strategy and problems encountered in monitoring the flood. The well-completion technique implemented to operate the flood is described, and the scheme economics is reviewed.

  13. Development of a method for evaluating carbon dioxide miscible flooding prospects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Swift, G.W.

    1985-03-01

    Research was undertaken to develop a method of evaluating reservoirs as prospects for carbon dioxide flooding. Evaluation was to be based on a determination of miscibility pressure and displacement efficiency under idealized conditions. To reach the objective, project work was divided into five areas: (1) conducting of phase-equilibrium studies of carbon dioxide with synthetic oils; (2) application of an equation of state to simulate the phase behavior of carbon dioxide - oil systems; (3) conducting of linear displacements of crude oils and synthetic oils by carbon dioxide in a slim-tube apparatus; (4) application of the equation of state, the phase-behavior data and slim-tube data to develop a method of screening reservoirs for carbon dioxide flooding based on determination of minimum miscibility pressure and displacement efficiency; (5) development of a one-dimensional mathematical model, based on the equation of state, for application in conjunction with the results of Parts 1 to 4. The accomplishments for these five areas are discussed in five chapters. 44 references, 90 figures, 42 tables.

  14. POST WATERFLOOD CO2 MISCIBLE FLOOD IN LIGHT OIL FLUVIAL DOMINATED DELTAIC RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Tipton

    2004-04-06

    Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. (TEPI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cost sharing cooperative agreement to conduct an Enhanced Oil Recovery demonstration project at Port Neches. The field is located in Orange County near Beaumont, Texas, and shown in Appendix A. The project would demonstrate the effectiveness of the CO{sub 2} miscible process in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoirs. It would also evaluate the use of horizontal CO{sub 2} injection wells to improve the overall sweep efficiency and determine the recovery efficiency of CO{sub 2} floods in waterflooded and partial waterdrive reservoirs. Texaco's objective on this project was (1) to utilize all available technologies, and to develop new ones, and (2) to design a CO{sub 2} flood process which is cost effective and can be applied to many other reservoirs throughout the US. A database of potential reservoirs for the gulf coast region was developed by LSU, using a screening model developed by Texaco Research Center in Houston. A PC-based CO{sub 2} screening model was developed and the aforementioned database generated to show the utility of this technology throughout the US. Finally, the results and the information gained from this project was disseminated throughout the oil industry via a series of SPE papers and industry open forums. Reservoir characterization efforts for the Marginulina sand shown in Appendix C, were accomplished utilizing conventional and advanced technologies including 3-D seismic. Sidewall and conventional cores were cut and analyzed, lab tests were conducted on reservoir fluids and reservoir voidage was monitored as shown in Appendices B through M. Texaco has utilized the above data to develop a Stratamodel to best describe and characterize the reservoir and to use it as input for the compositional simulator. The compositional model was revised several times to integrate the new data from the 3-D seismic and field performance under CO{sub 2} injection, to

  15. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

    2003-09-30

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2003 to September 30, 2003. Conductivity testing between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 was performed over the period 08/20/03 through 09/05/03. Observed response in CO{sub 2} 13 production rates to changes in CO{sub 2}I No.1 injection rates are consistent with sufficient permeability between CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 for a viable CO{sub 2} flood with a sufficient Process Pore Volume Rate (PPV). Based on the permeabilities near the CO{sub 2} No.16, a 2-producing well pattern has been determined to be optimal but may be changed during the flood depending on the response observed in the CO{sub 2} No.16. Present inter-well test results indicate there is greater permeability architecture complexity than originally predicted and that a low-permeability region or barrier that restricts but does stop flow may exist between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and the CO{sub 2} No.13. Pilot area repressurization began on 09/05/03, immediately after CO{sub 2}I No.1-CO{sub 2} No.13 conductivity testing was complete, by increasing injection in the CO{sub 2}I No.1, CO{sub 2} No.10, and CO{sub 2} No.18. Adequate reservoir pressure in the portion of the pilot area needed to be above minimum miscibility pressure should be reached in November at which time initial CO{sub 2} injection could begin. It is estimated the 2-producing well, 10+-acre (4.05 ha) producing pattern will produce 18,000-21,000 BO (barrels oil; 2,880-3,360 m{sup 3}). Depending primarily on surface facilities costs, operating expenses, and the price of oil, for the predicted range of oil recovery the pilot is estimated to either break-even or be profitable from this point forward. Final arrangements and agreements for CO{sub 2} supply and delivery are being worked on and will be finalized in the next month.

  16. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir, Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    This report demonstrates the effectiveness of the CO2 miscible process in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoirs. It also evaluated the use of horizontal CO2 injection wells to improve the overall sweep efficiency. A database of FDD reservoirs for the gulf coast region was developed by LSU, using a screening model developed by Texaco Research Center in Houston. The results of the information gained in this project is disseminated throughout the oil industry via a series of SPE papers and industry open forums.

  17. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  18. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2005-12-31

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

  19. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2006-06-30

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has

  20. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2007-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in

  1. Improved Efficiency of Miscible C02 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for C02 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyun Guo; David S. Schechter; Jyun-Syung Tsau; Reid B. Grigg; Shih-Hsien Chang

    1997-04-06

    The PRRC-modified DOE pseudomiscible reservoir simulator MASTER was used to conduct a systematic investigation of CO2 flooding using horizontal wells in conjunction with foam. We evaluated the effects of horizontal well radius, length, and location on oil recovery through our testing. This work is necessary to provide field predictions for the use of foam and/or horizontal wells. A number of coreflood tests were performed to examine the effect of foam on oil recovery in heterogeneous porous media. Two coaxial composite cores were used to simulate layered formation systems. The first, an isolated coaxial composite core, was used to simulate a layered formation system of which the layers were not in communication. The second, in capillary contact, simulated layers in communication. Preliminary results suggest that oil displacement is more efficient when surfactant solution is used with CO2 to form CO2-foam. Results from both systems indicate the potential of using foam for improving oil recovery in heterogeneous porous media. Since injectivity loss is a problem in a number of gas injection projects, a preliminary investigation of injectivity loss in WAG was performed. A number of tests were carried out to investigate injectivity loss, indicating that for a given rock the injectivity loss depends on oil saturation in the core during WAG flooding. Higher loss was found in cores with high in-situ oil saturations. No injectivity loss was observed with the naturally fractured carbonate core.

  2. Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil, fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir. FY 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.

    1995-03-01

    The project is a Class 1 DOE-sponsored field demonstration project of a CO{sub 2} miscible flood project at the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The project will determine the recovery efficiency of CO{sub 2} flooding a waterflooded and a partial waterdrive sandstone reservoir at a depth of 5,800. The project will also evaluate the use of a horizontal CO{sub 2} injection well placed at the original oil-water contact of the waterflooded reservoir. A PC-based reservoir screening model will be developed by Texaco`s research lab in Houston and Louisiana State University will assist in the development of a database of fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs where CO{sub 2} flooding may be applicable. This technology will be transferred throughout the oil industry through a series of technical papers and industry open forums.

  3. Improved efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhanced prospects for CO2 flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report, April 17, 1991--May 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

    1998-02-01

    From 1986 to 1996, oil recovery in the US by gas injection increased almost threefold, to 300,000 bbl/day. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection projects make up three-quarters of the 191,139 bbl/day production increase. This document reports experimental and modeling research in three areas that is increasing the number of reservoirs in which CO{sub 2} can profitably enhance oil recovery: (1) foams for selective mobility reduction (SMR) in heterogeneous reservoirs, (2) reduction of the amount of CO{sub 2} required in CO{sub 2} floods, and (3) low interfacial tension (97) processes and the possibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in naturally fractured reservoirs. CO{sub 2} injection under miscible conditions can effectively displace oil, but due to differences in density and viscosity the mobility of CO{sub 2} is higher than either oil or water. High CO{sub 2} mobility causes injection gas to finger through a reservoir, causing such problems as early gas breakthrough, high gas production rates, excessive injection gas recycling, and bypassing of much of the reservoir oil. These adverse effects are exacerbated by increased reservoir heterogeneity, reaching an extreme in naturally fractured reservoirs. Thus, many highly heterogeneous reservoirs have not been considered for CO{sub 2} injection or have had disappointing recoveries. One example is the heterogeneous Spraberry trend in west Texas, where only 10% of its ten billion barrels of original oil in place (OOIP) are recoverable by conventional methods. CO{sub 2} mobility can be reduced by injecting water (brine) alternated with CO{sub 2} (WAG) and then further reduced by adding foaming agents-surfactants. In Task 1, we studied a unique foam property, selective mobility reduction (SMR), that effectively reduces the effects of reservoir heterogeneity. Selective mobility reduction creates a more uniform displacement by decreasing CO{sub 2} mobility in higher permeability zones more than in lower permeability zones.

  4. Improved efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhanced prospects for CO{sub 2} flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Annual report, June 1, 1997--May 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

    1998-07-01

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the first year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principle areas: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems): interfacial tension (IFT), phase behavior, miscibility, capillary number, injectivity, wettability, and gravity drainage; (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems): reduction of mobility using foam, diversion by selective mobility reduction (SMR) using foam, improved injectivity, alternating water and gas injection, and using horizontal wells; and (3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results): gravity drainage, SMR, CO{sub 2}-foam flooding, interfacial tension, injectivity profile, horizontal wells, and naturally fractured reservoirs. Studies of surfactant foam quality were performed during this first year. Simulation studies on a foam pilot area resulted in an acceptable history match model. The results confirm that the communication path between the foam injection well and a production well had a strong impact on the production performance. A laboratory study to aid in the development of a gravity drainage reservoir was undertaken on the Wellman Unit. Experiments were begun meant to duplicate situations of injectivity loss in WAG flooding and identify factors affecting the injectivity loss. The preliminary results indicate that for a given rock the injectivity loss depends on oil saturation in the core during WAG flooding. The injectivity loss is higher in cores with high in-situ oil saturations during WAG flooding. This effect is being verified by more experimental data.

  5. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal), Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    This project outlines a proposal to improve the recovery of light oil from waterflooded fluvial dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoir through a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) flood. The site is the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The field is well explored and well exploited. The project area is 270 acres within the Port Neches Field.

  6. Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix)

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Mikael, Sami

    2002-02-05

    The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields.

  7. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-06-30

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. Assessment of the demonstration site has defined many aspects of the reservoir. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. Further analysis of the pilot site by the partners has indicated that a staged demonstration is considered optimal. A phased approach to implementation of the demonstration is proposed to reduce the risk of uncertainties as to whether the reservoir has basic properties (connectivity and ability to pressure-up) conducive to a meaningful CO2 flood demonstration. The proposed plan is to flood a 10+-acre pattern. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale ({approx}60-acre) demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. In general, the following significant modifications to the original Statement of Work are proposed: (1) The proposed plan would extend the period of Budget Period 1 to May 7, 2003. (2) Redefine the period of Budget Period 2 from 3/7/01-3/7/05 to 5/7/03-3/7/08. (3) Redefine the period of Budget Period 3 from 3/7/05-3/7/06 to 3/7/08-3/7/09. (4) To allow initial verification of the viability of the process before proceeding into the flood demonstration, move activities involved with preparing wells in the flood pattern (Task 5.1), repressurizing the pattern (Task 5.2), and constructing surface facilities (Task 5.3) from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1. (5) Allow US Energy Partners (USEP) to be a supplier of carbon dioxide from the ethanol plant in Russell, Kansas. (6) Change the pilot flood pattern, including the number and location of wells involved

  8. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2001-12-31

    Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2001 to December 31, 2001. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre) CO{sub 2} demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. Testing of present Colliver lease injection water on Lansing-Kansas City (L-KC) oomoldic rock indicates that injection brine must be filtered to < {approx}3-5 um and <15 um to prevent plugging of rocks with permeability as low as 1 md (millidarcy; 0.001 um2) and 10 md (0.01 um2), respectively. Pressure build-up testing on the Carter-Colliver No.7 well is interpreted to indicate the L-KC reservoir surrounding this well is {approx}9 ft (2.7 m) thick having an average effective water permeability of 25-35 md (0.025-0.035 um2) that is connected to the wellbore by either a high permeability fracture, bed, or region with low skin. Reservoir simulation evaluation of gridcell size effect on model oil recovery prediction indicates that, based on the model prediction of distribution of produced oil and CO{sub 2} volumes, oil recovery is strongly influenced by gravity segregation of CO{sub 2} into the upper higher permeability layers and indicates the strong control that vertical permeability and permeability barriers between depositional flood cycles exert on the CO{sub 2} flooding process. Simulations were performed on modifications of the 60-acre, two-injector pattern to evaluate oil recovery using other large-scale patterns. Simulations indicated that several 73-acre patterns with a single injector located near the Colliver No.7 could provide improved economics without increasing the amount of CO{sub 2} injected. The US Energy Partners ethanol plant in Russell, KS began operations in October ahead

  9. IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2002-03-26

    The objective of this project is two-fold. It will demonstrate use of nitrogen as a widely available, cost-effective and environmentally superior injectant for miscible floods. It will also demonstrate the effectiveness of horizontal wellbores in reducing gas breakthrough and cycling. It is expected that the demonstration will lead to implementation of nitrogen injection projects in areas without readily available carbon dioxide sources. Technology transfer will occur throughout the project.

  10. Comparison of WAG and continuous enriched-gas injection as miscible processes in Sadlerochit core

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, A.P.; Ostrander, J.F.

    1983-10-01

    Short core displacements were conducted to evaluate miscible condensing-gas drive for the Sadlerochit reservoir of the Prudhoe Bay field. The cores were from well DS 14-5. The enriched gas was a 60-40 blend on a mole basis of rich Sadlerochit gas and the liquids from the Field Fuel Gas Unit (FFGU) and the separators at Flow Station 3. The experimental program consisted of four floods conducted in each of four cores for a total of sixteen displacements. Each set of floods consisted of: a gravity-stabilized continuous gas injection displacement with the core at connate water saturation; a gravity-stabilized continuous gas injection displacement with the core at waterflood residual oil saturation; a simultaneous injection brine enriched gas flood at a 4 to 1 brine-to-gas ratio (as determined at reservoir conditions) with the core at connate water saturation; a simultaneous injection brine enriched gas flood at a 4 to 1 brine-to-gas ratio with the core at waterflood residual oil saturation. All displacements yielded approximately the same residual oil saturation averaging 2.26 STPV (i.e., stock tank pore volume). The range of values was 0.88 to 3.74 STPV.

  11. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2003-06-30

    Progress is reported for the period from April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. The pilot water injection plant became operational 4/18/03 and began long-term injection in the CO2I No.1 on 4/23/03. The CO2I No.1 exhibits sufficient injectivity for pilot requirements with average absolute permeability surrounding this well equal to {approx}85 millidarcies. Response to injection in the CO2I No.1 has established that conductivity between CO2I No.1 and CO2 No.12, No.10, No.18 and TB Carter No.5 is sufficient for the demonstration. Workovers of the CO2 No.16 and CO2 No.13 were completed in April and May, respectively. Pressure response indicates No.16 communicates with the flood pattern area but core, swab-test, and pressure response data indicate permeability surrounding No.16 is not adequate to maintain the production rates needed to support the original pattern as the well is presently completed. Decisions concerning possible further testing and stimulation have been postponed until after testing of the No.13 is complete. Production rates for the No.13 are consistent with a surrounding reservoir average absolute permeability of {approx}80 md. However, pressure and rate tests results, partially due to the nature of the testing conducted to date, have not confirmed the nature of the CO2I No.1-CO2 No.13 conductivity. A build-up test and conductivity test are planned to begin the first weeks of the next quarter to obtain reservoir properties data and establish the connectivity and conductivity between CO2 I-1 and CO2 No.13. A new geomodel of the pattern area has been developed based on core from No.16 and the new wireline logs from the No.10, No.12, No.16, and No.13. The new geomodel is currently being incorporated into the basic calculations of reservoir volume and flood design and predicted response as well as the reservoir simulators. Murfin signed a letter agreement with FLOCO2 of Odessa, TX for supply of CO2 storage and injection equipment. Technology transfer activities

  12. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan P. Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

    2003-01-01

    Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. On November 1, 2002 Murfin Drilling Company purchased the 70-acre pilot area and will continue as the operator of the pilot. Murfin is seeking working interest partners and meetings with local small independents were conducted. To date, White Eagle Resources and John O. Farmer Oil Company have committed to working interest in the project. Arrangements have been made with Rein Operating to test the Rein No. 7 water supply well on the neighboring lease. Based on review of wellbore conditions in the Colliver No. 9 and No. 16 it has been decided to use the No. 16 in the pilot. A new tank battery was installed near the Colliver No. 10 well and the existing producers plumbed to the new tank battery to isolate production from the pilot area. Reservoir simulations have indicated that the low-permeability interval in the Carter-Colliver CO2I No. 1 injection well below 2,900 ft does not exhibit sufficient injectivity to warrant special stimulation or conformance treatment programs at the present time. Discussions have been initiated with FLOCO2 and preliminary conditions have been agreed upon for the exchange of CO2 for the use of storage and pump equipment at the pilot. A short-term injection test and the well reworks have been scheduled. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report. A presentation was given at the DOE Class II Review Meeting in Midland, TX on December 12, 2002.

  13. Improved Miscible Nitrogen Flood Performance Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Laterals in a Class I Reservoir - East Binger (Marchand) Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2004-06-30

    The DOE-sponsored project at the East Binger Unit is an investigation into the benefits of reservoir characterization and horizontal wells in this particular setting of geologic and recovery method. The geologic setting is a tight (average porosity of 7% and average permeability of less than 1 millidarcy) Pennsylvanian-age sandstone at about 10,000 feet, and the recovery method is a miscible nitrogen flood. The projected oil recovery of the East Binger Unit, prior to the initiation of this project, was about 25%. Gravity segregation of nitrogen and crude oil was believed to be the principal cause of the poor sweep efficiency, and it was envisioned that with horizontal producing wells in the lower portion of the reservoir and horizontal injection wells near the top, the process could be converted from a lateral displacement process to a vertical displacement/gravity assisted process. Through the characterization and field development work completed in Budget Periods 1 and 2, Binger Operations, LLC (BOL) has developed a different interpretation of the sweep problem as well as a different approach to improving recovery. The sweep problem is now believed to be one of an areal nature, due to a combination of natural and hydraulic fracturing. Vertical wells have provided a much better economic return than have the horizontal wells. The natural and hydraulic fracturing manifests itself as a direction of higher permeability, and the flood is being converted to a line drive flood aligned with this orientation. Consistent with this concept, horizontal wells have been drilled along the line of the fracture orientation, such that hydraulic fracturing leads to 'longitudinal' fractures, in line with the wellbore. As such, the hydraulically fractured horizontal wells are not significantly different than hydraulically fractured vertical wells - save for the potential for a much longer fracture face. This Topical Report contains data from new wells, plus new and updated production

  14. Comparison of WAG (water-alternating-gas) and continuous enriched-gas injection as miscible processes in Sadlerochit core

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, A.P.; Ostrander, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Short core displacements were conducted to evaluate miscible condensing-gas drive for the Sadlerochit reservoir of the Prudhoe Bay field. The cores were from well No. DS 14-5. The enriched gas was a 60 to 40 blend on a mole basis of rich Sadlerochit gas and the liquids from the Field Fuel Gas Unit and the separators at Flow Station 3. The experimental program consisted of 4 floods conducted in each of 4 cores for a total of 16 displacements. The floods consisted of gravity-stabilized continuous gas injection displacements with the core (1) at connate water saturation or (2) at waterflood residual oil saturation; and simultaneous injection brine enriched-gas floods at a 4 to 1 brine-to-gas ratio with the core (1) at connate water saturation or (2) at waterflood residual oil saturation.

  15. 4D seismic to image a thin carbonate reservoir during a miscible C02 flood: Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Franseen, E.K.; Byrnes, A.P.; Watney, W.L.; Harrison, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of miscible CO2 injected into a shallow (900 m) thin (3.6-6m) carbonate reservoir was monitored using the high-resolution parallel progressive blanking (PPB) approach. The approach concentrated on repeatability during acquisition and processing, and use of amplitude envelope 4D horizon attributes. Comparison of production data and reservoir simulations to seismic images provided a measure of the effectiveness of time-lapse (TL) to detect weak anomalies associated with changes in fluid concentration. Specifically, the method aided in the analysis of high-resolution data to distinguish subtle seismic characteristics and associated trends related to depositional lithofacies and geometries and structural elements of this carbonate reservoir that impact fluid character and EOR efforts.

  16. Improved Miscible Nitrogen Flood Performance Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Laterals in a Class I Reservoir - East Binger (Marchand) Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Sinner

    2006-06-30

    The reservoir characterization and investigation of the benefits of horizontal wells in the East Binger Unit miscible nitrogen flood as been completed. A significant work program was implemented from 2002 to 2005 in an effort to reduce gas cycling and economically increase ultimate oil recovery. Horizontal and vertical infill wells were drilled and existing producers were converted to injection. Due to successful infill drilling based on the improved flow characterization, more drilling was done than originally planned, and further drilling will occur after the project is completed. Through the drilling of wells and reservoir characterization work, it was determined that poor areal sweep efficiency is the primary factor causing nitrogen cycling and limiting oil recovery. This is in contrast to the perception prior to the initiation of development, which was that gravity segregation was causing poor vertical sweep efficiency. Although not true of all infill wells, most were drilled in areas with little sweep and came online producing gas with much lower nitrogen contents than previously drilled wells in the field and in the pilot area. Seven vertical and three horizontal wells were drilled in the pilot area throughout the project. As previously reported, the benefits of horizontal drilling were found to be insufficient to justify their increased cost. Nitrogen recycle, defined as nitrogen production as a percentage of injection, decreased from 72% prior to initiation of the project to about 25% before rising back to a current rate of 40%. Injection into the pilot area, despite being limited at times by problems in the Air Separation Unit of the Nitrogen Management Facility, increased 60% over levels prior to the project. Meanwhile, gas production and nitrogen content of produced gas both decreased.

  17. Pseudolatex preparation using a novel emulsion-diffusion process involving direct displacement of partially water-miscible solvents by distillation.

    PubMed

    Quintanar-Guerrero, D; Allémann, E; Fessi, H; Doelker, E

    1999-10-25

    Pseudolatexes were obtained by a new process based on an emulsification-diffusion technique involving partially water-miscible solvents. The preparation method consisted of emulsifying an organic solution of polymer (saturated with water) in an aqueous solution of a stabilizing agent (saturated with solvent) using conventional stirrers, followed by direct solvent distillation. The technique relies on the rapid displacement of the solvent from the internal into the external phase which thereby provokes polymer aggregation. Nanoparticle formation is believed to occur because rapid solvent diffusion produces regions of local supersaturation near the interface, and nanoparticles are formed due to the ensuing interfacial phase transformations and polymer aggregation that occur in these interfacial domains. Using this method, it was possible to prepare pseudolatexes of biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers such as poly(D,L-lactic acid) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone), Eudragit E, cellulose acetate phthalate, cellulose acetate trimellitate using ethyl acetate or 2-butanone as partially water-miscible solvents and poly(vinyl alcohol) or poloxamer 407 as stabilizing agent. A transition from nano- to microparticles was observed at high polymer concentrations. At concentrations above 30% w/v of Eudragit E in ethyl acetate or cellulose acetate phthalate in 2-butanone only microparticles were obtained. This behaviour was attributed to decreased transport of polymer molecules into the aqueous phase.

  18. 4D seismic monitoring of the miscible CO2 flood of Hall-Gurney Field, Kansas, U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raef, A.E.; Miller, R.D.; Byrnes, A.P.; Harrison, W.E.

    2004-01-01

    A cost-effective, highly repeatable, 4D-optimized, single-pattern/patch seismic data-acquisition approach with several 3D data sets was used to evaluate the feasibility of imaging changes associated with the " water alternated with gas" (WAG) stage. By incorporating noninversion-based seismic-attribute analysis, the time and cost of processing and interpreting the data were reduced. A 24-ms-thick EOR-CO 2 injection interval-using an average instantaneous frequency attribute (AIF) was targeted. Changes in amplitude response related to decrease in velocity from pore-fluid replacement within this time interval were found to be lower relative to background values than in AIF analysis. Carefully color-balanced AIF-attribute maps established the overall area affected by the injected EOR-CO2.

  19. Combustion-process derived comparable performances of Zn-(In:Sn)-O thin-film transistors with a complete miscibility

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Qingjun; Lu, Jianguo Cheng, Jipeng; Sun, Rujie; Feng, Lisha; Dai, Wen; Yan, Weichao; Ye, Zhizhen; Li, Xifeng

    2014-09-29

    Amorphous zinc-indium-tin oxide (a-ZITO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been prepared using a low-temperature combustion process, with an emphasis on complete miscibility of In and Sn contents. The a-ZITO TFTs were comparatively studied in detail, especially for the working stability. The a-ZITO TFTs all exhibited acceptable and excellent behaviors from Sn-free TFTs to In-free TFTs. The obtained a-ZTO TFTs presented a field-effect mobility of 1.20 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, an on/off current ratio of 4.89 × 10{sup 6}, and a long-term stability under positive bias stress, which are comparable with those of the a-ZIO TFTs. The In-free a-ZTO TFTs are very potential for electrical applications with a low cost.

  20. 44 CFR 78.6 - Flood Mitigation Plan approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flood Mitigation Plan..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE § 78.6 Flood Mitigation Plan approval process. The State POC will forward all...

  1. 44 CFR 78.6 - Flood Mitigation Plan approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flood Mitigation Plan..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE § 78.6 Flood Mitigation Plan approval process. The State POC will forward all...

  2. 44 CFR 78.6 - Flood Mitigation Plan approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Flood Mitigation Plan approval..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE § 78.6 Flood Mitigation Plan approval process. The State POC will forward all...

  3. 44 CFR 78.6 - Flood Mitigation Plan approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flood Mitigation Plan..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE § 78.6 Flood Mitigation Plan approval process. The State POC will forward all...

  4. 44 CFR 78.6 - Flood Mitigation Plan approval process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flood Mitigation Plan..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSURANCE AND HAZARD MITIGATION National Flood Insurance Program FLOOD MITIGATION ASSISTANCE § 78.6 Flood Mitigation Plan approval process. The State POC will forward all...

  5. Flood adaptive traits and processes: an overview.

    PubMed

    Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Unanticipated flooding challenges plant growth and fitness in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Here we describe mechanisms of developmental plasticity and metabolic modulation that underpin adaptive traits and acclimation responses to waterlogging of root systems and submergence of aerial tissues. This includes insights into processes that enhance ventilation of submerged organs. At the intersection between metabolism and growth, submergence survival strategies have evolved involving an ethylene-driven and gibberellin-enhanced module that regulates growth of submerged organs. Opposing regulation of this pathway is facilitated by a subgroup of ethylene-response transcription factors (ERFs), which include members that require low O₂ or low nitric oxide (NO) conditions for their stabilization. These transcription factors control genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism as well as proteins that fine-tune their function in transcription and turnover. Other mechanisms that control metabolism and growth at seed, seedling and mature stages under flooding conditions are reviewed, as well as findings demonstrating that true endurance of submergence includes an ability to restore growth following the deluge. Finally, we highlight molecular insights obtained from natural variation of domesticated and wild species that occupy different hydrological niches, emphasizing the value of understanding natural flooding survival strategies in efforts to stabilize crop yields in flood-prone environments.

  6. Glacier lake outburst floods - modelling process chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Yvonne; Huggel, Christian; Haeberli, Wilfried

    2013-04-01

    New lakes are forming in high-mountain areas all over the world due to glacier recession. Often they will be located below steep, destabilized flanks and are therefore exposed to impacts from rock-/ice-avalanches. Several events worldwide are known, where an outburst flood has been triggered by such an impact. In regions such as in the European Alps or in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru, where valley bottoms are densely populated, these far-travelling, high-magnitude events can result in major disasters. For appropriate integral risk management it is crucial to gain knowledge on how the processes (rock-/ice-avalanches - impact waves in lake - impact on dam - outburst flood) interact and how the hazard potential related to corresponding process chains can be assessed. Research in natural hazards so far has mainly concentrated on describing, understanding, modeling or assessing single hazardous processes. Some of the above mentioned individual processes are quite well understood in their physical behavior and some of the process interfaces have also been investigated in detail. Multi-hazard assessments of the entire process chain, however, have only recently become subjects of investigations. Our study aims at closing this gap and providing suggestions on how to assess the hazard potential of the entire process chain in order to generate hazard maps and support risk assessments. We analyzed different types of models (empirical, analytical, physically based) for each process regarding their suitability for application in hazard assessments of the entire process chain based on literature. Results show that for rock-/ice-avalanches, dam breach and outburst floods, only numerical, physically based models are able to provide the required information, whereas the impact wave can be estimated by means of physically based or empirical assessments. We demonstrate how the findings could be applied with the help of a case study of a recent glacier lake outburst event at Laguna

  7. An investigation into the influence of drug-polymer interactions on the miscibility, processability and structure of polyvinylpyrrolidone-based hot melt extrusion formulations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siok-Yee; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2015-12-30

    While hot melt extrusion is now established within the pharmaceutical industry, the prediction of miscibility, processability and structural stability remains a pertinent issue, including the issue of whether molecular interaction is necessary for suitable performance. Here we integrate the use of theoretical and experimental drug-polymer interaction assessment with determination of processability and structure of dispersions in two polyvinylpyrrolidone-based polymers (PVP and PVP vinyl acetate, PVPVA). Caffeine and paracetamol were chosen as model drugs on the basis of their differing hydrogen bonding potential with PVP. Solubility parameter and interaction parameter calculations predicted a greater miscibility for paracetamol, while ATR-FTIR confirmed the hydrogen bonding propensity of the paracetamol with both polymers, with little interaction detected for caffeine. PVP was found to exhibit greater interaction and miscibility with paracetamol than did PVPVA. It was noted that lower processing temperatures (circa 40°C below the Tg of the polymer alone and Tm of the crystalline drug) and higher drug loadings with associated molecular dispersion up to 50% w/w were possible for the paracetamol dispersions, although molecular dispersion with the non-interactive caffeine was noted at loadings up to 20% w./w. A lower processing temperature was also noted for caffeine-loaded systems despite the absence of detectable interactions. The study has therefore indicated that theoretical and experimental detection of miscibility and drug-polymer interactions may lead to insights into product processing and extrudate structure, with direct molecular interaction representing a helpful but not essential aspect of drug-polymer combination prediction.

  8. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The National Energy Strategy Plan (NES) has called for 900,000 barrels/day production of heavy oil in the mid-1990s to meet our national needs. To achieve this goal, it is important that the Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought to production. Alaska has more than 25 billion barrels of heavy oil deposits. Conoco, and now BP Exploration have been producing from Schrader Bluff Pool, which is part of the super heavy oil field known as West Sak Field. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, North Slope of Alaska, is estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21{degrees}API) oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion; however, the primary recovery will be much smaller than expected. Hence, waterflooding will be implemented earlier than anticipated. The eventual use of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques, such as hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process, is vital for recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The purpose of this research project was to determine the nature of miscible solvent slug which would be commercially feasible, to evaluate the performance of the hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug process, and to assess the feasibility of this process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. The laboratory experimental work includes: slim tube displacement experiments and coreflood experiments. The components of solvent slug includes only those which are available on the North Slope of Alaska.

  9. Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery research is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center to advance the application of miscible carbon dioxide flooding. This research is an integral part of a multidisciplinary effort to improve the technology for producing additional oil from US resources. This report summarizes the problems of the technology and the 1986 results of the ongoing research that was conducted to solve those problems. Poor reservoir volumetric sweep efficiency is the major problem associated with gas flooding and all miscible displacements. This problem results from the channeling and viscous fingering that occur due to the large differences between viscosity or density of the displacing and displaced fluids (i.e., carbon dioxide and oil, respectively). Simple modeling and core flooding studies indicate that, because of differences in fluid viscosities, breakthrough can occur after only 30% of the total pore volume (PV) of the rock has been injected with gas, while field tests have shown breakthrough occurring much earlier. The differences in fluid densities lead to gravity segregation. The lower density carbon dioxide tends to override the residual fluids in the reservoir. This process would be considerably more efficient if a larger area of the reservoir could be contacted by the gas. Current research has focused on the mobility control, computer simulation, and reservoir heterogeneity studies. Three mobility control methods have been investigated: (1) the use of polymers for direct thickening of high-density carbon dioxide, (2) mobile ''foam-like dispersions'' of carbon dioxide and an aqueous surfactant, and (3) in situ deposition of chemical precipitates. 22 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. 3-D hydrodynamic modelling of flood impacts on a building and indoor flooding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gems, Bernhard; Mazzorana, Bruno; Hofer, Thomas; Sturm, Michael; Gabl, Roman; Aufleger, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Given the current challenges in flood risk management and vulnerability assessment of buildings exposed to flood hazards, this study presents three-dimensional numerical modelling of torrential floods and its interaction with buildings. By means of a case study application, the FLOW-3D software is applied to the lower reach of the Rio Vallarsa torrent in the village of Laives (Italy). A single-family house on the flood plain is therefore considered in detail. It is exposed to a 300-year flood hydrograph. Different building representation scenarios, including an entire impervious building envelope and the assumption of fully permeable doors, light shafts and windows, are analysed. The modelling results give insight into the flooding process of the building's interior, the impacting hydrodynamic forces on the exterior and interior walls, and further, they quantify the impact of the flooding of a building on the flow field on the surrounding flood plain. The presented study contributes to the development of a comprehensive physics-based vulnerability assessment framework. For pure water floods, this study presents the possibilities and limits of advanced numerical modelling techniques within flood risk management and, thereby, the planning of local structural protection measures.

  11. Improved efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhanced prospects for CO{sub 2} flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, R.B.; Heller, J.P.; Schechter, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this research is to improve the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} flooding in heterogeneous reservoirs. Activities include: exploration of the applicability of selective mobility reduction utilizing foams; possible higher economic viability of floods at slightly reduced CO{sub 2} injection pressures; and taking advantage of gravitational forces during flooding in fractured reservoirs.

  12. Multiphase flow of miscible liquids: jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Travis W.; Logia, Alison N.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2015-05-01

    Drops and jets of liquids that are miscible with the surrounding bulk liquid are present in many processes from cleaning surfaces with the aid of liquid soaps to the creation of biocompatible implants for drug delivery. Although the interactions of immiscible drops and jets show similarities to miscible systems, the small, transient interfacial tension associated with miscible systems create distinct outcomes such as intricate droplet shapes and breakup resistant jets. Experiments have been conducted to understand several basic multiphase flow problems involving miscible liquids. Using high-speed imaging of the morphological evolution of the flows, we have been able to show that these processes are controlled by interfacial tensions. Further multiphase flows include investigating miscible jets, which allow the creation of fibers from inelastic materials that are otherwise difficult to process due to capillary breakup. This work shows that stabilization from the diminishing interfacial tensions of the miscible jets allows various elongated morphologies to be formed.

  13. Spreading of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Daniel J.; Haward, Simon J.; Shen, Amy Q.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-05-01

    Miscible liquids commonly contact one another in natural and technological situations, often in the proximity of a solid substrate. In the scenario where a drop of one liquid finds itself on a solid surface and immersed within a second, miscible liquid, it will spread spontaneously across the surface. We show experimental findings of the spreading of sessile drops in miscible environments that have distinctly different shape evolution and power-law dynamics from sessile drops that spread in immiscible environments, which have been reported previously. We develop a characteristic time to scale radial data of the spreading sessile drops based on a drainage flow due to gravity. This time scale is effective for a homologous subset of the liquids studied. However, it has limitations when applied to significantly chemically different, yet miscible, liquid pairings; we postulate that the surface energies between each liquid and the solid surface becomes important for this other subset of the liquids studied. Initial experiments performed with pendant drops in miscible environments support the drainage flow observed in the sessile drop systems.

  14. Comparison of oil removal in surfactant alternating gas with water alternating gas, water flooding and gas flooding in secondary oil recovery process

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Mehdi Mohammad; Safarzadeh, Mohammad Amin; Sahraei, Eghbal; Nejad, Seyyed Alireza Tabatabaei

    2014-01-01

    Growing oil prices coupled with large amounts of residual oil after operating common enhanced oil recovery methods has made using methods with higher operational cost economically feasible. Nitrogen is one of the gases used in both miscible and immiscible gas injection process in oil reservoir. In heterogeneous formations gas tends to breakthrough early in production wells due to overriding, fingering and channeling. Surfactant alternating gas (SAG) injection is one of the methods commonly used to decrease this problem. Foam which is formed on the contact of nitrogen and surfactant increases viscosity of injected gas. This increases the oil–gas contact and sweep efficiency, although adsorption of surfactant on rock surface can causes difficulties and increases costs of process. Many parameters must be considered in design of SAG process. One of the most important parameters is SAG ratio that should be in optimum value to improve the flooding efficiency. In this study, initially the concentration of surfactant was optimized due to minimization of adsorption on rock surface which results in lower cost of surfactant. So, different sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) concentrations of 100, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 ppm were used to obtain the optimum concentration at 70 °C and 144.74×105 Pa. A simple, clean and relatively fast spectrophotometric method was used for determination of surfactant which is based on the formation of an ion-pair. Then the effect of surfactant to gas volume ratio on oil recovery in secondary oil recovery process during execution of immiscible surfactant alternating gas injection was examined experimentally. The experiments were performed with sand pack under certain temperature, pressure and constant rate. Experiments were performed with surfactant to gas ratio of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 2:1 and 3:1 and 1.2 pore volume injected. Then, comparisons were made between obtained results (SAG) with water flooding, gas flooding and water alternating gas

  15. Floods

    MedlinePlus

    Floods are common in the United States. Weather such as heavy rain, thunderstorms, hurricanes, or tsunamis can ... is breached, or when a dam breaks. Flash floods, which can develop quickly, often have a dangerous ...

  16. Correlation of minimum miscibility pressure for impure CO/sub 2/ streams

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, H.M.; Renner, T.A.; Wenger, R.S.

    1984-04-01

    The displacement efficiency of oil by carbon dioxide is highly pressure dependent and miscible displacement efficiency is only achieved at pressures greater than a certain minimum. This minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) is a function of temperature and composition of the injection gas. The study presented in this paper examines the effect on MMP of up to 55 mole percent impurities in the CO/sub 2/-rich injection gas. A correlation of these data was developed based on the mole average pseudocritical temperature (TCM) of the gas and the minimum miscibility pressure of pure CO/sub 2/ with the same oil at the same conditions. In general, it was found that increasing the TCM of the gas lowered the MMP and decreasing the TCM increased the MMP. Injection gases with the same TCM but very different compositions were found to have the same MMP. Various correlating parameters were tried but TCM was found to be the most suitable. This correlation is compared to others in the literature and found to be superior in the case where the drive gas contained both light and intermediate components. The correlation indicates that miscibility in a field-wide CO/sub 2/ flood may be maintained by reinjection of impure CO/sub 2/ streams if sufficient intermediate hydrocarbons are present in the produced gas to offset the effects of lighter gases. Since CO/sub 2/ cleanup is one of the major costs in fieldwide CO/sub 2/ flooding, reduction or complete elimination of produced gas cleanup will have a significant positive impact on process economics. The operational and regulatory aspects of injecting an impure CO/sub 2/ stream must be considered, however, in order to optimize the recycling scheme.

  17. Post waterflood CO{sub 2} miscible flood in light oil fluvial: Dominated deltaic reservoirs. Third quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-15

    Production from the Marg Area 1 at Port Neches is averaging 337 BOPD for this quarter. The production drop is due to fluctuation in both GOR and BS&W on various producing wells, low water injectivity in the reservoir and shut-in one producing well to perform a workover to replace a failed gravel pack setting. Coil tubing work was performed on 2 injection wells in order to resume injection of water and CO{sub 2} in the reservoir. The Marg Area 2 did not respond favorably to CO{sub 2} injection in the Kuhn No. 6 well. For this reason Texaco will not pursue any further development of this section of the reservoir due mainly to low target reserves. Instead Texaco will reallocate the money to a new Marg segment (Marg Area 3) in order to test a new process that will utilize the CO{sub 2} to accelerate the primary production rates and reduce cycle time. Also the process should reduce water disposal cost, cash lifting cost, operating cost and increase the NPV of the reserves.

  18. Post waterflood CO2 miscible flood in light oil fluvial - dominated deltaic reservoirs. Technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 30, 1994. 1st Quarter, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-15

    Production is averaging about 450 BOPD for the quarter. The fluctuation was primarily due to a temporary shutdown of CO{sub 2} delivery and maturing of the first WAG cycle. CO{sub 2} and water injection were reversed again in order to optimize changing yields and water cuts in the producing wells. Measured BHP was close to the anticipated value. A limited CO{sub 2} volume of 120 MMCF was injected to stimulate well Kuhn No. 6 to test the Huff-Puff process, since the well did not respond to CO{sub 2} injection from the main reservoir. The well will be placed on February 1, 1995. Total CO{sub 2} injection averaged this quarter about 8.8 MMCFD, including 3.6 MMCFD purchased CO{sub 2} from Cardox. The stratigraphy of the sand deposits is also discussed.

  19. Linking timing, magnitude and process-controls of floods in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghuijs, Wouter; Woods, Ross; Hutton, Christopher; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2016-04-01

    River flooding can have severe societal, economic and environmental consequences. However, limited understanding of the regional differences in flood generating mechanisms results in poorly understood flood trends, and consequently, uncertain predictions of future flood conditions. Through systematic data analyses of 420 catchments we expose the primary drivers of flooding across the contiguous United States. This is achieved by exploring which flood-generating processes control the seasonality and magnitude of maximum annual flows. The regional patterns of seasonality and interannual variability of the magnitude of maximum annual flows are, in general, poorly explained by rainfall characteristics alone. For most catchments soil moisture dependent precipitation excess, snowmelt and rain-on-snow events are found to be much better predictors of flooding responses. The generated continental-scale classification of dominant flood generating processes emphasizes the disparity between extreme rainfall and flooding, and can assist predictions of the nature of flooding and flood risk within the continental US.

  20. Flooding and Flood Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, K.N.; Fallon, J.D.; Lorenz, D.L.; Stark, J.R.; Menard, Jason; Easter, K.W.; Perry, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Floods result in great human disasters globally and nationally, causing an average of $4 billion of damages each year in the United States. Minnesota has its share of floods and flood damages, and the state has awarded nearly $278 million to local units of government for flood mitigation projects through its Flood Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Since 1995, flood mitigation in the Red River Valley has exceeded $146 million. Considerable local and state funding has been provided to manage and mitigate problems of excess stormwater in urban areas, flooding of farmlands, and flood damages at road crossings. The cumulative costs involved with floods and flood mitigation in Minnesota are not known precisely, but it is safe to conclude that flood mitigation is a costly business. This chapter begins with a description of floods in Minneosta to provide examples and contrasts across the state. Background material is presented to provide a basic understanding of floods and flood processes, predication, and management and mitigation. Methods of analyzing and characterizing floods are presented because they affect how we respond to flooding and can influence relevant practices. The understanding and perceptions of floods and flooding commonly differ among those who work in flood forecasting, flood protection, or water resource mamnagement and citizens and businesses affected by floods. These differences can become magnified following a major flood, pointing to the need for better understanding of flooding as well as common language to describe flood risks and the uncertainty associated with determining such risks. Expectations of accurate and timely flood forecasts and our ability to control floods do not always match reality. Striving for clarity is important in formulating policies that can help avoid recurring flood damages and costs.

  1. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, January 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1995-07-01

    Alaska is the second largest oil producing state in the nation and currently contributes nearly 24% of the nations oil production. It is imperative that Alaskan heavy oil fields be brought into production. Schrader Bluff reservoir, located in the Milne Point Unit, which is part of the heavy oil field known as West Sak is estimated to contain 1.5 billion barrels of (14 to 21 degree API) oil-in-place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. The eventual implementation of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be vital for the recovery of additional oil from this reservoir. The availability of hydrocarbon gases (solvents) on the Alaska North Slope make the hydrocarbon miscible solvent injection process an important consideration for the EOR project in Schrader Bluff reservoir. Since Schrader Bluff oil is heavy and viscous, a water-alternating-gas (WAG) type of process for oil recovery is appropriate since such a process tends to derive synergetic benefits from both water injection (which provides mobility control and improvement in sweep efficiency) and miscible gas injection (which provides improved displacement efficiency). A miscible solvent slug injection process rather than continuous solvent injection is considered appropriate. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine the effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir.

  2. Water flooding process using multiple fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, R.M.; Gilchrist, R.E.; Hover, G.W.

    1981-09-29

    A process is disclosed for the recovery of oil from a subterranean formation. Which is preferably a residium from a prior recovery operation. The process includes injecting a first treatment fluid comprising an aqueous solution of polymer of 50 ppm to 5000 ppm polymer, for example a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide, in an amount of from 0.5 to 100% pore volume of the formation and thereafter injecting into said formation a second treatment fluid comprising a mixture of an aqueous solution of polymer and from 0.01 to 3.5 weight percent caustic, for example NaOH, in an amount of from 0.5 to 100% pore volume of the formation and recovering oil from the formation.

  3. Liquid Phase Miscibility Gap Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Markworth, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    The manner in which the microstructural features of liquid-phase miscibility gap alloys develop was determined. This will allow control of the microstructures and the resultant properties of these alloys. The long-duration low gravity afforded by the shuttle will allow experiments supporting this research to be conducted with minimal interference from buoyancy effects and gravitationally driven convection currents. Ground base studies were conducted on Al-In, Cu-Pb, and Te-Tl alloys to determine the effect of cooling rate, composition, and interfacial energies on the phase separation and solidification processes that influence the development of microstructure in these alloys. Isothermal and directional cooling experiments and simulations are conducted. The ground based activities are used as a technological base from which flight experiments formulated and to which these flight experiments are compared.

  4. USING PHASE DIAGRAMS TO PREDICT THE PERFORMANCE OF COSOLVENT FLOODS FOR NAPL REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cosolvent flooding using water miscible solvents such as alcohols has been proposed as an in-situ NAPL remediation technique. This process is conceptually similar to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using alcohols and some surfactant formulations. As a result of interest in the EOR ...

  5. Investigations of infiltration processes from flooded areas by column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohrlok, U.; Bethge, E.; Golalipour, A.

    2009-04-01

    In case of inundation of flood plains during flood events there is an increased risk of groundwater contamination due to infiltration of increasingly polluted river water. Specifically in densely populated regions, this groundwater may be used as source for drinking water supply. For the evaluation of this a detailed quantitative understanding of the infiltration processes under such conditions is required. In this context the infiltration related to a flood event can be described by three phases. The first phase is defined by the saturation of the unsaturated soils. Within the second phase infiltration takes place under almost saturated conditions determined by the hydraulic load of the flood water level. The drainage of the soils due to falling groundwater table is characterizing the third phase. Investigations by soil columns gave a detailed insight into the infiltration processes caused by flooding. Inflow at the soil top was established by a fixed water table fed by a Mariotte bottle. Free outflow and a groundwater table were used as lower boundary condition. Inflow and outflow volume were monitored. The evolution of the matrix pressure was observed by micro-tensiometers installed at several depths within the soil column. The flow processes during phase one and two were characterized by a tracer test. Some of the experiments were repeated in order to study the influence of preliminary events. Main results were a difference in infiltration due to the lower boundary condition with regard to inflow rate, outflow dynamics and matrix pressure evolution which is directly related to the water content evolution. Further, the influence of preliminary events was different for the different boundary conditions. A replacement of pre-event water could be observed which was confirmed by volume balances calculated for the infiltration experiments. Although these water balances were almost closed significant dynamics of the matrix pressure remained in soil column in the

  6. Miscibility of Polyolefin Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Lipson, Jane E. G.

    1998-10-01

    Phase separation in polymers is important for many technical applications but difficult to predict theoretically. Recently, extensive experimental studies on the miscibility of polyolefins revealed that these systems display a wider variety of mixing behavior than their chemical similarity suggests. In order to predict phase diagrams of polyolefin blends from pure component properties, we have developed a method in which small scale simulations of local interactions are combined with an analytical model for the thermodynamics, the Born-Green-Yvon lattice model. A comparison with experimental data shows that the new approach yields qualitatively correct predictions for phase separation in LCST as well as UCST blends, including the effects of pressure and molar mass of the components on the phase transition temperatures.

  7. Flood risk changes emerging from the feedbacks between physical and social processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglione, Alberto; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Carr, Gemma; Kuil, Linda; Yan, Kun; Brandimarte, Luigia; Blöschl, Günter

    2015-04-01

    To explore changes in flood risk, we propose a novel approach whereby the mutual interactions and continuous feedbacks between floods and societies are explicitly accounted for. We apply this approach by using a socio-hydrological model and simulate the behavior of societies that cope with flooding by either building levees or dikes or resettling out of flood-prone areas. We show that this novel approach is able to capture (and explain) spontaneous dynamics, such as adaptation and levee effects, which often emerge from the interplay between physical and social processes. Moreover, the implementation of this approach provides fascinating insights for flood risk management. For instance, when coupled dynamics are accounted for, flood-poor periods can be more dangerous for societies than flood-rich periods because they lower the collective memory of flooding and therefore reduce societal resilience to flooding.

  8. Enhancing flood forecasting with the help of processed based calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullmann, Johannes; Krauße, Thomas; Philipp, Andy

    Due to the fact that the required input data are not always completely available and model structures are only a crude description of the underlying natural processes, model parameters need to be calibrated. Calibrated model parameters only reflect a small domain of the natural processes well. This imposes an obstacle on the accuracy of modelling a wide range of flood events, which, in turn is crucial for flood forecasting systems. Together with the rigid model structures of currently available rainfall-runoff models this presents a serious constraint to portraying the highly non-linear transformation of precipitation into runoff. Different model concepts (interflow, direct runoff), or rather the represented processes, such as infiltration, soil water movement etc. are more or less dominating different sections of the runoff spectrum. Most models do not account for such transient characteristics inherent to the hydrograph. In this paper we try to show a way out of the dilemma of limited model parameter validity. Exemplarily, we investigate on the model performance of WaSiM-ETH, focusing on the parameterisation strategy in the context of flood forecasting. In order to compensate for the non-transient parameters of the WaSiM model we propose a process based parameterisation strategy. This starts from a detailed analysis of the considered catchments rainfall-runoff characteristics. Based on a classification of events, WaSiM-ETH is calibrated and validated to describe all the event classes separately. These specific WaSiM-ETH event class models are then merged to improve the model performance in predicting peak flows. This improved catchment modelling can be used to train an artificial intelligence based black box forecasting tool as described in [Schmitz, G.H., Cullmann, J., Görner, W., Lennartz, F., Dröge, W., 2005. PAI-OFF: Eine neue Strategie zur Hochwasservorhersage in schnellreagierenden Einzugsgebieten. Hydrologie und Wasserbewirtschaftung 49, 226

  9. Atmospheric processes triggering the Central European floods in June 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, C. M.; Binder, H.; Pfahl, S.; Piaget, N.; Wernli, H.

    2014-01-01

    In June 2013 Central Europe was hit by a century flood affecting the Danube and Elbe catchments after a 4 day period of heavy precipitation and causing severe human and economic loss. In this study model analysis and observational data are investigated to reveal the key atmospheric processes that caused the heavy precipitation event. The period preceeding the flood was characterised by a weather regime associated with cool and unusual wet conditions resulting from repeated Rossby wave breaking (RWB). During the event a single RWB established a reversed baroclinicity in the low to mid troposphere in Central Europe with cool air trapped over the Alps and warmer air to the North. The upper-level cut-off resulting from the RWB instigated three consecutive cyclones in eastern Europe that unusually tracked westward during the days of heavy precipitation. Continuous large-scale slantwise ascent in so-called "upside down" warm conveyor belts (WCBs) associated with these cyclones is found as the key process that caused the 4 day heavy precipitation period. Fed by moisture sources from continental evapotranspiration, these WCBs unusually ascended equatorward along the southward sloping moist isentropes. Although "upside down" WCBs are climatologically rare events, they have great potential for causing high impact weather.

  10. Atmospheric processes triggering the central European floods in June 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, C. M.; Binder, H.; Pfahl, S.; Piaget, N.; Wernli, H.

    2014-07-01

    In June 2013, central Europe was hit by a century flood affecting the Danube and Elbe catchments after a 4 day period of heavy precipitation and causing severe human and economic loss. In this study model analysis and observational data are investigated to reveal the key atmospheric processes that caused the heavy precipitation event. The period preceding the flood was characterised by a weather regime associated with cool and unusual wet conditions resulting from repeated Rossby wave breaking (RWB). During the event a single RWB established a reversed baroclinicity in the low to mid-troposphere in central Europe with cool air trapped over the Alps and warmer air to the north. The upper-level cut-off resulting from the RWB instigated three consecutive cyclones in eastern Europe that unusually tracked westward during the days of heavy precipitation. Continuous large-scale slantwise ascent in so-called "equatorward ascending" warm conveyor belts (WCBs) associated with these cyclones is found as the key process that caused the 4 day heavy precipitation period. Fed by moisture sources from continental evapotranspiration, these WCBs unusually ascended equatorward along the southward sloping moist isentropes. Although "equatorward ascending" WCBs are climatologically rare events, they have great potential for causing high impact weather.

  11. Effect of phase behavior on bypassing in enriched gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Bhogeswara, R.; Mohanty, K.K. )

    1994-05-01

    Enriched gas floods incorporate a complex interaction of heterogeneity, fingering, multiphase flow, and phase behavior. Experiments and simulations indicate that the optimum solvent enrichment in high-viscosity-ratio secondary gas floods can be below minimum miscibility enrichment (MME). The compositional path and resulting mobility profile in multidimensional multiple-contact miscible (MCM) or immiscible floods are different from their 1D counterparts for high-viscosity-ratio floods in heterogeneous media.

  12. Transient Interfacial Phenomena in Miscible Polymer Systems (TIPMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.; Bessonov, Nicholas; Volpert, Vitaly; Wilke, Hermann

    2003-01-01

    Almost one hundred years ago Korteweg published a theory of how stresses could be induced in miscible fluids by concentration gradients, causing phenomena that would appear to be the same as with immiscible fluids. Miscible fluids could manifest a transient or effective interfacial tension (EIT). To this day, there has been no definitive experiment to confirm Korteweg's model but numerous fascinating and suggestive experiments have been reported. The goal of TIPMPS is to answer the question: Can concentration and temperature gradients in miscible materials induce stresses that cause convection? Many polymer processes involving miscible monomer and polymer systems could be affected by fluid flow and so this work could help understand miscible polymer processing, not only in microgravity, but also on earth. Demonstrating the existence of this phenomenon in miscible fluids will open up a new area of study for materials science. The science objectives of TIPMPS are: (1) Determine if convection can be induced by variation of the width of a miscible interface; (2) Determine if convection can be induced by variation of temperature along a miscible interface; (3) Determine if convection can be induced by variation of conversion along a miscible interface An interface between two miscible fluids can best be created via a spatially-selective photopolymerization of dodecyl acrylate with a photoinitiator, which allows the creation of precise and accurate concentration gradients between polymer and monomer. Optical techniques will be used to measure the refractive index variation caused by the resultant temperature and concentration fields. The viscosity of the polymer will be measured from the increase in the fluorescence of pyrene. Because the large concentration and temperature gradients cause buoyancy-driven convection that prevents the observation of the predicted flows, the experiment must be done in microgravity. In this report, we will consider our efforts to estimate

  13. Interpretations of Polymer-Polymer Miscibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olabisi, Olagoke

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of polymeric mixtures, mixtures of structurally different homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. Defines concepts of polymer-polymer miscibility from practical and theoretical viewpoints, and ways of predicting such miscibility. (JN)

  14. Hydro-geological process chain for building a flood scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longoni, Laura; Brambilla, Davide; Papini, Monica; Ivanov, Vladislav; Radice, Alessio

    2015-04-01

    Flash-flood events in mountain environments are often related to the transport of large amounts of sediment from the slopes through the stream network. As a consequence, significant morphological changes may occur in rivers during a single, short-duration event, with possibly significant effect on the water elevation. An appropriate hazard evaluation would therefore require the thorough modelling of the flood-related phenomena and of their interconnection. In this context, this work is focused on an attempt of integrated modelling of event-scale water and sediment transport processes for a reference case-study of the Mallero basin in the Italian Alps. The area of the catchments is about 320 square km, the main stream being almost 25 km long and having slopes in the range from 1 to 40 %. A town (Sondrio) is present at the downstream end of the river. In 1987, Sondrio was at risk of inundation due to a combined effect of relatively high discharge and aggradation of the river bed up to 5 m (almost equal to the bankfull depth in the in-town reach). A 100-year flood scenario was produced including (i) a sediment supply model, (ii) a one-dimensional, hydro-morphologic model of the river bed evolution, and (iii) an estimation of the outflowing discharge at river sections where the bank elevation was exceeded by water. Rainfall-runoff transformation was not included into the modelling chain as the 100-year water hydrograph was already available from previous studies. For the sediment production model, a downscaling in time of the Gavrilovic equation was attempted using rainfall estimation from depth-duration-frequency curves, which furnished values in reasonable agreement with some available data. The hydro-morphologic model, based on the Saint-Venant and Exner equations, was preliminarily calibrated against data for bed aggradation measured in 1987. A point of separation was chosen at an appropriate location in the basin, and the sediment yield estimated upstream of this

  15. A process flood typology along an Alpine transect: classification based on cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoccatelli, Davide; Parajka, Juraj; Gaal, Ladislav; Blöschl, Günter; Borga, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Flood classification according with their causative processes helps to understand how flood regimes change across climates. The aim of this work is to create a flood classification scheme along a longitudinal Alpine transect spanning 200 km in a North-South direction. The investigation is focused on the analysis of floods that have similar properties and can be defined as a type. After the definition of flood types we analyzed their properties, their spatial organization and the relation with the topography of the transect. Precipitation and temperature follow a sharp gradient across the transect, with both precipitation and temperature low around the main alpine ridge. Along this gradient the causative processes of floods are changing, modifying the flood regimes of catchments. The three main floods each year on 33 alpine basins (from 50 to 500 km2) are isolated from about 20 years of hourly discharge. An hydrological model simulates the catchment conditions at the begin of each event. For each flood we created a set of indexes to describe hydrograph properties, meteorological inputs and catchment conditions. A cluster analysis on these indexes defined how many flood types can be found in our data and what are their unique properties. Successively a classification tree analysis defined the best criteria to identify those clusters. Results indicate that transect floods are best divided in three clusters, that can be related with Snowmelt, Rain and Flash Floods. The successive classification tree analysis showed that a good classification can also be achieved using few criteria, but that the application of an hydrological model is useful to identify snowmelt events. The distribution of these flood types in space and time across the Alps is reported, and it is in agreement with the processes involved. This approach proved, across different climates, to be able to identify groups of floods that could be related with the driving processes, and to define and evaluate

  16. Field Experiments Aimed To The Analysis of Flood Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriero, D.; Iacobellis, V.; Oliveto, G.; Romano, N.; Telesca, V.; Fiorentino, M.

    The study of the soil moisture dynamics and of the climate-soil-vegetation interac- tion is essential for the comprehension of possible climatic change phenomena, as well as for the analysis of occurrence of extreme hydrological events. In this trend the theoretically-based distribution of floods recently derived by Fiorentino and Ia- cobellis, [ŞNew insights about the climatic and geologic control on the probability distribution of floodsT, Water Resources Research, 2001, 37: 721-730] demonstrated, by an application in some Southern Italy basins, that processes at the hillslope scale strongly influence the basin response by means of the different mechanisms of runoff generation produced by various distributions of partial area contributing. This area is considered as a stochastic variable whose pdf position parameter showed strong de- pendence on the climate as it can seen in the studied basins behavior: in dry zones, where there is the prevalence of the infiltration excess (Horton) mechanism, the basin water loss parameter decreases as basin area increases and the flood peak source area depends on the permeability of soils; in humid zones, with the prevalence of satu- ration excess (Dunne) process, the loss parameter seems independent from the basin area and very sensitive to simple climatic index while only small portion of the area invested by the storm contributes to floods. The purpose of this work is to investigate the consistency of those interpretations by means of field experiments at the hillslope scale to establish a parameterization accounting for soil physical and hydraulic prop- erties, vegetation characteristics and land-use. The research site is the catchment of River Fiumarella di Corleto, which is located in Basilicata Region, Italy, and has a drainage area of approximately 32 km2. The environment has a rather dynamic geo- morphology and very interesting features from the soil-landscape modeling viewpoint [Santini A., A. Coppola, N. Romano, and

  17. Enhanced oil recovery using water as a driving fluid. Part 7. Field applications of carbon dioxide flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Mungan, N.

    1981-09-01

    Spurred by Windfall Profit Tax incentives and the availability of less costly CO/sub 2/ from natural deposits, there now is increased interest and activities in the field application of CO/sub 2/ flooding in the US. Interest is focused on miscible CO/sub 2/ flooding, but it should be recognized that even without miscibility, the swelling and viscosity reduction of crude oil can significantly contribute to incremental oil recovery. Thus, CO/sub 2/ flooding may apply to the recovery of heavy oils and could serve as an alternative process to steam and hydrocarbon solvent processes in some instances. This study deals with how to identify a suitable reservoir, studies required to support a field application, guidelines for pilot testing, operational problems that may arise in the field, and a brief review of field applications to date.

  18. Polyolefin Blend Miscibility and Packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, David J.

    2000-03-01

    Over the last several years data have been obtained on the miscibility of a wide range of polyolefins, covering some 200 blends involving about 75 different components. Despite the fact that there are no 'specific interactions' between these saturated hydrocarbon polymers, every kind of phase behavior has been observed, including UCST, LCST, and even negative values of the Flory interaction parameter. The key factor that determines how these polyolefins mix is the way that they pack. Very often, polyolefins mix regularly, that is, the interaction energy is determined by the cohesive energies of the pure components. When they do mix regularly, miscibility is achieved by a close match in the packing lengths of the components. Favorable irregular mixing appears to be the result of some specific packing arrangements. Recent data on the effects of pressure and temperature on the mixing of several polyolefin blends shows that the interaction energies depend only on density (and not on T and P independently) for UCST blends far from a critical point. As a result, the effects of pressure on miscibility can be predicted for such blends from knowledge of the effects of temperature on the interactions combined with PVT data. This remarkable simplification appears to be related to the van der Waals nature of the interactions between saturated hydrocarbons. Density dependence predicts the trends correctly for LCST polyolefin blends, but for these mixtures the interactions depend in a more complex way on T and P.

  19. Process-based distributed hydrological modelling of annual floods in the Upper Zambezi using the Desert Flood Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhardt, Markus; Sven, Kralisch; Manfred, Fink; Daniel, Butchart-Kuhlmann; Anthony, Chabala; Melanie, Fleischer; Jörg, Helmschrot; Wilson, Phiri; Tina, Trautmann; Henry, Zimba; Imasiku, Nyambe

    2016-04-01

    Wetland areas are especially sensitive to changes in hydrological conditions. The catchment of the Luanginga River, a tributary of the Upper Zambezi which covers about 33000 km², shows this characteristic in an exemplary way. Ranging from the Angolan highlands to the Barotse floodplain of the Zambezi River , it is characterized by an annual flow regime and extensive wetland areas. Due to its annual flooding with peak times in April, the area features exceptionally fertile soils with high agricultural production and is further known for its rich cultural heritage, making it especially sensitive to changes of hydrological conditions . To identify possible changes related to projected climate and land management change, especially in the area of the floodplain, there is a need to apply a process-based distributed hydrological model of the annual floods . Remote sensing techniques have shown to be appropriate to identify the extend of the important flooding and were used to validate the model in space and time. The results of this research can be used as a basis with which to provide evidence-based advice and information for all decision-makers and stakeholders in the region. For this assessment , such a modelling approach is applied to adequately represent hydrological processes and to address key water resources management issues at sub-basin levels. Introducing a wetland simulation extension, the model allows to represent the annual flood regime of the system and thus to address the effect of climate change and upstream land use changes on flow regimes in the downstream watershed. In order to provide a basis for model validation and calibration, the inundated area was determined using the Desert Flood Index (DFI), which was generated from a time series of Landsat images. We will give a short introduction to the study area and related water resources management problems, present the intended model structure and show first simulations and model validation results

  20. Insurance against climate change and flood risk: Insurability and decision processes of insurers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Hung-Chih; Hung, Jia-Yi

    2016-04-01

    1. Background Major portions of the Asia-Pacific region is facing escalating exposure and vulnerability to climate change and flood-related extremes. This highlights an arduous challenge for public agencies to improve existing risk management strategies. Conventionally, governmental funding was majorly responsible and accountable for disaster loss compensation in the developing countries in Asia, such as Taiwan. This is often criticized as an ineffective and inefficient measure of dealing with flood risk. Flood insurance is one option within the toolkit of risk-sharing arrangement and adaptation strategy to flood risk. However, there are numerous potential barriers for insurance companies to cover flood damage, which would cause the flood risk is regarded as uninsurable. This study thus aims to examine attitudes within the insurers about the viability of flood insurance, the decision-making processes of pricing flood insurance and their determinants, as well as to examine potential solutions to encourage flood insurance. 2. Methods and data Using expected-utility theory, an insurance agent-based decision-making model was developed to examine the insurers' attitudes towards the insurability of flood risk, and to scrutinize the factors that influence their decisions on flood insurance premium-setting. This model particularly focuses on how insurers price insurance when they face either uncertainty or ambiguity about the probability and loss of a particular flood event occurring. This study considers the factors that are expected to affect insures' decisions on underwriting and pricing insurance are their risk perception, attitudes towards flood insurance, governmental measures (e.g., land-use planning, building codes, risk communication), expected probabilities and losses of devastating flooding events, as well as insurance companies' attributes. To elicit insurers' utilities about premium-setting for insurance coverage, the 'certainty equivalent,' 'probability

  1. Vistula River bed erosion processes and their influence on Warsaw's flood safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuszewski, A.; Moran, S.

    2015-03-01

    Large cities have historically been well protected against floods as a function of their importance to society. In Warsaw, Poland, located on a narrow passage of the Vistula River valley, urban flood disasters were not unusual. Beginning at the end of the 19th century, the construction of river embankment and training works caused the narrowing of the flood passage path in the downtown reach of the river. The process of bed erosion lowered the elevation of the river bed by 205 cm over the 20th century, and the consequences of bed lowering are reflected by the rating curve change. Conditions of the flood passage have been analysed by the CCHE2D hydrodynamic model both in retro-modelling and scenario simulation modelling. The high water mark of the 1844 flood and iterative calculations in retro-modelling made possible estimation of the discharge, Q = 8250 m3 s-1. This highest observed historical flood in a natural river has been compared to recent conditions of the Vistula River in Warsaw by scenario modelling. The result shows dramatic changes in water surface elevation, velocities, and shear stress. The vertical velocity in the proximity of Port Praski gauge at km 513 can reach 3.5 m s-1, a very high value for a lowland river. The average flow conveyance is improving due to channel erosion but also declining in the case of extreme floods due to high resistance from vegetation on the flood plains.

  2. Novel Shapes of Miscible Interfaces Observed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, Ramaswamy; Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of miscible displacements in a cylindrical tube are being investigated experimentally and numerically, with a view to understand the complex processes that occur, for example, in enhanced oil recovery, hydrology, and filtration. We have observed complex shapes of the interface between two liquids that mix with each other when the less viscous liquid is displaced by the more viscous one in a tube. A less viscous fluid that displaces a more viscous fluid is known to propagate in the form of a "finger," and a flight experiment proposed by Maxworthy et al. to investigate the miscible-interface dynamics is currently being developed by NASA. From the current theory of miscible displacements, which was developed for a porous medium satisfying Darcy's law, it can be shown that in the absence of gravity the interface between the fluids is destabilized and thus susceptible to fingering only when a more viscous fluid is displaced by a less viscous one. Therefore, if the interface is initially flat and the more viscous fluid displaces the less viscous fluid, the interface ought to be stable and remain flat. However, numerical simulations by Chen and Meiburg for such displacement in a cylindrical tube show that the interface is unstable and a finger of the more viscous fluid is indeed formed. Preliminary experiments performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center show that not only can fingering occur when the more viscous fluid displaces a less viscous one in a cylindrical tube, but also that under certain conditions the advancing finger achieves a sinuous or snakelike shape. These experiments were performed using silicone oils in a vertical pipette of small diameter. In the initial configuration, the more viscous fluid rested on top of the less viscous one, and the interface was nominally flat. A dye was added to the upper liquid for ease of observation of the interface between the fluids. The flow was initiated by draining the lower fluid from the bottom of the

  3. The effect of pressure, isotopic (H/D) substitution, and other variables on miscibility in polymer-solvent systems. The nature of the demixing process; dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hook, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    A research program examining the effects of pressure, isotope substitution and other variables on miscibility in polymer solvent systems is described. The techniques employed included phase equilibrium measurements and dynamic light scattering and small angle neutron scattering.

  4. Voice-enabled Knowledge Engine using Flood Ontology and Natural Language Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sermet, M. Y.; Demir, I.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Information System (IFIS) is a web-based platform developed by the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) to provide access to flood inundation maps, real-time flood conditions, flood forecasts, flood-related data, information and interactive visualizations for communities in Iowa. The IFIS is designed for use by general public, often people with no domain knowledge and limited general science background. To improve effective communication with such audience, we have introduced a voice-enabled knowledge engine on flood related issues in IFIS. Instead of navigating within many features and interfaces of the information system and web-based sources, the system provides dynamic computations based on a collection of built-in data, analysis, and methods. The IFIS Knowledge Engine connects to real-time stream gauges, in-house data sources, analysis and visualization tools to answer natural language questions. Our goal is the systematization of data and modeling results on flood related issues in Iowa, and to provide an interface for definitive answers to factual queries. The goal of the knowledge engine is to make all flood related knowledge in Iowa easily accessible to everyone, and support voice-enabled natural language input. We aim to integrate and curate all flood related data, implement analytical and visualization tools, and make it possible to compute answers from questions. The IFIS explicitly implements analytical methods and models, as algorithms, and curates all flood related data and resources so that all these resources are computable. The IFIS Knowledge Engine computes the answer by deriving it from its computational knowledge base. The knowledge engine processes the statement, access data warehouse, run complex database queries on the server-side and return outputs in various formats. This presentation provides an overview of IFIS Knowledge Engine, its unique information interface and functionality as an educational tool, and discusses the future plans

  5. Study of hydrocarbon miscible solvent slug injection process for improved recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff Pool, Milne Point Unit, Alaska. Annual report, December 1, 1992--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    The shallow Cretaceous sands of the Schrader Bluff Reservoir occur between depths of 4,000 and 4,800 feet below surface and are estimated to contain up to 1.5 billion barrels of oil in place. The field is currently under production by primary depletion. Initial production indicated that primary recovery will fall short of earlier estimates and waterflooding will have to be employed much earlier than expected. A large portion of the oil-in-place thus would still be left behind in this reservoir after primary and secondary recovery methods have been applied. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques will be needed to recover the additional portion of remaining oil in this huge reservoir and to add significant additional reserves. Slim tube displacement studies, PVT data and asphaltene precipitation studies are needed for Schrader Bluff heavy oil to define possible hydrocarbon solvent suitable for miscible solvent slug displacement process. Such studies are essential because the API gravity of the crude in Schrader Bluff reservoir varies significantly from well to well. Coreflood experiments are also needed to determine effect of solvent slug size, WAG ratio and solvent composition on the oil recovery and solvent breakthrough. A compositional reservoir simulation study will be conducted later to evaluate the complete performance of the hydrocarbon solvent slug process and to assess the feasibility of this process for improving recovery of heavy oil from Schrader Bluff reservoir. This report contains the following: reservoir description; slim tube displacement studies; and coreflood experiments.

  6. Two glass transitions in miscible polymer blends?

    SciTech Connect

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-06-28

    In contrast to mixtures of two small molecule fluids, miscible binary polymer blends often exhibit two structural relaxation times and two glass transition temperatures. Qualitative explanations postulate phenomenological models of local concentration enhancements due to chain connectivity in ideal, fully miscible systems. We develop a quantitative theory that explains qualitative trends in the dynamics of real miscible polymer blends which are never ideal mixtures. The theory is a synthesis of the lattice cluster theory of blend thermodynamics, the generalized entropy theory for glass-formation in polymer materials, and the Kirkwood-Buff theory for concentration fluctuations in binary mixtures.

  7. Enhanced oil recovery by CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement in the Little Knife Field, Billings County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, J.B.; Larsen, W.K.; Lindsay, R.F.; Nettle, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Gulf Oil Exploration and Production Company, in conjunction with the Department of Energy, has successfully conducted a field test of the CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement process in the Little Knife Field. All project objectives were conceived, implemented, and accomplished as a result of the synergetic cooperation and communication between the various departments within Gulf Oil Corporation and the DOE. The minitest succeeded in establishing water-flood residual-oil saturations. It also succeeded in reducing the waterflood residual-oil saturation to a lower value by CO/sub 2//water injection. Finally, and most importantly, the minitest was successfully characterized, developed, and monitored. Monitoring was accomplished by cased-hole logging, fluid sampling, and simulation modeling. 9 refs.

  8. A regional look at the selection of a process-oriented model for flood peak/volume relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolgay, Ján; Gaál, Ladislav; Bacigál, Tomáš; Kohnová, Silvia; Hlavčová, Kamila; Výleta, Roman; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-05-01

    Recent research on the bivariate flood peak/volume frequency analysis has mainly focused on the statistical aspects of the use of various copula models. The interplay of climatic and catchment processes in discriminating among these models has attracted less interest. In the paper we analyse the influence of climatic and hydrological controls on flood peak and volume relationships and their models, which are based on the concept of comparative hydrology in the catchments of a selected region in Austria. Independent flood events have been isolated and assigned to one of the three types of flood processes: synoptic floods, flash floods and snowmelt floods. First, empirical copulas are regionally compared in order to verify whether any flood processes are discernible in terms of the corresponding bivariate flood-peak relationships. Next the types of copulas, which are frequently used in hydrology are fitted, and their goodness-of-fit is examined in a regional scope. The spatial similarity of copulas and their rejection rate, depending on the flood type, region, and sample size are examined, too. In particular, the most remarkable difference is observed between flash floods and the other two types of flood. It is concluded that treating flood processes separately in such an analysis is beneficial, both hydrologically and statistically, since flood processes and the relationships associated with them are discernible both locally and regionally in the pilot region. However, uncertainties inherent in the copula-based bivariate frequency analysis itself (caused, among others, also by the relatively small sample sizes for consistent copula model selection, upper tail dependence characterization and reliable predictions) may not be overcome in the scope of such a regional comparative analysis.

  9. Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, M.B.; Zoz, S.C.; Berkenbosch, L.J. . Dept. of Agricultural Engineering)

    1992-10-01

    Miscibility data have been obtained for a variety of non-CFC refrigerants and their potential lubricants. Ten different refrigerants and seven different lubricants were investigated. Experiments are being performed in two phases: Phase I, reported herein, focuses on performing screening tests for miscibility and Phase II consists of developing miscibility plots. The miscibility tests are being performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The bath temperature can be precisely controlled over a temperature range of -50 C to 90C(-58 F to 194 F). The test cells are constructed to allow for complete visibility of lubricant-refrigerant mixtures under all test conditions.

  10. Surface Tension and Fingering of Miscible Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abib, Mohammed; Liu, Jian-Bang; Ronney, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments on miscible, buoyantly unstable reaction-diffusion fronts and non-reacting displacement fronts in Hele-Shaw cells show a fingering-type instability whose wavelengths (lambda*) are consistent with an interfacial tension (sigma) at the front caused by the change in chemical composition, even though the solutions are miscible in all proportions. In conjunction with the Saffman-Taylor model, the relation sigma = K/tau, where tau is the interface thickness and K approximately equal 4 +/- 2 x 10(exp -6) dyne, enables prediction of our measured values of lambda* as well as results from prior experiments on miscible interfaces. These results indicate that even for miscible fluids, surface tension is generally a more significant factor than diffusion in interfacial stability and flow characteristics.

  11. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  12. An integrated process for the production of platform chemicals and diesel miscible fuels by acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and downstream upgrading of the acid hydrolysis residues with thermal and catalytic pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Girisuta, Buana; Kalogiannis, Konstantinos G; Dussan, Karla; Leahy, James J; Hayes, Michael H B; Stefanidis, Stylianos D; Michailof, Chrysa M; Lappas, Angelos A

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates an integrated process for the production of platform chemicals and diesel miscible biofuels. An energy crop (Miscanthus) was treated hydrothermally to produce levulinic acid (LA). Temperatures ranging between 150 and 200 °C, sulfuric acid concentrations 1-5 wt.% and treatment times 1-12 h were applied to give different combined severity factors. Temperatures of 175 and 200 °C and acid concentration of 5 wt.% were found to be necessary to achieve good yield (17 wt.%) and selectivities of LA while treatment time did not have an effect. The acid hydrolysis residues were characterized for their elemental, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents, and then tested in a small-scale pyrolyzer using silica sand and a commercial ZSM-5 catalyst. Milder pretreatment yielded more oil (43 wt.%) and oil O(2) (37%) while harsher pretreatment and catalysis led to more coke production (up to 58 wt.%), less oil (12 wt.%) and less oil O(2) (18 wt.%).

  13. Effects of vibrations on dynamics of miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponenko, Yu.; Shevtsova, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the mixing of two miscible fluids in gravitationally stable configuration. In the absence of external forces the diffusion process leads to the mixing of species. The aim of this study is to analyze the physical mechanism by which vibrations affect the mixing characteristic of two stratified miscible fluids. The translational periodic vibrations of a rigid cell filled with different mixtures of water-isopropanol are imposed. The vibrations with a constant frequency and amplitude are directed along the interface. In absence of gravity vibration-induced mass transport is incomparably faster than in diffusion regime. Our results highlight the strong interplay between gravity and vibrational impact, the relative weight of each effect is determined by ratio vibrational and classical Rayleigh numbers.

  14. Optical data processing and projected applications of the ERTS-1 imagery covering the 1973 Mississippi River Valley floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, M.; Ruggles, F. H.

    1974-01-01

    Flooding along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries was imaged by the multispectral scanner (MSS) on the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) on at least three orbits during the spring of 1973. The ERTS data provided the first opportunity for mapping the regional extent of flooding at the time the imagery was acquired. Special optical data processing techniques were used to produce a variety of multispectral color composites which enhanced floodplain details. One of these, a two-color composite of near infrared bands 6 and 7, was enlarged and registered to 1:250,000-scale topographic maps and used as the basis for preparation of flood image maps. Two specially filtered three-color composites of MSS bands 5, 6, and 7 and 4, 5, and 7 were prepared to aid in the interpretation of the data. The extent of the flooding was vividly depicted on a single image by two-color temporal composites produced on the additive-color viewer using band 7 flood data superimposed on pre-flood band 7 images. Analysis of temporal data composites of the pre-flood and post-flood band 7 images indicate that changes in surface reflectance characteristics caused by the flooding can be delineated, thus making it possible to map the overall area flooded without the necessity of a real-time system to track and image the peak flood waves.

  15. Quantifying the effect of sea level rise and flood defence - apoint process perspective on coastal flood damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettle, M.; Rybski, D.; Kropp, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to recent advances in projecting sea levels, estimations about the economic impact of sea level rise are vague. Nonetheless, they are of great importance for policy making with regard to adaptation and greenhouse-gas mitigation. Since the damage is mainly caused by extreme events, we propose a stochastic framework to estimate the monetary losses from coastal floods in a confined region. For this purpose, we follow a Peak-over-Threshold approach employing a Poisson point process and the Generalised Pareto Distribution. By considering the effect of sea level rise as well as potential adaptation scenarios on the involved parameters, we are able to study the development of the annual damage. An application to the city of Copenhagen shows that a doubling of losses can be expected from a mean sea level increase of only 11 cm. In general, we find that for varying parameters the expected losses can be well approximated by one of three analytical expressions depending on the extreme value parameters. These findings reveal the complex interplay of the involved parameters and allow conclusions of fundamental relevance. For instance, we show that the damage always increases faster than the sea level rise itself. This in turn can be of great importance for the assessment of sea level rise impacts on the global scale. Our results are accompanied by an assessment of uncertainty, which reflects the stochastic nature of extreme events. While the uncertainty of flood damage increases with rising sea levels, we find that the error of our estimations in relation to the expected damage decreases.

  16. Quantifying the effect of sea level rise and flood defence - a point process perspective on coastal flood damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettle, M.; Rybski, D.; Kropp, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to recent advances in projecting sea levels, estimations about the economic impact of sea level rise are vague. Nonetheless, they are of great importance for policy making with regard to adaptation and greenhouse-gas mitigation. Since the damage is mainly caused by extreme events, we propose a stochastic framework to estimate the monetary losses from coastal floods in a confined region. For this purpose, we follow a Peak-over-Threshold approach employing a Poisson point process and the Generalised Pareto Distribution. By considering the effect of sea level rise as well as potential adaptation scenarios on the involved parameters, we are able to study the development of the annual damage. An application to the city of Copenhagen shows that a doubling of losses can be expected from a mean sea level increase of only 11 cm. In general, we find that for varying parameters the expected losses can be well approximated by one of three analytical expressions depending on the extreme value parameters. These findings reveal the complex interplay of the involved parameters and allow conclusions of fundamental relevance. For instance, we show that the damage typically increases faster than the sea level rise itself. This in turn can be of great importance for the assessment of sea level rise impacts on the global scale. Our results are accompanied by an assessment of uncertainty, which reflects the stochastic nature of extreme events. While the absolute value of uncertainty about the flood damage increases with rising mean sea levels, we find that it decreases in relation to the expected damage.

  17. Miscibility Studies on Polymer Blends Modified with Phytochemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Neelakandan; Kyu, Thein

    2009-03-01

    The miscibility studies related to an amorphous poly(amide)/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) [PA/PVP] blend with a crystalline phytochemical called ``Mangiferin'' is presented. Phytochemicals are plant derived chemicals which intrinsically possess multiple salubrious properties that are associated with prevention of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and hypertension. Incorporation of phytochemicals into polymers has shown to have very promising applications in wound healing, drug delivery, etc. The morphology of these materials is crucial to applications like hemodialysis, which is governed by thermodynamics and kinetics of the phase separation process. Hence, miscibility studies of PA/PVP blends with and without mangiferin have been carried out using dimethyl sulfoxide as a common solvent. Differential scanning calorimetry studies revealed that the binary PA/PVP blends were completely miscible at all compositions. However, the addition of mangiferin has led to liquid-liquid phase separation and liquid-solid phase transition in a composition dependent manner. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy was undertaken to determine specific interaction between the polymer constituents and the role of possible hydrogen bonding among three constituents will be discussed.

  18. Towards a generalized catchment flood processes simulation system with distributed hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution distributed hydrological model is regarded as to have the potential to finely simulate the catchment hydrological processes, but challenges still exist. This paper, presented a generalized catchment flood processes simulation system with Liuxihe Model, a physically-based distributed hydrological model proposed mainly for catchment flood forecasting, which is a process-based hydrological model. In this system, several cutting edge technologies have been employed, such as the supercomputing technology, PSO algorithm for parameter optimization, cloud computation, GIS and software engineering, and it is deployed on a high performance computer with free public accesses. The model structure setting up data used in this system is the open access database, so it could be used for catchments world widely. With the application of parallel computation algorithm, the model spatial resolution could be as fine as up to 100 m grid, while maintaining high computation efficiency, and could be used in large scale catchments. With the utilization of parameter optimization method, the model performance cold be improved largely. The flood events of several catchments in southern China with different drainage sizes have been simulated by this system, and the results show that this system has strong capability in simulating catchment flood events even in large river basins.

  19. Pore-scale simulation of miscible displacement in porous media using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ming

    2016-03-01

    A numerical model based on the lattice Boltzmann method is presented to investigate the viscous fingering phenomena of miscible displacement processes in porous media, which involves the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transport. Especially, temperature- and concentration-dependent pore-fluid viscosity is considered. A complete list is derived and given for the conversion of relevant physical variables to lattice units to facilitate the understanding and implementation of the coupled problems involving fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transport using the LBM. To demonstrate the proposed model capacity, two different complex geometry microstructures using high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images of core sample have been obtained and incorporated as computation geometries for modeling miscible displacement processes in porous media. The viscous fingering phenomena of miscible displacement processes are simulated in two different cases, namely in a channel and a porous medium respectively. Some influencing factors on the miscible displacement process, such as the pore-scale microstructure, Le number and Re number, are studied in great detail. The related simulation results have demonstrated that: (1) the existence of the pore-scale microstructure can have a significant effect on the front morphologies and front propagation speed in the miscible displacement process; (2) as the Le number increases, the fluid front and thermal front evolve differently, with the thermal front being less unstable due to more diffusion; (3) a larger Re number can lead to an increase in the propagation speed of the front.

  20. Processes and Geomorphological Impacts of an Extreme Flash Flood Event in SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A major flash flood event took place on 28 September, 2012 in SE Spain, resulting in 10 fatalities and much damage to infrastructure regionally. The flood affected long-term monitoring sites in two catchments in which morphological changes and flow dynamics of these ephemeral channels were being measured. Thus detailed data on channel state prior to the flood were available. The flood event in the Nogalte catchment was extreme in its peak flow, rate of rise and unit runoff. The catchment has steep relief and much bare soil under almond groves, resulting in high sediment supply. The channel is confined in places, but mostly wide and braided, composed of loose gravel and occupying much of the valley floor. Flow was spatially continuous, with high connectivity throughout the catchment. The flood effects were net depositional in the monitored sites, with massive sedimentation on the channel bars. Vegetation was destroyed. Bank erosion and destruction of embankments took place in some locations. Hydraulic calculations indicate very high velocities, stream power and Froude numbers. Modelling and field evidence demonstrate extremely high sediment competence and sediment loadings. The influence of the event dynamics on processes and net outcomes is discussed. The impacts are compared with other events in this and neighbouring catchments. Overall, the event in the Nogalte did not alter the morphology markedly in spite of its extreme characteristics. It is suggested that these valley floors are adapted to this type of flash flood but that flows of such force and magnitude need to be allowed for in management in such an environment.

  1. Optical data processing and projected applications of the ERTS-1 imagery covering the 1973 Mississippi River Valley floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deutsch, Morris; Ruggles, Fred

    1974-01-01

    Flooding along the Mississippi River and some of its tributaries was detected by the multispectral scanner (MSS) on the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) on at least three orbits during the spring of 1973. The ERTS data provided the first opportunity for mapping the regional extent of flooding at the time of the imagery. Special optical data processing techniques were used to produce a variety of multispectral color composites enhancing flood-plain details. One of these, a 2-color composite of near infrared bands 6 and 7, was enlarged and registered to 1:250,000-scale topographic maps and used as the basis for preparation of flood image maps. Two specially filtered 3-color composites of MSS bands 5, 6, and 7 and 4, 5, and 7 were prepared to aid in the interpretation of the data. The extent of the flooding was vividly depicted on a single image by 2-color temporal composites produced on the additive-color viewer using band 7 flood data superimposed on pre-flood band 7 images. On May 24, when the floodwaters at St. Louis receded to bankfull stage, imagery was again obtained by ERTS. Analysis of temporal data composites of the pre-flood and post-flood band 7 images indicate that changes in surface reflectance characteristics caused by the flooding can be delineated, thus making it possible to map the overall area flooded without the necessity of a real-time system to track and image the peak flood waves. Regional planning and disaster relief agencies such as the Corps of Engineers, Office of Emergency Preparedness, Soil Conservation Service, interstate river basin commissions and state agencies, as well as private lending and insurance institutions, have indicated strong potential applications for ERTS image-maps of flood-prone areas.

  2. A FRAMEWORK TO DESIGN AND OPTIMIZE CHEMICAL FLOODING PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  3. A Framework to Design and Optimize Chemical Flooding Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2006-08-31

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  4. Transient surface tension in miscible liquids.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Laurent; Guenoun, Patrick; Beysens, Daniel; Delsanti, Michel; Petitjeans, Philippe; Kurowski, Pascal

    2010-10-01

    Evidence of the existence of a transient surface tension between two miscible fluid phases is given. This is done by making use of a density matched free of gravity perturbations, binary liquid of isobutyric acid and water, which presents a miscibility gap and is studied by light scattering. The experiment is performed very near the critical point of the binary liquid, where the diffusion of phases is extremely slow. The surface tension is deduced from the evolution of the structure factor obtained from low angle light scattering. The latter evolution is successfully analyzed in terms of a local equilibrium diffusive approach that makes explicit how the surface tension decreases with time. PMID:21230286

  5. Coupling glacial lake impact, dam breach, and flood processes: A modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Clague, John J.; Schaub, Yvonne; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-11-01

    Glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) are highly mobile mixtures of water and sediment that occur suddenly and are capable of traveling tens to hundreds of kilometers with peak discharges and volumes several orders of magnitude larger than those of normal floods. They travel along existing river channels, in some instances into populated downstream regions, and thus pose a risk to people and infrastructure. Many recent events involve process chains, such as mass movements impacting glacial lakes and triggering dam breaches with subsequent outburst floods. A concern is that effects of climate change and associated increased instability of high mountain slopes may exacerbate such process chains and associated extreme flows. Modeling tools can be used to assess the hazard of potential future GLOFs, and process modeling can provide insights into complex processes that are difficult to observe in nature. A number of numerical models have been developed and applied to simulate different types of extreme flows, but such modeling faces challenges stemming from a lack of process understanding and difficulties in measuring extreme flows for calibration purposes. Here we review the state of knowledge of key aspects of modeling GLOFs, with a focus on process cascades. Analysis and simulation of the onset, propagation, and potential impact of GLOFs are based on illustrative case studies. Numerical models are presently available for simulating impact waves in lakes, dam failures, and flow propagation but have been used only to a limited extent for integrated simulations of process cascades. We present a spectrum of case studies from Patagonia, the European Alps, central Asia, and the Himalayas in which we simulate single processes and process chains of past and potential future events. We conclude that process understanding and process chain modeling need to be strengthened and that research efforts should focus on a more integrative treatment of processes in numerical models.

  6. Miscibility of Itraconazole-Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose Blends: Insights with High Resolution Analytical Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Hitesh S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-12-01

    Drug-polymer miscibility is considered to be a prerequisite to achieve an optimally performing amorphous solid dispersion (ASD). Unfortunately, it can be challenging to evaluate drug-polymer miscibility experimentally. The aim of this study was to investigate the miscibility of ASDs of itraconazole (ITZ) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) using a variety of analytical approaches. The phase behavior of ITZ-HPMC films prepared by solvent evaporation was studied before and after heating. Conventional methodology for miscibility determination, that is, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), was used in conjunction with emerging analytical techniques, such as fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, and atomic force microscopy coupled with nanoscale infrared spectroscopy and nanothermal analysis (AFM-nanoIR-nanoTA). DSC results showed a single glass transition event for systems with 10% to 50% drug loading, suggesting that the ASDs were miscible, whereas phase separation was observed for all of the films based on the other techniques. The AFM-coupled techniques indicated that the phase separation occurred at the submicron scale. When the films were heated, it was observed that the ASD components underwent mixing. The results provide new insights into the phase behavior of itraconazole-HPMC dispersions and suggest that the emerging analytical techniques discussed herein are promising for the characterization of miscibility and microstructure in drug-polymer systems. The observed differences in the phase behavior in films prepared by solvent evaporation before and after heating also have implications for processing routes and suggest that spray drying/solvent evaporation and hot melt extrusion/melt mixing can result in ASDs with varying extent of miscibility between the drug and the polymer.

  7. State-of-the-art review of nitrogen and flue gas flooding in enhanced oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anada, H.R.

    1980-12-01

    This report provides a review of technical publications and patents in the field of nitrogen and flue gas flooding in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The physical and chemical characteristics of nitrogen and flue gas are provided with some comparisons with CO/sub 2/ related to EOR operations. Experimental research and field based activities using nitrogen and flue gas are briefly summarized. Cost data for generation of nitrogen and flue gases are provided. Nitrogen and flue gas costs are approximately one third to one half that of CO/sub 2/. The low cost of production and its non-corrosive nature are advantages of using nitrogen, whereas the higher miscibility pressure requirement is a disadvantage. Nitrogen flooding does not work well with low API gravity crudes. Miscible displacement with nitrogen seems promising for oils containing solution gas. Flue gas flooding can be applied to low API gravity crude reservoirs. However, flue gas flooding creates operating problems due to its corrosive nature. The report provides a discussion on process and reservoir parameters that affect nitrogen and/or flue gas flooding in EOR. A bibliography of related literature is provided in the appendices.

  8. Fire, floods and woody debris: Interactions between biotic and geomorphic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendix, Jacob; Cowell, C. Mark

    2010-04-01

    Fire and floods interact in the riparian zone as processes that structure plant communities and landforms. Although much of the immediate impact of fire is on the vegetation, fire-related changes in runoff, sediment supply, riparian vegetation, and woody debris volume have ongoing geomorphic impacts on the valley floor. Consequent hydrogeomorphic changes, in turn, affect the composition and distribution of vegetation. This paper reviews these interactions, and provides an example of how fires and floods intersect to supply burnt trees as woody debris. Because the temporal and spatial distribution of woody debris is initially controlled by patterns of tree mortality, ecological disturbances, like fire, can be an important source for pulses of woody debris in riparian systems. To understand these interactions, we examine woody debris inputs 3 years after a wildfire in the riparian gallery forests of the western Transverse Ranges, California. Within our sample of 339 burned stems, snags fell in distinctive patterns: species were variable in susceptibility to falling, and fell at greater rates at sites with greater subsequent flooding. Discordance between the species composition of fallen snags and that of overall burned stems indicates that variability in forest composition must be considered in predicting post-disturbance inputs of woody debris. Variation in snagfall timing among species suggests that woody debris inputs are likely to occur in multiple, sequential pulses after wildfire. The role of flooding is superimposed on this ecological influence, as the timing and spatial variability of floods affect the recruitment of woody debris from the supply of snags created by fire.

  9. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 18 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and six monitor surveys clearly imaged changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators.

  10. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2007-06-30

    The objective of this research project was to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in the hopes of observing changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE No.DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data. Attribute analysis was a very useful tool in enhancing changes in seismic character present, but difficult to interpret on time amplitude slices. Lessons learned from and tools/techniques developed during this project will allow high-resolution seismic imaging to be routinely applied to many CO{sub 2} injection programs in a large percentage of shallow carbonate oil fields in the midcontinent.

  11. 4-D High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Monitoring of Miscible CO2 Injected into a Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Richard D. Miller; Abdelmoneam E. Raef; Alan P. Byrnes; William E. Harrison

    2006-08-31

    The objective of this research project is to acquire, process, and interpret multiple high-resolution 3-D compressional wave and 2-D, 2-C shear wave seismic data in an attempt to observe changes in fluid characteristics in an oil field before, during, and after the miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood that began around December 1, 2003, as part of the DOE-sponsored Class Revisit Project (DOE DE-AC26-00BC15124). Unique and key to this imaging activity is the high-resolution nature of the seismic data, minimal deployment design, and the temporal sampling throughout the flood. The 900-m-deep test reservoir is located in central Kansas oomoldic limestones of the Lansing-Kansas City Group, deposited on a shallow marine shelf in Pennsylvanian time. After 30 months of seismic monitoring, one baseline and eight monitor surveys clearly detected changes that appear consistent with movement of CO{sub 2} as modeled with fluid simulators and observed in production data.

  12. Concentration-dependent diffusion instability in reactive miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratsun, Dmitry; Kostarev, Konstantin; Mizev, Aleksey; Mosheva, Elena

    2015-07-01

    We report on chemoconvective pattern formation phenomena observed in a two-layer system of miscible fluids filling a vertical Hele-Shaw cell. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the concentration-dependent diffusion coupled with frontal acid-base neutralization can give rise to the formation of a local unstable zone low in density, resulting in a perfectly regular cell-type convective pattern. The described effect gives an example of yet another powerful mechanism which allows the reaction-diffusion processes to govern the flow of reacting fluids under gravity conditions.

  13. Process controls on regional flood frequency: Coefficient of variation and basin scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BlöSchl, Günter; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    1997-12-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) of maximum annual floods is examined to understand the effects of process controls and catchment size. A derived flood frequency model is used to interpret data from 489 catchments in Austria. At the core of process controls appears to be the interaction of catchment response time and storm duration, but the magnitude is not large, and often this interaction is hidden by other processes. The dependence of rainfall intensity and duration is clearly very important and reduces CV significantly. Increasing channel travel times with catchment scale tend to translate into decreasing CVs with area for small catchments while they tend to translate into increasing CVs with area for larger catchments. Nonlinear runoff processes, including threshold effects, is the main mechanism for increasing CV. They give rise to complex patterns in the relationship between CV and area. Base flow has been used as a surrogate for a number of processes, such as seasonality of streamflow. It always decreases CV and, in particular, leads to a significant decrease of CV with area. Both the observed tendency of CV to decrease with area and the scatter in the data are the result of a complex interplay of a number of processes which allows various alternative interpretations. Depending on which processes dominate under a particular hydrologic regime, different patterns arise. It appears that the explanations of the relationship between CV and catchment scale suggested in the literature are too simplistic. The case is made for using the concept of hydrologic regimes and process studies of the type presented here to help delineate homogeneous regions for regional flood frequency analyses in a physically consistent way.

  14. Influence of seismic processes and volcanic activity on the formation of disastrous floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Dmitriy

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the main cause of catastrophic floods are considered prolonged heavy rains, which lead to over-saturation of soil moisture and the deposition of precipitation on the surface of the earth. And at the same time there is reason to believe that precipitation cannot be the main cause of floods. Firstly, we observe a catastrophic floods not in every case of heavy precipitation: moreover, a direct correlation between precipitation intensity and scale of the flooding is not detected. Secondly, a simple calculation shows that the quantity of water, that drops down to the ground with torrential rains, are insufficient to cover the earth's surface such layer of water, where we can talk about the flood (especially catastrophic). In particular, the intensity of normal not tropical rainfall does not exceed 60 mm per hour. Then such a downpour would have to go continuously for at least two days in a row, to cause flooding of a height of 3 m provided a complete impenetrability of the earth's surface. In reality, however, such showers last no more than half an hour. Thus, it can be argued that the source of water for catastrophic floods fed by ground water, the volume of which is comparable with the volume of all surface water on Earth [1]. Classic examples of surface and groundwater interactions are, on the one hand, springs and artesian wells, and on the other hand, the phenomenon of absorption of precipitation by soil. In normal conditions underground water is moving by aquifers, penetrating through the pores and cracks in rocks in the conditions of nonstationary/unsteady filtration, forming a 3D network of underground channels in different directions (horizontal, vertical, inclined), including the so-called underground lakes - water basins in underground cavities. Especially strongly these processes are shown in the fractured and karst rocks. It is also important that the movement of water obeys the laws of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics in terms of specific

  15. A review of atmospheric and land surface processes with emphasis on flood generation in the Southern Himalayan rivers.

    PubMed

    Dimri, A P; Thayyen, R J; Kibler, K; Stanton, A; Jain, S K; Tullos, D; Singh, V P

    2016-06-15

    Floods in the southern rim of the Indian Himalayas are a major cause of loss of life, property, crops, infrastructure, etc. They have long term socio-economic impacts on the habitat living along/across the Himalayas. In the recent decade extreme precipitation events have led to numerous flash floods in and around the Himalayan region. Sporadic case-based studies have tried to explain the mechanisms causing the floods. However, in some of the cases, the causative mechanisms have been elusive. Various types of flood events have been debated at different spatial and temporal scales. The present study provides an overview of mechanisms that lead to floods in and around the southern rim of the Indian Himalayas. Atmospheric processes, landuse interaction, and glacier-related outbreaks are considered in the overview. PMID:26974566

  16. A review of atmospheric and land surface processes with emphasis on flood generation in the Southern Himalayan rivers.

    PubMed

    Dimri, A P; Thayyen, R J; Kibler, K; Stanton, A; Jain, S K; Tullos, D; Singh, V P

    2016-06-15

    Floods in the southern rim of the Indian Himalayas are a major cause of loss of life, property, crops, infrastructure, etc. They have long term socio-economic impacts on the habitat living along/across the Himalayas. In the recent decade extreme precipitation events have led to numerous flash floods in and around the Himalayan region. Sporadic case-based studies have tried to explain the mechanisms causing the floods. However, in some of the cases, the causative mechanisms have been elusive. Various types of flood events have been debated at different spatial and temporal scales. The present study provides an overview of mechanisms that lead to floods in and around the southern rim of the Indian Himalayas. Atmospheric processes, landuse interaction, and glacier-related outbreaks are considered in the overview.

  17. Using phase diagrams to predict the performance of cosolvent floods for NAPL remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Falta, R.W.

    1998-12-31

    Cosolvent flooding using water miscible solvents such as alcohols has been proposed as an in situ NAPL remediation technique. This process is conceptually similar to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) using alcohols and some surfactant formulations. As a result of interest in the EOR aspects of these systems, analytical and graphical methods based on fractional flow theory were developed in the petroleum engineering literature for modeling these floods. The existing fractional flow solutions have not been used previously in environmental applications of cosolvent flooding, but they are applicable and provide many useful insights into the process. These applications are discussed, with an emphasis on explaining the mechanisms which tend to mobilize trapped NAPL during a cosolvent flood. The theory provides a simple way to predict the general behavior of a cosolvent flood using the phase diagram. It is concluded that the one-dimensional performance of a cosolvent flood can be predicted largely by inspection of the ternary phase diagram. In particular, the nature of the cosolvent flood depends primarily on the position of the cosolvent injection concentration relative to a critical tie line extension which passes through the plait point, tangent to the binodal curve.

  18. Spatial Analysis in Determination Of Flood Prone Areas Using Geographic Information System and Analytical Hierarchy Process at Sungai Sembrong's Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukari, S. M.; Ahmad, M. A.; Wai, T. L.; Kaamin, M.; Alimin, N.

    2016-07-01

    Floods that struck Johor state in 2006 and 2007 and the East Coastal in 2014 have triggered a greatly impact to the flood management here in Malaysia. Accordingly, this study conducted to determine potential areas of flooding, especially in Batu Pahat district since it faces terrifying experienced with heavy flood. This objective is archived by using the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) on study area of flood risk location at the watershed area of Sungai Sembrong. GIS functions as spatial analysis is capable to produce new information based on analysis of data stored in the system. Meanwhile the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used as a method for setting up in decision making concerning the existing data. By using AHP method, preparation and position of the criteria and parameters required in GIS are neater and easier to analyze. Through this study, a flood prone area in the watershed of Sungai Sembrong was identified with the help of GIS and AHP. Analysis was conducted to test two different cell sizes, which are 30 and 5. The analysis of flood prone areas were tested on both cell sizes with two different water levels and the results of the analysis were displayed by GIS. Therefore, the use of AHP and GIS are effective and able to determine the potential flood plain areas in the watershed area of Sungai Sembrong.

  19. Viscous fingering with partially miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Experimental and numerical studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible (e.g. water and glycerol) or perfectly immiscible (e.g. water and oil). In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other (e.g. CO2 and water). Following our recent work for miscible systems (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a porous medium, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. In our model, partial miscibility is characterized through the design of the thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We express the model in dimensionless form and elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution. Figure caption: final snapshots in simulations of viscous fingering with a two-fluid system mimicking that of CO2 and water. The colormap corresponds to the concentration of CO2. A band of less viscous gas phase rich in CO2 (red) displaces through the more viscous liquid phase that is undersaturated with CO2 (blue). At the fluid interface, an exchange of CO2 occurs as a result of local chemical potentials that drives the system towards thermodynamic equilibrium. This results in a shrinkage of gas phase as well as a local increase in

  20. Hydrological processes generating flash floods at hillslope scale in a small mountainous Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Christophe; Brunet, Pascal; Le Bourgeois, Olivier; Nguyen, Son; Borrell, Valérie; Ayral, Pierre-Alain; Didon-Lescot, Jean-François; Domergue, Jean-Marc; Grard, Nadine

    2015-04-01

    This work deals with the understanding at the hillslope scale of the hydrological process that generate flash floods. The Valescure small catchment (4km2) is a mountainous Mediterranean catchment, with steep slopes (30°) and granitic geology. An intensive survey of the catchment was displayed along a 4-years period (2011-2014) at the local and hillslope scale, in order to grab properties of the soil such as depths, clay content, water content, hydraulic conductivity and water retention, latelal flux velocity, bedrock permeability…. A simplified physically-based model was used to simulate vertical fluxes at both atmosphere/soil and sub-surface/bedrock interfaces, as well as the lateral fluxes of both surface and sub-surface. The model combines an adapted Green&Ampt model with finite depth of the soil with a kinematic wave model for the surface routing, and a Darcy model for the sub-surface routing. Most of the parameters of the model derive from the survey of the catchment: spatial distribution of the soil depth, vertical hydraulic conductivity at saturation, spatial and temporal variability of the soil moisture at various depths…. Some others are calibrated from observed rainfall and runoff data along a 10-years monitoring period (2005-2014): bedrock permeability, lateral hydraulic conductivity, initial water content in the soil. The model simulates quite well the observed floods over 30 events, based on the following assumptions : 1/ in spite of very high rainfall rates, most of the rainfall infiltrates in highly permeable soils (Ks ~ 200-300 mm.h-1), 2/ runoff only occurs when the soil is totally saturated, 3/ saturation of soil is highly amplified due to fast lateral flow, around 1m.h-1, that converge along a dense gully network, 4/ most of the flash flood runoff is due to exfiltration of the water in those gullies, 5/ the calibrated parameters of the model are in very close agreement with their experimental estimation. In addition, the model was proved to

  1. The Dynamics of Miscible Interfaces: Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meiburg, Eckart

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this experimental/computational investigation (joint with Prof Maxworthy at USC) has been to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces, both from a scientific and a practical point of view, and to prepare a related experiment to be flown on the International Space Station. In order to address these effects, we have focused experimental and computational investigations on miscible displacements in cylindrical capillary tubes, as well as in Hele-Shaw cells. Regarding the flow in a capillary tube, the question was addressed as to whether Korteweg stresses and/or divergence effects can potentially account for discrepancies observed between conventional Stokes flow simulations and experiments for miscible flows in capillary tubes. An estimate of the vorticity and streamfunction fields induced by the Kortewegs stresses was derived, which shows these stresses to result in the formation of a vortex ring structure near the tip of the concentration front. Through this mechanism the propagation velocity of the concentration front is reduced, in agreement with the experimental observations. Divergence effects, on the other hand, were seen to be very small, and they have a negligible influence on the tip velocity. As a result, it can be concluded that they are not responsible for the discrepancies between experiments and conventional Stokes simulations. A further part of our investigation focussed on the development of high-accuracy three-dimensional spectral element simulation techniques for miscible flows in capillary tubes, including the effects of variable density and viscosity. Towards this end, the conservation equations are treated in cylindrical coordinates.

  2. Dynamics of miscible displacements in round tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Meiburg, E.; Maxworthy, T.; Chen, C.Y.; Petitjeans, P.

    1995-12-31

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation of miscible two-phase flow in a capillary tube is reported. The fraction of fluid left behind on the wall is obtained as a function of the Peclet, Atwood, and Froude numbers. Scaling arguments are presented for two distinct flow regimes, dominated by diffusion and convection, respectively. In the latter one, an effective surface tension value can be estimated.

  3. Flood hazards analysis based on changes of hydrodynamic processes in fluvial systems of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simas, Iury; Rodrigues, Cleide

    2016-04-01

    The metropolis of Sao Paulo, with its 7940 Km² and over 20 million inhabitants, is increasingly being consolidated with disregard for the dynamics of its fluvial systems and natural limitations imposed by fluvial terraces, floodplains and slopes. Events such as floods and flash floods became particularly persistent mainly in socially and environmentally vulnerable areas. The Aricanduva River basin was selected as the ideal area for the development of the flood hazard analysis since it presents the main geological and geomorphological features found in the urban site. According to studies carried out by Anthropic Geomorphology approach in São Paulo, to study this phenomenon is necessary to take into account the original hydromorphological systems and its functional conditions, as well as in which dimensions the Anthropic factor changes the balance between the main variables of surface processes. Considering those principles, an alternative model of geographical data was proposed and enabled to identify the role of different driving forces in terms of spatial conditioning of certain flood events. Spatial relationships between different variables, such as anthropogenic and original morphology, were analyzed for that purpose in addition to climate data. The surface hydrodynamic tendency spatial model conceived for this study takes as key variables: 1- The land use present at the observed date combined with the predominant lithological group, represented by a value ranging 0-100, based on indexes of the National Soil Conservation Service (NSCS-USA) and the Hydraulic Technology Center Foundation (FCTH-Brazil) to determine the resulting balance of runoff/infiltration. 2- The original slope, applying thresholds from which it's possible to determine greater tendency for runoff (in percents). 3- The minimal features of relief, combining the curvature of surface in plant and profile. Those three key variables were combined in a Geographic Information System in a series of

  4. Molecular driving forces behind the tetrahydrofuran–water miscibility gap

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Micholas Dean; Mostofian, Barmak; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-06

    The tetrahydrofuran water binary system exhibits an unusual closed-loop miscibility gap (transitions from a miscible regime to an immiscible regime back to another miscible regime as the temperature increases). Here, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the structural and dynamical behavior of the binary system in the temperature regime of this gap at four different mass ratios, and we compare the behavior of bulk water and tetrahydrofuran. The changes in structure and dynamics observed in the simulations indicate that the temperature region associated with the miscibility gap is distinctive. Within the miscibility-gap temperature region, the self diffusion of watermore » is significantly altered and the second virial coefficients (pair interaction strengths) show parabolic-like behavior. Altogether, the results suggest that the gap is the result of differing trends with temperature of minor structural changes, which produces interaction virials with parabolic temperature dependence near the miscibility gap.« less

  5. Molecular Driving Forces behind the Tetrahydrofuran-Water Miscibility Gap.

    PubMed

    Smith, Micholas Dean; Mostofian, Barmak; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Smith, Jeremy C

    2016-02-01

    The tetrahydrofuran-water binary system exhibits an unusual closed-loop miscibility gap (transitions from a miscible regime to an immiscible regime back to another miscible regime as the temperature increases). Here, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we probe the structural and dynamical behavior of the binary system in the temperature regime of this gap at four different mass ratios, and we compare the behavior of bulk water and tetrahydrofuran. The changes in structure and dynamics observed in the simulations indicate that the temperature region associated with the miscibility gap is distinctive. Within the miscibility-gap temperature region, the self-diffusion of water is significantly altered and the second virial coefficients (pair-interaction strengths) show parabolic-like behavior. Overall, the results suggest that the gap is the result of differing trends with temperature of minor structural changes, which produces interaction virials with parabolic temperature dependence near the miscibility gap. PMID:26734991

  6. Miscibility and dynamical properties of cellulose acetate/plasticizer systems.

    PubMed

    Bao, Cong Yu; Long, Didier R; Vergelati, Caroll

    2015-02-13

    Due to its biodegradability and renewability, a great interest has been devoted to investigating cellulose acetate in order to expand its potential applications. In addition, secondary cellulose acetate (CDA) could also be considered as a model system for strongly polar polymer system. The dynamical behavior of CDA is supposed to be governed by H-bonding and dipolar interaction network. Due to their high glass transition temperature, cellulose acetate-based systems are processed when blended with plasticizers. It is thus of utmost importance to study the miscibility and plasticizing effects of various molecules. We prepared CDA films via solvent casting method with diethyl phthalate as the plasticizer. Miscibility diagrams were established by calorimetry and thermo-mechanical (DMTA) experiments. Dynamical properties were analyzed by DMTA and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. We could identify the α-relaxation of these CDA-plasticizer systems in the frequency range from 0.06 Hz to 10(6)Hz, which allowed for describing the dynamics in the so-called Williams-Landel-Ferry/Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann regime.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-08-21

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

  8. Modeling a Glacial Lake Outburst Flood Process Chain: The Case of Lake Palcacocha and Huaraz, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisolm, Rachel; Somos-Valenzuela, Marcelo; Rivas Gomez, Denny; McKinney, Daene C.; Portocarrero Rodriguez, Cesar

    2016-04-01

    One of the consequences of recent glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, is the risk of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs) from lakes that have formed at the base of retreating glaciers. GLOFs are often triggered by avalanches falling into glacial lakes, initiating a chain of processes that may culminate in significant inundation and destruction downstream. This paper presents simulations of all of the processes involved in a potential GLOF originating from Lake Palcacocha, the source of a previously catastrophic GLOF on December 13, 1941, 1800 people in the city of Huaraz, Peru. The chain of processes simulated here includes: (1) avalanches above the lake; (2) lake dynamics resulting from the avalanche impact, including wave generation, propagation, and run-up across lakes; (3) terminal moraine overtopping and dynamic moraine erosion simulations to determine the possibility of breaching; (4) flood propagation along downstream valleys; and (5) inundation of populated areas. The results of each process feed into simulations of subsequent processes in the chain, finally resulting in estimates of inundation in the city of Huaraz. The results of the inundation simulations were converted into flood intensity and hazard maps (based on an intensity-likelihood matrix) that may be useful for city planning and regulation. Three avalanche events with volumes ranging from 0.5-3 x 106 m3 were simulated, and two scenarios of 15 m and 30 m lake lowering were simulated to assess the potential of mitigating the hazard level in Huaraz. For all three avalanche events, three-dimensional hydrodynamic models show large waves generated in the lake from the impact resulting in overtopping of the damming-moraine. Despite very high discharge rates (up to 63.4 x 103 m3/s), the erosion from the overtopping wave did not result in failure of the damming-moraine when simulated with a hydro-morphodynamic model using excessively conservative soil characteristics that provide very

  9. Modeling a glacial lake outburst flood process chain: the case of Lake Palcacocha and Huaraz, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somos-Valenzuela, Marcelo A.; Chisolm, Rachel E.; Rivas, Denny S.; Portocarrero, Cesar; McKinney, Daene C.

    2016-07-01

    One of the consequences of recent glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, is the risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) from lakes that have formed at the base of retreating glaciers. GLOFs are often triggered by avalanches falling into glacial lakes, initiating a chain of processes that may culminate in significant inundation and destruction downstream. This paper presents simulations of all of the processes involved in a potential GLOF originating from Lake Palcacocha, the source of a previously catastrophic GLOF on 13 December 1941, killing about 1800 people in the city of Huaraz, Peru. The chain of processes simulated here includes (1) avalanches above the lake; (2) lake dynamics resulting from the avalanche impact, including wave generation, propagation, and run-up across lakes; (3) terminal moraine overtopping and dynamic moraine erosion simulations to determine the possibility of breaching; (4) flood propagation along downstream valleys; and (5) inundation of populated areas. The results of each process feed into simulations of subsequent processes in the chain, finally resulting in estimates of inundation in the city of Huaraz. The results of the inundation simulations were converted into flood intensity and preliminary hazard maps (based on an intensity-likelihood matrix) that may be useful for city planning and regulation. Three avalanche events with volumes ranging from 0.5 to 3 × 106 m3 were simulated, and two scenarios of 15 and 30 m lake lowering were simulated to assess the potential of mitigating the hazard level in Huaraz. For all three avalanche events, three-dimensional hydrodynamic models show large waves generated in the lake from the impact resulting in overtopping of the damming moraine. Despite very high discharge rates (up to 63.4 × 103 m3 s-1), the erosion from the overtopping wave did not result in failure of the damming moraine when simulated with a hydro-morphodynamic model using excessively conservative soil

  10. Process-Based Modeling of Floods Through Shrub Carrs of Varying Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Floodplain surfaces typically are protected from erosion during deep overbank flows by vegetation of varying types and densities. Drag on stems, branches, leaves, and exposed roots of the floodplain plants reduces both the near-bed flow and the fluid forces on the sediment grains. The drag on vegetation and on topographic elements of the floodplain surface can be calculated by carefully applying fundamental fluid-mechanical principals. Doing so requires identification and appropriate approximation of the reference velocity in the drag equation, and accurate estimates of the floodplain plant geometries and spacings. For shrubs, calculations indicate that skin friction on leaves is negligible compared to form drag on stems and branches, whereas, for uncut grasses, skin friction on the fronds is of primary importance. Scaling relationships are developed for each shrub species for specific applications, so that the fluid mechanically important properties can be estimated from mean stem diameters, mean stem group diameters, and mean stem group spacings. Stem group spacings and diameters can be related to shrub-canopy spacings and diameters respectively, which are determined from aerial photographs in the applications. A process-based model incorporating the necessary principles was developed and applied to a headwater tributary of East Plum Creek, Colorado. Calculations using the estimated decrease in density of the sandbar willows along this tributary accurately postdict the site of initiation of floodplain unraveling (transformation from a narrow, sinuous stream to a wide, straight one) that occurred during an extreme flood in 1965. Details of this application are presented in an accompanying poster. The model then is applied to Clark Fork of the Columbia River in the Deer Lodge Valley, Montana. This meandering fluvial system is an EPA Superfund site, because the flood-of-record in 1908 deposited several decimeters of contaminated tailings in the meander belt. The

  11. Investigations on transparent liquid-miscibility gap systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Nishioka, G.; Ross, S.

    1979-01-01

    Sedimentation and phase separation is a well known occurrence in monotectic or miscibility gap alloys. Previous investigations indicate that it may be possible to prepare such alloys in a low-gravity space environment but recent experiments indicate that there may be nongravity dependent phase separation processes which can hinder the formation of such alloys. Such phase separation processes are studied using transparent liquid systems and holography. By reconstructing holograms into a commercial-particle-analysis system, real time computer analysis can be performed on emulsions with diameters in the range of 5 micrometers or greater. Thus dynamic effects associated with particle migration and coalescence can be studied. Characterization studies on two selected immiscible systems including an accurate determination of phase diagrams, surface and interfacial tension measurements, surface excess and wetting behavior near critical solution temperatures completed.

  12. Pore-Scale Study of Miscible Displacements in Porous Media Using Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ting; Shi, Baochang; Huang, Changsheng; Liang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    In the past few years, the miscible displacements in porous media were usually simulated by some semiempirical models based on the volume averaging at the representative elementary volume scale. To better understand the microscopic mechanism of the viscous fingering phenomenon in porous media for miscible fluids, in this paper the miscible displacements processes in porous media are studied using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) at the pore scale. First, the code of LBM is tested by simulating the displacement process of two miscible fluids with the same viscosity between two parallel plates which is the well-known Taylor-Aris dispersion problem, and comparing the results with the theoretical predictions. Then, the effects of the Péclet number Pe, the viscosity ratio M and the structure of the porous media on the displacement phenomenon are investigated, and the location and velocity of the finger tip, the displacement efficiency are also studied. In this paper, the displacement efficiency is calculated by 1-m, here the quantity m is defined as m=V_M/V_T, where V_M is the volume of more viscous fluids (the displaced fluid) left behind the finger tip, V_T is the total pore volume behind the finger tip. It can be found that the "interface" of two fluids will become clearer with the increasing of the Péclet number. As Pe and M are large enough, the viscous fingering phenomenon will occur, and in the front of the finger, "mushroom-like" pattern can be observed. Besides, with the increasing of Pe or M the quantity m will be increased too, i.e., the displacement efficiency will be decreased. While Pe (or M) is greater than a certain value, the growth rate of the quantity m will slow down. The same trend was observed for the miscible displacement in capillary tubes or Hele-Shaw cells. Besides, changing the structure of the porous media makes the finger pattern different. The present simulation results provide a good understanding of the microscopic mechanism of the

  13. Mixing of two miscible fluids at high Schmidt number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mark; Alberini, Federico; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    The blending of two miscible liquids at high Schmidt number is an increasingly common industrial problem: as processes push towards shorter timescales yet the rheology of the fluids becomes increasingly complex. This leads to phenomena which resemble a quasi two-phase system with zero interfacial tension. In this study, we compare experimental results with computational fluid dynamics simulations using unstructured-mesh adaptivity for the flow of two Newtonian, or two power-law fluids through a complex geometry representative of a Kenics type static mixer used in industry. The geometry induces a stretching and folding of the fluid elements which causes exponential growth of the interface length down the geometry. The interfacial topology obtained from the simulations is compared with experiments carried out using Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF), which enables the spatial distribution of each phase, and the interfaces between them, to be determined at the outlet of the geometry. EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K003976/1.

  14. A new automatic SAR-based flood mapping application hosted on the European Space Agency's grid processing on demand fast access to imagery environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostache, Renaud; Chini, Marco; Matgen, Patrick; Giustarini, Laura

    2013-04-01

    There is a clear need for developing innovative processing chains based on earth observation (EO) data to generate products supporting emergency response and flood management at a global scale. Here an automatic flood mapping application is introduced. The latter is currently hosted on the Grid Processing on Demand (G-POD) Fast Access to Imagery (Faire) environment of the European Space Agency. The main objective of the online application is to deliver flooded areas using both recent and historical acquisitions of SAR data in an operational framework. It is worth mentioning that the method can be applied to both medium and high resolution SAR images. The flood mapping application consists of two main blocks: 1) A set of query tools for selecting the "crisis image" and the optimal corresponding pre-flood "reference image" from the G-POD archive. 2) An algorithm for extracting flooded areas using the previously selected "crisis image" and "reference image". The proposed method is a hybrid methodology, which combines histogram thresholding, region growing and change detection as an approach enabling the automatic, objective and reliable flood extent extraction from SAR images. The method is based on the calibration of a statistical distribution of "open water" backscatter values inferred from SAR images of floods. Change detection with respect to a pre-flood reference image helps reducing over-detection of inundated areas. The algorithms are computationally efficient and operate with minimum data requirements, considering as input data a flood image and a reference image. Stakeholders in flood management and service providers are able to log onto the flood mapping application to get support for the retrieval, from the rolling archive, of the most appropriate pre-flood reference image. Potential users will also be able to apply the implemented flood delineation algorithm. Case studies of several recent high magnitude flooding events (e.g. July 2007 Severn River flood

  15. Understanding processes that generate flash floods in the arid Judean Desert to the Dead Sea - a measurement network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Hanna; Rödiger, Tino; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Geyer, Stefan; Merz, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Flash floods in (semi-) arid regions are fascinating in their suddenness and can be harmful for humans, infrastructure, industry and tourism. Generated within minutes, an early warning system is essential. A hydrological model is required to quantify flash floods. Current models to predict flash floods are often based on simplified concepts and/or on concepts which were developed for humid regions. To more closely relate such models to local conditions, processes within catchments where flash floods occur require consideration. In this study we present a monitoring approach to decipher different flash flood generating processes in the ephemeral Wadi Arugot on the western side of the Dead Sea. To understand rainfall input a dense rain gauge network was installed. Locations of rain gauges were chosen based on land use, slope and soil cover. The spatiotemporal variation of rain intensity will also be available from radar backscatter. Level pressure sensors located at the outlet of major tributaries have been deployed to analyze in which part of the catchment water is generated. To identify the importance of soil moisture preconditions, two cosmic ray sensors have been deployed. At the outlet of the Arugot water is sampled and level is monitored. To more accurately determine water discharge, water velocity is measured using portable radar velocimetry. A first analysis of flash flood processes will be presented following the FLEX-Topo concept .(Savenije, 2010), where each landscape type is represented using an individual hydrological model according to the processes within the three hydrological response units: plateau, desert and outlet. References: Savenije, H. H. G.: HESS Opinions "Topography driven conceptual modelling (FLEX-Topo)", Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 14, 2681-2692, doi:10.5194/hess-14-2681-2010, 2010.

  16. Enhanced oil recovery by CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement in the Little Knife Field, Billings County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, J.B.; Larsen, W.K.; Lindsay, R.F.; Nettle, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    A CO/sub 2/ minitest employing the miscible displacement process was conducted in the Mission Canyon Formation (lower Mississippian) at Little Knife Field, North Dakota. The Mission Canyon is a dolomitized carbonate reservoir which is undergoing primary depletion. Four wells were drilled in an inverted four-spot configuration, covering five acres. The central well served as the injection well and was surrounded by three non-producing observation wells. A WAG-type injection sequence utilized five alternate slugs of formation water and CO/sub 2/. Preflush injection began December 11, 1980, followed by the WAG slugs from January 7 to March 25, 1981. Drive water injection commenced immediately and was completed on September 24, 1981. Injection rates were maintained at 1150 B/D during water injection and 40 T/D during CO/sub 2/ injection. Tracers were used during the waterflood preflush and with the water during the WAG. A pressure core behind the flood front was obtained to confirm residual-oil saturations in the project interval. Overall rock recovery was excellent, 90%, but sample recovery under reservoir pressure was less than anticipated. Invasion of drilling fluids during coring was checked by introduction of a radioactive tracer into the coring fluid. Project analysis is still ongoing and once completed, the simulation models will be updated and used to predict field-wide applicability. (JMT)

  17. Pore scale to flood plain scale modeling of reactive transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steefel, C.; Molins, S.; Andre, B.; Trebotich, D.; Shen, C.; Landrot, G.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Reactive transport processes operate at a wide variety of scales in the subsurface, although modeling these across the scales remains a challenge. The need to treat reactive transport processes across scales is necessary because of the hierarchical nature of porous media in the subsurface, with physical, chemical, and potentially microbial heterogeneities present all the way from the pore to flood plain (watershed) or reservoir scale. The need to address the hierarchical nature of subsurface porous media is particularly important for resolving the long-standing "discrepancy" between laboratory and field rates, which are likely due at least in part to the development of gradients in concentration and thus reaction rate at all scales of heterogeneity. The huge range in modeling scales (microns to kilometers) are a computational challenge, but so is the need to consider differing constitutive equations, for example Navier-Stokes versus Darcy flow equations, or explicitly resolved mineral-microbe-fluid interfaces versus volume-averaged reactive surface areas, at the differing scales. Pore scale processes focusing on carbonate dissolution and precipitation are addressed by solving the Navier-Stokes or Stokes equation for flow at the pore scale coupled to reactive transport calculations in which the interfacial area for mineral dissolution and precipitation is taken directly from the pore geometry. Partial or complete diffusion control of reaction rates is accounted for directly by resolving velocity gradients in the vicinity of reactive mineral grains. Hydrologic accessibility of reactive surface area is also accounted for in this approach, although in general this is an additional factor that needs to be factored into simulations of reactive transport in volume-averaged porous media. At a scale above the pore scale, we use volume-averaged micro-continuum models to address reactivity and transport at the centimeter scale using a sample from the Cranfield formation in

  18. Design by Nature in a Confined Flood Alleviation Scheme: Analysis of Form-Process Feedbacks and Morphological Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, D.; German, S.

    2015-12-01

    any conventional hard flood risk alleviation schemes have been detrimental to natural geomorphic processes and have damaged fluvial habitats. This is primarily due to the over-riding focus on managing flood risk by dictating channel capacity and hydraulics, which is not always conducive to the promotion of geomorphologically-healthy and diverse conditions that allow and promote natural processes. This paper explains how the principles of fluvial geomorphology had a large influence on the design, construction and post project monitoring of a flood alleviation scheme in Wales within a heavily confined river corridor that is designated as having special ecological status; without adversely impacting on flood risk. The challenge was to ensure that the physical habitat required by the important species (including Atlantic Salmon and Ranunculus) were retained and that the surrounding infrastructure and properties were not at risk of being undercut as a result of scour in the confined high energy channel. A geomorphologically-guided soft engineering approach was taken to promote local morphological diversity and flow diversity, utilising information from up and downstream natural river reaches, and general geomorphological principles. The proposed layout was modelled in 1D to understand the effects of the reprofiling on flows, allowing for a basic assessment of coarse sediment transport to be undertaken. A combination of terrestrial laser scanning and contact GPS surveys were used to monitor morphological evolution post construction, and to determine how morphological form adjusted post-construction within the confined channel. This paper will introduce the guiding principles of process restoration that influenced scheme design, and then report on the morphological evolution of the river channel that occurred as river processes produced and maintained a dynamic, diverse and healthy physical habitat. Keywords: Process Restoration; Form Process Feedbacks; Fluvial

  19. Grid infrastructure for automatic processing of SAR data for flood applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussul, Natalia; Skakun, Serhiy; Shelestov, Andrii

    2010-05-01

    More and more geosciences applications are being put on to the Grids. Due to the complexity of geosciences applications that is caused by complex workflow, the use of computationally intensive environmental models, the need of management and integration of heterogeneous data sets, Grid offers solutions to tackle these problems. Many geosciences applications, especially those related to the disaster management and mitigations require the geospatial services to be delivered in proper time. For example, information on flooded areas should be provided to corresponding organizations (local authorities, civil protection agencies, UN agencies etc.) no more than in 24 h to be able to effectively allocate resources required to mitigate the disaster. Therefore, providing infrastructure and services that will enable automatic generation of products based on the integration of heterogeneous data represents the tasks of great importance. In this paper we present Grid infrastructure for automatic processing of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) satellite images to derive flood products. In particular, we use SAR data acquired by ESA's ENVSAT satellite, and neural networks to derive flood extent. The data are provided in operational mode from ESA rolling archive (within ESA Category-1 grant). We developed a portal that is based on OpenLayers frameworks and provides access point to the developed services. Through the portal the user can define geographical region and search for the required data. Upon selection of data sets a workflow is automatically generated and executed on the resources of Grid infrastructure. For workflow execution and management we use Karajan language. The workflow of SAR data processing consists of the following steps: image calibration, image orthorectification, image processing with neural networks, topographic effects removal, geocoding and transformation to lat/long projection, and visualisation. These steps are executed by different software, and can be

  20. A new automatic synthetic aperture radar-based flood mapping application hosted on the European Space Agency's Grid Processing of Demand Fast Access to Imagery environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matgen, Patrick; Giustarini, Laura; Hostache, Renaud

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces an automatic flood mapping application that is hosted on the Grid Processing on Demand (GPOD) Fast Access to Imagery (Faire) environment of the European Space Agency. The main objective of the online application is to deliver operationally flooded areas using both recent and historical acquisitions of SAR data. Having as a short-term target the flooding-related exploitation of data generated by the upcoming ESA SENTINEL-1 SAR mission, the flood mapping application consists of two building blocks: i) a set of query tools for selecting the "crisis image" and the optimal corresponding "reference image" from the G-POD archive and ii) an algorithm for extracting flooded areas via change detection using the previously selected "crisis image" and "reference image". Stakeholders in flood management and service providers are able to log onto the flood mapping application to get support for the retrieval, from the rolling archive, of the most appropriate reference image. Potential users will also be able to apply the implemented flood delineation algorithm. The latter combines histogram thresholding, region growing and change detection as an approach enabling the automatic, objective and reliable flood extent extraction from SAR images. Both algorithms are computationally efficient and operate with minimum data requirements. The case study of the high magnitude flooding event that occurred in July 2007 on the Severn River, UK, and that was observed with a moderateresolution SAR sensor as well as airborne photography highlights the performance of the proposed online application. The flood mapping application on G-POD can be used sporadically, i.e. whenever a major flood event occurs and there is a demand for SAR-based flood extent maps. In the long term, a potential extension of the application could consist in systematically extracting flooded areas from all SAR images acquired on a daily, weekly or monthly basis.

  1. Process, mechanism and impacts of scale formation in alkaline flooding by a variable porosity and permeability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jiachun

    2016-06-01

    In spite of the role of alkali in enhancing oil recovery (EOR), the formation of precipitation during alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) flooding can severely do harm to the stratum of oil reservoirs, which has been observed in situ tests of oil fields such as scale deposits found in oil stratum and at the bottom of oil wells. On the other hand, remarkable variation of stratum parameters, e.g., pore radius, porosity, and permeability due to scale formation considerably affects seepage flow and alkaline flooding process in return. The objective of this study is to firstly examine these mutual influential phenomena and corresponding mechanisms along with EOR during alkaline flooding when the effects of precipitation are no longer negligible. The chemical kinetic theory is applied for the specific fundamental reactions to describe the process of rock dissolution in silica-based reservoirs. The solubility product principle is used to analyze the mechanism of alkali scale formation in flooding. Then a 3D alkaline flooding coupling model accounting for the variation of porosity and permeability is established to quantitatively estimate the impact of alkali scales on reservoir stratum. The reliability of the present model is verified in comparison with indoor experiments and field tests of the Daqing oil field. Then, the numerical simulations on a 1/4 well group in a 5-spot pattern show that the precipitation grows with alkali concentration, temperature, and injection pressure and, thus, reduces reservoir permeability and oil recovery correspondingly. As a result, the selection of alkali with a weak base is preferable in ASP flooding by tradeoff strategy.

  2. Oscillatory interfacial instability between miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Torregrosa, Marita; Yasnou, Viktar

    Interfacial instabilities occurring between two fluids are of fundamental interest in fluid dynamics, biological systems and engineering applications such as liquid storage, solvent extraction, oil recovery and mixing. Horizontal vibrations applied to stratified layers of immiscible liquids may generate spatially periodic waving of the interface, stationary in the reference frame of the vibrated cell, referred to as a "frozen wave". We present experimental evidence that frozen wave instability exists between two ordinary miscible liquids of similar densities and viscosities. At the experiments and at the numerical model, two superimposed layers of ordinary liquids, water-alcohol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cavity in a gravitationally stable configuration. The density and viscosity of these fluids are somewhat similar. Similar to the immiscible fluids this instability has a threshold. When the value of forcing is increased the amplitudes of perturbations grow continuously displaying a saw-tooth structure. The decrease of gravity drastically changes the structure of frozen waves.

  3. Confinement-induced miscibility in polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, S.; Liu, Y.; Rafailovich, M. H.; Sokolov, J.; Gersappe, D.; Winesett, D. A.; Ade, H.

    1999-07-01

    The use of polymer thin films in technology is increasingly widespread-for example, as protective or lithographic surface coatings, or as active (electronic or optical) elements in device architectures. But it is difficult to generate films of polymer mixtures with homogeneous surface properties, because of the tendency of the polymers to phase-separate,. Copolymer compatibilizers can induce miscibility in polymer blends, but only with chemical components that are either close to a critical point in the phase diagram or which have an attractive interaction between them,. Instead of manipulating the chemical composition of the blend, we show here that complete mixing can be obtained in polymer blends by the physical effect of confinement in thin films. The compatibilization results from entropic inhibition of phase separation into micelles, owing to confinement. The result is an intimately mixed microemulsion with a perfectly flat surface and a two-dimensional maze-like structure with columnar domains that extend through the film.

  4. Miscible Applied Simulation Techniques for Energy Recovery

    2005-07-01

    During the use of MASTER at the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center (PRRC) as research division of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology a number of modification have been made to the original MASTER. We have worked at minimizing programming errors and incorporating a foaming option for surfactant solution (aqueous phase) injection altemating with gas (SAG) The original program checks and modifications performed at PRRC were under the direction of Dr. Shih-Hsien Changmore » under previous DOE contracts. The final modifications and completion of the documentation were performed by Dr. Zhengwen Zeng under DOE Contract Number DE-FG26-01BC15364. Drs. Chang and Zeng worked under Dr. Reid B. Grigg in the Gas Flooding Processes and Flow Heterogeneities Section of PRRC. This work is not intended to have any long-term support from the PRRC, but any errors should be reported to the Department of Energy for inclusion in future releases of MASTER. MASTER is an effective reservoir simulator for modeling a number of fluid flow problems and is a straight forward and economical program. We thank the Department of Energy for the original development of this program and the availability for our use.« less

  5. "Physically-based" numerical experiment to determine the dominant hillslope processes during floods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Eric; Esclaffer, Thomas; Dangla, Patrick; Payrastre, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    To study the dynamics of hillslope responses during flood event, a fully coupled "physically-based" model for the combined numerical simulation of surface runoff and underground flows has been developed. A particular attention has been given to the selection of appropriate numerical schemes for the modelling of both processes and of their coupling. Surprisingly, the most difficult question to solve, from a numerical point of view, was not related to the coupling of two processes with contrasted kinetics such as surface and underground flows, but to the high gradient infiltration fronts appearing in soils, source of numerical diffusion, instabilities and sometimes divergence. The model being elaborated, it has been successfully tested against results of high quality experiments conducted on a laboratory sandy slope in the early eighties, which is still considered as a reference hillslope experimental setting (Abdul & Guilham). The model appeared able to accurately simulate the pore pressure distributions observed in this 1.5 meter deep and wide laboratory hillslope, as well as its outflow hydrograph shapes and the measured respective contributions of direct runoff and groundwater to these outflow hydrographs. Based on this great success, the same model has been used to simulate the response of a theoretical 100-meter wide and 10% sloped hillslope, with a 2 meter deep pervious soil and impervious bedrock. Three rain events have been tested: a 100 millimeter rainfall event over 10 days, over 1 day or over one hour. The simulated responses are hydrologically not realistic and especially the fast component of the response, that is generally observed in the real-world and explains flood events, is almost absent of the simulated response. Thinking a little about the whole problem, the simulation results appears totally logical according to the proposed model. The simulated response, in fact a recession hydrograph, corresponds to a piston flow of a relatively uniformly

  6. Pre- and post-processing of hydro-meteorological ensembles for the Norwegian flood forecasting system in 145 basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr Hegdahl, Trine; Steinsland, Ingelin; Merete Tallaksen, Lena; Engeland, Kolbjørn

    2016-04-01

    Probabilistic flood forecasting has an added value for decision making. The Norwegian flood forecasting service is based on a flood forecasting model that run for 145 basins. Covering all of Norway the basins differ in both size and hydrological regime. Currently the flood forecasting is based on deterministic meteorological forecasts, and an auto-regressive procedure is used to achieve probabilistic forecasts. An alternative approach is to use meteorological and hydrological ensemble forecasts to quantify the uncertainty in forecasted streamflow. The hydrological ensembles are based on forcing a hydrological model with meteorological ensemble forecasts of precipitation and temperature. However, the ensembles of precipitation are often biased and the spread is too small, especially for the shortest lead times, i.e. they are not calibrated. These properties will, to some extent, propagate to hydrological ensembles, that most likely will be uncalibrated as well. Pre- and post-processing methods are commonly used to obtain calibrated meteorological and hydrological ensembles respectively. Quantitative studies showing the effect of the combined processing of the meteorological (pre-processing) and the hydrological (post-processing) ensembles are however few. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of pre- and post-processing on the skill of streamflow predictions, and we will especially investigate if the forecasting skill depends on lead-time, basin size and hydrological regime. This aim is achieved by applying the 51 medium-range ensemble forecast of precipitation and temperature provided by the European Center of Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF). These ensembles are used as input to the operational Norwegian flood forecasting model, both raw and pre-processed. Precipitation ensembles are calibrated using a zero-adjusted gamma distribution. Temperature ensembles are calibrated using a Gaussian distribution and altitude corrected by a constant gradient

  7. Wax deposition in a WAG flood

    SciTech Connect

    Nenninger, J.E.; Cutten, F.B.; Shields, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Substantial deposits of a gummy material were discovered in the injection system of a water-alternating-gas (WAG) miscible flood. Capillary column gas chromatographic analyses revealed that these deposits were due to wax contamination of the natural gas liquids used to enrich the injection gas. To remove the deposits, propane was added to the injection gas. This treatment was carried out successfully at virtually no extra cost.

  8. Reducing uncertainty in the selection of bi-variate distributions of flood peaks and volumes using copulas and hydrological process-based model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolgay, Jan; Gaál, Ladislav; Bacigál, Tomáš; Kohnová, Silvia; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Bi-variate distributions of flood peaks and flood event volumes are needed for a range of practical purposes including e.g. retention basin design and identifying extent and duration of flooding in flood hazard zones. However, the selection of the types of bi-variate distributions and estimating their parameters from observed peak-volume pairs are associated with far larger uncertainties compared to uni-variate distributions, since observed flood records of required length are rarely available. This poses a serious problem to reliable flood risk estimation in bi-variate design cases. The aim of this contribution was to shed light on the possibility of reducing uncertainties in the estimation of the dependence models/parameters from a regional perspective. The peak-volume relationships were modeled in terms of copulas. Flood events were classified according to their origin. In order to reduce the uncertainty in estimating flood risk, pooling and analyzing catchments of similar behavior according to flood process types was attempted. Most of the work reported in the literature so far did not direct the multivariate analysis toward discriminating certain types of models regionally according to specific runoff generation processes. Specifically, the contribution addresses these problems: - Are the peak-volume relationships of different flood types for a given catchment similar? - Are the peak-volume dependence structures between catchments in a larger region for given flood types similar? - Are some copula types more suitable for given flood process types and does this have consequences for reliable risk estimation? The target region is located in the northern parts of Austria, and consists of 72 small and mid-sized catchments. Instead of the traditional approach that deals with annual maximum floods, the current analysis includes all independent flood events in the region. 24 872 flood events from the period 1976-2007 were identified, and classified as synoptic, flash

  9. Flooding of lignite mines: isotope variations and processes in a system influenced by saline groundwater.

    PubMed

    Trettin, Rolf; Glässer, Walter; Lerche, Ian; Seelig, Ulrike; Treutler, Hanns-Christian

    2006-06-01

    The quality of both groundwaters and surface waters that arise during flooding of abandoned lignite open pits are influenced by regional and local factors. A typical regional factor is due to oxidised sedimentary sulfides. A more local factor is the interaction of shallow water with highly saline groundwater, which is important in Merseburg-Ost (Germany). Investigation of this system is aided by the use of many environmental isotope tracers but special problems can arise. In order to reveal processes in the mine environment (shallow groundwater, lake water) and to characterise mixtures with saline groundwater results are described using the tracers deltaD, delta18O, delta13C, delta34S, 87Sr/86Sr, 3H, 14C, 39Ar, and 222Rn. Deep highly saline groundwater had a radiocarbon concentration typically below 10 pMC. The values of delta13C(DIC) are around-5 per thousand. As delta13C of the aquifer rock samples (Permian, Zechstein carbonates) was in the range of-6...+5 per thousand, residence time corrections based on delta13C are questionable. Additional checks with 39Ar, as well as results from the variationof delta18O (or deltaD) with respect to the salinity, emphasise a Holocene age; as is also the case for most mineralised groundwaters and also for water having a low delta18O (and deltaD). For saline groundwater residing in the Zechstein aquifer the measured delta34S values of about 12 per thousand are close to those expected from the literature. In contrast, the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of dissolved strontium is far from the values anticipated for the aquifer rocks despite there being proportionality between the chloride concentration and the strontium concentration. Furthermore, the proportionality is not valid in lower mineralised water. The 87Sr/86Sr ratio can, therefore, hardly be used as a tracer for the distribution of ascending saline water. The amount of salt-water coming from below into the residual quarry basins is an essential contribution to the lake inventories

  10. Deconvolving Flood Plain Dynamical Processes from Pedogenic Processes on Ancient Floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols (fossil soils) preserved in ancient floodplain systems represent one of the most widely used and potentially powerful continental paleoclimatic archives. At the same time, to apply most of the quantitative paleoclimate proxies requires the deconvolution of floodplain dynamics from pedogenic processes. For example, a paleosol could be weakly developed because of low atmospheric CO2 levels, low amounts of precipitation, or because of short formation duration due to frequent channel avulsion. The interpretation of local floodplain dynamics in paleo-floodplain systems is often simplistic, assuming both straightforward uniformitarianism and also that a single vertical section represents that lateral diversity of environments, however, these assumptions have rarely, if ever, been put to the test. Herein, a variety of paleoclimatic and paleobiological proxies will be examined in well-preserved paleo-floodplain settings in Spain, Wyoming, and Montana to test those assumptions. Multi-proxy (phytolith, stable isotope) paleovegetation studies along paleo-floodplain transects in Montana (Miocene, Eocene) indicate substantial heterogeneity at the scale of tens to hundreds of meters, floodplain dynamics-driven succession, and cryptic paludal or everwet areas that are not recognizable purely on the basis of sedimentology. Similarly, rapidly aggrading floodplains in fluvial distributary systems (Spain, Miocene) or in dryland basins (Montana) often record significant mismatches between paleosol-based and paleobotanically based estimates of paleoprecipitation, likely due to variable sediment accumulation rates. Both of those sets of results indicate that single vertical sections are unlikely to represent the breadth floodplain environments and properties operating across paleo-floodplain systems. In contrast, newly described mineralogical proxies based on rock magnetics that can be used to reconstruct paleoclimatic/paleoenvironmental properties appear to be robust at the

  11. CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process in a light oil shallow carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Prieditis, J.; Wehner, S.

    1998-01-01

    The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. Miscible CO{sub 2} flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin`s daily production. There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO{sub 2} projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO{sub 2} H-n-P process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO{sub 2} projects when coupled together.

  12. Dynamic Heterogeneity in Interacting Miscible Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Ashish; Lodge, Timothy

    2008-03-01

    Dynamic heterogeneity leading to time-temperature superposition (tTS) failure has been widely reported in non-interacting/weakly interacting miscible polymer blends. However, coupling of the component dynamic response in blends, even with a huge dynamic asymmetry in the pure components, is possible with H-bonding interactions. This study is focused on finding the minimum level of interaction necessary for thermo-rheological simplicity in blends. Blends of styrene-co-vinylphenol (PSVPh) and poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) were chosen. Incorporation of styrene provides an effective way to modulate H-bonding interactions in the system. Linear viscoelastic data indicate that tTS fails for PS/PVME blends, whereas data obtained for different PVPh/PVME blends showed that tTS was obeyed a over wide temperature range. For PSVPh/PVME blends with low PSVPh content, tTS was successful. This suggests that the presence of alternating styrene and vinyl phenol units was insufficient for dynamic response decoupling. Further studies are in progress, with varying vinyl phenol content in PSVPh, to explore the influence of H-bonding on dynamic heterogeneity and blend dynamics.

  13. Polyolefin Miscibility: Novel Insights from Molecular Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolak, Justyna E.; White, Jeffery L.

    2004-03-01

    We present experimental evidence for increased local entropy in a high-molecular weight polymer upon blend formation with a second, higher Tg polymer. Direct spectroscopic observation of conformational dynamics at or slightly above Tg by 2D solid-state NMR reveals an increase in the absolute configurational entropy of polyisobutylene when a miscible blend with polyethylene-co-butene is formed while no increase is observed for phase-separated blends. Static ^2H and ^129Xe NMR experiments support this conclusion. These results contradict traditional thermodynamic models where entropy of mixing for two macromolecules is assumed to be zero. Such models are inherently based on non-local polymer structures, and fail to account for specific dynamics at sub-Rg length scales. Our experimental results on saturated hydrocarbon blends, in which enthalpic interactions are small due to the identical chemical composition of polyolefins, indicate cumulative conformational entropy gains upon mixing. In a second manifestation of these new experimental insights, Adams-Gibbs theory is used to determine changes in the configurational entropy across the glass-transition temperature range.

  14. Estimating the Response of Physical Processes in the South San Francisco Bay for Flood Stage Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andes, L.; Wu, F.; MacWilliams, M.; Lu, C.; Lo, J.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal flooding in the far south San Francisco Bay (SSFB) can be a function of astronomical tide, residual tide, in-bay wind speed and direction and fluvial discharge. These physical processes and coastal levee failure were considered as input parameters into a Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) to estimate coastal flood stage frequency in the SSFB. Limited data is available in the SSFB to estimate the contribution of these physical processes to coastal flood statistics. Over 100 years of measured water surface elevation (WSE) is available at the San Francisco tide station which can be used as input to hydrodynamic model simulations to estimate the WSE response in the SSFB. Data sampling criteria have been developed to select significant events at the San Francisco tide station for data transfer to the project site and statistical analysis. The coincidently sampled astronomical and residual tides at the San Francisco tide station were analyzed to cover the full range of the combinations of astronomical and residual tides that contribute to coastal flood statistics at the project site. A look-up table of astronomical and residual tide in the form of WSE responses at the project site from the hydrodynamic simulations was established for the interpolation in the MCS. The hydrodynamic model simulations indicated that the higher-high astronomical tides between 5.15 and 7.25 feet MLLW amplifies with a factor of 1.40 to 1.90 as a function of tidal frequency and water depth, including tidal range. The residual tide varies minimally as it propagates into the SSFB. In-Bay wind set-up from a significant event was found to contribute on the order of one foot to the total WSE in the SSFB; however, wind events with strong magnitudes along the primary axis of the bay occur infrequently making an insignificant contribution to the overall flood statistics. The fluvial discharges of Guadalupe River and Coyote Creek were considered in the hydrodynamic simulations as they are located

  15. Assessment Approach for Identifying Compatibility of Restoration Projects with Geomorphic and Flooding Processes in Gravel Bed Rivers.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Paul; Aldrich, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A critical requirement for a successful river restoration project in a dynamic gravel bed river is that it be compatible with natural hydraulic and sediment transport processes operating at the reach scale. The potential for failure is greater at locations where the influence of natural processes is inconsistent with intended project function and performance. We present an approach using practical GIS, hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport analyses to identify locations where specific restoration project types have the greatest likelihood of working as intended because their function and design are matched with flooding and morphologic processes. The key premise is to identify whether a specific river analysis segment (length ~1-10 bankfull widths) within a longer reach is geomorphically active or inactive in the context of vertical and lateral stabilities, and hydrologically active for floodplain connectivity. Analyses involve empirical channel geometry relations, aerial photographic time series, LiDAR data, HEC-RAS hydraulic modeling, and a time-integrated sediment transport budget to evaluate trapping efficiency within each segment. The analysis segments are defined by HEC-RAS model cross sections. The results have been used effectively to identify feasible projects in a variety of alluvial gravel bed river reaches with lengths between 11 and 80 km and 2-year flood magnitudes between ~350 and 1330 m(3)/s. Projects constructed based on the results have all performed as planned. In addition, the results provide key criteria for formulating erosion and flood management plans. PMID:25910870

  16. Assessment Approach for Identifying Compatibility of Restoration Projects with Geomorphic and Flooding Processes in Gravel Bed Rivers.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Paul; Aldrich, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A critical requirement for a successful river restoration project in a dynamic gravel bed river is that it be compatible with natural hydraulic and sediment transport processes operating at the reach scale. The potential for failure is greater at locations where the influence of natural processes is inconsistent with intended project function and performance. We present an approach using practical GIS, hydrologic, hydraulic, and sediment transport analyses to identify locations where specific restoration project types have the greatest likelihood of working as intended because their function and design are matched with flooding and morphologic processes. The key premise is to identify whether a specific river analysis segment (length ~1-10 bankfull widths) within a longer reach is geomorphically active or inactive in the context of vertical and lateral stabilities, and hydrologically active for floodplain connectivity. Analyses involve empirical channel geometry relations, aerial photographic time series, LiDAR data, HEC-RAS hydraulic modeling, and a time-integrated sediment transport budget to evaluate trapping efficiency within each segment. The analysis segments are defined by HEC-RAS model cross sections. The results have been used effectively to identify feasible projects in a variety of alluvial gravel bed river reaches with lengths between 11 and 80 km and 2-year flood magnitudes between ~350 and 1330 m(3)/s. Projects constructed based on the results have all performed as planned. In addition, the results provide key criteria for formulating erosion and flood management plans.

  17. Rheology of miscible polymer blends with hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyi

    Poly(4-vinylphenol) (PVPh) was blended with four different polymers: poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME), poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc), poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP), and poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) by solvent casting. The miscibility of these four PVPh-based blend systems was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the composition-dependent glass transition temperature (Tg) was predicted by a thermodynamic theory. The hydrogen bonds between phenolic group in PVPh and ether group, carbonyl group or pyridine group was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The fraction of hydrogen bonds was calculated by the Coleman-Graf-Painter association model. Linear dynamic viscoelasticity of four PVPh-based miscible polymer blends with hydrogen bonding was investigated. Emphasis was placed on investigating how the linear dynamic viscoelasticity of miscible polymer blends with specific interaction might be different from that of miscible polymer blends without specific interaction. We have found that an application of time-temperature superposition (TTS) to the PVPh-based miscible blends with intermolecular hydrogen bonding is warranted even when the difference in the component glass transition temperatures is as large as about 200°C, while TTS fails for miscible polymer blends without specific interactions. On the basis of such an observation, we have concluded that hydrogen bonding suppressed concentration fluctuations in PVPh-based miscible blends. It has been found that both the intra-association (self-association) of the phenoxy hydroxyl groups in PVPh and inter-association (intermolecular interactions) between the constituent components have a profound influence on the frequency dependence of dynamic moduli in the terminal region of the PVPh-based miscible blend systems investigated. Hydrogenated functional polynorbornenes (HFPNBs) were synthesized and they were used to investigate the miscibility and rheology of HFPNB

  18. Uphill diffusion and phase separation in partially miscible multicomponent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Raghavan, Ashwin; Ghoniem, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    The partially miscible multicomponent mixtures, which are frequently encountered in green chemistry processes, often exhibit complicated behaviors, and are critical to the production rate, energy efficiency, and pollution controls. Recent studies have been mainly focused on phase behaviors. However, the coupled phase equilibrium and transport process, which may be the answer to phase separations observed in experiments, is not well researched. Here, we present a numerical and theoretical study on coupled mixing of heavy oil and supercritical water, and the results of our state-of-art modeling agree with experimental measurements. We find that due to the non-ideal diffusion driving force, (1) strong uphill diffusion of heavy oil fractions occurs, (2) a new heavy oil phase is separated starting from the plait point, and heavy fractions become highly concentrated, and (3) water diffusion initially overshoots in oil, and is expelled lately. Finally, we conclude our analysis applicable to different molecules and conditions. The authors thank Saudi Aramco for supporting this work (contract number 6600023444).

  19. Model parameters conditioning on regional hydrologic signatures for process-based design flood estimation in ungauged basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Daniela; De Luca, Davide Luciano

    2015-04-01

    The use of rainfall-runoff models represents an alternative to statistical approaches (such as at-site or regional flood frequency analysis) for design flood estimation, and constitutes an answer to the increasing need for synthetic design hydrographs (SDHs) associated to a specific return period. However, the lack of streamflow observations and the consequent high uncertainty associated with parameter estimation, usually pose serious limitations to the use of process-based approaches in ungauged catchments, which in contrast represent the majority in practical applications. This work presents the application of a Bayesian procedure that, for a predefined rainfall-runoff model, allows for the assessment of posterior parameters distribution, using the limited and uncertain information available for the response of an ungauged catchment (Bulygina et al. 2009; 2011). The use of regional estimates of river flow statistics, interpreted as hydrological signatures that measure theoretically relevant system process behaviours (Gupta et al. 2008), within this framework represents a valuable option and has shown significant developments in recent literature to constrain the plausible model response and to reduce the uncertainty in ungauged basins. In this study we rely on the first three L-moments of annual streamflow maxima, for which regressions are available from previous studies (Biondi et al. 2012; Laio et al. 2011). The methodology was carried out for a catchment located in southern Italy, and used within a Monte Carlo scheme (MCs) considering both event-based and continuous simulation approaches for design flood estimation. The applied procedure offers promising perspectives to perform model calibration and uncertainty analysis in ungauged basins; moreover, in the context of design flood estimation, process-based methods coupled with MCs approach have the advantage of providing simulated floods uncertainty analysis that represents an asset in risk-based decision

  20. D/H on Mars: Effects of floods, volcanism, impacts, and polar processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Water in the Martian atmosphere is 5.1 times more enriched in deuterium than terrestial water. The enrichment has been previously attributed to either a massive loss of water early in the planet's history or the presence of only a very small reservoir of water that has exchanged with the atmosphere over geologic time. Both these interpretations appear inconsistent with geologic evidence of large floods and sustained volcanism. Large floods are believed to have episodically introduced large amounts of water onto the surface. During a large flood roughly 1017 g of water would almost immediately sublime into the atmospher and be frozen out on polar terrain, to form a new layer several centimeters thick. The long-term effect of a flood would depend on where the water pooled after the flood. If the water pooled at low latitudes, all the water would slowly sublime into the atmosphers and ultimately be frozen out at the poles, thereby adding several meters to the polar deposits for each flood. If the water pooled at high latitude, it would form a permanent ice deposit, largely isolated from further interchange with the atmosphere. Volcanism has also episodically introduced water into the atmosphere. Most of this water has become incorporated into the polar deposits. That released over the last 3.5 Ga could have added a few kilometers to the polar deposits, depending on the amount of dust incorporated along with the ice. Large cometary impacts would have introduced additional large amounts of water into the atmosphere. The long-term evolution of D/H in the atmosphere depends on the rate of exchange of water between the atmosphere and the polar deposits. If exchange is active, then loss rates of hydrogen from the upper atmosphere are substantially higher than those estimated by Y. L. Yung, J. Wen, J. P. Pinto, M. Allen, K. K. Pierce, and S. Paulsen [Icarus 76, 146-159 (1988)]. More plausibly, exchange of water between the atmosphere and the polar deposits is limited, so

  1. Miscibility comparison for three refrigerant mixtures and four component refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1999-07-01

    Miscibility data were taken and compared for seven different refrigerants when mixed with the same polyol ester (POE) lubricant. Four of the seven refrigerants were single-component refrigerants while three of the refrigerants were mixtures composed of various combinations of the pure refrigerants. The purpose of this research was to investigate the difference in miscibility characteristics between refrigerant mixtures and their respective component refrigerants. The POE lubricant was a penta erythritol mixed-acid type POE which has a viscosity ISO32. The four pure refrigerants were R-32, R-125, R-134a, and R-143a and the three refrigerant mixtures were R-404A, R407C, and R-410A. The miscibility tests were performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The test cells were constructed to allow for complete visibility of the refrigerant/lubricant mixtures under all test conditions. The tests were performed over a concentration range of 0 to 100% and a temperature range of {minus}40 to 194 F. The miscibility test results for refrigerant mixtures are compared to component refrigerants. In all cases, the refrigerant mixtures appear to have better miscibility than their most immiscible pure component.

  2. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Kovar, M.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

    1999-02-24

    The application cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in a attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir.

  3. Dewetting dynamics in miscible polymer-polymer thin film mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besancon, Brian M.; Green, Peter F.

    2007-06-01

    Thin polystyrene films supported by oxidized silicon (SiOx/Si) substrates may be unstable or metastable, depending on the film thickness, h, and can ultimately dewet the substrate when heated above their glass transition. In the metastable regime, holes nucleate throughout the film and subsequently grow due to capillary driving forces. Recent studies have shown that the addition of a second component, such as a copolymer or miscible polymer, can suppress the dewetting process and stabilize the film. We examined the hole growth dynamics and the hole morphology in thin film mixtures composed of polystyrene and tetramethyl bisphenol-A polycarbonate (TMPC) supported by SiOx/Si substrates. The hole growth velocity decreased with increasing TMPC content beyond that expected from changes in the bulk viscosity. The authors show that the suppression of the dewetting velocity is primarily due to reductions in the capillary driving force for dewetting and to increased friction at the substrate-polymer interface. The viscosity, as determined from the hole growth dynamics, decreases with decreasing film thickness, and is connected to a depression of the glass transition of the film.

  4. Optical Studies of model binary miscibility gap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Witherow, W. K.; Facemire, B. R.; Nishioka, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    In order to develop a better understanding of separation processes in binary miscibility gap metal alloys, model transparent fluid systems were studied. The system selected was diethylene glycol-ethyl salicylate which has convenient working temperatures (288 to 350 K), low toxicity, and is relatively easy to purify. The system is well characterized with respect to its phase diagram, density, surface and interfacial tensions, viscosity and other pertinent physical properties. Studies of migration of the dispersed phase in a thermal gradient were performed using conventional photomicroscopy. Velocities of the droplets of the dispersed phase were measured and compared to calculated rates which included both Stokes and thermal components. A holographic microscopy system was used to study growth, coalescence, and particle motions. Sequential holograms allowed determination of particle size distribution changes with respect to time and temperature. Holographic microscopy is capable of recording particle densities up to 10 to the 7th power particles/cu cm and is able to resolve particles of the order of 2 to 3 microns in diameter throughout the entire volume of the test cell. The reconstructed hologram produces a wavefront that is identical to the original wavefront as it existed when the hologram was made. The reconstructed wavefront is analyzed using a variety of conventional optical methods.

  5. Space shuttle experiments on Al-In liquid phase miscibility gap (LPMG) alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelles, S. H.; Markworth, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Massive phase separation observed at low-g was studied during the phase separation process while cooling through the miscibility gap under a controlled thermal gradient was investigated. The molten drops which form during the phase separation process appear to move in a direction opposite to that predicted by the theory of thermocapillary droplet motion. A second experiment utilized a plunger arrangement designed to eliminate the surface tension driven convection currents originating at a free surface. This experiment suggests that the free surface does contribute to the coalescence process but that there are other mechanisms which are more important.

  6. Miscibility studies on blends containing telechelic supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrue, Michelle; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2007-03-01

    The incorporation of associating end groups influences the phase behavior of polymer blends. We are studying the effects of the incorporation of strong, site-selective, hydrogen-bonding groups in various polymer blend systems. We have synthesized several telechelic ureidopyrimidone (UPy) functionalized polymers. These self-complimentary functional groups have the ability to form four hydrogen bonds. When these groups are incorporated into a polymer blend, the miscibility is altered. Laser light scattering has been employed to study the phase behavior of these systems. Data from systems in which only one polymer was functionalized indicate a reduced miscibility when compared with the unfunctionalized parent blend. We are also investigating the effect of functionalizing both polymers of the blend with UPy end groups. We predict enhanced miscibility in such systems.

  7. COSOLVENCY OF PARTIALLY MISCIBLE ORGANIC SOLVENTS ON THE SOLUBILITY OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cosolvency of completely miscible organic solvents (CMOSs) and partially miscible organic solvents (PMOSs) on the solubility of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) was examined, with an emphasis on PMOSs. Measured solubilities were compared with predictions from the log- lin...

  8. Multiple flow processes accompanying a dam-break flood in a small upland watershed, Centralia, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, John E.

    1994-01-01

    On October 5, 1991, following 35 consecutive days of dry weather, a 105-meter long, 37-meter wide, 5.2-meter deep concrete-lined watersupply reservoir on a hillside in the eastern edge of Centralia, Washington, suddenly failed, sending 13,250 cubic meters of water rushing down a small, steep tributary channel into the city. Two houses were destroyed, several others damaged, mud and debris were deposited in streets, on lawns, and in basements over four city blocks, and 400 people were evacuated. The cause of failure is believed to have been a sliding failure along a weak seam or joint in the siltstone bedrock beneath the reservoir, possibly triggered by increased seepage into the rock foundation through continued deterioration of concrete panel seams, and a slight rise (0.6 meters) in the pool elevation. A second adjacent reservoir containing 18,900 cubic meters of water also drained, but far more slowly, when a 41-cm diameter connecting pipe was broken by the landslide. The maximum discharge resulting from the dam-failure was about 71 cubic meters per second. A reconstructed hydrograph based on the known reservoir volume and calculated peak discharge indicates the flood duration was about 6.2 minutes. Sedimentologic evidence, high-water mark distribution, and landforms preserved in the valley floor indicate that the dam failure flood consisted of two flow phases: an initial debris flow that deposited coarse bouldery sediment along the slope-area reach as it lost volume, followed soon after by a water-flood that achieved a stage about one-half meter higher than the debris flow. The Centralia dam failure is one of three constructed dams destroyed by rapid foundation failure that defines the upper limits of an envelope curve of peak flood discharge as a function of potential energy for failed constructed dams worldwide.

  9. Assessment of flood hazard areas at a regional scale using an index-based approach and Analytical Hierarchy Process: Application in Rhodope-Evros region, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, Nerantzis; Kougias, Ioannis; Patsialis, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    The present study introduces a multi-criteria index to assess flood hazard areas in a regional scale. Accordingly, a Flood Hazard Index (FHI) has been defined and a spatial analysis in a GIS environment has been applied for the estimation of its value. The developed methodology processes information of seven parameters namely flow accumulation, distance from the drainage network, elevation, land use, rainfall intensity and geology. The initials of these criteria gave the name to the developed method: "FIGUSED". The relative importance of each parameter for the occurrence and severity of flood has been connected to weight values. These values are calculated following an "Analytical Hierarchy Process", a method originally developed for the solution of Operational Research problems. According to their weight values, information of the different parameters is superimposed, resulting to flood hazard mapping. The accuracy of the method has been supported by a sensitivity analysis that examines a range for the weights' values and corresponding to alternative scenarios. The presented methodology has been applied to an area in north-eastern Greece, where recurring flood events have appeared. Initially FIGUSED method resulted to a Flood Hazard Index (FHI) and a corresponding flood map. A sensitivity analysis on the parameters' values revealed some interesting information on the relative importance of each criterion, presented and commented in the Discussion section. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis concluded to a revised index FHIS (methodology named FIGUSED-S) and flood mapping, supporting the robustness of FIGUSED methodology. A comparison of the outcome with records of historical flood events confirmed that the proposed methodology provides valid results. PMID:26318691

  10. Assessment of flood hazard areas at a regional scale using an index-based approach and Analytical Hierarchy Process: Application in Rhodope-Evros region, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, Nerantzis; Kougias, Ioannis; Patsialis, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    The present study introduces a multi-criteria index to assess flood hazard areas in a regional scale. Accordingly, a Flood Hazard Index (FHI) has been defined and a spatial analysis in a GIS environment has been applied for the estimation of its value. The developed methodology processes information of seven parameters namely flow accumulation, distance from the drainage network, elevation, land use, rainfall intensity and geology. The initials of these criteria gave the name to the developed method: "FIGUSED". The relative importance of each parameter for the occurrence and severity of flood has been connected to weight values. These values are calculated following an "Analytical Hierarchy Process", a method originally developed for the solution of Operational Research problems. According to their weight values, information of the different parameters is superimposed, resulting to flood hazard mapping. The accuracy of the method has been supported by a sensitivity analysis that examines a range for the weights' values and corresponding to alternative scenarios. The presented methodology has been applied to an area in north-eastern Greece, where recurring flood events have appeared. Initially FIGUSED method resulted to a Flood Hazard Index (FHI) and a corresponding flood map. A sensitivity analysis on the parameters' values revealed some interesting information on the relative importance of each criterion, presented and commented in the Discussion section. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis concluded to a revised index FHIS (methodology named FIGUSED-S) and flood mapping, supporting the robustness of FIGUSED methodology. A comparison of the outcome with records of historical flood events confirmed that the proposed methodology provides valid results.

  11. Processes controlling Sr in surface and ground waters of Tertiary tholeiitic flood basalts in Northern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridriksson, Thráinn; Arnórsson, Stefán; Bird, Dennis K.

    2009-11-01

    Strontium concentrations of 253 natural water samples from Skagafjördur, a Tertiary tholeiitic flood basalt region in northern Iceland range between 0.10 and 28 ppb. Surface environments (rivers, lakes, and peat soil waters) include the whole range of observed Sr concentrations whereas the Sr concentrations of ground waters are, in most cases, <3.5 ppb. Concentrations of Sr derived from basalt dissolution (i.e., rock-derived Sr) in waters of rivers and lakes exhibit a near linear correlation with the concentration of rock-derived Ca with a median molar Ca/Sr ratio of 1350. This systematic correlation suggests that Ca and Sr concentrations are controlled by weathering processes, i.e., the extent of dissolution of the basalt. The relative mobility of Sr during weathering in Skagafjördur is approximately half that of Ca, which is consistent with observed relative mobilities of these elements elsewhere in Iceland and in other basaltic regions. Peat soil waters commonly have lower concentrations of Sr and higher Ca concentrations than rivers and lakes, and molar ratios of rock-derived Ca to Sr in peat soil waters exhibit no systematic pattern. In several cases calculated concentrations of rock-derived Sr in peat soil waters yield negative values, suggesting a mineralogic sink for Sr in these waters. The low Sr concentrations in cold and thermal ground waters (<3.5 ppb) suggest mineralogic control over Sr in the ground water systems. Precipitation of secondary Sr minerals such as strontianite and celestite is ruled out as the ground waters are understaturated with respect to these minerals. Ground waters are characterized by high Ca/Sr molar ratios (˜5000 compared to bedrock Ca/Sr ratio of 730) suggesting that Sr is being preferentially incorporated (relative to Ca) into secondary minerals. The secondary minerals present in the bedrock in Skagafjördur that can preferentially incorporate Sr include zeolites, such as heulandite, chabazite, and thomsonite, and smectite

  12. Modelling cascading and erosional processes for glacial lake outburst floods in the Quillcay catchment, Huaraz, Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Patrick; Huggel, Christian; Frey, Holger; Chisolm, Rachel; McKinney, Daene; McArdell, Brian; Portocarrero, Cesar; Cochachin, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    Huaraz as the largest city in Cordillera Blanca has faced a major disaster in 1941, when an outburst flood from Lake Palcacocha killed several thousand people and caused widespread destruction. Recent studies on glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) modelling and early warning systems focussed on Lake Palcacocha which has regrown after the 1941 event, from a volume of half a million m3 in 1974 to a total volume of more than 17 million m3 today. However, little research has been conducted so far concerning the situation of other lakes in the Quillcay catchment, namely Lake Tullparaju (12 mill. m3) and Cuchillacocha (2.5 mill. m3), which both also pose a threat to the city of Huaraz. In this study, we modelled the cascading processes at Lake Tullparaju and Lake Cuchillacocha including rock/ice avalanches, flood wave propagation in the lake and the resulting outburst flood and debris flows. We used the 2D model RAMMS to simulate ice avalanches. Model output was used as input for analytical 2D and 3D calculations of impact waves in the lakes that allowed us to estimate dam overtopping wave height. Since the dimension of the hanging glaciers above all three lakes is comparable, the scenarios in this study have been defined similar to the previous study at Lake Palcacocha. The flow propagation model included sediment entrainment in the steeper parts of the catchment, adding up to 50% to the initial flow volume. The results for total travel time as well as for inundated areas and flow depth and velocity in the city of Huaraz are comparable to the previous studies at Lake Palcacocha. This underlines the importance of considering also these lakes within an integral hazard analysis for the city of Huaraz. A main challenge for modelling GLOFs in the Quillcay catchment using RAMMS is the long runout distance of over 22 km combined with the very low slope gradient of the river. Further studies could improve the process understanding and could focus on more detailed investigations

  13. Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO sub 2 gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Raible, C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

  14. Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO{sub 2} gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Raible, C.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

  15. Molecular dynamics of binary and ternary nanodroplets with a miscibility gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilemski, Gerald; Hrahsheh, Fawaz

    2012-02-01

    The structure of nanodroplets plays an important role in many natural processes including particle nucleation and aerosol formation in the atmosphere. Among other factors, chemical miscibility and surface tension strongly affect the structure of multicomponent nanodroplets at low temperature. Here, we investigate the structure of water/nonane and water/butanol/nonane nanodroplets using molecular dynamics (MD). Our MD results confirm our theoretical predictions of nonspherical nanodroplet (Russian-Doll) structures at low temperatures using density functional and lattice Monte Carlo techniques. We systematically study the variation of the droplet structure with temperature and with butanol concentration.

  16. Calcium Carbonate Crystal Growth in Porous Media, in the presence of Water Miscible and Non-Miscible Organic Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaho, Sofia; Sygouni, Varvara; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of sparingly soluble salts (scaling) within porous media is a major problem encountered in many industrial and environmental applications. In the oil industry scaling causes severe operational malfunctions and, therefore, increasing the total operating and maintenance cost [1]. The most common types of sparingly soluble salts located in oil fields include carbonate and sulfate salts of calcium, strondium and barium[1,2]. Multiple phase flow and tubing surface properties are some of the factors affecting scale formation [3]. The main purpose of the present work was the investigation of the precipitation mechanisms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) through in situ mixing of two soluble salt solutions in a flow granular medium, in the presence of water miscible organic fluid (ethylene glycol) or non-miscible organic fluid (n-dodecane). All series of experiments were carried out in a two dimensional porous medium made of Plexiglas. For all solutions used in the experiments, the contact angles with the surface of the porous medium and the interfacial tensions were measured. During the experiments, the calcium carbonate crystal growth was continuously monitored and recorded through an optical microscope equipped with a digital programmed video camera. The snap-shots were taken within specific time intervals and their detailed procession gave information concerning the crystal growth rate and kinetics. The pH of the effluent was measured and fluids samples were collected for calcium analysis using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). In all experiments effluent calcium concentration decreased as a function of time, suggesting that CaCO3 precipitation took place inside the porous medium. Crystals of the precipitated salt were identified using Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and the morphology of the crystals was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The induction time for precipitation of CaCO3 crystals in the presence of n-dodecane was significantly

  17. Pakistan Flooding

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Flooding in Pakistan     View Larger Image In late July 2010, flooding caused by heavy monsoon rains began in several regions of Pakistan, ... and Aug 11, 2010 Images:  Pakistan Flood location:  Asia thumbnail:  ...

  18. Numerical Simulations of Precipitation Processes, Microphysics, and Microwave Radiative Properties of flood Producing Storms in Mediterranean & Adriatic Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the meteorological and microphysical nature of Mediterranean storms requires a combination of in situ data analysis, radar data analysis, and satellite data analysis, effectively integrated with numerical modeling studies at various scales. An important aspect of understanding microphysical controls of severe storms, is first understanding the meteorological controls under which a storm has evolved, and then using that information to help characterize the dominant microphysical processes. For hazardous Mediterranean storms, highlighted by the October 5-6, 1998 Friuli flood event in northern Italy, a comprehensive microphysical interpretation requires an understanding of the multiple phases of storm evolution. This involves intense convective development, Sratiform decay, orographic lifting, and sloped frontal lifting processes, as well as the associated vertical motions and thermodynamical instabilities governing physical processes that effect details of the size distributions and fall rates of the various types of hydrometeors found within the storm environment. This talk overviews the microphysical elements of a severe Mediterranean storm in such a context, investigated with the aid of TRMM satellite and other remote sensing measurements, but guided by a nonhydrostatic mesoscale model simulation of the Friuli flood event. The data analysis for this paper was conducted by my research groups at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center in Huntsville, AL and Florida State University in Tallahassee, and in collaboration with Dr. Alberto Mugnai's research group at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Rome. The numerical modeling was conducted by Professor Oreg Tripoli and Ms. Giulia Panegrossi at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, using Professor Tripoli's nonhydrostatic modeling system (NMS). This is a scalable, fully nested mesoscale model capable of resolving nonhydrostatic circulations from regional scale down to cloud scale

  19. Glass Transition of Miscible Binary Polymer-Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besancon, Brian M.; Soles, Christopher L.; Green, Peter F.

    2006-08-01

    The average glass transition temperatures, Tg, of thin homopolymer films exhibit a thickness dependence, Tg(h), associated with a confinement effect and with polymer-segment interface interactions. The Tg’s of completely miscible thin film blends of tetramethyl bisphenol-A polycarbonate (TMPC) and deuterated polystyrene (dPS), supported by SiOx/Si, decrease with decreasing h for PS weight fractions ϕ>0.1. This dependence is similar to that of PS and opposite to that of TMPC thin films. Based on an assessment of Tg(h,ϕ), we suggest that the Tg(h,ϕ) of miscible blends should be rationalized, additionally, in terms of the notion of a self-concentration and associated heterogeneous component dynamics.

  20. On the phase-field modelling of a miscible liquid/liquid boundary.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruilin; Vorobev, Anatoliy

    2016-02-15

    Mixing of miscible liquids is essential for numerous processes in industry and nature. Mixing, i.e. interpenetration of molecules through the liquid/liquid boundary, occurs via interfacial diffusion. Mixing can also involve externally or internally driven hydrodynamic flows, and can lead to deformation or disintegration of the liquid/liquid boundary. At the moment, the mixing dynamics remains poorly understood. The classical Fick's law, generally accepted for description of the diffusion process, does not explain the experimental observations, in particular, the recent experiments with dissolution of a liquid solute by a liquid solvent within a horizontal capillary (Stevar and Vorobev, 2012). We present the results of the numerical study aimed at development of an advanced model for the dissolution dynamics of liquid/liquid binary mixtures. The model is based on the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach that is used as a physics-based model for the thermo- and hydrodynamic evolution of binary mixtures. Within this approach, the diffusion flux is defined through the gradient of chemical potential, and, in particular, includes the effect of barodiffusion. The dynamic interfacial stresses at the miscible interface are also taken into account. The simulations showed that such an approach can accurately reproduce the shape of the solute/solvent boundary, and some aspects of the diffusion dynamics. Nevertheless, all experimentally-observed features of the diffusion motion of the solute/solvent boundary, were not reproduced. PMID:26609922

  1. On the phase-field modelling of a miscible liquid/liquid boundary.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ruilin; Vorobev, Anatoliy

    2016-02-15

    Mixing of miscible liquids is essential for numerous processes in industry and nature. Mixing, i.e. interpenetration of molecules through the liquid/liquid boundary, occurs via interfacial diffusion. Mixing can also involve externally or internally driven hydrodynamic flows, and can lead to deformation or disintegration of the liquid/liquid boundary. At the moment, the mixing dynamics remains poorly understood. The classical Fick's law, generally accepted for description of the diffusion process, does not explain the experimental observations, in particular, the recent experiments with dissolution of a liquid solute by a liquid solvent within a horizontal capillary (Stevar and Vorobev, 2012). We present the results of the numerical study aimed at development of an advanced model for the dissolution dynamics of liquid/liquid binary mixtures. The model is based on the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach that is used as a physics-based model for the thermo- and hydrodynamic evolution of binary mixtures. Within this approach, the diffusion flux is defined through the gradient of chemical potential, and, in particular, includes the effect of barodiffusion. The dynamic interfacial stresses at the miscible interface are also taken into account. The simulations showed that such an approach can accurately reproduce the shape of the solute/solvent boundary, and some aspects of the diffusion dynamics. Nevertheless, all experimentally-observed features of the diffusion motion of the solute/solvent boundary, were not reproduced.

  2. Floodplain biogeochemical processing of floodwaters in the Atchafalaya River Basin during the Mississippi River flood of 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Durelle T.; Keim, Richard F.; Edwards, Brandon L.; Jones, C. Nathan; Kroes, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 flood in the Lower Mississippi resulted in the second highest recorded river flow diverted into the Atchafalaya River Basin (ARB). The higher water levels during the flood peak resulted in high hydrologic connectivity between the Atchafalaya River and floodplain, with up to 50% of the Atchafalaya River water moving off channel. Water quality samples were collected throughout the ARB over the course of the flood event. Significant nitrate (NO3-) reduction (75%) occurred within the floodplain, resulting in a total NO3- reduction of 16.6% over the flood. The floodplain was a small but measurable source of dissolved reactive phosphorus (SRP) and ammonium (NH4+). Collectively, these results from this large flood event suggest that enhancing river-floodplain connectivity through freshwater diversions will reduce NO3- loads to the Gulf of Mexico during large annual floods.

  3. Comparing bottom-up and top-down parameterisations of a process-based runoff generation model tailored on floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonetti, Manuel; Scherrer, Simon; Margreth, Michael; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    Information about the spatial distribution of dominant runoff processes (DRPs) can improve flood predictions on ungauged basins, where conceptual rainfall-runoff models usually appear to be limited due to the need for calibration. For example, hydrological classifications based on DRPs can be used as regionalisation tools assuming that, once a model structure and its parameters have been identified for each DRP, they can be transferred to other areas where the same DRP occurs. Here we present a process-based runoff generation model as an event-based spin-off of the conceptual hydrological model PREVAH. The model is grid-based and consists of a specific storage system for each DRP. To unbind the parameter values from catchment-related characteristics, the runoff concentration and the flood routing are uncoupled from the runoff generation routine and simulated separately. For the model parameterisation, two contrasting approaches are applied. First, in a bottom-up approach, the parameters of the runoff generation routine are determined a priori based on the results of sprinkling experiments on 60-100 m2 hillslope plots at several grassland locations in Switzerland. The model is, then, applied on a small catchment (0.5 km2) on the Swiss Plateau, and the parameters linked to the runoff concentration are calibrated on a single heavy rainfall-runoff event. The whole system is finally verified on several nearby catchments of larger sizes (up to 430 km2) affected by different heavy rainfall events. In a second attempt, following a top-down approach, all the parameters are calibrated on the largest catchment under investigation and successively verified on three sub-catchments. Simulation results from both parameterisation techniques are finally compared with results obtained with the traditional PREVAH.

  4. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the flooding predictor, an advanced process control strategy, into a universally useable tool that will maximize the separation yield of a distillation column.

  5. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  6. Miscibility as a factor for component crystallization in multisolute frozen solutions.

    PubMed

    Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Shibata, Hiroko; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between the miscibility of formulation ingredients and their crystallization during the freezing segment of the lyophilization process was studied. The thermal properties of frozen solutions containing myo-inositol and cosolutes were obtained by performing heating scans from -70 °C before and after heat treatment at -20 °C to -5 °C. Addition of dextran 40,000 reduced and prevented crystallization of myo-inositol. In the first scan, some frozen solutions containing an inositol-rich mixture with dextran showed single broad transitions (Tg's: transition temperatures of maximally freeze-concentrated solutes) that indicated incomplete mixing of the concentrated amorphous solutes. Heat treatment of these frozen solutions induced separation of the solutes into inositol-dominant and solute mixture phases (Tg' splitting) following crystallization of myo-inositol (Tg' shifting). The crystal growth involved myo-inositol molecules in the solute mixture phase. The amorphous-amorphous phase separation and resulting loss of the heteromolecular interaction in the freeze-concentrated inositol-dominant phase should allow ordered assembly of the solute molecules required for nucleation. Some dextran-rich and intermediate concentration ratio frozen solutions retained single Tg's of the amorphous solute mixture, both before and after heat treatments. The relevance of solute miscibility on the crystallization of myo-inositol was also indicated in the systems containing glucose or recombinant human albumin.

  7. Controlling Miscibility in Polyethylene-Polynorbornene Block Copolymers via Side-Group Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhearn, William; Register, Richard

    Block copolymers containing a crystallizable block, such as polyethylene (PE), and an amorphous block with high glass transition temperature (Tg) are an interesting class of materials since the rigid glassy block can improve the mechanical response of the article under strain by reinforcing the crystal fold surface. However, to prepare an easily processable PE-containing block copolymer it is necessary to avoid microphase separation in the melt by selection of amorphous blocks with weak repulsive interactions against PE (low Flory interaction parameter χ or interaction energy density X) . Most such low- χ polymers are chemically similar to PE, such as copolymers of ethylene and a small amount of an α-olefin, and therefore exhibit similarly low glass transition temperatures. This work investigates a series of low- and high-Tg polymers based on substituted norbornene monomers, polymerized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Hydrogenated polynorbornene derivatives possess a wide range of glass transition temperatures, and miscibility with PE can be readily tuned by the choice of substituents on the monomers (e.g. aromatic vs. aliphatic groups). Two species investigated, hydrogenated poly(cyclohexyl norbornene) and hydrogenated poly(norbornyl norbornene), have high Tg and also remain miscible with polyethylene to high molecular weight. Furthermore, we develop a set of mixing rules to qualitatively predict the solubility behavior of substituted ROMP polynorbornenes as a function of their side-groups.

  8. Serpentine diffusion trajectories and the Ouzo effect in partially miscible ternary liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates the transient equilibration process when partially miscible ternary liquid mixtures of two different compositions are brought into contact with each other. Diffusional coupling effects are shown to become increasingly significant as the mixture compositions approach the meta-stable regions of the phase equilibrium diagrams. The proper modelling of coupled diffusion phenomena requires the use of a Fick diffusivity matrix [D], with inclusion of non-zero off-diagonal elements. The primary objective of this article is to develop a simple, robust, procedure for the estimation of the matrix [D], using the Maxwell-Stefan (M-S) formulation as a convenient starting point. In the developed simplified approach, the Fick diffusivity matrix [D] is expressed as the product of a scalar diffusivity and the matrix of thermodynamic correction factors [Γ]. By detailed examination of experimental data for the matrix [D] in a wide variety of ternary mixtures, it is deduced that the major contribution of diffusional coupling arises from the contributions of non-ideal solution thermodynamics, quantified by the matrix of thermodynamic correction factors [Γ]. An important consequence of strong thermodynamic coupling is that equilibration trajectories are serpentine in shape and may exhibit incursions into meta-stable zones opening up the possibility of spontaneous emulsification and the Ouzo effect. If diffusional coupling effects are ignored, the equilibration trajectory is linear in composition space. For a wide variety of partially miscible ternary mixtures, it is demonstrated that the corresponding linear equilibration trajectories do not anticipate the possibility of emulsification.

  9. Miscibility and Morphology of Poly(lactic ACID)/POLY(Β-HYDROXYBUTYRATE) Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tri Phuong, Nguyen; Guinault, Alain; Sollogoub, Cyrille

    2011-01-01

    The miscibility and morphology of poly(lactic)acid (PLA)/polyβ-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) prepared by melt blending method were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), melt rheology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. FTIR and DSC methods present some limits to examine the miscibility state of PLA/PHB blends. This drawback can be overcome with the Cole-Cole method by observing the η" = f(η') curves to confirm the miscibility of semicrystalline PLA/ semicrystalline PHB blends. MEB micrographs of fractured surface of blends were also used to investigate the miscibility of these blends.

  10. Aggregation behavior and total miscibility of fluorinated ionic liquids in water.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, Ana B; Araújo, João M M; Teixeira, Fabiana S; Marrucho, Isabel M; Piñeiro, Manuel M; Rebelo, Luis Paulo N

    2015-02-01

    In this work, novel and nontoxic fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs) that are totally miscible in water and could be used in biological applications, where fluorocarbon compounds present a handicap because their aqueous solubility (water and biological fluids) is in most cases too low, have been investigated. The self-aggregation behavior of perfluorosulfonate-functionalized ionic liquids in aqueous solutions has been characterized using conductometric titration, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), surface tension measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), viscosity and density measurements, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Aggregation and interfacial parameters have been computed by conductimetry, calorimetry, and surface tension measurements in order to study various thermodynamic and surface properties that demonstrate that the aggregation process is entropy-driven and that the aggregation process is less spontaneous than the adsorption process. The novel perfluorosulfonate-functionalized ILs studied in this work show improved surface activity and aggregation behavior, forming distinct self-assembled structures.

  11. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    /vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  12. Theory of the Miscibility of Fullerenes in Random Copolymer Melts

    SciTech Connect

    Dadmun, Mark D; Sumpter, Bobby G; Schweizer, Kenneth; Banerjee, Debapriya

    2013-01-01

    We combine polymer integral equation theory and computational chemistry methods to study the interfacial structure, effective interactions, miscibility and spatial dispersion mechanism of fullerenes dissolved in specific random AB copolymer melts characterized by strong non-covalent electron donor-acceptor interactions with the nanofiller. A statistical mechanical basis is developed for designing random copolymers to optimize fullerene dispersion at intermediate copolymer compositions. Pair correlation calculations reveal a strong sensitivity of interfacial packing near the fullerene to copolymer composition and adsorption energy mismatch. The potential of mean force between fullerenes displays rich trends, often non-monotonic with copolymer composition, reflecting a non-additive competition between direct filler attractions and polymer-mediated bridging and steric stabilization. The spinodal phase diagrams are in qualitative agreement with recent solubility limit experimental observations on three systems, and testable predictions are made for other random copolymers. The distinctive non-monotonic variation of miscibility with copolymer composition is found to be primarily a consequence of composition-dependent, spatially short-range attractions between the A and B monomers with the fullerene. A remarkably rich, polymer-specific temperature dependence of the spinodal diagram is predicted which reflects the thermal sensitivity of spatial correlations which can result in fullerene miscibility either increasing or decreasing with cooling. The calculations are contrasted with a simpler effective homopolymer model and the random structure Flory-Huggins model. The former appears to be qualitatively reasonable but can incur large quantitative errors since it misses preferential packing of monomers near nanoparticles, while the latter appears to fail qualitatively due to its neglect of all spatial correlations.

  13. Breakup and deformation of a droplet falling in a miscible solution.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Mayumi, Ryosei; Nakamura, Taiki; Takami, Toshiya; Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu

    2016-06-01

    When a droplet with a higher density falls in a miscible solution, the droplet deforms and breaks up. The instability of a vortex ring, formed by droplet deformation during the falling process, causes the breakup. To determine the origin of the instability, the wavelengths and thicknesses of the vortex rings are investigated at the time when the instability occurs. The experimental results are almost in agreement with the calculated results for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the thickness of a higher-density solution. Furthermore, we performed simulations considering the torus shapes and circulations of the vortex ring. The simulations provided patterns similar to those observed experimentally for the breakup process, and showed that the circulations suppress the instability of the vortex ring. These results imply that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a dominant role in the instability of vortex rings. PMID:27415262

  14. Nonlinear dressed states at the miscibility-immiscibility threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklas, E.; Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamical evolution of spatial patterns in a complex system can reveal the underlying structure and stability of stationary states. As a model system we employ a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate at the transition from miscible to immiscible with the additional control of linear interconversion. Excellent agreement is found between the detailed experimental time evolution and the corresponding numerical mean-field computations. Analyzing the dynamics of the system, we find clear indications of stationary states that we term nonlinear dressed states. A steady-state bifurcation analysis reveals a smooth connection of these states with dark-bright soliton solutions of the integrable two-component Manakov model.

  15. Theoretical Analysis for Corium Pool with Miscibility Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Seiler, Jean-Marie; Fouquet, Angelique; Froment, Karine; Defoort, Francoise

    2003-03-15

    A model is proposed describing the corium pool behavior with a material composition presenting a miscibility gap. The model is described in the first part of this paper, and the state of its validation is developed in the second part, against SIMECO experiments. Qualitatively the model predicts the experimental behavior (domain of existence of two layers, phase separation in the boundary layers, and power split). Applicability to the reactor situation is discussed. It is also concluded that the time delay to obtain physicochemical equilibrium between liquid phases is of the same order of magnitude as the time delay necessary to obtain thermal-hydraulic steady state (established heat flux distribution)

  16. On the instabilities in miscible fluids under horizontal oscillating forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Gaponenko, Yuri; Mialdun, Aliaksandr

    2012-07-01

    In this research the attention is focused on the mass transfer under vibrations. The pure vibrational effect can be observed in weightlessness only. However, experimental studies addressing vibrational phenomena in weightlessness are very limited. This study was initiated by preparation of VIPIL proposal in the response of ESA AO-2009 call and will continue in the frame of the preparation the experiment VIPIL on the ISS. The current research is an attempt to provide experimental and numerical evidence for the instability in miscible fluids in the case of horizontal vibrations parallel to the interface. We present the results of the pioneer experiment SOVICON on the observation of the interface behavior between miscible liquids and vibrational convection in reduced gravity, conducted in the 49th Parabolic Flight Campaigns organized by the European Space Agency. Two miscible liquid mixtures, water and isopropanol of different concentrations, are placed in a closed cell, submitted to horizontal and sinusoidal oscillations at different frequencies and amplitudes. For the certain set of control parameters the localized mean convective flows are emerged in the vicinity of the triple points: the contact point between solid vertical wall and two liquids. These localized convective patterns spread along the solid walls and provide a local mixing along the walls. This type of instability was studied numerically in the averaged approach for high frequency vibrations [1], [2]. During the microgravity experiments we observed another type of instability in the form of standing waves. Above a threshold, a relief appears at the interface between the two fluids. This instability occurs when the vibration amplitude and frequency are above a critical value which is set by the level of viscous dissipation in the liquid. In general, this viscous dissipation will have a few sources: motion in the bulk of the liquid, motion near the boundaries of the liquid container, motion of any

  17. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability

  18. k-t Acceleration in pure phase encode MRI to monitor dynamic flooding processes in rock core plugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J.

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the pore system in sedimentary rocks with MRI when fluids are introduced is very important in the study of petroleum reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery. However, the lengthy acquisition time of each image, with pure phase encode MRI, limits the temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal correlations can be exploited to undersample the k-t space data. The stacked frames/profiles can be well approximated by an image matrix with rank deficiency, which can be recovered by nonlinear nuclear norm minimization. Sparsity of the x-t image can also be exploited for nonlinear reconstruction. In this work the results of a low rank matrix completion technique were compared with k-t sparse compressed sensing. These methods are demonstrated with one dimensional SPRITE imaging of a Bentheimer rock core plug and SESPI imaging of a Berea rock core plug, but can be easily extended to higher dimensionality and/or other pure phase encode measurements. These ideas will enable higher dimensionality pure phase encode MRI studies of dynamic flooding processes in low magnetic field systems.

  19. k-t acceleration in pure phase encode MRI to monitor dynamic flooding processes in rock core plugs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the pore system in sedimentary rocks with MRI when fluids are introduced is very important in the study of petroleum reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery. However, the lengthy acquisition time of each image, with pure phase encode MRI, limits the temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal correlations can be exploited to undersample the k-t space data. The stacked frames/profiles can be well approximated by an image matrix with rank deficiency, which can be recovered by nonlinear nuclear norm minimization. Sparsity of the x-t image can also be exploited for nonlinear reconstruction. In this work the results of a low rank matrix completion technique were compared with k-t sparse compressed sensing. These methods are demonstrated with one dimensional SPRITE imaging of a Bentheimer rock core plug and SESPI imaging of a Berea rock core plug, but can be easily extended to higher dimensionality and/or other pure phase encode measurements. These ideas will enable higher dimensionality pure phase encode MRI studies of dynamic flooding processes in low magnetic field systems.

  20. k-t acceleration in pure phase encode MRI to monitor dynamic flooding processes in rock core plugs.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2014-06-01

    Monitoring the pore system in sedimentary rocks with MRI when fluids are introduced is very important in the study of petroleum reservoirs and enhanced oil recovery. However, the lengthy acquisition time of each image, with pure phase encode MRI, limits the temporal resolution. Spatiotemporal correlations can be exploited to undersample the k-t space data. The stacked frames/profiles can be well approximated by an image matrix with rank deficiency, which can be recovered by nonlinear nuclear norm minimization. Sparsity of the x-t image can also be exploited for nonlinear reconstruction. In this work the results of a low rank matrix completion technique were compared with k-t sparse compressed sensing. These methods are demonstrated with one dimensional SPRITE imaging of a Bentheimer rock core plug and SESPI imaging of a Berea rock core plug, but can be easily extended to higher dimensionality and/or other pure phase encode measurements. These ideas will enable higher dimensionality pure phase encode MRI studies of dynamic flooding processes in low magnetic field systems. PMID:24809307

  1. Evidence for the cooccurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation processes in a flooded paddy field.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; Lian, Xu; He, Zhan-Fei; Geng, Sha; Jin, Ren-Cun; He, Yun-Feng; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Bao-Lan

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. In the present study, we provide direct evidence for the cooccurrence of the anammox and n-damo processes in a flooded paddy field in southeastern China. Stable isotope experiments showed that the potential anammox rates ranged from 5.6 to 22.7 nmol N2 g(-1) (dry weight) day(-1) and the potential n-damo rates varied from 0.2 to 2.1 nmol CO2 g(-1) (dry weight) day(-1) in different layers of soil cores. Quantitative PCR showed that the abundance of anammox bacteria ranged from 1.0 × 10(5) to 2.0 × 10(6) copies g(-1) (dry weight) in different layers of soil cores and the abundance of n-damo bacteria varied from 3.8 × 10(5) to 6.1 × 10(6) copies g(-1) (dry weight). Phylogenetic analyses of the recovered 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that anammox bacteria affiliated with "Candidatus Brocadia" and "Candidatus Kuenenia" and n-damo bacteria related to "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" were present in the soil cores. It is estimated that a total loss of 50.7 g N m(-2) per year could be linked to the anammox process, which is at intermediate levels for the nitrogen flux ranges of aerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification reported in wetland soils. In addition, it is estimated that a total of 0.14 g CH4 m(-2) per year could be oxidized via the n-damo process, while this rate is at the lower end of the aerobic methane oxidation rates reported in wetland soils.

  2. Post waterflood CO(2) Miscible Flood in Light Oil Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, Tim

    1997-08-15

    Only one well remains on production in the Port Neches C0{sub 2} project; Kuhn number 14. Production from this project is approaching economic limit and the project is nearing termination at this point. The workover to return Kuhn number 38 to production failed and the well is currently shut in. All produced C0{sub 2} is currently being reinjected in the reservoir. The C0{sub 2} recycled volume is 2 MMCFD.

  3. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave VanderGriend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2003-03-31

    Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2003. A water supply well was permitted, drilled, and completed in the shallow, fresh-water, Dakota Sandstone. The pumphouse has been put in place and the long-term injection equipment is being set-up. Although the short-term injectivity test was cut short by power failure following an ice storm, results indicate the well exhibits sufficient injectivity to proceed with the long-term injectivity test, which will start in the beginning of the second quarter. The CO2 Project No.10 and No.12 wells were reworked and the Lansing-Kansas City (LKC) ''C'' interval in both wells isolated. The CO2 Project No.16 well was drilled deeper, cored in the LKC ''C'' and ''G'' zones, and cased to the ''C'' zone and will be perforated and stimulated in the beginning of second quarter. Initial wireline log analysis and examination of the core indicate that the porosity of the ''C'' zone in this location may be lower than in other parts of the pattern by 3-5 porosity units. Log analysis indicates water saturations are near 60% consistent with predicted residual oil saturation to waterflood modeling. Lower porosities may indicate lower permeability may also be present. Core analysis is being conducted and results will be available in the first week of the second quarter. A draft letter agreement has been presented to FLOCO2 Company for supply of CO2 storage and injection pump equipment.

  4. Post Waterflood C02 Miscible Flood in Light Oil Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Tipton

    1998-05-13

    The only remaining active well, Kuhn #14, in the Port Neches CO2 project went off production in October 1997. Production from this project is reached economic limit and the project termination began in the last quarter of 1997.

  5. Alvord (3000-ft Strawn) LPG flood: design and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, G.D.; Todd, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Mitchell Energy Corporation has implemented a LPG-dry gas miscible process in the Alvord (3000 ft Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas utilizing the DOE tertiary incentive program. The field had been waterflooded for 14 years and was producing near its economic limit at the time this project was started. This paper presents the results of the reservoir simulation study that was conducted to evaluate pattern configuration and operating alternatives so as to maximize LPG containment and oil recovery performance. Several recommendations resulting from this study were implemented for the project. Based on the model prediction, tertiary oil recovery is expected to be between 100,000 and 130,000 bbls, or about 7 percent of th oil originally in place in the Unit. An evaluation of the project performance to date is presented. In July of 1981 the injection of a 16% HPV slug of propane was completed. Natural gas is being used to drive the propane slug. A peak oil response of 222 BOPD was achieved in August of 1981 and production has since been declining. The observed performance of the flood indicates that the actual tertiary oil recovered will reach the predicted value, although the project life will be longer than expected. The results presented in this paper indicate that, without the DOE incentive program, the economics for this project would still be uncertain at this time.

  6. The Dynamics of Miscible Fluids: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Meiburg, E.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.; Lauver, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a space flight experiment to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces. A less viscous fluid displaces one of higher viscosity within a tube. The two fluids are miscible in all proportions. An intruding "finger" forms that occupies a fraction of the tube. As time progresses diffusion at the interface combined with flow induced straining between the two fluids modifies the concentration and velocity distributions within the whole tube. Also, under such circumstances it has been proposed that the interfacial stresses could depend on the local concentration gradients (Korteweg stresses) and that the divergence of the velocity need not be zero, even though the flow is incompressible. We have obtained reasonable agreement for the tip velocity between numerical simulations (that ignored the Korteweg stress and divergence effects) and physical experiments only at high Peelet Numbers. However at moderate to low Pe agreement was poor. As one possibility we attributed this lack of agreement to the disregard of these effects. We propose a space experiment to measure the finger shape, tip velocity, and the velocity and concentration fields. From intercomparisons between the experiment and the calculations we can then extract values for the coefficients of the Korteweg stress terms and confirm or deny the importance of these stresses.

  7. The Dynamics of Miscible Fluids: A Space Flight Experiment (MIDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxworthy, T.; Meiburg, E.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Rashidnia, N.; Lauver, R.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a space flight experiment to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces. A less viscous fluid displaces one of higher viscosity within a tube. The two fluids are miscible in all proportions. An intruding "finger" forms that occupies a fraction of the tube. As time progresses diffusion at the interface combined with flow induced straining between the two fluids modifies the concentration and velocity distributions within the whole tube. Also, under such circumstances it has been proposed that the interfacial stresses could depend on the local concentration gradients (Korteweg stresses) and that the divergence of the velocity need not be zero, even though the flow is incompressible. We have obtained reasonable agreement for the tip velocity between numerical simulations (that ignored the Korteweg stress and divergence effects) and physical experiments only at high Peclet Numbers. However at moderate to low Pe agreement was poor. As one possibility we attributed this lack of agreement to the disregard of these effects. We propose a space experiment to measure the finger shape, tip velocity, and the velocity and concentration fields. From intercomparisons between the experiment and the calculations we can then extract values for the coefficients of the Korteweg stress terms and confirm or deny the importance of these stresses.

  8. Miscible viscous fingering with linear adsorption on the porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M.; Martin, M.; De Wit, A.

    2007-07-01

    Viscous fingering between miscible fluids of different viscosities can affect the dispersion of finite samples in porous media. In some applications, as typically in chromatographic separations or pollutant dispersion in underground aquifers, adsorption onto the porous matrix of solutes (the concentration of which rules the viscosity of the solution) can affect the fingering dynamics. Here, we investigate theoretically the influence of such an adsorption on the stability and nonlinear properties of viscous samples displaced in a two-dimensional system by a less viscous and miscible carrying fluid. The model is based on Darcy's law for the evolution of the fluid velocity coupled to a diffusion-convection equation for the concentration of a solute in the mobile phase inside the porous medium. The adsorption-desorption dynamics of the solute onto the stationary phase is assumed to be at equilibrium, to follow a linear isotherm and is characterized by a retention parameter κ' equal to the adsorption-desorption equilibrium constant K multiplied by the phase ratio F. In practice, retention on the porous matrix renormalizes the log-mobility ratio by a factor (1+κ'). Correspondingly, a linear stability analysis and nonlinear simulations of the model show that an increase of κ' leads to a stabilization of viscous fingering with fingers appearing on a dimensional time scale multiplied by (1+κ')3 and with a dimensional wavelength multiplied by (1+κ').

  9. Investigation of Polymer-Surfactant and Polymer-Drug-Surfactant Miscibility for Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gumaste, Suhas G; Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-09-01

    In a solid dispersion (SD), the drug is generally dispersed either molecularly or in the amorphous state in polymeric carriers, and the addition of a surfactant is often important to ensure drug release from such a system. The objective of this investigation was to screen systematically polymer-surfactant and polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility by using the film casting method. Miscibility of the crystalline solid surfactant, poloxamer 188, with two commonly used amorphous polymeric carriers, Soluplus® and HPMCAS, was first studied. Then, polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility was determined using itraconazole as the model drug, and ternary phase diagrams were constructed. The casted films were examined by DSC, PXRD and polarized light microscopy for any crystallization or phase separation of surfactant, drug or both in freshly prepared films and after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 7, 14, and 30 days. The miscibility of poloxamer 188 with Soluplus® was <10% w/w, while its miscibility with HPMCAS was at least 30% w/w. Although itraconazole by itself was miscible with Soluplus® up to 40% w/w, the presence of poloxamer drastically reduced its miscibility to <10%. In contrast, poloxamer 188 had minimal impact on HPMCAS-itraconazole miscibility. For example, the phase diagram showed amorphous miscibility of HPMCAS, itraconazole, and poloxamer 188 at 54, 23, and 23% w/w, respectively, even after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 1 month. Thus, a relatively simple and practical method of screening miscibility of different components and ultimately physical stability of SD is provided. The results also identify the HPMCAS-poloxamer 188 mixture as an optimal surface-active carrier system for SD. PMID:27301752

  10. Investigation of Polymer-Surfactant and Polymer-Drug-Surfactant Miscibility for Solid Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gumaste, Suhas G; Gupta, Simerdeep Singh; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2016-09-01

    In a solid dispersion (SD), the drug is generally dispersed either molecularly or in the amorphous state in polymeric carriers, and the addition of a surfactant is often important to ensure drug release from such a system. The objective of this investigation was to screen systematically polymer-surfactant and polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility by using the film casting method. Miscibility of the crystalline solid surfactant, poloxamer 188, with two commonly used amorphous polymeric carriers, Soluplus® and HPMCAS, was first studied. Then, polymer-drug-surfactant miscibility was determined using itraconazole as the model drug, and ternary phase diagrams were constructed. The casted films were examined by DSC, PXRD and polarized light microscopy for any crystallization or phase separation of surfactant, drug or both in freshly prepared films and after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 7, 14, and 30 days. The miscibility of poloxamer 188 with Soluplus® was <10% w/w, while its miscibility with HPMCAS was at least 30% w/w. Although itraconazole by itself was miscible with Soluplus® up to 40% w/w, the presence of poloxamer drastically reduced its miscibility to <10%. In contrast, poloxamer 188 had minimal impact on HPMCAS-itraconazole miscibility. For example, the phase diagram showed amorphous miscibility of HPMCAS, itraconazole, and poloxamer 188 at 54, 23, and 23% w/w, respectively, even after exposure to 40°C/75% RH for 1 month. Thus, a relatively simple and practical method of screening miscibility of different components and ultimately physical stability of SD is provided. The results also identify the HPMCAS-poloxamer 188 mixture as an optimal surface-active carrier system for SD.

  11. Aspects of organic matter transport and processing within Savannah River Plant streams and the Savannah River flood plain swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, F.R.

    1985-06-01

    The studies were directed toward understanding; (1) the transport dynamics, storage, and retention of organic matter, (2) the processing of leaf material that enters the streams and swamp habitats of the SRP, and (3) how these factors are influenced by current or previous reactor operations at the SRP. Suspended particulate organic matter, benthic organic matter, and in-stream wood were investigated along selected reaches of Steel Creek from April 1983 to April 1984. Concentrations of organic seston ranged from 0.4 to 5.7 mg l/sup -1/. Steel Creek transported significantly higher concentrations of particulate organic matter than did either Meyers Branch or the waters at the swamp site. Seston and dissolved organic matter were investigated on Four Mile Creek, a thermal stream on the SRP, within three different reactor cycles; reactor not operating (cold flow), reactor operating in early portion of cycle (early hot flow), and reactor operating in late portion of cycle (late hot flow). Significantly higher concentrations of particulate organic matter were transported at all study sites during hot flow than during cold flow. Particulate organic matter and dissolved organic matter concentrations were investigated at twelve sampling sites to quantify input and output dynamics of organic matter to the flood plain swamp. Samples were taken biweekly from February 1983 to March 1984. Dissolved organic matter concentrations ranged from 1.3 to 9.9 mg l/sup -1/ and particulate organic matter concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 5.1 mg l/sup -1/. Leaf decomposition of three bottomland tree species was studied at six stream and four swamp sites under various temperature regimes.

  12. Flood Hazards - A National Threat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    In the late summer of 2005, the remarkable flooding brought by Hurricane Katrina, which caused more than $200 billion in losses, constituted the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history. However, even in typical years, flooding causes billions of dollars in damage and threatens lives and property in every State. Natural processes, such as hurricanes, weather systems, and snowmelt, can cause floods. Failure of levees and dams and inadequate drainage in urban areas can also result in flooding. On average, floods kill about 140 people each year and cause $6 billion in property damage. Although loss of life to floods during the past half-century has declined, mostly because of improved warning systems, economic losses have continued to rise due to increased urbanization and coastal development.

  13. Evolution of flood typology across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Parajka, Juraj; Viglione, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Following the frequent occurrence of severe flood events in different parts of Europe in the recent past, there has been a rise in interest in understanding the mechanisms by which the different events have been triggered and how they have been evolving over time. This study was carried out to establish the characteristics of observed flood events in the past across Europe in terms of their spatial extent and the processes leading up to the events using a process based hydrological model. To this end, daily discharge data from more than 750 stations of the Global Runoff Data Center were used to identify flood events at the stations based on a threshold method for the period 1961-2010. The identified events at the different stations were further analyzed to determine whether they form the same flood event, thereby delineating the spatial extent of the flood events. The pan-European hydrological model, E-HYPE, which runs at a daily time step, was employed to estimate a set of catchment hydrological and hydro-meteorological state variables that are relevant in the flood generating process for each of the identified spatially delineated flood events. A subsequent clustering of the events based on the simulated state variables, together with the spatial extent of the flood events, was used to identify the flood generating mechanism of each flood event. Four general flood generation mechanisms were identified: long-rain flood, short-rain flood, snowmelt flood, and rain-on-snow flood. A trend analysis was performed to investigate how the frequency of each of the flood types has changed over time. In order to investigate whether there is a regional and seasonal pattern in the dominant flood generating mechanisms, this analysis was performed separately for winter and summer seasons and three different regions of Europe: Northern, Western, and Eastern Europe. The results show a regional difference both in the dominant flood generating mechanism and the corresponding trends.

  14. Flood Risk and Global Change: Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra-Llobet, A.

    2014-12-01

    Global flood risk is increasing in response to population growth in flood-prone areas, human encroachment into natural flood paths (exacerbating flooding in areas formerly out of harm's way), and climate change (which alters variables driving floods). How will societies respond to and manage flood risk in coming decades? Analysis of flood policy evolution in the EU and US demonstrates that changes occurred in steps, in direct response to disasters. After the flood produced by the collapse of Tous Dam in 1982, Spain initiated a systematic assessment of areas of greatest flood risk and civil protection response. The devastating floods on the Elbe and elsewhere in central Europe in 2002 motivated adoption of the EU Floods Directive (2007), which requires member states to develop systematic flood risk maps (now due) and flood risk management plans (due in 2015). The flooding of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 resulted in a nationwide levee-safety assessment and improvements in communicating risk, but overall less fundamental change in US flood management than manifest in the EU since 2007. In the developing world, large (and increasing) concentrations of populations in low-lying floodplains, deltas, and coasts are increasingly vulnerable, and governments mostly ill-equipped to implement fundamental changes in land use to prevent future increases in exposure, nor to develop responses to the current threats. Even in the developed world, there is surprisingly little research on how well residents of flood-prone lands understand their true risk, especially when they are 'protected' by '100-year' levees. Looking ahead, researchers and decision makers should prioritize improvements in flood risk perception, river-basin-scale assessment of flood runoff processes (under current and future climate and land-use conditions) and flood management alternatives, and bridging the disconnect between national and international floodplain management policies and local land

  15. Role of Conformation in - Interactions and Polymer/Fullerene Miscibility

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Bucknall, David G.; Thio, Yonathan S; Gurun, Bilge; Campbell, Katie

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the miscibility between C60 fullerene and a series of phenylic vinyl polymers has been investigate using a combination of wide-angle x-ray (WAXS) and neutron (WANS) scattering and density functional theory (DFT) computational modeling. The solubility limit of the C60 in the polymers was found to increase non-linearly with increasing phenylic groups in the side-chain from 1 wt% in polystyrene (PS) to 12 wt% in poly(9-vinyl phenanthrene) (P9VPh). The DFT calculations showed that the polymer interacts with the fullerene preferentially with the phenylic groups in these vinyl polymers. However, due to the backbone these phenyl groups are unable to form the energetically favorable T-junction or planar - stacks with the fullerene, and are randomly oriented to the cage. The non-linear increase in solubility is believed to be associated with shape conformity of the three ring phenanthrene to the curvature of the fullerene.

  16. Miscibility critical pressures in monolayers of ternary lipid mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, S L; Anderson, T G; McConnell, H M

    2000-01-01

    When phospholipids are mixed with cholesterol in a monolayer at an air-water interface, coexisting 2-dimensional liquid phases can be observed if the surface pressure, pi, is lower than the miscibility critical pressure, pi(c). Ternary mixtures of two phospholipid species with dihydrocholesterol have been reported to have critical pressures that are linearly proportional to the relative composition of the phospholipids. However, we report here that, if the acyl chains of the two phospholipids differ significantly in length or unsaturation, the behavior is markedly different. In this case, the critical pressure of the ternary mixture can be remarkably high, exceeding the critical pressures of the corresponding binary mixtures. High critical pressures are also seen in binary mixtures of phospholipid and dihydrocholesterol when the two acyl chains of the phospholipid differ sufficiently in length. Using regular solution theory, we interpret the elevated critical pressures of these mixtures as an attractive interaction between the phospholipid components. PMID:11023907

  17. Miscible viscous fingering involving production of gel by chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hoshino, Kenichi

    2015-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated miscible viscous fingering with chemical reactions producing gel. Here, two systems were employed. In one system, sodium polyacrylate (SPA) solution and aluminum ion (Al3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In another system, SPA solution and ferric ion (Fe3 +) solution were used as the more and less viscous liquids, respectively. In the case of Al3 +, displacement efficiency was smaller than that in the non-reactive case, whereas in the case of Fe3 +, the displacement efficiency was larger. We consider that the difference in change of the patterns in the two systems will be caused by the difference in the properties of the gels. Therefore, we have measured the rheological properties of the gels by means of a rheometer. We discuss relationship between the VF patterns and the rheological measurement.

  18. Imaging fluid saturation development in long-core flood displacements

    SciTech Connect

    Grave, A.; Kolitvelt, K.; Lien, J.R.; Skauge, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Fluid saturation development in long-core flood experiments is investigated. Information on 1D fluid saturation distributions is obtained by labeling the fluid phases with nuclear tracers and detecting radiation with a movable detector. Various flood experiments were done on 2.5-ft (76-cm)-long sandstone cores. In miscible displacements where radioactive brine is displacing inactive brine, dispersion and ion adsorption are evaluated. Imaging saturation profiles during drainages and waterfloods gives information on saturation front velocity and time development of local saturation variations. Experimental results are compared with numerical results from a 1D front-tracking black-oil simulator that incorporated inhomogeneities and capillary effects. Surfactant floods were investigated to test the applicability for EOR studies.

  19. Nonequilibrium dynamics induced by miscible-immiscible transition in binary Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Yujiro; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kunimi, Masaya; Saito, Hiroki; Hirano, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We have observed and characterized the nonequilibrium spatial dynamics of a two-component 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) that is controllable switched back and forth between the miscible and immiscible phases of the phase separation transition by changing the internal states of the 87Rb atoms. The subsequent evolution exhibits large scale oscillations of the spatial structure that involve component mixing and separation. We show that the larger total energy of the miscible system results in a higher oscillation frequency. This investigation introduces a new technique to control the miscibility and the spatial degrees of freedom in atomic BECs.

  20. A database on flood and debris-flow processes in alluvial fans: a preliminary analysis aimed at evaluation of the damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennari, Carmela; Santangelo, Nicoletta; Santo, Antonio; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Debris-flow and flood events cause yearly wide damages to buildings and infrastructures, and produce many casualties and fatalities. These processes are very common in Italy, affecting mainly torrential stream basins with different geological and morphological settings: in the Alpine mountain areas they are quite well analysed, whilst much less attention is generally paid in contexts such as those of the Apennines mostly due to the minor frequency of the events. Nevertheless, debris-flows and flood processes occur along many alluvial fans, have greatly contributed to their building up, and are therefore worth to be studied. Along many areas of the Southern Apennines, coalescent alluvial fans are a widespread geomorphic unit, typically located at the foot of steep slopes. In most cases these areas correspond to the more highly urbanised sectors, generally considered to be safer than the bottom valley, as concerns the direct effects from flooding. During intense storms, villages and towns built on alluvial fans may be affected by flooding and/or debris flow processes originated in the above catchment, and rapidly transferred downslope due to the steep slopes and the torrential character of the streams. This creates a very high hazard to the population and is at the origin of the severe and recurrent damage to urban settlements. Starting from the above considerations, we compiled a catalogue of flood and debris-flow events occurred in Campania Region, southern Italy, by consulting very different information sources: national and local newspapers and journals, regional historical archives, scientific literature, internet blogs. More than 350 events, occurred in Campania from 1700 to present, were collected. Information on time of occurrence and location are available for each event, with different level of accuracy, that is typically lower going back to the oldest events for which only the year or the month of occurrence of the event was identified; nevertheless, for

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis on the in-situ mixing zone of CO2 miscible displacement flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongchen; Yang, Wenzhe; Wang, Dayong; Yang, Mingjun; Jiang, Lanlan; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Yuechao; Dou, Binlin; Wang, Zhiguo

    2014-06-01

    The in-situ mixing zone represents dynamic characteristics of CO2 miscible displacement flows, which is important for carbon dioxide enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) projects. However, the migration characteristics of the in-situ mixing zone under reservoir conditions has been neither well studied nor fully understood. The in-situ mixing zone with the flowing mixture of supercritical CO2 and n-decane (nC10) was investigated by using a magnetic resonance imaging apparatus at a reservoir condition of 8.5 MPa and 37.8 °C in porous media. The experimental results showed that the CO2-frontal velocity was larger than the mixing-frontal velocity. The mixing zone length was linearly declined in the miscible displacement process. And the declining rate of the mixing zone length was increased with injection rate. It indicates that the mixing zone length is not constant in a vertically stable CO2 misible displacement and a volume contraction due to phase behavior effects may occur. Then, an error function based on the convection-dispersion equation was fitted with CO2 miscible displacement experiments. The error function was well fitted both at a series of fixed core positions and a series of fixed displacement times. Furthermore, the longitudinal dispersion coefficients (Klx and Klt) and the longitudinal Peclet numbers (Ped and PeL) were quantified from the fitting results. The evolutions of the longitudinal dispersion coefficient were reduced along the displacement time. And the declining rate was increased with injection rate. And with proceeding, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient was tending towards stability and constant. But the evolutions of the longitudinal Peclet numbers were increased along the displacement time. And the increasing rate was increased with injection rate.

  2. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, AND VISCOSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236EA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, and viscosity measurements of refrigerant R-236ea with three potential lubricants. (NOTE: The data were needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The lubricants...

  3. Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants, Phase 1. Final report, 6 February 1992--15 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, M.B.; Zoz, S.C.; Berkenbosch, L.J.

    1992-10-01

    Miscibility data have been obtained for a variety of non-CFC refrigerants and their potential lubricants. Ten different refrigerants and seven different lubricants were investigated. Experiments are being performed in two phases: Phase I, reported herein, focuses on performing screening tests for miscibility and Phase II consists of developing miscibility plots. The miscibility tests are being performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The bath temperature can be precisely controlled over a temperature range of -50 C to 90C(-58 F to 194 F). The test cells are constructed to allow for complete visibility of lubricant-refrigerant mixtures under all test conditions.

  4. Flood Risk and Flood hazard maps - Visualisation of hydrological risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spachinger, Karl; Dorner, Wolfgang; Metzka, Rudolf; Serrhini, Kamal; Fuchs, Sven

    2008-11-01

    Hydrological models are an important basis of flood forecasting and early warning systems. They provide significant data on hydrological risks. In combination with other modelling techniques, such as hydrodynamic models, they can be used to assess the extent and impact of hydrological events. The new European Flood Directive forces all member states to evaluate flood risk on a catchment scale, to compile maps of flood hazard and flood risk for prone areas, and to inform on a local level about these risks. Flood hazard and flood risk maps are important tools to communicate flood risk to different target groups. They provide compiled information to relevant public bodies such as water management authorities, municipalities, or civil protection agencies, but also to the broader public. For almost each section of a river basin, run-off and water levels can be defined based on the likelihood of annual recurrence, using a combination of hydrological and hydrodynamic models, supplemented by an analysis of historical records and mappings. In combination with data related to the vulnerability of a region risk maps can be derived. The project RISKCATCH addressed these issues of hydrological risk and vulnerability assessment focusing on the flood risk management process. Flood hazard maps and flood risk maps were compiled for Austrian and German test sites taking into account existing national and international guidelines. These maps were evaluated by eye-tracking using experimental graphic semiology. Sets of small-scale as well as large-scale risk maps were presented to test persons in order to (1) study reading behaviour as well as understanding and (2) deduce the most attractive components that are essential for target-oriented risk communication. A cognitive survey asking for negative and positive aspects and complexity of each single map complemented the experimental graphic semiology. The results indicate how risk maps can be improved to fit the needs of different user

  5. Flood information for flood-plain planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bue, Conrad D.

    1967-01-01

    Floods are natural and normal phenomena. They are catastrophic simply because man occupies the flood plain, the highwater channel of a river. Man occupies flood plains because it is convenient and profitable to do so, but he must purchase his occupancy at a price-either sustain flood damage, or provide flood-control facilities. Although large sums of money have been, and are being, spent for flood control, flood damage continues to mount. However, neither complete flood control nor abandonment of the flood plain is practicable. Flood plains are a valuable resource and will continue to be occupied, but the nature and degree of occupancy should be compatible with the risk involved and with the degree of protection that is practicable to provide. It is primarily to meet the needs for defining the risk that the flood-inundation maps of the U.S. Geological Survey are prepared.

  6. Determination of the optimum solvent bank size requirement during CO/sub 2/ flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Omole, O.

    1983-01-01

    This laboratory investigation studied the efficiency of water and of nitrogen as CO/sub 2/ slug propellants, determined the optimum CO/sub 2/ slug size required for flooding, and the effect of horizontal permeability variation on oil recovery during CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding in horizontal consolidated Berea sandstone cores. The interaction between carbon dioxide and dolomite rock during CO/sub 2/ flooding in carbonate oil reservoirs was also investigated using dolomite cores. Water was found to be a more efficient CO/sub 2/ slug propellant than nitrogen in the range of pressure and temperature studied. (110/sup 0/F less than or equal to T less than or equal to 120/sup 0/F, 1500 psig less than or equal to flooding pressure less than or equal to 2650 psig). While the efficiency of nitrogen as the CO/sub 2/ slug propellant increased with the flooding pressure, that of water was almost unaffected by the flooding pressure. A 0.3 HPV CO/sub 2/ slug was found to be the optimum solvent bank size required for miscible flooding in the cores used. The total oil recoveries from a core with variable horizontal permeability were a little lower than those from an homogeneous core at similar flooding conditions (crude oil, pressure and temperature). The heterogeneous core contained zones with horizontal permeabilities greater than or equal to the permeability of the homogeneous core. The total oil recoveries were found to be dependent on the flooding temperature - they decreased as the flooding temperature was increased.

  7. Connection between rotation and miscibility in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Shimodaira, Takayuki; Saito, Hiroki; Kishimoto, Tetsuo

    2010-07-15

    A two-component Bose-Einstein condensate rotating in a toroidal trap is investigated. The topological constraint depends on the density distribution of each component along the circumference of the torus, and therefore the quantization condition on the circulation can be controlled by changing the miscibility using the Feshbach resonance. We find that the system exhibits a variety of dynamics depending on the initial angular momentum when the miscibility is changed.

  8. Dominant flood generating mechanisms across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghuijs, Wouter R.; Woods, Ross A.; Hutton, Christopher J.; Sivapalan, M.

    2016-05-01

    River flooding can have severe societal, economic, and environmental consequences. However, limited understanding of the regional differences in flood-generating mechanisms results in poorly understood historical flood trends and uncertain predictions of future flood conditions. Through systematic data analyses of 420 catchments we expose the primary drivers of flooding across the contiguous United States. This is achieved by exploring which flood-generating processes control the seasonality and magnitude of maximum annual flows. The regional patterns of seasonality and interannual variabilities of maximum annual flows are, in general, poorly explained by rainfall characteristics alone. For most catchments soil moisture dependent precipitation excess, snowmelt, and rain-on-snow events are found to be much better predictors of the flooding responses. The continental-scale classification of dominant flood-generating processes we generate here emphasizes the disparity in timing and variability between extreme rainfall and flooding and can assist predictions of flooding and flood risk within the continental U.S.

  9. Phase-field modelling of a miscible system in spinning droplet tensiometer.

    PubMed

    Vorobev, Anatoliy; Boghi, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    The spinning drop tensiometry is used for measurements of surface tension coefficients, especially, when interfaces are characterised by low and ultra-low interfacial stresses. A droplet of lighter liquid is introduced into a rotating capillary that was initially saturated with another heavier liquid. The tube is subject to axial rotation that results in droplet's elongation along the tube's axis. The equilibrium shape of the droplet is used to determine the surface tension coefficient. In this work, the evolution of a slowly miscible droplet introduced into a spinning capillary is investigated. This technique is frequently employed for studies of the dynamics of miscible systems, even despite the fact that a strict equilibrium is never achieved in a mixture of fully miscible liquids. The numerical modelling of a miscible droplet is fulfilled on the basis of the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach. The numerical results are compared against the experimental data pursuing two objectives: (i) to verify the use of the phase-field approach as a consistent physics-based approach capable of accurate tracking of the short- and long-term evolution of miscible systems, and (ii) to estimate the values of the phenomenological parameters introduced within the phase-field approach, so making this approach a practical tool for modelling of thermohydrodynamic changes in miscible systems within various configurations. PMID:27501043

  10. Phase-field modelling of a miscible system in spinning droplet tensiometer.

    PubMed

    Vorobev, Anatoliy; Boghi, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    The spinning drop tensiometry is used for measurements of surface tension coefficients, especially, when interfaces are characterised by low and ultra-low interfacial stresses. A droplet of lighter liquid is introduced into a rotating capillary that was initially saturated with another heavier liquid. The tube is subject to axial rotation that results in droplet's elongation along the tube's axis. The equilibrium shape of the droplet is used to determine the surface tension coefficient. In this work, the evolution of a slowly miscible droplet introduced into a spinning capillary is investigated. This technique is frequently employed for studies of the dynamics of miscible systems, even despite the fact that a strict equilibrium is never achieved in a mixture of fully miscible liquids. The numerical modelling of a miscible droplet is fulfilled on the basis of the phase-field (Cahn-Hilliard) approach. The numerical results are compared against the experimental data pursuing two objectives: (i) to verify the use of the phase-field approach as a consistent physics-based approach capable of accurate tracking of the short- and long-term evolution of miscible systems, and (ii) to estimate the values of the phenomenological parameters introduced within the phase-field approach, so making this approach a practical tool for modelling of thermohydrodynamic changes in miscible systems within various configurations.

  11. Blend miscibility of cellulose propionate with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone-co-methyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Kazuki; Teramoto, Yoshikuni; Nishio, Yoshiyuki

    2013-10-15

    The blend miscibility of cellulose propionate (CP) with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone-co-methyl methacrylate) (P(VP-co-MMA)) was investigated. The degree of substitution (DS) of CP used ranged from 1.6 to >2.9, and samples for the vinyl polymer component were prepared in a full range of VP:MMA compositions. Through DSC analysis and solid-state (13)C NMR and FT-IR measurements, we revealed that CPs of DS<2.7 were miscible with P(VP-co-MMA)s of VP≥~10mol% on a scale within a few nanometers, in virtue of hydrogen-bonding interactions between CP-hydroxyls and VP-carbonyls. When the DS of CP exceeded 2.7, the miscibility was restricted to the polymer pairs using P(VP-co-MMA)s of VP=ca. 10-40 mol%; the scale of mixing in the blends concerned was somewhat larger (ca. 5-20 nm), however. The appearance of such a "miscibility window" was interpretable as an effect of intramolecular repulsion in the copolymer component. Results of DMA and birefringence measurements indicated that the miscible blending of CP with the vinyl polymer invited synergistic improvements in thermomechanical and optical properties of the respective constituent polymers. Additionally, it was found that the VP:MMA composition range corresponding to the miscibility window was expanded by modification of the CP component into cellulose acetate propionate. PMID:23987378

  12. Flood resilience urban territories. Flood resilience urban territories.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraud, Hélène; Barroca, Bruno; Hubert, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    The flood's impact during the last twenty years on French territory reveals our lack of preparation towards large-extended floods which might cause the stopping of companies' activity, services, or lead to housing unavailability during several months. New Orleans' case has to exemplify us: four years after the disaster, the city still couldn't get back its dynamism. In France, more than 300 towns are flood-exposed. While these towns are the mainspring of territory's development, it is likely that the majority of them couldn't get up quickly after a large-extended flood. Therefore, to understand and improve the urban territory's resilience facing floods is a real stake for territory's development. Urban technical networks supply, unify and irrigate all urban territories' constituents. Characterizing their flood resilience can be interesting to understand better urban resilience. In this context, waste management during and after floods is completely crucial. During a flood, the waste management network can become dysfunctional (roads cut, waste storage installations or waste treatment flooded). How can the mayor respect his obligation to guarantee salubrity and security in his city? In post flood the question is even more problematic. The waste management network presents a real stake for territory's restart. After a flood, building materials, lopped-of branches, furniture, business stocks, farm stocks, mud, rubbles, animal cadavers are wet, mixed, even polluted by hydrocarbons or toxic substances. The waste's volume can be significant. Sanitary and environmental risks can be crucial. In view of this situation, waste's management in post crisis period raises a real problem. What to make of this waste? How to collect it? Where to stock it? How to process it? Who is responsible? Answering these questions is all the more strategic since this waste is the mark of disaster. Thus, cleaning will be the first population's and local actor's reflex in order to forget the

  13. Geomorphological factors of flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic load, rise of extreme meteorological events frequency and total precipitation depth often lead to increasing danger of catastrophic fluvial processes worldwide. Flash floods are one of the most dangerous and less understood types of them. Difficulties of their study are mainly related to short duration of single events, remoteness and hard access to origin areas. Most detailed researches of flash floods focus on hydrological parameters of the flow itself and its meteorological factors. At the same time, importance of the basin geological and geomorphological structure for flash floods generation and the role they play in global sediment redistribution is yet poorly understood. However, understanding and quantitative assessment of these features is a real basis for a complete concept of factors, characteristics and dynamics of flash floods. This work is a review of published data on flash floods, and focuses on the geomorphological factors of the phenomenon. We consider both individual roles and interactions between different geomorphological features (the whole basin parameters, characteristics of the single slopes and valley bottom). Special attention is paid to critical values of certain factors. This approach also highlights the gaps or less studied factors of flash floods. Finally, all data is organized into a complex diagram that may be used for flash floods modeling. This also may help to reach a new level of flash flood predictions and risk assessment.

  14. The Impact of Miscible Viscous Fingering on Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, J.; De Anna, P.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous one. Instead of progressing as a uniform front, the less viscous fluid forms fingers that vary in size and shape to create complex patterns. The interface created from these patterns affects mixing between the two fluids, and therefore is of critical importance in applications such as enhanced oil recovery and microfluidics. This work focuses on how the evolution of the fingering interface affects mixing between two miscible fluids, specifically in a radial configuration. We measure the local concentration field temporally and spatially with the use of a fluorescent tracer in the injected fluid, and with this high resolution information are able to calculate various measures of mixing, such as mixing efficiency, scalar dissipation rate, and the areal mixing zone for different fluid injection rates and various viscosity ratios. We propose a scaling theory based on experimental observations for the growth of the mixing zone and the overall rate of mixing. This is a snapshot of the concentration field. In this experiment, water with a fluorescent tracer at a concentration of 250mg/L is displacing fluid ten times more viscous from a point injection. The inset shows an enlarged section of the concentration field.

  15. The Impact of Miscible Viscous Fingering on Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Jane; de Anna, Pietro; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-11-01

    Viscous fingering is a hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous one. Instead of progressing as a uniform front, the less viscous fluid forms fingers that vary in size and shape to create complex patterns. The interface created from these patterns affects mixing between the two fluids, and therefore is of critical importance in applications such as enhanced oil recovery and microfluidics. This work focuses on how the evolution of the fingering interface affects mixing between two miscible fluids, specifically in a radial configuration. We measure the local concentration field temporally and spatially with the use of a fluorescent tracer in the injected fluid, and with this high resolution information are able to calculate various measures of mixing, such as mixing efficiency, scalar dissipation rate, and the areal mixing zone for different fluid injection rates and various viscosity ratios. We propose a scaling theory based on experimental observations for the growth of the mixing zone and the overall rate of mixing.

  16. Damping of Quasi-stationary Waves Between Two Miscible Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    2002-01-01

    Two viscous miscible liquids with an initially sharp interface oriented vertically inside a cavity become unstable against oscillatory external forcing due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The instability causes growth of quasi-stationary (q-s) waves at the interface between the two liquids. We examine computationally the dynamics of a four-mode q-s wave, for a fixed energy input, when one of the components of the external forcing is suddenly ceased. The external forcing consists of a steady and oscillatory component as realizable in a microgravity environment. Results show that when there is a jump discontinuity in the oscillatory excitation that produced the four-mode q-s wave, the interface does not return to its equilibrium position, the structure of the q-s wave remains imbedded between the two fluids over a long time scale. The damping characteristics of the q-s wave from the time history of the velocity field show overdamped and critically damped response; there is no underdamped oscillation as the flow field approaches steady state. Viscous effects serve as a dissipative mechanism to effectively damp the system. The stability of the four-mode q-s wave is dependent on both a geometric length scale as well as the level of background steady acceleration.

  17. Combustion of two-component miscible droplets in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Aharon, Israel; Gage, James W.; Jenkins, Andrew J.; Kahoe, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    This research focuses on the combustion of binary miscible droplets initially in the mm size range. Experiments are performed using the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec drop tower in Cleveland, Ohio, where mixtures of alkanes and/or alcohols are studied. The fuel components are selected to have significantly different volatilities. Initial oxygen mole fractions from about 0.15-0.5 and initial pressures from 0.2-2 atm are employed. Different inerts are used (He, CO2, Ar, N2) to change burning rates and sooting behaviors. Objectives are to observe the following: (1) Transient droplet diameters (including three-staged combustion behaviors and microexplosion; (2) Transient flow behaviors (sudden flame contraction, luminosity, extinction); and (3) Behaviors of observable soot particles. theoretical and computational research in support of this program has also been undertaken. This research includes analytical studies to determine the effects of small but nonzero gravitational levels on droplet gasification, analytical studies of hydrodynamic stability of spherically-symmetrical droplet gasification (to address the question as to whether spherically-symmetrical droplet gasification may be destabilized from capillary, i.e., Marangoni effects), and computational modeling of effects of capillary stresses on droplet gasification.

  18. Confinement effects on the miscibility of block copolymer blends.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Russell K W; Matsen, Mark W

    2016-04-01

    Thin films of long and short symmetric AB diblock copolymers are examined using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). We focus on hard confining walls with a preference for the A component, such that the lamellar domains orient parallel to the film with an even number ν of monolayers. For neat melts, confinement causes the lamellar period, D, to deviate from its bulk value, Db, in order to be commensurate with the film thickness, i.e., L = νD/2. For blends, however, the melt also has the option of macrophase separating into ν(l) large and ν((s)) small monolayers so as to provide a better fit, where L = ν(l)D(l)/2 + ν(s)D((s))/2. In addition to performing full SCFT calculations of the entire film, we develop a semi-analytical calculation for the coexistence of thick and thin monolayers that helps explain the complicated interplay between miscibility and commensurability. PMID:27106106

  19. Laminar flow of two miscible fluids in a simple network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karst, Casey M.; Storey, Brian D.; Geddes, John B.

    2013-03-01

    When a fluid comprised of multiple phases or constituents flows through a network, nonlinear phenomena such as multiple stable equilibrium states and spontaneous oscillations can occur. Such behavior has been observed or predicted in a number of networks including the flow of blood through the microcirculation, the flow of picoliter droplets through microfluidic devices, the flow of magma through lava tubes, and two-phase flow in refrigeration systems. While the existence of nonlinear phenomena in a network with many inter-connections containing fluids with complex rheology may seem unsurprising, this paper demonstrates that even simple networks containing Newtonian fluids in laminar flow can demonstrate multiple equilibria. The paper describes a theoretical and experimental investigation of the laminar flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids of different density and viscosity through a simple network. The fluids stratify due to gravity and remain as nearly distinct phases with some mixing occurring only by diffusion. This fluid system has the advantage that it is easily controlled and modeled, yet contains the key ingredients for network nonlinearities. Experiments and 3D simulations are first used to explore how phases distribute at a single T-junction. Once the phase separation at a single junction is known, a network model is developed which predicts multiple equilibria in the simplest of networks. The existence of multiple stable equilibria is confirmed experimentally and a criterion for existence is developed. The network results are generic and could be applied to or found in different physical systems.

  20. Tsunami flooding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric; Jones, Henry; McBride, Mark; Fedors, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Panel 5 focused on tsunami flooding with an emphasis on Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) as derived from its counterpart, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) that determines seismic ground-motion hazards. The Panel reviewed current practices in PTHA and determined the viability of extending the analysis to extreme design probabilities (i.e., 10-4 to 10-6). In addition to earthquake sources for tsunamis, PTHA for extreme events necessitates the inclusion of tsunamis generated by submarine landslides, and treatment of the large attendant uncertainty in source characterization and recurrence rates. Tsunamis can be caused by local and distant earthquakes, landslides, volcanism, and asteroid/meteorite impacts. Coastal flooding caused by storm surges and seiches is covered in Panel 7. Tsunamis directly tied to earthquakes, the similarities with (and path forward offered by) the PSHA approach for PTHA, and especially submarine landslide tsunamis were a particular focus of Panel 5.

  1. Effects of Land-Cover Change, Floods, and Stream Position on Geomorphic Processes - Implications for Restoration Activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, F.A.; ,

    2001-01-01

    A geomorphic study for North Fish Creek, a northern Wisconsin tributary to Lake Superior was analyzed to determine the hydrologic and geomorphic changes caused by clear-cut logging and agricultural activity. Discharge magnitude estimated with HEC-2 for full-channel capacities indicate that modern full-channel discharges are about twice as large as pre-1946 full-channel discharges. Flood-plain deposition rates were high along the transitional main stem after European settlement. Restoration and protection activities would be most effective if focused on watershed practices to reduce runoff and on channel restoration that reduce buff and bank erosion in the upper and transitional main stems.

  2. Quantifying Floods of a Flood Regime in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, A. A.; Fleenor, W. E.; Viers, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Interaction between a flood hydrograph and floodplain topography results in spatially and temporally variable conditions important for ecosystem process and function. Individual floods whose frequency and dimensionality comprise a river's flood regime contribute to that variability and in aggregate are important drivers of floodplain ecosystems. Across the globe, water management actions, land use changes as well as hydroclimatic change associated with climate change have profoundly affected natural flood regimes and their expression within the floodplain landscape. Homogenization of riverscapes has degraded once highly diverse and productive ecosystems. Improved understanding of the range of flood conditions and spatial variability within floodplains, or hydrospatial conditions, is needed to improve water and land management and restoration activities to support the variable conditions under which species adapted. This research quantifies the flood regime of a floodplain site undergoing restoration through levee breaching along the lower Cosumnes River of California. One of the few lowland alluvial rivers of California with an unregulated hydrograph and regular floodplain connectivity, the Cosumnes River provides a useful test-bed for exploring river-floodplain interaction. Representative floods of the Cosumnes River are selected from previously-established flood types comprising the flood regime and applied within a 2D hydrodynamic model representing the floodplain restoration site. Model output is analyzed and synthesized to quantify and compare conditions in space and time, using metrics such as depth and velocity. This research establishes methods for quantifying a flood regime's floodplain inundation characteristics, illustrates the role of flow variability and landscape complexity in producing heterogeneous floodplain conditions, and suggests important implications for managing more ecologically functional floodplains.

  3. Coupled effect of viscosity and density gradients on fingering instabilities of a miscible slice in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2016-08-01

    Miscible displacements in porous media exhibit interesting spatio-temporal patterns. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms of these emergent patterns is relevant in a number of physicochemical processes. Here, we have numerically investigated the instabilities in a miscible slice in vertical porous media. Depending on the viscosity and density gradients at the two interfaces, four distinct flow configurations are obtained, which are partitioned into two different groups, each containing a pair of equivalent flows until the interaction between the two interfaces. An analysis of the pressure drop around the respective unstable interface(s) supports numerical results. We classify the stabilizing and destabilizing scenarios in a parameter space spanned by the log-mobility ratio (R) and the displacement velocity (U). When the viscosity and density gradients are unstably stratified at the opposite interfaces, the stability characteristics are very complex. The most notable findings of this paper are the existence of a stable region between two unstable regions in the R-U plane and occurrence of secondary instabilities. We further show that the stability regions in the R-U plane depend strongly on the slice width, and beyond a threshold value of it the stable zone remains almost unaltered. For thin sample, the stable region expands and the secondary instabilities disappear.

  4. Fast fluorescence-based microfluidic method for measuring minimum miscibility pressure of CO2 in crude oils.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phong; Mohaddes, Danyal; Riordon, Jason; Fadaei, Hossein; Lele, Pushan; Sinton, David

    2015-03-17

    Carbon capture, storage, and utilization has emerged as an essential technology for near-term CO2 emission control. The largest CO2 projects globally combine storage and oil recovery. The efficiency of this process relies critically on the miscibility of CO2 in crude oils at reservoir conditions. We present a microfluidic approach to quantify the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) that leverages the inherent fluorescence of crude oils, is faster than conventional technologies, and provides quantitative, operator-independent measurements. To validate the approach, synthetic oil mixtures of known composition (pentane, hexadecane) are tested and MMP values are compared to reported values. Results differ by less than 0.5 MPa on average, in contrast to comparison between conventional methods with variations on the order of 1-2 MPa. In terms of speed, a pressure scan for a single MMP measurement required less than 30 min (with potential to be sub-10 min), in stark contrast to days or weeks with existing approaches. The method is applied to determine the MMP for Pennsylvania, West Texas, and Saudi crudes. Importantly, our fluorescence-based approach enables rapid, automated, operator-independent measurement of MMP as needed to inform the world's largest CO2 projects.

  5. Characterization of remarkable floods in France, a transdisciplinary approach applied on generalized floods of January 1910

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudou, Martin; Lang, Michel; Vinet, Freddy; Coeur, Denis

    2014-05-01

    The 2007 Flood Directive promotes the integration and valorization of historical and significant floods in flood risk management (Flood Directive Text, chapter II, and article 4). Taking into account extreme past floods analysis seems necessary in the mitigation process of vulnerability face to flooding risk. In France, this aspect of the Directive was carried out through the elaboration of Preliminary Flood Risk Assessment (PFRA) and the establishment of a 2000 floods list. From this first list, a sample of 176 floods, considered as remarkable has been selected. These floods were compiled in discussion with local authorities in charge of flood management (Lang et al., 2012) and have to be integrated in priority in local risk management policies. However, a consideration emerges about this classification: how a remarkable flood can be defined? According which criteria can it be considered as remarkable? To answer these questions, a methodology has been established by building an evaluation grid of remarkable floods in France. The primary objective of this grid is to analyze the remarkable flood's characteristics (hydrological and meteorological characteristics, sociological- political and economic impacts), and secondly to propose a classification of significant floods selected in the 2011 PFRA. To elaborate this evaluation grid, several issues had to be taken into account. First, the objective is to allow the comparison of events from various periods. These temporal disparities include the integration of various kinds of data and point out the importance of historical hydrology. It is possible to evaluate accurately the characteristics of recent floods by interpreting quantitative data (for example hydrological records. However, for floods that occurred before the 1960's it is necessary resorting to qualitative information such as written sources is necessary (Coeur, Lang, 2008). In a second part the evaluation grid requires equitable criteria in order not to

  6. The Importance of the Nothofagus Forest on Snowmelt Process linked to floods in Mountain Basins of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina as Input for Land Use Policies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iturraspe, R. J.; Urciuolo, A. B.; Lofiego, R.

    2007-05-01

    The conception and application of policies and best practices for the appropriate land use from the view point of extreme floods attenuation, must be based on scientist acknowledge of the basin response, reaching each one of the hydrological cycle's components. That condition is necessary as a start point for an integrated intersectoral management of water and forest resources at the basin scale, especially when forest logging or forest urbanization appear as land use alternatives with socioeconomic importance, confronting the natural roll of the forest in the basin. Within this framework, this article analyzes the forest importance on the seasonal snow-pack and snow-melting process in the mountain basin environment of Tierra del Fuego Island, Argentina, where a mixed rain-snow hydrological regimen and a canopy of native Nothofagus forest are basic features considered. Extreme floods events are related to heavy rain and snow-melting combination. In theory, the worst scenario is the exceptional rain occurrence at the moment of the maximum snow storage, air temperature higher than 0ºC in the whole basin, and previous wet conditions. On this scenario we analyze aspects that indicate forest influences on the snow pack distribution and evolution which are favorable to the attenuation of the intensity of melting process which are induced by rain and temperate air mass. Results were obtained in the context of the EPIC FORCE (EU) Project.

  7. Efficiency analysis of greenhouse gas sequestration during miscible CO2 injection in fractured oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Japan; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2008-08-01

    During CO2 injection into naturally fractured oil reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, the great portion of oil is recovered by matrix-fracture interaction. Diffusive mass transfer between matrix and fracture controls this process if CO2 is miscible with matrix oil. Oil expelled from matrix is replaced by CO2, and the matrix could be potentially a good storage medium for the long-term. For the cooptimization of the oil recovery and CO2 storage, i.e., maximizing the oil recovery while maximizing the amount of CO2 stored, we propose an efficiency analysis using a dimensionless term defined as the global effectiveness factor. The Biot number and Thiele modulus were incorporated in the development of the global effectiveness factor. Diffusion coefficients and the rate of mass-transfer constants were obtained from our previous finite element modeling study. We first defined and derived the dimensionless groups to be used in the efficiency analysis and then formulated a relationship between the dimensionless groups and the efficiency indicators, i.e., the ratios of total solute (oil) produced to total solvent injected and total solvent stored to total solvent injected. It was shown that the efficiency of the process can be represented by a dimensionless group that consists of well-known dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds number, the Peclet number, the Sherwood number, and the global effectiveness factor. PMID:18754463

  8. Regional flood probabilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    The T-year annual maximum flood at a site is defined to be that streamflow, that has probability 1/T of being exceeded in any given year, and for a group of sites the corresponding regional flood probability (RFP) is the probability that at least one site will experience a T-year flood in any given year. The RFP depends on the number of sites of interest and on the spatial correlation of flows among the sites. We present a Monte Carlo method for obtaining the RFP and demonstrate that spatial correlation estimates used in this method may be obtained with rank transformed data and therefore that knowledge of the at-site peak flow distribution is not necessary. We examine the extent to which the estimates depend on specification of a parametric form for the spatial correlation function, which is known to be nonstationary for peak flows. It is shown in a simulation study that use of a stationary correlation function to compute RFPs yields satisfactory estimates for certain nonstationary processes. Application of asymptotic extreme value theory is examined, and a methodology for separating channel network and rainfall effects on RFPs is suggested. A case study is presented using peak flow data from the state of Washington. For 193 sites in the Puget Sound region it is estimated that a 100-year flood will occur on the average every 4,5 years.

  9. Respiratory exposure to components of water-miscible metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Suuronen, Katri; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Riala, Riitta; Tuomi, Timo

    2008-10-01

    Water-miscible metalworking fluids (MWFs) are capable of causing respiratory symptoms and diseases. Recently, much emphasis has been put on developing new methods for assessing respiratory exposure to MWF emulsions. The air concentrations of ingredients and contaminants of MWF and inhalable dust were measured in 10 metal workshops in southern Finland. Oil mist was determined by infra red spectroscopy analysis after tetrachloroethylene extraction from the filter. Aldehydes were collected on Sep-Pak chemosorbents and analysed by liquid chromatography. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected on Tenax adsorbents and analysed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection after thermal desorption. Endotoxins were collected on glass fibre filter and analysed by enzyme-based spectrophotometry, and viable microbes were collected on polycarbonate filter and cultured. Inhalable dust was collected on cellulose acetate filter and quantified gravimetrically. Associations between the different exposures were calculated with Spearman's correlations. The mean concentration of oil mist was 0.14 (range <0.010-0.60) mg m(-3). The mean total concentration of aldehydes was 0.095 (0.026-0.38) mg m(-3), with formaldehyde as the main aldehyde. The average total concentration of VOC was 1.9 (0.34-4.5) mg m(-3) consisting mainly of high-boiling aliphatic hydrocarbons. Several potential sensitizing chemicals such as terpenes were found in small quantities. The concentration of microbial contaminants was low. All the measured air concentrations were below the Finnish occupational exposure limits. The exposure in machine shops was quantitatively dominated by volatile compounds. Additional measurements of MWF components such as aldehydes, alkanolamines and VOCs are needed to get more information on the chemical composition of workshops' air. New air cleaning methods should be introduced, as oil mist separators are insufficient to clean the air of small molecular impurities.

  10. Theory For The Miscibility Windows In Blends Of Polypropylene And Ethylene-α-Olefin Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, David; Li, Huimin; Curro, John

    2008-03-01

    The miscibility of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and ethylene-α-olefin (C2Cx) copolymers has been intensively studied both for its industrial importance and as a model system for complex polymer miscibility behavior. Experiments generally show a window of miscibility for particular regions in the parameter space defined by copolymer composition, volume fraction, and branch chain length. Since the cost of systematic molecular dynamics studies of such systems is still prohibitive, a statistical mechanical approach with the molecular interaction potentials and chain structure as the only input is highly desirable. We present self-consistent Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (SC-PRISM) calculations of blends of iPP and C2Cx copolymer, where Cx is propylene, butene, and hexene. The calculated enthalpy of mixing is shown to correlate well with experimental trends for the miscibility window. Furthermore, since the theory allows access to molecular-level correlations, insight is provided into the mechanisms for the specific miscibility behavior, including contributions due to chain conformations.

  11. Pluvial flood damage analyses and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Müller, Meike; Kienzler, Sarah; Hatzfeld, Fritz; Thieken, Annegret H.

    2015-04-01

    Pluvial floods in urban areas are caused by local, fast storm events with very high rainfall rates that lead to failure of the drainage system of a city. Pluvial floods often occur with little warning in areas not obviously prone to flooding. Such local extreme events have a high potential for damage, particularly due to a high vulnerability caused by high densities of population, buildings and assets in cities. However, only little knowledge is available about the damaging processes during pluvial floods and how damage can be mitigated. To gain more insight, we investigated how pluvial floods affected private households during three different pluvial flood events and how people were able to cope with the flooding in the cities of Lohmar, Hersbruck and Osnabrück in Germany.

  12. Evaluation of some water-miscible organic solvents for spray-drying enzymes and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sass, Anke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    The spray-drying behaviour of 16 water-miscible organic solvents on a bench-scale machine (Büchi B290 with inert loop) was determined under mild-to-moderate process conditions, namely inlet gas temperature of 130 °C and liquid feed flow rate of ≤3 mL/min. The solvents with boiling points below the inlet gas temperature could be fully dried (Group 1 solvents). The two exceptions were DMSO and DMF which despite their higher boiling points could be fully dried. The remaining solvents with boiling points above the inlet gas temperature were not fully dried during passage through the spray-dryer (Group 2 solvents). Trypsin and lysozyme when spray-dried from Group 1 solvent binary mixtures with water showed similar inactivation and residual water content, independent of solvent. The level of residual solvent was, however, strongly dependent on solvent. Trehalose (20%) and mannitol (10%) could be spray-dried from DMSO/water binary mixtures, but the amorphous disaccharide required higher inlet gas temperature. Trehalose/trypsin and mannitol/trypsin formulations showed differing degrees of protection against enzyme inactivation when spray-dried from Group 1 solvent binary mixtures with water. In all solvents the mannitol protected as well, if not better, than the trehalose. This study identifies some suitable organic solvents for spray-drying protein formulations, but also shows the difficulties of remaining organic solvent under the moderate inlet gas temperature used.

  13. Influencing solvent miscibility and aqueous stability of aluminum nanoparticles through surface functionalization with acrylic monomers.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Christopher A; Pierce, Christian J; Spowart, Jonathan E

    2010-09-01

    With growing interest in the development of new composite systems for a variety of applications that require easily processable materials and adequate structural properties with high energy densities, we have pursued the chemical functionalization of oxide-passivated aluminum nanoparticles (nAl) using three acrylic monomers, 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 2-carboxyethyl acrylate (CEA), and phosphonic acid 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate ester (PAM), to provide chemical compatibility within various solvent and polymeric systems. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that attachment of MPS and PAM monomers occurs through the formation of bonds directly to the passivated oxide surface upon reaction with surface hydroxyls, whereas CEA monomers interact through the formation of ionic carboxylate binding to aluminum atoms within the oxide. The coated particles demonstrate enhanced miscibility in common organic solvents and monomers; MPS and PAM coatings are additionally shown to inhibit oxidation of the aluminum particles when exposed to aqueous environments at room temperature, and PAM coatings are stable at even elevated temperatures. PMID:20795650

  14. Evaluation of some water-miscible organic solvents for spray-drying enzymes and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sass, Anke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    The spray-drying behaviour of 16 water-miscible organic solvents on a bench-scale machine (Büchi B290 with inert loop) was determined under mild-to-moderate process conditions, namely inlet gas temperature of 130 °C and liquid feed flow rate of ≤3 mL/min. The solvents with boiling points below the inlet gas temperature could be fully dried (Group 1 solvents). The two exceptions were DMSO and DMF which despite their higher boiling points could be fully dried. The remaining solvents with boiling points above the inlet gas temperature were not fully dried during passage through the spray-dryer (Group 2 solvents). Trypsin and lysozyme when spray-dried from Group 1 solvent binary mixtures with water showed similar inactivation and residual water content, independent of solvent. The level of residual solvent was, however, strongly dependent on solvent. Trehalose (20%) and mannitol (10%) could be spray-dried from DMSO/water binary mixtures, but the amorphous disaccharide required higher inlet gas temperature. Trehalose/trypsin and mannitol/trypsin formulations showed differing degrees of protection against enzyme inactivation when spray-dried from Group 1 solvent binary mixtures with water. In all solvents the mannitol protected as well, if not better, than the trehalose. This study identifies some suitable organic solvents for spray-drying protein formulations, but also shows the difficulties of remaining organic solvent under the moderate inlet gas temperature used. PMID:23596974

  15. Melt-Miscibility in Block Copolymers Containing Polyethylene and Substituted Polynorbornene Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhearn, William; Register, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Block copolymers containing a crystallizable block, such as polyethylene (PE), and a high-Tg amorphous block are potentially interesting materials since the rigid glassy block can mitigate the poor yield strength of the PE crystals. However, chemical incompatibility between blocks, quantified by the Flory interaction parameter χ or the interaction energy density X, drives microphase separation at low temperatures or high chain lengths. To prepare a high molecular weight PE-containing block copolymer that is easy to process (i.e. with a disordered low-viscosity melt) it is necessary to select amorphous blocks that have low mixing energies with PE. The only suitable polymers currently known are chemically similar to PE and therefore have similarly low glass transition temperatures. We investigate a series of both low- and high-Tg polymers based on substituted norbornene monomers, polymerized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). Several ROMP polymers of this type exhibit high Tg and low interaction energy against PE. For example, hydrogenated poly(cyclohexyl norbornene) has Tg = 88 oC and has interaction energy density XhPCyN - PE ~ 0.8 MPa, comparable to the interaction energy density between PE and hydrogenated polyisoprene. The miscibility of an amorphous block can be further tuned by statistical copolymerization of norbornene units with aromatic side-groups (high Hildebrand solubility parameter) and norbornene units with aliphatic side-groups (low Hildebrand solubility parameter).

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Dandina N. Rao

    2003-10-01

    This is the first Annual Technical Progress Report being submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy on the work performed under the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15323. This report follows two other progress reports submitted to U.S. DOE during the first year of the project: The first in April 2003 for the project period from October 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003, and the second in July 2003 for the period April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. Although the present Annual Report covers the first year of the project from October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003, its contents reflect mainly the work performed in the last quarter (July-September, 2003) since the work performed during the first three quarters has been reported in detail in the two earlier reports. The main objective of the project is to develop a new gas-injection enhanced oil recovery process to recover the oil trapped in reservoirs subsequent to primary and/or secondary recovery operations. The project is divided into three main tasks. Task 1 involves the design and development of a scaled physical model. Task 2 consists of further development of the vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 involves the determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Each technical progress report, including this one, reports on the progress made in each of these tasks during the reporting period. Section I covers the scaled physical model study. A survey of literature in related areas has been conducted. Test apparatus has been under construction throughout the reporting period. A bead-pack visual model, liquid injection system, and an image analysis system have been completed and used for preliminary experiments. Experimental runs with decane and paraffin oil have been conducted in the bead pack model. The results indicate the need for modifications in the apparatus, which are currently underway. A bundle of capillary tube model has been considered and

  17. Floods, flood control, and bottomland vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Jonathan M.; Auble, Gregor T.

    2000-01-01

    Bottomland plant communities are typically dominated by the effects of floods. Floods create the surfaces on which plants become established, transport seeds and nutrients, and remove establish plants. Floods provide a moisture subsidy that allows development of bottomland forests in arid regions and produce anoxic soils, which can control bottomland plant distribution in humid regions. Repeated flooding produces a mosaic of patches of different age, sediment texture, and inundation duration; this mosaic fosters high species richness.

  18. The Effects of Branching and Deuterium Labeling on Polymer Blend Miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defelice, Jeffrey; Higgins, Julia; Lipson, Jane

    Local structural or chemical changes made to one component of a polymer blend can have a significant impact on miscibility. In this talk we will focus on several blends involving linear and 4-arm star polystyrene (PS), both hydrogenous and deuterated, and poly(vinylmethylether) (PVME). We consider the effect of the structural change on the miscibility of PS/PVME, then turn to the added effect of deuterium labeling, both on this blend and for isotopic PS mixtures. Using our Locally Correlated Lattice (LCL) model we are able to identify trends in the physical properties of pure components, such as: free volume, thermal expansion coefficient, and cohesive energy density. We find that branching and labeling, both independently and cumulatively, affect pure component properties. Our ability to correlate structural and chemical changes with trends in physical properties leads to predictions about the compatibility of pure components, and thus their blend miscibility. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1403757 and GAANN.

  19. Effect of using miscible and immiscible healing agent on solid state self-healing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makenan, Siti Mastura; Jamil, Mohd Suzeren Md.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effect of using various healing agent which are miscible; poly(bisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin), and immiscible; poly(ethylene-co-acetate) and poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid), on self-healing resin system. The specimens were analysed by Fourier-transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and izod test. Optical image of the sample morphology was observed using optical microscope. Healing efficiencies (HE) were evaluated using izod test. The concept of healing recovery was proved based on the use of miscible and immiscible healing agent. From the results, it can be concluded that the healable resin with miscible healing agent has the highest HE within the third healing cycle.

  20. Drivers of flood damage on event level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreibich, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    Flood risk is dynamic and influenced by many processes related to hazard, exposure and vulnerability. Flood damage increased significantly over the past decades, however, resulting overall economic loss per event is an aggregated indicator and it is difficult to attribute causes to this increasing trend. Much has been learned about damaging processes during floods at the micro-scale, e.g. building level. However, little is known about the main factors determining the amount of flood damage on event level. Thus, we analyse and compare paired flood events, i.e. consecutive, similar damaging floods that occurred in the same area. In analogy to 'Paired catchment studies' - a well-established method in hydrology to understand how changes in land use affect streamflow - we will investigate how and why resulting flood damage in a region differed between the first and second consecutive flood events. One example are the 2002 and 2013 floods in the Elbe and Danube catchments in Germany. The 2002 flood caused the highest economic damage (EUR 11600 million) due to a natural hazard event in Germany. Damage was so high due to extreme flood hazard triggered by extreme precipitation and a high number of resulting dyke breaches. Additionally, exposure hotspots like the city of Dresden at the Elbe river as well as some smaller municipalities at the river Mulde (e.g. Grimma, Eilenburg, Bitterfeld, Dessau) were severely impacted. However, affected parties and authorities learned from the extreme flood in 2002, and many governmental flood risk programs and initiatives were launched. Considerable improvements since 2002 occurred on many levels that deal with flood risk reduction and disaster response, in particular in 1) increased flood prevention by improved spatial planning, 2) an increased number of property-level mitigation measures, 3) more effective early warning and improved coordination of disaster response and 4) a more targeted maintenance of flood defence systems and their

  1. Scales of Natural Flood Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Alex; Quinn, Paul; Owen, Gareth; Hetherington, David; Piedra Lara, Miguel; O'Donnell, Greg

    2016-04-01

    The scientific field of Natural flood Management (NFM) is receiving much attention and is now widely seen as a valid solution to sustainably manage flood risk whilst offering significant multiple benefits. However, few examples exist looking at NFM on a large scale (>10km2). Well-implemented NFM has the effect of restoring more natural catchment hydrological and sedimentological processes, which in turn can have significant flood risk and WFD benefits for catchment waterbodies. These catchment scale improvements in-turn allow more 'natural' processes to be returned to rivers and streams, creating a more resilient system. Although certain NFM interventions may appear distant and disconnected from main stem waterbodies, they will undoubtedly be contributing to WFD at the catchment waterbody scale. This paper offers examples of NFM, and explains how they can be maximised through practical design across many scales (from feature up to the whole catchment). New tools to assist in the selection of measures and their location, and to appreciate firstly, the flooding benefit at the local catchment scale and then show a Flood Impact Model that can best reflect the impacts of local changes further downstream. The tools will be discussed in the context of our most recent experiences on NFM projects including river catchments in the north east of England and in Scotland. This work has encouraged a more integrated approach to flood management planning that can use both traditional and novel NFM strategies in an effective and convincing way.

  2. Implementing the EU Floods Directive (2007/60/EC) in Austria: Flood Risk Management Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhold, Clemens

    2013-04-01

    he Directive 2007/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2007 on the assessment and management of flood risks (EFD) aims at the reduction of the adverse consequences for human health, the environment, cultural heritage and economic activity associated with floods in the Community. This task is to be achieved based on three process steps (1) preliminary flood risk assessment (finalised by the end of 2011), (2) flood hazard maps and flood risk maps (due 2013) and (3) flood risk management plans (due 2015). Currently, an interdisciplinary national working group is defining the methodological framework for flood risk management plans in Austria supported by a constant exchange with international bodies and experts. Referring to the EFD the components of the flood risk management plan are (excerpt): 1. conclusions of the preliminary flood risk assessment 2. flood hazard maps and flood risk maps and the conclusions that can be drawn from those maps 3. a description of the appropriate objectives of flood risk management 4. a summary of measures and their prioritisation aiming to achieve the appropriate objectives of flood risk management The poster refers to some of the major challenges in this process, such as the legal provisions, coordination of administrative units, definition of public relations, etc. The implementation of the EFD requires the harmonisation of legal instruments of various disciplines (e.g. water management, spatial planning, civil protection) enabling a coordinated - and ideally binding - practice of flood risk management. This process is highly influenced by the administrative organisation in Austria - federal, provincial and municipality level. The Austrian approach meets this organisational framework by structuring the development of the flood risk management plan into 3 time-steps: (a) federal blueprint, (b) provincial editing and (c) federal finishing as well as reporting to the European Commission. Each time

  3. Flooding tolerance in halophytes.

    PubMed

    Colmer, Timothy D; Flowers, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Flooding is a common environmental variable with salinity. Submerged organs can suffer from O(2) deprivation and the resulting energy deficits can compromise ion transport processes essential for salinity tolerance. Tolerance of soil waterlogging in halophytes, as in glycophytes, is often associated with the production of adventitious roots containing aerenchyma, and the resultant internal O(2) supply. For some species, shallow rooting in aerobic upper soil layers appears to be the key to survival on frequently flooded soils, although little is known of the anoxia tolerance in halophytes. Halophytic species that inhabit waterlogged substrates are able to regulate their shoot ion concentrations in spite of the hypoxic (or anoxic) medium in which they are rooted, this being in stark contrast with most other plants which suffer when salinity and waterlogging occur in combination. Very few studies have addressed the consequences of submergence of the shoots by saline water; these have, however, demonstrated tolerance of temporary submergence in some halophytes.

  4. Flooding tolerance in halophytes.

    PubMed

    Colmer, Timothy D; Flowers, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    Flooding is a common environmental variable with salinity. Submerged organs can suffer from O(2) deprivation and the resulting energy deficits can compromise ion transport processes essential for salinity tolerance. Tolerance of soil waterlogging in halophytes, as in glycophytes, is often associated with the production of adventitious roots containing aerenchyma, and the resultant internal O(2) supply. For some species, shallow rooting in aerobic upper soil layers appears to be the key to survival on frequently flooded soils, although little is known of the anoxia tolerance in halophytes. Halophytic species that inhabit waterlogged substrates are able to regulate their shoot ion concentrations in spite of the hypoxic (or anoxic) medium in which they are rooted, this being in stark contrast with most other plants which suffer when salinity and waterlogging occur in combination. Very few studies have addressed the consequences of submergence of the shoots by saline water; these have, however, demonstrated tolerance of temporary submergence in some halophytes. PMID:18482227

  5. Direct Determination of the Metastable Liquid Miscibility Gap in Undercooled Cu-Co Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, D.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Williams, G.

    1999-01-01

    Bulk Cu-Co alloys at compositions ranging from 10 to 80 wt pct Co were highly undercooled using a melt fluxing technique. The metastable liquid separation boundary has been directly determined from the measured temperature-time profiles. It was found that the critical point of the miscibility gap is slightly shifted towards the Co side and about 90 K below the liquidus. A droplet-shaped microstructure was observed for all solidified specimens (Cu- 10 to 80 wt pct Co), when the melts were undercooled into the metastable miscibility boundary.

  6. Tuning the phase diagrams: the miscibility studies of multilactate liquid crystalline compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnov, Alexej; Tykarska, Marzena; Hamplová, Věra; Kurp, Katarzyna

    2016-09-01

    Design of binary and multicomponent liquid crystalline mixtures is a very powerful tool to reach the desired self-assembling properties. Beyond many advantages, this method has a distinct negativity - it is very material-consuming. While working with unique chiral materials in the research laboratory, this problem can be solved by applying miscibility study by the contact preparation method. In this work, the miscibility studies of lactic acid derivatives and non-chiral/chiral liquid crystalline molecules of different structure have been done in order to establish the phase diagrams. Special attention is focused on the ferro(antiferro)electric smectic phases.

  7. Enhanced oil recovery by CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement in the Little Knife Field, Billings County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Desch, J.B.; Larsen, W.K.; Lindsay, R.F.; Nettle, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    A CO/sub 2/ minitest involving the miscible displacement process was conducted in the Mission Canyon formation (lower Mississippian) at Little Knife field, ND. The Mission Canyon is a dolomitized carbonate reservoir at approximately 9,700 to 9,900 ft (2957 to 3018 m) subsurface, which is undergoing primary depletion. Four wells were drilled in an inverted four-spot configuration, covering 5 acres (20 234 m/sup 2/). The central well served as the injection well and was surrounded by three nonproducing observation wells. Oriented cores were cut in each well for detailed reservoir characterization and laboratory testing. In addition, a well test program was conducted that involved two pulse tests and injectivity tests on the individual wells. Results from these tests were used to upgrade two reservoir simulation models. Various parameters within the computer models were modified to determine the most efficient injection plan for the specific reservoir characteristics.

  8. Flooding and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, flooding is the nation's most common natural disaster. Some floods develop slowly during an extended period of rain or in a warming trend following a heavy snow. Flash floods can occur quickly, without any visible sign of rain. Catastrophic floods are associated with burst dams and levees,…

  9. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency.

  10. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. PMID:23553033

  11. Cyber surveillance for flood disasters.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-01-01

    Regional heavy rainfall is usually caused by the influence of extreme weather conditions. Instant heavy rainfall often results in the flooding of rivers and the neighboring low-lying areas, which is responsible for a large number of casualties and considerable property loss. The existing precipitation forecast systems mostly focus on the analysis and forecast of large-scale areas but do not provide precise instant automatic monitoring and alert feedback for individual river areas and sections. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an easy method to automatically monitor the flood object of a specific area, based on the currently widely used remote cyber surveillance systems and image processing methods, in order to obtain instant flooding and waterlogging event feedback. The intrusion detection mode of these surveillance systems is used in this study, wherein a flood is considered a possible invasion object. Through the detection and verification of flood objects, automatic flood risk-level monitoring of specific individual river segments, as well as the automatic urban inundation detection, has become possible. The proposed method can better meet the practical needs of disaster prevention than the method of large-area forecasting. It also has several other advantages, such as flexibility in location selection, no requirement of a standard water-level ruler, and a relatively large field of view, when compared with the traditional water-level measurements using video screens. The results can offer prompt reference for appropriate disaster warning actions in small areas, making them more accurate and effective. PMID:25621609

  12. Cyber Surveillance for Flood Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-01-01

    Regional heavy rainfall is usually caused by the influence of extreme weather conditions. Instant heavy rainfall often results in the flooding of rivers and the neighboring low-lying areas, which is responsible for a large number of casualties and considerable property loss. The existing precipitation forecast systems mostly focus on the analysis and forecast of large-scale areas but do not provide precise instant automatic monitoring and alert feedback for individual river areas and sections. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an easy method to automatically monitor the flood object of a specific area, based on the currently widely used remote cyber surveillance systems and image processing methods, in order to obtain instant flooding and waterlogging event feedback. The intrusion detection mode of these surveillance systems is used in this study, wherein a flood is considered a possible invasion object. Through the detection and verification of flood objects, automatic flood risk-level monitoring of specific individual river segments, as well as the automatic urban inundation detection, has become possible. The proposed method can better meet the practical needs of disaster prevention than the method of large-area forecasting. It also has several other advantages, such as flexibility in location selection, no requirement of a standard water-level ruler, and a relatively large field of view, when compared with the traditional water-level measurements using video screens. The results can offer prompt reference for appropriate disaster warning actions in small areas, making them more accurate and effective. PMID:25621609

  13. Designing a Flood-Risk Education Program in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosschaart, Adwin; van der Schee, Joop; Kuiper, Wilmad

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on designing a flood-risk education program to enhance 15-year-old students' flood-risk perception. In the flood-risk education program, learning processes were modeled in such a way that the arousal of moderate levels of fear should prompt experiential and analytical information processing. In this way, understanding of flood…

  14. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-08-14

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system.

  15. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system. PMID:26287201

  16. Visual Sensing for Urban Flood Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing climatic extremes, the frequency and severity of urban flood events have intensified worldwide. In this study, image-based automated monitoring of flood formation and analyses of water level fluctuation were proposed as value-added intelligent sensing applications to turn a passive monitoring camera into a visual sensor. Combined with the proposed visual sensing method, traditional hydrological monitoring cameras have the ability to sense and analyze the local situation of flood events. This can solve the current problem that image-based flood monitoring heavily relies on continuous manned monitoring. Conventional sensing networks can only offer one-dimensional physical parameters measured by gauge sensors, whereas visual sensors can acquire dynamic image information of monitored sites and provide disaster prevention agencies with actual field information for decision-making to relieve flood hazards. The visual sensing method established in this study provides spatiotemporal information that can be used for automated remote analysis for monitoring urban floods. This paper focuses on the determination of flood formation based on image-processing techniques. The experimental results suggest that the visual sensing approach may be a reliable way for determining the water fluctuation and measuring its elevation and flood intrusion with respect to real-world coordinates. The performance of the proposed method has been confirmed; it has the capability to monitor and analyze the flood status, and therefore, it can serve as an active flood warning system. PMID:26287201

  17. Flood vulnerability indices at varying spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Balica, S F; Douben, N; Wright, N G

    2009-01-01

    Populations around the world are vulnerable to natural disasters. Such disasters are occurring with increased frequency as a consequence of socio-economic and land-use developments and due to increased climate variability. This paper describes a methodology for using indicators to compute a Flood Vulnerability Index which is aimed at assessing the conditions which influence flood damage at various spatial scales: river basin, sub-catchment and urban area. The methodology developed distinguishes different characteristics at each identified spatial scale, thus allowing a more in-depth analysis and interpretation of local indicators. This also pinpoints local hotspots of flood vulnerability. The final results are presented by means of a standardised number, ranging from 0 to 1, which symbolises comparatively low or high flood vulnerability between the various spatial scales. The Flood Vulnerability Index can be used by international river basin organisations to identify and develop action plans to deal with floods and flooding or on smaller scales to improve local decision-making processes by selecting measures to reduce vulnerability at local and regional levels. In this work the methodology has been applied to various case studies at different spatial scales. This leads to some interesting observations on how flood vulnerability can be reflected by quantifiable indicators across scales, e.g. the relationship between the flood vulnerability of a sub-catchment with its river basin or the weak relation between the flood vulnerability of an urban area with the sub-catchment or river basin which it belongs to.

  18. Flood Resilient Systems and their Application for Flood Resilient Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojlovic, N.; Gabalda, V.; Antanaskovic, D.; Gershovich, I.; Pasche, E.

    2012-04-01

    Following the paradigm shift in flood management from traditional to more integrated approaches, and considering the uncertainties of future development due to drivers such as climate change, one of the main emerging tasks of flood managers becomes the development of (flood) resilient cities. It can be achieved by application of non-structural - flood resilience measures, summarised in the 4As: assistance, alleviation, awareness and avoidance (FIAC, 2007). As a part of this strategy, the key aspect of development of resilient cities - resilient built environment can be reached by efficient application of Flood Resilience Technology (FReT) and its meaningful combination into flood resilient systems (FRS). FRS are given as [an interconnecting network of FReT which facilitates resilience (including both restorative and adaptive capacity) to flooding, addressing physical and social systems and considering different flood typologies] (SMARTeST, http://www.floodresilience.eu/). Applying the system approach (e.g. Zevenbergen, 2008), FRS can be developed at different scales from the building to the city level. Still, a matter of research is a method to define and systematise different FRS crossing those scales. Further, the decision on which resilient system is to be applied for the given conditions and given scale is a complex task, calling for utilisation of decision support tools. This process of decision-making should follow the steps of flood risk assessment (1) and development of a flood resilience plan (2) (Manojlovic et al, 2009). The key problem in (2) is how to match the input parameters that describe physical&social system and flood typology to the appropriate flood resilient system. Additionally, an open issue is how to integrate the advances in FReT and findings on its efficiency into decision support tools. This paper presents a way to define, systematise and make decisions on FRS at different scales of an urban system developed within the 7th FP Project

  19. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, VISCOSITY, AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236EA WITH FOUR DIFFERENT EXXON LUBRICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density data for the refrigerant hydrofluorocarbon (HFC)-236ea (or R-236ea) and four lubricants supplied by Exxon Corporation. Such data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for ...

  20. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, VISCOSITY, AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236FA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density measurements for refrigerant R-236fa and two potential lubricants . (The data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The tested oi...

  1. Miscibility of Quillaja Saponins with other Co-surfactants under Different pH Values.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Corina L; Salminen, Hanna; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    The miscibility behavior of mixed surfactant systems and the influence of extrinsic parameters are crucial for their application as emulsifiers. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the miscibility behavior of mixed systems composed of commercial Quillaja saponin and a co-surfactant, namely sodium caseinate, pea protein, rapeseed lecithin, or egg lecithin. These mixtures were evaluated macro- and microscopically at different concentration ratios (maximum concentration 5% w/v) at pH 3, 5, and 7 at 25 °C. The individual ingredients were also assessed for their charge properties and surface hydrophobicity. The results showed that Quillaja saponin-caseinate mixtures were miscible only at pH 7, and showed aggregation and precipitation at lower pH due to increasing electrostatic attraction forces. Rheological measurements showed that Quillaja saponin-pea protein mixtures formed gelled structures at all tested pH values mainly via association of hydrophobic patches. Quillaja saponins mixed with rapeseed lecithin were miscible at all tested pH values due to electrostatic repulsion. Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin mixtures aggregated independent of pH and concentration ratio. The microscopic analysis revealed that the lower the pH and the higher the Quillaja saponin ratio, the denser were the formed Quillaja saponin-egg lecithin aggregates. The results are summarized in ternary phase diagrams that provide a useful tool in selecting a surfactant system for food applications. PMID:26458074

  2. The impact of miscibility on organic solar cell performance and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Brian A.; Tumbleston, John R.; Bartelt, Jon A.; McGehee, Michael D.; McNeill, Christopher R.; Ade, Harald

    2013-03-01

    The recent demonstration of molecular miscibility/solubility between polymers and fullerenes has revealed a much more complex picture of nanostructure, charge dynamics, and device stability - aspects that are all entangled. Here we show that miscibility is important in several ways that depends on the particular material blend. For example, recent absolute measurements on domain size and composition have revealed nanostructure in PTB7:PC71BM blends that is controlled by miscibility and that well-mixed regions likely hinder charge separation in this system. On the other hand, PBDTTPD:PC61BM blends rely on high levels of mixing for electron percolation. Such evidence leads to a complex interplay between charge separation, electron trapping, and percolation. Miscibility, a thermodynamic parameter, can, furthermore, determine the thermal stability of device active layers, which we show varies widely between materials systems. This suggests tailoring of the molecular interactions between donor and acceptor materials in solar cells may be the key to high-performing, highly stable and, therefore, economically viable organic electronics technologies.

  3. Determining the melt miscibility of commercial polyolefin blends by Small-Angle Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping

    2005-03-01

    The melt miscibility of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) (Mw = 52 kg/mol, PDI = 2.9) and linear low-density polyethylenes (LLDPEs) based on homogeneous ethylene-1-butene copolymers (EB0187: 18.7 mol% butene branches, Mw = 58.1 kg/mol and EB0059: 5.9 mol% butene branches, Mw = 70 kg/mol) is determined by Small-Angle Light Scattering (SALS) under parallel-polarized optical alignment. Blends with branching density differences (δy) ranging from 5.9 to 18.7 mol% were studied. For the HDPE/EB0187 blend, (δy = 18.7%), cooling and isothermal measurements (2 h) in the melt can be used to determine the miscibility and the phase boundary. When this blend is rapidly cooled room temperature, the resulting SALS patterns show that the size of phase separated domain (˜ 1 μm) is much smaller than the average spherulite size (68 μm). These results consist with our microscopic observations and the transmitted light measured simultaneously with the VV scattering in the melt. From the compositions studied, we can conclude that this blend exhibits UCST behavior. For blends with lower δy, isothermal measurements provide a sensitive means for determining the melt miscibility. Based on the above observations, we can conclude that SALS can be used to determine the melt miscibility of polyolefin blends.

  4. Large-scale Flood Monitoring: Where is the most exposed to large flood in Asia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; PARK, J.; Iwami, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Flood mapping and monitoring (particularly flood areas, locations, and durations) are an imperative process and are the fundamental part of risk management as well as emergency response. We have found that Bangladesh is the highest risk country among 14 Asian developing countries from flood risk assessment under climate change scenarios because of its largest vulnerable population to cyclic 50-year flood events. This study shows a methodological possibility to be used as a standard approach for continental-scale flood hazard and risk assessment with the use of multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), a big contributor to progress in real-time hazard mapping. The purpose of this study is to detect flood inundation areas considering the flood propagation even with limitations of optical and multispectral images. We improved a water detection algorithm to achieve a better discrimination capacity to discern flood areas by using amodified land surface water index (MLSWI), and estimated flood extent areas, coupled with the water level and an optimal threshold ofMLSWI based on the spectral characteristics. In Bangladesh, the FFWC warns people that floods occur when the water level exceeds the danger level. We clearly confirmed that the flood propagation was in good agreement with the timing of the water level exceeding the water danger level in the case of the cyclic 10-year flood event. The flooding was also found to be proportional to theflood extent (areas) and duration. The results showed the novel approach's capability of providing instant,comprehensive nationwide flood mapping over the entire Bangladesh by using multi-temporal MODIS data. The ambiguities of rapid flood mapping from satellite-derived products were verified in the Brahmaputra River by using high-resolution images (ALOS AVNIR2, spatial resolution 10m), ground truth and field survey data.

  5. The Impact of Fullerene Structure on its Miscibility with P3HT and its Correlation of Performance in Organic Photovoltaics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huipeng; Hsiao, Yu-Che; Hu, Bin; Dadmun, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Neutron reflectivity experiments are utilized to obtain the miscibility limit of four different fullerenes, bis-PCBM, ICBA, thio-PCBM, and PC70BM, in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The intermixing of P3HT and fullerene bilayers is monitored by neutron reflectivity before and after thermal annealing, providing quantification of the miscibility and interdiffusion of the fullerene within P3HT. These results indicate that the miscibility limit of these fullerenes in P3HT ranges from 11% to 26%, where the bis-adduct fullerenes exhibit lower miscibility in P3HT, which is also verified by small angle neutron scatting (SANS). The in-plane morphology of the P3HT:fullerene mixtures was also examined by SANS, which shows a decrease in domain size and an increase in the specific interfacial area between the fullerene and the polymer with the bis-fullerenes. Correlation of miscibility and morphology to device performance indicates that polymer/fullerene miscibility is crucial to rationally optimize the design of fullerenes for use in organic photovoltaics. Bis-PCBM has a higher open circuit voltage (Voc) than PC60BM with P3HT; however, device performance of bis-PCBM based devices is lower than that of PC60BM based devices. This decrease in performance is attributed to the lower miscibility of bis-PCBM in P3HT, which decreases the probability of exciton dissociation and enhances the recombination of free charge carriers in the miscible region. Moreover, the minimum distance between fullerenes in the miscible region to facilitate intermolecular transport is identified as 11 .

  6. The Impact of Fullerene Structure on Its Miscibility with P3HT and Its Correlation of Performance in Organic Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huipeng; Peet, Jeff; Hsiao, Yu-Che; Hu, Bin; Dadmun, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Neutron reflectivity experiments are utilized to obtain the miscibility limit of four different fullerenes, bis-PCBM, ICBA, thio-PCBM, and PC70BM, in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). The intermixing of P3HT and fullerene bilayers is monitored by neutron reflectivity before and after thermal annealing, providing quantification of the miscibility and interdiffusion of the fullerene within P3HT. These results indicate that the miscibility limit of these fullerenes in P3HT ranges from 11% to 26%, where the bis-adduct fullerenes exhibit lower miscibility in P3HT, which is also verified by small angle neutron scatting (SANS). The in-plane morphology of the P3HT:fullerene mixtures was also examined by SANS, which shows a decrease in domain size and an increase in the specific interfacial area between the fullerene and the polymer with the bis-fullerenes. Correlation of miscibility and morphology to device performance indicates that polymer/ fullerene miscibility is crucial to rationally optimize the design of fullerenes for use in organic photovoltaics. Bis-PCBM has a higher open circuit voltage (Voc) than PC60BM with P3HT; however, device performance of bis-PCBM based devices is lower than that of PC60BM based devices. This decrease in performance is attributed to the lower miscibility of bis-PCBM in P3HT, which decreases the probability of exciton dissociation and enhances the recombination of free charge carriers in the miscible region. Moreover, the minimum distance between fullerenes in the miscible region to facilitate intermolecular transport is identified as 11 .

  7. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Somasundaran

    2004-11-20

    The aim of the project is to develop a knowledge base to help the design of enhanced processes for mobilizing and extracting untrapped oil. We emphasize evaluation of novel surfactant mixtures and obtaining optimum combinations of the surfactants for efficient chemical flooding EOR processes. In this regard, an understanding of the aggregate shape, size and structure is crucial since these properties govern the crude oil removal efficiency. During the three-year period, the adsorption and aggregation behavior of sugar-based surfactants and their mixtures with other types of surfactants have been studied. Sugar-based surfactants are made from renewable resources, nontoxic and biodegradable. They are miscible with water and oil. These environmentally benign surfactants feature high surface activity, good salinity, calcium and temperature tolerance, and unique adsorption behavior. They possess the characteristics required for oil flooding surfactants and have the potential for replacing currently used surfactants in oil recovery. A novel analytical ultracentrifugation technique has been successfully employed for the first time, to characterize the aggregate species present in mixed micellar solution due to its powerful ability to separate particles based on their size and shape and monitor them simultaneously. Analytical ultracentrifugation offers an unprecedented opportunity to obtain important information on mixed micelles, structure-performance relationship for different surfactant aggregates in solution and their role in interfacial processes. Initial sedimentation velocity investigations were conducted using nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) to choose the best analytical protocol, calculate the partial specific volume and obtain information on sedimentation coefficient, aggregation mass of micelles. Four softwares: OptimaTM XL-A/XL-I data analysis software, DCDT+, Svedberg and SEDFIT, were compared for the analysis of sedimentation velocity

  8. CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations, a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. This project has two defined budget periods. The first budget period primarily involves tasks associated with reservoir analysis and characterization, characterizing existing producibility problems, and reservoir simulation of the proposed technology. The final budget period covers the actual field demonstration of the proposed technology. Technology transfer spans the entire course of the project. This report covers the concluding tasks performed under the second budget period.

  9. Special challenges in assessing and mapping flood risk following a flood-debris flow event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggett, Graeme

    2016-04-01

    Severe rainfall along the Colorado front range in 2013 delivered flood and debris flows to many mountain communities, causing millions of dollars of damage as well as taking several lives. Phase changes in clear-hyperconcentrated-debris flows during the event created challenges in recreating the hydrology post-flood and in estimating and mapping new regulatory floodplains to support ongoing flood recovery efforts. This presentation highlights approaches used to overcome these challenges and to adequately represent the different processes and their uncertainties in updated flood hazard and risk assessments. It also considers the need to educate and involve the community in this process.

  10. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Booth, D.B.; Burges, S.J.; Montgomery, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial patterns of bed material entrainment by floods were documented at seven gravel bars using arrays of metal washers (bed tags) placed in the streambed. The observed patterns were used to test a general stochastic model that bed material entrainment is a spatially independent, random process where the probability of entrainment is uniform over a gravel bar and a function of the peak dimensionless shear stress ??*0 of the flood. The fraction of tags missing from a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect to ??*0 with a mean value (50% of the tags entrained) of 0.085 and standard deviation of 0.022 (root-mean-square error of 0.09). Variation in partial entrainment for a given ??*0 demonstrated the effects of flow conditioning on bed strength, with lower values of partial entrainment after intermediate magnitude floods (0.065 < ??*0 < 0.08) than after higher magnitude floods. Although the probability of bed material entrainment was approximately uniform over a gravel bar during individual floods and independent from flood to flood, regions of preferential stability and instability emerged at some bars over the course of a wet season. Deviations from spatially uniform and independent bed material entrainment were most pronounced for reaches with varied flow and in consecutive floods with small to intermediate magnitudes.

  11. Flooding the Zone: A Ten-Point Approach to Assessing Critical Thinking as Part of the AACSB Accreditation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaliere, Frank; Mayer, Bradley W.

    2012-01-01

    Undergoing the accreditation process of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) can be quite daunting and stressful. It requires prodigious amounts of planning, record-keeping, and document preparation. It is not something that can be thrown together at the last minute. The same is true of the five-year reaccreditation…

  12. Formation of PGM-Cu-Ni deposits in the process of evolution of flood-basalt magmatism in the Noril'sk region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutskaya, N. A.

    2011-08-01

    The timing of the emplacement of ore-bearing melts in the process of evolution of flood-basalt magmatism in the Noril'sk District is discussed. The current models of ore formation consider the emplacement of ore-bearing intrusions either under the conditions of a closed magmatic system as a product of a self-dependent magmatic event, or under the conditions of an open magmatic system, where intrusions are parts of the conduits feeding lava flows. In both cases, the composition of the initial magma, the content of volatile components therein, and the contribution of country rock assimilation are important for the development of a genetic model. The relationships between lavas and intrusions are exemplified in the South Maslov intrusion, which cuts through the rocks of the Nadezhdinsky Formation. No geological evidence for links of lavas to intrusions has been established. Substantial difference in geochemistry (Ti contents, Gd/Yb and La/Sm ratios, etc.) of the tuff and lava sequence on the northern shore of Lake Lama and the Maslov intrusions are demonstrated. It is concluded that the Noril'sk deposits were formed as products of emplacement of self-dependent portion of magma in the post-lower Nadezhdinsky time. The melt composition determined from melt inclusions in olivine corresponds to high-Mg tholeiitic basalt (up to 7-8 wt % MgO) containing up to 1 wt % H2O and 0.3 wt % Cl and undersaturated with sulfur. The fluid regime of flood-basalt volcanism had no anomalous features—the fluid was aqueous-carbon dioxide. The melts of ore-bearing and barren intrusions had similar concentrations of volatile components. The distribution of major and trace elements in intrusive rocks of the contact zone with the lower part of the Nadezhdinsky Formation characterized by high (La/Sm)N ratio in comparison with gabbroic rocks (2.8-2.3 and 1.3-1.6, respectively), indicates that contamination of the initial melt only took place in a narrow (1 m) contact zone or did not develop at

  13. On the relationship between hydro-meteorological patterns and flood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nied, Manuela; Pardowitz, Tobias; Nissen, Katrin; Ulbrich, Uwe; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Merz, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Flood generation is triggered by the interaction of the hydrological pre-conditions and the meteorological conditions at different space-time scales. This interaction results in floods of diverse characteristics, e.g. spatial flood extent and temporal flood progression. While previous studies have either linked flood occurrence to weather patterns neglecting the hydrological pre-conditions or categorised floods according to their generating mechanisms into flood types, this study combines both approaches. Exemplary for the Elbe River basin, the influence of pre-event soil moisture as an indicator of hydrological pre-conditions, on the link between weather patterns and flood occurrence is investigated. Flood favouring soil moisture and weather patterns as well as their combined influence on flood occurrence are examined. Flood types are identified and linked to soil moisture and weather patterns. The results show that the flood favouring hydro-meteorological patterns vary between seasons and can be linked to flood types. The highest flood potential for long-rain floods is associated with a weather pattern that is often identified in the presence of so called ';Vb' cyclones. Rain-on-snow and snowmelt floods are associated with westerly and north-westerly wind directions. In the analysis period, 18% of weather patterns only caused flooding in case of preceding soil saturation. The presented concept is part of a paradigm shift from pure flood frequency analysis to a frequency analysis that bases itself on process understanding by describing flood occurrence and characteristics in dependence of hydro-meteorological patterns.

  14. Characterization of remarkable floods in France, a transdisciplinary approach applied on generalized floods of January 1910

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudou, Martin; Lang, Michel; Vinet, Freddy; Coeur, Denis

    2014-05-01

    The 2007 Flood Directive promotes the integration and valorization of historical and significant floods in flood risk management (Flood Directive Text, chapter II, and article 4). Taking into account extreme past floods analysis seems necessary in the mitigation process of vulnerability face to flooding risk. In France, this aspect of the Directive was carried out through the elaboration of Preliminary Flood Risk Assessment (PFRA) and the establishment of a 2000 floods list. From this first list, a sample of 176 floods, considered as remarkable has been selected. These floods were compiled in discussion with local authorities in charge of flood management (Lang et al., 2012) and have to be integrated in priority in local risk management policies. However, a consideration emerges about this classification: how a remarkable flood can be defined? According which criteria can it be considered as remarkable? To answer these questions, a methodology has been established by building an evaluation grid of remarkable floods in France. The primary objective of this grid is to analyze the remarkable flood's characteristics (hydrological and meteorological characteristics, sociological- political and economic impacts), and secondly to propose a classification of significant floods selected in the 2011 PFRA. To elaborate this evaluation grid, several issues had to be taken into account. First, the objective is to allow the comparison of events from various periods. These temporal disparities include the integration of various kinds of data and point out the importance of historical hydrology. It is possible to evaluate accurately the characteristics of recent floods by interpreting quantitative data (for example hydrological records. However, for floods that occurred before the 1960's it is necessary resorting to qualitative information such as written sources is necessary (Coeur, Lang, 2008). In a second part the evaluation grid requires equitable criteria in order not to

  15. National flood modelling for insurance purposes: using IFSAR for flood risk estimation in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, R.; Shaw, F.; Mackay, H.; Galy, H.; Foote, M.

    2005-10-01

    Flood risk poses a major problem for insurers and governments who ultimately pay the financial costs of losses resulting from flood events. Insurers therefore face the problem of how to assess their exposure to floods and how best to price the flood element of their insurance products. This paper looks at the insurance implications of recent flood events in Europe and the issues surrounding insurance of potential future events. In particular, the paper will focus on the flood risk information needs of insurers and how these can be met. The data requirements of national and regional flood models are addressed in the context of the accuracy of available data on property location. Terrain information is generally the weakest component of sophisticated flood models. Therefore, various sources of digital terrain models (DTM) are examined and discussed with consideration of the vertical and horizontal accuracy, the speed of acquisition, the costs and the comprehensiveness of the data. The NEXTMap DTM series from Intermap Technologies Inc. is proposed as a suitable DTM for flood risk identification and mapping, following its use in the UK. Its acquisition, processing and application is described and future plans discussed. Examples are included of the application of flood information to insurance property information and the potential benefits and advantages of using suitable hazard modelling data sources are detailed.

  16. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional simulations of miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, W

    2006-02-23

    A comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional high-resolution numerical large-eddy simulations of planar, miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability flows are presented. The resolution of the three-dimensional simulation is sufficient to attain a fully turbulent state. A number of different statistics from the mixing region (e.g., growth rates, PDFs, mixedness measures, and spectra) are used to demonstrate that two-dimensional flow simulations differ substantially from the three-dimensional one. It is found that the two-dimensional flow grows more quickly than its three-dimensional counterpart at late times, develops larger structures, and is much less well mixed. These findings are consistent with the concept of inverse cascade in two-dimensional flow, as well as the influence of a reduced effective Atwood number on miscible flow.

  17. Pressure dependence of various phase transitions for the miscible block copolymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Du Yeol; Lee, Yonghoon; Lee, Hoyeon; Kim, Yeongsik; Yonsei University Team

    2015-03-01

    The phase behaviors of block copolymer (BCP) blends composed of the weakly interacting (with no specific interaction) polystyrene-b-poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PS-b-PnBMA) and deuterated polystyrene-b-poly-(n-hexyl methacrylate) (dPS-b-PnHMA) were investigated by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) and Depolarized Light Scattering (DPLS) measurements. The various composition-dependent phase behaviors were generated due to a miscible phase between the PnBMA and PnHMA blocks in the BCP blends. To elucidate the origin and difference in baroplasticity of weakly interacting BCP blends, the pressure dependence of transition temperatures was evaluated using enthalpic and volumetric changes at phase transitions. We also demonstrate that the entropic compressibility for the miscible BCP blends is a baroplastic indicator, which was characterized by the negative volume change on mixing (Vmix) at transitions.

  18. The Glass Transition of Miscible Binary Polymer-Polymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Peter; Besancon, Brian; Soles, Christopher

    2007-03-01

    Studies of the glass transition temperatures, Tg, of completely miscible thin film blends of tetramethyl bisphenol-A polycarbonate (TMPC) and deuterated polystyrene (dPS), supported by SiOx/Si, were examined using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and incoherent elastic neutron scattering (INS). While both sets of measurements independently reveal that Tg exhibits qualitatively similar trends with film thickness, h, there were important quantitative differences, which depended on composition. The Tgs measured by INS were consistently larger than those determined by SE for PS weight fractions φ>0.1. These observations are rationalized in terms of theory based on the notion of a self- concentration and reveal evidence of heterogeneous component behavior in these miscible polymer-polymer systems.

  19. Miscibility phase diagram of ring-polymer blends: A topological effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaue, Takahiro; Nakajima, Chihiro H.

    2016-04-01

    The miscibility of polymer blends, a classical problem in polymer science, may be altered, if one or both of the component do not have chain ends. Based on the idea of topological volume, we propose a mean-field theory to clarify how the topological constraints in ring polymers affect the phase behavior of the blends. While the large enhancement of the miscibility is expected for ring-linear polymer blends, the opposite trend toward demixing, albeit comparatively weak, is predicted for ring-ring polymer blends. Scaling formulas for the shift of critical point for both cases are derived. We discuss the valid range of the present theory, and the crossover to the linear polymer blends behaviors, which is expected for short chains. These analyses put forward a view that the topological constraints could be represented as an effective excluded-volume effects, in which the topological length plays a role of the screening factor.

  20. The Hydroclimatology of Extreme Flooding in the Lower Mississippi River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2015-04-01

    The 1927 flood in the lower Mississippi River was the most destructive flood in American history, inundating more than 68,000 square kilometers of land, resulting in approximately 500 fatalities and leaving more than 700,000 people homeless. Despite the prominence of the 1927 flood, hard details on the flood, and the storms that produced the flood, are sparse. We examine the hydrometeorology, hydroclimatolgy and hydrology of the 1927 flood in the lower Mississippi River through empirical analyses of rainfall and streamflow records and through downscaling simulations of the storms that were responsible for cata-strophic flooding. We use 20th Century Reanalysis fields as boundary conditions and initial conditions for downscaling simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We place the hydrometeorological analyses of the 1927 storms in a hydroclimatolog-ical context through analyses of the 20th Century Reanalysis fields. Analyses are designed to assess the physical processes that control the upper tail of flooding in the lower Missis-sippi River. We compare the 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River to floods in 2011, 1937 and 1973 that represent the most extreme flooding in the Lower Mississippi River. Our results show that extreme flooding is tied to anomalous water vapor transport linked to strength and position of the North Atlantic Subtropical High. More generally, the results are designed to provide insights to the hydroclimatology of flooding in large rivers.

  1. Effect of Chain Structure on the Miscibility of Cellulose Acetate Blends. A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Caleb W.; Jiang, Zhe; Bozell, Joseph J.; Rials, Timothy G.; Heller, William T.; Dadmun, Mark D.

    2013-02-12

    The miscibility of cellulose ester blends with varying degree of substitution (DS) of acetates along the chain backbone has been investigated using small-angle neutron scattering. The difference in degree of substitution (ΔDS) between the two components in the blend was systematically varied from 0.06 to 0.63 where each blend was found to be a partially miscible, two-phase system. Miscibility between the two components initially decreases as ΔDS of the blends increases. The Flory interaction parameter, χ, concurrently increases with increasing ΔDS as a result of diminishing van der Waals forces between components. The cellulose acetates with lower degree of substitution, which contain more hydroxyl substituents, however, demonstrate greater miscibility even at higher ΔDS. This is interpreted to be the result of favorable hydrogen bonding between blend components that are possible in the presence of more hydroxyl groups. FT-IR data support this interpretation, indicating an increase in hydrogen bonding in a blend having a lower DS component. These results indicate that while an increase in structural differences between cellulose acetate blend components limits miscibility, the presence of hydroxyl groups on the chain promotes mixing. This competition accentuates the significant impact specific interactions have on blend miscibility for these copolymers.

  2. Going to space: Implementation of spatial input data processing in real-time flood forecasting in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasak, T.; Krejci, J.; Danhelka, J.

    2009-04-01

    Real-time forecasting systems were developed and used in the Czech Republic since late 90's. AquaLog forecasting system is used for forecasting in the Czech part of the Elbe river basin. AquaLog uses SAC-SMA for rainfall-runoff modeling and SNOW17 for modeling of snow cover accumulation and melting. There are about 150 forecasting profiles (computed sub-basins). Data input pre-processing module AquaBase for data quality check and correction. Previous version of AquaBase and AquaLog (ver.5) operated in the scale of basins using time-series of observed precipitation and temperature to compute MAP and MAT based on Thiessen polygons method for basins of typical size of 200-500 km2 (basins were internally divided into 2-4 computation units based on elevation to simulate more precisely the snow cover). New version of AquaBase (ver.6) process data into regular 1 km grid offering to choose between several interpolating techniques: - Inverse distance weighted (IDW) with optional value of power parameter, number of stations and diameter in km to be taken into account - IDW quadrant (IDWq) using only the nearest station from every quadrant of space (optional power parameter and diameter applicable) - IDW and temperature gradient (for temperature only) correcting the interpolated value according to optional vertical temperature gradient and elevation difference among used stations (optional power parameter and diameter applicable) - Krigging with optional parameters - Co-krigging with optional parameters - Use of radar-raingauge dynamically combined field product AquaBase ver.6 enables editing of precipitation and temperature field by implementing pseudo-gauges anywhere in the space and editing its values. AquaLog computation unit were changed to small sub-basins of typical size of 10 to 15 km2 and specific unit hydrographs were derived for every sub-basin. MAP and MAT based on grid analysis in AquaBase environment input every particular sub-basin. Long time runoff simulation

  3. Lamellar miscibility gap in a binary catanionic surfactant-water system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno F B; Marques, Eduardo F; Olsson, Ulf

    2007-12-01

    The coexistence of two lamellar liquid-crystalline phases in equilibrium for binary surfactant-water systems is a rare and still puzzling phenomenon. In the few binary systems where it has been demonstrated experimentally, the surfactant is invariably ionic and the miscibility gap is thought to stem from a subtle balance between attractive and repulsive interbilayer forces. In this paper, we report for the first time a miscibility gap for a catanionic lamellar phase formed by the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium octylsulfonate (TASo) in water. Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering, polarizing light microscopy, and 2H NMR unequivocally show the coexistence of a dilute (or swollen) lamellar phase, Lalpha', and a concentrated (or collapsed) lamellar phase, Lalpha' '. Furthermore, linear swelling is observed for each of the phases, with the immiscibility region occurring for 15-54 wt % surfactant. In the dilute region, the swollen lamellar phase is in equilibrium with an isotropic micellar region. Vesicles can be observed in this two-phase region as a dispersion of Lalpha' in the solution phase. A theoretical cell model based on combined DLVO and short-range repulsive potentials is presented in order to provide physical insight into the miscibility gap. The surfactant TASo is net uncharged, but it undergoes partial dissociation owing to the higher aqueous solubility of the short octylsulfonate chain. Thus, a residual positive charge in the bilayer is originated and, consequently, an electrostatic repulsive force, whose magnitude is dependent on surfactant concentration. For physically reasonable values of the solubility of the octyl chain, assumed to be constant with surfactant volume fraction, a fairly good agreement is observed between the experimental miscibility gap and the theoretical one. PMID:17994726

  4. Miscibility between differently shaped mesogens: structural and morphological study of a phthalocyanine-perylene binary system.

    PubMed

    Zucchi, Gaël; Viville, Pascal; Donnio, Bertrand; Vlad, Alexandru; Melinte, Sorin; Mondeshki, Mihail; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans Wolfgang; Geerts, Yves H; Lazzaroni, Roberto

    2009-04-23

    The thermotropic, structural, and morphological properties of blends of a disk-like liquid crystalline phthalocyanine derivative and a lath-shaped perylenetetracarboxidiimide mesogen derivative have been studied by combining differential scanning calorimetry, thermal polarized optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, and atomic force microscopy. The two compounds are fully miscible for blends containing at least 60 mol % of the disk-like molecule. In such composition range, the homogeneous blends form a columnar hexagonal (Col(h)) mesophase for which the thermal stability is enhanced compared to that of the corresponding mesophase of the pure phthalocyanine. The miscible blends self-align homeotropically between two glass slides. For blends containing between 55 and 40 mol % of the disk-shaped molecule, the two components are fully miscible at high temperature but the perylene derivative forms a separate crystalline phase when the temperature is decreased. Phase separation is systematically observed in blends containing less than 40 mol % of the discotic molecule. In this case, the resulting Col(h) mesophase is less stabilized compared to the blends containing a larger amount of the phthalocyanine derivative. These phase-separated blends do not show any homeotropic alignment. AFM investigations confirm the formation of a single columnar morphology in the phthalocyanine-rich blends, consistent with the full miscibility between the two compounds. Solid-state NMR measurements on the mixed phase show the influence of the presence of the perylene molecules on the molecular dynamics of the molecules; remarkably, the presence of the host molecules improves the local order parameter in the phthalocyanine columnar phase. PMID:19301888

  5. Flood Impact Modelling and Natural Flood Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Gareth; Quinn, Paul; ODonnell, Greg

    2016-04-01

    Local implementation of Natural Flood Management methods are now being proposed in many flood schemes. In principal it offers a cost effective solution to a number of catchment based problem as NFM tackles both flood risk and WFD issues. However within larger catchments there is the issue of which subcatchments to target first and how much NFM to implement. If each catchment has its own configuration of subcatchment and rivers how can the issues of flood synchronisation and strategic investment be addressed? In this study we will show two key aspects to resolving these issues. Firstly, a multi-scale network water level recorder is placed throughout the system to capture the flow concentration and travel time operating in the catchment being studied. The second is a Flood Impact Model (FIM), which is a subcatchment based model that can generate runoff in any location using any hydrological model. The key aspect to the model is that it has a function to represent the impact of NFM in any subcatchment and the ability to route that flood wave to the outfall. This function allows a realistic representation of the synchronisation issues for that catchment. By running the model in interactive mode the user can define an appropriate scheme that minimises or removes the risk of synchornisation and gives confidence that the NFM investment is having a good level of impact downstream in large flood events.

  6. Floods in mountain environments: A synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffel, Markus; Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Marston, Richard A.

    2016-11-01

    Floods are a crucial agent of geomorphic change in the channels and valley floors of mountains watercourses. At the same time, they can be highly damaging to property, infrastructure, and life. Because of their high energy, mountain watercourses are highly vulnerable to environmental changes affecting their catchments and channels. Many factors have modified and frequently still tend to modify the environmental conditions in mountain areas, with impacts on geomorphic processes and the frequency, magnitude, and timing of floods in mountain watercourses. The ongoing climate changes vary between regions but may affect floods in mountain areas in many ways. In many mountain regions of Europe, widespread afforestation took place over the twentieth century, considerably increasing the amounts of large wood delivered to the channels and the likelihood of jamming bridges. At the same time, deforestation continues in other mountain areas, accelerating runoff and amplifying the magnitude and frequency of floods in foreland areas. In many countries, in-channel gravel mining has been a common practice during recent decades; the resultant deficit of bed material in the affected channels may suddenly manifest during flood events, resulting in the failure of scoured bridges or catastrophic channel widening. During the past century many rivers in mountain and foreland areas incised deeply; the resultant loss of floodplain water storage has decreased attenuation of flood waves, hence increasing flood hazard to downstream river reaches. On the other hand, a large amount of recent river restoration activities worldwide may provide examples of beneficial changes to flood risk, attained as a result of increased channel storage or reestablished floodplain water storage. Relations between geomorphic processes and floods operate in both directions, which means that changes in flood probability or the character of floods (e.g., increased wood load) may significantly modify the morphology

  7. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Kovar, Mark; Wehner, Scott

    1998-01-13

    The application of cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U. S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected sites for this demonstration project are the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico and the Sundown Slaughter Field in Hockley County, Texas. Miscible CO2 flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin's daily production. There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO2 projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response, which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is being investigated as a near

  8. Calcium nitrate miscible displacement at different concentrations in packed soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previatello da Silva, Livia; Alves de Oliveira, Luciano; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas

    2015-04-01

    Studies on miscible displacement provide us with rational means to understand the important physical phenomena involved leaching in soils, fertilizers, movement of ions and other similar processes. With current environmental concerns and the need to understand the processes that govern movement of water and solutes in soil, studies are needed to allow increasing the efficiency of input use in agriculture that somehow can mitigate the impact of activities of this sector on groundwater contamination. Contamination of soil and groundwater and surface water in areas with fertilizer application and reuse of effluent is closely linked to materials chemical characteristics, and retention and transmission of water and soil solutes. Solute mobility in soil is inversely related to their adsorption to solid fraction or to environmental conditions that favor ions precipitation. Ion adsorption to soil exchange complex makes ion maintains exchange with the soil solution, providing once their retention by the solid fraction, another its availability in aqueous medium. Nitrate leaching is a physical phenomenon, favored by low energy involved in adsorption to soil particles and also by its high solubility in water. This high solubility and the weak interaction with soil matrix to allow anion follow the wetting front. Therefore, the objective was determine nitrate transport parameters in soil, through Breakthrough Curves (BTC) development under conditions of disturbed soil samples (saturated soil and steady state conditions) in columns (20.0 cm in height and 5 cm in diameter), by calcium nitrate solution application at two concentrations, 50 and 130 g m-3 NO3-, in two tropical soil types, Yellow Oxisol (S1) and Anfisol (S2). Research was carried out in laboratory. Transport parameters for both soils and nitrate concentrations were obtained by numerical fit using STANMOD software, by the inverse modelling. Results showed predominance of convective transport in S1, which had a higher

  9. Flood loss assessment in Can Tho City, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, T. C.; Kreibich, H.

    2012-04-01

    Floods are recurring events in the Lower Mekong Basin resulting in loss of life and property, causing damage to agriculture and rural infrastructure, and disrupting social and economic activities. Flood management and mitigation has become a priority issue at the national and regional levels. Besides, it is expected that large areas of the Mekong delta, the Red River delta and the central coast will be flooded by sea-level rise due to climate change. Can Tho City is ranked under the five most flood-tide-influenced cities of Vietnam. It is the biggest city in the Mekong delta and it is located near the Hau river. Like other region of the Mekong delta, Can Tho suffers due to floods from upstream and flood tides from the sea. In the flood season large rural areas of the city are flooded, particularly during tidal days. Flood risk management policy includes preparative measures for living with floods and to minimise the damage caused by floods as well as to take advantage of floods for sustainable development. An intensive literature review, including administrative reports as well as expert interviews have been undertaken to gain more insight into flood characteristics, their consequences and risk mitigation. Therefore, flood damaging processes and trends have been reviewed for Can Tho City and the Mekong Basin in Vietnam. Additionally, suitable flood damage estimation methodologies have been collected as important input for flood risk analyses. On this basis it has been investigated which flood risk mitigation and management strategies promise to be effective in Can Tho City, Vietnam.

  10. Miscible viscous fingering involving viscosity changes of the displacing fluid by chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Iguchi, Chika; Matsuda, Kenji; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2010-02-01

    In our previous study, we experimentally studied the effects of changes in the viscosity of the displaced more-viscous liquid by instantaneous reactions on miscible viscous fingering pattern [Y. Nagatsu, K. Matsuda, Y. Kato, and Y. Tada, "Experimental study on miscible viscous fingering involving viscosity changes induced by variations in chemical species concentrations due to chemical reactions," J. Fluid Mech. 571, 475 (2007)]. In the present study, experiments have been performed on the miscible viscous fingering involving changes in the viscosity of the displacing less-viscous liquid by instantaneous reactions in a radial Hele-Shaw cell. We have found that the shielding effect is suppressed and the fingers are widened when the viscosity is increased. As a result, the reaction makes the fingering pattern denser. In contrast, the shielding effect is enhanced, and the fingers are narrowed when the viscosity is decreased. As a result, the reaction makes the fingering pattern less dense. These results are essentially same as those obtained by the above-mentioned previous study. This shows that the effects of changes in the viscosity due to the instantaneous reactions are independent of whether the changes occur in the displaced liquid or in the displacing liquid. A mechanism for the independence is discussed.

  11. Solid state drug-polymer miscibility studies using the model drug ABT-102.

    PubMed

    Jog, Rajan; Gokhale, Rajeev; Burgess, Diane J

    2016-07-25

    Amorphous solid dispersions typically suffer storage stability issues due to: their amorphous nature, high drug loading, uneven drug:stabilizer ratio and plasticization effects as a result of hygroscopic excipients. An extensive solid state miscibility study was conducted to aid in understanding the mechanisms involved in drug/stabilizer interactions. ABT-102 (model drug) and nine different polymers with different molecular weights and viscosities were selected to investigate drug/polymer miscibility. Three different polymer:drug ratios (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1, w/w) were analyzed using: DSC, FTIR and PXRD. Three different techniques were used to prepare the amorphous solid dispersions: serial dilution, solvent evaporation and spray drying. Spray drying was the best method to obtain amorphous solid dispersions. However, under certain conditions amorphous formulations could be obtained using solvent evaporation. Melting point depression was used to calculate interaction parameters and free energy of mixing for the various drug polymer mixtures. The spray dried solid dispersions yielded a negative free energy of mixing which indicated strong drug-polymer miscibility compared to the solvent evaporation and serial dilution method. Soluplus was the best stabilizer compared to PVP and HPMC, which is probably a consequence of strong hydrogen bonding between the two CO moieties of soluplus and the drug NH moieities.

  12. Miscibility of sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate in the adsorbed film and aggregate.

    PubMed

    Iyota, Hidemi; Krastev, Rumen

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption, micelle formation, and salting out of sodium dodecyl sulfate in the presence of sodium chloride were studied from the viewpoint of their mixed adsorption and aggregate formation. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of a sodium chloride-sodium dodecyl sulfate mixture was measured as a function of the total molality and composition of the mixture. Phase diagrams of adsorption and aggregate formation were obtained by applying thermodynamic equations to the surface tension. Judging from the phase diagrams, sodium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulfate are miscible in the adsorbed film at very large composition of sodium chloride and in the salted-out crystalline particle, while they are immiscible in the micelle. The miscibilities in the adsorbed film, micelle, and crystalline particle increase in the following order: particle > adsorbed film > micelle. The difference in miscibility among the oriented states was ascribed to the difference in geometry between the adsorbed film and micelle and to the interaction between bilayer surfaces in the particle.

  13. Effect of Pressure on Polyolefin Blends Miscibility: Scaling of the Interaction Parameter with Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabeony, M.; Lohse, D. J.; Garner, R. T.; Han, S. J.; Migler, K.; Graessley, W. W.

    1998-03-01

    We have performed a combination of SANS, cloud point, and PVT measurements to investigate the effect of pressure on the miscibility of polyolefin blends. Both blends with ambient upper critical solution temperature (UCST) and lower critical solution temperature (LCST) have been investigated and the pressure coefficient for the critical temperature determined. In both cases, increasing pressure raises the critical temperature, i.e., increasing pressure destabilizes the mixed state for UCST blends, while it increases the degree of miscibility for LCST blends. For UCST blends, the pressure and temperature dependence of the interaction energies collapse on a single master curve when plotted against the mean density of the blend. The simplicity of this behavior suggests a simple equation of state and can be related to the nature of the van de Waals interactions between these saturated hydrocarbons. These results also allow a straightforward prediction of the pressure effect on miscibility from the PVT data of the pure components and the temperature dependence of the interaction energy at ambient pressure. No such simple behavior was found in blends exhibiting LCST where the interaction energies depend on P and T in a complex manner.

  14. The effect of ionic liquid hydrophobicity and solvent miscibility on pluronic amphiphile self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj Chandra; Atkin, Rob; Warr, Gregory G

    2013-11-21

    The phase behavior of the triblock copolymer, (EO)20(PO)70(EO)20 (P123), in the water-immiscible (hydrophobic) ionic liquids (ILs), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (bmimPF6), and tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (bmimFAP), has been investigated, and its amphiphilic self-assembly examined using small-angle X-ray scattering. The results obtained are contrasted with those for P123 in water. Direct and water-swellable micellar, hexagonal, and lamellar phases of P123 are found in bmimPF6, which behaves like a polar solvent despite being water immiscible, but bmimFAP behaves as a truly hydrophobic solvent, forming only a lamellar phase over a narrow composition range. The miscibility of bmimPF6 and water is increased by P123 addition, and at sufficiently high P123 concentrations, a single lamellar phase forms in which bmimPF6 and water are miscible in all proportions. In contrast, the preferential solubilization of bmimPF6 by PEO chains and bmimFAP by PPO chains causes the nanosegregation of these miscible ILs in concentrated P123 solutions. This leads to the formation of a P123/bmimPF6/bmimFAP microemulsion where bmimPF6 is the polar solvent and bmimFAP is the non-polar solvent. PMID:24138343

  15. Severe Flooding in India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Floods devestated parts of eastern India along the Brahmaputra River in June 2000. In some tributaries of the Brahmaputra, the water reached more than 5 meters (16.5 feet) above flood stage. At least 40 residents died, and the flood waters destroyed a bridge linking the region to the rest of India. High water also threatened endangered Rhinos in Kaziranga National Park. Flooded areas are shown in red in the above image. The map was derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data taken on June 15, 2000. For more information on observing floods with satellites, see: Using Satellites to Keep our Head above Water and the Dartmouth Flood Observatory Image by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory

  16. CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wehner, S.C.; Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Preiditus, J.; Vogt, J.

    1996-09-01

    The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg/San Andres formation; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico.

  17. The 2006 Danube flood inundation patterns and the 1864 topographic map of South Romania: How the present hydrological processes are determined by the original landscape?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, Gábor; Bartos, Zsombor; Imecs, Zoltán; Magyari-Sáska, Zsolt; Crăciunescu, Vasile; Flueraru, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The satellite-based inundation maps of the 2006 Danube floods in Romania were fit geometrically to the 1864 topographic map sheets covering the Romanian regions of Oltenia and Muntenia. The old maps were systematically geo-referenced using the data of the original geodetic control and cartographic details; their Cassini-Soldner projection was properly parametrized and completed by the data of the original geodetic datum. The sheets were geo-referred using ground control points only at their four corners, knowing their coordinates in their own projection. The coupled satellite data was provided by the Landsat and MODIS data, all transformed to the modern grid system of Romania. The inundation patterns in the Danube embayments of Ghidici, Bechet and Calaraşi were analyzed on the historical map content layer. The comparison was made in two aspects: (1) how the low floodplain, inundated by the recent big flood was marked in the historical sheets, reflecting its old, almost original environmental setting, and (2) how the historical settlement outlines were changed during the passed 150 years, mostly because of the flood events. The comparison provide interesting examples about the inundation 'islands' during the flood and their original state as well as 'settlement moving' from the low and middle-level floodplain to the flood-free terraces. This work was supported by a grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-RU-TE-2011-3-0125 and the Project NATO SfP 978016.

  18. Final Report, Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2003-05-31

    The Flooding Predictor is an advanced process control strategy comprising a patented pattern-recognition methodology that identifies pre-flood patterns discovered to precede flooding events in distillation columns. The grantee holds a U.S. patent on the modeling system. The technology was validated at the Separations Research Program, The University of Texas at Austin under a grant from the U. S. Department of Energy, Inventions & Innovation Program. Distillation tower flooding occurs at abnormally high vapor and/or liquid rates. The loss in tray efficiencies is attributed to unusual behavior of liquid inventories inside the column leading to conditions of flooding of the space in between trays with liquid. Depending on the severity of the flood condition, consequences range from off spec products to equipment damage and tower shutdown. This non-intrusive pattern recognition methodology, processes signal data obtained from existing column instrumentation. Once the pattern is identified empirically, it is modeled and coded into the plant's distributed control system. The control system is programmed to briefly "unload" the tower each time the pattern appears. The unloading takes the form of a momentary reduction in column severity, e.g., decrease bottom temperature, reflux or tower throughput. Unloading the tower briefly at the pre-flood state causes long-term column operation to become significantly more stable - allowing an increase in throughput and/or product purity. The technology provides a wide range of value between optimization and flooding. When a distillation column is not running at capacity, it should be run in such a way ("pushed") that optimal product purity is achieved. Additional benefits include low implementation and maintenance costs, and a high level of console operator acceptance. The previous commercial applications experienced 98% uptime over a four-year period. Further, the technology is unique in its ability to distinguish between different

  19. Miscibility behavior of sphingomyelin with phytosterol derivatives by a Langmuir monolayer approach.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The miscibility behavior of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) with phytosterol derivatives of β-sitosterol (SITO), β-sitosteryl glucoside (SG), and β-sitosteryl glucoside palmitate (SGP) was systematically investigated using Langmuir monolayers. The surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms for binary PSM/SITO, PSM/SG, and PSM/SGP systems on 0.02 M Tris buffer with 0.13 M NaCl (pH 7.4) were measured as a function of the molar fraction of PSM (X(PSM)). The surface potentials (ΔV) of the pure components were analyzed using the three-layer model proposed by Demchak and Fort [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 46 (1974) 191-203]. The contributions of the hydrophilic D-glucose moiety, hydrophobic palmitoyl group, and sphingomyelin group to the vertical component of the dipole moment (μ(⊥)) were evaluated. The thermodynamic quantities, based on the π-A isotherms, revealed that PSM interacts attractively with all three phytosterol derivatives in the following order: SITO > SGP > SG. In addition, the two-dimensional phase diagram constructed based on the phase transition pressure (π(eq)), from a liquid-expanded to liquid-condensed state, and collapse (π(c)) pressure shows that the two-component systems are all miscible with each other. The manner of miscibility between PSM/SG and PSM/SGP systems is found to be opposite in the large X(PSM) region. The interaction between the same molecules (PSM-PSM or SG-SG) is stronger than that of the different molecules (PSM-SG) in the PSM/SG system, and vice versa in the PSM/SGP system. These results suggest that the incorporation of a D-glucose and palmitoyl group to a SITO molecule dramatically changes the miscibility behavior with PSM. Observations using fluorescence microscopy imaging also provide insights into miscibility behavior in the monolayer state.

  20. Analysis of the linkage between rain and flood regime and its application to regional flood frequency estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunderlik, Juraj M.; Burn, Donald H.

    2002-04-01

    Improving techniques of flood frequency estimation at ungauged sites is one of the foremost goals of contemporary hydrology. River flood regime is a resultant reflection of a composite catchment hydrologic response to flood producing processes. In this sense the process of identifying homogeneous pooling groups can be plausibly based on catchment similarity in flood regime. Unfortunately the application of any pooling approach that is based on flood regime is restricted to gauged sites. Because flood regime can be markedly determined by rainfall regime, catchment similarity in rainfall regime can be an alternative option for identifying flood frequency pooling groups. An advantage of such a pooling approach is that rainfall data are usually spatially and temporary more abundant than flood data and the approach can also be applied at ungauged sites. Therefore in this study we have quantified the linkage between rainfall and flood regime and explored the appropriateness of substituting rainfall regime for flood regime in regional pooling schemes. Two different approaches to describing rainfall regime similarity using tools of directional statistics have been tested and used for evaluation of the potential of rainfall regime for identification of hydrologically homogeneous pooling groups. The outputs were compared to an existing pooling framework adopted in the Flood Estimation Handbook. The results demonstrate that regional pooling based on rainfall regime information leads to a high number of initially homogeneous groups and seems to be a sound pooling alternative for catchments with a close linkage between rain and flood regimes.

  1. Using of Hydrodynamic Model for the Support of Decision Making Process in Water Management and Flood Risk Assessment of Lower Kuban River, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, O.; Zeiliguer, A.; Buber, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrological conditions of Lower Kuban River watershed are extremely variable. Frequently arising floods, alternated with the periods of water shortage. The catastrophic flood events occur promptly and, commonly, there is not enough time to manage flooding by normal operation of reservoirs. The management of water releases using standard rules during high waters is not effective. There is a need to use the imitation hydrodynamic model of the river network for the flood forecasting to check all possible variants of flood development and to take the efficient decision in short time. The model of the water object, validated and calibrated on the data of observations, allows to determine the basic river parameters (discharges, levels, velocities etc.) in the operative mode and to solve the following tasks: - Protection of the settlements and agricultural areas in the floodplain; - Management of water resources during the period of water deficit. The object of modeling is the basin of Lower Kuban River, including the following parts: Krasnodarskoe, Shapsugskoe, Krjukovskoe, Varnavinskoe reservoirs, Fedorovskij and Tikhovskij hydrounits, Lower Kuban River and it's branch Protoka from Krasnodar hydrosystem up to the Azov Sea, Krjukovsky connecting channel and Varnavinskij release channel, adjusted to left tributaries of Zakubanskij area together with Krjukovskoe and Varnavinskoe reservoirs. The multipurpose hydrodynamic model of system of interconnected rivers and channels at Lower Kuban River was developed with MIKE 11 package (Danish Hydraulic Institute). On its basis the special technique of water system regulation to protect agricultural areas in floodplain zone was developed. Developed approach along with authentic and regularly peer hour monitored data provide us with necessary tool for qualitative management of regulating hydraulic structures during the passage of high waters. Keywords: Flood risk assessment, MIKE 11, hydrodynamic model

  2. Surfactant flooding oil recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, J.; Mills, M.; Tyler, T.; Ware, J.

    1980-07-29

    A method of recovering petroleum from a subterranean petroleum-containing formation penrated by at least one injection well and by at least one spaced apart production well is described. The wells being in fluid communication with the formation, comprising: (A) injecting into the formation via the injection well an aqueous, saline fluid having a salinity greater than 20,000 ppM total dissolved solids and containing a surfactant comprising petroleum sulfonates whose average equivalent weight is from 350 to 400, from 15 to 35 percent of said pertroleum sulfonates having equilvent weights of 350 or less, from 30 to 50 percent of said petroleum sulfonates having equivalent weights greater than 350 and less than 500, and from 10 to 40 percent of said petroleum sulfonates having equivalent weights of 500 and above and a solubilizing co-surfactant selected from the group consisting of ethoxylated alkanols, ethoxylated alkylphenols, alkyl or alkylaryl polyethoxy sulfates, alkyl or alkylaryl polyalkoxyalkyl sulfonates, and mixtures thereof, said surfactant fluid displacing petroleum toward the production well; and (B) recovering petroleum displaced by the surfactant fluids from the formation and via the production well.

  3. Past and present floods in South Moravia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, Rudolf; Chromá, Kateřina; Řezníčková, Ladislava; Valášek, Hubert; Dolák, Lukáš; Stachoň, Zdeněk; Soukalová, Eva; Dobrovolný, Petr

    2015-04-01

    Floods represent the most destructive natural phenomena in the Czech Republic, often causing great material damage or loss of human life. Systematic instrumental measurements of water levels in Moravia (the eastern part of the Czech Republic) started mainly in the 1880s-1890s, while for discharges it was in the 1910s-1920s. Different documentary evidence allows extension of our knowledge about floods prior the instrumental period. The paper presents long-term flood chronologies for four South Moravian rivers: the Jihlava, the Svratka, the Dyje and the Morava. Different documentary data are used to extract floods. Taxation records are of particular importance among them. Since the mid-17th century, damage to property and land (fields, meadows, pastures or gardens) entitled farmers and landowners to request a tax relief. Related documents of this administration process kept mainly in Moravian Land Archives in Brno allow to obtain detail information about floods and their impacts. Selection of floods in the instrumental period is based on calculation of N-year return period of peak water levels and/or peak discharges for selected hydrological stations of the corresponding rivers (with return period of two years and more). Final flood chronologies combine floods derived from both documentary data and hydrological measurements. Despite greater inter-decadal variability, periods of higher flood frequency are c. 1821-1850 and 1921-1950 for all four rivers; for the Dyje and Morava rivers also 1891-1900. Flood frequency fluctuations are further compared with other Central European rivers. Uncertainties in created chronologies with respect to data and methods used for compilation of long-term series and anthropogenic changes in river catchments are discussed. The study is a part of the research project "Hydrometeorological extremes in Southern Moravia derived from documentary evidence" supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, reg. no. 13-19831S.

  4. Mapping technological and biophysical capacities of watersheds to regulate floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mogollon, Beatriz; Villamagna, Amy M.; Frimpong, Emmanuel A.; Angermeier, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Flood regulation is a widely valued and studied service provided by watersheds. Flood regulation benefits people directly by decreasing the socio-economic costs of flooding and indirectly by its positive impacts on cultural (e.g., fishing) and provisioning (e.g., water supply) ecosystem services. Like other regulating ecosystem services (e.g., pollination, water purification), flood regulation is often enhanced or replaced by technology, but the relative efficacy of natural versus technological features in controlling floods has scarcely been examined. In an effort to assess flood regulation capacity for selected urban watersheds in the southeastern United States, we: (1) used long-term flood records to assess relative influence of technological and biophysical indicators on flood magnitude and duration, (2) compared the widely used runoff curve number (RCN) approach for assessing the biophysical capacity to regulate floods to an alternative approach that acknowledges land cover and soil properties separately, and (3) mapped technological and biophysical flood regulation capacities based on indicator importance-values derived for flood magnitude and duration. We found that watersheds with high biophysical (via the alternative approach) and technological capacities lengthened the duration and lowered the peak of floods. We found the RCN approach yielded results opposite that expected, possibly because it confounds soil and land cover processes, particularly in urban landscapes, while our alternative approach coherently separates these processes. Mapping biophysical (via the alternative approach) and technological capacities revealed great differences among watersheds. Our study improves on previous mapping of flood regulation by (1) incorporating technological capacity, (2) providing high spatial resolution (i.e., 10-m pixel) maps of watershed capacities, and (3) deriving importance-values for selected landscape indicators. By accounting for technology that enhances

  5. Seasonal characteristics of flood regimes across the Alpine-Carpathian range.

    PubMed

    Parajka, J; Kohnová, S; Bálint, G; Barbuc, M; Borga, M; Claps, P; Cheval, S; Dumitrescu, A; Gaume, E; Hlavčová, K; Merz, R; Pfaundler, M; Stancalie, G; Szolgay, J; Blöschl, G

    2010-11-17

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the differences in the long-term regimes of extreme precipitation and floods across the Alpine-Carpathian range using seasonality indices and atmospheric circulation patterns to understand the main flood-producing processes. This is supported by cluster analyses to identify areas of similar flood processes, both in terms of precipitation forcing and catchment processes. The results allow to isolate regions of similar flood generation processes including southerly versus westerly circulation patterns, effects of soil moisture seasonality due to evaporation and effects of soil moisture seasonality due to snow melt. In many regions of the Alpine-Carpathian range, there is a distinct shift in flood generating processes with flood magnitude as evidenced by a shift from summer to autumn floods. It is argued that the synoptic approach proposed here is valuable in both flood analysis and flood estimation. PMID:25067854

  6. Seasonal characteristics of flood regimes across the Alpine–Carpathian range

    PubMed Central

    Parajka, J.; Kohnová, S.; Bálint, G.; Barbuc, M.; Borga, M.; Claps, P.; Cheval, S.; Dumitrescu, A.; Gaume, E.; Hlavčová, K.; Merz, R.; Pfaundler, M.; Stancalie, G.; Szolgay, J.; Blöschl, G.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The aim of this paper is to analyse the differences in the long-term regimes of extreme precipitation and floods across the Alpine–Carpathian range using seasonality indices and atmospheric circulation patterns to understand the main flood-producing processes. This is supported by cluster analyses to identify areas of similar flood processes, both in terms of precipitation forcing and catchment processes. The results allow to isolate regions of similar flood generation processes including southerly versus westerly circulation patterns, effects of soil moisture seasonality due to evaporation and effects of soil moisture seasonality due to snow melt. In many regions of the Alpine–Carpathian range, there is a distinct shift in flood generating processes with flood magnitude as evidenced by a shift from summer to autumn floods. It is argued that the synoptic approach proposed here is valuable in both flood analysis and flood estimation. PMID:25067854

  7. Seasonal characteristics of flood regimes across the Alpine-Carpathian range.

    PubMed

    Parajka, J; Kohnová, S; Bálint, G; Barbuc, M; Borga, M; Claps, P; Cheval, S; Dumitrescu, A; Gaume, E; Hlavčová, K; Merz, R; Pfaundler, M; Stancalie, G; Szolgay, J; Blöschl, G

    2010-11-17

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the differences in the long-term regimes of extreme precipitation and floods across the Alpine-Carpathian range using seasonality indices and atmospheric circulation patterns to understand the main flood-producing processes. This is supported by cluster analyses to identify areas of similar flood processes, both in terms of precipitation forcing and catchment processes. The results allow to isolate regions of similar flood generation processes including southerly versus westerly circulation patterns, effects of soil moisture seasonality due to evaporation and effects of soil moisture seasonality due to snow melt. In many regions of the Alpine-Carpathian range, there is a distinct shift in flood generating processes with flood magnitude as evidenced by a shift from summer to autumn floods. It is argued that the synoptic approach proposed here is valuable in both flood analysis and flood estimation.

  8. Alabama district flood plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedgecock, T. Scott; Pearman, J. Leroy; Stricklin, Victor E.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this flood plan is to outline and record advance planning for flood emergencies, so that all personnel will know the general plan and have a ready-reference for necessary information. This will ensure that during any flood event, regardless of the extent or magnitude, the resources of the District can be mobilized into a maximum data collection operation with a mimimum of effort.

  9. Controls on flood and sediment wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.; Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of flood wave propagation - celerity and transformation - through a fluvial system is of generic importance for flood forecasting/mitigation. In association with flood wave propagation, sediment wave propagation may induce local erosion and sedimentation, which will affect infrastructure and riparian natural habitats. Through analysing flood and sediment wave propagation, we gain insight in temporal changes in transport capacity (the flood wave) and sediment availability and transport (the sediment wave) along the river channel. Heidel (1956) was amongst the first to discuss the progressive lag of sediment concentration behind the corresponding flood wave based on field measurements. Since then this type of hysteresis has been characterized in a number of studies, but these were often based on limited amount of floods and measurement sites, giving insufficient insight into associated forcing mechanisms. Here, as part of a project concerned with the hydrological and geomorphic forcing of sediment transfer processes in alpine environments, we model the downstream propagation of short duration, high frequency releases of water and sediment (purges) from a flow intake in the Borgne d'Arolla River in south-west Switzerland. A total of >50 events were measured at 1 minute time intervals using pressure transducers and turbidity probes at a number of sites along the river. We show that flood and sediment wave propagation can be well represented through simple convection diffusion models. The models are calibrated/validated to describe the set of measured waves and used to explain the observed variation in wave celerity and diffusion. In addition we explore the effects of controlling factors including initial flow depth, flood height, flood duration, bed roughness, bed slope and initial sediment concentration, on the wave propagation processes. We show that the effects of forcing mechanisms on flood and sediment wave propagation will lead to different

  10. Paleohydraulics and hydrodynamics of Scabland floods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The last major episode of scabland flooding (approx. 18,000-13,000 years B.P.) left considerable high-water mark evidence in the form of: (1) eroded channel margins; (2) depositional features; (3) ice-rafter erratics; and (4) divide crossings. These were used to reconstruct maximum flood stages and water-surface gradients. Engineering hydraulic calculation procedures allowed the analyses of flood discharges and mean velocities from these data. Secondary flow phenomena, including various forms of vortices and flow separations, are considered to have been the principal erosive processes. The intense pressure and velocity gradients of vortices along the irregular channel boundaries produced the plucking-type erosion.

  11. Root responses to flooding.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2013-06-01

    Soil water-logging and submergence pose a severe threat to plants. Roots are most prone to flooding and the first to suffer from oxygen shortage. Roots are vital for plant function, however, and maintenance of a functional root system upon flooding is essential. Flooding-resistant plants possess a number of adaptations that help maintain oxygen supply to the root. Plants are also capable of initiating organogenesis to replace their original root system with adventitious roots if oxygen supply becomes impossible. This review summarizes current findings on root development and de novo root genesis in response to flooding.

  12. Flood frequency in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childers, J.M.

    1970-01-01

    Records of peak discharge at 183 sites were used to study flood frequency in Alaska. The vast size of Alaska, its great ranges of physiography, and the lack of data for much of the State precluded a comprehensive analysis of all flood determinants. Peak stream discharges, where gaging-station records were available, were analyzed for 2-year, 5-year, 10-year, 25-year, and 50-year average-recurrence intervals. A regional analysis of the flood characteristics by multiple-regression methods gave a set of equations that can be used to estimate floods of selected recurrence intervals up to 50 years for any site on any stream in Alaska. The equations relate floods to drainage-basin characteristics. The study indicates that in Alaska the 50-year flood can be estimated from 10-year gaging- station records with a standard error of 22 percent whereas the 50-year flood can be estimated from the regression equation with a standard error of 53 percent. Also, maximum known floods at more than 500 gaging stations and miscellaneous sites in Alaska were related to drainage-area size. An envelope curve of 500 cubic feet per second per square mile covered all but 2 floods in the State.

  13. RASOR flood modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Joost; Buckman, Lora; Bachmann, Daniel; Visser, Martijn; Tollenaar, Daniel; Vatvani, Deepak; Kramer, Nienke; Goorden, Neeltje

    2015-04-01

    Decision making in disaster management requires fast access to reliable and relevant information. We believe that online information and services will become increasingly important in disaster management. Within the EU FP7 project RASOR (Rapid Risk Assessment and Spatialisation of Risk) an online platform is being developed for rapid multi-hazard risk analyses to support disaster management anywhere in the world. The platform will provide access to a plethora of GIS data that are relevant to risk assessment. It will also enable the user to run numerical flood models to simulate historical and newly defined flooding scenarios. The results of these models are maps of flood extent, flood depths and flow velocities. The RASOR platform will enable to overlay historical event flood maps with observations and Earth Observation (EO) imagery to fill in gaps and assess the accuracy of the flood models. New flooding scenarios can be defined by the user and simulated to investigate the potential impact of future floods. A series of flood models have been developed within RASOR for selected case study areas around the globe that are subject to very different flood hazards: • The city of Bandung in Indonesia, which is prone to fluvial flooding induced by heavy rainfall. The flood hazard is exacerbated by land subsidence. • The port of Cilacap on the south coast of Java, subject to tsunami hazard from submarine earthquakes in the Sunda trench. • The area south of city of Rotterdam in the Netherlands, prone to coastal and/or riverine flooding. • The island of Santorini in Greece, which is subject to tsunamis induced by landslides. Flood models have been developed for each of these case studies using mostly EO data, augmented by local data where necessary. Particular use was made of the new TanDEM-X (TerraSAR-X add-on for Digital Elevation Measurement) product from the German Aerospace centre (DLR) and EADS Astrium. The presentation will describe the flood models and the

  14. Thermodynamics and Phase Behavior of Miscible Polymer Blends in the Presence of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Nicholas Philip

    The design of environmentally-benign polymer processing techniques is an area of growing interest, motivated by the desire to reduce the emission of volatile organic compounds. Recently, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2) has gained traction as a viable candidate to process polymers both as a solvent and diluent. The focus of this work was to elucidate the nature of the interactions between scCO2 and polymers in order to provide rational insight into the molecular interactions which result in the unexpected mixing thermodynamics in one such system. The work also provides insight into the nature of pairwise thermodynamic interactions in multicomponent polymer-polymer-diluent blends, and the effect of these interactions on the phase behavior of the mixture. In order to quantify the strength of interactions in the multicomponent system, the binary mixtures were characterized individually in addition to the ternary blend. Quantitative analysis of was made tractable through the use of a model miscible polymer blend containing styrene-acrylonitrile copolymer (SAN) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (dPMMA), a mixture which has been considered for a variety of practical applications. In the case of both individual polymers, scCO2 is known to behave as a diluent, wherein the extent of polymer swelling depends on both temperature and pressure. The solubility of scCO 2 in each polymer as a function of temperature and pressure was characterized elsewhere. The SAN-dPMMA blend clearly exhibited lower critical solution temperature behavior, forming homogeneous mixtures at low temperatures and phase separating at elevated temperature. These measurements allowed the determination of the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter chi23 for SAN (species 2) and dPMMA (species 3) as a function of temperature at ambient pressure, in the absence of scCO2 (species 1). Characterization of the phase behavior of the multicomponent (ternary) mixture was also carried out by SANS. An in situ SANS

  15. Floods and wetlands: combining a water-balance model and remote-sensing techniques to characterize hydrological processes of ecological importance in the Tana River Delta (Kenya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, C.; Duvail, S.; Belaud, G.; Moussa, R.; Grünberger, O.; Albergel, J.

    2012-10-01

    The Tana River Delta (TRD) provides a multitude of ecosystem services for the local communities including fishing, farming and livestock keeping. The hydrological regime of its river determines for a large part the environmental health of the delta. The development of upstream irrigation schemes and hydroelectric infrastructure can seriously impact the ecological status of the TRD. The Tana Inundation Model (TIM) presented here is the first known hydrological model of the TRD. Using it, we quantify essential hydrological variables of ecological importance for 2002-2011 such as flood extent and duration, flood timing and frequency, flood peaks and water height. TIM also provides an annual water balance. The model simulates river inflows and outflows, precipitation, overland flow, evapotranspiration and infiltration. The TRD is characterized by scarce hydrological data and a high cloud cover limiting the use of many remote sensing techniques. The methodology therefore combined a conventional water-balance analysis with the extraction of inundation extents from MODIS satellite imagery at a medium spatial and temporal resolution. In non extreme years and for the actual configuration of the Tana River, the flooded area exceeds 560 km2. Floods over 200 km2 occur approximately every two years, with a mean duration of less than 25 days. River discharge from the upper catchment counts for over 96% of the total water inflow. This study provides the first known estimates of these variables for the Tana River Delta and is therefore primordial for the management of the water and other natural resources of the zone. The hydrological model based on the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) is generic enough to be applied to other catchments with scarce hydrological data.

  16. Miscibility behavior of two-component monolayers at the air-water interface: perfluorocarboxylic acids and DMPE.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hiroki; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Shimono, Satoshi; Sueishi, Kunihiko; Shibata, Osamu

    2009-09-01

    Surface pressure (pi)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (DeltaV)-A isotherms have been measured for two-component monolayers of four different perfluorocarboxylic acids [FCn; perfluorododecanoic acid (FC12), perfluorotetradecanoic acid (FC14), perfluorohexadecanoic acid (FC16), and perfluorooctadecanoic acid (FC18)] and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) on 0.15M NaCl (pH 2) at 298.2K. The present study is focused on the miscibility and the interfacial behavior for the binary DMPE/FCn monolayers upon compression. From the isotherms, the miscibility has been elucidated in terms of the additivity rule, the interaction parameter, and the interaction energy. The interaction parameter (or energy) is compared with that for the previous dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/FCn systems [Colloids Surf. B 41 (2005) 285-298] to understand the effect of phospholipids' polar headgroup on the binary miscibility. Furthermore, the phase behavior of the DMPE/FCn systems has been morphologically examined using fluorescence microscopy (FM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). These images reveal the different interaction modes among the four systems; DMPE can be miscible with FC12 and FC14 and immiscible with FC16 and FC18 in the monolayer state. These systematic examinations indicate that the miscibility of perfluorocarboxylic acids and phospholipids depends on combination of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon chain lengths and on phospholipids' polar headgroups within a monolayer.

  17. Correlation Between Miscibility and Rheological Characteristics of the Polystyrene (PS) and Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marwat, Zafrullah Khan; Baloch, Musa Kaleem

    2016-11-01

    Rheological measurement has been an effective technique to characterize the miscibility of polymer blends. This article investigates the viscoelastic behavior of poly(styrene) (PS) and poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile) (PSAN) binary solutions in tetrahydrofuran (THF) relative to PS/PSAN/THF ternary solutions mainly reporting the findings of the authors involving the correlation between the miscibility and rheological behavior. Rheological properties, such as shear viscosity, and shear stress as a function of shear rate were investigated for different blend compositions. Moreover, complex viscosity, loss and storage moduli were also investigated as functions of both the frequency and blend composition. The criterion of miscibility based on the rule of mixture has been discussed. The present study revealed very small window of miscibility as only composition, 50/50 showed values close to the additivity rule or intermediate to those of the neat polymers, thereby indicating very weak interactions between the blend components. On the basis of various findings during the rheological investigation, the blend under study is classified almost immiscible. Moreover, the obtained results also suggested that the miscibility depends on the blend composition and frequency.

  18. Connections between winter snowpack and subsequent spring floods in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Lena; Engeland, Kolbjørn; Holmqvist, Erik; Bache Stranden, Heidi

    2016-04-01

    In Norway many inland and mountainous catchments have a hydrological regime where snow accumulates during winter. The runoff is delayed until the snow melts during spring. These processes are important for flood forecasting and water resource management, such as operation of hydropower reservoirs. It is commonly assumed that spring flood volume and peak linked to antecedent conditions such as winter snowpack, i.e. a large winter snowpack results in a high spring flood. The aims of this study are (i) to identify for which catchments a high correlation between snow water equivalent (SWE) at the end of the snow accumulation season and the subsequent spring flood, and (ii) establish regression models for these catchments to be used for seasonal flood forecasting. Daily runoff data from 43 distributed catchments all over Norway, each with at least 50 years of observations and a flood regime which is significantly influenced by snowmelt, were used. For each of these catchments we extracted SWE, precipitation and temperature on daily resolution from the on gridded data of Senorge.no. A peak-over-threshold approach was used to select independent flood events above the 90-th percentile. Maximum discharge, duration and volume were calculated for each event. The contribution of rain and snowmelt to each flood was additionally determined, based on snowmelt, precipitation and temperature data. The spring flood was defined as the first flood event that occurs after the date of maximum SWE, and the snowmelt contribution of at least 70%. The contribution of rain to a spring flood is independent of maximum SWE, resulting in a weaker correlation between maximum SWE and spring flood size. We therefore scaled the flood with the percentage of snow contribution to the flood event in order to adjust for the contribution from rain. The correlations between SWE and the spring flood were higher for scaled spring floods than for the unscaled ones. The results show for half of the stations a

  19. Stochastic trigger model for flood peaks: 2. Application of the model to the flood peaks of Goksu-Karahacili

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvas, M. L.

    1982-04-01

    In order to assess the suitability of the stochastic trigger process in modeling flood peak occurrences in the time-discharge plane, the trigger process is applied to the flood peaks data of the Karahacili gaging station on the Goksu River, Turkey, in each of the flood seasons which are defined in the paper. The flood peak process in each flood season is treated as a transient stochastic process which starts at the beginning of the season and ends at the end of the season. Consequently, time-discharge nonhomogeneous trigger processes are used to model these seasonal flood peak processes. In each flood season the two-dimensional nonhomogeneous stochastic trigger (TDNST) model is calibrated by fitting its first theoretical time-discharge moment and its second theoretical time moment to the corresponding estimated moments of the observed flood peak counts at Goksu-Karahacili. Then in each flood season the theoretical two-dimensional probability mass function (pmf) of the variable discharge exceedence level (DEL) is calculated from the calibrated TDNST model for that flood season. The goodness of fit of the theoretical two-dimensional pmf to the empirical two-dimensional pmf of the Goksu-Karahacili flood peak counts in each flood season is tested by the chi-square goodness-of-fit (CSGQF) test. In all of the flood seasons the TDNST model passes the CSGOF test at discharge levels above the 500-m3/s DEL. This DEL corresponds to a river stage that is 1 m above the river bank stage at Goksu-Karahacili.

  20. CO2 injectivity in saline aquifers: The impact of non-Darcy flow, phase miscibility, and gas compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijic, Ana; LaForce, Tara C.; Muggeridge, Ann H.

    2014-05-01

    A key aspect of CO2 storage is the injection rate into the subsurface, which is limited by the pressure at which formation starts to fracture. Hence, it is vital to assess all of the relevant processes that may contribute to the pressure increase in the aquifer during CO2 injection. Building on an existing analytical solution for immiscible and spatially varying non-Darcy flow, this paper presents a mathematical model that accounts for combined effects of non-Darcy flow, phase miscibility, and gas compressibility in radial two-phase displacements. Results show that in low-permeability formations when CO2 is injected at high rates, non-Darcy simulations forecast better displacement efficiency compared to flow under Darcy conditions. This will have a positive effect on the formation CO2 storage capacity. This, however, comes at the cost of increased well pressures. More favorable estimations of the pressure buildup are obtained when CO2 compressibility is taken into account because reservoir pressures are reduced due to the change in the gas phase properties. Also, non-Darcy flow results in a significant reduction in halite precipitation in the near-well region, with a positive effect on CO2 injectivity. In the examples shown, non-Darcy flow conditions may lead to significantly different pressure and saturation distributions in the near-well region, with potentially important implications for CO2 injectivity.

  1. SERVIR-Africa: Developing an Integrated Platform for Floods Disaster Management in Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macharia, Daniel; Korme, Tesfaye; Policelli, Fritz; Irwin, Dan; Adler, Bob; Hong, Yang

    2010-01-01

    SERVIR-Africa is an ambitious regional visualization and monitoring system that integrates remotely sensed data with predictive models and field-based data to monitor ecological processes and respond to natural disasters. It aims addressing societal benefits including floods and turning data into actionable information for decision-makers. Floods are exogenous disasters that affect many parts of Africa, probably second only to drought in terms of social-economic losses. This paper looks at SERVIR-Africa's approach to floods disaster management through establishment of an integrated platform, floods prediction models, post-event flood mapping and monitoring as well as flood maps dissemination in support of flood disaster management.

  2. Microwave remote sensing of flood inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Guy J.-P.; Moller, Delwyn K.

    Flooding is one of the most costly natural disasters and thus mapping, modeling and forecasting flood events at various temporal and spatial scales is important for any flood risk mitigation plan, disaster relief services and the global (re-)insurance markets. Both computer models and observations (ground-based, airborne and Earth-orbiting) of flood processes and variables are of great value but the amount and quality of information available varies greatly with location, spatial scales and time. It is very well known that remote sensing of flooding, especially in the microwave region of the electromagnetic spectrum, can complement ground-based observations and be integrated with flood models to augment the amount of information available to end-users, decision-makers and scientists. This paper aims to provide a concise review of both the science and applications of microwave remote sensing of flood inundation, focusing mainly on synthetic aperture radar (SAR), in a variety of natural and man-made environments. Strengths and limitations are discussed and the paper will conclude with a brief account on perspectives and emerging technologies.

  3. Communicating Flood Risk with Street-Level Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, B. F.; Matthew, R.; Houston, D.; Cheung, W. H.; Karlin, B.; Schubert, J.; Gallien, T.; Luke, A.; Contreras, S.; Goodrich, K.; Feldman, D.; Basolo, V.; Serrano, K.; Reyes, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal communities around the world face significant and growing flood risks that require an accelerating adaptation response, and fine-resolution urban flood models could serve a pivotal role in enabling communities to meet this need. Such models depict impacts at the level of individual buildings and land parcels or "street level" - the same spatial scale at which individuals are best able to process flood risk information - constituting a powerful tool to help communities build better understandings of flood vulnerabilities and identify cost-effective interventions. To measure understanding of flood risk within a community and the potential impact of street-level models, we carried out a household survey of flood risk awareness in Newport Beach, California, a highly urbanized coastal lowland that presently experiences nuisance flooding from high tides, waves and rainfall and is expected to experience a significant increase in flood frequency and intensity with climate change. Interviews were completed with the aid of a wireless-enabled tablet device that respondents could use to identify areas they understood to be at risk of flooding and to view either a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) flood map or a more detailed map prepared with a hydrodynamic urban coastal flood model (UCI map) built with grid cells as fine as 3 m resolution and validated with historical flood data. Results indicate differences in the effectiveness of the UCI and FEMA maps at communicating the spatial distribution of flood risk, gender differences in how the maps affect flood understanding, and spatial biases in the perception of flood vulnerabilities.

  4. αs-Casein-PE6400 mixtures: surface properties, miscibility and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Anne; Menéndez-Aguirre, Orquidéa; Hinrichs, Jörg; Stubenrauch, Cosima; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Surface properties, miscibility and self-assembly of mixtures of a food-grade αs-casein and the triblock copolymer PE6400 (PEO13-PPO30-PEO13) were examined. The properties at the surface were determined by surface pressure measurements for a 1:1 molar mixture. Comparison of the measured with the calculated isotherms show attractive interactions at surface pressures above 9mN/m. The miscibility gaps of solutions containing 0.004-0.2mmol/l αs-casein and 0.02-0.1mol/l polymer were examined. It was found that a one-phase region exists at distinct mixing ratios and temperatures. Comparison of the cloud points of mixtures of αs-casein and PE6400 with pure αs-casein showed that the presence of the triblock copolymer enhanced the solubility of the protein. The ζ-potential of the αs-casein solution decreased by addition of PE6400 to zero. Our results thus suggest that αs-casein and PE6400 are miscible. The results of the cloud point and ζ-potential measurements were explained by formation of a mixed aggregate where the PPO chains are anchored inside the hydrophobic part of the αs-casein while the PEO chains cover the charged hydrophilic part of the αs-casein thereby leading to an increase of the cloud point and a decrease in ζ-potential. This is in agreement with the attractive interactions between αs-casein and PE6400 as observed via surface pressure measurements at the surface.

  5. αs-Casein-PE6400 mixtures: surface properties, miscibility and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Anne; Menéndez-Aguirre, Orquidéa; Hinrichs, Jörg; Stubenrauch, Cosima; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-06-01

    Surface properties, miscibility and self-assembly of mixtures of a food-grade αs-casein and the triblock copolymer PE6400 (PEO13-PPO30-PEO13) were examined. The properties at the surface were determined by surface pressure measurements for a 1:1 molar mixture. Comparison of the measured with the calculated isotherms show attractive interactions at surface pressures above 9mN/m. The miscibility gaps of solutions containing 0.004-0.2mmol/l αs-casein and 0.02-0.1mol/l polymer were examined. It was found that a one-phase region exists at distinct mixing ratios and temperatures. Comparison of the cloud points of mixtures of αs-casein and PE6400 with pure αs-casein showed that the presence of the triblock copolymer enhanced the solubility of the protein. The ζ-potential of the αs-casein solution decreased by addition of PE6400 to zero. Our results thus suggest that αs-casein and PE6400 are miscible. The results of the cloud point and ζ-potential measurements were explained by formation of a mixed aggregate where the PPO chains are anchored inside the hydrophobic part of the αs-casein while the PEO chains cover the charged hydrophilic part of the αs-casein thereby leading to an increase of the cloud point and a decrease in ζ-potential. This is in agreement with the attractive interactions between αs-casein and PE6400 as observed via surface pressure measurements at the surface. PMID:24727118

  6. Molecular simulations of the miscibility in binary mixtures of PVDF and POSS compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-lin; Sun, Yi; Zhou, Yu; Li, Qing-kun

    2009-10-01

    The miscibility behavior of binary mixtures of poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) and six different kinds of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) compounds ((ethylic)8Si8O12 (E-POSS), (phenyl)8Si8O12 (P-POSS), (3, 3, 3-trifluoropropyl)8Si8O12(FP-POSS), (1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-nonafluorohexyl)8Si8O12 (FH-POSS), (1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-tridecafluorooctyl)8Si8O12 (FO-POSS) and (1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-heptadecafluorodecyl)8Si8O12 (FD-POSS)) was studied using molecular simulations and the extended Flory-Huggins model. First, the pairwise binding energies Eij and coordination numbers Zij were computed by means of a Monte Carlo approach. Then the mixing energies Emix, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters χ and the free energies ΔGmix in the temperature range 100-600 K and phase diagrams of the six different mixtures were obtained. All these results indicate that PVDF/FP-POSS, PVDF/FH-POSS, PVDF/FO-POSS and PVDF/FD-POSS are fully miscible at any temperature. PVDF/E-POSS and PVDF/P-POSS are immiscible except at very high temperatures. The lowest energy frames and the frame energies show that the miscibility of PVDF and the four kinds of fluorinated POSS compounds is derived from the polar C-F bonds and the electrostatic interactions in their molecules.

  7. Evaluation of various modelling approaches in flood routing simulation and flood area mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, George; Loukas, Athanasios; Vasiliades, Lampros; Aronica, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    An essential process of flood hazard analysis and mapping is the floodplain modelling. The selection of the modelling approach, especially, in complex riverine topographies such as urban and suburban areas, and ungauged watersheds may affect the accuracy of the outcomes in terms of flood depths and flood inundation area. In this study, a sensitivity analysis implemented using several hydraulic-hydrodynamic modelling approaches (1D, 2D, 1D/2D) and the effect of modelling approach on flood modelling and flood mapping was investigated. The digital terrain model (DTMs) used in this study was generated from Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) point cloud data. The modelling approaches included 1-dimensional hydraulic-hydrodynamic models (1D), 2-dimensional hydraulic-hydrodynamic models (2D) and the coupled 1D/2D. The 1D hydraulic-hydrodynamic models used were: HECRAS, MIKE11, LISFLOOD, XPSTORM. The 2D hydraulic-hydrodynamic models used were: MIKE21, MIKE21FM, HECRAS (2D), XPSTORM, LISFLOOD and FLO2d. The coupled 1D/2D models employed were: HECRAS(1D/2D), MIKE11/MIKE21(MIKE FLOOD platform), MIKE11/MIKE21 FM(MIKE FLOOD platform), XPSTORM(1D/2D). The validation process of flood extent achieved with the use of 2x2 contingency tables between simulated and observed flooded area for an extreme historical flash flood event. The skill score Critical Success Index was used in the validation process. The modelling approaches have also been evaluated for simulation time and requested computing power. The methodology has been implemented in a suburban ungauged watershed of Xerias river at Volos-Greece. The results of the analysis indicate the necessity of sensitivity analysis application with the use of different hydraulic-hydrodynamic modelling approaches especially for areas with complex terrain.

  8. Flood management: prediction of microbial contamination in large-scale floods in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jonathon; Lai, Ka Man; Davies, Mike; Clifton, David; Ridley, Ian; Biddulph, Phillip

    2011-07-01

    With a changing climate and increased urbanisation, the occurrence and the impact of flooding is expected to increase significantly. Floods can bring pathogens into homes and cause lingering damp and microbial growth in buildings, with the level of growth and persistence dependent on the volume and chemical and biological content of the flood water, the properties of the contaminating microbes, and the surrounding environmental conditions, including the restoration time and methods, the heat and moisture transport properties of the envelope design, and the ability of the construction material to sustain the microbial growth. The public health risk will depend on the interaction of these complex processes and the vulnerability and susceptibility of occupants in the affected areas. After the 2007 floods in the UK, the Pitt review noted that there is lack of relevant scientific evidence and consistency with regard to the management and treatment of flooded homes, which not only put the local population at risk but also caused unnecessary delays in the restoration effort. Understanding the drying behaviour of flooded buildings in the UK building stock under different scenarios, and the ability of microbial contaminants to grow, persist, and produce toxins within these buildings can help inform recovery efforts. To contribute to future flood management, this paper proposes the use of building simulations and biological models to predict the risk of microbial contamination in typical UK buildings. We review the state of the art with regard to biological contamination following flooding, relevant building simulation, simulation-linked microbial modelling, and current practical considerations in flood remediation. Using the city of London as an example, a methodology is proposed that uses GIS as a platform to integrate drying models and microbial risk models with the local building stock and flood models. The integrated tool will help local governments, health authorities

  9. Directional solidification of alloys in systems containing a liquid miscibility gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Lograso, T. A.; Hellawell, A.

    1982-01-01

    The problem considered is the unidirectional growth of alloys close to monotectic composition and within the miscibility gap when the direction of gravity is down the temperature gradient (solidification upwards) or up the temperature gradient (solidification downwards). The systems Al-In and Al-Bi are taken as examples. With solidification upwards it is shown that bulk liquid composition adjusts to that of the monotectic while in the reverse situation, the bulk liquid gradually rises. In the former case it is possible to grow aligned fibrous structures of monotectic composition but in the latter the microstructures are irregular and globular.

  10. Measurements of viscosity and permeability of two phase miscible fluid flow in rock cores.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L; Taylor, D G

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the application of 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the measurement of fluid viscosity and rock core plug permeability during two phase miscible displacements in certain rock types. The core plug permeability was determined by monitoring glycerol solutions displacing D2O. Simple physical principles were used to calculate the core permeability from the measured displacement angle for a set of Lochaline sandstone core plugs. In a further experiment the viscosity of polyacrylamide solution 1500 ppm was determined in the core plug. The permeability and viscosity results compared well to conventional core analysis methods.

  11. Dark-dark solitons and modulational instability in miscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefer, M. A.; Chang, J. J.; Hamner, C.; Engels, P.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the dynamics of two miscible superfluids experiencing fast counterflow in a narrow channel. The superfluids are formed by two distinguishable components of a trapped dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The onset of counterflow-induced modulational instability throughout the cloud is observed and shown to lead to the proliferation of dark-dark vector solitons. These solitons do not exist in single-component systems, exhibit intriguing beating dynamics, and can experience a transverse instability leading to vortex line structures. Experimental results and multidimensional numerical simulations are presented.

  12. Video of Miscible Fluid Experiment Conducted on NASA Low Gravity Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This is a video of dyed water being injected into glycerin in a 2.2 centimeter (cm) diameter test tube. The experiment was conducted on the KC-135 aircraft, a NASA plane that creates microgravity and 2g conditions as it maneuvers through multiple parabolas. The water is less dense and so it rises to the top of the glycerin. The goal of the experiment was to determine if a blob of a miscible fluid would spontaneously become spherical in a microgravity environment.

  13. Enhanced sampling simulation analysis of the structure of lignin in the THF–water miscibility gap

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Micholas Dean; Petridis, Loukas; Cheng, Xiaolin; Mostofian, Barmak; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2016-01-26

    Using temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics, we characterize a globule-to-coil transition for a softwood-like lignin biopolymer in a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-water cosolvent system at temperatures at which the cosolvent undergoes a de-mixing transition. The lignin is found to be in a coil state, similar to that in the high-temperature miscible region. Analysis of the transition kinetics indicates that THF acts in a surfactant-like fashion. In conclusion, the present study thus suggests that THF-water based pretreatments may efficiently remove lignin from biomass even at relatively low (non-water boiling) temperatures.

  14. Microstructural Evolution of Alloy Powder for Electronic Materials with Liquid Miscibility Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuma, I.; Saegusa, T.; Takaku, Y.; Wang, C. P.; Liu, X. J.; Kainuma, R.; Ishida, K.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure of powders that are applicable for electronic materials were studied for some systems in which there is a liquid miscibility gap. The characteristic morphologies of an egg-like core type and a uniform second-phase dispersion are shown in relation to the phase diagram, where thermodynamic calculations are a powerful tool for alloy design and the prediction of microstructure. Typical examples of microstructural evolution and properties of Pb-free solders and Ag-based micropowders with high electrical conductivity produced by a gas-atomizing method are presented.

  15. CO2 miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery in Dutch North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Alkemade, P.J.C.

    1995-12-31

    In the Dutch sector of the North Sea several relatively small oil deposits are present. Their locations are spread and only few oil fields are being produced. An attempt is made to investigate the feasibility of EOR application i.e. CO2 miscible displacement by a commonly available pressurized CO2 supply system. This feasibility study is based on an utilizes as much as possible past and present data bout existing oil fields, CO2 availability, compression and distribution pipelines to be installed and injection methods at existing production facilities.

  16. The Spokane flood controversy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    An enormous plexus of proglacial channels that eroded into the loess and basalt of the Columbia Plateau, eastern Washington is studied. This channeled scabland contained erosional and depositional features that were unique among fluvial phenomena. Documentation of the field relationships of the region explains the landforms as the product of a relatively brief, but enormous flood, then so-called the Spokane flood.

  17. Glacier generated floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walder, J.S.; Fountain, A.G.; ,

    1997-01-01

    Destructive floods result from drainage of glacier-dammed lakes and sudden release of water stored within glaciers. There is a good basis - both empirical and theoretical - for predicting the magnitude of floods from ice-dammed lakes, although some aspects of flood initiation need to be better understood. In contrast, an understanding of floods resulting from release of internally stored water remains elusive, owing to lack of knowledge of how and where water is stored and to inadequate understanding of the complex physics of the temporally and spatially variable subglacial drainage system.Destructive floods result from drainage of glacier-dammed lakes and sudden release of water stored within glaciers. There is a good basis - both empirical and theoretical - for predicting the magnitude of floods from ice-dammed lakes, although some aspects of flood initiation need to be better understood. In contrast, an understanding of floods resulting from release of internally stored water remains elusive, owing to lack of knowledge of how and where water is stored and to inadequate understanding of the complex physics of the temporally and spatially variable subglacial drainage system.

  18. Continental Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Continental flood basalts have been receiving considerable scientific attention lately. Recent publications have focused on several particular flood-basalt provinces (Brito-Arctic, Karoo, Parana', Deccan, and Columbia Plateau), and much attention has been given to the proposed connection between flood-basalt volcanism, bolide impacts, and mass extinctions. The editor of Continental Flood Basalts, J. D. Macdougall, conceived the book to assemble in a single volume, from a vast and scattered literature, an overview of each major post-Cambrian flood-basalt province.Continental Flood Basalts has 10 chapters; nine treat individual flood-basalt provinces, and a summary chapter compares and contrasts continental flood-basalts and mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Specifically, the chapters address the Columbia River basalt, the northwest United States including the Columbia River basalt, the Ethiopian Province, the North Atlantic Tertiary Province, the Deccan Traps, the Parana' Basin, the Karoo Province, the Siberian Platform, and Cenozoic basaltic rocks in eastern China. Each chapter is written by one or more individuals with an extensive background in the province.

  19. Discover Floods Educators Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Now available as a Download! This valuable resource helps educators teach students about both the risks and benefits of flooding through a series of engaging, hands-on activities. Acknowledging the different roles that floods play in both natural and urban communities, the book helps young people gain a global understanding of this common--and…

  20. Necessity of Flood Early Warning Systems in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, C.; Natesan, U.; Durga Rao, K. H. V.

    2014-12-01

    India is one of the highly flood prone countries in the world. National flood commission has reported that 400,000 km² of geographical area is prone to floods, constituting to twelve percent of the country's geographical area. Despite the reoccurrences of floods, India still does not have a proper flood warning system. Probably this can be attributed to the lack of trained personnel in using advanced techniques. Frequent flood hazards results in damage to livelihood, infrastructure and public utilities. India has a potential to develop an early warning system since it is one of the few countries where satellite based inputs are regularly used for monitoring and mitigating floods. However, modeling of flood extent is difficult due to the complexity of hydraulic and hydrologic processes during flood events. It has been reported that numerical methods of simulations can be effectively used to simulate the processes correctly. Progress in computational resources, data collection and development of several numerical codes has enhanced the use of hydrodynamic modeling approaches to simulate the flood extent in the floodplains. In this study an attempt is made to simulate the flood in one of the sub basins of Godavari River in India using hydrodynamic modeling techniques. The modeling environment includes MIKE software, which simulates the water depth at every grid cell of the study area. The runoff contribution from the catchment was calculated using Nebdor Afstromnings model. With the hydrodynamic modeling approach, accuracy in discharge and water level computations are improved compared to the conventional methods. The results of the study are proming to develop effective flood management plans in the basin. Similar studies could be taken up in other flood prone areas of the country for continuous modernisation of flood forecasting techniques, early warning systems and strengthening decision support systems, which will help the policy makers in developing management

  1. The use of rheology to elucidate the granulation mechanisms of a miscible and immiscible system during continuous twin-screw melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Heeze, Liza; Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Oldörp, Klaus; Nopens, Ingmar; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-08-20

    Twin-screw hot melt granulation (TS HMG) is a valuable, but still unexplored alternative to granulate temperature and moisture sensitive drugs in a continuous way. Recently, the material behavior of an immiscible drug-binder blend during TS HMG was unraveled by using a rheometer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Additionally, vibrational spectroscopic techniques proved the link between TS HMG and rheology since equal interactions at molecular level did occur in both processes. This allowed to use a rheometer to gain knowledge of the material behavior during hot melt processing of an immiscible drug-binder blend. However, miscibility of a drug-binder formulation and drug-binder interactions appear to influence the rheological properties and, hence conceivably also the granulation mechanism. The aim of this research was to examine if the TS HMG process of a miscible formulation system is comparable with the mechanism of an immiscible system and to evaluate whether rheology still serves as a useful tool to understand and optimize the hot melt granulation (HMG) process. The executed research (thermal analysis, rheological parameters and spectroscopic data) demonstrated the occurrence of a high and broad tan(δ) curve without a loss peak during the rheological temperature ramp which implies a higher material deformability without movement of the softened single polymer chains. Spectroscopic analysis revealed drug-polymer interactions which constrain the polymer to flow independently. As a result, the binder distribution step, which generally follows the immersion step, was hindered. This insight assisted the understanding of the granule properties. Inhomogeneous granules were produced due to large initial nuclei or adhesion of multiple smaller nuclei. Consequently, a higher granulation temperature was required in order to get the binder more homogeneously distributed within the granules. PMID:27374203

  2. "Prophetic vision, vivid imagination": The 1927 Mississippi River flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James A.; Baeck, Mary Lynn

    2015-12-01

    The 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River was the most destructive flood in American history, inundating more than 70,000 km2 of land, resulting in approximately 500 fatalities and leaving more than 700,000 people homeless. Despite the prominence of the 1927 flood, details on the flood, and the storms that produced the flood, are sparse. We examine the hydrometeorology and hydroclimatology of the 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River through downscaling simulations of the storms that were responsible for catastrophic flooding and through empirical analyses of rainfall and streamflow records. We use Twentieth Century Reanalysis fields as boundary conditions and initial conditions for downscaling simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We place the hydrometeorological analyses of the 1927 storms in a hydroclimatological context through analyses of the Twentieth Century Reanalysis fields. Analyses are designed to assess the physical processes that control the upper tail of flooding in the Lower Mississippi River. We compare the 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River to floods in 1937 and 2011 that represent the most extreme flooding in the Lower Mississippi River.

  3. Validation of a Global Hydrodynamic Flood Inundation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, P. D.; Smith, A.; Sampson, C. C.; Alfieri, L.; Neal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we present first validation results for a hyper-resolution global flood inundation model. We use a true hydrodynamic model (LISFLOOD-FP) to simulate flood inundation at 1km resolution globally and then use downscaling algorithms to determine flood extent and depth at 90m spatial resolution. Terrain data are taken from a custom version of the SRTM data set that has been processed specifically for hydrodynamic modelling. Return periods of flood flows along the entire global river network are determined using: (1) empirical relationships between catchment characteristics and index flood magnitude in different hydroclimatic zones derived from global runoff data; and (2) an index flood growth curve, also empirically derived. Bankful return period flow is then used to set channel width and depth, and flood defence impacts are modelled using empirical relationships between GDP, urbanization and defence standard of protection. The results of these simulations are global flood hazard maps for a number of different return period events from 1 in 5 to 1 in 1000 years. We compare these predictions to flood hazard maps developed by national government agencies in the UK and Germany using similar methods but employing detailed local data, and to observed flood extent at a number of sites including St. Louis, USA and Bangkok in Thailand. Results show that global flood hazard models can have considerable skill given careful treatment to overcome errors in the publicly available data that are used as their input.

  4. 78 FR 52954 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  5. 78 FR 52953 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  6. 78 FR 5820 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  7. 78 FR 5821 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  8. 78 FR 21143 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  9. Flood hazard and flood risk assessment using a time series of satellite images: a case study in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Skakun, Sergii; Kussul, Nataliia; Shelestov, Andrii; Kussul, Olga

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the use of time series of satellite imagery to flood hazard mapping and flood risk assessment is presented. Flooded areas are extracted from satellite images for the flood-prone territory, and a maximum flood extent image for each flood event is produced. These maps are further fused to determine relative frequency of inundation (RFI). The study shows that RFI values and relative water depth exhibit the same probabilistic distribution, which is confirmed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The produced RFI map can be used as a flood hazard map, especially in cases when flood modeling is complicated by lack of available data and high uncertainties. The derived RFI map is further used for flood risk assessment. Efficiency of the presented approach is demonstrated for the Katima Mulilo region (Namibia). A time series of Landsat-5/7 satellite images acquired from 1989 to 2012 is processed to derive RFI map using the presented approach. The following direct damage categories are considered in the study for flood risk assessment: dwelling units, roads, health facilities, and schools. The produced flood risk map shows that the risk is distributed uniformly all over the region. The cities and villages with the highest risk are identified. The proposed approach has minimum data requirements, and RFI maps can be generated rapidly to assist rescuers and decisionmakers in case of emergencies. On the other hand, limitations include: strong dependence on the available data sets, and limitations in simulations with extrapolated water depth values.

  10. Flood hazard and flood risk assessment using a time series of satellite images: a case study in Namibia.

    PubMed

    Skakun, Sergii; Kussul, Nataliia; Shelestov, Andrii; Kussul, Olga

    2014-08-01

    In this article, the use of time series of satellite imagery to flood hazard mapping and flood risk assessment is presented. Flooded areas are extracted from satellite images for the flood-prone territory, and a maximum flood extent image for each flood event is produced. These maps are further fused to determine relative frequency of inundation (RFI). The study shows that RFI values and relative water depth exhibit the same probabilistic distribution, which is confirmed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The produced RFI map can be used as a flood hazard map, especially in cases when flood modeling is complicated by lack of available data and high uncertainties. The derived RFI map is further used for flood risk assessment. Efficiency of the presented approach is demonstrated for the Katima Mulilo region (Namibia). A time series of Landsat-5/7 satellite images acquired from 1989 to 2012 is processed to derive RFI map using the presented approach. The following direct damage categories are considered in the study for flood risk assessment: dwelling units, roads, health facilities, and schools. The produced flood risk map shows that the risk is distributed uniformly all over the region. The cities and villages with the highest risk are identified. The proposed approach has minimum data requirements, and RFI maps can be generated rapidly to assist rescuers and decisionmakers in case of emergencies. On the other hand, limitations include: strong dependence on the available data sets, and limitations in simulations with extrapolated water depth values. PMID:24372226

  11. A Methodology to Define Flood Resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourbier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flood resilience has become an internationally used term with an ever-increasing number of entries on the Internet. The SMARTeST Project is looking at approaches to flood resilience through case studies at cities in various countries, including Washington D.C. in the United States. In light of U.S. experiences a methodology is being proposed by the author that is intended to meet ecologic, spatial, structural, social, disaster relief and flood risk aspects. It concludes that: "Flood resilience combines (1) spatial, (2) structural, (3) social, and (4) risk management levels of flood preparedness." Flood resilience should incorporate all four levels, but not necessarily with equal emphasis. Stakeholders can assign priorities within different flood resilience levels and the considerations they contain, dividing 100% emphasis into four levels. This evaluation would be applied to planned and completed projects, considering existing conditions, goals and concepts. We have long known that the "road to market" for the implementation of flood resilience is linked to capacity building of stakeholders. It is a multidisciplinary enterprise, involving the integration of all the above aspects into the decision-making process. Traditional flood management has largely been influenced by what in the UK has been called "Silo Thinking", involving constituent organizations that are responsible for different elements, and are interested only in their defined part of the system. This barrier to innovation also has been called the "entrapment effect". Flood resilience is being defined as (1) SPATIAL FLOOD RESILIENCE implying the management of land by floodplain zoning, urban greening and management to reduce storm runoff through depression storage and by practicing Sustainable Urban Drainage (SUD's), Best Management Practices (BMP's, or Low Impact Development (LID). Ecologic processes and cultural elements are included. (2) STRUCTURAL FLOOD RESILIENCE referring to permanent flood defense

  12. Preparation of carbamazepine-Soluplus solid dispersions by hot-melt extrusion, and prediction of drug-polymer miscibility by thermodynamic model fitting.

    PubMed

    Djuris, Jelena; Nikolakakis, Ioannis; Ibric, Svetlana; Djuric, Zorica; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos

    2013-05-01

    Hot-melt extrusion (HME) is a dust- and solvent-free continuous process enabling the preparation of a variety of solid dosage forms containing solid dispersions of poorly soluble drugs into thermoplastic polymers. Miscibility of drug and polymer is a prerequisite for stable solid dispersion formation. The present study investigates the feasibility of forming solid dispersions of carbamazepine (CBZ) into polyethyleneglycol-polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate grafted copolymer (Soluplus) by hot-melt extrusion. Physicochemical properties of the raw materials, extrudates, co-melted products, and corresponding physical mixtures were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and hot stage microscopy (HSM), while miscibility of CBZ and Soluplus was estimated on the basis of the Flory-Huggins theory, Hansen solubility parameters, and solid-liquid equilibrium equation. It was found that hot-melt extrusion of carbamazepine and Soluplus is feasible on a single-screw hot-melt extruder without the addition of plasticizers. DSC analysis and FTIR spectroscopy revealed that a molecular dispersion is formed when the content of CBZ does not exceed ∼5% w/w while higher CBZ content results in a microcrystalline dispersion of CBZ form III crystals, with the molecularly dispersed percentage increasing with extrusion temperature, at the risk of inducing transformation to the undesirable form I of CBZ. Thermodynamic modeling elucidated potential limitations and temperature dependence of solubility/dispersibility of carbamazepine in Soluplus hot-melt extrudates. The results obtained by thermodynamic models are in agreement with the findings of the HME processing, encouraging therefore their further application in the HME process development.

  13. An automated approach to flood mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weihua; Mckeown, Donald M.; Messinger, David W.

    2012-10-01

    Heavy rain from Tropical Storm Lee resulted in a major flood event for the southern tier of New York State in early September 2011 causing evacuation of approximately 20,000 people in and around the city of Binghamton. In support of the New York State Office of Emergency Management, a high resolution multispectral airborne sensor (WASP) developed by RIT was deployed over the flooded area to collect aerial images. One of the key benefits of these images is their provision for flood inundation area mapping. However, these images require a significant amount of storage space and the inundation mapping process is conventionally carried out using manual digitization. In this paper, we design an automated approach for flood inundation mapping from the WASP airborne images. This method employs Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) for color RGB or multispectral aerial images to extract the flood binary map; then it uses a set of morphological processing and a boundary vectorization technique to convert the binary map into a shapefile. This technique is relatively fast and only requires the operator to select one pixel on the image. The generated shapefile is much smaller than the original image and can be imported to most GIS software packages. This enables critical flood information to be shared with and by disaster response managers very rapidly, even over cellular phone networks.

  14. Flood Warning and Forecasting System in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskova, Danica

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, it finished project Flood Warning and Forecasting System (POVAPSYS) as part of the flood protection in Slovakia till 2010. The aim was to build POVAPSYS integrated computerized flood forecasting and warning system. It took a qualitatively higher level of output meteorological and hydrological services in case of floods affecting large territorial units, as well as local flood events. It is further unfolding demands on performance and coordination of meteorological and hydrological services, troubleshooting observation, evaluation of data, fast communication, modeling and forecasting of meteorological and hydrological processes. Integration of all information entering and exiting to and from the project POVAPSYS provides Hydrological Flood Forecasting System (HYPOS). The system provides information on the current hydrometeorological situation and its evolution with the generation of alerts and notifications in case of exceeding predefined thresholds. HYPOS's functioning of the system requires flawless operability in critical situations while minimizing the loss of its key parts. HYPOS is a core part of the project POVAPSYS, it is a comprehensive software solutions based on a modular principle, providing data and processed information including alarms, in real time. In order to achieve full functionality of the system, in proposal, we have put emphasis on reliability, robustness, availability and security.

  15. A global flash flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Calum; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Hewson, Tim; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-04-01

    resolution appropriate to the NWP system. We then demonstrate how these warning areas could eventually complement existing global systems such as the Global Flood Awareness System (GloFAS), to give warnings of flash floods. This work demonstrates the possibility of creating a global flash flood forecasting system based on forecasts from existing global NWP systems. Future developments, in post-processing for example, will need to address an under-prediction bias, for extreme point rainfall, that is innate to current-generation global models.

  16. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Low temperature synthesis of Ru–Cu alloy nanoparticles with the compositions in the miscibility gap

    SciTech Connect

    Martynova, S.A.; Filatov, E.Yu.; Korenev, S.V.; Kuratieva, N.V.; Sheludyakova, L.A.; Plusnin, P.E.; Shubin, Yu.V.; Slavinskaya, E.M.; Boronin, A.I.

    2014-04-01

    A complex salt [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}Cl][Cu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}H{sub 2}O]—the precursor of nanoalloys combining ruthenium and copper was prepared. It crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n. Thermal properties of the prepared salt were examined in different atmospheres (helium, hydrogen, oxygen). Thermal decomposition of the precursor in inert atmosphere was thoroughly examined and the intermediate products were characterized. Experimental conditions for preparation of copper-rich (up to 12 at% of copper) metastable solid solution Cu{sub x}Ru{sub 1−x} (based on Ru structure) were optimized, what is in sharp contrast to the bimetallic miscibility gap known for the bulk counterparts in a wide composition range. Catalytic properties of copper–ruthenium oxide composite were tested in catalytic oxidation of CO. - Highlights: • We synthesized new precursor of CuRu metastable nanoalloys. • Thermal properties of the prepared salt were examined in different atmospheres. • Thermodestruction mechanism of precursor are studied. • Cu{sub 0.12}Ru{sub 0.88} nanoalloy with the compositions in the miscibility gap is obtained. • Catalytic conversion of CO on copper–ruthenium oxide composite were examined.

  18. Effects of sweep rates of external magnetic fields on the labyrinthine instabilities of miscible magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C.-Y.; Lin, J.-Z.; Chen, M.-Y.; Chen, L.-Q.; Liang, T.-K.

    2011-05-01

    The interfacial instability of miscible magnetic fluids in a Hele-Shaw Cell is studied experimentally, with different magnitudes and sweep rates of the external magnetic field. The initial circular oil-based magnetic fluid drop is surrounded by the miscible fluid, diesel. The external uniform magnetic fields induce small fingerings around the initial circular interface, so call labyrinthine fingering instability, and secondary waves. When the magnetic field is applied at a given sweep rate, the interfacial length grows significantly at the early stage. It then decreases when the magnetic field reaches the preset values, and finally approaches a certain asymptotic value. In addition, a dimensionless parameter, Pe, which includes the factors of diffusion and sweep rate of the external magnetic field, is found to correlate the experimental data. It is shown that the initial growth rate of the interfacial length is linearly proportional to Pe for the current experimental parameter range and is proportional to the square root of the sweep rate at the onset of labyrinthine instability.

  19. Schlieren Imaging of Gravitational Instabilities during Miscible Viscous Fingering of Glycerol-Water Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Daniela; Stewart, Simone; Bunton, Patrick; Meiburg, Eckart; de Wit, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Viscous fingering occurs when a lower viscosity fluid displaces a higher viscosity fluid causing interfacial instabilities creating finger-like patterns. In a typical flow, the less viscous fluid is injected into the higher viscous fluid that is between the plates of a Hele-Shaw cell. In most cases for transparent flows, dye is dissolved into the displacing fluid in order to observe it. This work uses Schlieren imaging of miscible fluid displacements in a horizontal Hele-Shaw Cell, which reveals new information about the three-dimensional nature of VF. A Schlieren system is composed of a parallel light beam, a lens that brings the light to a focus, a cutoff of some type, and a camera. Schlieren does not require dye, ensuring the natural flow of the fluids is undisturbed. Here the imaging system is described followed by results of miscible flows of water in to aqueous glycerol solutions. Structures attributable to three-dimensional buoyancy-driven flows are readily observed. These results are interpreted in light of recent three-dimensional calculations. Supported by National Science Foundation CBET-1335739.

  20. Minimal effect of lipid charge on membrane miscibility phase behavior in three ternary systems.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Matthew C; Starr, Jordan B; Turtle, Cameron W; Ashcraft, Jake; Keller, Sarah L

    2013-06-18

    Giant unilamellar vesicles composed of a ternary mixture of phospholipids and cholesterol exhibit coexisting liquid phases over a range of temperatures and compositions. A significant fraction of lipids in biological membranes are charged. Here, we present phase diagrams of vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids, which are zwitterionic; phosphatidylglycerol (PG) lipids, which are anionic; and cholesterol (Chol). Specifically, we use DiPhyPG-DPPC-Chol and DiPhyPC-DPPG-Chol. We show that miscibility in membranes containing charged PG lipids occurs over similarly high temperatures and broad lipid compositions as in corresponding membranes containing only uncharged lipids, and that the presence of salt has a minimal effect. We verified our results in two ways. First, we used mass spectrometry to ensure that charged PC/PG/Chol vesicles formed by gentle hydration have the same composition as the lipid stocks from which they are made. Second, we repeated the experiments by substituting phosphatidylserine for PG as the charged lipid and observed similar phenomena. Our results consistently support the view that monovalent charged lipids have only a minimal effect on lipid miscibility phase behavior in our system. PMID:23790371

  1. Oil-Miscible and Non-Corrosive Phosphonium Ionic Liquids as Candidate Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Bo; Bansal, Dinesh G; Qu, Jun; Sun, Xiaoqi; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng; Blau, Peter Julian; Bunting, Bruce G; Mordukhovich, Gregory; Smolenski, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been receiving considerable attention from the lubricants industry as potential friction and wear-reducing additives, but their solubility in oils is an issue. Unlike most ionic liquids that are insoluble in non-polar hydrocarbon oils, this study reports phosphonium-based ILs (PP-ILs) that are fully miscible with both mineral oil-based and synthetic lubricants. Both the cation and anion in quaternary structures, long alkyl chains, and capability of pairing the cation and the anion via a H-O bond are hypothesized to improve the compatibility between ions and neutral oil molecules. The measured viscosities of the oil-IL blends agree well with the Refutas equation that is for solutions containing multiple components. High thermal stability and non-corrosiveness were observed for the PP-ILs. Effective friction reduction and anti-wear functionality have been demonstrated in tribological tests when adding 5 wt% of a PP-IL into a base oil, suggesting potential applications for using the oil-miscible PP-ILs as lubricant additives.

  2. Assessing the Strength Enhancement of Heterogeneous Networks of Miscible Polymer Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Carl; Roland, Mike

    2013-03-01

    At the typical crosslink densities of elastomers, the failure properties vary inversely with mechanical stiffness, so that compounding entails a compromise between stiffness and strength. Our approach to circumvent this conventional limitation is by forming networks of two polymers that: (i) are thermodynamically miscible, whereby the chemical composition is uniform on the segmental level; and (ii) have markedly different reactivities for network formation. The resulting elastomer consists of one highly crosslinked component and one that is lightly or uncrosslinked. This disparity in crosslinking causes their respective contributions to the network mechanical response to differ diametrically. Earlier results showed some success with this approach for thermally crosslinked blends of 1,2-polybutadiene (PVE) and polyisoprene (PI), as well as ethylene-propylene copolymer (EPM) and ethylene-propylene-diene random terpolymer (EPDM), taking advantage of their differing reactivities to sulfur. In this work we demonstrate the miscibility of polyisobutylene (PIB) with butyl rubber (BR) (a copolymer of PIB and polyisoprene) and show that networks in which only the BR is crosslinked possess greater tensile strengths than neat BR over the same range of moduli. Office of Naval Research

  3. Size-dependent spinodal and miscibility gaps for intercalation in nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Burch, Damian; Bazant, Martin Z

    2009-11-01

    Using a recently proposed mathematical model for intercalation dynamics in phase-separating materials ( Singh , G. K. , Ceder , G. and Bazant , M. Z. Electrochimica Acta 2008 , 53 , 7599. ), we show that the spinodal and miscibility gaps generally shrink as the host particle size decreases to the nanoscale. Our work is motivated by recent experiments on the high-rate Li-ion battery material LiFePO(4); this serves as the basis for our examples, but our analysis and conclusions apply to any intercalation material. We describe two general mechanisms for the suppression of phase separation in nanoparticles, (i) a classical bulk effect, predicted by the Cahn-Hilliard equation in which the diffuse phase boundary becomes confined by the particle geometry; and (ii) a novel surface effect, predicted by chemical-potential-dependent reaction kinetics, in which insertion/extraction reactions stabilize composition gradients near surfaces in equilibrium with the local environment. Composition-dependent surface energy and (especially) elastic strain can contribute to these effects but are not required to predict decreased spinodal and miscibility gaps at the nanoscale. PMID:19824617

  4. Size-dependent spinodal and miscibility gaps for intercalation in nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Burch, Damian; Bazant, Martin Z

    2009-11-01

    Using a recently proposed mathematical model for intercalation dynamics in phase-separating materials ( Singh , G. K. , Ceder , G. and Bazant , M. Z. Electrochimica Acta 2008 , 53 , 7599. ), we show that the spinodal and miscibility gaps generally shrink as the host particle size decreases to the nanoscale. Our work is motivated by recent experiments on the high-rate Li-ion battery material LiFePO(4); this serves as the basis for our examples, but our analysis and conclusions apply to any intercalation material. We describe two general mechanisms for the suppression of phase separation in nanoparticles, (i) a classical bulk effect, predicted by the Cahn-Hilliard equation in which the diffuse phase boundary becomes confined by the particle geometry; and (ii) a novel surface effect, predicted by chemical-potential-dependent reaction kinetics, in which insertion/extraction reactions stabilize composition gradients near surfaces in equilibrium with the local environment. Composition-dependent surface energy and (especially) elastic strain can contribute to these effects but are not required to predict decreased spinodal and miscibility gaps at the nanoscale.

  5. Cellulose acetate butyrate/poly(caprolactonetriol) blends: Miscibility, mechanical properties, and in vivo inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Kanis, Luiz A; Marques, Ellen L; Zepon, Karine M; Pereira, Jefferson R; Pamato, Saulo; de Oliveira, Marcelo T; Danielski, Lucinéia G; Petronilho, Fabricia C

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the results of the characterization of cellulose acetate butyrate and polycaprolactone-triol blends in terms of miscibility, swelling capacity, mechanical properties, and inflammatory response in vivo. The cellulose acetate butyrate film was opaque and rigid, with glass transition (T g ) at 134℃ and melting temperature of 156℃. The cellulose acetate butyrate/polycaprolactone-triol films were transparent up to a polycaprolactone-triol content of 60%. T g of the cellulose acetate butyrate films decreased monotonically as polycaprolactone-triol was added to the blend, thus indicating miscibility. FTIR spectroscopy revealed a decrease in intramolecular hydrogen bonding in polycaprolactone-triol, whereas no hydrogen bonding was observed between cellulose acetate butyrate and -OH from polycaprolactone-triol. The increase in polycaprolactone-triol content in the blend decreased the water uptake. An increase in polycaprolactone-triol content decreased the modulus of elasticity and increased the elongation at break. A cellulose acetate butyrate/polycaprolactone-triol 70/30 blend implanted in rats showed only an acute inflammatory response 7 days after surgery. No change in inflammation mediators was observed.

  6. Forming Nanoparticle Monolayers at Liquid-Air Interfaces by Using Miscible Liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Datong; Hu, Jiayang; Kennedy, Kathleen M; Herman, Irving P

    2016-08-23

    One standard way of forming monolayers (MLs) of nanoparticles (NPs) is to drop-cast a NP dispersion made using one solvent onto a second, immiscible solvent; after this upper solvent evaporates, the NP ML can be transferred to a solid substrate by liftoff. We show that this previously universal use of only immiscible solvent pairs can be relaxed and close-packed, hexagonally ordered NP monolayers can self-assemble at liquid-air interfaces when some miscible solvent pairs are used instead. We demonstrate this by drop-casting an iron oxide NP dispersion in toluene on a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) liquid substrate. The NPs are energetically stable at the DMSO surface and remain there even with solvent mixing. Excess NPs coagulate and precipitate in the DMSO, and this limits NPs at the surface to approximately 1 ML. The ML domains at the surface nucleate independently, which is in contrast to ML growth at the receding edge of the drying drop, as is common in immiscible solvent pair systems and seen here for the toluene/diethylene glycol immiscible solvent pair system. This new use of miscible solvent pairs can enable the formation of MLs for a wider range of NPs. PMID:27458656

  7. May flood-poor periods be more dangerous than flood-rich periods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Jose Luis; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Viglione, Alberto; Kuil, Linda; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2014-05-01

    River floods are among the most devastating natural hazards experienced by populations that, since the earliest recorded civilisations, have settled in floodplains because they offer favourable conditions for trade, agriculture, and economic development. The occurrence of a flood may cause loss of lives and tremendous economic damages and, therefore, is rightly seen as a very negative event by the communities involved. Occurrence of many floods in a row is, of course, even more frustrating and is rightly considered a unbearable calamity. Unfortunately, the occurrence of many floods in a limited number of consecutive years is not unusual. In many places in the world, it has been observed that extreme floods do not arrive randomly but cluster in time into flood-poor and flood-rich periods consistent with the Hurst effect. If this is the case, when are the people more in danger? When should people be more scared? In flood-poor or flood-rich periods? In this work, a Socio-Hydrology model (Di Baldassarre et al., 2013; Viglione et al., 2014) is used to show that, maybe counter-intuitively, flood-poor periods may be more dangerous than flood-rich periods. The model is a conceptualisation of a hypothetical setting of a city at a river where a community evolves, making choices between flood management options on the floodplain. The most important feedbacks between the economic, political, technological and hydrological processes of the evolution of that community are represented in the model. In particular, the model also accounts in a dynamic way for the evolution of the the community awareness to flood risk. Occurrence of floods tends to increase peoples' recognition that their property is in an area that is potentially at risk of flooding, both at the scales of individuals and communities, which is one of the main reasons why flood coping actions are taken. It is shown through examples that frequent flood events may result in moderate damages because they ensure that the

  8. Flood hazard assessment for french NPPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebour, Vincent; Duluc, Claire-Marie; Guimier, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the approach for flood hazard assessment for NPP which is on-going in France in the framework of post-Fukushima activities. These activities were initially defined considering both European "stress tests" of NPPs pursuant to the request of the European Council, and the French safety audit of civilian nuclear facilities in the light of the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The main actors in that process are the utility (EDF is, up to date, the unique NPP's operator in France), the regulatory authority (ASN) and its technical support organization (IRSN). This paper was prepared by IRSN, considering official positions of the other main actors in the current review process, it was not officially endorsed by them. In France, flood hazard to be considered for design basis definition (for new NPPs and for existing NPPs in periodic safety reviews conducted every 10 years) was revised before Fukushima-Daichi accident, due to le Blayais NPP December 1999 experience (partial site flooding and loss of some safety classified systems). The paper presents in the first part an overview of the revised guidance for design basis flood. In order to address design extension conditions (conditions that could result from natural events exceeding the design basis events), a set of flooding scenarios have been defined by adding margins on the scenarios that are considered for the design. Due to the diversity of phenomena to be considered for flooding hazard, the margin assessment is specific to each flooding scenario in terms of parameter to be penalized and of degree of variation of this parameter. The general approach to address design extension conditions is presented in the second part of the paper. The next parts present the approach for five flooding scenarios including design basis scenario and additional margin to define design extension scenarios.

  9. Nanoparticle induced miscibility in LCST polymer blends: critically assessing the enthalpic and entropic effects.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Priti; Rao, Praveen; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2016-01-01

    The use of copolymer and polymer blends widened the possibility of creating materials with multilayered architectures. Hierarchical polymer systems with a wide array of micro and nanostructures are generated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) in partially miscible polymer blends. Various parameters like the interaction between the polymers, concentration, solvent/non-solvent ratio, and quenching temperature have to be optimized to obtain these micro/nanophase structures. Alternatively, the addition of nanoparticles is another strategy to design materials with desired hetero-phase structures. The dynamics of the polymer nanocomposite depends on the statistical ordering of polymers around the nanoparticle, which is dependent on the shape of the nanoparticle. The entropic loss due to deformation of polymer chains, like the repulsive interactions due to coiling and the attractive interactions in the case of swelling has been highlighted in this perspective article. The dissipative particle dynamics has been discussed and is correlated with the molecular dynamics simulation in the case of polymer blends. The Cahn-Hillard-Cook model on variedly shaped immobile fillers has shown difference in the propagation of the composition wave. The nanoparticle shape has a contributing effect on the polymer particle interaction, which can change the miscibility window in the case of these phase separating polymer blends. Quantitative information on the effect of spherical particles on the demixing temperature is well established and further modified to explain the percolation of rod shaped particles in the polymer blends. These models correlate well with the experimental observations in context to the dynamics induced by the nanoparticle in the demixing behavior of the polymer blend. The miscibility of the LCST polymer blend depends on the enthalpic factors like the specific interaction between the components, and the solubility product and the entropic losses occurring due

  10. Flood insurance in Canada: implications for flood management and residential vulnerability to flood hazards.

    PubMed

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  11. Flood Insurance in Canada: Implications for Flood Management and Residential Vulnerability to Flood Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulahen, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Insurance coverage of damage caused by overland flooding is currently not available to Canadian homeowners. As flood disaster losses and water damage claims both trend upward, insurers in Canada are considering offering residential flood coverage in order to properly underwrite the risk and extend their business. If private flood insurance is introduced in Canada, it will have implications for the current regime of public flood management and for residential vulnerability to flood hazards. This paper engages many of the competing issues surrounding the privatization of flood risk by addressing questions about whether flood insurance can be an effective tool in limiting exposure to the hazard and how it would exacerbate already unequal vulnerability. A case study investigates willingness to pay for flood insurance among residents in Metro Vancouver and how attitudes about insurance relate to other factors that determine residential vulnerability to flood hazards. Findings indicate that demand for flood insurance is part of a complex, dialectical set of determinants of vulnerability.

  12. Nogales flood detention study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Laura M.; Levick, Lainie; Guertin, D. Phillip; Callegary, James; Guadarrama, Jesus Quintanar; Anaya, Claudia Zulema Gil; Prichard, Andrea; Gray, Floyd; Castellanos, Edgar; Tepezano, Edgar; Huth, Hans; Vandervoet, Prescott; Rodriguez, Saul; Nunez, Jose; Atwood, Donald; Granillo, Gilberto Patricio Olivero; Ceballos, Francisco Octavio Gastellum

    2010-01-01

    Flooding in Ambos Nogales often exceeds the capacity of the channel and adjacent land areas, endangering many people. The Nogales Wash is being studied to prevent future flood disasters and detention features are being installed in tributaries of the wash. This paper describes the application of the KINEROS2 model and efforts to understand the capacity of these detention features under various flood and urbanization scenarios. Results depict a reduction in peak flow for the 10-year, 1-hour event based on current land use in tributaries with detention features. However, model results also demonstrate that larger storm events and increasing urbanization will put a strain on the features and limit their effectiveness.

  13. Regional flood frequency analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book, the fourth of a four volume set, contains five sections encompassing major aspects of regional flood frequency analysis. Each section starts usually with an invited state-of-the-art paper followed by contributed papers. The first section provides an assessment of regional flood frequency analysis. Methods for performing regional frequency analysis for ungaged watersheds are presented in Section 2. More discussion on regional frequency analysis is provided in Section 3. Selection and comparison of regional frequency methods are dealt with in Section 4; these are of great interest to the user. Increasing attention is being focused these days on paleohydrologic flood analysis. This topic is covered in Section 5.

  14. Effect of flooding on C metabolism of flood-tolerant (Quercus robur) and non-tolerant (Fagus sylvatica) tree species.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Eleni; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    Flooding is assumed to cause an energy crisis in plants because-due to a lack of O(2)-mitochondrial respiration is replaced by alcoholic fermentation which yields considerably less energy equivalents. In the present study, the effect of flooding on the carbon metabolism of flooding-tolerant pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and flooding-sensitive European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings was characterized. Whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations dropped in roots of F. sylvatica, they were constant in Q. robur during flooding. At the same time, root alcohol dehydrogenase activities were decreased in beech but not in oak, suggesting substrate limitation of alcoholic fermentation in beech roots. Surprisingly, leaf and phloem sap sugar concentrations increased in both species but to a much higher degree in beech. This finding suggests that the phloem unloading process in flooding-sensitive beech was strongly impaired. It is assumed that root-derived ethanol is transported to the leaves via the transpiration stream. This mechanism is considered an adaptation to flooding because it helps avoid the accumulation of toxic ethanol in the roots and supports the whole plant's carbon metabolism by channelling ethanol into the oxidative metabolism of the leaves. A labelling experiment demonstrated that in the leaves of flooded trees, ethanol metabolism does not differ between flooded beech and oak, indicating that processes in the roots are crucial for the trees' flooding tolerance. PMID:22367762

  15. Effect of flooding on C metabolism of flood-tolerant (Quercus robur) and non-tolerant (Fagus sylvatica) tree species.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Eleni; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    Flooding is assumed to cause an energy crisis in plants because-due to a lack of O(2)-mitochondrial respiration is replaced by alcoholic fermentation which yields considerably less energy equivalents. In the present study, the effect of flooding on the carbon metabolism of flooding-tolerant pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) and flooding-sensitive European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings was characterized. Whereas soluble carbohydrate concentrations dropped in roots of F. sylvatica, they were constant in Q. robur during flooding. At the same time, root alcohol dehydrogenase activities were decreased in beech but not in oak, suggesting substrate limitation of alcoholic fermentation in beech roots. Surprisingly, leaf and phloem sap sugar concentrations increased in both species but to a much higher degree in beech. This finding suggests that the phloem unloading process in flooding-sensitive beech was strongly impaired. It is assumed that root-derived ethanol is transported to the leaves via the transpiration stream. This mechanism is considered an adaptation to flooding because it helps avoid the accumulation of toxic ethanol in the roots and supports the whole plant's carbon metabolism by channelling ethanol into the oxidative metabolism of the leaves. A labelling experiment demonstrated that in the leaves of flooded trees, ethanol metabolism does not differ between flooded beech and oak, indicating that processes in the roots are crucial for the trees' flooding tolerance.

  16. Development of flood index by characterisation of flood hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Biswa; Suman, Asadusjjaman

    2015-04-01

    In recent years the world has experienced deaths, large-scale displacement of people, billions of Euros of economic damage, mental stress and ecosystem impacts due to flooding. Global changes (climate change, population and economic growth, and urbanisation) are exacerbating the severity of flooding. The 2010 floods in Pakistan and the 2011 floods in Australia and Thailand demonstrate the need for concerted action in the face of global societal and environmental changes to strengthen resilience against flooding. Due to climatological characteristics there are catchments where flood forecasting may have a relatively limited role and flood event management may have to be trusted upon. For example, in flash flood catchments, which often may be tiny and un-gauged, flood event management often depends on approximate prediction tools such as flash flood guidance (FFG). There are catchments fed largely by flood waters coming from upstream catchments, which are un-gauged or due to data sharing issues in transboundary catchments the flow of information from upstream catchment is limited. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of these downstream catchments will never be sufficient to provide any required forecasting lead time and alternative tools to support flood event management will be required. In FFG, or similar approaches, the primary motif is to provide guidance by synthesising the historical data. We follow a similar approach to characterise past flood hydrographs to determine a flood index (FI), which varies in space and time with flood magnitude and its propagation. By studying the variation of the index the pockets of high flood risk, requiring attention, can be earmarked beforehand. This approach can be very useful in flood risk management of catchments where information about hydro-meteorological variables is inadequate for any forecasting system. This paper presents the development of FI and its application to several catchments including in Kentucky in the USA

  17. A European Flood Database: facilitating comprehensive flood research beyond administrative boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J.; Arheimer, B.; Aronica, G. T.; Bilibashi, A.; Boháč, M.; Bonacci, O.; Borga, M.; Burlando, P.; Castellarin, A.; Chirico, G. B.; Claps, P.; Fiala, K.; Gaál, L.; Gorbachova, L.; Gül, A.; Hannaford, J.; Kiss, A.; Kjeldsen, T.; Kohnová, S.; Koskela, J. J.; Macdonald, N.; Mavrova-Guirguinova, M.; Ledvinka, O.; Mediero, L.; Merz, B.; Merz, R.; Molnar, P.; Montanari, A.; Osuch, M.; Parajka, J.; Perdigão, R. A. P.; Radevski, I.; Renard, B.; Rogger, M.; Salinas, J. L.; Sauquet, E.; Šraj, M.; Szolgay, J.; Viglione, A.; Volpi, E.; Wilson, D.; Zaimi, K.; Blöschl, G.

    2015-06-01

    The current work addresses one of the key building blocks towards an improved understanding of flood processes and associated changes in flood characteristics and regimes in Europe: the development of a comprehensive, extensive European flood database. The presented work results from ongoing cross-border research collaborations initiated with data collection and joint interpretation in mind. A detailed account of the current state, characteristics and spatial and temporal coverage of the European Flood Database, is presented. At this stage, the hydrological data collection is still growing and consists at this time of annual maximum and daily mean discharge series, from over 7000 hydrometric stations of various data series lengths. Moreover, the database currently comprises data from over 50 different data sources. The time series have been obtained from different national and regional data sources in a collaborative effort of a joint European flood research agreement based on the exchange of data, models and expertise, and from existing international data collections and open source websites. These ongoing efforts are contributing to advancing the understanding of regional flood processes beyond individual country boundaries and to a more coherent flood research in Europe.

  18. Flood hazard assessment in areas prone to flash flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvočka, Davor; Falconer, Roger A.; Bray, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Contemporary climate projections suggest that there will be an increase in the occurrence of high-intensity rainfall events in the future. These precipitation extremes are usually the main cause for the emergence of extreme flooding, such as flash flooding. Flash floods are among the most unpredictable, violent and fatal natural hazards in the world. Furthermore, it is expected that flash flooding will occur even more frequently in the future due to more frequent development of extreme weather events, which will greatly increase the danger to people caused by flash flooding. This being the case, there will be a need for high resolution flood hazard maps in areas susceptible to flash flooding. This study investigates what type of flood hazard assessment methods should be used for assessing the flood hazard to people caused by flash flooding. Two different types of flood hazard assessment methods were tested: (i) a widely used method based on an empirical analysis, and (ii) a new, physically based and experimentally calibrated method. Two flash flood events were considered herein, namely: the 2004 Boscastle flash flood and the 2007 Železniki flash flood. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the areas susceptible to extreme flooding, the flood hazard assessment should be conducted using methods based on a mechanics-based analysis. In comparison to standard flood hazard assessment methods, these physically based methods: (i) take into account all of the physical forces, which act on a human body in floodwater, (ii) successfully adapt to abrupt changes in the flow regime, which often occur for flash flood events, and (iii) rapidly assess a flood hazard index in a relatively short period of time.

  19. Evaluation of on-line DEMs for flood inundation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Brett F.

    2007-08-01

    Recent and highly accurate topographic data should be used for flood inundation modeling, but this is not always feasible given time and budget constraints so the utility of several on-line digital elevation models (DEMs) is examined with a set of steady and unsteady test problems. DEMs are used to parameterize a 2D hydrodynamic flood simulation algorithm and predictions are compared with published flood maps and observed flood conditions. DEMs based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) are preferred because of horizontal resolution, vertical accuracy (˜0.1 m) and the ability to separate bare-earth from built structures and vegetation. DEMs based on airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IfSAR) have good horizontal resolution but gridded elevations reflect built structures and vegetation and therefore further processing may be required to permit flood modeling. IfSAR and shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM) DEMs suffer from radar speckle, or noise, so flood plains may appear with non-physical relief and predicted flood zones may include non-physical pools. DEMs based on national elevation data (NED) are remarkably smooth in comparison to IfSAR and SRTM but using NED, flood predictions overestimate flood extent in comparison to all other DEMs including LiDAR, the most accurate. This study highlights utility in SRTM as a global source of terrain data for flood modeling.

  20. National Flood Interoperability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Flood Interoperability Experiment is led by the academic community in collaboration with the National Weather Service through the new National Water Center recently opened on the Tuscaloosa campus of the University of Alabama. The experiment will also involve the partners in IWRSS (Integrated Water Resources Science and Services), which include the USGS, the Corps of Engineers and FEMA. The experiment will address the following questions: (1) How can near-real-time hydrologic forecasting at high spatial resolution, covering the nation, be carried out using the NHDPlus or next generation geofabric (e.g. hillslope, watershed scales)? (2) How can this lead to improved emergency response and community resilience? (3) How can improved an improved interoperability framework support the first two goals and lead to sustained innovation in the research to operations process? The experiment will run from September 2014 through August 2015, in two phases. The mobilization phase from September 2014 until May 2015 will assemble the components of the interoperability framework. A Summer Institute to integrate the components will be held from June to August 2015 at the National Water Center involving faculty and students from the University of Alabama and other institutions coordinated by CUAHSI. It is intended that the insight that arises from this experiment will help lay the foundation for a new national scale, high spatial resolution, near-real-time hydrologic simulation system for the United States.

  1. Flood Bypass Capacity Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siclari, A.; Hui, R.; Lund, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Large river flows can damage adjacent flood-prone areas, by exceeding river channel and levee capacities. Particularly large floods are difficult to contain in leveed river banks alone. Flood bypasses often can efficiently reduce flood risks, where excess river flow is diverted over a weir to bypasses, that incur much less damage and cost. Additional benefits of bypasses include ecosystem protection, agriculture, groundwater recharge and recreation. Constructing or expanding an existing bypass costs in land purchase easements, and levee setbacks. Accounting for such benefits and costs, this study develops a simple mathematical model for optimizing flood bypass capacity using benefit-cost and risk analysis. Application to the Yolo Bypass, an existing bypass along the Sacramento River in California, estimates optimal capacity that economically reduces flood damage and increases various benefits, especially for agriculture. Land availability is likely to limit bypass expansion. Compensation for landowners could relax such limitations. Other economic values could affect the optimal results, which are shown by sensitivity analysis on major parameters. By including land geography into the model, location of promising capacity expansions can be identified.

  2. Influence of Miscibility Phenomenon on Crystalline Polymorph Transition in Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride)/Acrylic Rubber/Clay Nanocomposite Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Abolhasani, Mohammad Mahdi; Naebe, Minoo; Jalali-Arani, Azam; Guo, Qipeng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, intercalation of nanoclay in the miscible polymer blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and acrylic rubber(ACM) was studied. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the formation of nanoscale polymer blend/clay hybrid. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray analysis revealed the coexistence of β and γ crystalline forms in PVDF/Clay nanocomposite while α crystalline form was found to be dominant in PVDF/ACM/Clay miscible hybrids. Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (B) was used to further explain the miscibility phenomenon observed. The B parameter was determined by combining the melting point depression and the binary interaction model. The estimated B values for the ternary PVDF/ACM/Clay and PVDF/ACM pairs were all negative, showing both proper intercalation of the polymer melt into the nanoclay galleries and the good miscibility of PVDF and ACM blend. The B value for the PVDF/ACM blend was almost the same as that measured for the PVDF/ACM/Clay hybrid, suggesting that PVDF chains in nanocomposite hybrids interact with ACM chains and that nanoclay in hybrid systems is wrapped by ACM molecules. PMID:24551141

  3. Influence of miscibility phenomenon on crystalline polymorph transition in poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic rubber/clay nanocomposite hybrid.

    PubMed

    Abolhasani, Mohammad Mahdi; Naebe, Minoo; Jalali-Arani, Azam; Guo, Qipeng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, intercalation of nanoclay in the miscible polymer blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and acrylic rubber(ACM) was studied. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the formation of nanoscale polymer blend/clay hybrid. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray analysis revealed the coexistence of β and γ crystalline forms in PVDF/Clay nanocomposite while α crystalline form was found to be dominant in PVDF/ACM/Clay miscible hybrids. Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (B) was used to further explain the miscibility phenomenon observed. The B parameter was determined by combining the melting point depression and the binary interaction model. The estimated B values for the ternary PVDF/ACM/Clay and PVDF/ACM pairs were all negative, showing both proper intercalation of the polymer melt into the nanoclay galleries and the good miscibility of PVDF and ACM blend. The B value for the PVDF/ACM blend was almost the same as that measured for the PVDF/ACM/Clay hybrid, suggesting that PVDF chains in nanocomposite hybrids interact with ACM chains and that nanoclay in hybrid systems is wrapped by ACM molecules. PMID:24551141

  4. Miscibility of polyolefin blends from a Born-Green-Yvon lattice model in conjunction with small scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, J.; Lipson, J. E. G.

    1999-02-01

    The large variation in miscibility of blends of polyolefins is related to the architecture of the chain molecules. In this paper we present first results of an approach in which small scale simulations of local interactions are combined with an analytical model for the thermodynamics, the Born-Green-Yvon lattice model, to predict phase diagrams of polyolefin blends from the pure component properties.

  5. The Miscibility and Depth Profile of PCBM in P3HT: Thermodynamic Information to Improve Organic Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Dadmun, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has shown that poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and the surface functionalized fullerene 1-(3-methyloxycarbonyl)propy(1-phenyl [6,6]) C61 (PCBM) are much more miscible than originally thought, and the evidence of this miscibility requires a return to understanding the optimal morphology and structure of organic photovoltaic active layers. This manuscript describes the results of experiments that were designed to provide quantitative thermodynamic information on the miscibility, interdiffusion, and depth profile of P3HT:PCBM thin films that are formed by thermally annealing initial bilayers. It is found that the resultant thin films consist of a bulk layer that is not influenced by the air or substrate surface. The composition of PCBM in this bulk layer increases with increased PCBM loading in the original bilayer until the bulk layer contains 22 vol% PCBM. The introduction of additional PCBM into the sample does not increase the amount of PCBM dispersed in this bulk layer. This observation is interpreted to indicate that the miscibility limit of PCBM in P3HT is 22 vol%, while the precise characterization of the depth profiles in these films shows that the PCBM selectively segregates to the silicon and near air surface. The selective segregation of the PCBM near the air surface is ascribed to an entropic driving force.

  6. Preparing for floods: flood forecasting and early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloke, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Flood forecasting and early warning has continued to stride ahead in strengthening the preparedness phases of disaster risk management, saving lives and property and reducing the overall impact of severe flood events. For example, continental and global scale flood forecasting systems such as the European Flood Awareness System and the Global Flood Awareness System provide early information about upcoming floods in real time to various decisionmakers. Studies have found that there are monetary benefits to implementing these early flood warning systems, and with the science also in place to provide evidence of benefit and hydrometeorological institutional outlooks warming to the use of probabilistic forecasts, the uptake over the last decade has been rapid and sustained. However, there are many further challenges that lie ahead to improve the science supporting flood early warning and to ensure that appropriate decisions are made to maximise flood preparedness.

  7. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  8. Urban flood risk warning under rapid urbanization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangbo; Zhou, Haolan; Zhang, Hui; Du, Guoming; Zhou, Jinhui

    2015-05-01

    In the past decades, China has observed rapid urbanization, the nation's urban population reached 50% in 2000, and is still in steady increase. Rapid urbanization in China has an adverse impact on urban hydrological processes, particularly in increasing the urban flood risks and causing serious urban flooding losses. Urban flooding also increases health risks such as causing epidemic disease break out, polluting drinking water and damaging the living environment. In the highly urbanized area, non-engineering measurement is the main way for managing urban flood risk, such as flood risk warning. There is no mature method and pilot study for urban flood risk warning, the purpose of this study is to propose the urban flood risk warning method for the rapidly urbanized Chinese cities. This paper first presented an urban flood forecasting model, which produces urban flood inundation index for urban flood risk warning. The model has 5 modules. The drainage system and grid dividing module divides the whole city terrain into drainage systems according to its first-order river system, and delineates the drainage system into grids based on the spatial structure with irregular gridding technique; the precipitation assimilation module assimilates precipitation for every grids which is used as the model input, which could either be the radar based precipitation estimation or interpolated one from rain gauges; runoff production module classifies the surface into pervious and impervious surface, and employs different methods to calculate the runoff respectively; surface runoff routing module routes the surface runoff and determines the inundation index. The routing on surface grid is calculated according to the two dimensional shallow water unsteady flow algorithm, the routing on land channel and special channel is calculated according to the one dimensional unsteady flow algorithm. This paper then proposed the urban flood risk warning method that is called DPSIR model based

  9. Modeling of Flood Risk for the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, D.; Li, S.; Katz, B.; Goteti, G.; Kaheil, Y. H.; Vojjala, R.

    2011-12-01

    The science of catastrophic risk modeling helps people to understand the physical and financial implications of natural catastrophes (hurricanes, flood, earthquakes, etc.), terrorism, and the risks associated with changes in life expectancy. As such it depends on simulation techniques that integrate multiple disciplines such as meteorology, hydrology, structural engineering, statistics, computer science, financial engineering, actuarial science, and more in virtually every field of technology. In this talk we will explain the techniques and underlying assumptions of building the RMS US flood risk model. We especially will pay attention to correlation (spatial and temporal), simulation and uncertainty in each of the various components in the development process. Recent extreme floods (e.g. US Midwest flood 2008, US Northeast flood, 2010) have increased the concern of flood risk. Consequently, there are growing needs to adequately assess the flood risk. The RMS flood hazard model is mainly comprised of three major components. (1) Stochastic precipitation simulation module based on a Monte-Carlo analogue technique, which is capable of producing correlated rainfall events for the continental US. (2) Rainfall-runoff and routing module. A semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model was developed to properly assess the antecedent conditions, determine the saturation area and runoff. The runoff is further routed downstream along the rivers by a routing model. Combined with the precipitation model, it allows us to correlate the streamflow and hence flooding from different rivers, as well as low and high return-periods across the continental US. (3) Flood inundation module. It transforms the discharge (output from the flow routing) into water level, which is further combined with a two-dimensional off-floodplain inundation model to produce comprehensive flood hazard map. The performance of the model is demonstrated by comparing to the observation and published data. Output from

  10. Flood hazard, vulnerability, and risk assessment for human life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, T.; Chang, T.; Lai, J.; Hsieh, M.; Tan, Y.; Lin, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Flood risk assessment is an important issue for the countries suffering tropical cyclones and monsoon. Taiwan is located in the hot zone of typhoon tracks in the Western Pacific. There are three to five typhoons landing Taiwan every year. Typhoons and heavy rainfalls often cause inundation disaster rising with the increase of population and the development of social economy. The purpose of this study is to carry out the flood hazard, vulnerability and risk in term of human life. Based on the concept that flood risk is composed by flood hazard and vulnerability, a inundation simulation is performed to evaluate the factors of flood hazard for human life according to base flood (100-year return period). The flood depth, velocity and rising ratio are the three factors of flood hazards. Furthermore, the factors of flood vulnerability are identified in terms of human life that are classified into two main factors, residents and environment. The sub factors related to residents are the density of population and the density of vulnerable people including elders, youngers and disabled persons. The sub factors related to environment include the the number of building floors, the locations of buildings, the and distance to rescue center. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is adopted to determine the weights of these factors. The risk matrix is applied to show the risk from low to high based on the evaluation of flood hazards and vulnerabilities. The Tseng-Wen River watershed is selected as the case study because a serious flood was induced by Typhoon Morakot in 2009, which produced a record-breaking rainfall of 2.361mm in 48 hours in the last 50 years. The results of assessing the flood hazard, vulnerability and risk in term of human life could improve the emergency operation for flood disaster to prepare enough relief goods and materials during typhoon landing.

  11. On the significance of future trends in flood frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, M.; Schulz, K.; Wieder, O.

    2015-12-01

    Floods are a significant threat for alpine headwater catchments and for the forelands. The formation of significant flood events is thereby often coupled on processes occurring in the alpine zone. Rain on snow events are just one example. The prediction of flood risks or trends of flood risks is of major interest to people under direct threat, policy and decision makers as well as for insurance companies. A lot of research was and is currently done in view of detecting future trends in flood extremes or return periods. From a pure physically based point of view, there is strong evidence that those trends exist. But, the central point question is if trends in flood events or other extreme events could be detected from a statistical point of view and on the basis of the available data. This study will investigate this question on the basis of different target parameters and by using long term measurements.

  12. Measuring flood footprint of a regional economy - A case study for the UK flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, D.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the urban economy and society is central to understanding the broad impacts of flooding and to identify cost-effective adaptation and mitigation measures. Assessments of the flooding impacts on cities have traditionally focused on the initial impact on people and assets. These initial estimates (so-called ';direct damage') are useful both in understanding the immediate implications of damage, and in marshalling the pools of capital and supplies required for re-building after an event. Since different economies as well as societies are coupled, especially under the current economic crisis, any small-scale damage may be multiplied and cascaded throughout wider economic systems and social networks. The direct and indirect damage is currently not evaluated well and could be captured by quantification of what we call the flood footprint. Flooding in one location can impact the whole UK economy. Neglecting these knock-on costs (i.e. the true footprint of the flood) means we might be ignoring the economic benefits and beneficiaries of flood risk management interventions. In 2007, for example, floods cost the economy about £3.2 bn directly, but the wider effect might actually add another 50% to 250% to that. Flood footprint is a measure of the exclusive total socioeconomic impact that is directly and indirectly caused by a flood event to the flooding region and wider economic systems and social networks. We adopt the UK 2012 flooding. An input-output basic dynamic inequalities (BDI) model is used to assess the impact of the floodings on the level of a Yorkshire economy, accounting for interactions between industries through demand and supply of intermediate consumption goods with a circular flow. After the disaster the economy will be unbalanced. The recovery process finishes when the economy is completely balance, i.e., when labour production capacity equals demands and production and all the variables reach pre-disaster levels. The analysis is carried out

  13. Flood Finder: Mobile-based automated water level estimation and mapping during floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongsiriyaporn, B.; Jariyavajee, C.; Laoharawee, N.; Narkthong, N.; Pitichat, T.; Goldin, S. E.

    2014-02-01

    Every year, Southeast Asia faces numerous flooding disasters, resulting in very high human and economic loss. Responding to a sudden flood is difficult due to the lack of accurate and up-to- date information about the incoming water status. We have developed a mobile application called Flood Finder to solve this problem. Flood Finder allows smartphone users to measure, share and search for water level information at specified locations. The application uses image processing to compute the water level from a photo taken by users. The photo must be of a known reference object with a standard size. These water levels are more reliable and consistent than human estimates since they are derived from an algorithmic measuring function. Flood Finder uploads water level readings to the server, where they can be searched and mapped by other users via the mobile phone app or standard browsers. Given the widespread availability of smartphones in Asia, Flood Finder can provide more accurate and up-to-date information for better preparation for a flood disaster as well as life safety and property protection.

  14. Validation of a global hydrodynamic flood inundation model against high resolution observation data of urban flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Paul; Sampson, Chris; Smith, Andy; Neal, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present further validation results for a hyper-resolution global flood inundation model. We use a true hydrodynamic model that uses highly efficient numerical algorithms (LISFLOOD-FP) to simulate flood inundation at ~1km resolution globally and then use downscaling algorithms to determine flood extent and water depth at 3 seconds of arc spatial resolution (~90m at the equator). The global model has ~150 million cells and requires ~180 hours of CPU time for a 10 year simulation period. Terrain data are taken from a custom version of the SRTM data set that has been processed specifically for hydrodynamic modelling. Return periods of flood flows along the entire global river network are determined using: (1) empirical relationships between catchment characteristics and index flood magnitude in different hydroclimatic zones derived from global runoff data; and (2) an index flood growth curve, also empirically derived. Bankful return period flow is then used to set channel width and depth, and flood defence impacts are modelled using empirical relationships between GDP, urbanization and defence standard of protection. The results of these simulations are global flood hazard maps for a number of different return period events from 1 in 5 to 1 in 1000 years. This method has already been show to compare well to return period flood hazard maps derived from models built with high resolution and accuracy local data (Sampson et al., submitted), yet the output from the global flood model has not yet been compared to real flood observations. Whilst the spatial resolution of the global model is high given the size of the model domain, ~1km resolution is still coarse compared to the models typically used to simulate urban flooding and the data typically used to validate these (~25m or less). Comparison of the global model to real-world observations or urban flooding therefore represents an exceptionally stringent test of model skill. In this paper we therefore

  15. Effect of cholesterol on miscibility and phase behavior in binary mixtures with synthetic ceramide 2 and octadecanoic acid. Infrared studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Mendelsohn, R; Rerek, M E; Moore, D J

    2001-06-01

    The three main lipid components of the stratum corneum, namely ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol, play a fundamental role in the maintenance of the skin barrier. The current investigation is aimed toward understanding the miscibility and intermolecular interactions of these lipids. Toward this end, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the three possible equimolar binary mixtures of cholesterol, a synthetic non-hydroxylated fatty acid N-acyl sphingosine with a C18 chain length (N-stearoylsphingosine, approximating human ceramide 2), and stearic acid were undertaken. The thermotropic responses of the methylene stretching and scissoring vibrations were used to evaluate chain conformation and packing respectively. Selective perdeuteration, of either the stearic acid or the ceramide acid chains, permitted separate and simultaneous evaluation of the conformational order and packing properties of the sphingosine chain, the amide linked fatty acid chains and/or the stearic acid chain. Whereas cholesterol mixed well with ceramide at physiological temperatures, the stearic acid was miscible with the cholesterol only at relatively high temperatures where the fatty acid is disordered. A complex interaction between stearic acid and ceramide was detected. A separate fatty acid-rich phase persisted until at least 50 degrees C, whereas at higher temperatures the components appear to be quite miscible. However, a preferential association of the fatty acid with the ceramide base chain is indicated. None of the binary systems studied exhibit miscibility and interactions resembling those in the ternary mixtures of these substances, which is widely used to model stratum corneum. The role of cholesterol in controlling the miscibility characteristics in the ternary system is evident.

  16. Acousto-optic method used to control water pollution by miscible liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferria, Kouider; Griani, Lazhar; Laouar, Naamane

    2012-05-01

    An acousto-optic (A.O.) method has been developed for controlling the quality of water mixed by miscible liquids like acetone or ethanol… The liquid mixture is filled in a rectangular glass cell, which is placed orthogonally to the incident collimated beam of light. This cell consists of a piezoelectric transducer for generating ultrasonic waves. The collimated light while passing through this cell undergoes a diffraction phenomenon. The diffracted dots are collected by a converging photographic objective and displayed in its back focal plane. The location of the diffracted dots and their intensity are sensitive to any variation of the interaction medium. This result leads to decide about the quality of the water.

  17. Polymer collapse in miscible good solvents is a generic phenomenon driven by preferential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos M.; Kremer, Kurt

    2014-09-01

    Water and alcohol, such as methanol or ethanol, are miscible and, individually, good solvents for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm), but this polymer precipitates in water-alcohol mixtures. The intriguing behaviour of solvent mixtures that cannot dissolve a given polymer or a given protein, while the same macromolecule dissolves well in each of the cosolvents, is called cononsolvency. It is a widespread phenomenon, relevant for many formulation steps in the physicochemical and pharmaceutical industry, that is usually explained by invoking specific chemical details of the mixtures: as such, it has so far eluded any generic explanation. Here, by using a combination of simulations and theory, we present a simple and universal treatment that requires only the preferential interaction of one of the cosolvents with the polymer. The results show striking quantitative agreement with experiments and chemically specific simulations, opening a new perspective towards an operational understanding of macromolecular solubility.

  18. Countersuperflow instability in miscible two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Shungo; Tsubota, Makoto; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu

    2011-06-15

    We study theoretically the instability of countersuperflow, i.e., two counterpropagating miscible superflows, in uniform two-component Bose-Einstein condensates. Countersuperflow instability causes mutual friction between the superfluids, causing a momentum exchange between the two condensates, when the relative velocity of the counterflow exceeds a critical value. The momentum exchange leads to nucleation of vortex rings from characteristic density patterns due to the nonlinear development of the instability. Expansion of the vortex rings drastically accelerates the momentum exchange, leading to a highly nonlinear regime caused by intervortex interaction and vortex reconnection between the rings. For a sufficiently large interaction between the two components, rapid expansion of the vortex rings causes isotropic turbulence and the global relative motion of the two condensates relaxes. The maximum vortex line density in the turbulence is proportional to the square of the relative velocity.

  19. Theoretical study of miscibility and glass-forming trends in mixtures of polystyrene spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, W.-H.; Stroud, D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of glass-forming trends and miscibility in mixtures of polystyrene spheres (polyballs) of different diameters, suspended in an aqueous solution, is presented. The polyballs are assumed to be charged and to interact via a Debye-Hueckel screened Coulomb potential. The Helmholtz free energy is calculated from a variational principle based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality, in which a mixture of hard spheres of different diameters is chosen as the reference system. It is found that when the charges of the two types of polyballs are sufficiently different, the variationally determined ratio of hard-sphere diameters differs substantially, leading to packing difficulties characteristic of glass formation. The experimentally observed range of glass formation corresponds to a ratio of hard-sphere diameters of 0.8 or less. Calculations of the free energy as a function of concentration indicate that the liquid polyball mixture is stable against the phase separation, even for widely different polyball charges.

  20. Polymer collapse in miscible good solvents is a generic phenomenon driven by preferential adsorption.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Debashish; Marques, Carlos M; Kremer, Kurt

    2014-09-12

    Water and alcohol, such as methanol or ethanol, are miscible and, individually, good solvents for poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm), but this polymer precipitates in water-alcohol mixtures. The intriguing behaviour of solvent mixtures that cannot dissolve a given polymer or a given protein, while the same macromolecule dissolves well in each of the cosolvents, is called cononsolvency. It is a widespread phenomenon, relevant for many formulation steps in the physicochemical and pharmaceutical industry, that is usually explained by invoking specific chemical details of the mixtures: as such, it has so far eluded any generic explanation. Here, by using a combination of simulations and theory, we present a simple and universal treatment that requires only the preferential interaction of one of the cosolvents with the polymer. The results show striking quantitative agreement with experiments and chemically specific simulations, opening a new perspective towards an operational understanding of macromolecular solubility.

  1. Stability of viscosity stratified flows down an incline: Role of miscibility and wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sukhendu; Usha, R.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of wall velocity slip on the linear stability of a gravity-driven miscible two-fluid flow down an incline are examined. The fluids have the matched density but different viscosity. A smooth viscosity stratification is achieved due to the presence of a thin mixed layer between the fluids. The results show that the presence of slip exhibits a promise for stabilizing the miscible flow system by raising the critical Reynolds number at the onset and decreasing the bandwidth of unstable wave numbers beyond the threshold of the dominant instability. This is different from its role in the case of a single fluid down a slippery substrate where slip destabilizes the flow system at the onset. Though the stability properties are analogous to the same flow system down a rigid substrate, slip is shown to delay the surface mode instability for any viscosity contrast. It has a damping/promoting effect on the overlap modes (which exist due to the overlap of critical layer of dominant disturbance with the mixed layer) when the mixed layer is away/close from/to the slippery inclined wall. The trend of slip effect is influenced by the location of the mixed layer, the location of more viscous fluid, and the mass diffusivity of the two fluids. The stabilizing characteristics of slip can be favourably used to suppress the non-linear breakdown which may happen due to the coexistence of the unstable modes in a flow over a substrate with no slip. The results of the present study suggest that it is desirable to design a slippery surface with appropriate slip sensitivity in order to meet a particular need for a specific application.

  2. Nonmodal linear stability analysis of miscible viscous fingering in porous media.

    PubMed

    Hota, Tapan Kumar; Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-11-01

    The nonmodal linear stability of miscible viscous fingering in a two-dimensional homogeneous porous medium has been investigated. The linearized perturbed equations for Darcy's law coupled with a convection-diffusion equation is discretized using a finite difference method. The resultant initial value problem is solved by a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, followed by a singular value decomposition of the propagator matrix. Particular attention is given to the transient behavior rather than the long-time behavior of eigenmodes predicted by the traditional modal analysis. The transient behaviors of the response to external excitations and the response to initial conditions are studied by examining the ε-pseudospectra structures and the largest energy growth function, respectively. With the help of nonmodal stability analysis we demonstrate that at early times the displacement flow is dominated by diffusion and the perturbations decay. At later times, when convection dominates diffusion, perturbations grow. Furthermore, we show that the dominant perturbation that experiences the maximum amplification within the linear regime lead to the transient growth. These two important features were previously unattainable in the existing linear stability methods for miscible viscous fingering. To explore the relevance of the optimal perturbation obtained from nonmodal analysis, we performed direct numerical simulations using a highly accurate pseudospectral method. Furthermore, a comparison of the present stability analysis with existing modal and initial value approach is also presented. It is shown that the nonmodal stability results are in better agreement than the other existing stability analyses, with those obtained from direct numerical simulations. PMID:26651779

  3. Determination of miscibility pressure by direct observation method. Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the project is to conduct laboratory tests to: (1) develop a method for determining MMP through direct observation using a high pressure cell; (2) determine feasibility of in-situ foam generation by visual observation and microphotographic technique. The project is presently organized and carried out in three major fronts: (1) MMP test; (2) high pressure sampling and chemical analysis; and (3) foam study and displacement test. The technical progress in each of these areas is discussed. The effects of temperature on MMP and appearance of CO/sub 2/-rich phase for four crude oils tested are plotted. The MMP is the pressure at which the CO/sub 2/-rich phase becomes miscible with CO/sub 2/ vapor. The results of gas chromatographic analysis for the four crude oils tested are presented. As previously stated the richness of C/sub 5/ to C/sub 20/ components is the key factor for determining the quality and stability of the miscible transition zone. The surfactant/CO/sub 2/ ratio relative to foam quality and foam quantity are presented in a table and also plotted. The plotted figures show: (1) the foam qualities increased as the surfactant rates are decreased; (2) at 75/sup 0/F, the foam quality increases as the pressure is decreased whereas the reverse is true for temperature at 120/sup 0/F; (3) foam generating rate increased with increasing surfactant/CO/sub 2/ ratio; (4) high temperatures tend to lower the rate and high pressures tend to increase the rate at 120/sup 0/F but to decrease at 75/sup 0/F; (5) foam quality was found to be affected more by surfactant/CO/sub 2/ ratio, and to a lesser degree by pressure and temperature. (ATT)

  4. Changes in Soil Microbial Community Structure with Flooding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flooding disturbs both above- and below-ground ecosystem processes. Although often ignored, changes in below-ground environments are no less important than those that occur above-ground. Shifts in soil microbial community structure are expected when anaerobic conditions develop from flooding. The ...

  5. Real Time Monitoring of Flooding from Microwave Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Frey, H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this report, we review the progress to date including results from data analyses and present a schedule of milestones for the remainder of the project. We discuss the processing of flood extent data and SSM/I brightness temperature data for the 1993 Midwest Flood. We present preliminary results from the derivation of open water fraction from brightness temperatures.

  6. Flooding in Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Masakazu; Matumoto, Aoki

    2010-05-01

    Edo River to diverge from Tone River on the right side flows away through Tokyo downtown, and into Tokyo Bay. Tone River of main stream flows through the north region of Kanto into Chiba prefecture of rural aria. Tone River originally flowed through present Edo River into Tokyo downtown. So when Tokyo (Edo era) became the political center of Japan 400 years ago, this place had been suffered from flood caused by augmenting downstream flowing of rainfall over watershed catchment area. Edo Government extended near independent small rivers and connected with Tone River and led away most of flood water transportation into Chiba prefecture to be a rural reason. The present rout of the river has been determined in the mass during the 16th century. Created artificial Edo River experimentally divided into 40 percentage and artificial Tone River divided into 60 percentage of flood water transportation. After that Japanese Government confirmed a safety against flood and confirmed to be a safety Tokyo by using SFM (storage function method) and SNFM (steady non-uniform flow method). Japanese Government estimated Plan High Water Discharge 17,500m3/s at upstream of the divergent point and Edo river flowing through 40 percentage (7,000m3/s) of 17,500m3/s which was same ratio as Edo era. But SFM and SNFM could not explain dynamic flow phenomena. We surveyed how many channel storage amount were there in this river by using UFM (unsteady flow method). We reproduce real flowing shape and carried out more detail dynamic phenomena. In this research, we had taken up diverse and various 11floods from 1981. These floods were confirmed that Edo River to be bifurcated less than 40 percentages. Large flood are not always high ratio of diversion in to Edo River. It's almost smaller ratio rather than higher ratio. For example, peak discharge 11,117m3/s, Aug. 1982 flood was bifurcated into Edo river flowing through 20 percentage of 11,117m3/s. Small flood peak discharge 1,030m3/s, Aug. 1992

  7. The tele-connections of long duration floods and their implications for dynamically updating the Flood Control Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devineni, Naresh; Najibi, Nasser; Lall, Upmanu

    2016-04-01

    Traditional approaches to flood risk assessment are typically indexed to an instantaneous peak flow event at a specific recording gage on a river, and then extrapolated through hydraulic modeling of that peak flow to the potential area that is likely to be inundated. However, property losses tend to be determined as much by the duration and volume of flooding as by the depth and velocity of inundation. We argue that the existing notion of a flood risk assessment and consequent reservoir flood control operations needs to be revisited, especially for floods due to persistent rainfall (>30 day duration). Our interest lies in explicitly understanding the dependence of the likelihood or frequency and intensity of extreme regional floods on a causal chain of ocean-atmosphere processes whose slow variation and regime-like changes translate into significant and persistent changes in the probability of major floods in the large river basins. An understanding and mapping of these factors into a dynamic risk framework is important for establishing a process by which flood risk for large basins could be systematically updated reflecting changing climate conditions, whether due to human influence, or as part of the natural cycles of climate variation. In this study, we developed an inference system for climate informed flood risk assessment using an integrated statistical modeling approach. We first develop multivariate flood attributes and classify their characteristic spatial variability using the hierarchical clustering approach. Depending on the flood event type, different rainfall inducing mechanisms (e.g. tropical storm, local convection, frontal system, recurrent tropical waves) may be involved with characteristic spatial scales and statistical properties. Hence, we identify the antecedent rainfall conditions for the flood types and map their corresponding specific atmospheric circulation patterns using compositing of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and the storm tracks

  8. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  9. Achieving Natural Flood Management through collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Alex; Byers, Samantha; Thomas, Ted; Welton, Phil

    2016-04-01

    Recent flooding in the UK has brought much attention to the field of Natural flood Management (NFM) as a means of helping to reduce flood risk to communities. Key questions exist in the field, which include quantifying the impact of NFM and maintaining it. In addition, agencies and at-risk communities look for ways of delivering NFM in a tightly stretched financial climate. Well-implemented NFM has the effect of restoring more natural catchment hydrological and sedimentological processes, which in turn can have significant flood risk and WFD benefits for catchment waterbodies. These catchment scale improvements in-turn allow more 'natural' processes to be returned to rivers and streams, creating a more resilient system. NFM can tick many boxes and target many funding opportunities. This paper discusses the NFM component of the Lustrum Beck Flood Alleviation Scheme (Stockton-On-Tees, UK), and explains how a multi-agency approach had to be considered to allow elements of the scheme to be delivered. A startling 70 different landowners and agencies manage the land in the Lustrum Beck catchment (~40km2). A partnership between the Environment Agency and the Forestry Commission is planning to work on a demonstration site in the centre of the catchment. The paper goes on to explain the importance of this demonstration area in the context of the wider scheme.

  10. Miscible fluid displacement stability in unconfined porous media:. Two-dimensional flow experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawitz, James W.; Annable, Michael D.; Rao, P. S. C.

    1998-06-01

    In situ flushing groundwater remediation technologies, such as cosolvent flushing, rely on the stability of the interface between the resident and displacing fluids for efficient removal of contaminants. Contrasts in density and viscosity between the resident and displacing fluids can adversely affect the stability of the displacement front. Petroleum engineers have developed techniques to describe these types of processes; however, their findings do not necessarily translate directly to aquifer remediation. The purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate how density and viscosity contrasts affected cosolvent displacements in unconfined porous media characterized by the presence of a capillary fringe. Two-dimensional flow laboratory experiments, which were partially scaled to a cosolvent flushing field experiment, were conducted to determine potential implications of flow instabilities in homogeneous sand packs. Numerical simulations were also conducted to investigate the differential impact of fluid property contrasts in unconfined and confined systems. The results from these experiments and simulations indicated that the presence of a capillary fringe was an important factor in the displacement efficiency. Buoyant forces can act to carry a lighter-than-water cosolvent preferentially into the capillary fringe during displacement of the resident groundwater. During subsequent water flooding, buoyancy forces can act to effectively trap the cosolvent in the capillary fringe, contributing to the inefficient removal of cosolvent from the aquifer.

  11. Floods in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Follansbee, Robert; Sawyer, Leon R.

    1948-01-01

    The first records of floods in Colorado antedated the settlement of the State by about 30 years. These were records of floods on the Arkansas and Republican Rivers in 1826. Other floods noted by traders, hunters and emigrants, some of whom were on their way to the Far West, occurred in 1844 on the Arkansas River, and by inference on the South Platte River. Other early floods were those on the Purgatoire, the Lower Arkansas, and the San Juan Rivers about 1859. The most serious flood since settlement began was that on the Arkansas River during June 1921, which caused the loss of about 100 lives and an estimated property loss of $19,000,000. Many floods of lesser magnitude have occurred, and some of these have caused loss of life and very considerable property damage. Topography is the chief factor in determining the location of storms and resulting floods. These occur most frequently on the eastern slope of the Front Range. In the mountains farther west precipitation is insufficient to cause floods except during periods of melting snow, in June. In the southwestern part of the State, where precipitation during periods of melting snow is insufficient to cause floods, the severest floods yet experienced resulted from heavy rains in September 1909 and October 1911. In the eastern foothills region, usually below an altitude of about 7,500 feet and extending for a distance of about 50 miles east of the mountains, is a zone subject to rainfalls of great intensity known as cloudbursts. These cloudbursts are of short duration and are confined to very small areas. At times the intensity is so great as to make breathing difficult for those exposed to a storm. The areas of intense rainfall are so small that Weather Bureau precipitation stations have not been located in them. Local residents, being cloudburst conscious, frequently measure the rainfall in receptacles in their yards, and such records constitute the only source of information regarding the intensity. A flood

  12. A laboratory investigation of the optimum CO/sub 2/ slug size required for CO/sub 2/ flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Omole, O.; Osoba, J.S.

    1984-02-01

    The optimum CO/sub 2/ bank size required during CO/sub 2/ flooding was studied in linear horizontal consolidated sandstone cores. Crude oils were displaced from the cores by different CO/sub 2/ slug sizes propelled with brine at pressures above the CO/sub 2/ - crude oil miscibility pressures of the oils. Two natural crude oils of 34/sup 0/ and 44/sup 0/ API gravity, two 2 in. X 2 in. 15 foot long and a 5 foot long horizontal consolidated sandstone cores were used for the investigation. Studies were conducted at 110/sup 0/ and at 120/sup 0/ F. A 0.3 HPV of CO/sub 2/ slug was found to be an optimum bank size required for flooding in the horizontal cores using water as the slug propellant. The total oil recoveries were lower for tests conducted at 120/sup 0/ F than for those conducted at 110/sup 0/ F.

  13. Detection and attribution of flood trends in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mediero, Luis; Santillan, David; Garrote, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Flood frequency analyses usually assume stationarity in observed series. However, non-stationarity assumptions question the results of traditional flood frequency analyses. Several factors can cause either trends or abrupt changes in flood time series, such as climate change, wildfires, volcanic eruptions, land-use changes, anthropogenic actions or relocation of gauging stations. Most of trend studies in Spain have been focused on annual, seasonal and monthly flows, which can be applied to water resources and droughts management. Nevertheless, a few local studies have analysed trends in floods in Spain at instantaneous or daily scales. A study to detect flood trends regarding magnitude, frequency and timing is carried out in Spain at a larger spatial scale. A representative hydrological network of gauging stations where near-natural flow regimes can be considered was obtained. Both annual maximum and peak over threshold series were extracted. Three periods of time were selected: 1942-2009, 1949-2009 and 1959-2009, to account for a smaller data set with a longer temporal scale and vice versa. The Mann-Kendall test was used to detect trends in flood series. An attempt to relate detected flood trends to precipitation trends was conducted. As result, a general decreasing trend in magnitude and frequency of floods was detected throughout Spain. Regarding flood timing, floods tend to occur later in the northwest of Spain. Most of flood trends in magnitude could be related to decreasing trends in precipitation and changes that modify rainfall-runoff processes at the catchment scale. Acknowledgements: The authors acknowledge support from the MODEX project (CGL2011-22868) "Physically-based modelling for characterisation of extreme hydrologic response under a probabilistic approach. Application to dam safety analysis and optimisation of reservoir operation during floods", funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness.

  14. Flood variability east of Australia’s Great Dividing Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustomji, Paul; Bennett, Neil; Chiew, Francis

    2009-08-01

    SummaryThe variability of flow in river channels influences the spatial and temporal variability of many biophysical processes including the transport of sediment and waterborne pollutants and the recruitment of aquatic animals and plants. In this study, inter- and intra-basin patterns of flood variability are examined for catchments east of Australia's Great Dividing Range. Three measures of flood variability are explored with uncertainty quantified using bootstrap resampling. The two preferred measures of flood variability (namely a flood quantile ratio and a power law scaling coefficient) produced similar results. Catchments in the wet tropics of far north Queensland experience low flood variability. Flood variability increased southwards through Queensland, reaching a maximum in the vicinity of the Fitzroy and Burnett River basins. The small near-coast catchments of southern Queensland and northern New Wales experience low flood variability. Flood variability is also high in the southern Hunter River and Hawkesbury-Nepean basins. Using L-moment ratio diagrams with data from 424 streamflow stations, we also conclude that the Generalised Pareto distribution is preferable for modelling flood frequency curves for this region. These results provide a regional perspective that can be used to develop new hypotheses about the effects of hydrologic variability on the biophysical characteristics of these Australian rivers.

  15. 78 FR 5822 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  16. 77 FR 18846 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  17. 77 FR 18844 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  18. 77 FR 18841 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  19. 78 FR 5826 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  20. 78 FR 5824 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  1. 78 FR 49278 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  2. 78 FR 21143 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  3. 77 FR 18839 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  4. 77 FR 18842 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  5. 77 FR 18835 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  6. 78 FR 49277 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  7. 77 FR 18837 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Comments are requested on proposed flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of any Base Flood Elevation (BFE), base flood...

  8. The Global Flood Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P.; Huddelston, M.; Michel, G.; Thompson, S.; Heynert, K.; Pickering, C.; Abbott Donnelly, I.; Fewtrell, T.; Galy, H.; Sperna Weiland, F.; Winsemius, H.; Weerts, A.; Nixon, S.; Davies, P.; Schiferli, D.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, a Global Flood Model (GFM) initiative has been proposed by Willis, UK Met Office, Esri, Deltares and IBM. The idea is to create a global community platform that enables better understanding of the complexities of flood risk assessment to better support the decisions, education and communication needed to mitigate flood risk. The GFM will provide tools for assessing the risk of floods, for devising mitigation strategies such as land-use changes and infrastructure improvements, and for enabling effective pre- and post-flood event response. The GFM combines humanitarian and commercial motives. It will benefit: - The public, seeking to preserve personal safety and property; - State and local governments, seeking to safeguard economic activity, and improve resilience; - NGOs, similarly seeking to respond proactively to flood events; - The insurance sector, seeking to understand and price flood risk; - Large corporations, seeking to protect global operations and supply chains. The GFM is an integrated and transparent set of modules, each composed of models and data. For each module, there are two core elements: a live "reference version" (a worked example) and a framework of specifications, which will allow development of alternative versions. In the future, users will be able to work with the reference version or substitute their own models and data. If these meet the specification for the relevant module, they will interoperate with the rest of the GFM. Some "crowd-sourced" modules could even be accredited and published to the wider GFM community. Our intent is to build on existing public, private and academic work, improve local adoption, and stimulate the development of multiple - but compatible - alternatives, so strengthening mankind's ability to manage flood impacts. The GFM is being developed and managed by a non-profit organization created for the purpose. The business model will be inspired from open source software (eg Linux): - for non-profit usage

  9. Flood of support.

    PubMed

    Musgrave, Shonagh

    A year on from the torrential floods that struck Cumbria, many people are still unable to return to their homes. A team of therapists is helping people to cope with the stress and frustration. The January 2005 floods came four years after foot and mouth disease hit Cumbria. The region depends on agriculture, hill walking and tourism for revenue. Therapists offer residents a choice of eight, different complementary therapies. Users of the service say the therapies reduce stress and help them relax. PMID:16629105

  10. Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods

    SciTech Connect

    Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

    2013-12-31

    The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of– state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a user’s guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

  11. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  12. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  13. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  14. 44 CFR 60.24 - Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... flood-related erosion-prone areas. 60.24 Section 60.24 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL..., Mudslide (i.e., Mudflow)-Prone and Flood-Related Erosion-Prone Areas § 60.24 Planning considerations for flood-related erosion-prone areas. The planning process for communities identified under part 65 of...

  15. Epic Flooding in Georgia, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; McCallum, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Atlanta-September 2009 Floods * The epic floods experienced in the Atlanta area in September 2009 were extremely rare. Eighteen streamgages in the Metropolitan Atlanta area had flood magnitudes much greater than the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) annual exceedance probability. * The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) reported that 23 counties in Georgia were declared disaster areas due to this flood and that 16,981 homes and 3,482 businesses were affected by floodwaters. Ten lives were lost in the flood. The total estimated damages exceed $193 million (H.E. Longenecker, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., November 2009). * On Sweetwater Creek near Austell, Ga., just north of Interstate 20, the peak stage was more than 6 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. Flood magnitudes in Cobb County on Sweetwater, Butler, and Powder Springs Creeks greatly exceeded the estimated 0.2-percent (500-year) floods for these streams. * In Douglas County, the Dog River at Ga. Highway 5 near Fairplay had a peak stage nearly 20 feet higher than the estimated peak stage of the 0.2-percent (500-year) flood. * On the Chattahoochee River, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage at Vinings reached the highest level recorded in the past 81 years. Gwinnett, De Kalb, Fulton, and Rockdale Counties also had record flooding. South Georgia March and April 2009 Floods * The March and April 2009 floods in South Georgia were smaller in magnitude than the September floods but still caused significant damage. * No lives were lost in this flood. Approximately $60 million in public infrastructure damage occurred to roads, culverts, bridges and a water treatment facility (Joseph T. McKinney, Federal Emergency Management Agency, written commun., July 2009). * Flow at the Satilla River near Waycross, exceeded the 0.5-percent (200-year) flood. Flows at seven other stations in South Georgia exceeded the 1-percent (100-year) flood.

  16. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  17. Spatial planning using probabilistic flood maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso, Leonardo; Mukolwe, Micah; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2015-04-01

    Probabilistic flood maps account for uncertainty in flood inundation modelling and convey a degree of certainty in the outputs. Major sources of uncertainty include input data, topographic data, model structure, observation data and parametric uncertainty. Decision makers prefer less ambiguous information from modellers; this implies that uncertainty is suppressed to yield binary flood maps. Though, suppressing information may potentially lead to either surprise or misleading decisions. Inclusion of uncertain information in the decision making process is therefore desirable and transparent. To this end, we utilise the Prospect theory and information from a probabilistic flood map to evaluate potential decisions. Consequences related to the decisions were evaluated using flood risk analysis. Prospect theory explains how choices are made given options for which probabilities of occurrence are known and accounts for decision makers' characteristics such as loss aversion and risk seeking. Our results show that decision making is pronounced when there are high gains and loss, implying higher payoffs and penalties, therefore a higher gamble. Thus the methodology may be appropriately considered when making decisions based on uncertain information.

  18. Sustainability appraisal and flood risk management

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jeremy G. White, Iain Richards, Juliet

    2009-01-15

    This research establishes that sustainability appraisal (SA) has a role to play in strengthening spatial plans in the context of flooding issues. Indeed, evidence has been gathered to indicate that tentative steps are being taken in this direction during the SA of English regional spatial plans, which are used as an illustrative case study. In England as in many other countries, appraisal procedures including SA and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are enshrined in planning law. An opportunity therefore exists to utilise existing and familiar planning tools to embed flooding considerations within spatial plans at an early stage in the planning process. SA (and similar appraisal tools such as SEA) can therefore usefully aid in the implementation of decision making principles and government policy relating to flooding. Moreover, with the threats associated with climate change becoming increasingly apparent, of which increased flood risk is a particular concern in many countries, there is a need develop appropriate adaptation responses. This article emphasizes the role that SA can play in managing future flood risk in this context.

  19. Flooding stress: acclimations and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Bailey-Serres, J; Voesenek, L A C J

    2008-01-01

    Flooding is an environmental stress for many natural and man-made ecosystems worldwide. Genetic diversity in the plant response to flooding includes alterations in architecture, metabolism, and elongation growth associated with a low O(2) escape strategy and an antithetical quiescence scheme that allows endurance of prolonged submergence. Flooding is frequently accompanied with a reduction of cellular O(2) content that is particularly severe when photosynthesis is limited or absent. This necessitates the production of ATP and regeneration of NAD(+) through anaerobic respiration. The examination of gene regulation and function in model systems provides insight into low-O(2)-sensing mechanisms and metabolic adjustments associated with controlled use of carbohydrate and ATP. At the developmental level, plants can escape the low-O(2) stress caused by flooding through multifaceted alterations in cellular and organ structure that promote access to and diffusion of O(2). These processes are driven by phytohormones, including ethylene, gibberellin, and abscisic acid. This exploration of natural variation in strategies that improve O(2) and carbohydrate status during flooding provides valuable resources for the improvement of crop endurance of an environmental adversity that is enhanced by global warming.

  20. 77 FR 50709 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has provided to the affected communities. The FIRM and FIS report are the... affected by the flood hazard determinations are provided in the tables below. Any request for.... Additional information regarding the SRP process can be found online at...

  1. Hydrologic Flood Routing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heggen, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses a short classroom-based BASIC program which routes stream flow through a system of channels and reservoirs. The program is suitable for analyses of open channel conveyance systems, flood detention reservoirs, and combinations of the two. (Author/JN)

  2. After the Flood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2007-01-01

    When floodwater swept through the McVities biscuit factory in Carlisle in January 2005 few were confident that it would reopen. The factory, in the Caldewgate area of the city, was one of the first casualties of the flood, as water, nine feet deep in places, coursed trough the food preparation areas, destroying equipment and covering everything in…

  3. Flooding on Elbe River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further downriver in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea. Credit:Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  4. The Stanford Flood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Philip D.

    1979-01-01

    Describes, from the flood to the start of freeze-drying operations, the preservation efforts of Stanford University regarding books damaged by water in the Green Library in November 1978. Planning, action, and mopping-up activities are chronicled, and 20 suggestions are offered as guidance in future similar situations. (JD)

  5. Rethinking the relationship between flood risk perception and flood management.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, S; Muro, M; Jeffrey, P; Smith, H M

    2014-04-15

    Although flood risk perceptions and their concomitant motivations for behaviour have long been recognised as significant features of community resilience in the face of flooding events, there has, for some time now, been a poorly appreciated fissure in the accompanying literature. Specifically, rationalist and constructivist paradigms in the broader domain of risk perception provide different (though not always conflicting) contexts for interpreting evidence and developing theory. This contribution reviews the major constructs that have been applied to understanding flood risk perceptions and contextualises these within broader conceptual developments around risk perception theory and contemporary thinking around flood risk management. We argue that there is a need to re-examine and re-invigorate flood risk perception research, in a manner that is comprehensively underpinned by more constructivist thinking around flood risk management as well as by developments in broader risk perception research. We draw attention to an historical over-emphasis on the cognitive perceptions of those at risk to the detriment of a richer understanding of a wider range of flood risk perceptions such as those of policy-makers or of tax-payers who live outside flood affected areas as well as the linkages between these perspectives and protective measures such as state-supported flood insurance schemes. Conclusions challenge existing understandings of the relationship between risk perception and flood management, particularly where the latter relates to communication strategies and the extent to which those at risk from flooding feel responsible for taking protective actions.

  6. Free volume study on the miscibility of PEEK/PEI blend using positron annihilation and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, R.; Alam, S.

    2015-06-01

    High performance polymer blend of poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) and poly(ether imide) (PEI) was examined for their free volume behaviour using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis methods. The fractional free volume obtained from PALS shows a negative deviation from linear additivity rule implying good miscibility between PEEK and PEI. The dynamic modulus and loss tangent were obtained for the blends at three different frequencies 1, 10 and 100 Hz at temperatures close to and above their glass transition temperature. Applying Time-Temperature-Superposition (TTS) principle to the DMTA results, master curves were obtained at a reference temperature To and the WLF coefficients c01 and c02 were evaluated. Both the methods give similar results for the dependence of fractional free volume on PEI content in this blend. The results reveal that free volume plays an important role in determining the visco-elastic properties in miscible polymer blends.

  7. European Flood Awareness System - now operational

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alionte Eklund, Cristina.; Hazlinger, Michal; Sprokkereef, Eric; Garcia Padilla, Mercedes; Garcia, Rafael J.; Thielen, Jutta; Salamon, Peter; Pappenberger, Florian

    2013-04-01

    EFAS Computational centre - European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts - will be running the forecasts, post-processing and operating the EFAS-Information System platform • EFAS Dissemination centre—Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Slovak Hydrometeorological Institute and Rijkswaterstaat Waterdienst (the Netherlands)—analyse the results on a daily basis, assess the situation, and disseminate information to the EFAS partners The European Commission is responsible for contract management. The Joint Research Centre further provides support for EFAS through research and development. Aims of EFAS operational • added value early flood forecasting products to hydrological services • unique overview products of ongoing and forecast floods in Europe more than 3 days in advance • create a European network of operational hydrological services

  8. Past and future flooding in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele-Eich, Insa; Hopson, Thomas; Simmer, Clemens; Simon, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Currently, an average of about 20 % of the land surface in Bangladesh is flooded each year, affecting one of the most densely populated regions in the world. We aim to understand the processes currently determining flooding in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) basin, in particular the role of precipitation and sea-level rise, as well as to assess how climate change might impact flood characteristics in the future. Water level and discharge data were provided by the Bangladesh Water Development Board on a daily basis for a period of 1909-2009. Monthly maps based on daily sea level anomalies from the Data Unification Altimeter Combination System DUACS are available on a 0.25° by 0.25° grid for the time period 1993-2014. Ensemble model output for upper catchment precipitation and annual mean thermosteric sea-level rise is taken from historical and RCP scenario runs conducted with the CCSM4. We first analyzed daily water levels of the past 100 years in order to detect potential shifts in extremes. The available observations are then used to set up a generalized linear model to detect how precipitation influences flooding in the GBM basin. This model can then be used to give a prognosis on changes in future flooding. Our analysis suggests that water levels have indeed changed over the course of the past century. While the magnitude and duration of average flood events decreased, the frequency of extreme flood events has increased. Low water levels have also changed, with a significant decrease in the annual minimum water level most noticeable when we compare the time periods 1909-1939 and 1979-2009. For the future, first results confirm the decrease in return periods of strong flood events found in previous studies. The impact of climate change on flooding will also be compared to the impact of man-made structures such as Farakka barrage, built across the Ganges on the border between India and Bangladesh and operating since 1975. This is of particular interest as

  9. Dynamics of flood water infiltration and ground water recharge in hyperarid desert.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Ofer; Tatarsky, Boaz; Enzel, Yehouda; Kulls, Christoph; Seely, Mary; Benito, Gererdo

    2008-01-01

    A study on flood water infiltration and ground water recharge of a shallow alluvial aquifer was conducted in the hyperarid section of the Kuiseb River, Namibia. The study site was selected to represent a typical desert ephemeral river. An instrumental setup allowed, for the first time, continuous monitoring of infiltration during a flood event through the channel bed and the entire vadose zone. The monitoring system included flexible time domain reflectometry probes that were designed to measure the temporal variation in vadose zone water content and instruments to concurrently measure the levels of flood and ground water. A sequence of five individual floods was monitored during the rainy season in early summer 2006. These newly generated data served to elucidate the dynamics of flood water infiltration. Each flood initiated an infiltration event which was expressed in wetting of the vadose zone followed by a measurable rise in the water table. The data enabled a direct calculation of the infiltration fluxes by various independent methods. The floods varied in their stages, peaks, and initial water contents. However, all floods produced very similar flux rates, suggesting that the recharge rates are less affected by the flood stages but rather controlled by flow duration and available aquifer storage under it. Large floods flood the stream channel terraces and promote the larger transmission losses. These, however, make only a negligible contribution to the recharge of the ground water. It is the flood duration within the active streambed, which may increase with flood magnitude that is important to the recharge process.

  10. Rapid Exposure Assessment of Nationwide River Flood for Disaster Risk Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Park, J.; Arifuzzaman, B.; Iwami, Y.; Amirul, Md.; Kondoh, A.

    2016-06-01

    considerably increased. For flood disaster risk reduction, it is important to identify and characterize flood area, locations (particularly lowland along rivers), and durations. For this purpose, flood mapping and monitoring are an imperative process and the fundamental part of risk management as well as emergency response. Our ultimate goal is to detect flood inundation areas over a nationwide scale despite limitations of optical and multispectral images, and to estimate flood risk in terms of affected people. We propose a methodological possibility to be used as a standard approach for nationwide rapid flood exposure assessment with the use of the multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), a big contributor to progress in near-real-time flood mapping. The preliminary results in Bangladesh show that a propensity of flood risk change strongly depends on the temporal and spatial dynamics of exposure such as distributed population.

  11. Attribution of regional flood changes based on scaling fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viglione, Alberto; Merz, Bruno; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Parajka, Juraj; Nester, Thomas; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-07-01

    Changes in the river flood regime may be due to atmospheric processes (e.g., increasing precipitation), catchment processes (e.g., soil compaction associated with land use change), and river system processes (e.g., loss of retention volume in the floodplains). This paper proposes a new framework for attributing flood changes to these drivers based on a regional analysis. We exploit the scaling characteristics (i.e., fingerprints) with catchment area of the effects of the drivers on flood changes. The estimation of their relative contributions is framed in Bayesian terms. Analysis of a synthetic, controlled case suggests that the accuracy of the regional attribution increases with increasing number of sites and record lengths, decreases with increasing regional heterogeneity, increases with increasing difference of the scaling fingerprints, and decreases with an increase of their prior uncertainty. The applicability of the framework is illustrated for a case study set in Austria, where positive flood trends have been observed at many sites in the past decades. The individual scaling fingerprints related to the atmospheric, catchment, and river system processes are estimated from rainfall data and simple hydrological modeling. Although the distributions of the contributions are rather wide, the attribution identifies precipitation change as the main driver of flood change in the study region. Overall, it is suggested that the extension from local attribution to a regional framework, including multiple drivers and explicit estimation of uncertainty, could constitute a similar shift in flood change attribution as the extension from local to regional flood frequency analysis.

  12. Attribution of regional flood changes based on scaling fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Bruno; Viet Dung, Nguyen; Parajka, Juraj; Nester, Thomas; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Changes in the river flood regime may be due to atmospheric processes (e.g., increasing precipitation), catchment processes (e.g., soil compaction associated with land use change), and river system processes (e.g., loss of retention volume in the floodplains). This paper proposes a new framework for attributing flood changes to these drivers based on a regional analysis. We exploit the scaling characteristics (i.e., fingerprints) with catchment area of the effects of the drivers on flood changes. The estimation of their relative contributions is framed in Bayesian terms. Analysis of a synthetic, controlled case suggests that the accuracy of the regional attribution increases with increasing number of sites and record lengths, decreases with increasing regional heterogeneity, increases with increasing difference of the scaling fingerprints, and decreases with an increase of their prior uncertainty. The applicability of the framework is illustrated for a case study set in Austria, where positive flood trends have been observed at many sites in the past decades. The individual scaling fingerprints related to the atmospheric, catchment, and river system processes are estimated from rainfall data and simple hydrological modeling. Although the distributions of the contributions are rather wide, the attribution identifies precipitation change as the main driver of flood change in the study region. Overall, it is suggested that the extension from local attribution to a regional framework, including multiple drivers and explicit estimation of uncertainty, could constitute a similar shift in flood change attribution as the extension from local to regional flood frequency analysis.

  13. Data expansion: the potential of grey literature for understanding floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Bertelmann, R.; Merz, B.

    2013-03-01

    Sophisticated methods have been developed and become standard in analysing floods as well as for assessing flood risk. However, increasingly critique of the current standards and scientific practice can be found both in the flood hydrology community as well as in the risk community who argue that the considerable amount of information already available on natural disasters has not been adequately deployed and brought to effective use. We describe this phenomenon as a failure to synthesize knowledge that results from barriers and ignorance in awareness, use and management of the entire spectrum of relevant content, that is, data, information and knowledge. In this paper we argue that the scientific community in flood risk research ignores event-specific analysis and documentations as another source of data. We present results from a systematic search that includes an intensive study on sources and ways of information dissemination of flood-relevant publications. We obtain 186 documents that contain information on the sources, pathways, receptors and/or consequences for any of the 40 strongest trans-basin floods in Germany in the period 1952-2002. This study therefore provides the most comprehensive metadata collection of flood documentations for the considered geographical space and period. A total of 87.5% of all events have been documented, and especially the most severe floods have received extensive coverage. Only 30% of the material has been produced in the scientific/academic environment, and the majority of all documents (about 80%) can be considered grey literature (i.e. literature not controlled by commercial publishers). Therefore, ignoring grey sources in flood research also means ignoring the largest part of knowledge available on single flood events (in Germany). Further, the results of this study underpin the rapid changes in information dissemination of flood event literature over the last decade. We discuss the options and obstacles of incorporating

  14. Data expansion: the potential of grey literature for understanding floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Bertelmann, R.; Merz, B.

    2012-09-01

    Sophisticated methods have been developed and become standard in analysing floods as well as for assessing the flood risk. However, increasingly critique of the current standards and scientific practice can be found both in the flood hydrology community as well as in the risk community who argue that the considerable amount of information already available on natural disasters has not been adequately deployed and brought to effective use. We describe this phenomenon as a failure to synthesize knowledge that results from barriers and ignorance in awareness, use and management of the entire spectrum of relevant content, that is, data, information and knowledge. In this paper we argue that the scientific community in flood risk research ignores event specific analysis and documentations as another source of data. We present results from a systematic search that includes an intensive study on sources and ways of information dissemination of flood relevant publications. We obtain 183 documents that contain information on the sources, pathways, receptors and/or consequences for any of the 40 strongest trans-basin floods in Germany in the period 1952-2002. This study therefore provides the most comprehensive meta-data collection of flood documentations for the considered geographical space and period. 87.5% of all events have been documented and especially the most severe floods have received extensive coverage. Only 30% of the material has been produced in the scientific/academic environment and the majority of all documents (about 80%) can be considered grey literature. Therefore, ignoring grey sources in flood research also means ignoring the largest part of knowledge available on single flood events (in Germany). Further, the results of this study underpin the rapid changes in information dissemination of flood event literature over the last decade. We discuss the options and obstacles of incorporating this data in the knowledge building process in the light of the

  15. Scoping of Flood Hazard Mapping Needs for Androscoggin County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) developed a plan in 1997 to modernize the FEMA flood mapping program. FEMA flood maps delineate flood hazard areas in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). FEMA's plan outlined the steps necessary to update FEMA's flood maps for the nation to a seamless digital format and streamline FEMA's operations in raising public awareness of the importance of the maps and responding to requests to revise them. The modernization of flood maps involves conversion of existing information to digital format and integration of improved flood hazard data as needed and as funds allow. To determine flood mapping modernization needs, FEMA has established specific scoping activities to be done on a county-by-county basis for identifying and prioritizing requisite flood-mapping activities for map modernization. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with FEMA and the Maine Floodplain Management Program (MFMP) State Planning Office, began scoping work in 2006 for Androscoggin County. Scoping activities included assembling existing data and map needs information for communities in Androscoggin County, documentation of data, contacts, community meetings, and prioritized mapping needs in a final scoping report (this document), and updating the Mapping Needs Update Support System (MNUSS) Database with information gathered during the scoping process. The average age of the FEMA floodplain maps in Androscoggin County, Maine, is at least 17 years. Most studies were published in the early 1990s, and some towns have partial maps that are more recent than their study date. Since the studies were done, development has occurred in many of the watersheds and the characteristics of the watersheds have changed with time. Therefore, many of the older studies may not depict current conditions nor accurately estimate risk in terms of flood heights or flood mapping.

  16. Scoping of Flood Hazard Mapping Needs for Penobscot County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) developed a plan in 1997 to modernize the FEMA flood mapping program. FEMA flood maps delineate flood hazard areas in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). FEMA's plan outlined the steps necessary to update FEMA's flood maps for the nation to a seamless digital format and streamline FEMA's operations in raising public awareness of the importance of the maps and responding to requests to revise them. The modernization of flood maps involves conversion of existing information to digital format and integration of improved flood hazard data as needed. To determine flood mapping modernization needs, FEMA has established specific scoping activities to be done on a county-by-county basis for identifying and prioritizing requisite flood-mapping activities for map modernization. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with FEMA and the Maine State Planning Office Floodplain Management Program (MFMP), began scoping work in 2006 for Penobscot County. Scoping activities included assembling existing data and map needs information for communities in Penobscot County, documentation of data, contacts, community meetings, and prioritized mapping needs in a final scoping report (this document), and updating the Mapping Needs Update Support System (MNUSS) Database with information gathered during the scoping process. As of 2007, the average age of the FEMA floodplain maps in Penobscot County, Maine, is 22 years, based on the most recent revisions to the maps. Because the revisions did not affect all the map panels in each town, however, the true average date probably is more than 22 years. Many of the studies were published in the mid-1980s. Since the studies were completed, development has occurred in many of the watersheds, and the characteristics of the watersheds have changed with time. Therefore, many of the older studies may not depict current conditions nor accurately estimate risk in terms

  17. Scoping of Flood Hazard Mapping Needs for Lincoln County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) developed a plan in 1997 to modernize the FEMA flood mapping program. FEMA flood maps delineate flood hazard areas in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). FEMA's plan outlined the steps necessary to update FEMA's flood maps for the nation to a seamless digital format and streamline FEMA's operations in raising public awareness of the importance of the maps and responding to requests to revise them. The modernization of flood maps involves conversion of existing information to digital format and integration of improved flood hazard data as needed. To determine flood mapping modernization needs, FEMA has established specific scoping activities to be done on a county-by-county basis for identifying and prioritizing requisite flood-mapping activities for map modernization. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with FEMA and the Maine Floodplain Management Program (MFMP) State Planning Office, began scoping work in 2006 for Lincoln County. Scoping activities included assembling existing data and map needs information for communities in Lincoln County, documentation of data, contacts, community meetings, and prioritized mapping needs in a final scoping report (this document), and updating the Mapping Needs Update Support System (MNUSS) database with information gathered during the scoping process. The average age of the FEMA floodplain maps in Lincoln County, Maine is at least 17 years. Many of these studies were published in the mid- to late-1980s, and some towns have partial maps that are more recent than their study. However, in the ensuing 15-20 years, development has occurred in many of the watersheds, and the characteristics of the watersheds have changed with time. Therefore, many of the older studies may not depict current conditions nor accurately estimate risk in terms of flood heights or flood mapping.

  18. Scoping of Flood Hazard Mapping Needs for Hancock County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Charles W.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Background The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) developed a plan in 1997 to modernize the FEMA flood mapping program. FEMA flood maps delineate flood hazard areas in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). FEMA's plan outlined the steps necessary to update FEMA's flood maps for the nation to a seamless digital format and streamline FEMA's operations in raising public awareness of the importance of the maps and responding to requests to revise them. The modernization of flood maps involves conversion of existing information to digital format and integration of improved flood hazard data as needed. To determine flood mapping modernization needs, FEMA has established specific scoping activities to be done on a county-by-county basis for identifying and prioritizing requisite flood-mapping activities for map modernization. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with FEMA and the Maine Floodplain Management Program (MFMP) State Planning Office, began scoping work in 2006 for Hancock County. Scoping activities included assembling existing data and map needs information for communities in Hancock County, documentation of data, contacts, community meetings, and prioritized mapping needs in a final scoping report (this document), and updating the Mapping Needs Update Support System (MNUSS) database with information gathered during the scoping process. The average age of the FEMA floodplain maps (all types) in Hancock County, Maine, is at least 19 years. Most of these studies were published in the late 1980s and early 1990s, and no study is more recent than 1992. Some towns have partial maps that are more recent than their study, indicating that the true average age of the data is probably more than 19 years. Since the studies were done, development has occurred in some of the watersheds and the characteristics of the watersheds have changed. Therefore, many of the older studies may not depict current conditions or accurately estimate

  19. Reinforcing flood-risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Reed, Duncan W

    2002-07-15

    Flood-frequency estimation is inherently uncertain. The practitioner applies a combination of gauged data, scientific method and hydrological judgement to derive a flood-frequency curve for a particular site. The resulting estimate can be thought fully satisfactory only if it is broadly consistent with all that is reliably known about the flood-frequency behaviour of the river. The paper takes as its main theme the search for information to strengthen a flood-risk estimate made from peak flows alone. Extra information comes in many forms, including documentary and monumental records of historical floods, and palaeological markers. Meteorological information is also useful, although rainfall rarity is difficult to assess objectively and can be a notoriously unreliable indicator of flood rarity. On highly permeable catchments, groundwater levels present additional data. Other types of information are relevant to judging hydrological similarity when the flood-frequency estimate derives from data pooled across several catchments. After highlighting information sources, the paper explores a second theme: that of consistency in flood-risk estimates. Following publication of the Flood estimation handbook, studies of flood risk are now using digital catchment data. Automated calculation methods allow estimates by standard methods to be mapped basin-wide, revealing anomalies at special sites such as river confluences. Such mapping presents collateral information of a new character. Can this be used to achieve flood-risk estimates that are coherent throughout a river basin? PMID:12804255

  20. Reinforcing flood-risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Reed, Duncan W

    2002-07-15

    Flood-frequency estimation is inherently uncertain. The practitioner applies a combination of gauged data, scientific method and hydrological judgement to derive a flood-frequency curve for a particular site. The resulting estimate can be thought fully satisfactory only if it is broadly consistent with all that is reliably known about the flood-frequency behaviour of the river. The paper takes as its main theme the search for information to strengthen a flood-risk estimate made from peak flows alone. Extra information comes in many forms, including documentary and monumental records of historical floods, and palaeological markers. Meteorological information is also useful, although rainfall rarity is difficult to assess objectively and can be a notoriously unreliable indicator of flood rarity. On highly permeable catchments, groundwater levels present additional data. Other types of information are relevant to judging hydrological similarity when the flood-frequency estimate derives from data pooled across several catchments. After highlighting information sources, the paper explores a second theme: that of consistency in flood-risk estimates. Following publication of the Flood estimation handbook, studies of flood risk are now using digital catchment data. Automated calculation methods allow estimates by standard methods to be mapped basin-wide, revealing anomalies at special sites such as river confluences. Such mapping presents collateral information of a new character. Can this be used to achieve flood-risk estimates that are coherent throughout a river basin?

  1. Floods and Societies: Dynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, G.; Viglione, A.; Carr, G.; Kuil, L., Jr.; Brandimarte, L.; Bloeschl, G.

    2014-12-01

    There is growing concern that future flood losses and fatalities might increase significantly in many regions of the world because of rapid urbanization in deltas and floodplains, in addition to sea level rise and climate change. To better anticipate long-term trajectories of future flood risk, there is a need to treat floodplains and deltas as fully coupled human-physical systems. Here we propose a novel approach to explore the long-term behavior emerging from the mutual interactions and feedbacks between physical and social systems. The implementation of our modeling framework shows that green societies, which cope with flooding by resettling out of floodplains, are more resilient to increasing flood frequency than technological societies, which deal with flooding by building levees. Also, we show that when coupled dynamics are accounted for, flood-poor periods could (paradoxically) be more dangerous than flood-rich periods.

  2. Flash-Flood hydrological simulations at regional scale. Scale signature on road flooding vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anquetin, Sandrine; Vannier, Olivier; Ollagnier, Mélody; Braud, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    This work contributes to the evaluation of the dynamics of the human exposure during flash-flood events in the Mediterranean region. Understanding why and how the commuters modify their daily mobility in the Cévennes - Vivarais area (France) is the long-term objective of the study. To reach this objective, the methodology relies on three steps: i) evaluation of daily travel patterns, ii) reconstitution of road flooding events in the region based on hydrological simulation at regional scale in order to capture the time evolution and the intensity of flood and iii) identification of the daily fluctuation of the exposition according to road flooding scenarios and the time evolution of mobility patterns. This work deals with the second step. To do that, the physically based and non-calibrated hydrological model CVN (Vannier, 2013) is implemented to retrieve the hydrological signature of past flash-flood events in Southern France. Four past events are analyzed (September 2002; September 2005 (split in 2 different events); October 2008). Since the regional scale is investigated, the scales of the studied catchments range from few km2 to few hundreds of km2 where many catchments are ungauged. The evaluation is based on a multi-scale approach using complementary observations coming from post-flood experiments (for small and/or ungaugged catchments) and operational hydrological network (for larger catchments). The scales of risk (time and location of the road flooding) are also compared to observed data of road cuts. The discussion aims at improving our understanding on the hydrological processes associated with road flooding vulnerability. We specifically analyze runoff coefficient and the ratio between surface and groundwater flows at regional scale. The results show that on the overall, the three regional simulations provide good scores for the probability of detection and false alarms concerning road flooding (1600 points are analyzed for the whole region). Our

  3. Flooding in counter-current two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ragland, W.A.; Ganic, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Flooding is a phenomenon which is best described as the transition from counter-current to co-current flow. Early notice was taken of this phenomenon in the chemical engineering industry. Flooding also plays an important role in the field of two-phase heat transfer since it is a limit for many systems involving counter-current flow. Practical applications of flooding limited processes include wickless thermosyphons and the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) of pressurized water nuclear reactors. The phenomenon of flooding also is involved in the behavior of nuclear reactor core materials during severe accident conditions where flooding is one of the mechanisms governing the motion of the molten fuel pin cladding.

  4. Flood marks of the 1813 flood in the Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklanek, Pavol; Pekárová, Pavla; Halmová, Dana; Pramuk, Branislav; Bačová Mitková, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    In August 2013, 200 years have passed since the greatest and most destructive floods known in the Slovak river basins. The flood affected almost the entire territory of Slovakia, northeastern Moravia, south of Poland. River basins of Váh (Orava, Kysuca), Poprad, Nitra, Hron, Torysa, Hornád, upper and middle Vistula, Odra have been most affected. The aim of this paper is to map the flood marks documenting this catastrophic flood in Slovakia. Flood marks and registrations on the 1813 flood in the Váh river basin are characterized by great diversity and are written in Bernolák modification of Slovak, in Latin, German and Hungarian. Their descriptions are stored in municipal chronicles and Slovak and Hungarian state archives. The flood in 1813 devastated the entire Váh valley, as well as its tributaries. Following flood marks were known in the Vah river basin: Dolná Lehota village in the Orava river basin, historical map from 1817 covering the Sučany village and showing three different cross-sections of the Váh river during the 1813 flood, flood mark in the city of Trenčín, Flood mark in the gate of the Brunovce mansion, cross preserved at the old linden tree at Drahovce, and some records in written documents, e.g. Cifer village. The second part of the study deals with flood marks mapping in the Hron, Hnilec and Poprad River basins, and Vistula River basin in Krakow. On the basis of literary documents and the actual measurement, we summarize the peak flow rates achieved during the floods in 1813 in the profile Hron: Banská Bystrica. According to recent situation the 1813 flood peak was approximately by 1.22 m higher, than the flood in 1974. Also in the Poprad basin is the August 1813 flood referred as the most devastating flood in last 400 years. The position of the flood mark is known, but the building was unfortunately removed later. The water level in 1813 was much higher than the water level during the recent flood in June 2010. In Cracow the water level

  5. Flood risk as