Science.gov

Sample records for mitochondrial dna transit

  1. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  2. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Holt, I J; Harding, A E; Morgan-Hughes, J A

    1988-05-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that mitochondrial myopathy may be caused by mutation of the mitochondrial (mt) genome, restriction fragment length polymorphism in leucocyte mt DNA has been studied in 38 patients with mitochondrial myopathy, 44 of their unaffected matrilineal relatives, and 35 normal control subjects. Previously unreported mt DNA polymorphisms were identified in both patients and controls. No differences in restriction fragment patterns were observed between affected and unaffected individuals in the same maternal line, and there was no evidence of major deletion of mt DNA in patients. This study provides no positive evidence of mitochondrial inheritance in mitochondrial myopathy, but this has not been excluded.

  4. Transcription of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tabak, H F; Grivell, L A; Borst, P

    1983-01-01

    While mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the simplest DNA in nature, coding for rRNAs and tRNAs, results of DNA sequence, and transcript analysis have demonstrated that both the synthesis and processing of mitochondrial RNAs involve remarkably intricate events. At one extreme, genes in animal mtDNAs are tightly packed, both DNA strands are completely transcribed (symmetric transcription), and the appearance of specific mRNAs is entirely dependent on processing at sites signalled by the sequences of the tRNAs, which abut virtually every gene. At the other extreme, gene organization in yeast (Saccharomyces) is anything but compact, with long stretches of AT-rich DNA interspaced between coding sequences and no obvious logic to the order of genes. Transcription is asymmetric and several RNAs are initiated de novo. Nevertheless, extensive RNA processing occurs due largely to the presence of split genes. RNA splicing is complex, is controlled by both mitochondrial and nuclear genes, and in some cases is accompanied by the formation of RNAs that behave as covalently closed circles. The present article reviews current knowledge of mitochondrial transcription and RNA processing in relation to possible mechanisms for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

  5. Environmental mutagens induced transversions but not transitions in regulatory region of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Michael A; Huang, Sarah X L; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul; Davidson, Mercy M; Hei, Tom K

    2009-01-01

    One of the long-term objectives of the research in our laboratory was to determine whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations were generated in cell lines exposed to a variety of known mutagens. Many of these mutagens are known to increase oxidative stress in the cell, and one potential outcome of this would be an increased incidence of point mutations in mtDNA. Recently, there has been some controversy regarding the validity of point mutations in the regulatory region of mtDNA as a predictive or causative marker for carcinogenesis. Studies were undertaken to assess whether nuclear mutagens such as arsenic (As), asbestos, and ultraviolet (UV) and gamma-radiation, induced both heteroplasmic and homoplasmic point mutations in mtDNA. A direct sequencing approach was used to reduce the occurrence of experimental errors and cross-checked all base changes with databases of known polymorphisms. Our results showed that, while base changes did occur, there was no marked difference between the number of changes in treated and untreated cells. Furthermore, in human lymphocyte samples from subjects exposed to As, most of these base changes were previously reported. Interestingly, there was an increase in the number of transversions (purine ( pyrimidine) in smokers from a human population study, but as with the findings in cell culture samples, there was no difference in the total number of base changes. Data suggest that only a change in the number of rare transversions would be indicative of an increase in point mutations in mtDNA after exposure to mutagens.

  6. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  7. Phylogenetic relationships among phrynosomatid lizards as inferred from mitochondrial ribosomal DNA sequences: substitutional bias and information content of transitions relative to transversions.

    PubMed

    Reeder, T W

    1995-06-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among 40 species, representing all genera, within the North American lizard family Phrynosomatidae were inferred from mitochondrial ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Cladistic analysis of the DNA sequence data (779 bp; 162 informative characters) supported the monophyly of the sand lizards (Callisaurus, Cophosaurus, Holbrookia, and Uma), Petrosaurus, Phrynosoma, Urosaurus, and Uta. All the species of Sceloporus, except S. variabilis and S. chrysostictus, formed a clade. Except for a sand lizard + Phrynosoma clade, the intergeneric relationships inferred from the mtDNA were largely incongruent with recent cladistic analyses based on morphology. Sceloporus group monophyly was not supported, with Petrosaurus being a member of a clade containing Sator, Sceloporus, and Urosaurus, to the exclusion of Uta. The phylogenetic placement of Uta was ambiguous. The substitutional bias in the phrynosomatid mitochondrial rDNA sequences was examined, as well as the phylogenetic information content of transitions relative to transversions. There appeared to be a lower transition bias than observed in other vertebrate sequences, with some classes of transversions occurring as frequently as G <-> A transitions. Transitions were no less informative for phylogeny reconstruction than transversions. Therefore, transitions should not be down-weighted in phylogenetic analysis, as is often done.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA maintenance: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Akhmedov, Alexander T; Marín-García, José

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival, and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders, cancer, premature aging, and cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. Mitochondria are unique as they contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, so-called mitochondrial nucleoids, along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription, and repair. Although the organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and other types of mtDNA damage. Defects in the components of these highly organized machineries, which mediate mtDNA maintenance (replication and repair), may result in accumulation of point mutations and/or deletions in mtDNA and decreased mtDNA copy number impairing mitochondrial function. This review will focus on the mechanisms of mtDNA maintenance with emphasis on the proteins implicated in these processes and their functional role in various disease conditions and aging.

  9. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianxin; Sharma, Lokendra Kumar; Bai, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed. PMID:19532122

  10. Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer Epidemiology Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    A workshop to review the state-of-the science in the mitochondrial DNA field and its use in cancer epidemiology, and to develop a concept for a research initiative on mitochondrial DNA and cancer epidemiology.

  11. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  13. Experimental strategies towards treating mitochondrial DNA disorders.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Julie L; Craven, Lyndsey; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2007-06-01

    An extensive range of molecular defects have been identified in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA), causing a range of clinical phenotypes characterized by mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction. Sadly, given the complexities of mitochondrial genetics, there are no available cures for mtDNA disorders. In this review, we consider experimental, genetic-based strategies that have been or are being explored towards developing treatments, focussing on two specific areas which we are actively pursuing--assessing the benefit of exercise training for patients with mtDNA defects, and the prevention of mtDNA disease transmission.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA with a large-scale deletion causes two distinct mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-09-04

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (ΔmtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ΔmtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ΔmtDNA (mito-miceΔ). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ΔmtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ΔmtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ΔmtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-miceΔ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome-like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of mtDNA in various tissues reached >70-80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ΔmtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA with a Large-Scale Deletion Causes Two Distinct Mitochondrial Disease Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (∆mtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ∆mtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ∆mtDNA (mito-mice∆). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ∆mtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ∆mtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ∆mtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-mice∆ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome−like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of ∆mtDNA in various tissues reached >70–80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ∆mtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of ∆mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice. PMID:23853091

  16. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    PubMed

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA heterogeneity in Tunisian Berbers.

    PubMed

    Fadhlaoui-Zid, K; Plaza, S; Calafell, F; Ben Amor, M; Comas, D; Bennamar El gaaied, A

    2004-05-01

    Berbers live in groups scattered across North Africa whose origins and genetic relationships with their neighbours are not well established. The first hypervariable segment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region was sequenced in a total of 155 individuals from three Tunisian Berber groups and compared to other North Africans. The mtDNA lineages found belong to a common set of mtDNA haplogroups already described in North Africa. Besides the autochthonous North African U6 haplogroup, a group of L3 lineages characterized by the transition at position 16041 seems to be restricted to North Africans, suggesting that an expansion of this group of lineages took place around 10500 years ago in North Africa, and spread to neighbouring populations. Principal components and the coordinate analyses show that some Berber groups (the Tuareg, the Mozabite, and the Chenini-Douiret) are outliers within the North African genetic landscape. This outlier position is consistent with an isolation process followed by genetic drift in haplotype frequencies, and with the high heterogeneity displayed by Berbers compared to Arab samples as shown in the AMOVA. Despite this Berber heterogeneity, no significant differences were found between Berber and Arab samples, suggesting that the Arabization was mainly a cultural process rather than a demographic replacement.

  18. Cryptic crested newt diversity at the Eurasian transition: the mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Near Eastern Triturus newts.

    PubMed

    Wielstra, B; Themudo, G Espregueira; Güçlü, O; Olgun, K; Poyarkov, N A; Arntzen, J W

    2010-09-01

    Crested newts of the Triturus karelinii group occur in a phylogeographically understudied region: the Near East. Controversy surrounds the systematic position of these newts within the complete crested newt assemblage (the Triturus cristatus superspecies). We explore the situation using mitochondrial sequence data (ND2 and ND4, approximately 1.7kb) and employing different methods of phylogenetic inference (Bayesian inference and Maximum Likelihood using mixed models) and molecular dating (r8s and BEAST). The T. karelinii group is monophyletic and constitutes one of four main lineages in the T. cristatus superspecies. The separation of the T. karelinii group from the remaining crested newts around 9Ma is related to the formation of the Mid-Aegean Trench, which separated the Balkan and Anatolian landmasses. The T. karelinii group comprises three geographically structured clades (eastern, central and western). The genetic divergence shown by these clades is comparable to that among recognized crested newt species. We suggest the uplift of the Armenian Plateau to be responsible for the separation of the eastern clade around 7Ma, and the re-establishment of a marine connection between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean at the end of the Messinian Salinity Crisis to have caused the split between the central and western clade around 5.5Ma. Genetic structuring within the three clades dates to the Quaternary Ice Age (<2.59Ma) and is associated with alternating periods of isolation and reconnection caused by periodic changes in sea level and surface runoff.

  19. Melatonin protects against common deletion of mitochondrial DNA-augmented mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jou, Mei-Jie; Peng, Tsung-I; Yu, Pai-Zu; Jou, Shuo-Bin; Reiter, Russel J; Chen, Jin-Yi; Wu, Hong-Yueh; Chen, Chih-Chun; Hsu, Lee-Fen

    2007-11-01

    Defected mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC), in addition to causing a severe ATP deficiency, often augments reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondria (mROS) which enhances pathological conditions and diseases. Previously, we demonstrated a potent endogenously RC defect-augmented mROS associated dose-dependently with a commonly seen large-scale deletion of 4977 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), i.e. the common deletion (CD). As current treatments for CD-associated diseases are rather supplementary and ineffective, we investigated whether melatonin, a potential mitochondrial protector, provides beneficial protection for CD-augmented mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptosis particularly upon the induction of a secondary oxidative stress. Detailed mechanistic investigations were performed by using laser scanning dual fluorescence imaging microscopy to provide precise spatial and temporal resolution of mitochondrial events at single cell level. We demonstrate, for the first time, that melatonin significantly prevents CD-augmented mROS formation under basal conditions as well as at early time-points upon secondary oxidative stress induced by H2O2 exposure. Thus, melatonin prevents mROS-mediated depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) and subsequent opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) and cytochrome c release. Moreover, melatonin prevents depletion of cardiolipin which appears to be crucial for postponing later MPTP opening, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane and apoptosis. Finally, the protection provided by melatonin is superior to those caused by the suppression of mitochondrial Ca2+ regulators including the mitochondrial Na+-Ca2) exchanger, the MPTP, and the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter and by antioxidants including vitamin E and mitochondria-targeted coenzyme Q, MitoQ. As RC defect-augmented endogenous mitochondrial oxidative stress is centrally involved in a variety of pathological

  20. (Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  1. Borrowing Nuclear DNA Helicases to Protect Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-01-01

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases. PMID:25984607

  2. Borrowing nuclear DNA helicases to protect mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lin; Liu, Yilun

    2015-05-13

    In normal cells, mitochondria are the primary organelles that generate energy, which is critical for cellular metabolism. Mitochondrial dysfunction, caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or an abnormal mtDNA copy number, is linked to a range of human diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, premature aging‎ and cancer. mtDNA resides in the mitochondrial lumen, and its duplication requires the mtDNA replicative helicase, Twinkle. In addition to Twinkle, many DNA helicases, which are encoded by the nuclear genome and are crucial for nuclear genome integrity, are transported into the mitochondrion to also function in mtDNA replication and repair. To date, these helicases include RecQ-like helicase 4 (RECQ4), petite integration frequency 1 (PIF1), DNA replication helicase/nuclease 2 (DNA2) and suppressor of var1 3-like protein 1 (SUV3). Although the nuclear functions of some of these DNA helicases have been extensively studied, the regulation of their mitochondrial transport and the mechanisms by which they contribute to mtDNA synthesis and maintenance remain largely unknown. In this review, we attempt to summarize recent research progress on the role of mammalian DNA helicases in mitochondrial genome maintenance and the effects on mitochondria-associated diseases.

  3. Mitochondrial replacement in human oocytes carrying pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunju; Wu, Jun; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Koski, Amy; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Agaronyan, Karen; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Martinez-Redondo, Paloma; Ma, Hong; Lee, Yeonmi; Hayama, Tomonari; Van Dyken, Crystal; Wang, Xinjian; Luo, Shiyu; Ahmed, Riffat; Li, Ying; Ji, Dongmei; Kayali, Refik; Cinnioglu, Cengiz; Olson, Susan; Jensen, Jeffrey; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Huang, Taosheng; Wolf, Don P; Temiakov, Dmitry; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Amato, Paula; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2016-12-08

    Maternally inherited mitochondrial (mt)DNA mutations can cause fatal or severely debilitating syndromes in children, with disease severity dependent on the specific gene mutation and the ratio of mutant to wild-type mtDNA (heteroplasmy) in each cell and tissue. Pathogenic mtDNA mutations are relatively common, with an estimated 778 affected children born each year in the United States. Mitochondrial replacement therapies or techniques (MRT) circumventing mother-to-child mtDNA disease transmission involve replacement of oocyte maternal mtDNA. Here we report MRT outcomes in several families with common mtDNA syndromes. The mother's oocytes were of normal quality and mutation levels correlated with those in existing children. Efficient replacement of oocyte mutant mtDNA was performed by spindle transfer, resulting in embryos containing >99% donor mtDNA. Donor mtDNA was stably maintained in embryonic stem cells (ES cells) derived from most embryos. However, some ES cell lines demonstrated gradual loss of donor mtDNA and reversal to the maternal haplotype. In evaluating donor-to-maternal mtDNA interactions, it seems that compatibility relates to mtDNA replication efficiency rather than to mismatch or oxidative phosphorylation dysfunction. We identify a polymorphism within the conserved sequence box II region of the D-loop as a plausible cause of preferential replication of specific mtDNA haplotypes. In addition, some haplotypes confer proliferative and growth advantages to cells. Hence, we propose a matching paradigm for selecting compatible donor mtDNA for MRT.

  4. Improving upon nature's somatic mitochondrial DNA therapies.

    PubMed

    Dani, M A; Dani, S U

    2010-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) directs key metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells. While a number of mtDNA mutations are known causes of human diseases and age-related dysfunctions, some mtDNA haplotypes are associated with extreme longevity. Despite the mutagenic mitochondrial environment naturally enhancing somatic mtDNA mutation rates, mtDNA remains grossly stable along generations of plant and animal species including man. This relative stability can be accounted for by the purging of deleterious mutations by natural selection operating on growing cells, tissues, organisms and populations, as observed in gametogenesis, embryogenesis, oncogenesis and cladogenesis. In the adult multicellular organism, however, mtDNA mutations accumulate in slowly dividing cells, and, to a much higher degree, in postmitotic cells and tissues. Dynamic mitochondrial fusion and fission, by redistributing polymorphic mtDNA molecules; mitophagy, by clearing defective mitochondria and mutated mtDNA; compensatory mutations and mtDNA repair can compensate for the accumulation of mtDNA mutations only to a certain extent, thereby creating a dysfunctional threshold. Here we hypothesize that this threshold is naturally up-regulated by both vertical and horizontal transfers of mtDNA from stem cells or cell types which retain the capacity of purging deleterious mtDNA through cell division and natural selection in the adult organism. When these natural cell and tissue mtDNA reserves are exhausted, artificial mtDNA therapy may provide for additional threshold up-regulation. Replacement of mtDNA has been already successfully accomplished in early stage embryos and stem cells in a number of species including primates. It is thus simply a matter of refinement of technique that somatic mtDNA therapy, i.e., therapy of pathological conditions based on the transfer of mtDNA to somatic eukaryotic cells and tissues, becomes a medical reality.

  5. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Prevalence of rare mitochondrial DNA mutations in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Lebre, Anne Sophie; Jardel, Claude; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Hoarau, Claire; Maoulida, Hassani; Charrier, Nathanaël; Gai, Xiaowu; Xie, Hongbo M; Ferre, Marc; Fragaki, Konstantina; Hardy, Gaëlle; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte; Marlin, Sandrine; Dhaenens, Claire Marie; Slama, Abdelhamid; Rocher, Christophe; Paul Bonnefont, Jean; Rötig, Agnès; Aoutil, Nadia; Gilleron, Mylène; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Reynier, Pascal; Ceresuela, Jennifer; Jonard, Laurence; Devos, Aurore; Espil-Taris, Caroline; Martinez, Delphine; Gaignard, Pauline; Le Quan Sang, Kim-Hanh; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Falk, Marni J; Florentz, Catherine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases are rare disorders whose prevalence is estimated around 1 in 5000. Patients are usually tested only for deletions and for common mutations of mtDNA which account for 5–40% of cases, depending on the study. However, the prevalence of rare mtDNA mutations is not known. Methods We analysed the whole mtDNA in a cohort of 743 patients suspected of manifesting a mitochondrial disease, after excluding deletions and common mutations. Both heteroplasmic and homoplasmic variants were identified using two complementary strategies (Surveyor and MitoChip). Multiple correspondence analyses followed by hierarchical ascendant cluster process were used to explore relationships between clinical spectrum, age at onset and localisation of mutations. Results 7.4% of deleterious mutations and 22.4% of novel putative mutations were identified. Pathogenic heteroplasmic mutations were more frequent than homoplasmic mutations (4.6% vs 2.8%). Patients carrying deleterious mutations showed symptoms before 16 years of age in 67% of cases. Early onset disease (<1 year) was significantly associated with mutations in protein coding genes (mainly in complex I) while late onset disorders (>16 years) were associated with mutations in tRNA genes. MTND5 and MTND6 genes were identified as ‘hotspots’ of mutations, with Leigh syndrome accounting for the large majority of associated phenotypes. Conclusions Rare mitochondrial DNA mutations probably account for more than 7.4% of patients with respiratory chain deficiency. This study shows that a comprehensive analysis of mtDNA is essential, and should include young children, for an accurate diagnosis that is now accessible with the development of next generation sequencing technology. PMID:23847141

  7. Ancient Out-of-Africa Mitochondrial DNA Variants Associate with Distinct Mitochondrial Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants have been traditionally used as markers to trace ancient population migrations. Although experiments relying on model organisms and cytoplasmic hybrids, as well as disease association studies, have served to underline the functionality of certain mtDNA SNPs, only little is known of the regulatory impact of ancient mtDNA variants, especially in terms of gene expression. By analyzing RNA-seq data of 454 lymphoblast cell lines from the 1000 Genomes Project, we found that mtDNA variants defining the most common African genetic background, the L haplogroup, exhibit a distinct overall mtDNA gene expression pattern, which was independent of mtDNA copy numbers. Secondly, intra-population analysis revealed subtle, yet significant, expression differences in four tRNA genes. Strikingly, the more prominent African mtDNA gene expression pattern best correlated with the expression of nuclear DNA-encoded RNA-binding proteins, and with SNPs within the mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins PTCD1 and MRPS7. Our results thus support the concept of an ancient regulatory transition of mtDNA-encoded genes as humans left Africa to populate the rest of the world. PMID:27812116

  8. Inferring ethnicity from mitochondrial DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The assignment of DNA samples to coarse population groups can be a useful but difficult task. One such example is the inference of coarse ethnic groupings for forensic applications. Ethnicity plays an important role in forensic investigation and can be inferred with the help of genetic markers. Being maternally inherited, of high copy number, and robust persistence in degraded samples, mitochondrial DNA may be useful for inferring coarse ethnicity. In this study, we compare the performance of methods for inferring ethnicity from the sequence of the hypervariable region of the mitochondrial genome. Results We present the results of comprehensive experiments conducted on datasets extracted from the mtDNA population database, showing that ethnicity inference based on support vector machines (SVM) achieves an overall accuracy of 80-90%, consistently outperforming nearest neighbor and discriminant analysis methods previously proposed in the literature. We also evaluate methods of handling missing data and characterize the most informative segments of the hypervariable region of the mitochondrial genome. Conclusions Support vector machines can be used to infer coarse ethnicity from a small region of mitochondrial DNA sequence with surprisingly high accuracy. In the presence of missing data, utilizing only the regions common to the training sequences and a test sequence proves to be the best strategy. Given these results, SVM algorithms are likely to also be useful in other DNA sequence classification applications. PMID:21554759

  9. Characterization of mitochondrial DNA in primary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Giannattasio, S; Pucci, A; Lippolis, R; Camaschella, C; Marra, E

    1995-12-29

    With the aim of studying the involvement of the mitochondrial genome in the impairment of heart function, mitochondrial DNA was analyzed by modified primer shift-polymerase chain reaction in a panel of young patients affected by primary cardiomyopathies. Mitochondrial DNA molecules harboring the 7436 bp deletion were specifically found in cardiomyopathic patients as compared with a panel of control subjects. The 4977 bp deletion was commonly detected among the subjects analyzed whereas none of the specific tRNA gene point mutations generally associated with the cardiomyopathic trait were detected. The presence of the 7436 bp deletion as a consequence of a premature aging of the heart muscle, secondary to heart dysfunction, is discussed.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA diagnosis for taeniasis and cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakao, Minoru; Sako, Yasuhito; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Sato, Marcello Otake; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Molecular diagnosis for taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans on the basis of mitochondrial DNA analysis was reviewed. Development and application of three different methods, including restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, base excision sequence scanning thymine-base analysis and multiplex PCR, were described. Moreover, molecular diagnosis of cysticerci found in specimens submitted for histopathology and the molecular detection of taeniasis using copro-DNA were discussed.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA hypomethylation in chrome plating workers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linqing; Xia, Bo; Yang, Xueqin; Ding, Hong; Wu, Desheng; Zhang, Huimin; Jiang, Gaofeng; Liu, Jianjun; Zhuang, Zhixiong

    2016-01-22

    A matched case-control study was conducted to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) exposure and variation in mitochondrial (mt) DNA methylation. We enrolled 29 pairs of subjects in this study; Cr exposure was confirmed in the cases by detecting blood Cr and other metal ion concentrations. DNA damage caused by Cr exposure was determined in terms of binucleated micronucleus frequency (BNMN) and mtDNA copy number. Finally, a Sequenom MassARRAY platform was applied to inspect the DNA methylation levels of mitochondrially encoded tRNA phenylalanine (MT-TF), mitochondrially encoded 12S RNA (MT-RNR1), and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) genes. The blood Cr ion concentration and micronucleus frequency of the Cr-exposed group were higher than those of the control group, whereas the mtDNA copy number remained unchanged. The methylation levels of MT-TF and MT-RNR1 but not LINE-1 were significantly lower in Cr-exposed workers. Pearson correlation analysis showed that workers with higher blood Cr ion concentrations exhibited lower MT-TF and MT-RNR1 gene methylation, and multiple linear regression analysis indicated that CpG sites 1 and 2 in MT-TF and CpG site 6 in MT-RNR1 were affected. These results suggested that methylation level of mtDNA has the possibility of acting as an alternative effect biomarker for Cr exposure.

  12. Restoration of normal embryogenesis by mitochondrial supplementation in pig oocytes exhibiting mitochondrial DNA deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Cagnone, Gael L. M.; Tsai, Te-Sha; Makanji, Yogeshwar; Matthews, Pamela; Gould, Jodee; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Elgass, Kirstin D.; Wong, Ashley S. A.; Wu, Lindsay E.; McKenzie, Matthew; Sinclair, David A.; John, Justin C. St.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of women fail to achieve pregnancy due to either failed fertilization or embryo arrest during preimplantation development. This often results from decreased oocyte quality. Indeed, reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number (mitochondrial DNA deficiency) may disrupt oocyte quality in some women. To overcome mitochondrial DNA deficiency, whilst maintaining genetic identity, we supplemented pig oocytes selected for mitochondrial DNA deficiency, reduced cytoplasmic maturation and lower developmental competence, with autologous populations of mitochondrial isolate at fertilization. Supplementation increased development to blastocyst, the final stage of preimplantation development, and promoted mitochondrial DNA replication prior to embryonic genome activation in mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes but not in oocytes with normal levels of mitochondrial DNA. Blastocysts exhibited transcriptome profiles more closely resembling those of blastocysts from developmentally competent oocytes. Furthermore, mitochondrial supplementation reduced gene expression patterns associated with metabolic disorders that were identified in blastocysts from mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes. These results demonstrate the importance of the oocyte’s mitochondrial DNA investment in fertilization outcome and subsequent embryo development to mitochondrial DNA deficient oocytes. PMID:26987907

  13. Variable phenotypes in a family with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy harboring a 3291T > C mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sunami, Yoko; Sugaya, Keizo; Chihara, Norio; Goto, Yu-ichi; Matsubara, Shiro

    2011-10-01

    We present a Japanese family suffering from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a T-to-C transition at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide position 3291. Clinical manifestations of the patients include cerebellar ataxia with myopathy, recurrent headache, and myoclonus and epilepsy. The phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family and the mutational analysis showing maternal inheritance in a heteroplasmic fashion are consistent with well-recognized phenomena associated with many pathogenic point mutations of mtDNA tRNA genes. The 3291 mutation is a rare mtDNA mutation whose clinical presentation had only been reported in three sporadic cases. This is the first report of a family segregating the 3291 mutation with multigenerational matrilinear recurrence of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the pathogenicity of the 3291T > C mutation in mtDNA and its characteristic clinical heterogeneity.

  14. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  15. Mitochondrial DNA disease: new options for prevention.

    PubMed

    Craven, Lyndsey; Elson, Joanna L; Irving, Laura; Tuppen, Helen A; Lister, Lisa M; Greggains, Gareth D; Byerley, Samantha; Murdoch, Alison P; Herbert, Mary; Turnbull, Doug

    2011-10-15

    Very recently, two papers have presented intriguing data suggesting that prevention of transmission of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disease is possible. [Craven, L., Tuppen, H.A., Greggains, G.D., Harbottle, S.J., Murphy, J.L., Cree, L.M., Murdoch, A.P., Chinnery, P.F., Taylor, R.W., Lightowlers, R.N. et al. (2010) Pronuclear transfer in human embryos to prevent transmission of mitochondrial DNA disease. Nature, 465, 82-85. Tachibana, M., Sparman, M., Sritanaudomchai, H., Ma, H., Clepper, L., Woodward, J., Li, Y., Ramsey, C., Kolotushkina, O. and Mitalipov, S. (2009) Mitochondrial gene replacement in primate offspring and embryonic stem cells. Nature, 461, 367-372.] These recent advances raise hopes for families with mtDNA disease; however, the successful translational of these techniques to clinical practice will require further research to test for safety and to maximize efficacy. Furthermore, in the UK, amendment to the current legislation will be required. Here, we discuss the clinical and scientific background, studies we believe are important to establish safety and efficacy of the techniques and some of the potential concerns about the use of these approaches.

  16. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore and calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Renee; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Opening of a large conductance channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane, known as the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore, has been shown to be a primary mediator of cell death in the heart subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibitors of the MPT have been shown to reduce cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Furthermore, most cardioprotective strategies appear to reduce ischemic cell death either by reducing the triggers for the opening of the MPT, such as reducing calcium overload or reactive oxygen species, or by more direct inhibition of the MPT. This chapter focuses on key issues in the study of the MPT and provides some methods for measuring MPT opening in isolated mitochondria.

  17. The inheritance of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Cree, L M; Samuels, D C; Chinnery, P F

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations cause disease in >1 in 5000 of the population, and approximately 1 in 200 of the population are asymptomatic carriers of a pathogenic mtDNA mutation. Many patients with these pathogenic mtDNA mutations present with a progressive, disabling neurological syndrome that leads to major disability and premature death. There is currently no effective treatment for mitochondrial disorders, placing great emphasis on preventing the transmission of these diseases. An empiric approach can be used to guide genetic counseling for common mtDNA mutations, but many families transmit rare or unique molecular defects. There is therefore a pressing need to develop techniques to prevent transmission based on a solid understanding of the biological mechanisms. Several recent studies have cast new light on the genetics and cell biology of mtDNA inheritance, but these studies have also raised new controversies. Here we compare and contrast these findings and discuss their relevance for the transmission of human mtDNA diseases.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA haplotype predicts deafness risk

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchin, T.; Cortopassi, G.

    1995-12-18

    Since mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) does not recombine in humans, once deleterious variation arises within a particular mtDNA clone it remains linked to that clonal type. An A to G mutation at mtDNA position 1555 confers matrilineal deafness among Asians and others. Two major mtDNA types (I and II) have been defined in Asians by D-loop sequencing. We have determined the D-loop sequence of 8 unrelated deaf Asians bearing the 1555G mutation, and find that 7 are of type II, whereas only one is of type I. Thus the frequency of the 1555G mutation is higher in type II mtDNA than type I (P = 0.035, binomial test), and persons with type II mtDNA are more likely to become deaf. Type II mtDNAs are rare in the Caucasian population, which may explain the rarity of this form of deafness in the United States. Negative Darwinian selection is expected to rapidly eliminate mtDNAs bearing severely deleterious mutations; but mildly deleterious mutations whose phenotype is expressed after reproduction should persist on the mtDNA background in which they arose. Thus determination of mtDNA clonal type has the potential to predict human risk for diseases that are the result of mildly deleterious mtDNA mutations which confer a post-reproductive phenotype. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Mutation hot spots in mammalian mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Galtier, Nicolas; Enard, David; Radondy, Yoan; Bazin, Eric; Belkhir, Khalid

    2006-02-01

    Animal mitochondrial DNA is characterized by a remarkably high level of within-species homoplasy, that is, phylogenetic incongruence between sites of the molecule. Several investigators have invoked recombination to explain it, challenging the dogma of maternal, clonal mitochondrial inheritance in animals. Alternatively, a high level of homoplasy could be explained by the existence of mutation hot spots. By using an exhaustive mammalian data set, we test the hot spot hypothesis by comparing patterns of site-specific polymorphism and divergence in several groups of closely related species, including hominids. We detect significant co-occurrence of synonymous polymorphisms among closely related species in various mammalian groups, and a correlation between the site-specific levels of variability within humans (on one hand) and between Hominoidea species (on the other hand), indicating that mutation hot spots actually exist in mammalian mitochondrial coding regions. The whole data, however, cannot be explained by a simple mutation hot spots model. Rather, we show that the site-specific mutation rate quickly varies in time, so that the same sites are not hypermutable in distinct lineages. This study provides a plausible mutation model that potentially accounts for the peculiar distribution of mitochondrial sequence variation in mammals without the need for invoking recombination. It also gives hints about the proximal causes of mitochondrial site-specific hypermutability in humans.

  20. Complete Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in Iranians

    PubMed Central

    Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Denisova, Galina; Perkova, Maria; Farjadian, Shirin; Yepiskoposyan, Levon

    2013-01-01

    Due to its pivotal geographical location and proximity to transcontinental migratory routes, Iran has played a key role in subsequent migrations, both prehistoric and historic, between Africa, Asia and Europe. To shed light on the genetic structure of the Iranian population as well as on the expansion patterns and population movements which affected this region, the complete mitochondrial genomes of 352 Iranians were obtained. All Iranian populations studied here exhibit similarly high diversity values comparable to the other groups from the Caucasus, Anatolia and Europe. The results of AMOVA and MDS analyses did not associate any regional and/or linguistic group of populations in the Anatolia/Caucasus and Iran region pointing to close genetic positions of Persians and Qashqais to each other and to Armenians, and Azeris from Iran to Georgians. By reconstructing the complete mtDNA phylogeny of haplogroups R2, N3, U1, U3, U5a1g, U7, H13, HV2, HV12, M5a and C5c we have found a previously unexplored genetic connection between the studied Iranian populations and the Arabian Peninsula, India, Near East and Europe, likely the result of both ancient and recent gene flow. Our results for Persians and Qashqais point to a continuous increase of the population sizes from ∼24 kya to the present, although the phase between 14-24 kya is thought to be hyperarid according to the Gulf Oasis model. Since this would have affected hunter-gatherer ranges and mobility patterns and forced them to increasingly rely on coastal resources, this transition can explain the human expansion across the Persian Gulf region. PMID:24244704

  1. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in a maternal lineage of Holstein cows.

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, W W; Laipis, P J

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrial genotypes are shown to exist within one Holstein cow maternal lineage. They were detected by the appearance of an extra Hae III recognition site in one genotype. The nucleotide sequence of this region has been determined and the genotypes are distinguished by an adenine/guanine base transition which creates the new Hae III site. This point mutation occurs within an open reading frame at the third position of a glycine codon and therefore does not alter the amino acid sequence. The present pattern of genotypes within the lineage demands that multiple shifts between genotypes must have occurred within the past 20 years with the most rapid shift taking place in no more than 4 years and indicates that mitochondrial DNA polymorphism can occur between maternally related mammals. The process that gave rise to different genotypes in one lineage is clearly of fundamental importance in understanding intraspecific mitochondrial polymorphism and evolution in mammals. Several potential mechanisms for rapid mitochondrial DNA variation are discussed in light of these results. Images PMID:6289312

  2. Mitochondrial DNA analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Schapira, A H; Holt, I J; Sweeney, M; Harding, A E; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1990-01-01

    The reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme Q reductase (complex I) activity has recently been shown to be deficient in the substantia nigra of patients dying with Parkinson's disease. This biochemical defect is identical to that produced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which also produces parkinsonism in humans. Complex I comprises 25 polypeptides, seven of which are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Restriction fragment analysis of substantia nigra DNA from six patients with Parkinson's disease did not show any major deletion. In two cases, there were different novel polymorphisms that were not observed in control brain (n = 6) or blood (n = 34) samples.

  3. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  4. What is the mitochondrial permeability transition pore?

    PubMed

    Halestrap, Andrew P

    2009-06-01

    Under conditions of mitochondrial calcium overload, especially when accompanied by oxidative stress, elevated phosphate concentrations and adenine nucleotide depletion, a non-specific pore, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), opens in the inner mitochondrial membrane. MPTP opening enables free passage into the mitochondria of molecules of <1.5 kDa including protons. The resulting uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation leads to ATP depletion and necrotic cell death and it is now widely recognised that MPTP opening is a major cause of reperfusion injury and an effective target for cardioprotection. The properties of the MPTP are well defined, but despite extensive research in many laboratories, its exact molecular identity remains uncertain. Knockout studies have confirmed a role for cyclophilin-D (CyP-D), probably mediated by its peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity facilitating a conformational change of an inner membrane protein. However, the identity of the membrane component(s) remains controversial. Knockout studies have eliminated an essential role for either the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) or the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), although a regulatory role for the ANT was confirmed. Our own studies implicate the mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) in MPTP formation and are consistent with a calcium-triggered conformational change of the PiC, facilitated by CyP-D, inducing pore opening. We propose that this is enhanced by an association of the PiC with the "c" conformation of the ANT. Agents that modulate pore opening may act on either or both the PiC and the ANT. However, knockdown and reconstitution studies are awaited to confirm or refute this model.

  5. Number matters: control of mammalian mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    PubMed

    Clay Montier, Laura L; Deng, Janice J; Bai, Yidong

    2009-03-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for proper cellular functioning. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and the resulting mitochondrial malfunction have been implicated in cancer, neurodegeneration, diabetes, aging, and many other human diseases. Although it is known that the dynamics of the mammalian mitochondrial genome are not linked with that of the nuclear genome, very little is known about the mechanism of mtDNA propagation. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mode of mtDNA replication has advanced in recent years, though not without some controversies. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA copy number control in mammalian cells, while focusing on both mtDNA replication and turnover. Although mtDNA copy number is seemingly in excess, we reason that mtDNA copy number control is an important aspect of mitochondrial genetics and biogenesis and is essential for normal cellular function.

  6. The mitochondrial permeability transition and taurine.

    PubMed

    Palmi, M; Youmbi, G T; Sgaragli, G; Meini, A; Benocci, A; Fusi, F; Frosini, M; Della Corte, L; Davey, G; Tipton, K F

    2000-01-01

    Perturbed cellular calcium homeostasis has been implicated in both apoptosis and necrosis, but the role of altered mitochondrial calcium handling in the cell death process is unclear. Recently we found that taurine, a naturally occurring amino acid potentiates Ca2+ sequestration by rat liver mitochondria. These data, which accounted for the taurine antagonism on Ca2+ release induced by the neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium plus 6-hydroxy dopamine previously reported, prompted us to investigate the effects of taurine on the permeability transition (PT) induced experimentally by high Ca2+ plus phosphate concentrations. The parameters used to measure the PT were, mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release and membrane potential changes. The results showed that, whereas taurine failed to reverse changes of these parameters, cyclosporin A completely reversed them. Even though these results exclude a role in PT regulation under such gross insult conditions, they cannot exclude an important role for taurine in controlling pore-opening under milder more physiological PT-inducing conditions.

  7. The mitochondrial permeability transition in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Norenberg, M D; Rao, K V Rama

    2007-06-01

    Mitochondria, being the principal source of cellular energy, are vital for cell life. Yet, ironically, they are also major mediators of cell death, either by necrosis or apoptosis. One means by which these adverse effects occur is through the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) whereby the inner mitochondrial membrane suddenly becomes excessively permeable to ions and other solutes, resulting in a collapse of the inner membrane potential, ultimately leading to energy failure and cell necrosis. The mPT may also bring about the release of various factors known to cause apoptotic cell death. The principal factors leading to the mPT are elevated levels of intracellular Ca2+ and oxidative stress. Characteristically, the mPT is inhibited by cyclosporin A. This article will briefly discuss the concept of the mPT, its molecular composition, its inducers and regulators, agents that influence its activity and describe the consequences of its induction. Lastly, we will review its potential contribution to acute neurological disorders, including ischemia, trauma, and toxic-metabolic conditions, as well as its role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA content, an inaccurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in human immunodeficiency virus-related lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-05-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA Content, an Inaccurate Biomarker of Mitochondrial Alteration in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lipodystrophy▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ji; Jardel, Claude; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Jan, Véronique; Bastard, Jean Philippe; Fillaut-Chapin, Sandrine; Houry, Sydney; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lombès, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Lipoatrophy is a prevalent side effect of antiretroviral treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Its mechanisms are still disputed but include mitochondrial toxicity and, in particular, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion induced by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. To obtain an integrated evaluation of the mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophy, we investigated the DNA, RNA, and protein levels in 15 samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue from HIV-infected patients with peripheral lipoatrophy and compared the results with those for 15 samples from age- and body mass index-matched controls. The DNA and RNA analyses used PCR-based techniques, while proteins were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and measurement of activities with spectrophotometric assays. Depletion of mtDNA and mtDNA-encoded MT-CO2 mRNA was present, but normal levels of mtDNA-dependent activity (cytochrome c oxidase) and protein (MT-CO2p) showed that it was compensated for. An increase in nuclear-DNA-dependent mitochondrial activities (citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) and protein (COX4I1p), as well as transcriptional up-regulation of nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial genes (COX4I1 and UCP2), demonstrated increased mitochondrial biogenesis. However, the expression of the known transcription factors of mitochondrial biogenesis (TFAM, NRF1, GABPA, PPARGC1A, PPARGC1B, and PPRC1) was normal or decreased. Increased amounts of activated caspase 3 and of DDIT3 mRNA showed the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress, respectively. The mtDNA content did not correlate with any other mitochondrial parameter. In conclusion, mtDNA content does not appear to be an accurate biomarker of mitochondrial alteration in lipoatrophic adipose tissue. The preservation of mtDNA-dependent mitochondrial functions occurred despite severe mtDNA depletion. The presence of significant oxidative stress and apoptosis did not correlate with the mtDNA content. PMID

  10. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) regulates the calcium threshold for the mitochondrial permeability transition

    PubMed Central

    Artiga, Daniel J.; Abiria, Sunday A.; Clapham, David E.

    2016-01-01

    During the mitochondrial permeability transition, a large channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane opens, leading to the loss of multiple mitochondrial solutes and cell death. Key triggers include excessive reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial calcium overload, factors implicated in neuronal and cardiac pathophysiology. Examining the differential behavior of mitochondrial Ca2+ overload in Drosophila versus human cells allowed us to identify a gene, MCUR1, which, when expressed in Drosophila cells, conferred permeability transition sensitive to electrophoretic Ca2+ uptake. Conversely, inhibiting MCUR1 in mammalian cells increased the Ca2+ threshold for inducing permeability transition. The effect was specific to the permeability transition induced by Ca2+, and such resistance to overload translated into improved cell survival. Thus, MCUR1 expression regulates the Ca2+ threshold required for permeability transition. PMID:26976564

  11. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) regulates the calcium threshold for the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Dipayan; Artiga, Daniel J; Abiria, Sunday A; Clapham, David E

    2016-03-29

    During the mitochondrial permeability transition, a large channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane opens, leading to the loss of multiple mitochondrial solutes and cell death. Key triggers include excessive reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial calcium overload, factors implicated in neuronal and cardiac pathophysiology. Examining the differential behavior of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload in Drosophila versus human cells allowed us to identify a gene, MCUR1, which, when expressed in Drosophila cells, conferred permeability transition sensitive to electrophoretic Ca(2+) uptake. Conversely, inhibiting MCUR1 in mammalian cells increased the Ca(2+) threshold for inducing permeability transition. The effect was specific to the permeability transition induced by Ca(2+), and such resistance to overload translated into improved cell survival. Thus, MCUR1 expression regulates the Ca(2+) threshold required for permeability transition.

  12. Characterization of Nucleotide Misincorporation Patterns in the Iceman's Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Background The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation (“miscoding lesions”) has been the object of extensive investigations. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350–5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp) mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85%) of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine→thymine/guanine→adenine) transitions and

  13. Acceptance of Domestic Cat Mitochondrial DNA in a Criminal Proceeding

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Leslie A.; Grahn, Robert A.; Kun, Teri J.; Netzel, Linda R.; Wictum, Elizabeth E.; Halverson, Joy L.

    2014-01-01

    Shed hair from domestic animals readily adheres to clothing and other contact items, providing a source of transfer evidence for criminal investigations. Mitochondrial DNA is often the only option for DNA analysis of shed hair. Human mitochondrial DNA analysis has been accepted in the US court system since 1996. The murder trial of the State of Missouri versus Henry L. Polk, Jr. represents the first legal proceeding where cat mitochondrial DNA analysis was introduced into evidence. The mitochondrial DNA evidence was initially considered inadmissible due to concerns about the cat dataset and the scientific acceptance of the marker. Those concerns were subsequently addressed, and the evidence was deemed admissible. This report reviews the case in regards to the cat biological evidence and its ultimate admission as generally accepted and reliable. Expansion and saturation analysis of the cat mitochondrial DNA control region dataset supported the initial interpretation of the evidence. PMID:25086413

  14. Acceptance of domestic cat mitochondrial DNA in a criminal proceeding.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A; Grahn, Robert A; Kun, Teri J; Netzel, Linda R; Wictum, Elizabeth E; Halverson, Joy L

    2014-11-01

    Shed hair from domestic animals readily adheres to clothing and other contact items, providing a source of transfer evidence for criminal investigations. Mitochondrial DNA is often the only option for DNA analysis of shed hair. Human mitochondrial DNA analysis has been accepted in the US court system since 1996. The murder trial of the State of Missouri versus Henry L. Polk, Jr. represents the first legal proceeding where cat mitochondrial DNA analysis was introduced into evidence. The mitochondrial DNA evidence was initially considered inadmissible due to concerns about the cat dataset and the scientific acceptance of the marker. Those concerns were subsequently addressed, and the evidence was deemed admissible. This report reviews the case in regards to the cat biological evidence and its ultimate admission as generally accepted and reliable. Expansion and saturation analysis of the cat mitochondrial DNA control region dataset supported the initial interpretation of the evidence.

  15. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  16. Urinary mitochondrial DNA is a biomarker of mitochondrial disruption and renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Ryan M.; Stallons, L. Jay; Kneff, Joshua E.; Alge, Joseph L.; Harmon, Jennifer L.; Rahn, Jennifer J.; Arthur, John M.; Beeson, Craig C.; Chan, Sherine L.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the initiation and progression of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, no biomarkers exist linking renal injury to mitochondrial function and integrity. To this end, we evaluated urinary mitochondrial DNA (UmtDNA) as a biomarker of renal injury and function in humans with AKI following cardiac surgery. mtDNA was isolated from the urine of patients following cardiac surgery and quantified by qPCR. Patients were stratified into no AKI, stable AKI and progressive AKI groups based on Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) staging. UmtDNA was elevated in progressive AKI patients, and was associated with progression of patients with AKI at collection to higher AKIN stages. To evaluate the relationship of UmtDNA to measures of renal mitochondrial integrity in AKI, mice were subjected to sham surgery or varying degrees of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. UmtDNA increased in mice after 10-15 minutes of ischemia and positively correlated with ischemia time. Furthermore, UmtDNA was predictive of AKI in the mouse model. Finally, UmtDNA levels were negatively correlated with renal cortical mtDNA and mitochondrial gene expression. These translational studies demonstrate that UmtDNA is associated with recovery from AKI following cardiac surgery by serving as an indicator of mitochondrial integrity. Thus, UmtDNA may serve as valuable biomarker for the development of mitochondrial targeted therapies in AKI. PMID:26287315

  17. Genetics Home Reference: MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome MPV17-related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description MPV17 -related hepatocerebral mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome is an inherited disorder that can ...

  18. Mitochondrial DNA: impacting central and peripheral nervous systems

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Because of their high-energy metabolism, neurons are highly dependent on mitochondria, which generate cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. The mitochondrial genome encodes for critical components of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway machinery, and therefore mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cause energy production defects that frequently have severe neurological manifestations. Here, we review the principles of mitochondrial genetics and focus on prototypical mitochondrial diseases to illustrate how primary defects in mtDNA or secondary defects in mtDNA due to nuclear genome mutations can cause prominent neurological and multisystem features. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying mitochondrial diseases, the cellular mechanisms that protect mitochondrial integrity, and the prospects for therapy. PMID:25521375

  19. The little big genome: the organization of mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Iraselia; Jones, Edith; Ramos, Manuel; Innis-Whitehouse, Wendy; Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The small (16,569 base pair) human mitochondrial genome plays a significant role in cell metabolism and homeostasis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contributes to the generation of complexes which are essential to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). As such, mtDNA is directly integrated into mitochondrial biogenesis and signaling and regulates mitochondrial metabolism in concert with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial factors. Mitochondria are a highly dynamic, pleiomorphic network that undergoes fission and fusion events. Within this network, mtDNAs are packaged into structures called nucleoids which are actively distributed in discrete foci within the network. This sensitive organelle is frequently disrupted by insults such as oxidants and inflammatory cytokines, and undergoes genomic damage with double- and single-strand breaks that impair its function. Collectively, mtDNA is emerging as a highly sensitive indicator of cellular stress, which is directly integrated into the mitochondrial network as a contributor of a wide range of critical signaling pathways. PMID:27814641

  20. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. PMID:27253402

  1. Laser controlled singlet oxygen generation in mitochondria to promote mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Wang, Yupei; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Gan, Lu; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhang, Hong

    2015-11-18

    Reports have shown that a certain level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. However, it is unclear whether it is the mitochondrial ROS that stimulate mtDNA replication and this requires further investigation. Here we employed a photodynamic system to achieve controlled mitochondrial singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation. HeLa cells incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were exposed to laser irradiation to induce (1)O2 generation within mitochondria. Increased mtDNA copy number was detected after low doses of 630 nm laser light in ALA-treated cells. The stimulated mtDNA replication was directly linked to mitochondrial (1)O2 generation, as verified using specific ROS scavengers. The stimulated mtDNA replication was regulated by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA polymerase γ. MtDNA control region modifications were induced by (1)O2 generation in mitochondria. A marked increase in 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) level was detected in ALA-treated cells after irradiation. HeLa cell growth stimulation and G1-S cell cycle transition were also observed after laser irradiation in ALA-treated cells. These cellular responses could be due to a second wave of ROS generation detected in mitochondria. In summary, we describe a controllable method of inducing mtDNA replication in vitro.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA affinity of several Jewish communities.

    PubMed

    Ritte, U; Neufeld, E; Prager, E M; Gross, M; Hakim, I; Khatib, A; Bonné-Tamir, B

    1993-06-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 332 individuals from Israel, including 270 Jews (originating from 7 communities) and 62 Arabs, was analyzed. Each mtDNA haplotype was determined by the fragment patterns of restriction enzymes HpaI, BamHI, HaeII, MspI (HpaII), and AvaII. The variability of the total sample and of each community was high. Of 40 different haplotypes, 20 were found more than once. Most haplotypes are typical of Caucasians, but African types were found among Ethiopian Jews and to a lesser extent among Arabs. The communities differed in their haplotypes: Chi-square tests among six communities showed significant differences for most pairwise comparisons and nonsignificant differences involving mainly the Moroccan Jews. In a genetic distance analysis only the Ethiopian Jews appeared to be distinguished from the other communities. According to a GST analysis, approximately 30% of the variation among the mtDNA restriction maps is attributable to differences between communities.

  3. The Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Since mutations in mitochondrial DNA (MtDNA) have been shown to be a cause of many mitochondrial diseases as well as aging, it is important to understand the origin of these mutations and how replication proteins modulate this process. DNA polymerase γ (pol γ) is the polymease that is responsible for replication and repair of mtDNA. Pol γ has three main roles in mtDNA maintanence and mutagenesis. As the only known DNA polymerase in mitochondria, pol γ is required for all replication and repair functions and is the main source of errors produced in our mtDNA. Pol γ is also sensitive to a host of antiviral nucleoside analogs used to treat HIV-1 infections, which can cause an induced mitochondrial toxicity. Finally, the gene for pol γ, POLG, is a genetic locus for several mitochondrial disease with over 150 genetic mutations currently identified. PMID:20012584

  4. SCID mice containing muscle with human mitochondrial DNA mutations. An animal model for mitochondrial DNA defects.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, K M; Watt, D J; Lightowlers, R N; Johnson, M A; Relvas, J B; Taanman, J W; Turnbull, D M

    1998-01-01

    Defects of the mitochondrial genome are important causes of disease. Despite major advances in our investigation of patients, there is no effective therapy. Progress in this area is limited by the absence of any animal models in which we can evaluate treatment. To develop such a model we have injected human myoblasts into the tibialis anterior of SCID mice after inducing necrosis. After injection of normal human myoblasts, regenerating fibers expressed human beta-spectrin, confirming they were derived from fusion of human myoblasts. The stability of the muscle fibers was inferred by demonstrating the formation of motor end plates on the regenerating fibers. In addition, we show the presence of human cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, which is encoded by the mitochondrial genome, in the regenerated fibers. After injection of human myoblasts containing either the A8344G or the T8993C heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations, human beta-spectrin positive fibers were found to contain the mutation at a similar level to the injected myoblasts. These studies highlight the potential value of this model for the study of mitochondrial DNA defects. PMID:9854044

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Induces Early Renal Mitochondrial DNA Repair and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Fu, Ping; Suliman, Hagir B.; Crowley, Stephen D.; MacGarvey, Nancy Chou; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control), 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection. PMID:24988481

  6. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Edith E; Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Feichtinger, René G; Stanger, Olaf; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-20

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 ρ(0) cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in ρ(0) cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  7. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P M; Tellam, J; May, V L; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) precursor derived from nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. A single synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe was used to screen a rat atrial cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10. A 1.2 kb full-length cDNA clone provided the first complete amino acid sequence of pre-mMDH. The 1014 nucleotide-long open reading frame encodes the 314 residue long mature mMDH protein and a 24 amino acid NH2-terminal extension which directs mitochondrial import and is cleaved from the precursor after import to generate mature mMDH. The amino acid composition of the transit peptide is polar and basic. The pre-mMDH transit peptide shows marked homology with those of two other enzymes targeted to the rat mitochondrial matrix. Images PMID:3755817

  8. Production of mitochondrial DNA transgenic mice using zygotes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2002-04-01

    Several animal models of human disease, which have been developed by random or targeted modifications of genomic DNA sequences, have furthered our understanding of pathogenesis and the development of therapeutics. However, these models have not facilitated studies on mitochondrial diseases, since modifications to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences are not possible using current recombination techniques. Consequently, information on human mitochondrial diseases is relatively sparse, and issues related to mitochondrial pathogenesis and inheritance remain unresolved. Recently, we reported the development of a new technique to generate mice carrying mutant mtDNA from a mouse cell line. In this report, we describe our techniques in detail, with emphasis on the preparation of donor cytoplasts and the micromanipulative procedures for electrofusion of cytoplasts and recipient zygotes. These steps are critically important for the successful introduction of exogenous mtDNA into embryos, and thereby into animals, so that the mutant mtDNA is efficiently propagated in subsequent generations.

  9. Mathematical modeling of the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

    PubMed

    Tam, Zhi Yang; Gruber, Jan; Halliwell, Barry; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, sarcopenia, and the aging process itself. In cells, mtDNA molecules are constantly turned over (i.e. replicated and degraded) and are also exchanged among mitochondria during the fusion and fission of these organelles. While the expansion of a mutant mtDNA population is believed to occur by random segregation of these molecules during turnover, the role of mitochondrial fusion-fission in this context is currently not well understood. In this study, an in silico modeling approach is taken to investigate the effects of mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics on mutant mtDNA accumulation. Here we report model simulations suggesting that when mitochondrial fusion-fission rate is low, the slow mtDNA mixing can lead to an uneven distribution of mutant mtDNA among mitochondria in between two mitochondrial autophagic events leading to more stochasticity in the outcomes from a single random autophagic event. Consequently, slower mitochondrial fusion-fission results in higher variability in the mtDNA mutation burden among cells in a tissue over time, and mtDNA mutations have a higher propensity to clonally expand due to the increased stochasticity. When these mutations affect cellular energetics, nuclear retrograde signalling can upregulate mtDNA replication, which is expected to slow clonal expansion of these mutant mtDNA. However, our simulations suggest that the protective ability of retrograde signalling depends on the efficiency of fusion-fission process. Our results thus shed light on the interplay between mitochondrial fusion-fission and mtDNA turnover and may explain the mechanism underlying the experimentally observed increase in the accumulation of mtDNA mutations when either mitochondrial fusion or fission is inhibited.

  10. Maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA by diverse mechanisms to eliminate paternal mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sato, Miyuki; Sato, Ken

    2013-08-01

    The mitochondrion is an organelle that has its own DNA (mtDNA). Mitochondria play essential roles in energy production and in various cellular processes such as metabolism and signal transduction. In most animals, including humans, although the sperm-derived paternal mitochondria enter the oocyte cytoplasm after fertilization, their mtDNA is never transmitted to the offspring. This pattern of mtDNA inheritance is well known as "maternal inheritance." However, how the paternal mitochondria and mtDNA are eliminated from the cytoplasm of gametes or zygotes remains an enigma. Recently, a variety of mechanisms, including specific nuclease-dependent systems, ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy have been shown to degrade the paternal mtDNA or the paternal mitochondria themselves in order to prevent paternal mtDNA transmission. In this review, we will address the current state of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the elimination of paternal mtDNA or mitochondrial structures for ensuring the maternal transmission of mtDNA.

  11. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-06

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an intermediate lag to tumor growth, while cells from lung metastases exhibited full restoration of respiratory function and no lag in tumor growth. Stepwise assembly of mitochondrial respiratory (super)complexes was correlated with acquisition of respiratory function. Our findings indicate horizontal transfer of mtDNA from host cells in the tumor microenvironment to tumor cells with compromised respiratory function to re-establish respiration and tumor-initiating efficacy. These results suggest pathophysiological processes for overcoming mtDNA damage and support the notion of high plasticity of malignant cells.

  12. Proteomic Dissection of the Mitochondrial DNA Metabolism Apparatus in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    SAlly A. Mackenzie

    2004-01-06

    This study involves the investigation of nuclear genetic components that regulate mitochondrial genome behavior in higher plants. The approach utilizes the advanced plant model system of Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and functionally characterize multiple components of the mitochondrial DNA replication, recombination and mismatch repair system and their interaction partners. The rationale for the research stems from the central importance of mitochondria to overall cellular metabolism and the essential nature of the mitochondrial genome to mitochondrial function. Relatively little is understood about mitochondrial DNA maintenance and transmission in higher eukaryotes, and the higher plant mitochondrial genome displays unique properties and behavior. This investigation has revealed at least three important properties of plant mitochondrial DNA metabolism components. (1) Many are dual targeted to mitochondrial and chloroplasts by novel mechanisms, suggesting that the mitochondria a nd chloroplast share their genome maintenance apparatus. (2)The MSH1 gene, originating as a component of mismatch repair, has evolved uniquely in plants to participate in differential replication of the mitochondrial genome. (3) This mitochondrial differential replication process, termed substoichiometric shifting and also involving a RecA-related gene, appears to represent an adaptive mechanism to expand plant reproductive capacity and is likely present throughout the plant kingdom.

  13. Human mitochondrial DNA: roles of inherited and somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Eric A.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial genome are known to cause an array of diverse disorders, most of which are maternally inherited, and all of which are associated with defects in oxidative energy metabolism. It is now emerging that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are also linked to other complex traits, including neurodegenerative diseases, ageing and cancer. Here we discuss insights into the roles of mtDNA mutations in a wide variety of diseases, highlighting the interesting genetic characteristics of the mitochondrial genome and challenges in studying its contribution to pathogenesis. PMID:23154810

  14. Chronic Ethanol Consumption Increases Myocardial Mitochondrial DNA Mutations: A Potential Contribution by Mitochondrial Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, D.; Mathew, J.E.; Mitry, M.; Taft, M.; Force, A.; Edwards, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) presents as decreased myocardial contractility, arrhythmias and secondary non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure. Mitochondrial dysfunction is known to have a significant role in the development and complications of ACM. This study investigated if chronic ethanol feeding promoted myocardial mitochondrial topoisomerase dysfunction as one underlying cause of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in ACM. Methods: The impact of chronic ethanol exposure on the myocardial mitochondria was examined in both neonatal cardiomyocytes using 50 mM ethanol for 6 days and in rats assigned to control or ethanol feeding groups for 4 months. Results: Chronic ethanol feeding led to significant (P < 0.05) decreases in M-mode Fractional Shortening, ejection fraction, and the cardiac output index as well as increases in Tau. Ethanol feeding promoted mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by significantly decreased left ventricle cytochrome oxidase activity and decreases in mitochondrial protein content. Both in rats and in cultured cardiomyocytes, chronic ethanol presentation significantly increased mtDNA damage. Using isolated myocardial mitochondria, both mitochondrial topoisomerase-dependent DNA cleavage and DNA relaxation were significantly altered by ethanol feeding. Conclusion: Chronic ethanol feeding compromised cardiovascular and mitochondrial function as a result of a decline in mtDNA integrity that was in part the consequence of mitochondrial topoisomerase dysfunction. Understanding the regulation of the mitochondrial topoisomerases is critical for protection of mtDNA, not only for the management of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, but also for the many other clinical treatments that targets the topoisomerases in the alcoholic patient. PMID:24852753

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeography of the Norway Rat

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼1.2–1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼0.5–2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance. PMID:24586325

  16. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Lan, Zhenjiang; Kohn, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya), molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156) and D-loop (N = 212) sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance.

  17. Sephardic signature in haplogroup T mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Felice L

    2012-04-01

    A rare combination of mutations within mitochondrial DNA subhaplogroup T2e is identified as affiliated with Sephardic Jews, a group that has received relatively little attention. Four investigations were pursued: Search of the motif in 250 000 control region records across 8 databases, comparison of frequencies of T subhaplogroups (T1, T2b, T2c, T2e, T4, T(*)) across 11 diverse populations, creation of a phylogenic median-joining network from public T2e control region entries, and analysis of one Sephardic mitochondrial full genomic sequence with the motif. It was found that the rare motif belonged only to Sephardic descendents (Turkey, Bulgaria), to inhabitants of North American regions known for secret Spanish-Jewish colonization, or were consistent with Sephardic ancestry. The incidence of subhaplogroup T2e decreased from the Western Arabian Peninsula to Italy to Spain and into Western Europe. The ratio of sister subhaplogroups T2e to T2b was found to vary 40-fold across populations from a low in the British Isles to a high in Saudi Arabia with the ratio in Sephardim more similar to Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Italy than to hosts Spain and Portugal. Coding region mutations of 2308G and 14499T may locate the Sephardic signature within T2e, but additional samples and reworking of current T2e phylogenetic branch structure is needed. The Sephardic Turkish community has a less pronounced founder effect than some Ashkenazi groups considered singly (eg, Polish), but other comparisons of interest await comparable averaging. Registries of signatures will benefit the study of populations with a large number of smaller-size founders.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Maintains Mitochondrial DNA Replication via Demethylation of TFAM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exerts a wide range of actions in the body, especially in the modulation of mitochondrial functions. The normal replication of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is critical for cellular energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H2S affects mtDNA replication and the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesize that H2S maintains mtDNA copy number via inhibition of Dnmt3a transcription and TFAM promoter methylation. Results: Here, we demonstrated that deficiency of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE), a major H2S-producing enzyme, reduces mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial contents, and it inhibits the expressions of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial marker genes in both smooth muscle cells and aorta tissues from mice. Supply of exogenous H2S stimulated mtDNA copy number and strengthened the expressions of TFAM and mitochondrial marker genes. TFAM knockdown diminished H2S-enhanced mtDNA copy number. In addition, CSE deficiency induced the expression of DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) and TFAM promoter DNA methylation, and H2S repressed Dnmt3a expression, resulting in TFAM promoter demethylation. We further found that H2S S-sulfhydrates transcription repressor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) and enhances the binding of IRF-1 with Dnmt3a promoter after reduced Dnmt3a transcription. H2S had little effects on the expression of Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b as well as on ten-eleven translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase 1, 2, and 3. Innovation: A sufficient level of H2S is able to inhibit TFAM promoter methylation and maintain mtDNA copy number. Conclusion: CSE/H2S system contributes to mtDNA replication and cellular bioenergetics and provides a novel therapeutic avenue for cardiovascular diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 630–642. PMID:25758951

  20. Mechanisms of Uniparental Mitochondrial DNA Inheritance in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rachana; Lin, Xiaorong

    2011-12-01

    In contrast to the nuclear genome, the mitochondrial genome does not follow Mendelian laws of inheritance. The nuclear genome of meiotic progeny comes from the recombination of both parental genomes, whereas the meiotic progeny could inherit mitochondria from one, the other, or both parents. In fact, one fascinating phenomenon is that mitochondrial DNA in the majority of eukaryotes is inherited from only one particular parent. Typically, such unidirectional and uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA can be explained by the size of the gametes involved in mating, with the larger gamete contributing towards mitochondrial DNA inheritance. However, in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, bisexual mating involves the fusion of two isogamous cells of mating type (MAT) a and MATα, yet the mitochondrial DNA is inherited predominantly from the MATa parent. Although the exact mechanism underlying such uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in this fungus is still unclear, various hypotheses have been proposed. Elucidating the mechanism of mitochondrial inheritance in this clinically important and genetically amenable eukaryotic microbe will yield insights into general mechanisms that are likely conserved in higher eukaryotes. In this review, we highlight studies on Cryptococcus mitochondrial inheritance and point out some important questions that need to be addressed in the future.

  1. Molecular Poltergeists: Mitochondrial DNA Copies (numts) in Sequenced Nuclear Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hazkani-Covo, Einat; Zeller, Raymond M.; Martin, William

    2010-01-01

    The natural transfer of DNA from mitochondria to the nucleus generates nuclear copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) and is an ongoing evolutionary process, as genome sequences attest. In humans, five different numts cause genetic disease and a dozen human loci are polymorphic for the presence of numts, underscoring the rapid rate at which mitochondrial sequences reach the nucleus over evolutionary time. In the laboratory and in nature, numts enter the nuclear DNA via non-homolgous end joining (NHEJ) at double-strand breaks (DSBs). The frequency of numt insertions among 85 sequenced eukaryotic genomes reveal that numt content is strongly correlated with genome size, suggesting that the numt insertion rate might be limited by DSB frequency. Polymorphic numts in humans link maternally inherited mitochondrial genotypes to nuclear DNA haplotypes during the past, offering new opportunities to associate nuclear markers with mitochondrial markers back in time. PMID:20168995

  2. [Somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The study is concerned the design of new assays that may detect rare somatic mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, which may increase upon exposure to mutagens, and thus become a marker of human exposure to such mutagens. Two assays for somatic mutation were presented, one for mitochondrial DNA deletions which was developed by the author, and one for deletions of the ADA gene which resides in the nucleus.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA sequence evolution in the Arctoidea.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y P; Ryder, O A

    1993-01-01

    Some taxa in the superfamily Arctoidea, such as the giant panda and the lesser panda, have presented puzzles to taxonomists. In the present study, approximately 397 bases of the cytochrome b gene, 364 bases of the 12S rRNA gene, and 74 bases of the tRNA(Thr) and tRNA(Pro) genes from the giant panda, lesser panda, kinkajou, raccoon, coatimundi, and all species of the Ursidae were sequenced. The high transition/transversion ratios in cytochrome b and RNA genes prior to saturation suggest that the presumed transition bias may represent a trend for some mammalian lineages rather than strictly a primate phenomenon. Transversions in the 12S rRNA gene accumulate in arctoids at about half the rate reported for artiodactyls. Different arctoid lineages evolve at different rates: the kinkajou, a procyonid, evolves the fastest, 1.7-1.9 times faster than the slowest lineage that comprises the spectacled and polar bears. Generation-time effect can only partially explain the different rates of nucleotide substitution in arctoids. Our results based on parsimony analysis show that the giant panda is more closely related to bears than to the lesser panda; the lesser panda is neither closely related to bears nor to the New World procyonids. The kinkajou, raccoon, and coatimundi diverged from each other very early, even though they group together. The polar bear is closely related to the spectacled bear, and they began to diverge from a common mitochondrial ancestor approximately 2 million years ago. Relationships of the remaining five bear species are derived. PMID:8415740

  4. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching shapes metabolism and healthy ageing.

    PubMed

    Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Lechuga-Vieco, Ana Victoria; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Calvo, Enrique; Aix, Esther; González-Guerra, Andrés; Logan, Angela; Bernad-Miana, María Luisa; Romanos, Eduardo; Cruz, Raquel; Cogliati, Sara; Sobrino, Beatriz; Carracedo, Ángel; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Ruíz-Cabello, Jesús; Murphy, Michael P; Flores, Ignacio; Vázquez, Jesús; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2016-07-28

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) shows extensive within population sequence variability. Many studies suggest that mtDNA variants may be associated with ageing or diseases, although mechanistic evidence at the molecular level is lacking. Mitochondrial replacement has the potential to prevent transmission of disease-causing oocyte mtDNA. However, extension of this technology requires a comprehensive understanding of the physiological relevance of mtDNA sequence variability and its match with the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Studies in conplastic animals allow comparison of individuals with the same nuclear genome but different mtDNA variants, and have provided both supporting and refuting evidence that mtDNA variation influences organismal physiology. However, most of these studies did not confirm the conplastic status, focused on younger animals, and did not investigate the full range of physiological and phenotypic variability likely to be influenced by mitochondria. Here we systematically characterized conplastic mice throughout their lifespan using transcriptomic, proteomic,metabolomic, biochemical, physiological and phenotyping studies. We show that mtDNA haplotype profoundly influences mitochondrial proteostasis and reactive oxygen species generation,insulin signalling, obesity, and ageing parameters including telomere shortening and mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting in profound differences in health longevity between conplastic strains.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  6. Global Genetic Determinants of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hengshan; Singh, Keshav K.

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases including development of cancer is associated with depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content. These diseases are collectively described as mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome (MDS). High similarity between yeast and human mitochondria allows genomic study of the budding yeast to be used to identify human disease genes. In this study, we systematically screened the pre-existing respiratory-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains using fluorescent microscopy and identified 102 nuclear genes whose deletions result in a complete mtDNA loss, of which 52 are not reported previously. Strikingly, these genes mainly encode protein products involved in mitochondrial protein biosynthesis process (54.9%). The rest of these genes either encode protein products associated with nucleic acid metabolism (14.7%), oxidative phosphorylation (3.9%), or other protein products (13.7%) responsible for bud-site selection, mitochondrial intermembrane space protein import, assembly of cytochrome-c oxidase, vacuolar protein sorting, protein-nucleus import, calcium-mediated signaling, heme biosynthesis and iron homeostasis. Thirteen (12.7%) of the genes encode proteins of unknown function. We identified human orthologs of these genes, conducted the interaction between the gene products and linked them to human mitochondrial disorders and other pathologies. In addition, we screened for genes whose defects affect the nuclear genome integrity. Our data provide a systematic view of the nuclear genes involved in maintenance of mitochondrial DNA. Together, our studies i) provide a global view of the genes regulating mtDNA content; ii) provide compelling new evidence toward understanding novel mechanism involved in mitochondrial genome maintenance and iii) provide useful clues in understanding human diseases in which mitochondrial defect and in particular depletion of mitochondrial genome plays a critical role. PMID:25170845

  7. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2016-10-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Pathophysiology of mitochondrial volume homeostasis: potassium transport and permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Nowikovsky, Karin; Schweyen, Rudolf J; Bernardi, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial volume is a key issue in cellular pathophysiology. Mitochondrial volume and shape changes can occur following regulated fission-fusion events, which are modulated by a complex network of cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins; and through regulation of ion transport across the inner membrane. In this review we will cover mitochondrial volume homeostasis that depends on (i) monovalent cation transport across the inner membrane, a regulated process that couples electrophoretic K(+) influx on K(+) channels to K(+) extrusion through the K(+)-H(+) exchanger; (ii) the permeability transition, a loss of inner membrane permeability that may be instrumental in triggering cell death. Specific emphasis will be placed on molecular advances on the nature of the transport protein(s) involved, and/or on diseases that depend on mitochondrial volume dysregulation.

  9. RECQL4 LOCALIZES TO MITOCHONDRIA AND PRESERVES MITOCHONDRIAL DNA INTEGRITY

    PubMed Central

    Croteau, Deborah L.; Rossi, Marie L.; Canugovi, Chandrika; Tian, Jane; Sykora, Peter; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Wang, ZhengMing; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Akbari, Mansour; Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Copeland, William C.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY RECQL4 is associated with Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome (RTS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature aging, genomic instability and cancer predisposition. RECQL4 is a member of the RecQ-helicase family, and has many similarities to WRN protein, which is also implicated in premature aging. There is no information about whether any of the RecQ helicases play roles in mitochondrial biogenesis, which is strongly implicated in the aging process. Here, we used microscopy to visualize RECQL4 in mitochondria. Fractionation of human and mouse cells also showed that RECQL4 was present in mitochondria. Q-PCR amplification of mitochondrial DNA demonstrated that mtDNA damage accumulated in RECQL4-deficient cells. Microarray analysis suggested that mitochondrial bioenergetic pathways might be affected in RTS. Measurements of mitochondrial bioenergetics showed a reduction in the mitochondrial reserve capacity after lentiviral knockdown of RECQL4 in two different primary cell lines. Additionally, biochemical assays with RECQL4, mitochondrial transcription factor A and mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ showed that the polymerase inhibited RECQL4’s helicase activity. RECQL4 is the first 3′ to 5′ RecQ helicase to be found in both human and mouse mitochondria and the loss of RECQL4 alters mitochondrial integrity. PMID:22296597

  10. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing tubulointerstitial kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mallett, Andrew; Posse, Viktor; Moreno, Pablo; Sciacovelli, Marco; Duff, Jennifer; Wiesener, Michael S.; Hudson, Gavin; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2017-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial kidney disease is an important cause of progressive renal failure whose aetiology is incompletely understood. We analysed a large pedigree with maternally inherited tubulointerstitial kidney disease and identified a homoplasmic substitution in the control region of the mitochondrial genome (m.547A>T). While mutations in mtDNA coding sequence are a well recognised cause of disease affecting multiple organs, mutations in the control region have never been shown to cause disease. Strikingly, our patients did not have classical features of mitochondrial disease. Patient fibroblasts showed reduced levels of mitochondrial tRNAPhe, tRNALeu1 and reduced mitochondrial protein translation and respiration. Mitochondrial transfer demonstrated mitochondrial transmission of the defect and in vitro assays showed reduced activity of the heavy strand promoter. We also identified further kindreds with the same phenotype carrying a homoplasmic mutation in mitochondrial tRNAPhe (m.616T>C). Thus mutations in mitochondrial DNA can cause maternally inherited renal disease, likely mediated through reduced function of mitochondrial tRNAPhe. PMID:28267784

  11. Oxidative DNA damage causes mitochondrial genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Doudican, Nicole A; Song, Binwei; Shadel, Gerald S; Doetsch, Paul W

    2005-06-01

    Mitochondria contain their own genome, the integrity of which is required for normal cellular energy metabolism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by normal mitochondrial respiration can damage cellular macromolecules, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and have been implicated in degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging. We developed strategies to elevate mitochondrial oxidative stress by exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2) or utilizing mutants lacking mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (sod2Delta). Experiments were conducted with strains compromised in mitochondrial base excision repair (ntg1Delta) and oxidative damage resistance (pif1Delta) in order to delineate the relationship between these pathways. We observed enhanced ROS production, resulting in a direct increase in oxidative mtDNA damage and mutagenesis. Repair-deficient mutants exposed to oxidative stress conditions exhibited profound genomic instability. Elimination of Ntg1p and Pif1p resulted in a synergistic corruption of respiratory competency upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). Mitochondrial genomic integrity was substantially compromised in ntg1Delta pif1Delta sod2Delta strains, since these cells exhibit a total loss of mtDNA. A stable respiration-defective strain, possessing a normal complement of mtDNA damage resistance pathways, exhibited a complete loss of mtDNA upon exposure to antimycin and H(2)O(2). This loss was preventable by Sod2p overexpression. These results provide direct evidence that oxidative mtDNA damage can be a major contributor to mitochondrial genomic instability and demonstrate cooperation of Ntg1p and Pif1p to resist the introduction of lesions into the mitochondrial genome.

  12. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A is required for the segregation of mitochondrial DNA in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Sumitani, Megumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2011-01-15

    The segregation and transmission of the mitochondrial genome in humans are complicated processes but are particularly important for understanding the inheritance and clinical abnormalities of mitochondrial disorders. However, the molecular mechanism of the segregation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is required for the segregation of mtDNA in cultured cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TFAM in HeLa cells resulted in the enlarged mtDNA, as indicated by the assembly of fluorescent signals stained with PicoGreen. Fluorescent in situ hybridization confirmed the enlarged mtDNA and further showed the existence of increased numbers of mitochondria lacking mtDNA signals in TFAM knockdown cells. By complementation analysis, the C-terminal tail of TFAM, which enhances its affinity with DNA, was found to be required for the appropriate distribution of mtDNA. Furthermore, we found that TFAM knockdown induced asymmetric segregation of mtDNA between dividing daughter cells. These results suggest an essential role for human TFAM in symmetric segregation of mtDNA.

  13. Loss of mitochondrial DNA with aging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Massie, H R; Baird, M B; McMahon, M M

    1975-01-01

    The buoyant densities of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from Drosophila melanogaster lysates has been found to show no change with increasing age in both CsCl and Cs2SO4 equilibrium density gradients. Whole fly homogenates were used to demonstrate no change in nuclear DNA content during adult life. Mitochondrial DNA increased from 1.2 to 4.3% of the total DNA during the first week of adult life and then decreased during senescence to a minimum of 1.5% at 10 weeks of age which represented a 65% loss in mitochondrial DNA content with age. These data are interpreted to support the proposal that mitochondria destruction occurs during senescence.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA triplication and punctual mutations in patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Felhi, Rahma; Tabebi, Mouna; Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Chamkha, Imen; Maalej, Marwa; Ammar, Marwa; Kammoun, Fatma; Keskes, Leila; Hachicha, Mongia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2016-04-29

    Mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders caused by the impairment of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system which have been associated with various mutations of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear gene mutations. The clinical phenotypes are very diverse and the spectrum is still expanding. As brain and muscle are highly dependent on OXPHOS, consequently, neurological disorders and myopathy are common features of mtDNA mutations. Mutations in mtDNA can be classified into three categories: large-scale rearrangements, point mutations in tRNA or rRNA genes and point mutations in protein coding genes. In the present report, we screened mitochondrial genes of complex I, III, IV and V in 2 patients with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorders. The results showed the presence the pathogenic heteroplasmic m.9157G>A variation (A211T) in the MT-ATP6 gene in the first patient. We also reported the first case of triplication of 9 bp in the mitochondrial NC7 region in Africa and Tunisia, in association with the novel m.14924T>C in the MT-CYB gene in the second patient with mitochondrial neuromuscular disorder.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA variation in human radiation and disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-09-24

    Environmental adaptation, predisposition to common diseases, and, potentially, speciation may all be linked through the adaptive potential of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations of bioenergetics. This Perspective synthesizes evidence that human mtDNA variants may be adaptive or deleterious depending on environmental context and proposes that the accrual of mtDNA variation could contribute to animal speciation via adaptation to marginal environments.

  16. Oxidized mitochondrial DNA activates the NLRP3 inflammasome during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R; Karlin, Justin; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Chiba, Norika; Chen, Shuang; Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Wolf, Andrea J; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M; Rentsendorj, Altan; Vargas, Mario; Guerrero, Candace; Wang, Yinsheng; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Underhill, David M; Town, Terrence; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-03-23

    We report that in the presence of signal 1 (NF-κB), the NLRP3 inflammasome was activated by mitochondrial apoptotic signaling that licensed production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). NLRP3 secondary signal activators such as ATP induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, resulting in release of oxidized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, where it bound to and activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 inversely regulated mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA directly induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, because macrophages lacking mtDNA had severely attenuated IL-1β production, yet still underwent apoptosis. Both binding of oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β secretion could be competitively inhibited by the oxidized nucleoside 8-OH-dG. Thus, our data reveal that oxidized mtDNA released during programmed cell death causes activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results provide a missing link between apoptosis and inflammasome activation, via binding of cytosolic oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  17. Oxidized Mitochondrial DNA Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome During Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Karlin, Justin; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Chiba, Norika; Chen, Shuang; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Wolf, Andrea J.; Vergnes, Laurent; Ojcius, David M.; Rentsendorj, Altan; Vargas, Mario; Guerrero, Candace; Wang, Yinsheng; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Underhill, David M.; Town, Terrence; Arditi, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We report that in the presence of signal 1 (NF-κB), the NLRP3 inflammasome was activated by mitochondrial apoptotic signaling that licensed production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). NLRP3 secondary signal activators such as ATP induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, resulting in release of oxidized mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the cytosol, where it bound to and activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 inversely regulated mitochondrial dysfunction and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Mitochondrial DNA directly induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation, because macrophages lacking mtDNA had severely attenuated IL-1β production, yet still underwent apoptosis. Both binding of oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β secretion could be competitively inhibited by the oxidized nucleoside, 8-OH-dG. Thus, our data reveal that oxidized mtDNA released during programmed cell death causes activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results provide a missing link between apoptosis and inflammasome activation, via binding of cytosolic oxidized mtDNA to the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:22342844

  18. A peep into mitochondrial disorder: multifaceted from mitochondrial DNA mutations to nuclear gene modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Chen, Ye; Guan, Min-Xin

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome is responsible for multiple human diseases in a maternal inherited pattern, yet phenotypes of patients in a same pedigree frequently vary largely. Genes involving in epigenetic modification, RNA processing, and other biological pathways, rather than "threshold effect" and environmental factors, provide more specific explanation to the aberrant phenotype. Thus, the double hit theory, mutations both in mitochondrial DNA and modifying genes aggravating the symptom, throws new light on mitochondrial dysfunction processes. In addition, mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway that leads to reconfiguration of cell metabolism to adapt defects in mitochondria may as well play an active role. Here we review selected examples of modifier genes and mitochondrial retrograde signaling in mitochondrial disorders, which refine our understanding and will guide the rational design of clinical therapies.

  19. Mutations in circulating mitochondrial DNA: Cassandra of oral cancer?

    PubMed

    Kandel, Eugene S

    2012-07-01

    Cell-free circulating nucleic acids in human blood are increasing being researched as a source of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for clinical oncology. High copy number per cell and frequent mutations in various malignancies make mitochondrial genome an attractive target for such an investigation, but practical development and validation of biomarkers based on cell-free mitochondrial DNA has been lagging. Uzawa and colleagues report in the July issue of Oncotarget that in a retrospective study of patients with oral cancer the load of mutant mitochondrial DNA in patient's serum was a strong indicator of postoperative recurrence. Based on these observations, the predictive value of circulating mutant mitochondrial DNA merits further evaluation in patients with oral and other malignancies.

  20. An autoradiographic demonstration of nuclear DNA replication by DNA polymerase alpha and of mitochondrial DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, M; Hardt, N; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S

    1981-01-01

    The incorporation of thymidine into the DNA of eukaryotic cells is markedly depressed, but not completely inhibited, by aphidicolin, a highly specific inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha. An electron microscope autoradiographic analysis of the synthesis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in vivo in Concanavalin A stimulated rabbit spleen lymphocytes and in Hamster cell cultures, in the absence and in the presence of aphidicolin, revealed that aphidicolin inhibits the nuclear but not the mitochondrial DNA replication. We therefore conclude that DNA polymerase alpha performs the synchronous bidirectional replication of nuclear DNA and that DNA polymerase gamma, the only DNA polymerase present in the mitochondria, performs the "strand displacement" DNA synthesis of these organelles. Images PMID:6262734

  1. DNA Compaction by Yeast Mitochondrial Protein ABF2p

    SciTech Connect

    Friddle, R W; Klare, J E; Noy, A; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R; Baskin, R J; Martin, S S; Baldwin, E P

    2003-05-09

    We used high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image compaction of linear and circular DNA by the yeast mitochondrial protein ABF2p , which plays a major role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA. AFM images show that protein binding induces drastic bends in the DNA backbone for both linear and circular DNA. At high concentration of ABF2p DNA collapses into a tight globular structure. We quantified the compaction of linear DNA by measuring the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule at increasing concentrations of ABF2p. We also derived a polymer statistical mechanics model that gives quantitative description of compaction observed in our experiments. This model shows that a number of sharp bends in the DNA backbone is often sufficient to cause DNA compaction. Comparison of our model with the experimental data showed excellent quantitative correlation and allowed us to determine binding characteristics for ABF2. Our studies indicate that ABF2 compacts DNA through a novel mechanism that involves bending of DNA backbone. We discuss the implications of such a mechanism for mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form TK2-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form Enable Javascript to view ... Open All Close All Description TK2 -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, myopathic form ( TK2 -MDS) is an ...

  3. Staying in aerobic shape: how the structural integrity of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA is maintained.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sidney V; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Meeusen, Shelly L; Nunnari, Jodi

    2003-08-01

    The structure and integrity of the mitochondrial compartment are features essential for it to function efficiently. The maintenance of mitochondrial structure in cells ranging from yeast to humans has been shown to require both ongoing fission and fusion. Recent characterization of many of the molecular components that direct mitochondrial fission and fusion events have led to a more complete understanding of how these processes take place. Further, mitochondrial fragmentation observed when cells undergo apoptosis requires mitochondrial fission, underlying the importance of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial structure also impacts mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Recent studies suggest that faithful transmission of mitochondrial DNA to daughter cells might require a mitochondrial membrane tethering apparatus.

  4. Strong Purifying Selection in Transmission of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James Bruce; Freyer, Christoph; Elson, Joanna L; Wredenberg, Anna; Cansu, Zekiye; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2008-01-01

    There is an intense debate concerning whether selection or demographics has been most important in shaping the sequence variation observed in modern human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Purifying selection is thought to be important in shaping mtDNA sequence evolution, but the strength of this selection has been debated, mainly due to the threshold effect of pathogenic mtDNA mutations and an observed excess of new mtDNA mutations in human population data. We experimentally addressed this issue by studying the maternal transmission of random mtDNA mutations in mtDNA mutator mice expressing a proofreading-deficient mitochondrial DNA polymerase. We report a rapid and strong elimination of nonsynonymous changes in protein-coding genes; the hallmark of purifying selection. There are striking similarities between the mutational patterns in our experimental mouse system and human mtDNA polymorphisms. These data show strong purifying selection against mutations within mtDNA protein-coding genes. To our knowledge, our study presents the first direct experimental observations of the fate of random mtDNA mutations in the mammalian germ line and demonstrates the importance of purifying selection in shaping mitochondrial sequence diversity. PMID:18232733

  5. Lack of paternal inheritance of muscle mitochondrial DNA in sporadic mitochondrial myopathies.

    PubMed

    Filosto, Massimiliano; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Vives-Bauza, Cristofol; Vilà, Maya R; Shanske, Sara; Hirano, Michio; Andreu, Antoni L; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2003-10-01

    In 2002, paternal inheritance of muscle mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was reported in a patient with exercise intolerance and a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation restricted to skeletal muscle. To evaluate whether paternal inheritance is a common phenomenon, we studied 10 sporadic patients with skeletal muscle-restricted mtDNA mutations: five harbored mtDNA point mutations in protein-coding genes and five had single mtDNA deletions. We performed haplotype analysis and direct sequencing of the hypervariable regions 1 and 2 of the D-loop in muscle and blood from the patients and, when available, in blood from their parents. We did not observe paternal inheritance in any of our patients.

  6. Association of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes with mitochondrial DNA as integral nucleoid constituents

    PubMed Central

    Kienhöfer, Joachim; Häussler, Dagmar Johanna Franziska; Ruckelshausen, Florian; Muessig, Elisabeth; Weber, Klaus; Pimentel, David; Ullrich, Volker; Bürkle, Alexander; Bachschmid, Markus Michael

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in protein-DNA macrocomplexes called nucleoids. Average nucleoids contain 2–8 mtDNA molecules, which are organized by the histone-like mitochondrial transcription factor A. Besides well-characterized constituents, such as single-stranded binding protein or polymerase γ (Polγ), various other proteins with ill-defined functions have been identified. We report for the first time that mammalian nucleoids contain essential enzymes of an integral antioxidant system. Intact nucleoids were isolated with sucrose density gradients from rat and bovine heart as well as human Jurkat cells. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was detected by Western blot in the nucleoid fractions. DNA, mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase (GPx1), and Polγ were coimmunoprecipitated with SOD2 from nucleoid fractions, which suggests that an antioxidant system composed of SOD2 and GPx1 are integral constituents of nucleoids. Interestingly, in cultured bovine endothelial cells the association of SOD2 with mtDNA was absent. Using a sandwich filter-binding assay, direct association of SOD2 by salt-sensitive ionic forces with a chemically synthesized mtDNA fragment was demonstrated. Increasing salt concentrations during nucleoid isolation on sucrose density gradients disrupted the association of SOD2 with mitochondrial nucleoids. Our biochemical data reveal that nucleoids contain an integral antioxidant system that may protect mtDNA from superoxide-induced oxidative damage.—Kienhöfer, J., Häussler, D. J. F., Ruckelshausen, F., Muessig, E., Weber, K., Pimentel, D., Ullrich, V., Bürkle, A., Bachschmid, M. M. Association of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes with mitochondrial DNA as integral nucleoid constituents. PMID:19228881

  7. Mitochondrial disease in childhood: mtDNA encoded.

    PubMed

    Saneto, Russell P; Sedensky, Margret M

    2013-04-01

    Since the first description of a mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-associated disease in the late 1980s, there have been more than 275 mutations within the mtDNA genome described causing human disease. The phenotypic expression of these disorders is vast, as disturbances of the unique physiology of mitochondria can create a wide range of clinical heterogeneity. Features of heteroplasmy, threshold effect, genetic bottleneck, mtDNA depletion, mitotic segregation, and maternal inheritance have been identified and described as a result of novel biochemical and genetic controls of mitochondrial function. We hope that as we unfold this fascinating part of clinical medicine, the reader will see how alterations in the tapestry of mitochondrial biochemistry and genetics can give rise to human illness.

  8. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  9. Mitochondrial DNA in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis: Role of Horizontal mtDNA Transfer.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael V; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-08-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), encoding 13 out of more than 1,000 proteins of the mitochondrial proteome, is of paramount importance for the bioenergetic machinery of oxidative phosphorylation that is required for tumor initiation, propagation, and metastasis. In stark contrast to the widely held view that mitochondria and mtDNA are retained and propagated within somatic cells of higher organisms, recent in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that mitochondria move between mammalian cells. This is particularly evident in cancer where defective mitochondrial respiration can be restored and tumor-forming ability regained by mitochondrial acquisition. This paradigm shift in cancer cell biology and mitochondrial genetics, concerning mitochondrial movement between cells to meet bioenergetic needs, not only adds another layer of plasticity to the armory of cancer cells to correct damaged mitochondria, but also points to potentially new therapeutic approaches.

  10. Phase Transition of DNA Coated Nanogold Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa; Sun, Young; Harris, Nolan; Wickremasinghe, Nissanka

    2004-03-01

    Melting and hybridization of DNA-coated gold nanoparticle networks are investigated with optical absorption spectroscopy and tansmission electron microscopy. Single-stranded DNA-coated nanogold are linked with complementary, single-stranded linker DNA to form particle networks. Network formation results in a solution color change, which can be used for DNA detection. Compared to free DNA, networked DNA-nanoparticle systems result in a sharp melting transition. Melting curves calculated from percolation theory agree with our experimental results(1). (1) C.-H. Kiang, ``Phase Transition of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticles,'' Physica A, 321 (2003) 164--169.

  11. Mitochondria, mitochondrial DNA and Alzheimer's disease. What comes first?

    PubMed

    Mancuso, M; Orsucci, D; Siciliano, G; Murri, L

    2008-10-01

    To date, the beta amyloid (Abeta) cascade hypothesis remains the main pathogenetic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its role in the majority of sporadic AD cases is unclear. The mitochondria play central role in the bioenergetics of the cell and apoptotic cell death. In the past 20 years research has been directed at clarifying the involvement of mitochondria and defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in late-onset neurodegenerative disorders, including AD. Morphological, biochemical and genetic abnormalities of the mitochondria in several AD tissues have been reported. Impaired mitochondrial respiration, particularly COX deficiency, has been observed in brain, platelets and fibroblasts of AD patients. The "mitochondrial cascade hypothesis" could explain many of the biochemical, genetic and pathological features of sporadic AD. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) could cause energy failure, increased oxidative stress and accumulation of Abeta, which in a vicious cycle reinforces the mtDNA damage and the oxidative stress. Despite the evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD, no causative mutations in the mtDNA have been detected so far. Indeed, results of studies on the role of mtDNA haplogroups in AD are controversial. In this review we discuss the role of the mitochondria in the cascade of events leading to AD, and we will try to provide an answer to the question "what comes first".

  12. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and generates breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guha, M; Srinivasan, S; Ruthel, G; Kashina, A K; Carstens, R P; Mendoza, A; Khanna, C; Van Winkle, T; Avadhani, N G

    2014-11-06

    Metastatic breast tumors undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which renders them resistant to therapies targeted to the primary cancers. The mechanistic link between mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) reduction, often seen in breast cancer patients, and EMT is unknown. We demonstrate that reducing mtDNA content in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) activates Calcineurin (Cn)-dependent mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway, which induces EMT-like reprogramming to fibroblastic morphology, loss of cell polarity, contact inhibition and acquired migratory and invasive phenotype. Notably, mtDNA reduction generates breast cancer stem cells. In addition to retrograde signaling markers, there is an induction of mesenchymal genes but loss of epithelial markers in these cells. The changes are reversed by either restoring the mtDNA content or knockdown of CnAα mRNA, indicating the causal role of retrograde signaling in EMT. Our results point to a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancers targeted to the mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway for abrogating EMT and attenuating cancer stem cells, which evade conventional therapies. We report a novel regulatory mechanism by which low mtDNA content generates EMT and cancer stem cells in hMECs.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy dynamics in a kindred harboring a novel pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA glutamate gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, C.T.; Hao, H.; Bonilla, E.; DiMauro, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in a 32-year-old male with a myopathy (without progressive external ophthalmoplegia) and mild pyramidal involvement. This A{yields}G transition at mtDNA position 14709 alters an evolutionary conserved nucleotide in a region coding for the anticodon loop of the mitcohondrial tRNA{sup Glu}. The 14709 mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic but present at very high levels in the patient`s muscle (95%), white blood cells (81%) and hair follicles (90%). The same mutant mtDNA population was observed in white blood cells and hair follicles of all maternal relatives, but a lesser percentage (25-80%). The patient`s muscle showed many ragged-red fibers and a severe focal defect in cytochrome c oxidase activity, accompanied by the absence of cross-reacting material for mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides (ND 1 and COX II). The percentage of mutant mtDNA was not preferentially increased over two generations. Rather, the percentage of mutant mtDNA observed in siblings seemed to follow a normal distribution around the percentage observed in their mothers. Single hair PCR/RFLP analysis showed that the intercellular fluctuation in the percentage of mutant mtDNA differs among family members. Younger generations tend to have a more homogeneous distribution of mutant mtDNA in different hair follicles. The highest degree of variability between individual hair follicles was observed in the patient`s grandmother. These results suggest that the intercellular distribution of the mutant and wild-type mtDNA populations may drift towards homogeneity in subsequent generations.

  14. Silencing of cardiac mitochondrial NHE1 prevents mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening.

    PubMed

    Villa-Abrille, María C; Cingolani, Eugenio; Cingolani, Horacio E; Alvarez, Bernardo V

    2011-04-01

    Inhibition of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) reduces cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and also cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Although the mechanisms underlying these NHE1-mediated effects suggest delay of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, and reduction of mitochondrial-derived superoxide production, the possibility of NHE1 blockade targeting mitochondria has been incompletely explored. A short-hairpin RNA sequence mediating specific knock down of NHE1 expression was incorporated into a lentiviral vector (shRNA-NHE1) and transduced in the rat myocardium. NHE1 expression of mitochondrial lysates revealed that shRNA-NHE1 transductions reduced mitochondrial NHE1 (mNHE1) by ∼60%, supporting the expression of NHE1 in mitochondria membranes. Electron microscopy studies corroborate the presence of NHE1 in heart mitochondria. Immunostaining of rat cardiomyocytes also suggests colocalization of NHE1 with the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase. To examine the functional role of mNHE1, mitochondrial suspensions were exposed to increasing concentrations of CaCl(2) to induce MPTP opening and consequently mitochondrial swelling. shRNA-NHE1 transduction reduced CaCl(2)-induced mitochondrial swelling by 64 ± 4%. Whereas the NHE1 inhibitor HOE-642 (10 μM) decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+)-induced swelling in rats transduced with nonsilencing RNAi (37 ± 6%), no additional HOE-642 effects were detected in mitochondria from rats transduced with shRNA-NHE1. We have characterized the expression and function of NHE1 in rat heart mitochondria. Because mitochondria from rats injected with shRNA-NHE1 present a high threshold for MPTP formation, the beneficial effects of NHE1 inhibition in I/R resulting from mitochondrial targeting should be considered.

  15. Nuclear gadgets in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Clayton, D A

    1991-03-01

    In mammalian mitochondrial DNA, activation of the light-strand promoter mediates both priming of leading-strand replication and initiation of light-strand transcription. Accurate and efficient transcription requires at least two proteins: mitochondrial RNA polymerase and a separable transcription factor that can function across species boundaries. Subsequently, primer RNAs are cleaved by a site-specific ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease that recognizes short, highly conserved sequence elements in the RNA substrate.

  16. Ubisol-Q10 Prevents Glutamate-Induced Cell Death by Blocking Mitochondrial Fragmentation and Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Santosh; Mehta, Suresh L; Milledge, Gaolin Z.; Huang, Xinyu; Li, Haining; Li, P. Andy

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the major events that lead to the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) during glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell death. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has widely been used for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Comparing to traditional lipid-soluble CoQ10, water soluble CoQ10 (Ubisol-Q10) has high intracellular and intra-mitochondrial distribution. The aims of the present study are to determine the neuroprotective effects of Ubisol-Q10 on glutamate-induced cell death and to explore its functional mechanisms. HT22 neuronal cells were exposed to glutamate. Cell viability was measured and mitochondrial fragmentation was assessed by mitochondrial imaging. The mPTP opening was determined by mitochondrial membrane potential and calcium retention capacity. The results revealed that the anti-glutamate toxicity effects of Ubisol-Q10 was associated with its ability to block mitochondrial fragmentation, to maintain calcium retention capacity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and to prevent mPTP formation, AIF release, and DNA fragmentation. We concluded that Ubisol-Q10 protects cells from glutamate toxicity by preserving the integrity of mitochondrial structure and function. Therefore, adequate CoQ10 supplementation may be beneficial in preventing cerebral stroke and other disorders that involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27194946

  17. Mitochondrial DNA disease and developmental implications for reproductive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Burgstaller, Joerg Patrick; Johnston, Iain G.; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are potentially severe, incurable diseases resulting from dysfunctional mitochondria. Several important mitochondrial diseases are caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the genetic material contained within mitochondria, which is maternally inherited. Classical and modern therapeutic approaches exist to address the inheritance of mtDNA disease, but are potentially complicated by the fact that cellular mtDNA populations evolve according to poorly-understood dynamics during development and organismal lifetimes. We review these therapeutic approaches and models of mtDNA dynamics during development, and discuss the implications of recent results from these models for modern mtDNA therapies. We particularly highlight mtDNA segregation—differences in proliferative rates between different mtDNA haplotypes—as a potential and underexplored issue in such therapies. However, straightforward strategies exist to combat this and other potential therapeutic problems. In particular, we describe haplotype matching as an approach with the power to potentially ameliorate any expected issues from mtDNA incompatibility. PMID:25425607

  18. Mitochondrial DNA disease and developmental implications for reproductive strategies.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Joerg Patrick; Johnston, Iain G; Poulton, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are potentially severe, incurable diseases resulting from dysfunctional mitochondria. Several important mitochondrial diseases are caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the genetic material contained within mitochondria, which is maternally inherited. Classical and modern therapeutic approaches exist to address the inheritance of mtDNA disease, but are potentially complicated by the fact that cellular mtDNA populations evolve according to poorly-understood dynamics during development and organismal lifetimes. We review these therapeutic approaches and models of mtDNA dynamics during development, and discuss the implications of recent results from these models for modern mtDNA therapies. We particularly highlight mtDNA segregation-differences in proliferative rates between different mtDNA haplotypes-as a potential and underexplored issue in such therapies. However, straightforward strategies exist to combat this and other potential therapeutic problems. In particular, we describe haplotype matching as an approach with the power to potentially ameliorate any expected issues from mtDNA incompatibility.

  19. Induced pluripotent stem cells with a pathological mitochondrial DNA deletion

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Anne B. C.; Gagne, Katelyn E.; McLoughlin, Erin M.; Baccei, Anna; Gorman, Bryan; Hartung, Odelya; Miller, Justine D.; Zhang, Jin; Zon, Rebecca L.; Ince, Tan A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Lerou, Paul H.; Fleming, Mark D.; Daley, George Q.; Agarwal, Suneet

    2013-01-01

    In congenital mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disorders, a mixture of normal and mutated mtDNA (termed heteroplasmy) exists at varying levels in different tissues, which determines the severity and phenotypic expression of disease. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder caused by heteroplasmic deletions in mtDNA. The cause of the hematopoietic failure in PS is unknown, and adequate cellular and animal models are lacking. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are particularly amenable for studying mtDNA disorders, as cytoplasmic genetic material is retained during direct reprogramming. Here we derive and characterize iPS cells from a patient with PS. Taking advantage of the tendency for heteroplasmy to change with cell passage, we isolated isogenic PS-iPS cells without detectable levels of deleted mtDNA. We found that PS-iPS cells carrying a high burden of deleted mtDNA displayed differences in growth, mitochondrial function, and hematopoietic phenotype when differentiated in vitro, compared to isogenic iPS cells without deleted mtDNA. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming somatic cells from patients with mtDNA disorders can yield pluripotent stem cells with varying burdens of heteroplasmy that might be useful in the study and treatment of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:23400930

  20. Selective propagation of functional mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis restricts the transmission of a deleterious mitochondrial variant.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jahda H; Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is prone to mutation and few mtDNA repair mechanisms exist, crippling mitochondrial mutations are exceedingly rare. Recent studies have demonstrated strong purifying selection in the mouse female germline. However, the mechanisms underlying positive selection of healthy mitochondria remain to be elucidated. We visualized mtDNA replication during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis, finding that mtDNA replication commenced before oocyte determination during the late germarium stage and was dependent on mitochondrial fitness. We isolated a temperature-sensitive lethal mtDNA allele, mt:CoI(T300I), which resulted in reduced mtDNA replication in the germarium at the restrictive temperature. Additionally, the frequency of the mt:CoI(T300I) allele in heteroplasmic flies was decreased, both during oogenesis and over multiple generations, at the restrictive temperature. Furthermore, we determined that selection against mt:CoI(T300I) overlaps with the timing of selective replication of mtDNA in the germarium. These findings establish a previously uncharacterized developmental mechanism for the selective amplification of wild-type mtDNA, which may be evolutionarily conserved to limit the transmission of deleterious mutations.

  1. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to the risk of PD. Methods We examined the possibility of a maternal inheritance bias as well as the association between mitochondrial haplogroups and maternal inheritance and disease risk in a case-control study of 168 multiplex PD families in which the proband and one parent were diagnosed with PD. 2-tailed Fisher Exact Tests and McNemar's tests were used to compare allele frequencies, and a t-test to compare ages of onset. Results The frequency of affected mothers of the proband with PD (83/167, 49.4%) was not significantly different from the frequency of affected females of the proband generation (115/259, 44.4%) (Odds Ratio 1.22; 95%CI 0.83 - 1.81). After correcting for multiple tests, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of mitochondrial haplogroups or of the 10398G complex I gene polymorphism in PD patients compared to controls, and no significant associations with age of onset of PD. Mitochondrial haplogroup and 10398G polymorphism frequencies were similar in probands having an affected father as compared to probands having an affected mother. Conclusions These data fail to demonstrate a bias towards maternal inheritance in familial PD. Consistent with this, we find no association of common haplogroup-defining mtDNA variants or for the 10398G variant with the risk of PD. However, these data do not exclude a role for mtDNA variants in other populations, and it remains possible that other inherited mitochondrial DNA variants, or somatic mDNA mutations, contribute

  2. Mitochondrial swinger replication: DNA replication systematically exchanging nucleotides and short 16S ribosomal DNA swinger inserts.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2014-11-01

    Assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (swinger RNAs) resolves genomic 'parenthood' of some orphan mitochondrial transcripts. Twenty-three different systematic nucleotide exchanges (bijective transformations) exist. Similarities between transcription and replication suggest occurrence of swinger DNA. GenBank searches for swinger DNA matching the 23 swinger versions of human and mouse mitogenomes detect only vertebrate mitochondrial swinger DNA for swinger type AT+CG (from five different studies, 149 sequences) matching three human and mouse mitochondrial genes: 12S and 16S ribosomal RNAs, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I. Exchange A<->T+C<->G conserves self-hybridization properties, putatively explaining swinger biases for rDNA, against protein coding genes. Twenty percent of the regular human mitochondrial 16S rDNA consists of short swinger repeats (from 13 exchanges). Swinger repeats could originate from recombinations between regular and swinger DNA: duplicated mitochondrial genes of the parthenogenetic gecko Heteronotia binoei include fewer short A<->T+C<->G swinger repeats than non-duplicated mitochondrial genomes of that species. Presumably, rare recombinations between female and male mitochondrial genes (and in parthenogenetic situations between duplicated genes), favors reverse-mutations of swinger repeat insertions, probably because most inserts affect negatively ribosomal function. Results show that swinger DNA exists, and indicate that swinger polymerization contributes to the genesis of genetic material and polymorphism.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  4. A comprehensive characterization of rare mitochondrial DNA variants in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Piero; Lasorsa, Vito Alessandro; Hogarty, Michael D.; Castellano, Aurora; Conte, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Iolascon, Achille; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Capasso, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma, a tumor of the developing sympathetic nervous system, is a common childhood neoplasm that is often lethal. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors including neuroblastoma. We extracted mtDNA data from a cohort of neuroblastoma samples that had undergone Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) and also used snap-frozen samples in which mtDNA was entirely sequenced by Sanger technology. We next undertook the challenge of determining those mutations that are relevant to, or arisen during tumor development. The bioinformatics pipeline used to extract mitochondrial variants from matched tumor/blood samples was enriched by a set of filters inclusive of heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. Results Our in silico multistep workflow applied both on WES and Sanger-sequenced neuroblastoma samples, allowed us to identify a limited burden of somatic and germline mitochondrial mutations with a potential pathogenic impact. Conclusions The few singleton germline and somatic mitochondrial mutations emerged, according to our in silico analysis, do not appear to impact on the development of neuroblastoma. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that most mitochondrial somatic mutations can be considered as ‘passengers’ and consequently have no discernible effect in this type of cancer. PMID:27351283

  5. Nonneutral mitochondrial DNA variation in humans and chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Nachman, M.W.; Aquadro, C.F.; Brown, W.M.

    1996-03-01

    We sequenced the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3) gene from a sample of 61 humans, five common chimpanzees, and one gorilla to test whether patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation are consistent with a neutral model of molecular evolution. Within humans and within chimpanzees, the ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions was higher than observed in comparisons between species, contrary to neutral expectations. To test the generality of this result, we reanalyzed published human RFLP data from the entire mitochondrial genome. Gains of restriction sites relative to a known human mtDNA sequence were used to infer unambiguous nucleotide substitutions. We also compared the complete mtDNA sequences of three humans. Both the RFLP data and the sequence data reveal a higher ratio of replacement to silent nucleotide substitutions within humans than is seen between species. This pattern is observed at most or all human mitochondrial genes and is inconsistent with a strictly neutral model. These data suggest that many mitochondrial protein polymorphisms are slightly deleterious, consistent with studies of human mitochondrial diseases. 59 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Oxidative stress is not a major contributor to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Itsara, Leslie S; Kennedy, Scott R; Fox, Edward J; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10(-5)), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations.

  7. Blood Cell Mitochondrial DNA Content and Premature Ovarian Aging

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca; Arosio, M.; Beck-Peccoz, P.; Biondi, M.; Bione, S.; Bruni, V.; Brigante, C.; Cannavo`, S.; Cavallo, L.; Cisternino, M.; Colombo, I.; Corbetta, S.; Crosignani, P.G.; D'Avanzo, M.G.; Dalpra, L.; Danesino, C.; Di Battista, E.; Di Prospero, F.; Donti, E.; Einaudi, S.; Falorni, A.; Foresta, C.; Fusi, F.; Garofalo, N.; Giotti, I.; Lanzi, R.; Larizza, D.; Locatelli, N.; Loli, P.; Madaschi, S.; Maghnie, M.; Maiore, S.; Mantero, F.; Marozzi, A.; Marzotti, S.; Migone, N.; Nappi, R.; Palli, D.; Patricelli, M.G.; Pisani, C.; Prontera, P.; Petraglia, F.; Radetti, G.; Renieri, A.; Ricca, I.; Ripamonti, A.; Rossetti, R.; Russo, G.; Russo, S.; Tonacchera, M.; Toniolo, D.; Torricelli, F.; Vegetti, W.; Villa, N.; Vineis, P.; Wasniewsk, M.; Zuffardi, O.

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction. PMID:22879975

  8. Blood cell mitochondrial DNA content and premature ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Marco; Somigliana, Edgardo; Cacciatore, Chiara; Busnelli, Marta; Rossetti, Raffaella; Bonetti, Silvia; Paffoni, Alessio; Mari, Daniela; Ragni, Guido; Persani, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a critical fertility defect characterized by an anticipated and silent impairment of the follicular reserve, but its pathogenesis is largely unexplained. The frequent maternal inheritance of POI together with a remarkable dependence of ovarian folliculogenesis upon mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics suggested the possible involvement of a generalized mitochondrial defect. Here, we verified the existence of a significant correlation between blood and ovarian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in a group of women undergoing ovarian hyperstimulation (OH), and then aimed to verify whether mtDNA content was significantly altered in the blood cells of POI women. We recruited 101 women with an impaired ovarian reserve: 59 women with premature ovarian failure (POF) and 42 poor responders (PR) to OH. A Taqman copy number assay revealed a significant mtDNA depletion (P<0.001) in both POF and PR women in comparison with 43 women of similar age and intact ovarian reserve, or 53 very old women with a previous physiological menopause. No pathogenic variations in the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene were detected in 57 POF or PR women with low blood mtDNA content. In conclusion, blood cell mtDNA depletion is a frequent finding among women with premature ovarian aging, suggesting that a still undetermined but generalized mitochondrial defect may frequently predispose to POI which could then be considered a form of anticipated aging in which the ovarian defect may represent the first manifestation. The determination of mtDNA content in blood may become an useful tool for the POI risk prediction.

  9. Alterations of the mitochondrial proteome caused by the absence of mitochondrial DNA: A proteomic view

    PubMed Central

    Chevallet, Mireille; Lescuyer, Pierre; Diemer, Hélène; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    The proper functioning of mitochondria requires that both the mitochondrial and the nuclear genome are functional. To investigate the importance of the mitochondrial genome, which encodes only 13 subunits of the respiratory complexes, the mitochondrial rRNAs and a few tRNAs, we performed a comparative study on the 143B cell line and on its Rho-0 counterpart, i.e. devoid of mitochondrial DNA. Quantitative differences were found, of course in the respiratory complexes subunits, but also in the mitochondrial translation apparatus, mainly mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and in the ion and protein import system, i.e. including membrane proteins. Various mitochondrial metabolic processes were also altered, especially electron transfer proteins and some dehydrogenases, but quite often on a few proteins for each pathway. This study also showed variations in some hypothetical or poorly characterized proteins, suggesting a mitochondrial localization for these proteins. Examples include a stomatin-like protein and a protein sharing homologies with bacterial proteins implicated in tyrosine catabolism. Proteins involved in apoptosis control are also found modulated in Rho-0 mitochondria. PMID:16548050

  10. Methods for Efficient Elimination of Mitochondrial DNA from Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Nataliya; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Kousoulas, Konstantin G.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we document that persistent mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) damage due to mitochondrial overexpression of the Y147A mutant uracil-N-glycosylase as well as mitochondrial overexpression of bacterial Exonuclease III or Herpes Simplex Virus protein UL12.5M185 can induce a complete loss of mtDNA (ρ0 phenotype) without compromising the viability of cells cultured in media supplemented with uridine and pyruvate. Furthermore, we use these observations to develop rapid, sequence-independent methods for the elimination of mtDNA, and demonstrate utility of these methods for generating ρ0 cells of human, mouse and rat origin. We also demonstrate that ρ0 cells generated by each of these three methods can serve as recipients of mtDNA in fusions with enucleated cells. PMID:27136098

  11. Very Short Mitochondrial DNA Fragments and Heteroplasmy in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Nakahira, Kiichi; Guo, Xiaoxian; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Cell free DNA (cfDNA) has received increasing attention and has been studied in a broad range of clinical conditions. However, few studies have focused on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cell free form. We optimized DNA isolation and sequencing library preparation protocols to better retain short DNA fragments from plasma, and applied these optimized methods to plasma samples from patients with sepsis. Our methods can retain substantially shorter DNA, resulting in an average of 11.5 fold increase in short DNA fragments yield (DNA <100bp). We report that cf-mtDNA in plasma is highly enriched in short-size cfDNA (30~60 bp). Motivated by this unique size distribution, we size-selected short cfDNA, which further increased the mtDNA recovery rate by an average of 10.4 fold. We then detected mtDNA heteroplasmy in plasma from 3 patients. In one patient who previously received bone marrow transplantation, different minor allele frequencies were observed between plasma and leukocytes at heteroplasmic sites, consistent with mixed-tissue origin for cfDNA. For the other two patients, the heteroplasmy pattern is also different between plasma and leukocyte. Our study shed new lights into the architecture of the cfDNA, and mtDNA heteroplasmy identified in plasma provides new potential for biomarker discovery. PMID:27811968

  12. Mitochondrial DNA repair: a novel therapeutic target for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marín-García, José

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) handling to stress responses, cell survival and death. Malfunction of the organelle may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuromuscular, cancer, premature aging and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including myocardial ischemia, cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF). Mitochondria contain their own genome organized into DNA-protein complexes, called "mitochondrial nucleoids," along with multiprotein machineries, which promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, transcription and repair. Although the mammalian organelle possesses almost all known nuclear DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair, mismatch repair and recombinational repair, the proximity of mtDNA to the main sites of ROS production and the lack of protective histones may result in increased susceptibility to various types of mtDNA damage. These include accumulation of mtDNA point mutations and/or deletions and decreased mtDNA copy number, which will impair mitochondrial function and finally, may lead to CVD including HF.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA inheritance in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus gattii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixuan; Wilson, Amanda; Xu, Jianping

    2015-02-01

    The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly uniparental in most sexual eukaryotes. In this study, we examined the mitochondrial inheritance pattern of Cryptococcus gattii, a basidiomycetous yeast responsible for the recent and ongoing outbreak of cryptococcal infections in the US Pacific Northwest and British Columbia (especially Vancouver Island) in Canada. Using molecular markers, we analyzed the inheritance of mtDNA in 14 crosses between strains within and between divergent lineages in C. gattii. Consistent with results from recent studies, our analyses identified significant variations in mtDNA inheritance patterns among strains and crosses, ranging from strictly uniparental to biparental. For two of the crosses that showed uniparental mitochondrial inheritance in standard laboratory conditions, we further investigated the effects of the following environmental variables on mtDNA inheritance: UV exposure, temperature, and treatments with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and with the ubiquitination inhibitor ammonium chloride. Interestingly, one of these crosses showed no response to these environmental variables while the other exhibited diverse patterns ranging from complete uniparental inheritance of the MATa parent mtDNA, to biparental inheritance, and to a significant bias toward inheritance of the MATα parental mtDNA. Our results indicate that mtDNA inheritance in C. gattii differs from that in its closely related species Cryptococcus neoformans.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA evidence of southward migration of Manchus in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Bin; Sun, Wen-Yi; Zhan, Yang; Di, Wang; Yu, Chang-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The Northeast area of China is a cross region between East Asia and Siberia. Although five populations from this area have been studied in maternal lineage, little is known about the genetics of other populations. In this study, forty-seven Manchu individuals were analyzed using a mitochondrial DNA marker, and fourteen mitochondrial DNA haplogroups, the representative haplogroups of east Eurasian, were identified. All analyses showed that Manchu were close to the neighboring populations such as Mongolian, Korean and northern Han Chinese, and were far from the other populations who lived in the cradle of Manchu, suggesting that the Manchu integrated gradually with natives following its southward migration.

  16. A novel interaction between DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma plays an essential role in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    PubMed

    De, Ananya; Campbell, Colin

    2007-02-15

    The data in the present study show that DNA polymerase gamma and DNA ligase III interact in mitochondrial protein extracts from cultured HT1080 cells. An interaction was also observed between the two recombinant proteins in vitro. Expression of catalytically inert versions of DNA ligase III that bind DNA polymerase gamma was associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number and integrity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type DNA ligase III had no effect on mitochondrial DNA copy number or integrity. Experiments revealed that wild-type DNA ligase III facilitates the interaction of DNA polymerase gamma with a nicked DNA substrate in vitro, and that the zinc finger domain of DNA ligase III is required for this activity. Mitochondrial protein extracts prepared from cells overexpressing a DNA ligase III protein that lacked the zinc finger domain had reduced base excision repair activity compared with extracts from cells overexpressing the wild-type protein. These data support the interpretation that the interaction of DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma is required for proper maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome.

  17. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Alessandra; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Caporali, Leonardo; Carelli, Valerio; Zanna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia-deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E) are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however, mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is regulated and

  18. DNA Precursor Metabolism and Mitochondrial Genome Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    mitochondrial thiamine pyrophosphate depletion, embryonic lethality, CNS malformations, and anemia. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103, 15927–15932. List of papers...to facilitate deoxyribonucleotide transport, with diphosphates being the preferred substrates. Biesecker’s laboratory had generated knockout mice...transport ribonucleotides in reconstituted liposomes, with diphosphates again being the preferred substrates. That led us to speculate that the

  19. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures.

  20. Rapid Discrimination of Mitochondrial DNA Type and Use of Results to Study Mitochondrial Inheritance in Pleurotus spp.

    PubMed

    Sagawa, I; Moriyama, Y; Yanagi, S O; Ando, A; Nagata, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have reported a simple and rapid method to discriminate species in the genus Pleurotus by analysis of restriction-fragment-length polymorphism of whole-cell DNA, and found that several restriction enzymes gave DNA bands useful in such discrimination, but other enzymes tested did not. In the present study, we report the reason why there were useful and useless enzymes; the effective enzymes digested rDNA into small fragments that did not interfere with the detection of DNA bands useful for discrimination. The origin of these discriminative DNA bands was found to be mitochondrial DNA when the banding profiles of whole-cell DNA, mitochondrial DNA, and nuclear DNA were compared. Consequently, our method could be used for rapid and simple identification of mitochondrial DNA type in the genus Pleurotus. The results were used to study mitochondrial inheritance, and we found that only the nucleus but not the mitochondria migrated during the mating of Pleurotus cornucopiae with P. citrinopileatus.

  1. Establishment of a heteroplasmic mouse strain with interspecific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes and improvement of a PCR-RFLP-based measurement system for estimation of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Hiroshi; Cao, Liqin; Yamaguchi, Midori; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Taya, Choji

    2017-02-20

    Mitochondrial DNA segregation is one of the characteristic modes of mitochondrial inheritance in which the heteroplasmic state of mitochondrial DNA is transmitted to the next generation in variable proportions. To analyze mitochondrial DNA segregation, we produced a heteroplasmic mouse strain with interspecific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, which contains two types of mitochondrial DNA derived from C57BL/6J and Mus spretus strains. The strain was produced on a C57BL/6J nuclear genomic background by microinjection of donor cytoplasm into fertilized eggs. The PCR-RFLP semi-quantitative analysis method, which was improved to reduce the effect of heteroduplex formation, was used to measure the proportion of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA in tissues. Founder mice contained up to approximately 14% of exogenous Mus spretus mitochondrial DNA molecules in their tails, and the detected proportions differed among tissues of the same individual. Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA is transmitted to the next generation in varying proportions under the maternal inheritance mode. This mitochondrial heteroplasmic mouse strain and the improved PCR-RFLP measurement system enable analysis of the transmission of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA variants between tissues and generations.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number in Sleep Duration Discordant Monozygotic Twins

    PubMed Central

    Wrede, Joanna E.; Mengel-From, Jonas; Buchwald, Dedra; Vitiello, Michael V.; Bamshad, Michael; Noonan, Carolyn; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number is an important component of mitochondrial function and varies with age, disease, and environmental factors. We aimed to determine whether mtDNA copy number varies with habitual differences in sleep duration within pairs of monozygotic twins. Setting: Academic clinical research center. Participants: 15 sleep duration discordant monozygotic twin pairs (30 twins, 80% female; mean age 42.1 years [SD 15.0]). Design: Sleep duration was phenotyped with wrist actigraphy. Each twin pair included a “normal” (7–9 h/24) and “short” (< 7 h/24) sleeping twin. Fasting peripheral blood leukocyte DNA was assessed for mtDNA copy number via the n-fold difference between qPCR measured mtDNA and nuclear DNA creating an mtDNA measure without absolute units. We used generalized estimating equation linear regression models accounting for the correlated data structure to assess within-pair effects of sleep duration on mtDNA copy number. Measurements and Results: Mean within-pair sleep duration difference per 24 hours was 94.3 minutes (SD 62.6 min). We found reduced sleep duration (β = 0.06; 95% CI 0.004, 0.12; P < 0.05) and sleep efficiency (β = 0.51; 95% CI 0.06, 0.95; P < 0.05) were significantly associated with reduced mtDNA copy number within twin pairs. Thus every 1-minute decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep duration was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.06. Likewise, a 1% decrease in actigraphy-defined sleep efficiency was associated with a decrease in mtDNA copy number of 0.51. Conclusions: Reduced sleep duration and sleep efficiency were associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number in sleep duration discordant monozygotic twins offering a potential mechanism whereby short sleep impairs health and longevity through mitochondrial stress. Citation: Wrede JE, Mengel-From J, Buchwald D, Vitiello MV, Bamshad M, Noonan C, Christiansen L, Christensen K, Watson NF. Mitochondrial DNA copy number

  3. Rapamycin drives selection against a pathogenic heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Zheng, Kangni; Clark, Joanne; Swerdlow, Russell H; Pulst, Stefan M; Sutton, James P; Shinobu, Leslie A; Simon, David K

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial disorders for which effective treatments are lacking. Emerging data indicate that selective mitochondrial degradation through autophagy (mitophagy) plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity can activate mitophagy. To test the hypothesis that enhancing mitophagy would drive selection against dysfunctional mitochondria harboring higher levels of mutations, thereby decreasing mutation levels over time, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mutation levels in a human cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell line expressing a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation, the most common cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6 kinase signaling by rapamycin induced colocalization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, and resulted in a striking progressive decrease in levels of the G11778A mutation and partial restoration of ATP levels. Rapamycin-induced upregulation of mitophagy was confirmed by electron microscopic evidence of increased autophagic vacuoles containing mitochondria-like organelles. The decreased mutational burden was not due to rapamycin-induced cell death or mtDNA depletion, as there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity/apoptosis or mtDNA copy number between rapamycin and vehicle-treated cells. These data demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of mTOR kinase activity to activate mitophagy as a strategy to drive selection against a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation and raise the exciting possibility that rapamycin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations, although further studies are needed to determine if a similar strategy will be effective for other mutations and other cell types.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p < 0.01). Long time chronic suppurative otitis media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media.

  5. Fecal source tracking in water using a mitochondrial DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Nguyet-Minh; Villemur, Richard; Payment, Pierre; Brousseau, Roland; Topp, Edward; Masson, Luke

    2013-01-01

    A mitochondrial-based microarray (mitoArray) was developed for rapid identification of the presence of 28 animals and one family (cervidae) potentially implicated in fecal pollution in mixed activity watersheds. Oligonucleotide probes for genus or subfamily-level identification were targeted within the 12S rRNA - Val tRNA - 16S rRNA region in the mitochondrial genome. This region, called MI-50, was selected based on three criteria: 1) the ability to be amplified by universal primers 2) these universal primer sequences are present in most commercial and domestic animals of interest in source tracking, and 3) that sufficient sequence variation exists within this region to meet the minimal requirements for microarray probe discrimination. To quantify the overall level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in samples, a quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) universal primer pair was also developed. Probe validation was performed using DNA extracted from animal tissues and, for many cases, animal-specific fecal samples. To reduce the amplification of potentially interfering fish mtDNA sequences during the MI-50 enrichment step, a clamping PCR method was designed using a fish-specific peptide nucleic acid. DNA extracted from 19 water samples were subjected to both array and independent PCR analyses. Our results confirm that the mitochondrial microarray approach method could accurately detect the dominant animals present in water samples emphasizing the potential for this methodology in the parallel scanning of a large variety of animals normally monitored in fecal source tracking.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in ageing and disease: implications for HIV?

    PubMed

    Payne, Brendan A I; Gardner, Kristian; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause neurological and multisystem disease. Somatic (acquired) mtDNA mutations are also associated with degenerative diseases and with normal human ageing. It is well established that certain nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) antiretroviral drugs cause inhibition of the mtDNA polymerase, pol γ, leading to a reduction in mtDNA content (depletion). Given this effect of NRTI therapy on mtDNA replication, it is plausible that NRTI treatment may also lead to increased mtDNA mutations. Here we review recent evidence for an effect of HIV infection or NRTI therapy on mtDNA mutations, as well as discussing the methodological challenges in addressing this question. Finally, we discuss the possible implications for HIV-infected persons, with particular reference to ageing.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA replication during differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Facucho-Oliveira, Joao M; Alderson, Jon; Spikings, Emma C; Egginton, Stuart; St John, Justin C

    2007-11-15

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the intracellular process that generates the majority of the ATP of a cell through the electron-transfer chain, is highly dependent on proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). MtDNA replication is regulated by the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and the mitochondrial-specific DNA polymerase gamma, which consists of a catalytic (POLG) and an accessory (POLG2) subunit. Differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into specific cell types requires expansion of discrete populations of mitochondria and mtDNA replication to meet the specific metabolic requirements of the cell. We determined by real-time PCR that expression of pluripotent markers is reduced before the upregulation of Polg, Polg2 and Tfam in spontaneously differentiating R1 murine (m)ESCs, along with transient increases in mtDNA copy number. In D3 mESCs, the initial transient increase did not take place. However, precursors of neuronal and cardiomyocyte differentiation were positive for both POLG and TFAM. Similar-stage ESCs also showed active mtDNA replication, identified by 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine labelling, as mtDNA copy number increased. Retinoic-acid-induced differentiation resulted in more consistent patterns of replication and upregulation of Polg, Polg2 and Tfam, whereas siRNA knockdown demonstrated that steady-state expression of POLG is essential for maintaining pluripotency.

  8. Indirubin-3'-oxime impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and prevents mitochondrial permeability transition induction

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Ana T.; Gomes, Ana P.; Simoes, Anabela M.; Teodoro, Joao S.; Duarte, Filipe V.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.

    2008-12-01

    Indirubin, a red colored 3,2'-bisindole isomer, is a component of Indigo naturalis and is an active ingredient used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases. The family of indirubin derivatives, such as indirubin-3'-oxime, has been suggested for various therapeutic indications. However, potential toxic interactions such as indirubin effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics are still unknown. This study evaluated the action of indirubin-3'-oxime on the function of isolated rat liver mitochondria contributing to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the multiple effects of indirubin. Indirubin-3'-oxime incubated with isolated rat liver mitochondria, at concentrations above 10{mu}M, significantly depresses the phosphorylation efficiency of mitochondria as inferred from the decrease in the respiratory control and ADP/O ratios, the perturbations in mitochondrial membrane potential and in the phosphorylative cycle induced by ADP. Furthermore, indirubin-3'-oxime at up to 25{mu}M stimulates the rate of state 4 respiration and inhibits state 3 respiration. The increased lag phase of repolarization was associated with a direct inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase. Indirubin-3'-oxime significantly inhibited the activity of complex II and IV thus explaining the decreased FCCP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria pre-incubated with indirubin-3'-oxime exhibits decreased susceptibility to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. This work shows for the first time multiple effects of indirubin-3'-oxime on mitochondrial bioenergetics thus indicating a potential mechanism for indirubin-3'-oxime effects on cell function.

  9. Direct quantification of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yasutomo

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondria are known to be one of major organelles within a cell and to play a crucial role in many cellular functions. These organelles show the dynamic behaviors such as fusion, fission and the movement along cytoskeletal tracks. Besides mitochondria, mitochondrial DNA is also highly motile. Molecular analysis revealed that several proteins are involved in mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA dynamics. In addition to the degeneration of specific nerves with high energy requirement, mutation of genes coding these proteins results in metabolic diseases. During the last few years, a significant amount of relevant data has been obtained on molecular basis of these diseases but mitochondrial dynamics in cells derived from the patients is poorly understood. So far time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching and image correlation methods have been used to study organellar motion. Especially, image correlation method has possibility to evaluate diffusion coefficient of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA simultaneously and directly. When we search candidates for compounds that modulate mitochondrial dynamics by high throughput screening, image correlation method may be useful although the careful interpretation is required for crowded and heterogeneous environment within a cell.

  10. Evidence for Recombination of Mitochondrial DNA in Triploid Crucian Carp

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinhong; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the allotetraploid and triploid crucian carp and compare the complete mtDNA sequences between the triploid crucian carp and its female parent Japanese crucian carp and between the triploid crucian carp and its male parent allotetraploid. Our results indicate that the complete mtDNA nucleotide identity (98%) between the triploid crucian carp and its male parent allotetraploid was higher than that (93%) between the triploid crucian carp and its female parent Japanese crucian carp. Moreover, the presence of a pattern of identity and difference at synonymous sites of mitochondrial genomes between the triploid crucian carp and its parents provides direct evidence that triploid crucian carp possessed the recombination mtDNA fragment (12,759 bp) derived from the paternal fish. These results suggest that mtDNA recombination was derived from the fusion of the maternal and paternal mtDNAs. Compared with the haploid egg with one set of genome from the Japanese crucian carp, the diploid sperm with two sets of genomes from the allotetraploid could more easily make its mtDNA fuse with the mtDNA of the haploid egg. In addition, the triple hybrid nature of the triploid crucian carp probably allowed its better mtDNA recombination. In summary, our results provide the first evidence of mtDNA combination in polyploid fish. PMID:16322508

  11. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  12. Heterogeneous base distribution in mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, P; Holtrop, M; Kroon, A

    1977-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Neurospora crassa has a heterogeneous intramolecular base distribution. A contiguous piece, representing at least 30% of the total genome, has a G+C content that is 6% lower than the overall G+C content of the DNA. The genes for both ribosomal RNAs are contained in the remaining, relatively G+C rich, part of the genome. PMID:141040

  13. Fly Diversity Revealed by PCR-RFLP of Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asraoui, Jimmy F.; Sayar, Nancy P.; Knio, Khouzama M.; Smith, Colin A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we describe an inexpensive, two-session undergraduate laboratory activity that introduces important molecular biology methods in the context of biodiversity. In the first session, students bring tentatively identified flies (order Diptera, true flies) to the laboratory, extract DNA, and amplify a region of the mitochondrial gene…

  14. Mitochondrial DNA insertions in the nuclear Capra hircus genome.

    PubMed

    Ning, F Y; Fu, J; Du, Z H

    2017-01-23

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts), originating from mtDNA insertions into the nuclear genome, have been detected in many species. However, the distribution of numts in the newly published nuclear genome of domestic goat (Capra hircus) has not yet been explored. We used the entire goat mtDNA sequence and nuclear genome, to identify 118 numts using BLAST. Of these, 79 were able to map sequences to the genome. Further analysis showed that the size of the numts ranged from 318 to 9608 bp, and the homologous identity between numts and their respective corresponding mtDNA fragments varied between 65 and 99%. The identified Yunnan black goat numts covered nearly all the mitochondrial genes including mtDNA control region, and were distributed over all chromosomes with the exception of chromosomes 18, 21, and 25. The Y chromosome was excluded from our analysis, as sequence data are currently not available. Among the discovered 79 numts that we were able to map to the genome, 26 relatively complete mitochondrial genes were detected. Our results constitute valuable information for subsequent studies related to mitochondrial genes and goat evolution.

  15. A Polymorphism in Mitochondrial DNA Associated with IQ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skuder, Patricia; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Of 100 DNA markers examined in an allelic association study, only 1 showed a replicated association with IQ in samples totaling 107 children. How the gene marked by the particular restriction fragment length polymorphism was tracked and its mitochondrial origin identified is described. (SLD)

  16. Regulation and pharmacology of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    Zorov, Dmitry B.; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Yaniv, Yael; Nuss, H. Bradley; Wang, Su; Sollott, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The ‘mitochondrial permeability transition', characterized by a sudden induced change of the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability for water as well as for small substances (≤1.5 kDa), has been known for three decades. Research interest in the entity responsible for this phenomenon, the ‘mitochondrial permeability transition pore’ (mPTP), has dramatically increased after demonstration that it plays a key role in the life and death decision in cells. Therefore, a better understanding of this phenomenon and its regulation by environmental stresses, kinase signalling, and pharmacological intervention is vital. The characterization of the molecular identity of the mPTP will allow identification of possible pharmacological targets and assist in drug design for its precise regulation. However, despite extensive research efforts, at this point the pore-forming core component(s) of the mPTP remain unidentified. Pivotal new genetic evidence has shown that components once believed to be core elements of the mPTP (namely mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator and cyclophilin D) are instead only mPTP regulators (or in the case of voltage-dependent anion channels, probably entirely dispensable). This review provides an update on the current state of knowledge regarding the regulation of the mPTP. PMID:19447775

  17. The mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF modulates replication pausing in human mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Reyes, Aurelio; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Karhunen, Pekka J.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Holt, Ian J.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian mitochondrial transcription termination factor mTERF binds with high affinity to a site within the tRNALeu(UUR) gene and regulates the amount of read through transcription from the ribosomal DNA into the remaining genes of the major coding strand of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and SELEX, using mitochondrial protein extracts from cells induced to overexpress mTERF, revealed novel, weaker mTERF-binding sites, clustered in several regions of mtDNA, notably in the major non-coding region (NCR). Such binding in vivo was supported by mtDNA immunoprecipitation. Two-dimensional neutral agarose gel electrophoresis (2DNAGE) and 5′ end mapping by ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR) identified the region of the canonical mTERF-binding site as a replication pause site. The strength of pausing was modulated by the expression level of mTERF. mTERF overexpression also affected replication pausing in other regions of the genome in which mTERF binding was found. These results indicate a role for TERF in mtDNA replication, in addition to its role in transcription. We suggest that mTERF could provide a system for coordinating the passage of replication and transcription complexes, analogous with replication pause-region binding proteins in other systems, whose main role is to safeguard the integrity of the genome whilst facilitating its efficient expression. PMID:17884915

  18. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore: a mystery solved?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The permeability transition (PT) denotes an increase of the mitochondrial inner membrane permeability to solutes with molecular masses up to about 1500 Da. It is presumed to be mediated by opening of a channel, the permeability transition pore (PTP), whose molecular nature remains a mystery. Here I briefly review the history of the PTP, discuss existing models, and present our new results indicating that reconstituted dimers of the FOF1 ATP synthase form a channel with properties identical to those of the mitochondrial megachannel (MMC), the electrophysiological equivalent of the PTP. Open questions remain, but there is now promise that the PTP can be studied by genetic methods to solve the large number of outstanding problems. PMID:23675351

  19. Seventeen New Complete mtDNA Sequences Reveal Extensive Mitochondrial Genome Evolution within the Demospongiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V.

    2008-01-01

    Two major transitions in animal evolution–the origins of multicellularity and bilaterality–correlate with major changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. Demosponges, the largest class in the phylum Porifera, underwent only the first of these transitions and their mitochondrial genomes display a peculiar combination of ancestral and animal-specific features. To get an insight into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Demospongiae, we determined 17 new mtDNA sequences from this group and analyzing them with five previously published sequences. Our analysis revealed that all demosponge mtDNAs are 16- to 25-kbp circular molecules, containing 13–15 protein genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 2–27 tRNA genes. All but four pairs of sampled genomes had unique gene orders, with the number of shared gene boundaries ranging from 1 to 41. Although most demosponge species displayed low rates of mitochondrial sequence evolution, a significant acceleration in evolutionary rates occurred in the G1 group (orders Dendroceratida, Dictyoceratida, and Verticillitida). Large variation in mtDNA organization was also observed within the G0 group (order Homosclerophorida) including gene rearrangements, loss of tRNA genes, and the presence of two introns in Plakortis angulospiculatus. While introns are rare in modern-day demosponge mtDNA, we inferred that at least one intron was present in cox1 of the common ancestor of all demosponges. Our study uncovered an extensive mitochondrial genomic diversity within the Demospongiae. Although all sampled mitochondrial genomes retained some ancestral features, including a minimally modified genetic code, conserved structures of tRNA genes, and presence of multiple non-coding regions, they vary considerably in their size, gene content, gene order, and the rates of sequence evolution. Some of the changes in demosponge mtDNA, such as the loss of tRNA genes and the appearance of hairpin-containing repetitive elements, occurred in

  20. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  1. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  2. Preferential recombination between GC clusters in yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, C L; Gandy, B

    1987-01-01

    Yeast mitochondrial DNA molecules have long, AT-rich intergenic spacers punctuated by short GC clusters. GC-rich elements have previously been characterized by others as preferred sites for intramolecular recombination leading to the formation of subgenomic petite molecules. In the present study we show that GC clusters are favored sites for intermolecular recombination between a petite and the wild-type grande genome. The petite studied retains 6.5 kb of mitochondrial DNA reiterated tandemly to form molecules consisting of repeated units. Genetic selection for integration of tandem 6.5 kb repeats of the petite into the grande genome yielded a novel recombination event. One of two crossovers in a double exchange event occurred as expected in the 6.5 kb of matching sequence between the genomes, whereas the second exchange involved a 44 bp GC cluster in the petite and another 44 bp GC cluster in the grande genome 700 bp proximal to the region of homology. Creation of a mitochondrial DNA molecule with a repetitive region led to secondary recombination events that generated a family of molecules with zero to several petite units. The finding that 44 bp GC clusters are preferred as sites for intermolecular exchange adds to the data on petite excision implicating these elements as recombinational hotspots in the yeast mitochondrial genome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3327690

  3. Characterization of mitochondrial DNA from the pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens).

    PubMed

    Lesca, C; Moisand, A; Puget, A

    1976-01-01

    Further to anatomical and physiological studies performed on the pika (Ochotona rufescens rufescens), a new laboratory animal, the main characteristics of the mitochondrial DNA from its liver are defined. The buoyant density of this DNA is 1.695 g/cm3, its length 5.30 mum,, i.e., 3.17 times that of the replicative form of phiX 174. It could have approximately 16 500 base pairs. The DNA from the pika is very similar to that of the rat or the rabbit, although these animals show great physiological differences.

  4. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies: a correlation between neuropathological findings and defects in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    McKelvie, P A; Morley, J B; Byrne, E; Marzuki, S

    1991-03-01

    Neuropathological studies were carried out in two patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathies in whom the underlying lesions in muscle mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and respiratory enzyme complexes have been investigated. The first, a man with Kearns-Sayre syndrome, died at the age of 49 years. Autopsy showed an old parietal lobe infarct, diffuse spongiform leukoencephalopathy of cerebral and cerebellar white matter and mild spongiform change in deep grey matter and brainstem nuclei. Heteroplasmy of skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA with a 3.5 kb mtDNA deletion in one of two mtDNA populations was found. The second case, a woman, suffering from myoclonic epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, bilateral sensorineural deafness, several 'stroke-like' episodes died at age 52. At autopsy, an old infarct was seen in the L internal capsule. Severe loss of neurons and gliosis were found in the dentate nuclei, moderate changes in the red nuclei and inferior olivary nuclei and mild changes in the substantial nigra and locus coeruleus. In both patients, skeletal muscle biopsy showed numbers of ragged-red fibres and intramitochondrial paracrystalline inclusions at electron microscopy. A defect in the synthesis of the ND5 subunit of the respiratory complex I was suggested in the second patient in whom a diagnosis of MELAS was made.

  5. Natural radioactivity and human mitochondrial DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Lucy; Forster, Peter; Lutz-Bonengel, Sabine; Willkomm, Horst; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Radioactivity is known to induce tumors, chromosome lesions, and minisatellite length mutations, but its effects on the DNA sequence have not previously been studied. A coastal peninsula in Kerala (India) contains the world's highest level of natural radioactivity in a densely populated area, offering an opportunity to characterize radiation-associated DNA mutations. We sampled 248 pedigrees (988 individuals) in the high-radiation peninsula and in nearby low-radiation islands as a control population. We sequenced their mtDNA, and found that the pedigrees living in the high-radiation area have significantly (P < 0.01) increased germ-line point mutations between mothers and their offspring. In each mutation case, we confirmed maternity by autosomal profiling. Strikingly, the radioactive conditions accelerate mutations at nucleotide positions that have been evolutionary hot spots for at least 60,000 years. PMID:12370437

  6. CDK1 Enhances Mitochondrial Bioenergetics for Radiation-Induced DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Candas, Demet; Jiang, Guochun; Papadopoulos, Stelios; Tian, Lin; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Nuclear DNA repair capacity is a critical determinant of cell fate under genotoxic stress conditions. DNA repair is a well-defined energy consuming process; however, it is unclear how DNA repair is fueled and whether mitochondrial energy production contributes to nuclear DNA repair. Here, we report a dynamic enhancement of oxygen consumption and mitochondrial ATP generation in irradiated normal cells, paralleled with increased mitochondrial relocation of cell cycle kinase CDK1 and nuclear DNA repair. The basal and radiation-induced mitochondrial ATP generation is significantly reduced in cells harboring CDK1 phosphorylation deficient mutant complex I subunits. Similarly, mitochondrial ATP generation and nuclear DNA repair are also severely compromised in cells harboring mitochondrial-targeted kinase deficient CDK1. These results demonstrate a mechanism governing the communication between mitochondria and nucleus, by which CDK1 boosts mitochondrial bioenergetics to meet the increased cellular fuel demand for DNA repair and cell survival under genotoxic stress. PMID:26670043

  7. Physiological roles of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    Mnatsakanyan, Nelli; Beutner, Gisela; Porter, George A.; Alavian, Kambiz N.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons experience high metabolic demand during such processes as synaptic vesicle recycling, membrane potential maintenance and Ca2+ exchange/extrusion. The energy needs of these events are met in large part by mitochondrial production of ATP through the process of oxidative phosphorylation. The job of ATP production by the mitochondria is performed by the F1FO ATP synthase, a multi-protein enzyme that contains a membrane-inserted portion, an extra-membranous enzymatic portion and an extensive regulatory complex. Although required for ATP production by mitochondria, recent findings have confirmed that the membrane-confined portion of the c-subunit of the ATP synthase also houses a large conductance uncoupling channel, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), the persistent opening of which produces osmotic dysregulation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and cell death. Recent advances in understanding the molecular components of mPTP and its regulatory mechanisms have determined that decreased uncoupling occurs in states of enhanced mitochondrial efficiency; relative closure of mPTP therefore contributes to cellular functions as diverse as cardiac development and synaptic efficacy. PMID:26868013

  8. Ethical aspects of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Blesa, José Rafael; Tudela, Julio; Aznar, Justo

    2016-05-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) (cloning), as a reproductive or therapeutic method, and mitochondrial DNA transfer, as a method to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial diseases, are analyzed in this paper from a bioethics perspective. The licit purpose of being able to treat certain diseases, as in the case of SCNT, cannot justify, in any case, resorting to illicit means such as the manipulation, selection, and elimination of human embryos in the blastocyst phase, by using cell lines obtained from them. Crossing this line paves the way (as utilitarian ethics advocates) to assuming any cost in scientific experimentation so long as satisfactory results are obtained. With mitochondrial replacement, either human embryos are directly manipulated (pronuclear transfer) or germline cells are manipulated (maternal spindle transfer); changes in these could be transmitted to the offspring.

  9. Directly repeated sequences associated with pathogenic mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D R; Rutledge, S L; Stine, O C; Hurko, O

    1989-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequences of junctional regions associated with large deletions of mitochondrial DNA found in four unrelated individuals with a phenotype of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia. In each patient, the deletion breakpoint occurred within a directly repeated sequence of 13-18 base pairs, present in different regions of the normal mitochondrial genome-separated by 4.5-7.7 kilobases. In two patients, the deletions were identical. When all four repeated sequences are compared, a consensus sequence of 11 nucleotides emerges, similar to putative recombination signals, suggesting the involvement of a recombinational event. Partially deleted and normal mitochondrial DNAs were found in all tissues examined, but in very different proportions, indicating that these mutations originated before the primary cell layers diverged. Images PMID:2813377

  10. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification.

  11. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  12. Collated mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome (excluding the mitochondrial gamma polymerase, POLG1).

    PubMed

    Poulton, J; Hirano, M; Spinazzola, A; Arenas Hernandez, M; Jardel, C; Lombès, A; Czermin, B; Horvath, R; Taanman, J W; Rotig, A; Zeviani, M; Fratter, C

    2009-12-01

    These tables list both published and a number of unpublished mutations in genes associated with early onset defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance including C10orf2, SUCLG1, SUCLA2, TYMP, RRM2B, MPV17, DGUOK and TK2. The list should not be taken as evidence that any particular mutation is pathogenic. We have included genes known to cause mtDNA depletion, excluding POLG1, because of the existing database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/). We have also excluded mutations in C10orf2 associated with dominant adult onset disorders.

  13. Deciphering the spectrum of somatic mutations in the entire mitochondrial DNA genome.

    PubMed

    Chen, X Z; Fang, Y; Shi, Y H; Cui, J H; Li, L Y; Xu, Y C; Ling, B

    2015-04-30

    The mitochondrion is a crucial intracellular organelle responsible for regulating cellular energy metabolism, producing free radicals, initiating and executing the apoptotic pathways. Previous studies have shown that somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA are associated with various tumors, which may be involved during carcinogenesis and tumor progression. To examine the mutation pattern in cancer, 625 reported somatic mutations in the mitochondrial DNA genome were analyzed. We found that, except for deletions and insertions, most somatic mutations were point mutations, accounting for 89.44% of somatic mutations. Transition was the predominant form of somatic mutation in the entire mitochondrial DNA genome, accounting for 87.12% of point mutations, most of which were homoplastic. Frequency statistics analysis of point mutations indicated that, except for 3 tRNA genes, the mutations were distributed on all resting genes and in the D-loop region, with the latter showing the highest frequency of somatic mutation (19.34%), followed by the tRNA leucine 2 gene and non-coding regions between base pairs 5892 and 5903, while 13 coding-region genes and 2 rRNA genes showed a relatively lower frequency of somatic point mutations. Nonsynonymous mutations and terminal amino acid changes were the primary point somatic mutations detected from 13 coding-region genes, which may cause mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer cells. We found that the somatic mutations may affect the mitochondrial DNA genome; the non-coding region should be examined to identify somatic mutations as potential diagnostic biomarkers for early detection of cancer.

  14. Mitochondrial calcium and the permeability transition in cell death.

    PubMed

    Lemasters, John J; Theruvath, Tom P; Zhong, Zhi; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2009-11-01

    Dysregulation of Ca(2+) has long been implicated to be important in cell injury. A Ca(2+)-linked process important in necrosis and apoptosis (or necrapoptosis) is the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). In the MPT, large conductance permeability transition (PT) pores open that make the mitochondrial inner membrane abruptly permeable to solutes up to 1500 Da. The importance of Ca(2+) in MPT induction varies with circumstance. Ca(2+) overload is sufficient to induce the MPT. By contrast after ischemia-reperfusion to cardiac myocytes, Ca(2+) overload is the consequence of bioenergetic failure after the MPT rather than its cause. In other models, such as cytotoxicity from Reye-related agents and storage-reperfusion injury to liver grafts, Ca(2+) appears to be permissive to MPT onset. Lastly in oxidative stress, increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ROS generation act synergistically to produce the MPT and cell death. Thus, the exact role of Ca(2+) for inducing the MPT and cell death depends on the particular biologic setting.

  15. Phylogenetic Position of a Copper Age Sheep (Ovis aries) Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Background Sheep (Ovis aries) were domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region about 9,000-8,000 years ago. Currently, few mitochondrial (mt) DNA studies are available on archaeological sheep. In particular, no data on archaeological European sheep are available. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the first portion of mtDNA sequence of a Copper Age European sheep. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the clothes of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350 - 5,100 years before present). Mitochondrial DNA (a total of 2,429 base pairs, encompassing a portion of the control region, tRNAPhe, a portion of the 12S rRNA gene, and the whole cytochrome B gene) was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplification and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We have compared the sequence with the corresponding sequence of 334 extant lineages. Conclusions/Significance A phylogenetic network based on a new cladistic notation for the mitochondrial diversity of domestic sheep shows that the Ötzi's sheep falls within haplogroup B, thus demonstrating that sheep belonging to this haplogroup were already present in the Alps more than 5,000 years ago. On the other hand, the lineage of the Ötzi's sheep is defined by two transitions (16147, and 16440) which, assembled together, define a motif that has not yet been identified in modern sheep populations. PMID:22457789

  16. Targeting the mitochondrial genome via a dual function MITO-Porter: evaluation of mtDNA levels and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with certain types of mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in the occurrence of a variety of human diseases. For an effective mitochondrial gene therapy, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents to the innermost mitochondrial space (the mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We recently developed a MITO-Porter, a liposome-based nano-carrier that delivers cargo to mitochondria via a membrane-fusion mechanism. Using propidium iodide, as a probe to detect mtDNA, we were able to confirm that the MITO-Porter delivered cargoes to mitochondrial matrices in living cells. More recently, we constructed a Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter, a liposome-based nanocarrier for mitochondrial delivery via a stepwise process. In this chapter, we describe the methodology used to deliver bioactive molecules to the mitochondrial matrix using the above DF-MITO-Porter, and the evaluation of mtDNA levels and mitochondrial activities in living cells.

  17. qPCR-based mitochondrial DNA quantification: Influence of template DNA fragmentation on accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Christopher B.; Gallati, Sabina; Schaller, Andre

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR accurately determines fragmentation state of any given DNA sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR demonstrates different preservation of the nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR provides a diagnostic tool to validate the integrity of bioptic material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Serial qPCR excludes degradation-induced erroneous quantification. -- Abstract: Real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by relative comparison of a nuclear to a mitochondrial locus. Quantitative abnormal mtDNA content is indicative of mitochondrial disorders and mostly confines in a tissue-specific manner. Thus handling of degradation-prone bioptic material is inevitable. We established a serial qPCR assay based on increasing amplicon size to measure degradation status of any DNA sample. Using this approach we can exclude erroneous mtDNA quantification due to degraded samples (e.g. long post-exicision time, autolytic processus, freeze-thaw cycles) and ensure abnormal DNA content measurements (e.g. depletion) in non-degraded patient material. By preparation of degraded DNA under controlled conditions using sonification and DNaseI digestion we show that erroneous quantification is due to the different preservation qualities of the nuclear and the mitochondrial genome. This disparate degradation of the two genomes results in over- or underestimation of mtDNA copy number in degraded samples. Moreover, as analysis of defined archival tissue would allow to precise the molecular pathomechanism of mitochondrial disorders presenting with abnormal mtDNA content, we compared fresh frozen (FF) with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skeletal muscle tissue of the same sample. By extrapolation of measured decay constants for nuclear DNA ({lambda}{sub nDNA}) and mtDNA ({lambda}{sub mtDNA}) we present an approach to possibly correct measurements in

  18. Mitochondrial DNA deletions are associated with non-B DNA conformations

    PubMed Central

    Damas, Joana; Carneiro, João; Gonçalves, Joana; Stewart, James B.; Samuels, David C.; Amorim, António; Pereira, Filipe

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are a primary cause of mitochondrial disease and are believed to contribute to the aging process and to various neurodegenerative diseases. Despite strong observational and experimental evidence, the molecular basis of the deletion process remains obscure. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the primary cause of mtDNA vulnerability to breakage resides in the formation of non-B DNA conformations, namely hairpin, cruciform and cloverleaf-like elements. Using the largest database of human mtDNA deletions built thus far (753 different cases), we show that site-specific breakage hotspots exist in the mtDNA. Furthermore, we discover that the most frequent deletion breakpoints occur within or near predicted structures, a result that is supported by data from transgenic mice with mitochondrial disease. There is also a significant association between the folding energy of an mtDNA region and the number of breakpoints that it harbours. In particular, two clusters of hairpins (near the D-loop 3′-terminus and the L-strand origin of replication) are hotspots for mtDNA breakage. Consistent with our hypothesis, the highest number of 5′- and 3′-breakpoints per base is found in the highly structured tRNA genes. Overall, the data presented in this study suggest that non-B DNA conformations are a key element of the mtDNA deletion process. PMID:22661583

  19. Mitochondrial free [Ca2+] levels and the permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Vay, Laura; Hernández-SanMiguel, Esther; Lobatón, Carmen D; Moreno, Alfredo; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2009-03-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) activates many processes, from mitochondrial metabolism to opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and apoptosis. However, there is considerable controversy regarding the free mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](M)) levels that can be attained during cell activation or even in mitochondrial preparations. Studies using fluorescent dyes (rhod-2 or similar), have reported that phosphate precipitation precludes [Ca(2+)](M) from increasing above 2-3 microM. Instead, using low-Ca(2+)-affinity aequorin probes, we have measured [Ca(2+)](M) values more than two orders of magnitude higher. We confirm here these values by making a direct in situ calibration of mitochondrial aequorin, and we show that a prolonged increase in [Ca(2+)](M) to levels of 0.5-1mM was actually observed at any phosphate concentration (0-10mM) during continuous perfusion of 3.5-100 microM Ca(2+)-buffers. In spite of this high and maintained (>10 min) [Ca(2+)](M), mitochondria retained functionality and the [Ca(2+)](M) drop induced by a protonophore was fully reversible. In addition, this high [Ca(2+)](M) did not induce PTP opening unless additional activators (phenyl arsine oxide, PAO) were present. PAO induced a rapid, concentration-dependent and irreversible drop in [Ca(2+)](M). In conclusion [Ca(2+)](M) levels of 0.5-1mM can be reached and maintained for prolonged periods (>10 min) in phosphate-containing medium, and massive opening of PTP requires additional pore activators.

  20. Selfish Mitochondrial DNA Proliferates and Diversifies in Small, but not Large, Experimental Populations of Caenorhabditis briggsae

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Wendy S.; Coleman-Hulbert, Anna L.; Weiss, Emily S.; Howe, Dana K.; Ping, Sita; Wernick, Riana I.; Estes, Suzanne; Denver, Dee R.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary interactions across levels of biological organization contribute to a variety of fundamental processes including genome evolution, reproductive mode transitions, species diversification, and extinction. Evolutionary theory predicts that so-called “selfish” genetic elements will proliferate when the host effective population size (Ne) is small, but direct tests of this prediction remain few. We analyzed the evolutionary dynamics of deletion-containing mitochondrial DNA (ΔmtDNA) molecules, previously characterized as selfish elements, in six different natural strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae allowed to undergo experimental evolution in a range of population sizes (N = 1, 10, 100, and 1,000) for a maximum of 50 generations. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was analyzed for replicate lineages at each five-generation time point. Ten different ΔmtDNA molecule types were observed and characterized across generations in the experimental populations. Consistent with predictions from evolutionary theory, lab lines evolved in small-population sizes (e.g., nematode N = 1) were more susceptible to accumulation of high levels of preexisting ΔmtDNA compared with those evolved in larger populations. New ΔmtDNA elements were observed to increase in frequency and persist across time points, but almost exclusively at small population sizes. In some cases, ΔmtDNA levels decreased across generations when population size was large (nematode N = 1,000). Different natural strains of C. briggsae varied in their susceptibilities to ΔmtDNA accumulation, owing in part to preexisting compensatory mtDNA alleles in some strains that prevent deletion formation. This analysis directly demonstrates that the evolutionary trajectories of ΔmtDNA elements depend upon the population-genetic environments and molecular-genetic features of their hosts. PMID:26108490

  1. An improved test for Africanized honeybee mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Crozier, Y C; Koulianos, S; Crozier, R H

    1991-09-15

    Mitochondrial DNA derived from Apis mellifera scutellata, the ancestor of the Africanized bees of the New World, lacks a BglII restriction site found in other types of honeybee. We present primers allowing amplification of a 485-bp section of the cytochrome b gene containing this site, using the polymerase chain reaction. Digestion of the amplified product with BglII yields contrasting patterns between Africanized and other honeybees.

  2. Geographic variation of human mitochondrial DNA from Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Stoneking, M.; Wilson, A.C. ); Jorde, L.B. ); Bhatia, K. )

    1990-03-01

    High resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction maps, consisting of an average of 370 sites per mtDNA map, were constructed for 119 people from 25 localities in Papua, New Guinea (PNG). Comparison of these PNG restriction maps to published maps from Australian, Caucasian, Asian and African mtDNAs reveals that PNG has the lowest amount of mtDNA variation, and that PNG mtDNA lineages originated from Southeast Asia. The statistical significance of geographic structuring of populations with respect to mtDNA was assessed by comparing observed G{sub ST} values to a distribution of G{sub ST} values generated by random resampling of the data. These analyses show that there is significant structuring of mtDNA variation among worldwide populations, between highland and coastal PNG populations, and even between two highland PNG populations located approximately 200 km apart. However, coastal PNG populations are essentially panmictic, despite being spread over several hundred kilometers. The high resolution technique for examining mtDNA variation, coupled with extensive geographic sampling within a single defined area, leads to an enhanced understanding of the influence of geography on mtDNA variation in human populations.

  3. Levodopa response in Parkinsonism with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Robert A; Churchyard, Andrew; Dahl, Henrik H; Hutchison, Wendy M; Kirby, Denise M; Thyagarajan, Dominic

    2007-05-15

    We report a patient with an autosomal dominant chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia phenotype associated with multiple mtDNA deletions in muscle from a family in which linkage analysis excluded mutations in DNA polymerase gamma (POLG), adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT-1) or C10orf2 (Twinkle). She presented with prominent Parkinsonism characterized by prolonged benefit from levodopa (L-dopa) and the later development of L-dopa induced dyskinesias and motor fluctuations. Thus L-dopa responsiveness, L-dopa induced dyskinesias and motor fluctuations may also occur in atypical Parkinsonism of mitochondrial disease, just as they may in multiple system atrophy.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA sequences from a 7000-year old brain.

    PubMed Central

    Pääbo, S; Gifford, J A; Wilson, A C

    1988-01-01

    Pieces of mitochondrial DNA from a 7000-year-old human brain were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. Albumin and high concentrations of polymerase were required to overcome a factor in the brain extract that inhibits amplification. For this and other sources of ancient DNA, we find an extreme inverse dependence of the amplification efficiency on the length of the sequence to be amplified. This property of ancient DNA distinguishes it from modern DNA and thus provides a new criterion of authenticity for use in research on ancient DNA. The brain is from an individual recently excavated from Little Salt Spring in southwestern Florida and the anthropologically informative sequences it yielded are the first obtained from archaeologically retrieved remains. The sequences show that this ancient individual belonged to a mitochondrial lineage that is rare in the Old World and not previously known to exist among Native Americans. Our finding brings to three the number of maternal lineages known to have been involved in the prehistoric colonization of the New World. Images PMID:3186445

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Variation in Southeastern Pre-Columbian Canids.

    PubMed

    Brzeski, Kristin E; DeBiasse, Melissa B; Rabon, David R; Chamberlain, Michael J; Taylor, Sabrina S

    2016-05-01

    The taxonomic status of the red wolf (Canis rufus) is heavily debated, but could be clarified by examining historic specimens from the southeastern United States. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 3 ancient (350-1900 year olds) putative wolf samples excavated from middens and sinkholes within the historic red wolf range. We detected 3 unique mtDNA haplotypes, which grouped with the coyote mtDNA clade, suggesting that the canids inhabiting southeastern North America prior to human colonization from Europe were either coyotes, which would vastly expand historic coyote distributions, an ancient coyote-wolf hybrid, or a North American evolved red wolf lineage related to coyotes. Should the red wolf prove to be a distinct species, our results support the idea of either an ancient hybrid origin for red wolves or a shared common ancestor between coyotes and red wolves.

  6. Relative patterns and rates of evolution in heron nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, F H; Jones, C E; McCracken, K G

    2000-03-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data from 15 species of herons (Aves: Ardeidae), representing 13 genera, were compared with DNA hybridization data of single-copy nuclear DNA (scnDNA) from the same species in a taxonomic congruence assessment of heron phylogeny. The two data sets produced a partially resolved, completely congruent estimate of phylogeny with the following basic structure: (Tigrisoma, Cochlearius, (((Zebrilus, (Ixobrychus, Botaurus)), (((Ardea, Casmerodius), Bubulcus), ((Egretta thula, Egretta caerulea, Egretta tricolor), Syrigma), Butorides, Nycticorax, Nyctanassa)))). Because congruence indicated similar phylogenetic information in the two data sets, we used the relatively unsaturated DNA hybridization distances as surrogates of time to examine graphically the patterns and rates of change in cytochrome b distances. Cytochrome b distances were computed either from whole sequences or from partitioned sequences consisting of transitions, transversions, specific codon site positions, or specific protein-coding regions. These graphical comparisons indicated that unpartitioned cytochrome b has evolved at 5-10 times the rate of scnDNA. Third-position transversions appeared to offer the most useful sequence partition for phylogenetic analysis because of their relatively fast rate of substitution (two times that of scnDNA) and negligible saturation. We also examined lineage-based rates of evolution by comparing branch length patterns between the nuclear and cytochrome b trees. The degree of correlation in corresponding branch lengths between cytochrome b and DNA hybridization trees depended on DNA sequence partitioning. When cytochrome b sequences were not partitioned, branch lengths in the cytochrome b and DNA hybridization trees were not correlated. However, when cytochrome b sequences were reduced to third-position transversions (i.e., unsaturated, relatively fast changing data), branch lengths were correlated. This finding suggests that lineage

  7. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  8. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  9. DNA sequences proximal to human mitochondrial DNA deletion breakpoints prevalent in human disease form G-quadruplexes, a class of DNA structures inefficiently unwound by the mitochondrial replicative Twinkle helicase.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Sommers, Joshua A; Zhou, Jun; Kaplan, Daniel L; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Brosh, Robert M

    2014-10-24

    Mitochondrial DNA deletions are prominent in human genetic disorders, cancer, and aging. It is thought that stalling of the mitochondrial replication machinery during DNA synthesis is a prominent source of mitochondrial genome instability; however, the precise molecular determinants of defective mitochondrial replication are not well understood. In this work, we performed a computational analysis of the human mitochondrial genome using the "Pattern Finder" G-quadruplex (G4) predictor algorithm to assess whether G4-forming sequences reside in close proximity (within 20 base pairs) to known mitochondrial DNA deletion breakpoints. We then used this information to map G4P sequences with deletions characteristic of representative mitochondrial genetic disorders and also those identified in various cancers and aging. Circular dichroism and UV spectral analysis demonstrated that mitochondrial G-rich sequences near deletion breakpoints prevalent in human disease form G-quadruplex DNA structures. A biochemical analysis of purified recombinant human Twinkle protein (gene product of c10orf2) showed that the mitochondrial replicative helicase inefficiently unwinds well characterized intermolecular and intramolecular G-quadruplex DNA substrates, as well as a unimolecular G4 substrate derived from a mitochondrial sequence that nests a deletion breakpoint described in human renal cell carcinoma. Although G4 has been implicated in the initiation of mitochondrial DNA replication, our current findings suggest that mitochondrial G-quadruplexes are also likely to be a source of instability for the mitochondrial genome by perturbing the normal progression of the mitochondrial replication machinery, including DNA unwinding by Twinkle helicase.

  10. Mitochondrial permeability transition in Ca(2+)-dependent apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rasola, Andrea; Bernardi, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    A variety of stimuli utilize an increase of cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration as a second messenger to transmit signals, through Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum or opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels. Mitochondria contribute to the tight spatiotemporal control of this process by accumulating Ca(2+), thus shaping the return of cytosolic Ca(2+) to resting levels. The rise of mitochondrial matrix free Ca(2+) concentration stimulates oxidative metabolism; yet, in the presence of a variety of sensitizing factors of pathophysiological relevance, the matrix Ca(2+) increase can also lead to opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP), a high conductance inner membrane channel. While transient openings may serve the purpose of providing a fast Ca(2+) release mechanism, persistent PTP opening is followed by deregulated release of matrix Ca(2+), termination of oxidative phosphorylation, matrix swelling with inner membrane unfolding and eventually outer membrane rupture with release of apoptogenic proteins and cell death. Thus, a rise in mitochondrial Ca(2+) can convey both apoptotic and necrotic death signals by inducing opening of the PTP. Understanding the signalling networks that govern changes in mitochondrial free Ca(2+) concentration, their interplay with Ca(2+) signalling in other subcellular compartments, and regulation of PTP has important implications in the fine comprehension of the main biological routines of the cell and in disease pathogenesis.

  11. Immunogenicity of mitochondrial DNA modified by hydroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Alam, Khurshid; Moinuddin; Jabeen, Suraya

    2007-05-01

    Mitochondria consume about 90 percent of oxygen used by the body, and are a particularly rich source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this research communication mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was isolated from fresh goat liver and modified in vitro by hydroxyl radical generated from UV irradiation (254 nm) of hydrogen peroxide. As a consequence of hydroxyl radical modification, mtDNA showed hyperchromicity and sensitivity to nuclease S1 digestion as compared to control mtDNA. Animals immunized with mtDNA and ROS-modified mtDNA induced antibodies as detected by direct binding and competition ELISA. The data suggest that immunogenicity of mtDNA got augmented after treatment with hydroxyl radical. IgG isolated from immune sera showed specificity for respective immunogen and cross-reaction with other nucleic acids. Binding of induced antibodies with array of antigens clearly indicates their polyspecific nature. Moreover, the polyspecificity exhibited by induced antibodies is unique in view of similar multiple antigen binding properties of naturally occurring anti-DNA antibodies derived from SLE patients.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Divergence among Lycopersicon and Related Solanum Species

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Phillip E.; Hanson, Maureen R.

    1986-01-01

    Sequence divergence among the mitochondrial (mt) DNA of nine Lycopersicon and two closely related Solanum species was estimated using the shared fragment method. A portion of each mt genome was highlighted by probing total DNA with a series of plasmid clones containing mt-specific DNA fragments from Lycopersicon pennellii. A total of 660 fragments were compared. As calculated by the shared fragment method, sequence divergence among the mtDNAs ranged from 0.4% for the L. esculentum-L. esculentum var. cerasiforme pair to 2.7% for the Solanum rickii-L. pimpinellifolium and L. cheesmanii-L. chilense pairs. The mtDNA divergence is higher than that reported for Lycopersicon chloroplast (cp) DNA, which indicates that the DNAs of the two plant organelles are evolving at different rates. The percentages of shared fragments were used to construct a phenogram that illustrates the present-day relationships of the mtDNAs. The mtDNA-derived phenogram places L. hirsutum closer to L. esculentum than taxonomic and cpDNA comparisons. Further, the recent assignment of L. pennellii to the genus Lycopersicon is supported by the mtDNA analysis. PMID:17246320

  13. Mitochondrial DNA copy number variation across human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Miller, Martin L; Şenbabaoğlu, Yasin; Riaz, Nadeem; Sarungbam, Judy; Tickoo, Satish K; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Lee, William; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Hakimi, A Ari; Sander, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Mutations, deletions, and changes in copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are observed throughout cancers. Here, we survey mtDNA copy number variation across 22 tumor types profiled by The Cancer Genome Atlas project. We observe a tendency for some cancers, especially of the bladder, breast, and kidney, to be depleted of mtDNA, relative to matched normal tissue. Analysis of genetic context reveals an association between incidence of several somatic alterations, including IDH1 mutations in gliomas, and mtDNA content. In some but not all cancer types, mtDNA content is correlated with the expression of respiratory genes, and anti-correlated to the expression of immune response and cell-cycle genes. In tandem with immunohistochemical evidence, we find that some tumors may compensate for mtDNA depletion to sustain levels of respiratory proteins. Our results highlight the extent of mtDNA copy number variation in tumors and point to related therapeutic opportunities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10769.001 PMID:26901439

  14. Haplogrouping mitochondrial DNA sequences in Legal Medicine/Forensic Genetics.

    PubMed

    Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; van Oven, Mannis; Salas, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Haplogrouping refers to the classification of (partial) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences into haplogroups using the current knowledge of the worldwide mtDNA phylogeny. Haplogroup assignment of mtDNA control-region sequences assists in the focused comparison with closely related complete mtDNA sequences and thus serves two main goals in forensic genetics: first is the a posteriori quality analysis of sequencing results and second is the prediction of relevant coding-region sites for confirmation or further refinement of haplogroup status. The latter may be important in forensic casework where discrimination power needs to be as high as possible. However, most articles published in forensic genetics perform haplogrouping only in a rudimentary or incorrect way. The present study features PhyloTree as the key tool for assigning control-region sequences to haplogroups and elaborates on additional Web-based searches for finding near-matches with complete mtDNA genomes in the databases. In contrast, none of the automated haplogrouping tools available can yet compete with manual haplogrouping using PhyloTree plus additional Web-based searches, especially when confronted with artificial recombinants still present in forensic mtDNA datasets. We review and classify the various attempts at haplogrouping by using a multiplex approach or relying on automated haplogrouping. Furthermore, we re-examine a few articles in forensic journals providing mtDNA population data where appropriate haplogrouping following PhyloTree immediately highlights several kinds of sequence errors.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Lee, Jeffrey E; Fang, Shenying; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood has been suggested as risk modifier in various types of cancer. However, its influence on melanoma risk is unclear. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk in 500 melanoma cases and 500 healthy controls from an ongoing melanoma study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in cases than in controls (1.15 vs 0.99, P<0.001). Increased mtDNA copy number was associated with a 1.45-fold increased risk of melanoma (95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.97). Significant joint effects between mtDNA copy number and variables related to pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure were observed. This study supports an association between increased mtDNA copy number and melanoma risk that is independent on the known melanoma risk factors (pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure).

  16. Distinguishing African and European honeybee matrilines using amplified mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, H G; Smith, D R

    1991-01-01

    Previous DNA studies have revealed that feral neotropical African bees have largely retained an African genetic integrity. Additional DNA testing is needed to confirm these findings, to understand the processes responsible, and to follow African bee spread into the temperate United States. To facilitate surveys, the polymerase chain reaction was utilized. African and European honeybee mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was identified through amplified segments that carry informative restriction site and length polymorphisms. The ability to discriminate among honeybee subspecies was established by testing a total of 129 colonies from Africa and Europe. Matriline identities could thus be determined for imported New World bees. Among 41 managed and feral colonies in the United States and north Mexico, two European lineages (west and east) were distinguished. From neotropical regions, 72 feral colonies had African mtDNA and 4 had European mtDNA. The results support earlier conclusions that neotropical African bees have spread as unbroken African maternal lineages. Old and New World African honeybee populations exhibit different frequencies of a mtDNA length polymorphism. Through standard analyses, a north African mtDNA type that may have been imported previously from Spain or Portugal was not detected among neotropical African bees. Images PMID:1674608

  17. Triangulating the provenance of African elephants using mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Hondo, Tomoko; Roca, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    African elephant mitochondrial (mt) DNA follows a distinctive evolutionary trajectory. As females do not migrate between elephant herds, mtDNA exhibits low geographic dispersal. We therefore examined the effectiveness of mtDNA for assigning the provenance of African elephants (or their ivory). For 653 savanna and forest elephants from 22 localities in 13 countries, 4258 bp of mtDNA was sequenced. We detected eight mtDNA subclades, of which seven had regionally restricted distributions. Among 108 unique haplotypes identified, 72% were found at only one locality and 84% were country specific, while 44% of individuals carried a haplotype detected only at their sampling locality. We combined 316 bp of our control region sequences with those generated by previous trans-national surveys of African elephants. Among 101 unique control region haplotypes detected in African elephants across 81 locations in 22 countries, 62% were present in only a single country. Applying our mtDNA results to a previous microsatellite-based assignment study would improve estimates of the provenance of elephants in 115 of 122 mis-assigned cases. Nuclear partitioning followed species boundaries and not mtDNA subclade boundaries. For taxa such as elephants in which nuclear and mtDNA markers differ in phylogeography, combining the two markers can triangulate the origins of confiscated wildlife products. PMID:23798975

  18. Frequent somatic transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok; Tubio, Jose M C; Mifsud, William; Fu, Beiyuan; Davies, Helen R; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Li, Yilong; Yates, Lucy; Gundem, Gunes; Tarpey, Patrick S; Behjati, Sam; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Martin, Sancha; Fullam, Anthony; Gerstung, Moritz; Nangalia, Jyoti; Green, Anthony R; Caldas, Carlos; Borg, Åke; Tutt, Andrew; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; van't Veer, Laura J; Tan, Benita K T; Aparicio, Samuel; Span, Paul N; Martens, John W M; Knappskog, Stian; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Myklebost, Ola; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foster, Christopher; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin; Eeles, Rosalind; Bova, Steven G; Lakhani, Sunil R; Desmedt, Christine; Thomas, Gilles; Richardson, Andrea L; Purdie, Colin A; Thompson, Alastair M; McDermott, Ultan; Yang, Fengtang; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are separated from the nuclear genome for most of the cell cycle by the nuclear double membrane, intervening cytoplasm, and the mitochondrial double membrane. Despite these physical barriers, we show that somatically acquired mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusion sequences are present in cancer cells. Most occur in conjunction with intranuclear genomic rearrangements, and the features of the fusion fragments indicate that nonhomologous end joining and/or replication-dependent DNA double-strand break repair are the dominant mechanisms involved. Remarkably, mitochondrial-nuclear genome fusions occur at a similar rate per base pair of DNA as interchromosomal nuclear rearrangements, indicating the presence of a high frequency of contact between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA in some somatic cells. Transmission of mitochondrial DNA to the nuclear genome occurs in neoplastically transformed cells, but we do not exclude the possibility that some mitochondrial-nuclear DNA fusions observed in cancer occurred years earlier in normal somatic cells.

  19. Assessment of the significance of mitochondrial DNA damage by chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lo, Soo; Tolner, Berend; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Cooper, J Mark; Gu, Mei; Hartley, John A; Schapira, Anthony H V; Hochhauser, Daniel

    2005-08-01

    The pathways which are activated following damage to nuclear DNA in cancer cells are well understood. There is evidence that treatment with several chemotherapeutic agents may result in damage to mitochondrial DNA. This study investigated the contribution of mitochondrial DNA to cytotoxicity of DNA-interactive agents. To understand the significance of drug interactions with mitochondrial DNA, we investigated A549 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and their rho0 derivatives in which mitochondrial DNA has been eradicated. The parental cell line showed increased sensitivity to the anthracycline daunorubicin when compared with the A549 rho0 line. In addition, the A549 rho0 line was resistant to the rhodacyanine derivative, MKT-077, which has been shown to interact with mitochondrial DNA. Southern blotting demonstrated that MKT-077 mediated damage to mitochondrial but not nuclear DNA. Restoration of mitochondrial DNA by formation of cybrids restored sensitivity to these agents. The mitochondrial DNA damage, following treatment of A549 rho0 cells with MKT-077, resulted in G2 arrest which was not mediated by expression of p53. Mitochondrial DNA is a critical target for MKT-077 and daunorubicin, and is a potential target for novel chemotherapeutic agents.

  20. Multiple mechanisms underlying troglitazone-induced mitochondrial permeability transition

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Takuya; Norioka, Misaki; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2010-11-01

    Troglitazone, a thiazolidinedione class antidiabetic drug, was withdrawn from the market because of its severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. It causes a mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), which may in part contribute to its hepatotoxicity. In the present study, the mechanism of troglitazone mitochondrial toxicity was investigated in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was attenuated by bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}-independent phospholipase A{sub 2} (iPLA{sub 2}). In contrast, that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was exacerbated by BEL. This exacerbation was diminished by addition of 2 mM glutathione, an antioxidant. Oxygen consumption by state 3 respiration in isolated mitochondria was also decreased by troglitazone, but it was not affected by BEL. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was completely attenuated in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was not affected. Addition of 1 {mu}M cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of MPT pores, completely attenuated swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone while it only partly diminished that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone. Thus, the MPT induced by 10 and 50 {mu}M troglitazone are regulated by different mechanism; the MPT induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone is regulated by the activation of iPLA{sub 2} and caused by the opening of CsA-regulating MPT pores followed by accumulation of Ca{sup 2+} in mitochondria, while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone is partly regulated by reactive oxygen species and mainly caused by the opening of CsA-insensitive MPT pores.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of four Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Shoffner, J.M.; Wallace, D.C.

    1996-01-22

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence was determined on 3 patients with Alzheimer`s disease (AD) exhibiting AD plus Parkinson`s disease (PD) neuropathologic changes and one patient with PD. Patient mtDNA sequences were compared to the standard Cambridge sequence to identify base changes. In the first AD + PD patient, 2 of the 15 nucleotide substitutions may contribute to the neuropathology, a nucleotide pair (np) 4336 transition in the tRNA{sup Gln} gene found 7.4 times more frequently in patients than in controls, and a unique np 721 transition in the 12S rRNA gene which was not found in 70 other patients or 905 controls. In the second AD + PD patient, 27 nucleotide substitutions were detected, including an np 3397 transition in the ND1 gene which converts a conserved methionine to a valine. In the third AD + PD patient, 2 polymorphic base substitutions frequently found at increased frequency in Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients were observed, an np 4216 transition in ND1 and an np 13708 transition in the ND5 gene. For the PD patient, 2 novel variants were observed among 25 base substitutions, an np 1709 substitution in the 16S rRNA gene and an np 15851 missense mutation in the cytb gene. Further studies will be required to demonstrate a casual role for these base substitutions in neurodegenerative disease. 68 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of least cisco Coregonus sardinella in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Padula, V M; Causey, D; López, J A

    2017-03-01

    This study presents the first detailed analysis of the mitochondrial DNA diversity of least cisco Coregonus sardinella in Alaska using a 678 bp segment of the control region (D-loop) of the mitochondrial genome. Findings suggest that the history of C. sardinella in Alaska differs from that of other species of Coregonus present in the state and surrounding regions. The examined populations of C. sardinella are genetically diverse across Alaska. Sixty-eight distinct mitochondrial haplotypes were identified among 305 individuals sampled from nine locations. The haplotype minimum spanning network and phylogeny showed a modest level of geographic segregation among haplotypes, suggesting high levels of on-going or recent connectivity among distant populations. Observed ΦST values and the results of homogeneity and AMOVAs indicate incipient genetic differentiation between aggregations in three broad regional groups. Sites north of the Brooks Range formed one group, sites in the Yukon and Selawik Rivers formed a second group and sites south of the Yukon drainage formed the third group. Overall, the sequence data showed that a large proportion of mtDNA genetic variation in C. sardinella is shared across Alaska, but this variation is not homogeneously distributed across all regions and for all haplotype groups.

  3. Mitochondrial Permeability Transition in Pathogenesis of Hemorrhagic Injury: Targeted Therapy with Minocycline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    minocy- cline treatment (Figures 1-4). Minocycline also improved mitochondrial function as assessed by intravital multiphoton imaging of the...will make direct measurements by intravital multiphoton microscopy to determine whether onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition and...oxidative stress were assessed 6 h after resuscitation. Mitochondrial polarization were assessed by intravital microscopy. After H/R with vehicle or

  4. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Is Associated with Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wang, Renwei; Nelson, Heather; Barcelo, Helene; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood is associated with increased risk of several cancers. However, data from prospective studies on mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk are lacking. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study of 183 breast cancer cases with pre-diagnostic blood samples and 529 individually matched controls among participants of the Singapore Chinese Health Study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real time PCR. Conditional logistic regression analyses showed that there was an overall positive association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.01). The elevated risk for higher mtDNA copy numbers was primarily seen for women with <3 years between blood draw and cancer diagnosis; ORs (95% CIs) for 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th quintile of mtDNA copy number were 1.52 (0.61, 3.82), 2.52 (1.03, 6.12), 3.12 (1.31, 7.43), and 3.06 (1.25, 7.47), respectively, compared with the 1st quintile (Ptrend = 0.004). There was no association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk among women who donated a blood sample ≥3 years before breast cancer diagnosis (Ptrend = 0.41). This study supports a prospective association between increased mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk that is dependent on the time interval between blood collection and breast cancer diagnosis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these findings and to elucidate the biological role of mtDNA copy number in breast cancer risk. PMID:23776581

  5. Modulating mitochondrial quality in disease transmission: towards enabling mitochondrial DNA disease carriers to have healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Diot, Alan; Dombi, Eszter; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Morten, Karl; Carver, Janet; Wells, Dagan; Child, Tim; Johnston, Iain G.; Williams, Suzannah; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    One in 400 people has a maternally inherited mutation in mtDNA potentially causing incurable disease. In so-called heteroplasmic disease, mutant and normal mtDNA co-exist in the cells of carrier women. Disease severity depends on the proportion of inherited abnormal mtDNA molecules. Families who have had a child die of severe, maternally inherited mtDNA disease need reliable information on the risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. However, prenatal diagnosis and even estimates of risk are fraught with uncertainty because of the complex and stochastic dynamics of heteroplasmy. These complications include an mtDNA bottleneck, whereby hard-to-predict fluctuations in the proportions of mutant and normal mtDNA may arise between generations. In ‘mitochondrial replacement therapy’ (MRT), damaged mitochondria are replaced with healthy ones in early human development, using nuclear transfer. We are developing non-invasive alternatives, notably activating autophagy, a cellular quality control mechanism, in which damaged cellular components are engulfed by autophagosomes. This approach could be used in combination with MRT or with the regular management, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Mathematical theory, supported by recent experiments, suggests that this strategy may be fruitful in controlling heteroplasmy. Using mice that are transgenic for fluorescent LC3 (the hallmark of autophagy) we quantified autophagosomes in cleavage stage embryos. We confirmed that the autophagosome count peaks in four-cell embryos and this correlates with a drop in the mtDNA content of the whole embryo. This suggests removal by mitophagy (mitochondria-specific autophagy). We suggest that modulating heteroplasmy by activating mitophagy may be a useful complement to mitochondrial replacement therapy. PMID:27528757

  6. Addressing RNA integrity to determine the impact of mitochondrial DNA mutations on brain mitochondrial function with age.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M; Stewart, James B; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations.

  7. Addressing RNA Integrity to Determine the Impact of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations on Brain Mitochondrial Function with Age

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Scheffler, Katja; Esbensen, Ying; Strand, Janne M.; Stewart, James B.; Bjørås, Magnar; Eide, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can result in mitochondrial dysfunction, but emerging experimental data question the fundamental role of mtDNA mutagenesis in age-associated mitochondrial impairment. The multicopy nature of mtDNA renders the impact of a given mtDNA mutation unpredictable. In this study, we compared mtDNA stability and mtRNA integrity during normal aging. Seven distinct sites in mouse brain mtDNA and corresponding mtRNA were analyzed. Accumulation of mtDNA mutations during aging was highly site-specific. The variation in mutation frequencies overrode the age-mediated increase by more than 100-fold and aging generally did not influence mtDNA mutagenesis. Errors introduced by mtRNA polymerase were also site-dependent and up to two hundred-fold more frequent than mtDNA mutations, and independent of mtDNA mutation frequency. We therefore conclude that mitochondrial transcription fidelity limits the impact of mtDNA mutations. PMID:24819950

  8. Low abundance of mitochondrial DNA changes mitochondrial status and renders cells resistant to serum starvation and sodium nitroprusside insult.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Heo, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In Sung; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2015-07-01

    Mutation or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause severe mitochondrial malfunction, originating from the mitochondrion itself, or from the crosstalk between nuclei and mitochondria. However, the changes that would occur if the amount of mtDNA is diminished are less known. Thus, we generated rat myoblast H9c2 cells containing lower amounts of mtDNA via ethidium bromide and uridine supplementation. After confirming the depletion of mtDNA by quantitative PCR and gel electrophoresis analysis, we investigated the changes in mitochondrial physical parameters by using flow cytometry. We also evaluated the resistance of these cells to serum starvation and sodium nitroprusside. H9c2 cells with diminished mtDNA contents showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, mass, free calcium, and zinc ion contents as compared to naïve H9c2 cells. Furthermore, cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels were significantly higher in mtDNA-lowered H9c2 cells than in the naïve cells. Although the oxygen consumption rate and cell proliferation were decreased, mtDNA-lowered H9c2 cells were more resistant to serum deprivation and nitroprusside insults than the naïve H9c2 cells. Taken together, we conclude that the low abundance of mtDNA cause changes in cellular status, such as changes in reactive oxygen species, calcium, and zinc ion levels inducing resistance to stress.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA data reveal cryptic species within Taenia krabbei.

    PubMed

    Lavikainen, Antti; Haukisalmi, Voitto; Lehtinen, Markus J; Laaksonen, Sauli; Holmström, Sauli; Isomursu, Marja; Oksanen, Antti; Meri, Seppo

    2010-06-01

    Cysticerci of Taenia sp. from two elks (Alces alces) in Finland were characterized using morphological criteria and sequences of two mitochondrial DNA regions. The host species, size, structure and location of the cysticerci indicated that they might belong to Taenia krabbei, a circumpolar species occurring in a sylvatic life cycle in wild canids and cervids. Based on the number, length and shape of the rostellar hooks, the specimens could not be unambiguously defined as belonging to T. krabbei, T. cervi, T. ovis or T. solium. In the phylogenetic analysis, based on mitochondrial nucleotide sequence data, Taenia sp. was placed as a sister species of T. solium, distant from T. krabbei isolates previously characterized from Svalbard. This indicates that the Finnish and the Svalbard isolates, resembling T. krabbei, cannot represent a single species. The results suggest that careful morphological and genetic analyses of further isolates from intermediate and definitive hosts are required to define the taxonomic status of these two cryptic species.

  10. Forest elephant mitochondrial genomes reveal that elephantid diversification in Africa tracked climate transitions.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam L; Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Roca, Alfred L

    2012-03-01

    Among elephants, the phylogeographic patterns of mitochondrial (mt) and nuclear markers are often incongruent. One hypothesis attributes this to sex differences in dispersal and in the variance of reproductive success. We tested this hypothesis by examining the coalescent dates of genetic markers within elephantid lineages, predicting that lower dispersal and lower variance in reproductive success among females would have increased mtDNA relative to nuclear coalescent dates. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two forest elephants, aligning them to mitogenomes of African savanna and Asian elephants, and of woolly mammoths, including the most divergent mitogenomes within each lineage. Using fossil calibrations, the divergence between African elephant F and S clade mitochondrial genomes (originating in forest and savanna elephant lineages, respectively) was estimated as 5.5 Ma. We estimated that the (African) ancestor of the mammoth and Asian elephant lineages diverged 6.0 Ma, indicating that four elephantid lineages had differentiated in Africa by the Miocene-Pliocene transition, concurrent with drier climates. The coalescent date for forest elephant mtDNAs was c. 2.4 Ma, suggesting that the decrease in tropical forest cover during the Pleistocene isolated distinct African forest elephant lineages. For all elephantid lineages, the ratio of mtDNA to nuclear coalescent dates was much greater than 0.25. This is consistent with the expectation that sex differences in dispersal and in variance of reproductive success would have increased the effective population size of mtDNA relative to nuclear markers in elephantids, contributing to the persistence of incongruent mtDNA phylogeographic patterns.

  11. Genetic deletion of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier desensitizes the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and causes cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kwong, J Q; Davis, J; Baines, C P; Sargent, M A; Karch, J; Wang, X; Huang, T; Molkentin, J D

    2014-08-01

    The mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) is critical for ATP synthesis by serving as the primary means for mitochondrial phosphate import across the inner membrane. In addition to its role in energy production, PiC is hypothesized to have a role in cell death as either a component or a regulator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) complex. Here, we have generated a mouse model with inducible and cardiac-specific deletion of the Slc25a3 gene (PiC protein). Loss of PiC protein did not prevent MPTP opening, suggesting it is not a direct pore-forming component of this complex. However, Slc25a3 deletion in the heart blunted MPTP opening in response to Ca(2+) challenge and led to a greater Ca(2+) uptake capacity. This desensitization of MPTP opening due to loss or reduction in PiC protein attenuated cardiac ischemic-reperfusion injury, as well as partially protected cells in culture from Ca(2+) overload induced death. Intriguingly, deletion of the Slc25a3 gene from the heart long-term resulted in profound hypertrophy with ventricular dilation and depressed cardiac function, all features that reflect the cardiomyopathy observed in humans with mutations in SLC25A3. Together, these results demonstrate that although the PiC is not a direct component of the MPTP, it can regulate its activity, suggesting a novel therapeutic target for reducing necrotic cell death. In addition, mice lacking Slc25a3 in the heart serve as a novel model of metabolic, mitochondrial-driven cardiomyopathy.

  12. Bnip3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy is independent of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore

    PubMed Central

    Quinsay, Melissa N; Thomas, Robert L; Lee, Youngil

    2010-01-01

    Bnip3 is a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein which is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Bnip3 is also a potent inducer of autophagy in many cells. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which Bnip3 induces autophagy in adult cardiac myocytes. Overexpression of Bnip3 induced extensive autophagy in adult cardiac myocytes. Fluorescent microscopy studies and ultrastructural analysis revealed selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy in myocytes overexpressing Bnip3. Oxidative stress and increased levels of intracellular Ca2+ have been reported by others to induce autophagy, but Bnip3-induced autophagy was not abolished by antioxidant treatment or the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. We also investigated the role of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in Bnip3-induced autophagy. Although the mPTP has previously been implicated in the induction of autophagy and selective removal of damaged mitochondria by autophagosomes, mitochondria sequestered by autophagosomes in Bnip3-treated cardiac myocytes had not undergone permeability transition and treatment with the mPTP inhibitor cyclosporine A did not inhibit mitochondrial autophagy in cardiac myocytes. Moreover, cyclophilin D (cypD) is an essential component of the mPTP and Bnip3 induced autophagy to the same extent in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from wild-type and cypD-deficient mice. These results support a model where Bnip3 induces selective removal of the mitochondria in cardiac myocytes and that Bnip3 triggers induction of autophagy independent of Ca2+, ROS generation and mPTP opening. PMID:20668412

  13. Mesencephalic complex I deficiency does not correlate with parkinsonism in mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders.

    PubMed

    Palin, Eino J H; Paetau, Anders; Suomalainen, Anu

    2013-08-01

    Genetic evidence from recessively inherited Parkinson's disease has indicated a clear causative role for mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. This role has long been discussed based on findings that toxic inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory complex I caused parkinsonism and that tissues of patients with Parkinson's disease show complex I deficiency. Disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance are a common cause of inherited neurodegenerative disorders, and lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions or depletion and respiratory chain defect, including complex I deficiency. However, parkinsonism associates typically with defects of catalytic domain of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Surprisingly, however, not all mutations affecting DNA polymerase gamma manifest as parkinsonism, but, for example, spacer region mutations lead to spinocerebellar ataxia and/or severe epilepsy. Furthermore, defective Twinkle helicase, a close functional companion of DNA polymerase gamma in mitochondrial DNA replication, results in infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia, epilepsy or adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy, but not typically parkinsonism. Here we sought for clues for this specificity in the neurological manifestations of mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders by studying mesencephalic neuropathology of patients with DNA polymerase gamma or Twinkle defects, with or without parkinsonism. We show here that all patients with mitochondrial DNA maintenance disorders had neuronopathy in substantia nigra, most severe in DNA polymerase gamma-associated parkinsonism. The oculomotor nucleus was also affected, but less severely. In substantia nigra, all patients had a considerable decrease of respiratory chain complex I, but other respiratory chain enzymes were not affected. Complex I deficiency did not correlate with parkinsonism, age, affected gene or inheritance. We conclude that the cell number in substantia nigra correlated well with parkinsonism in DNA polymerase gamma

  14. Sperm mitochondrial DNA deletion in Iranian infertiles with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Bahrehmand Namaghi, I; Vaziri, H

    2017-04-01

    Asthenozoospermia is an important cause of male infertility. The mutations in sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) result in either functionless or malfunctioning some proteins, subsequently affecting sperm motility leading to asthenozoospermia. The purpose of this study was to investigate sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion in infertile men with low sperm motility/immotile spermatozoa compared to healthy subjects with high sperm motility. Semen samples of 256 asthenozoospermic infertiles and 200 controls from northern Iran were collected. After extraction of spermatozoa total DNA, Gap-polymerase chain reaction (Gap-PCR) was performed. The deletion was observed in 85.93% of patients with asthenozoospermia compared with 14% in controls [OR = 37.5397, 95% confidence interval = 12.937-108.9276, p < .0001]. It is concluded that there is a strong association between sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion and asthenozoospermia-induced infertility in the population examined. Large-scale mtDNA deletions in spermatozoa may induce bioenergetic disorders. Nevertheless, to validate our results broader research may be needed.

  15. Homogeneity in mitochondrial DNA control region sequences in Swedish subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Tillmar, Andreas O; Coble, Michael D; Wallerström, Thomas; Holmlund, Gunilla

    2010-03-01

    In order to promote mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing in Sweden we have typed 296 Swedish males, which will serve as a Swedish mtDNA frequency database. The tested males were taken from seven geographically different regions representing the contemporary Swedish population. The complete mtDNA control region was typed and the Swedish population was shown to have high haplotype diversity with a random match probability of 0.5%. Almost 47% of the tested samples belonged to haplogroup H and further haplogroup comparison with worldwide populations clustered the Swedish mtDNA data together with other European populations. AMOVA analysis of the seven Swedish subregions displayed no significant maternal substructure in Sweden (F (ST) = 0.002). Our conclusion from this study is that the typed Swedish individuals serve as good representatives for a Swedish forensic mtDNA database. Some caution should, however, be taken for individuals from the northernmost part of Sweden (provinces of Norrbotten and Lapland) due to specific demographic conditions. Furthermore, our analysis of a small sample set of a Swedish Saami population confirmed earlier findings that the Swedish Saami population is an outlier among European populations.

  16. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from two Denisovan individuals

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Susanna; Renaud, Gabriel; Viola, Bence; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Shunkov, Michael V.; Derevianko, Anatoly P.; Prüfer, Kay; Pääbo, Svante

    2015-01-01

    Denisovans, a sister group of Neandertals, have been described on the basis of a nuclear genome sequence from a finger phalanx (Denisova 3) found in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains. The only other Denisovan specimen described to date is a molar (Denisova 4) found at the same site. This tooth carries a mtDNA sequence similar to that of Denisova 3. Here we present nuclear DNA sequences from Denisova 4 and a morphological description, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, from another molar (Denisova 8) found in Denisova Cave in 2010. This new molar is similar to Denisova 4 in being very large and lacking traits typical of Neandertals and modern humans. Nuclear DNA sequences from the two molars form a clade with Denisova 3. The mtDNA of Denisova 8 is more diverged and has accumulated fewer substitutions than the mtDNAs of the other two specimens, suggesting Denisovans were present in the region over an extended period. The nuclear DNA sequence diversity among the three Denisovans is comparable to that among six Neandertals, but lower than that among present-day humans. PMID:26630009

  17. Amerindian mitochondrial DNA haplogroups predominate in the population of Argentina: towards a first nationwide forensic mitochondrial DNA sequence database.

    PubMed

    Bobillo, Maria Cecilia; Zimmermann, Bettina; Sala, Andrea; Huber, Gabriela; Röck, Alexander; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Corach, Daniel; Parson, Walther

    2010-07-01

    The study presents South American mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data from selected north (N = 98), central (N = 193) and south (N = 47) Argentinean populations. Sequence analysis of the complete mtDNA control region (CR, 16024-576) resulted in 288 unique haplotypes ignoring C-insertions around positions 16193, 309, and 573; the additional analysis of coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms enabled a fine classification of the described lineages. The Amerindian haplogroups were most frequent in the north and south representing more than 60% of the sequences. A slightly different situation was observed in central Argentina where the Amerindian haplogroups represented less than 50%, and the European contribution was more relevant. Particular clades of the Amerindian subhaplogroups turned out to be nearly region-specific. A minor contribution of African lineages was observed throughout the country. This comprehensive admixture of worldwide mtDNA lineages and the regional specificity of certain clades in the Argentinean population underscore the necessity of carefully selecting regional samples in order to develop a nationwide mtDNA database for forensic and anthropological purposes. The mtDNA sequencing and analysis were performed under EMPOP guidelines in order to attain high quality for the mtDNA database.

  18. Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Disrupts Cardiac Progenitor Cell Function and Reduces Survival.

    PubMed

    Orogo, Amabel M; Gonzalez, Eileen R; Kubli, Dieter A; Baptista, Igor L; Ong, Sang-Bing; Prolla, Tomas A; Sussman, Mark A; Murphy, Anne N; Gustafsson, Åsa B

    2015-09-04

    Transfer of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) improves cardiac function in heart failure patients. However, CPC function is reduced with age, limiting their regenerative potential. Aging is associated with numerous changes in cells including accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, but it is unknown how this impacts CPC function. Here, we demonstrate that acquisition of mtDNA mutations disrupts mitochondrial function, enhances mitophagy, and reduces the replicative and regenerative capacities of the CPCs. We show that activation of differentiation in CPCs is associated with expansion of the mitochondrial network and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Interestingly, mutant CPCs are deficient in mitochondrial respiration and rely on glycolysis for energy. In response to differentiation, these cells fail to activate mitochondrial respiration. This inability to meet the increased energy demand leads to activation of cell death. These findings demonstrate the consequences of accumulating mtDNA mutations and the importance of mtDNA integrity in CPC homeostasis and regenerative potential.

  19. Saami mitochondrial DNA reveals deep maternal lineage clusters.

    PubMed

    Delghandi, M; Utsi, E; Krauss, S

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of 62 Saami from the north of Norway was analyzed in the D loop hypervariable region I and II and sequences were compared to other gene pools. Two major (lineage 1 and 2) and two minor (lineage 3 and 4) maternal lineage clusters were found. Lineage 1 (56.9% of all hitherto analyzed Saami samples) contains a substantial number of branching haplotypes which are unknown in European gene pools. Lineage 2 (31.5%) and lineage 4 (3.6%) have few branching points and are present at a low rate throughout European gene pools. Lineage 3 (4.7%) has polymorphisms characteristic of circumpolar lineages.

  20. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms associated with longevity in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Guney, Ozgur; Ak, Handan; Atay, Sevcan; Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2014-07-01

    The accumulation of mutations in mitochondrial DNA is a widely recognized mechanism for aging and age related diseases. However, studies indicate that some mutations could be beneficial to longevity by slowing down the function of the electron transport chain, reducing free radical production. In this study, we re-sequenced the entire mitochondrial DNA from 50 individuals and examined aging-related variations in the Turkish population. We evaluated sequence data by comparing whole SNP frequencies, individual SNP frequencies, the effect of SNPs, SNP accumulation in certain mtDNA regions and haplotype profiles between elderly and control groups. The frequency of total mitochondrial SNPs was significantly higher in nonagenarians than controls (p=0.0094). Furthermore, non-coding, synonymous and tRNA mutations were more prevalent in the 90+ group compared to controls (p=0.0001, p<0.001, p=0.0096, respectively). A73G and C152T polymorphisms were significantly associated with longevity in the Turkish population (p=0.0086 and p=0.004, respectively). Additionally, C150T was specific to the 90+ group, but the difference failed to reach statistical significance (p=0.053). We also detected a novel transversion in the ATPase6 gene (C8899A) that was negatively associated with longevity (p=0.0016). Examining the distribution of SNPs among genes and functionally associated gene regions revealed a significant accumulation of mutations in the D-loop region and genes encoding Complex I subunits (ND1-6) (p<0.0001, p=0.0302, respectively). Moreover, there was an increase in the non-synonymous mutation frequency of Complex I genes in aged subjects (p<0.0001). Haplotype H was also significantly increased in the control group (p=0.0405). Overall, our findings support a role for mitochondrial genome variations and the functionality of oxidative phosphorylation in longevity. In this report, we sequenced the whole mtDNA of the Turkish population for the first time.

  1. Uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation by DNA gyrase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, M.; Weinberg, R.; Simpson, M.V.

    1986-05-01

    Supercoiled mtDNA and the swivel requirement for its replication suggest the existence of a mtDNA gyrase. The authors published studies on isolated mitochondria showing that novobiocin, coumermycin, nalidixic acid, and oxolinic acid promote relaxed DNA formation at the expense of supercoiled DNA are in accord with this view. However, their inability to directly detect the enzyme led them to ask whether these drugs act elsewhere. Their results with isolated rat liver mitochondria show that novo, nal, but not oxo, stimulate O/sub 2/ uptake as much as does 2.4-dinitrophenol (DNP). This possible uncoupling effect was confirmed by a standard (/sup 32/P) assay showing the following inhibitions of ATP synthesis: 0.2 mM novo, 95% (0.4 mM, 100%) 0.4 mM nal, 37%; oxo to at least 1.9 mM, 0%; (0.5 mM 2,4-DNP, 100%). Thus, oxo remains a useful tool for intact mitochondrial studies. Because these three drugs, especially novo, are being used to study the role of DNA superhelicity on pro- and eucaryotic (and mitochondrial) gene expression, the authors studied their effect on oxidative phosphorylation in such cells. In these cases the drugs did not affect DNP-sensitive (/sup 14/C)glutamine transport into E. coli cells (an established measure of ATP level), nor, in an S. cerevisiae mutant permeable to novo, did novo affect the steady state ATP level. Studies on cultured mammalian cells are in progress.

  2. Survival and mitochondrial function in septic patients according to mitochondrial DNA haplogroup

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We recently found that platelet cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activities and quantities in 6-month-survival septic patients are significantly higher than those of patients who died before 6 months. Other studies suggested that the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genotype could play a major role in sepsis survival. Given that COX catalytic subunits are encoded by mtDNA, the objective of the present study was to explore whether mtDNA population genetic variation could affect COX activity and quantity and favors sepsis survival. Methods A prospective, multicenter, observational study was carried out in six Spanish ICUs. We included 96 patients with severe sepsis. We determined the mtDNA haplogroup, the COX specific activity/citrate synthase specific activity (COXa/CSa) ratio and the COX quantity/citrate synthase specific activity (COXq/CSa) ratio in circulating platelets at the time of diagnosis, day 4 and day 8. We used survival at 1 and 6 months as endpoints. Results Patients with the JT mtDNA haplogroup (n = 15) showed higher COXq/CSa ratio at day 4 (P = 0.04) and day 8 (P = 0.02) than those with other haplogroups (n = 81). Logistic regression analysis showed that the JT mtDNA haplogroup (odds ratio = 0.18; 95% confidence interval = 0.04 to 0.94; P = 0.04) and COXq/CSa ratio (odds ratio = 0.53; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.93; P = 0.03) were associated with 1-month survival after controlling for age and lactic acid levels. Conclusions The novel findings of our study are that 1-month surviving septic patients showed higher COXq/CSa ratio than nonsurviving individuals, that patients from the JT mtDNA haplogroup showed a higher COXq/CSa ratio and that JT patients had a higher 1-month survival than patients from other mtDNA haplogroups. PMID:22251664

  3. Clonal expansion of early to mid-life mitochondrial DNA point mutations drives mitochondrial dysfunction during human ageing.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Laura C; Nooteboom, Marco; Elson, Joanna L; Tuppen, Helen A L; Taylor, Geoffrey A; Commane, Daniel M; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; Khrapko, Konstantin; Taylor, Robert W; Kirkwood, Thomas B L; Mathers, John C; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2014-09-01

    Age-related decline in the integrity of mitochondria is an important contributor to the human ageing process. In a number of ageing stem cell populations, this decline in mitochondrial function is due to clonal expansion of individual mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations within single cells. However the dynamics of this process and when these mtDNA mutations occur initially are poorly understood. Using human colorectal epithelium as an exemplar tissue with a well-defined stem cell population, we analysed samples from 207 healthy participants aged 17-78 years using a combination of techniques (Random Mutation Capture, Next Generation Sequencing and mitochondrial enzyme histochemistry), and show that: 1) non-pathogenic mtDNA mutations are present from early embryogenesis or may be transmitted through the germline, whereas pathogenic mtDNA mutations are detected in the somatic cells, providing evidence for purifying selection in humans, 2) pathogenic mtDNA mutations are present from early adulthood (<20 years of age), at both low levels and as clonal expansions, 3) low level mtDNA mutation frequency does not change significantly with age, suggesting that mtDNA mutation rate does not increase significantly with age, and 4) clonally expanded mtDNA mutations increase dramatically with age. These data confirm that clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations, some of which are generated very early in life, is the major driving force behind the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with ageing of the human colorectal epithelium.

  4. Transition state for protein-DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Diego U; Sánchez, Ignacio E; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo

    2008-08-05

    We describe the formation of protein-DNA contacts in the two-state route for DNA sequence recognition by a transcriptional regulator. Surprisingly, direct sequence readout establishes in the transition state and constitutes the bottleneck of complex formation. Although a few nonspecific ionic interactions are formed at this early stage, they mainly play a stabilizing role in the final consolidated complex. The interface is fairly plastic in the transition state, likely because of a high level of hydration. The overall picture of this two-state route largely agrees with a smooth energy landscape for binding that speeds up DNA recognition. This "direct" two-state route differs from the parallel multistep pathway described for this system, which involves nonspecific contacts and at least two intermediate species that must involve substantial conformational rearrangement in either or both macromolecules.

  5. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred. PMID:25780773

  6. Sequence polymorphism in a novel noncoding region of Pacific oyster mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Aranishi, Futoshi; Okimoto, Takane

    2005-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence polymorphism in a 641-bp novel major noncoding region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-NC) of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was analysed for 29 cultured individuals within the Goseong population. A total of 30 variable sites were detected, and the relative frequency of nucleotide alteration was determined to be 4.68. Alterations were mostly single nucleotide substitutions. Transition, transversion, both transition and transversion, and both transversion and nucleotide deletion were observed at 18, 9, 2 and 1 sites, respectively. Among 29 specimens, 22 haplotypes were identified, and pairwise genetic diversity of haplotypes was calculated to be 0.988 from multiple sequence substitutions using the two-parameter model. A phylogenetic tree, obtained for haplotypes by the neighbor-joining method, showed a single cluster of linkages. The cluster comprised 11 haplotypes associating with 14 specimens, while the other 11 haplotypes associating with 15 specimens were scattered. This mtDNA-NC presenting a high nucleotide sequence polymorphism is a potential mtDNA control region. It therefore can serve as a genetic marker for intraspecies phylogenetic analysis of the Pacific oyster and is more useful than the less polymorphic mtDNA coding genes.

  7. Phenotypic effects of cattle mitochondrial DNA in American bison.

    PubMed

    Derr, James N; Hedrick, Philip W; Halbert, Natalie D; Plough, Louis; Dobson, Lauren K; King, Julie; Duncan, Calvin; Hunter, David L; Cohen, Noah D; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2012-12-01

    Hybridization between endangered species and more common species is a significant problem in conservation biology because it may result in extinction or loss of adaptation. The historical reduction in abundance and geographic distribution of the American plains bison (Bison bison bison) and their recovery over the last 125 years is well documented. However, introgression from domestic cattle (Bos taurus) into the few remaining bison populations that existed in the late 1800s has now been identified in many modern bison herds. We examined the phenotypic effect of this ancestry by comparing weight and height of bison with cattle or bison mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from Santa Catalina Island, California (U.S.A.), a nutritionally stressful environment for bison, and of a group of age-matched feedlot bison males in Montana, a nutritionally rich environment. The environmental and nutritional differences between these 2 bison populations were very different and demonstrated the phenotypic effect of domestic cattle mtDNA in bison over a broad range of conditions. For example, the average weight of feedlot males that were 2 years of age was 2.54 times greater than that of males from Santa Catalina Island. In both environments, bison with cattle mtDNA had lower weight compared with bison with bison mtDNA, and on Santa Catalina Island, the height of bison with cattle mtDNA was lower than the height of bison with bison mtDNA. These data support the hypothesis that body size is smaller and height is lower in bison with domestic cattle mtDNA and that genomic integrity is important for the conservation of the American plains bison.

  8. Differentiation of mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomes in Russian populations.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Lunkina, Arina; Czarny, Jakub; Rychkov, Serge; Morozova, Irina; Denisova, Galina; Miścicka-Sliwka, Danuta

    2004-12-01

    The genetic composition of the Russian population was investigated by analyzing both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome loci polymorphisms that allow for the different components of a population gene pool to be studied, depending on the mode of DNA marker inheritance. mtDNA sequence variation was examined by using hypervariable segment I (HVSI) sequencing and restriction analysis of the haplogroup-specific sites in 325 individuals representing 5 Russian populations from the European part of Russia. The Y-chromosome variation was investigated in 338 individuals from 8 Russian populations (including 5 populations analyzed for mtDNA variation) using 12 binary markers. For both uniparental systems most of the observed haplogroups fell into major West Eurasian haplogroups (97.9% and 99.7% for mtDNA and Y-chromosome haplogroups, respectively). Multidimensional scaling analysis based on pairwise F(ST) values between mtDNA HVSI sequences in Russians compared to other European populations revealed a considerable heterogeneity of Russian populations; populations from the southern and western parts of Russia are separated from eastern and northern populations. Meanwhile, the multidimensional scaling analysis based on Y-chromosome haplogroup F(ST) values demonstrates that the Russian gene pool is close to central-eastern European populations, with a much higher similarity to the Baltic and Finno-Ugric male pools from northern European Russia. This discrepancy in the depth of penetration of mtDNA and Y-chromosome lineages characteristic for the most southwestern Russian populations into the east and north of eastern Europe appears to indicate that Russian colonization of the northeastern territories might have been accomplished mainly by males rather than by females.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA variant interactions modify breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Daniel; Bai, Ren-Kui; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Leal, Suzanne M

    2008-01-01

    Interactions between mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) variants and the risk of developing breast cancer were investigated using DNA samples collected from non-Jewish European American breast cancer patients and ethnically age-matched female controls. Logistic regression was used to evaluate two-way interactions between 17 mtDNA variants. To control for multiple testing, empirical P values were calculated using permutation. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to measure the contribution of variants in modifying the risk of developing breast cancer. A highly significant interaction was identified between variants 12308G and 10398G (empirical P value = 0.0028), with results suggesting these variants increase the risk of a woman developing breast cancer (OR = 3.03; 95% CI 1.53-6.11). Nominal significant P values were also observed for interactions between mtDNA variants 709A and 16189C; 4216C and 10398G; 4216C and 16189C; 10398G and 16159C; 13368A and 16189C; and 14766T and 16519C. However, after adjusting for multiple testing, the P values did not remain significant. Although it is important to elucidate the main effect of mtDNA variants on the risk of developing breast cancer, understanding gene x gene interactions will give a greater knowledge of disease etiology and aid in interpreting a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.

  10. Cardiac involvement in mitochondrial DNA disease: clinical spectrum, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew G D; Bourke, John P; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taylor, Robert W

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogenous group of genetic disorders that result from dysfunction of the final common pathway of energy metabolism. Mitochondrial DNA mutations affect key components of the respiratory chain and account for the majority of mitochondrial disease in adults. Owing to critical dependence of the heart on oxidative metabolism, cardiac involvement in mitochondrial disease is common and may occur as the principal clinical manifestation or part of multisystem disease. Recent advances in our understanding of the clinical spectrum and genetic aetiology of cardiac involvement in mitochondrial DNA disease have important implications for cardiologists in terms of the investigation and multi-disciplinary management of patients.

  11. Application of mitochondrial DNA polymorphism to meloidogyne molecular population biology.

    PubMed

    Hyman, B C; Whipple, L E

    1996-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have enabled the genotyping of individual nematodes, facilitating the analysis of genetic variability within and among plant-pathogenic nematode isolates. This review first describes representative examples of how RFLP, RAPD, AFLP, and DNA sequence analysis have been employed to describe populations of several phytonematodes, including the pinewood, burrowing, root-knot, and cyst nematodes. The second portion of this paper evaluates the utility of a size-variable mitochondrial DNA locus to examine the genetic structure of Meloidogyne isolates using two alternate methodologies, variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) and repeat associated poiymorphism (RAP) analysis. VNTR analysis has revealed genetic variation among individual nematodes, whereas RAP may provide useful markers for species and population differentiation.

  12. Replication stalling by catalytically impaired Twinkle induces mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O; Goffart, Steffi; Spelbrink, Johannes N

    2011-07-01

    Pathological mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been proposed to result from repair of double-strand breaks caused by blockage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. As mtDNA deletions are seen only in post-mitotic tissues, it has been suggested that they are selected out in actively dividing cells. By electron microscopy we observed rearranged mtDNA molecules in cultured human cells expressing a catalytically impaired helicase. As these molecules were undetectable by PCR, we propose that deleted mtDNA molecules in cultured cells are fragile and sensitive to heating. Further consequences of mtDNA replication stalling are discussed.

  13. Oxidants and not alkylating agents induce rapid mtDNA loss and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Furda, Amy M.; Marrangoni, Adele M.; Lokshin, Anna; Van Houten, Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for proper mitochondrial function and encodes 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs and 13 polypeptides that make up subunits of complex I, III, IV, in the electron transport chain and complex V, the ATP synthase. Although mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in processes such as premature aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer, it has not been shown whether persistent mtDNA damage causes a loss of oxidative phosphorylation. We addressed this question by treating mouse embryonic fibroblasts with either hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and measuring several endpoints, including mtDNA damage and repair rates using QPCR, levels of mitochondrial- and nuclear-encoded proteins using antibody analysis, and a pharmacologic profile of mitochondria using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. We show that a 60 min treatment with H2O2 causes persistent mtDNA lesions, mtDNA loss, decreased levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, a loss of ATP-linked oxidative phosphorylation and a loss of total reserve capacity. Conversely, a 60 min treatment with 2 mM MMS causes persistent mtDNA lesions but no mtDNA loss, no decrease in levels of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial subunit, and no mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that persistent mtDNA damage is not sufficient to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22766155

  14. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup H structure in North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ennafaa, Hajer; Cabrera, Vicente M; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; González, Ana M; Amor, Mohamed B; Bouhaha, Rym; Dzimiri, Nduna; Elgaaïed, Amel B; Larruga, José M

    2009-01-01

    Background The Strait of Gibraltar separating the Iberian Peninsula from North Africa is thought to be a stronger barrier to gene flow for male than for female lineages. However, the recent subdivision of the haplogroup H at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) level has revealed greater genetic differentiation among geographic regions than previously detected. The dissection of the mtDNA haplogroup H in North Africa, and its comparison with the Iberian Peninsula and Near-East profiles would help clarify the relative affinities among these regions. Results Like the Iberian Peninsula, the dominant mtDNA haplogroup H subgroups in North Africa are H1 (42%) and H3 (13%). The similarity between these regions is stronger in the North-West edge affecting mainly Moroccan Arabs, West Saharans and Mauritanians, and decreases eastwards probably due to gene flow from Near East as attested for the higher frequencies of H4, H5, H7, H8 and H11 subgroups. Moroccan Berbers show stronger affinities with Tunisian and Tunisian Berbers than with Moroccan Arabs. Coalescence ages for H1 (11 ± 2 ky) and H3 (11 ± 4 ky) in North Africa point to the possibility of a late Palaeolithic settlement for these lineages similar to those found for other mtDNA haplogroups. Total and partial mtDNA genomic sequencing unveiled stronger mtDNA differentiation among regions than previously found using HVSI mtDNA based analysis. Conclusion The subdivision of the mtDNA haplogroup H in North Africa has confirmed that the genetic differentiation found among Western and Eastern populations is mainly due to geographical rather than cultural barriers. It also shows that the historical Arabian role on the region had more a cultural than a demic effect. Whole mtDNA sequencing of identical H haplotypes based on HVSI and RFLP information has unveiled additional mtDNA differences between North African and Iberian Peninsula lineages, pointing to an older mtDNA genetic flow between regions than previously thought. Based on this

  15. 3-Nitropropionic acid induces autophagy by forming mitochondrial permeability transition pores rather than activatiing the mitochondrial fission pathway

    PubMed Central

    Solesio, Maria E; Saez-Atienzar, Sara; Jordan, Joaquin; Galindo, Maria F

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative process associated with mitochondrial alterations. Inhibitors of the electron–transport channel complex II, such as 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP), are used to study the molecular and cellular pathways involved in this disease. We studied the effect of 3NP on mitochondrial morphology and its involvement in macrophagy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Pharmacological and biochemical methods were used to characterize the effects of 3NP on autophagy and mitochondrial morphology. SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with GFP-LC3, GFP-Drp1 or GFP-Bax to ascertain their role and intracellular localization after 3NP treatment using confocal microscopy. KEY RESULTS Untreated SH-SY5Y cells presented a long, tubular and filamentous net of mitochondria. After 3NP (5 mM) treatment, mitochondria became shorter and rounder. 3NP induced formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores, both in cell cultures and in isolated liver mitochondria, and this process was inhibited by cyclosporin A. Participation of the mitochondrial fission pathway was excluded because 3NP did not induce translocation of the dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to the mitochondria. The Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 did not affect the observed changes in mitochondrial morphology. Finally, scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to prevent mitochondrial alterations, while cyclosporin A, but not Mdivi-1, prevented the generation of ROS. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS There was a direct correlation between formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and autophagy induced by 3NP treatment. Activation of autophagy preceded the apoptotic process and was mediated, at least partly, by formation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial permeability transition pores. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by González-Polo et al., pp. 60–62 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02203.x PMID

  16. Complete genome sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Massimiliano; Costelli, Cristina; Malavasi, Veronica; Cusano, Roberto; Concas, Alessandro; Angius, Andrea; Cao, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of mitochondrial genome of the Chlorella sorokiniana strain (SAG 111-8 k) is presented in this work. Within the Chlorella genus, it represents the second species with a complete sequenced and annotated mitochondrial genome (GenBank accession no. KM241869). The genome consists of circular chromosomes of 52,528 bp and encodes a total of 31 protein coding genes, 3 rRNAs and 26 tRNAs. The overall AT contents of the C. sorokiniana mtDNA is 70.89%, while the coding sequence is of 97.4%.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variation of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Resende, Adriana; Gonçalves, Joana; Muigai, Anne W T; Pereira, Filipe

    2016-06-01

    The history of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in Africa remains largely unknown. After being first introduced from the Near East, sheep gradually spread through the African continent with pastoral societies. The eastern part of Africa was important either for the first diffusion of sheep southward or for putative secondary introductions from the Arabian Peninsula or southern Asia. We analysed mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 91 domestic sheep from Kenya and found a high diversity of matrilines from the widespread haplogroup B, whereas only a single individual from haplogroup A was detected. Our phylogeography analyses of more than 500 available mitochondrial DNA sequences also identified ancestral haplotypes that were probably first introduced in Africa and are now widely distributed. Moreover, we found no evidence of an admixture between East and West African sheep. The presence of shared haplotypes in eastern and ancient southern African sheep suggests the possible southward movement of sheep along the eastern part of Africa. Finally, we found no evidence of an extensive introduction of sheep from southern Asia into Africa via the Indian Ocean trade. The overall findings on the phylogeography of East African domestic sheep set the grounds for understanding the origin and subsequent movements of sheep in Africa. The richness of maternal lineages in Kenyan breeds is of prime importance for future conservation and breeding programmes.

  18. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  19. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  20. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Neurocognitive Impairment During HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Samuels, David C.; Bush, William; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Heaton, Robert K.; Franklin, Donald R.; Straub, Peter; Murdock, Deborah G.; Clifford, David B.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Marra, Christina M.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M.; Grant, Igor; Kallianpur, Asha R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) remains an important complication in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Ancestry-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups have been associated with outcomes of HIV infection and combination antiretroviral therapy (CART), and with neurodegenerative diseases. We hypothesize that mtDNA haplogroups are associated with NCI in HIV-infected adults and performed a genetic association study in the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort. Methods. CHARTER is an observational study of ambulatory HIV-infected adults. Haplogroups were assigned using mtDNA sequence, and principal components were derived from ancestry-informative nuclear DNA variants. Outcomes were cross-sectional global deficit score (GDS) as a continuous measure, GDS impairment (GDS ≥ 0.50), and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) using international criteria. Multivariable models were adjusted for comorbidity status (incidental vs contributing), current CART, plasma HIV RNA, reading ability, and CD4 cell nadir. Results. Haplogroups were available from 1027 persons; median age 43 years, median CD4 nadir 178 cells/mm3, 72% on CART, and 46% with HAND. The 102 (9.9%) persons of genetically determined admixed Hispanic ancestry had more impairment by GDS or HAND than persons of European or African ancestry (P < .001 for all). In multivariate models including persons of admixed Hispanic ancestry, those with haplogroup B had lower GDS (β = −0.34; P = .008) and less GDS impairment (odds ratio = 0.16; 95% confidence interval, .04, .63; P = .009) than other haplogroups. There were no significant haplogroup associations among persons of European or African ancestry. Conclusions. In these mostly CART-treated persons, mtDNA haplogroup B was associated with less NCI among persons of genetically determined Hispanic ancestry. mtDNA variation may represent an ancestry-specific factor influencing NCI in HIV

  1. Wnt Signaling Prevents the Aβ Oligomer-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Opening Preserving Mitochondrial Structure in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Arrázola, Macarena S.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Cisternas, Pedro; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly known for synaptic impairment and neuronal cell loss, affecting memory processes. Beside these damages, mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD through the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). The mPTP is a non-selective pore that is formed under apoptotic conditions, disturbing mitochondrial structure and thus, neuronal viability. In AD, Aβ oligomers (Aβos) favor the opening of the pore, activating mitochondria-dependent neuronal cell death cascades. The Wnt signaling activated through the ligand Wnt3a has been described as a neuroprotective signaling pathway against amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide toxicity in AD. However, the mechanisms by which Wnt signaling prevents Aβos-induced neuronal cell death are unclear. We proposed here to study whether Wnt signaling protects neurons earlier than the late damages in the progression of the disease, through the preservation of the mitochondrial structure by the mPTP inhibition. To study specific events related to mitochondrial permeabilization we performed live-cell imaging from primary rat hippocampal neurons, and electron microscopy to analyze the mitochondrial morphology and structure. We report here that Wnt3a prevents an Aβos-induced cascade of mitochondrial events that leads to neuronal cell death. This cascade involves (a) mPTP opening, (b) mitochondrial swelling, (c) mitochondrial membrane potential loss and (d) cytochrome c release, thus leading to neuronal cell death. Furthermore, our results suggest that the activation of the Wnt signaling prevents mPTP opening by two possible mechanisms, which involve the inhibition of mitochondrial GSK-3β and/or the modulation of mitochondrial hexokinase II levels and activity. This study suggests a possible new approach for the treatment of AD from a mitochondrial perspective, and will also open new lines of study in the field of Wnt signaling in neuroprotection

  2. Wnt Signaling Prevents the Aβ Oligomer-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Opening Preserving Mitochondrial Structure in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Cisternas, Pedro; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly known for synaptic impairment and neuronal cell loss, affecting memory processes. Beside these damages, mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD through the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). The mPTP is a non-selective pore that is formed under apoptotic conditions, disturbing mitochondrial structure and thus, neuronal viability. In AD, Aβ oligomers (Aβos) favor the opening of the pore, activating mitochondria-dependent neuronal cell death cascades. The Wnt signaling activated through the ligand Wnt3a has been described as a neuroprotective signaling pathway against amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide toxicity in AD. However, the mechanisms by which Wnt signaling prevents Aβos-induced neuronal cell death are unclear. We proposed here to study whether Wnt signaling protects neurons earlier than the late damages in the progression of the disease, through the preservation of the mitochondrial structure by the mPTP inhibition. To study specific events related to mitochondrial permeabilization we performed live-cell imaging from primary rat hippocampal neurons, and electron microscopy to analyze the mitochondrial morphology and structure. We report here that Wnt3a prevents an Aβos-induced cascade of mitochondrial events that leads to neuronal cell death. This cascade involves (a) mPTP opening, (b) mitochondrial swelling, (c) mitochondrial membrane potential loss and (d) cytochrome c release, thus leading to neuronal cell death. Furthermore, our results suggest that the activation of the Wnt signaling prevents mPTP opening by two possible mechanisms, which involve the inhibition of mitochondrial GSK-3β and/or the modulation of mitochondrial hexokinase II levels and activity. This study suggests a possible new approach for the treatment of AD from a mitochondrial perspective, and will also open new lines of study in the field of Wnt signaling in neuroprotection.

  3. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics.

  4. The Levels of Male Gametic Mitochondrial DNA Are Highly Regulated in Angiosperms with Regard to Mitochondrial Inheritance[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sodmergen

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial inheritance are not yet clear, even though it is 100 years since the first description of non-Mendelian genetics. Here, we quantified the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the gametic cells of angiosperm species. We demonstrate that each egg cell from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus, and Nicotiana tabacum possesses 59.0, 42.7, and 73.0 copies of mtDNA on average, respectively. These values are equivalent to those in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, at 61.7 copies per cell. On the other hand, sperm or generative cells from Arabidopsis, A. majus, and N. tabacum possess minor amounts of mtDNA, at 0.083, 0.47, and 1 copy on average, respectively. We further reveal a 50-fold degradation of mtDNA during pollen development in A. majus. In contrast, markedly high levels of mtDNA are found in the male gametic cells of Cucumis melo and Pelargonium zonale (1296.3 and 256.7 copies, respectively). Our results provide direct evidence for mitochondrial genomic insufficiency in the eggs and somatic cells and indicate that a male gamete of an angiosperm may possess mtDNA at concentrations as high as 21-fold (C. melo) or as low as 0.1% (Arabidopsis) of the levels in somatic cells. These observations reveal the existence of a strong regulatory system for the male gametic mtDNA levels in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:20605854

  5. The levels of male gametic mitochondrial DNA are highly regulated in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Liu, Yang; Lin, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Shao-Xiang; Sun, Meng-Xiang; Sodmergen

    2010-07-01

    The mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial inheritance are not yet clear, even though it is 100 years since the first description of non-Mendelian genetics. Here, we quantified the copy numbers of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the gametic cells of angiosperm species. We demonstrate that each egg cell from Arabidopsis thaliana, Antirrhinum majus, and Nicotiana tabacum possesses 59.0, 42.7, and 73.0 copies of mtDNA on average, respectively. These values are equivalent to those in Arabidopsis mesophyll cells, at 61.7 copies per cell. On the other hand, sperm or generative cells from Arabidopsis, A. majus, and N. tabacum possess minor amounts of mtDNA, at 0.083, 0.47, and 1 copy on average, respectively. We further reveal a 50-fold degradation of mtDNA during pollen development in A. majus. In contrast, markedly high levels of mtDNA are found in the male gametic cells of Cucumis melo and Pelargonium zonale (1296.3 and 256.7 copies, respectively). Our results provide direct evidence for mitochondrial genomic insufficiency in the eggs and somatic cells and indicate that a male gamete of an angiosperm may possess mtDNA at concentrations as high as 21-fold (C. melo) or as low as 0.1% (Arabidopsis) of the levels in somatic cells. These observations reveal the existence of a strong regulatory system for the male gametic mtDNA levels in angiosperms with regard to mitochondrial inheritance.

  6. Restriction site heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial DNA of the marine fish Sciaenops ocellatus (L.).

    PubMed

    Gold, J R; Richardson, L R

    1990-01-01

    Restriction site heteroplasmy involving the enzymes NcoI and XbaI was detected in the mitochondrial DNAs of two individuals of the marine fish Sciaenops ocellatus. This represents only the sixth documented example of mitochondrial DNA restriction site heteroplasmy in animals. Two heteroplasmic individuals were found in a survey of nearly 750 individuals, suggesting that in most studies the incidence of mitochondrial DNA site heteroplasmy may be too low to be routinely detected.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: RRM2B-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with renal ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions RRM2B-MDS RRM2B-related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with renal tubulopathy Enable ... Open All Close All Description RRM2B -related mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, encephalomyopathic form with renal tubulopathy ( RRM2B - ...

  8. Segregation of naturally occurring mitochondrial DNA variants in a mini-pig model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within cells and tissues, the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is present in multimeric form and can harbour naturally occurring variants. Whilst high variant load can cause mitochondrial disease, naturally occurring mtDNA variants likely persist at low levels across generations of ...

  9. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway.

    PubMed

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-19

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland.

  10. Revealing latitudinal patterns of mitochondrial DNA diversity in Chileans.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Moreno, Fabián; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Martinón-Torres, Federico; García-Magariños, Manuel; Pantoja-Astudillo, Jaime A; Aguirre-Morales, Eugenia; Bustos, Patricio; Salas, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The territory of Chile is particularly long and narrow, which combined with its mountainous terrain, makes it a unique scenario for human genetic studies. We obtained 995 control region mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from Chileans representing populations living at different latitudes of the country from the North to the southernmost region. The majority of the mtDNA profiles are of Native American origin (∼88%). The remaining haplotypes are mostly of recent European origin (∼11%), and only a minor proportion is of recent African ancestry (∼1%). While these proportions are relatively uniform across the country, more structured patterns of diversity emerge when examining the variation from a phylogeographic perspective. For instance, haplogroup A2 reaches ∼9% in the North, and its frequency decreases gradually to ∼1% in the southernmost populations, while the frequency of haplogroup D (sub-haplogroups D1 and D4) follows the opposite pattern: 36% in the southernmost region, gradually decreasing to 21% in the North. Furthermore, there are remarkable signatures of founder effects in specific sub-clades of Native American (e.g. haplogroups D1j and D4p) and European (e.g. haplogroups T2b3 and K1a4a1a+195) ancestry. We conclude that the magnitude of the latitudinal differences observed in the patterns of mtDNA variation might be relevant in forensic casework.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA variation in the Viking age population of Norway

    PubMed Central

    Krzewińska, Maja; Bjørnstad, Gro; Skoglund, Pontus; Olason, Pall Isolfur; Bill, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Hagelberg, Erika

    2015-01-01

    The medieval Norsemen or Vikings had an important biological and cultural impact on many parts of Europe through raids, colonization and trade, from about AD 793 to 1066. To help understand the genetic affinities of the ancient Norsemen, and their genetic contribution to the gene pool of other Europeans, we analysed DNA markers in Late Iron Age skeletal remains from Norway. DNA was extracted from 80 individuals, and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms were detected by next-generation sequencing. The sequences of 45 ancient Norwegians were verified as genuine through the identification of damage patterns characteristic of ancient DNA. The ancient Norwegians were genetically similar to previously analysed ancient Icelanders, and to present-day Shetland and Orkney Islanders, Norwegians, Swedes, Scots, English, German and French. The Viking Age population had higher frequencies of K*, U*, V* and I* haplogroups than their modern counterparts, but a lower proportion of T* and H* haplogroups. Three individuals carried haplotypes that are rare in Norway today (U5b1b1, Hg A* and an uncommon variant of H*). Our combined analyses indicate that Norse women were important agents in the overseas expansion and settlement of the Vikings, and that women from the Orkneys and Western Isles contributed to the colonization of Iceland. PMID:25487335

  12. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in Guangdong Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Wang, Sha-Yan; Zhang, Ruan-Zhang; Hu, Yu-Hua; Gao, Guo-Feng; Liu, Yan-Hui; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2008-03-01

    Previous investigations on Chinese mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation revealed that the matrilineal gene pool of southern Han Chinese is rather complex, with much higher genetic diversity and more basal/ancient lineages than the northern Hans. The extreme case is Guangdong Han populations, among which pronounced (matrilineal) differentiation has been observed, indicative of complex demography of the region. To get more insights into the maternal makeup of southern Han Chinese, mtDNA variation of a total of 106 individuals sampled from Dongguan, Guangdong Province, China, was analyzed in this study. With the aid of the information from control-region hypervariable segments I and II (HVS-I and -II) as well as some necessary coding-region segments, the phylogenetic status of all mtDNAs under examination were determined according to the reconstructed East Asian mtDNA tree. In this way, the mtDNAs have been classified into various haplogroups or sub-haplogroups. The southern-prevalent haplogroups, such as R9 (20.8%), B (17.9%), M7b (14.2%), show relatively high distribution frequencies in Dongguan Hans; whereas the frequencies of Northern-prevalent haplogroups (with the exception of D) are quite low: C (1.9%), G2 (1.9%) and Z (1.9%), indicating the southern-origin of Dongguan Hans.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV–HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells. PMID:23868060

  14. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-07-18

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV-HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells.

  15. A restriction map of Xenopus laevis mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, A M; Vannier, P A; Brun, G M

    1982-08-01

    The mitochondrial DNA from Xenopus laevis is a 17.4 x 10(3)-base-pair circular DNA molecule. The mapping of this DNA, using 19 different restriction endonucleases is reported here. The sites are as follows: 1 for BamHI, PstI, SacI, SalI, BalI; 2 for BglII, SacII, EcoRI, ClaI, 3 for XhoI, 4 for AvaI, XbaI, PvuII, 5 for HindIII, 6 for HhaI, BclI, HpaI, 10 for AvaII and 11 for HincII. The same sites (except for one of the two ClaI sites) are observed in the molecule cloned in pBR322 DNA. The fragments corresponding to 62 cleavage sites have all been ordered and precisely located. They provide suitable conditions for further investigations connected with the study of replication and nucleotide sequence determination of this molecule.

  16. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  17. Next-generation sequencing reveals DGUOK mutations in adult patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions

    PubMed Central

    Garone, Caterina; Bordoni, Andreina; Gutierrez Rios, Purificacion; Calvo, Sarah E.; Ripolone, Michela; Ranieri, Michela; Rizzuti, Mafalda; Villa, Luisa; Magri, Francesca; Corti, Stefania; Bresolin, Nereo; Mootha, Vamsi K.; Moggio, Maurizio; DiMauro, Salvatore; Comi, Giacomo P.; Sciacco, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders still remains elusive in a large proportion of patients, but advances in next generation sequencing are significantly improving our chances to detect mutations even in sporadic patients. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions are caused by different molecular defects resulting in a wide spectrum of predominantly adult-onset clinical presentations, ranging from progressive external ophthalmoplegia to multi-systemic disorders of variable severity. The mutations underlying these conditions remain undisclosed in half of the affected subjects. We applied next-generation sequencing of known mitochondrial targets (MitoExome) to probands presenting with adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy and harbouring mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions in skeletal muscle. We identified autosomal recessive mutations in the DGUOK gene (encoding mitochondrial deoxyguanosine kinase), which has previously been associated with an infantile hepatocerebral form of mitochondrial DNA depletion. Mutations in DGUOK occurred in five independent subjects, representing 5.6% of our cohort of patients with mitochondrial DNA multiple deletions, and impaired both muscle DGUOK activity and protein stability. Clinical presentations were variable, including mitochondrial myopathy with or without progressive external ophthalmoplegia, recurrent rhabdomyolysis in a young female who had received a liver transplant at 9 months of age and adult-onset lower motor neuron syndrome with mild cognitive impairment. These findings reinforce the concept that mutations in genes involved in deoxyribonucleotide metabolism can cause diverse clinical phenotypes and suggest that DGUOK should be screened in patients harbouring mitochondrial DNA deletions in skeletal muscle. PMID:23043144

  18. Primer effect in the detection of mitochondrial DNA point heteroplasmy by automated sequencing.

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Marta; Ramos, Amanda; Santos, Cristina; Aluja, Maria Pilar

    2013-06-01

    The correct detection of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy by automated sequencing presents methodological constraints. The main goals of this study are to investigate the effect of sense and distance of primers in heteroplasmy detection and to test if there are differences in the accurate determination of heteroplasmy involving transitions or transversions. A gradient of the heteroplasmy levels was generated for mtDNA positions 9477 (transition G/A) and 15,452 (transversion C/A). Amplification and subsequent sequencing with forward and reverse primers, situated at 550 and 150 bp from the heteroplasmic positions, were performed. Our data provide evidence that there is a significant difference between the use of forward and reverse primers. The forward primer is the primer that seems to give a better approximation to the real proportion of the variants. No significant differences were found concerning the distance at which the sequencing primers were placed neither between the analysis of transitions and transversions. The data collected in this study are a starting point that allows to glimpse the importance of the sequencing primers in the accurate detection of point heteroplasmy, providing additional insight into the overall automated sequencing strategy.

  19. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion.

  20. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  1. Cancer-associated isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations induce mitochondrial DNA instability.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Shamaprasad, Nachiketha; Billmyre, R Blake; Heitman, Joseph; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-08-15

    A major advance in understanding the progression and prognostic outcome of certain cancers, such as low-grade gliomas, acute myeloid leukaemia, and chondrosarcomas, has been the identification of early-occurring mutations in the NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 These mutations result in the production of the onco-metabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), thought to contribute to disease progression. To better understand the mechanisms of 2HG pathophysiology, we introduced the analogous glioma-associated mutations into the NADP(+ )isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDP1, IDP2, IDP3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Intriguingly, expression of the mitochondrial IDP1(R148H) mutant allele results in high levels of 2HG production as well as extensive mtDNA loss and respiration defects. We find no evidence for a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism mediating this mtDNA loss. Instead, we show that 2HG production perturbs the iron sensing mechanisms as indicated by upregulation of the Aft1-controlled iron regulon and a concomitant increase in iron levels. Accordingly, iron chelation, or overexpression of a truncated AFT1 allele that dampens transcription of the iron regulon, suppresses the loss of respirative capacity. Additional suppressing factors include overexpression of the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD5 or disruption of the retrograde response transcription factor RTG1 Furthermore, elevated α-ketoglutarate levels also suppress 2HG-mediated respiration loss; consistent with a mechanism by which 2HG contributes to mtDNA loss by acting as a toxic α-ketoglutarate analog. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that may contribute to 2HG oncogenicity in glioma and acute myeloid leukaemia progression, with the promise for innovative diagnostic and prognostic strategies and novel therapeutic modalities.

  2. An Overview of Ten Italian Horse Breeds through Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Capodiferro, Marco Rosario; Capomaccio, Stefano; Buttazzoni, Luca; Biggio, Giovanni Paolo; Cherchi, Raffaele; Albertini, Emidio; Olivieri, Anna; Cappelli, Katia; Achilli, Alessandro; Silvestrelli, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background The climatic and cultural diversity of the Italian Peninsula triggered, over time, the development of a great variety of horse breeds, whose origin and history are still unclear. To clarify this issue, analyses on phenotypic traits and genealogical data were recently coupled with molecular screening. Methodology To provide a comprehensive overview of the horse genetic variability in Italy, we produced and phylogenetically analyzed 407 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control-region sequences from ten of the most important Italian riding horse and pony breeds: Bardigiano, Esperia, Giara, Lipizzan, Maremmano, Monterufolino, Murgese, Sarcidano, Sardinian Anglo-Arab, and Tolfetano. A collection of 36 Arabian horses was also evaluated to assess the genetic consequences of their common use for the improvement of some local breeds. Conclusions In Italian horses, all previously described domestic mtDNA haplogroups were detected as well as a high haplotype diversity. These findings indicate that the ancestral local mares harbored an extensive genetic diversity. Moreover, the limited haplotype sharing (11%) with the Arabian horse reveals that its impact on the autochthonous mitochondrial gene pools during the final establishment of pure breeds was marginal, if any. The only significant signs of genetic structure and differentiation were detected in the geographically most isolated contexts (i.e. Monterufolino and Sardinian breeds). Such a geographic effect was also confirmed in a wider breed setting, where the Italian pool stands in an intermediate position together with most of the other Mediterranean stocks. However, some notable exceptions and peculiar genetic proximities lend genetic support to historical theories about the origin of specific Italian breeds. PMID:27054850

  3. DNA double-strand breaks activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Kalifa, Lidza; Gewandter, Jennifer S; Staversky, Rhonda J; Sia, Elaine A; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Excessive nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased energy production, and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although numerous cell signaling pathways are activated when cells are injured, the ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM) protein has emerged as a major regulator of the response to both mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Because mitochondrial dysfunction is often a response to excessive DNA damage, it has been difficult to determine whether nuclear and/or mitochondrial DNA DSBs activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. In this study, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA DSBs were generated in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line by infecting with retroviruses expressing the restriction endonuclease PstI fused to a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) or nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and a hemagglutinin antigen epitope tag (HA). Expression of MTS-PstI-HA or NLS-PstI-HA activated the DNA damage response defined by phosphorylation of ATM, the tumor suppressor protein p53 (TP53), KRAB-associated protein (KAP)-1, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)-1. Phosphorylated ATM and SMC1 were detected in nuclear fractions, whereas phosphorylated TP53 and KAP1 were detected in both mitochondrial and nuclear fractions. PstI also enhanced expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 and inhibited cell growth. This response to DNA damage occurred in the absence of detectable mitochondrial dysfunction and excess production of ROS. These findings reveal that DNA DSBs are sufficient to activate ATM independent of mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that the activated form of ATM and some of its substrates are restricted to the nuclear compartment, regardless of the site of DNA damage.

  4. Extent of heterogeneity in mitochondrial DNA of European populations.

    PubMed

    Melton, T; Wilson, M; Batzer, M; Stoneking, M

    1997-05-01

    Variation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region as detected by sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes is described for 595 individuals from six European or European-derived populations. Estimates of diversity for mtDNA types exceed 0.91 in all populations, while 50% of the 158 types which were observed occur only once. Of 68 shared types, most occur rarely (< 3% of the total population); only one type occurs at a frequency greater than 10%, and it is present at comparable frequencies in all six populations (18-29%). An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) incorporating genetic distances between types shows that 100% of the variation present in the total sample is attributable to within-population diversity, while there are essentially no between-population differences. Another AMOVA was performed for the first hypervariable region SSO sites only, which included this sample plus an additional 537 SSO types from mine more European populations that were inferred from published mtDNA control region sequence data. Similar results were obtained, with over 99% of the variation overall attributable to within-population differences, and less than 1% of the variation attributable to between-population differences. The Saami were the most different from other populations, which had been observed in an earlier study of nucleotide sequence data. Overall, there is no statistically significant heterogeneity for European populations (p > 0.001), and these groups are virtually indistinguishable with respect to mtDNA SSO types. These results demonstrate the utility of mtDNA typing for forensic investigations.

  5. Mic60/Mitofilin determines MICOS assembly essential for mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA nucleoid organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Ruan, Y; Zhang, K; Jian, F; Hu, C; Miao, L; Gong, L; Sun, L; Zhang, X; Chen, S; Chen, H; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    The MICOS complex (mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system) is essential for mitochondrial inner membrane organization and mitochondrial membrane contacts, however, the molecular regulation of MICOS assembly and the physiological functions of MICOS in mammals remain obscure. Here, we report that Mic60/Mitofilin has a critical role in the MICOS assembly, which determines the mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. The downregulation of Mic60/Mitofilin or Mic19/CHCHD3 results in instability of other MICOS components, disassembly of MICOS complex and disorganized mitochondrial cristae. We show that there exists direct interaction between Mic60/Mitofilin and Mic19/CHCHD3, which is crucial for their stabilization in mammals. Importantly, we identified that the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1L regulates Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis. Impaired MICOS assembly causes the formation of 'giant mitochondria' because of dysregulated mitochondrial fusion and fission. Also, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized and clustered in these giant mitochondria in which mtDNA transcription is attenuated because of remarkable downregulation of some key mtDNA nucleoid-associated proteins. Together, these findings demonstrate that Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis regulated by Yme1L is central to the MICOS assembly, which is required for maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and organization of mtDNA nucleoids. PMID:26250910

  6. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Emilio J.

    2013-01-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest. PMID:24130438

  7. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Emilio J

    2013-09-01

    The frequencies of four mitochondrial Native American DNA haplogroups were determined in 1526 unrelated individuals from 11 Departments of Colombia and compared to the frequencies previously obtained for Amerindian and Afro-Colombian populations. Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups ranged from 74% to 97%. The lowest frequencies were found in Departments on the Caribbean coast and in the Pacific region, where the frequency of Afro-Colombians is higher, while the highest mtDNA Amerindian haplogroup frequencies were found in Departments that historically have a strong Amerindian heritage. Interestingly, all four mtDNA haplogroups were found in all Departments, in contrast to the complete absence of haplogroup D and high frequencies of haplogroup A in Amerindian populations in the Caribbean region of Colombia. Our results indicate that all four Native American mtDNA haplogroups were widely distributed in Colombia at the time of the Spanish conquest.

  8. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased fatigue resistance followed by severe muscle weakness in skeletal muscle of mitochondrial DNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Hernández, Andrés; Fahlström, Andreas; Cheng, Arthur J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bruton, Joseph D; Ulfhake, Brun; Westerblad, Håkan

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction can drastically impair muscle function, with weakness and exercise intolerance as key symptoms. Here we examine the time course of development of muscle dysfunction in a mouse model of premature ageing induced by defective proofreading function of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase (mtDNA mutator mouse). Isolated fast-twitch muscles and single muscle fibres from young (3-5 months) and end-stage (11 months) mtDNA mutator mice were compared to age-matched control mice. Force and free myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured under resting conditions and during fatigue induced by repeated tetani. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice displayed no weakness in the rested state, but had lower force and [Ca(2+)](i) than control mice during induction of fatigue. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice showed decreased activities of citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, reduced expression of cytochrome c oxidase, and decreased expression of triggers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PPARα, AMPK). Muscles from end-stage mtDNA mutator mice showed weakness under resting conditions with markedly decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)](i), force per cross-sectional area and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA1). In conclusion, fast-twitch muscles of prematurely ageing mtDNA mutator mice display a sequence of deleterious mitochondrial-to-nucleus signalling with an initial decrease in oxidative capacity, which was not counteracted by activation of signalling to increase mitochondrial biogenesis. This was followed by severe muscle weakness in the end stage. These results have implication for normal ageing and suggest that decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity due to a sedentary lifestyle may predispose towards muscle weakness developing later in life.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA of ancient Cumanians: culturally Asian steppe nomadic immigrants with substantially more western Eurasian mitochondrial DNA lineages.

    PubMed

    Bogácsi-Szabó, Erika; Kalmár, Tibor; Csányi, Bernadett; Tömöry, Gyöngyvér; Czibula, Agnes; Priskin, Katalin; Horváth, Ferenc; Downes, Christopher Stephen; Raskó, István

    2005-10-01

    The Cumanians were originally Asian pastoral nomads who in the 13th century migrated to Hungary. We have examined mitochondrial DNA from members of the earliest Cumanian population in Hungary from two archeologically well-documented excavations and from 74 modern Hungarians from different rural locations in Hungary. Haplogroups were defined based on HVS I sequences and examinations of haplogroup-associated polymorphic sites of the protein coding region and of HVS II. To exclude contamination, some ancient DNA samples were cloned. A database was created from previously published mtDNA HVS I sequences (representing 2,615 individuals from different Asian and European populations) and 74 modem Hungarian sequences from the present study. This database was used to determine the relationships between the ancient Cumanians, modern Hungarians, and Eurasian populations and to estimate the genetic distances between these populations. We attempted to deduce the genetic trace of the migration of Cumanians. This study is the first ancient DNA characterization of an eastern pastoral nomad population that migrated into Europe. The results indicate that, while still possessing a Central Asian steppe culture, the Cumanians received a large admixture of maternal genes from more westerly populations before arriving in Hungary. A similar dilution of genetic, but not cultural, factors may have accompanied the settlement of other Asian nomads in Europe.

  10. Identification and characterization of cannabinoids that induce cell death through mitochondrial permeability transition in Cannabis leaf cells.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yumi; Sasaki, Kaori; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Fukamizu, Tomohide; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Taura, Futoshi

    2007-07-13

    Cannabinoids are secondary metabolites stored in capitate-sessile glands on leaves of Cannabis sativa. We discovered that cell death is induced in the leaf tissues exposed to cannabinoid resin secreted from the glands, and identified cannabichromenic acid (CBCA) and Delta(1)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) as unique cell death mediators from the resin. These cannabinoids effectively induced cell death in the leaf cells or suspension-cultured cells of C. sativa, whereas pretreatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) inhibitor cyclosporin A suppressed this cell death response. Examinations using isolated mitochondria demonstrated that CBCA and THCA mediate opening of MPT pores without requiring Ca(2+) and other cytosolic factors, resulting in high amplitude mitochondrial swelling, release of mitochondrial proteins (cytochrome c and nuclease), and irreversible loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Therefore, CBCA and THCA are considered to cause serious damage to mitochondria through MPT. The mitochondrial damage was also confirmed by a marked decrease of ATP level in cannabinoid-treated suspension cells. These features are in good accord with those of necrotic cell death, whereas DNA degradation was also observed in cannabinoid-mediated cell death. However, the DNA degradation was catalyzed by nuclease(s) released from mitochondria during MPT, indicating that this reaction was not induced via a caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of the DNA degradation only slightly blocked the cell death induced by cannabinoids. Based on these results, we conclude that CBCA and THCA have the ability to induce necrotic cell death via mitochondrial dysfunction in the leaf cells of C. sativa.

  11. DNA nanotechnology. Programming colloidal phase transitions with DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Rogers, W Benjamin; Manoharan, Vinothan N

    2015-02-06

    DNA-grafted nanoparticles have been called "programmable atom-equivalents": Like atoms, they form three-dimensional crystals, but unlike atoms, the particles themselves carry information (the sequences of the grafted strands) that can be used to "program" the equilibrium crystal structures. We show that the programmability of these colloids can be generalized to the full temperature-dependent phase diagram, not just the crystal structures themselves. We add information to the buffer in the form of soluble DNA strands designed to compete with the grafted strands through strand displacement. Using only two displacement reactions, we program phase behavior not found in atomic systems or other DNA-grafted colloids, including arbitrarily wide gas-solid coexistence, reentrant melting, and even reversible transitions between distinct crystal phases.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Oliver; Turnbull, Doug

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA diseases are common neurological conditions caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes responsible for its maintenance. Current treatments for these disorders are focussed on the management of the symptoms, rather than the correction of biochemical defects caused by the mutation. This review focuses on the molecular effects of mutations, the symptoms they cause and current work focusing on the development of targeted treatments for mitochondrial DNA disease. - Highlights: • We discuss several common disease causing mtDNA mutations. • We highlight recent work linking pathogenicity to deletion size and heteroplasmy. • We discuss recent advances in the development of targeted mtDNA disease treatments.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA sequences of five squamates: phylogenetic affiliation of snakes.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2004-04-30

    Complete or nearly complete mitochondrial DNA sequences were determined from four lizards (Western fence lizard, Warren's spinytail lizard, Terrestrial arboreal alligator lizard, and Chinese crocodile lizard) and a snake (Texas blind snake). These genomes had a typical gene organization found in those of most mammals and fishes, except for a translocation of the glutamine tRNA gene in the blind snake and a tandem duplication of the threonine and proline tRNA genes in the spinytail lizard. Although previous work showed the existence of duplicate control regions in mitochondrial DNAs of several snakes, the blind snake did not have this characteristic. Phylogenetic analyses based on different tree-building methods consistently supported that the blind snake and a colubrid snake (akamata) make a sister clade relative to all the lizard taxa from six different families. An alternative hypothesis that snakes evolved from a lineage of varanoids was not favored and nearly statistically rejected by the Kishino-Hasegawa test. It is therefore likely that the apparent similarity of the tongue structure between snakes and varanoids independently evolved and that the duplication of the control region occurred on a snake lineage after divergence of the blind snake.

  14. Genetic variability of Taenia saginata inferred from mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Sima; Salavati, Reza; Beech, Robin N; Babaei, Zahra; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2015-04-01

    Taenia saginata is an important tapeworm, infecting humans in many parts of the world. The present study was undertaken to identify inter- and intraspecific variation of T. saginata isolated from cattle in different parts of Iran using two mitochondrial CO1 and 12S rRNA genes. Up to 105 bovine specimens of T. saginata were collected from 20 slaughterhouses in three provinces of Iran. DNA were extracted from the metacestode Cysticercus bovis. After PCR amplification, sequencing of CO1 and 12S rRNA genes were carried out and two phylogenetic analyses of the sequence data were generated by Bayesian inference on CO1 and 12S rRNA sequences. Sequence analyses of CO1 and 12S rRNA genes showed 11 and 29 representative profiles respectively. The level of pairwise nucleotide variation between individual haplotypes of CO1 gene was 0.3-2.4% while the overall nucleotide variation among all 11 haplotypes was 4.6%. For 12S rRNA sequence data, level of pairwise nucleotide variation was 0.2-2.5% and the overall nucleotide variation was determined as 5.8% among 29 haplotypes of 12S rRNA gene. Considerable genetic diversity was found in both mitochondrial genes particularly in 12S rRNA gene.

  15. FGF21 is a biomarker for mitochondrial translation and mtDNA maintenance disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, Jenni M.; Forsström, Saara; Bottani, Emanuela; Viscomi, Carlo; Baris, Olivier R.; Isoniemi, Helena; Höckerstedt, Krister; Österlund, Pia; Hurme, Mikko; Jylhävä, Juulia; Leppä, Sirpa; Markkula, Ritva; Heliö, Tiina; Mombelli, Giuliana; Uusimaa, Johanna; Laaksonen, Reijo; Laaksovirta, Hannu; Auranen, Mari; Zeviani, Massimo; Smeitink, Jan; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; Nakada, Kazuto; Isohanni, Pirjo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To validate new mitochondrial myopathy serum biomarkers for diagnostic use. Methods: We analyzed serum FGF21 (S-FGF21) and GDF15 from patients with (1) mitochondrial diseases and (2) nonmitochondrial disorders partially overlapping with mitochondrial disorder phenotypes. We (3) did a meta-analysis of S-FGF21 in mitochondrial disease and (4) analyzed S-Fgf21 and skeletal muscle Fgf21 expression in 6 mouse models with different muscle-manifesting mitochondrial dysfunctions. Results: We report that S-FGF21 consistently increases in primary mitochondrial myopathy, especially in patients with mitochondrial translation defects or mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions (675 and 347 pg/mL, respectively; controls: 66 pg/mL, p < 0.0001 for both). This is corroborated in mice (mtDNA deletions 1,163 vs 379 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). However, patients and mice with structural respiratory chain subunit or assembly factor defects showed low induction (human 335 pg/mL, p < 0.05; mice 335 pg/mL, not significant). Overall specificities of FGF21 and GDF15 to find patients with mitochondrial myopathy were 89.3% vs 86.4%, and sensitivities 67.3% and 76.0%, respectively. However, GDF15 was increased also in a wide range of nonmitochondrial conditions. Conclusions: S-FGF21 is a specific biomarker for muscle-manifesting defects of mitochondrial translation, including mitochondrial transfer-RNA mutations and primary and secondary mtDNA deletions, the most common causes of mitochondrial disease. However, normal S-FGF21 does not exclude structural respiratory chain complex or assembly factor defects, important to acknowledge in diagnostics. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that elevated S-FGF21 accurately distinguishes patients with mitochondrial myopathies from patients with other conditions, and FGF21 and GDF15 mitochondrial myopathy from other myopathies. PMID:27794108

  16. Radiation response of chemically derived mitochondrial DNA-deficient AG01522 human primary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nieri, D; Fioramonti, M; Berardinelli, F; Leone, S; Cherubini, R; De Nadal, V; Gerardi, S; Moreno, S; Nardacci, R; Tanzarella, C; Antoccia, A

    2013-08-30

    Mitochondria are the main cellular source of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and consequent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential may lead to redox imbalance and in turn to DNA damage, chromosomal instability and apoptosis. On the other hand, impaired mitochondrial functions may either exacerbate the detrimental effects of geno- and cytotoxic agents or may bring beneficial cellular responses. To study the role of mitochondria within this framework, AG01522 human primary fibroblasts were incubated with the mitochondrial polymerase γ inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC), leading to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and to mitochondrial dysfunctions. The successful treatment toward mtDNA depletion was confirmed by Complex-IV subunit I (COX-I) immunofluorescence and western blot assays. mtDNA-depleted cells and their counterparts were ultrastructurally characterized by transmission electron microscopy. mtDNA-depleted cells showed dramatic mitochondrial alterations such as fragmentation and cristae disruption along with a reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevated levels of ROS. Despite increased ROS levels, we did not find any difference in telomere length between ddC-treated and untreated cells. The spontaneous rate of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations was significantly enhanced in mtDNA-depleted cells whereas the induction of DSBs by low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET) (X-rays; 7.7keV/μm protons) and high-LET radiations (28.5keV/μm protons) did not differ when compared with normal cells. However, in irradiated cells impaired mitochondrial functions seemed to bring beneficial cellular responses to the detrimental effect of radiations. In fact, after X-irradiation mtDNA-depleted cells show less remaining unrejoined DSBs than normal cells and furthermore a lower induction of cytogenetic damage. Overall, these data show that active mitochondrial functions are required for the proper

  17. Inter- and intraspecific mitochondrial DNA variation in North American bears (Ursus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, M.A.; Amstrup, S.; Garner, G.; Vyse, Ernest R.

    1991-01-01

    We assessed mitochondrial DNA variation in North American black bears (Ursus americanus), brown bears (Ursus arctos), and polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Divergent mitochondrial DNA haplotypes (0.05 base substitutions per nucleotide) were identified in populations of black bears from Montana and Oregon. In contrast, very similar haplotypes occur in black bears across North America. This discordance of haplotype phylogeny and geographic distribution indicates that there has been maintenance of polymorphism and considerable gene flow throughout the history of the species. Intraspecific mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence in brown bears and polar bears is lower than in black bears. The two morphological forms of U. arctos, grizzly and coastal brown bears, are not in distinct mtDNA lineages. Interspecific comparisons indicate that brown bears and polar bears share similar mitochondrial DNA (0.023 base substitutions per nucleotide) which is quite divergent (0.078 base substitutions per nucleotide) from that of black bears. High mitochondrial DNA divergence within black bears and paraphyletic relationships of brown and polar bear mitochondrial DNA indicate that intraspecific variation across species' ranges should be considered in phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial DNA.

  18. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Their Role in Age-Related Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mikhed, Yuliya; Daiber, Andreas; Steven, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases is significantly increased in the older population. Risk factors and predictors of future cardiovascular events such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, or diabetes are observed with higher frequency in elderly individuals. A major determinant of vascular aging is endothelial dysfunction, characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent signaling processes. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress, loss of nitric oxide (•NO) signaling, loss of endothelial barrier function and infiltration of leukocytes to the vascular wall, explaining the low-grade inflammation characteristic for the aged vasculature. We here discuss the importance of different sources of ROS for vascular aging and their contribution to the increased cardiovascular risk in the elderly population with special emphasis on mitochondrial ROS formation and oxidative damage of mitochondrial DNA. Also the interaction (crosstalk) of mitochondria with nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is highlighted. Current concepts of vascular aging, consequences for the development of cardiovascular events and the particular role of ROS are evaluated on the basis of cell culture experiments, animal studies and clinical trials. Present data point to a more important role of oxidative stress for the maximal healthspan (healthy aging) than for the maximal lifespan. PMID:26184181

  19. Exploring the Effect of Asymmetric Mitochondrial DNA Introgression on Estimating Niche Divergence in Morphologically Cryptic Species

    PubMed Central

    Wielstra, Ben; Arntzen, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    If potential morphologically cryptic species, identified based on differentiated mitochondrial DNA, express ecological divergence, this increases support for their treatment as distinct species. However, mitochondrial DNA introgression hampers the correct estimation of ecological divergence. We test the hypothesis that estimated niche divergence differs when considering nuclear DNA composition or mitochondrial DNA type as representing the true species range. We use empirical data of two crested newt species (Amphibia: Triturus) which possess introgressed mitochondrial DNA from a third species in part of their ranges. We analyze the data in environmental space by determining Fisher distances in a principal component analysis and in geographical space by determining geographical overlap of species distribution models. We find that under mtDNA guidance in one of the two study cases niche divergence is overestimated, whereas in the other it is underestimated. In the light of our results we discuss the role of estimated niche divergence in species delineation. PMID:24743746

  20. DNA polymerase gamma and mitochondrial disease: understanding the consequence of POLG mutations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sherine S L; Copeland, William C

    2009-05-01

    DNA polymerase gamma is the only known DNA polymerase in human mitochondria and is essential for mitochondrial DNA replication and repair. It is well established that defects in mtDNA replication lead to mitochondrial dysfunction and disease. Over 160 coding variations in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase gamma (POLG) have been identified. Our group and others have characterized a number of the more common and interesting mutations, as well as those disease mutations in the DNA polymerase gamma accessory subunit. We review the results of these studies, which provide clues to the mechanisms leading to the disease state.

  1. Conservation of Transit Peptide-Independent Protein Import into the Mitochondrial and Hydrogenosomal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sriram; Stölting, Jan; Zimorski, Verena; Rada, Petr; Tachezy, Jan; Martin, William F.; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of protein import was a key step in the endosymbiotic acquisition of mitochondria. Though the main translocon of the mitochondrial outer membrane, TOM40, is ubiquitous among organelles of mitochondrial ancestry, the transit peptides, or N-terminal targeting sequences (NTSs), recognised by the TOM complex, are not. To better understand the nature of evolutionary conservation in mitochondrial protein import, we investigated the targeting behavior of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and vice versa. Hydrogenosomes import yeast mitochondrial proteins even in the absence of their native NTSs, but do not import yeast cytosolic proteins. Conversely, yeast mitochondria import hydrogenosomal proteins with and without their short NTSs. Conservation of an NTS-independent mitochondrial import route from excavates to opisthokonts indicates its presence in the eukaryote common ancestor. Mitochondrial protein import is known to entail electrophoresis of positively charged NTSs across the electrochemical gradient of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Our present findings indicate that mitochondrial transit peptides, which readily arise from random sequences, were initially selected as a signal for charge-dependent protein targeting specifically to the mitochondrial matrix. Evolutionary loss of the electron transport chain in hydrogenosomes and mitosomes lifted the selective constraints that maintain positive charge in NTSs, allowing first the NTS charge, and subsequently the NTS itself, to be lost. This resulted in NTS-independent matrix targeting, which is conserved across the evolutionary divide separating trichomonads and yeast, and which we propose is the ancestral state of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:26338186

  2. Development of primers to amplify mitochondrial DNA control region of Old World porcupines (subgenus Hystrix).

    PubMed

    Trucchi, E; Gentile, G; Sbordoni, V

    2008-09-01

    Eight primers were developed for the amplification of mitochondrial DNA control region of Old world porcupines (subgenus Hystrix). Successful amplifications of low-quality DNA extracted from old (12 years old) and recent quills were performed, thus facilitating field sampling. Successful cross-species amplifications were obtained for Hystrix africaeaustralis, H. cristata and H. indica. Length and structure of mitochondrial DNA control region were analysed and its usefulness as genetic marker for interspecific and population investigation was discussed.

  3. Concise Review: Heteroplasmic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations and Mitochondrial Diseases: Toward iPSC-Based Disease Modeling, Drug Discovery, and Regenerative Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Hideyuki; Goto, Yu-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own genome (mitochondrial DNA; mtDNA). Once mitochondria are damaged by mutant mtDNA, mitochondrial dysfunction is strongly induced, followed by symptomatic appearance of mitochondrial diseases. Major genetic causes of mitochondrial diseases are defects in mtDNA, and the others are defects of mitochondria-associating genes that are encoded in nuclear DNA (nDNA). Numerous pathogenic mutations responsible for various types of mitochondrial diseases have been identified in mtDNA; however, it remains uncertain why mitochondrial diseases present a wide variety of clinical spectrum even among patients carrying the same mtDNA mutations (e.g., variations in age of onset, in affected tissues and organs, or in disease progression and phenotypic severity). Disease-relevant induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from mitochondrial disease patients have therefore opened new avenues for understanding the definitive genotype-phenotype relationship of affected tissues and organs in various types of mitochondrial diseases triggered by mtDNA mutations. In this concise review, we briefly summarize several recent approaches using patient-derived iPSCs and their derivatives carrying various mtDNA mutations for applications in human mitochondrial disease modeling, drug discovery, and future regenerative therapeutics.

  4. Axonal Degeneration Is Mediated by the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Sebastian A.; Martinez, Nicolas W.; Yoo, Soonmoon; Jara, Juan S.; Zamorano, Sebastian; Hetz, Claudio; Twiss, Jeffery L.; Alvarez, Jaime; Court, Felipe A.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is an active process that has been associated with neurodegenerative conditions triggered by mechanical, metabolic, infectious, toxic, hereditary and inflammatory stimuli. This degenerative process can cause permanent loss of function, so it represents a focus for neuroprotective strategies. Several signaling pathways are implicated in axonal degeneration, but identification of an integrative mechanism for this self-destructive process has remained elusive. Here, we show that rapid axonal degeneration triggered by distinct mechanical and toxic insults is dependent on the activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Both pharmacological and genetic targeting of cyclophilin D, a functional component of the mPTP, protects severed axons and vincristine-treated neurons from axonal degeneration in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These effects were observed in axons from both the peripheral and central nervous system. Our results suggest that the mPTP is a key effector of axonal degeneration, upon which several independent signaling pathways converge. Since axonal and synapse degeneration are increasingly considered early pathological events in neurodegeneration, our work identifies a potential target for therapeutic intervention in a wide variety of conditions that lead to loss of axons and subsequent functional impairment. PMID:21248121

  5. A new mitochondrial DNA mutation in ND3 gene causing severe Leigh syndrome with early lethality.

    PubMed

    Crimi, Marco; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Galbiati, Sara; Palamidou, Phani; Fortunato, Francesco; Bordoni, Andreina; Papandreou, Urania; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Hadjigeorgiou, George M; Drogari, Eurydiki; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo Pietro

    2004-05-01

    We describe a new mitochondrial DNA mutation in a male infant who presented clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of Leigh syndrome and died at the age of 9 mo. The patient's development was reportedly normal in the first months of life. At the age of 5 mo, he presented severe generalized hypotonia, nystagmus, and absent eye contact. Laboratory examination showed increased lactate and pyruvate in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple necrotic lesions in the basal ganglia, brain stem, and thalamus. Muscle histopathology was unremarkable, whereas respiratory chain enzyme analysis revealed a severe complex I deficiency. The patient died after an acidotic coma at age 9 mo. Sequence analysis of the entire mtDNA disclosed a new T10158C mutation with variable tissue heteroplasm (muscle: 83%; blood: 48%). The mutation was undetectable in the blood of his unaffected mother. The transition changes a serine residue into a proline, in a highly conserved region of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (ND3). This is the first description of a mitochondrial ND3 gene in Leigh syndrome with early lethality.

  6. Investigation into length heteroplasmy in the mitochondrial DNA control region after treatment with bisulfite.

    PubMed

    Lee, James Chun-I; Tsai, Li-Chin; Yu, Yu-Jen; Lin, Chun-Yen; Linacre, Adrian; Hsieh, Hsing-Mei

    2016-04-01

    We report on a method to analyze length heteroplasmy within the human mitochondrial genome in which there are polycytosine [poly(C)] stretches. These poly(C) tracts induce heteroplasmy with the resultant inherent problems of accurate sequence designations. In this study, 20 samples that exhibited length heteroplasmy due to variation in the C-tracts within hypervariable region I (HVI) were treated with bisulfite, and one or more cytosine bases in these C-tracts were converted randomly to uracil. This resulted in an accurate sequence designation for nearly all samples. The only exceptions in which the DNA sequence could still not be determined occurred when there was total conversion, or a lack of conversion, of the cytosine bases. Replicate tests on the same samples showed that individual cytosine bases were randomly converted to uracil. This simple method was useful for investigating length heteroplasmy due to 16189C and 310C transitions in the mitochondrial-DNA control region. It is valuable for medical and forensic investigations.

  7. Redefining the roles of mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits in respiratory Complex I assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Rasika; Deng, Janice; Fang, Hezhi; Bai, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory Complex I deficiency is implicated in numerous degenerative and metabolic diseases. In particular, mutations in several mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded Complex I subunits including ND4, ND5 and ND6 have been identified in several neurological diseases. We previously demonstrated that these subunits played essential roles in Complex I assembly which in turn affected mitochondrial function. Here, we carried out a comprehensive study of the Complex I assembly pathway. We identified a new Complex I intermediate containing both membrane and matrix arms at an early assembly stage. We find that lack of the ND6 subunit does not hinder membrane arm formation; instead it recruits ND1 and ND5 enter the intermediate. While ND4 is important for the formation of the newly identified intermediate, the addition of ND5 stabilizes the complex and is required for the critical transition from Complex I to supercomplexes assembly. As a result, the Complex I assembly pathway has been redefined in this study. PMID:25887158

  8. Oxygen-induced changes in mitochondrial DNA and DNA repair enzymes in aging rat lens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ouyang, Shan; Zhang, Lan; Tang, Xianling; Song, Zhen; Liu, Ping

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of patients with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), vitrectomy and loss of vitreous gel during aging is associated with a high risk of subsequent development of nuclear cataract. Many studies proved that oxidation is the key reason of nuclear cataract. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in mitochondria as a by-product of normal metabolism and as a consequence of exposure to environmental compounds. Therefore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is at particularly high risk of ROS-induced damage. Oxidative damage to mtDNA has been implicated as a causative factor in a wide variety of degenerative diseases and aging. However, the effect of mtDNA damage to the lens has not been studied. The goals of the study were to identify if there was increased mtDNA damage in lens when the eye were exposed to hyperoxic or hypoxic conditions and also to evaluate the changes in gene expression of mtDNA base excision repair (mtBER) enzymes. Our data have shown that the damage of mtDNA, the expression of mtBER enzymes and the level of 8-OHdG in lens increased after inspired hyperoxia, which is likely associated with oxidative stress. However, there was no effect to mtDNA and mtBER enzymes in lens after inspired hypoxia. Nuclear cataract appeared rapidly at 14 month old rats in hyperoxia group, and lens kept transparency in other groups.

  9. The exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase γ is required for ligation during mitochondrial DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Macao, Bertil; Uhler, Jay P.; Siibak, Triinu; Zhu, Xuefeng; Shi, Yonghong; Sheng, Wenwen; Olsson, Monica; Stewart, James B.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase γ (POLγ) harbours a 3′–5′ exonuclease proofreading activity. Here we demonstrate that this activity is required for the creation of ligatable ends during mtDNA replication. Exonuclease-deficient POLγ fails to pause on reaching a downstream 5′-end. Instead, the enzyme continues to polymerize into double-stranded DNA, creating an unligatable 5′-flap. Disease-associated mutations can both increase and decrease exonuclease activity and consequently impair DNA ligation. In mice, inactivation of the exonuclease activity causes an increase in mtDNA mutations and premature ageing phenotypes. These mutator mice also contain high levels of truncated, linear fragments of mtDNA. We demonstrate that the formation of these fragments is due to impaired ligation, causing nicks near the origin of heavy-strand DNA replication. In the subsequent round of replication, the nicks lead to double-strand breaks and linear fragment formation. PMID:26095671

  10. Genetic polymorphisms of 54 mitochondrial DNA SNP loci in Chinese Xibe ethnic minority group

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chun-Mei; Hu, Li; Yang, Chun-Hua; Yin, Cai-Yong; Li, Zhi-Dan; Meng, Hao-Tian; Guo, Yu-Xin; Mei, Ting; Chen, Feng; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of 54 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants in Chinese Xibe ethnic minority group. A total of 137 unrelated healthy volunteers from Chinese Xibe group were the objects of our study. Among the selected loci, there were 51 variable positions including transitions and transversions, and single nucleotide transitions were common (83.93%) versus transversions. These variations defined 64 different mtDNA haplotypes exclusive of (CA)n and 9 bp deletion variation. The haplotype diversity and discrimination power in Xibe population were 0.9800 ± 0.004 and 0.9699, respectively. Besides, we compared Xibe group with 18 other populations and reconstructed a phylogenetic tree using Neighbor-Joining method. The result revealed that Xibe group was a close to Xinjiang Han and Yanbian Korean groups. Our data also indicated that Xibe group has a close relationship with Daur and Ewenki groups, which is reflected by the history that Xibe was influenced by Daur and Ewenki groups during the development of these groups. In conclusion, the variants we studied are polymorphic and could be used as informative genetic markers for forensic and population genetic application. PMID:28327596

  11. Mitochondrial DNA in the sea urchin Arbacia lixula: nucleotide sequence differences between two polymorphic molecules indicate asymmetry of mutations.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, C; De Luca, F; Saccone, C

    1991-07-22

    Two polymorphic forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) extracted from Arbacia lixula eggs were cloned and the nucleotide sequences of specific regions determined. A comparison of the sequences of the sense strand of the two molecules demonstrates that all the differences are transitions and only of the A----G type. A change such as G----A (or A----G) on the sense mtDNA strand results from either a direct G----A (or A----G) mutation on that strand or a C----T (or T----C) on the complementary strand. None of the C----T (or T----C) changes were detected on the sense strand, which implies that the A----G mutation bias on the sense strand is not reversed for the other strand. Our observation indicates the existence of mechanisms acting asymmetrically on the two mtDNA strands, possibly during mtDNA replication.

  12. Inhibiting Mitochondrial DNA Ligase IIIα Activates Caspase 1-Dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Roginskaya, Vera; Van Houten, Bennett; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-09-15

    Elevated levels of DNA ligase IIIα (LigIIIα) have been identified as a biomarker of an alteration in DNA repair in cancer cells that confers hypersensitivity to a LigIIIα inhibitor, L67, in combination with a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor. Because LigIIIα functions in the nucleus and mitochondria, we examined the effect of L67 on these organelles. Here, we show that, although the DNA ligase inhibitor selectively targets mitochondria, cancer and nonmalignant cells respond differently to disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα in cancer cells resulted in abnormal mitochondrial morphology, reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA, and increased levels of mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species that caused nuclear DNA damage. In contrast, these effects did not occur in nonmalignant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα activated a caspase 1-dependent apoptotic pathway, which is known to be part of inflammatory responses induced by pathogenic microorganisms in cancer, but not nonmalignant cells. These results demonstrate that the disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism elicits different responses in nonmalignant and cancer cells and suggests that the abnormal response in cancer cells may be exploited in the development of novel therapeutic strategies that selectively target cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5431-41. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA integrity changes with age but does not correlate with learning performance in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Hystad, E M; Amdam, G V; Eide, L

    2014-01-01

    The honey bee is a well-established model organism to study aging, learning and memory. Here, we used young and old forager honey bees to investigate whether age-related learning capacity correlates with mitochondrial function. The bees were selected for age and learning performance and mitochondrial function was evaluated by measuring mtDNA integrity, mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial gene expression. Quite unexpectedly, mtDNA from young bees showed more damage than mtDNA from older bees, but neither mtDNA integrity, nor mtDNA copy number nor mitochondrial gene expression correlated with learning performance. Although not statistically significant (p=0.07) the level of L-rRNA increased with age in good learners whereas it decreased in poor learners. Our results show that learning performance in honey bee does not correlate with absolute mitochondrial parameters like mtDNA damage, copy number or expression of mitochondrial genes, but may be associated with the ability to regulate mitochondrial activity.

  14. A genome-wide map of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Emilie S; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  15. Gene trees reveal repeated instances of mitochondrial DNA introgression in orangethroat darters (percidae: etheostoma).

    PubMed

    Bossu, Christen M; Near, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Phylogenies of closely related animal species are often inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene sequences. The accuracy of mtDNA gene trees is compromised through hybridization that leads to introgression of mitochondrial genomes. Using DNA sequences from 6 single-copy nuclear genes and 2 regions of the mitochondrial genome, we investigated the temporal and geographic signature of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression in the Etheostoma spectabile darter clade. Phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear genes result in the monophyly of the E. spectabile clade; however, with respect to sampled specimens of 5 species (Etheostoma fragi, Etheostoma uniporum, Etheostoma pulchellum, Etheostoma burri, and E. spectabile), the mitochondrial phylogeny is inconsistent with E. spectabile clade monophyly. Etheostoma uniporum and E. fragi are both fixed for heterospecific mitochondrial genomes. Limited nuclear introgression is restricted to E. uniporum. Our analyses show that the pattern of introgression is consistently asymmetric, with movement of heterospecific mitochondrial haplotypes and nuclear alleles into E. spectabile clade species; introgressive hybridization spans broad temporal scales; and introgression is restricted to species and populations in the Ozarks. The introgressed mitochondrial genome observed in E. fragi has an obscure phylogenetic placement among darters, an ancient age, and is possibly a mitochondrial fossil from an Etheostoma species that has subsequently gone extinct. These results indicate that introgression, both ancient and more contemporaneous, characterizes the history of diversification in the E. spectabile species clade and may be relatively common among clades comprising the species-rich North American freshwater fauna.

  16. Assessing Mitochondrial DNA Variation and Copy Number in Lymphocytes of ~2,000 Sardinians Using Tailored Sequencing Analysis Tools

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Sidore, Carlo; Butler, Thomas J.; Wing, Mary Kate; Qian, Yong; Meirelles, Osorio; Busonero, Fabio; Tsoi, Lam C.; Maschio, Andrea; Angius, Andrea; Kang, Hyun Min; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Cucca, Francesco; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Schlessinger, David

    2015-01-01

    DNA sequencing identifies common and rare genetic variants for association studies, but studies typically focus on variants in nuclear DNA and ignore the mitochondrial genome. In fact, analyzing variants in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences presents special problems, which we resolve here with a general solution for the analysis of mtDNA in next-generation sequencing studies. The new program package comprises 1) an algorithm designed to identify mtDNA variants (i.e., homoplasmies and heteroplasmies), incorporating sequencing error rates at each base in a likelihood calculation and allowing allele fractions at a variant site to differ across individuals; and 2) an estimation of mtDNA copy number in a cell directly from whole-genome sequencing data. We also apply the methods to DNA sequence from lymphocytes of ~2,000 SardiNIA Project participants. As expected, mothers and offspring share all homoplasmies but a lesser proportion of heteroplasmies. Both homoplasmies and heteroplasmies show 5-fold higher transition/transversion ratios than variants in nuclear DNA. Also, heteroplasmy increases with age, though on average only ~1 heteroplasmy reaches the 4% level between ages 20 and 90. In addition, we find that mtDNA copy number averages ~110 copies/lymphocyte and is ~54% heritable, implying substantial genetic regulation of the level of mtDNA. Copy numbers also decrease modestly but significantly with age, and females on average have significantly more copies than males. The mtDNA copy numbers are significantly associated with waist circumference (p-value = 0.0031) and waist-hip ratio (p-value = 2.4×10-5), but not with body mass index, indicating an association with central fat distribution. To our knowledge, this is the largest population analysis to date of mtDNA dynamics, revealing the age-imposed increase in heteroplasmy, the relatively high heritability of copy number, and the association of copy number with metabolic traits. PMID:26172475

  17. Mitochondrial DNA is released by shock and activates neutrophils via p38 map kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial DNA (bDNA) can activate an innate-immune stimulatory "danger" response via toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is unique among endogenous molecules in that mitochondria evolved from prokaryotic ancestors. Thus, mtDNA retains molecular motifs similar to bDNA. It is unknown, however, whether mtDNA is released by shock or is capable of eliciting immune responses like bDNA. We hypothesized shock-injured tissues might release mtDNA and that mtDNA might act as a danger-associated molecular pattern (or "alarmin") that can activate neutrophils (PMNs) and contribute to systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Standardized trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused circulation of mtDNA as well as nuclear DNA. Human PMNs were incubated in vitro with purified mtDNA or nuclear DNA, with or without pretreatment by chloroquine (an inhibitor of endosomal receptors like TLR9). Neutrophil activation was assessed as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 8 and MMP-9 release as well as p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA induced PMN MMP-8/MMP-9 release and p38 phosphorylation but did not activate p44/42. Responses were inhibited by chloroquine. Nuclear DNA did not induce PMN activation. Intravenous injection of disrupted mitochondria (mitochondrial debris) into rats induced p38 MAPK activation and IL-6 and TNF-alpha accumulation in the liver. In summary, mtDNA is released into the circulation by shock. Mitochondrial DNA activates PMN p38 MAPK, probably via TLR9, inducing an inflammatory phenotype. Mitochondrial DNA may act as a danger-associated molecular pattern or alarmin after shock, contributing to the initiation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

  18. Extensive polymorphism in the mitochondrial DNA of apes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, S D; Brown, W M; Davidson, W S; Wilson, A C

    1981-01-01

    Ape species are 2-10 times more variable than the human species with respect to the nucleotide sequence of mtDNA, even though ape populations have been smaller than the human population for at least 10,000 years. This finding was made by comparing purified mtDNAs from 27 individuals with the aid of 25 restriction endonucleases; for an additional 59 individuals, comparisons were made with fewer enzymes by using the blot hybridization method. The amount of intraspecific sequence divergence was greatest between orangutans of Borneo and Sumatra. Among common chimpanzees, a large component of the variation is due to two highly distinct forms of mtDNA that may reflect a major geographic subdivision. The least amount of sequence variation occurred among lowland gorillas, which exhibit only twice as much sequence variation as humans. The large intraspecific differences among apes, together with the geological and protein evidence, leads us to propose that each ape species is the remnant of an ancient and widespread population that became subdivided geographically and reduced in size and range, perhaps by hominid competition. The low variation among human mtDNAs is consistent with geological evidence that the human species is young. The distribution of site changes within the mitochondrial genome was also examined. Comparison of closely related mtDNAs shows that the ribosomal RNA genes have diverged more slowly than the rest of the genome. PMID:6273863

  19. A mitochondrial retroplasmid integrates into mitochondrial DNA by a novel mechanism involving the synthesis of a hybrid cDNA and homologous recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, C C; Kennell, J C; Wanner, L A; Lambowitz, A M

    1994-01-01

    The Mauriceville and Varkud mitochondrial plasmids of Neurospora spp. are closely related, small circular DNAs that propagate via an RNA intermediate and reverse transcription. Although the plasmids ordinarily replicate autonomously, they can also integrate into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), yielding defective mtDNAs that in some cases cause senescence. To investigate the integration mechanism, we analyzed four cases in which the Varkud plasmid integrated into the mitochondrial small rRNA gene, three in wild-type subcultures and one in a senescent mutant. Our analysis suggests that the integrations occurred by the plasmid reverse transcriptase template switching between the plasmid transcript and internal sequences in the mitochondrial small rRNA to yield hybrid cDNAs that circularized and recombined homologously with the mtDNA. The integrated plasmid sequences are transcribed, presumably from the mitochondrial small rRNA promoters, resulting in hybrid RNAs containing the 5' segment of the mitochondrial small rRNA linked head-to-tail to the full-length plasmid transcript. Analysis of additional senescent mutants revealed three cases in which the plasmid used the same mechanism to integrate at other locations in the mtDNA. In these cases, circular variant plasmids that had incorporated a mitochondrial tRNA or tRNA-like sequence by template switching integrated by homologous recombination at the site of the corresponding tRNA or tRNA-like sequence in mtDNA. This simple integration mechanism involving template switching to generate a hybrid cDNA that integrates homologously could have been used by primitive retroelements prior to the acquisition of a specialized integration machinery. Images PMID:7523850

  20. Purification and Comparative Assay of the Human Mitochondrial Replicative DNA Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Rosado-Ruiz, Fernando A.; So, Minyoung; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) helicase is essential for mtDNA replication and maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. Despite substantial advances that have been made in its characterization, there is still much to be understood about the functional roles of its domains and its interactions with the other components of the minimal mitochondrial DNA replisome. Critical to achieving this is the ability to isolate the enzyme in a stable, active form. In this chapter we describe a modified, streamlined purification strategy for recombinant forms of the enzyme. We also present assays to assess its helix unwinding activity and the stimulatory effects of the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB). Finally, we describe a concentration/buffer exchange method that we have employed to achieve greater enzyme stability and appropriate conditions for biochemical and biophysical studies. PMID:26530683

  1. The Percolation Transition in the DNA-Gold Nanoparticle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa; Ramos, Rona

    2002-03-01

    Melting and hybridization of DNA-capped gold nanoparticle networks are investigated with optical absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Single-stranded, 12-base DNA-capped gold nanoparticles are linked with complementary, single-stranded, 24-base linker DNA to form particle networks. Compared to free DNA, a sharp melting transition is seen in these networked DNA-nanoparticle systems. The sharpness is explained by percolation transition phenomena.

  2. Phase transition of DNA-linked gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2003-04-01

    Melting and hybridization of DNA-capped gold nanoparticle networks are investigated with optical absorption spectroscopy. Single-stranded, 12-base DNA-capped gold nanoparticles are linked with complementary, single-stranded, 24-base linker DNA to form particle networks. Compared to free DNA, a sharp melting transition is seen in these networked DNA-nanoparticle systems. The sharpness is explained by percolation transition phenomena.

  3. Quantitation of DNA copy number in individual mitochondrial particles by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Navratil, Marian; Poe, Bobby G; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2007-10-15

    Here, we present a direct method for determining mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy numbers in individual mitochondrial particles, isolated from cultured cells, by means of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection. We demonstrate that this method can detect a single molecule of PicoGreen-stained mtDNA in intact DsRed2-labeled mitochondrial particles isolated from human osteosarcoma 143B cells. This ultimate limit of mtDNA detection made it possible to confirm that an individual mitochondrial nucleoid, the genetic unit of mitochondrial inheritance, can contain a single copy of mtDNA. The validation of this approach was achieved via monitoring chemically induced mtDNA depletion and comparing the CE-LIF results to those obtained by quantitative microscopy imaging and multiplex real-time PCR analysis. Owing to its sensitivity, the CE-LIF method may become a powerful tool for investigating the copy number and organization of mtDNA in mitochondrial disease and aging, and in molecular biology techniques requiring manipulation and quantitation of DNA molecules such as plasmids.

  4. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  5. Mitochondrial DNA in CSF distinguishes LRRK2 from idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Podlesniy, Petar; Vilas, Dolores; Taylor, Peggy; Shaw, Leslie M; Tolosa, Eduard; Trullas, Ramon

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA regulates mitochondrial function which is altered in both idiopathic and familial forms of Parkinson's disease. To investigate whether these two disease forms exhibit an altered regulation of mitochondrial DNA we measured cell free mitochondrial DNA content in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from idiopathic and LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease patients. The concentration of mitochondrial DNA was measured using a digital droplet polymerase chain reaction technique in a total of 98 CSF samples from a cohort of subjects including: 20 LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease, 26 asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers, 31 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 21 first-degree relatives of LRRK2 Parkinson's disease patients without the mutation. Here we report that LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers with Parkinson's disease exhibit a high concentration of mitochondrial DNA in CSF compared with asymptomatic LRRK2(G2019S) mutation carriers and with idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. In addition, idiopathic, but not LRRK2 Parkinson's disease is associated with low CSF concentration of α-synuclein. These results show that high mitochondrial DNA content in CSF distinguishes idiopathic from LRRK2-related Parkinson's disease suggesting that different biochemical pathways underlie neurodegeneration in these two disorders.

  6. The potential role for use of mitochondrial DNA copy number as predictive biomarker in presbycusis

    PubMed Central

    Falah, Masoumeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Najafi, Mohammad; Balali, Maryam; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Asghari, Alimohamad; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaldin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is the most common communication disorder and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Its prevalence is expected to increase, due to the trend of growth of the elderly population. The current diagnostic test for detection of presbycusis is implemented after there has been a change in hearing sensitivity. Identification of a pre-diagnostic biomarker would raise the possibility of preserving hearing sensitivity before damage occurs. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including the production of reactive oxygen species and induction of expression of apoptotic genes, participates in the progression of presbycusis. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation has a critical role in presbycusis. However, the nature of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, an important biomarker in many other diseases, and presbycusis is undetermined. Methods Fifty-four subjects with presbycusis and 29 healthy controls were selected after ear, nose, throat examination and pure-tone audiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA relative to the nuclear genome was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Subjects with presbycusis had a lower median mitochondrial DNA copy number than healthy subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.007). Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also significantly associated with degree of hearing impairment (P=0.025) and audiogram configuration (P=0.022). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that lower mitochondrial DNA copy number is responsible for presbycusis through alteration of mitochondrial function. Moreover, the significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood samples with the degree of hearing impairment and audiogram configuration has potential for use as a standard test for presbycusis, providing the possibility of the development of an easy

  7. Biparental inheritance of organelles in Pelargonium: evidence for intergenomic recombination of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Janina; Weihe, Andreas; Pohlheim, Frank; Börner, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    While uniparental transmission of mtDNA is widespread and dominating in eukaryotes leaving mutation as the major source of genotypic diversity, recently, biparental inheritance of mitochondrial genes has been demonstrated in reciprocal crosses of Pelargonium zonale and P. inquinans. The thereby arising heteroplasmy carries the potential for recombination between mtDNAs of different descent, i.e. between the parental mitochondrial genomes. We have analyzed these Pelargonium hybrids for mitochondrial intergenomic recombination events by examining differences in DNA blot hybridization patterns of the mitochondrial genes atp1 and cob. Further investigation of these genes and their flanking regions using nucleotide sequence polymorphisms and PCR revealed DNA segments in the progeny, which contained both P. zonale and P. inquinans sequences suggesting an intergenomic recombination in hybrids of Pelargonium. This turns Pelargonium into an interesting subject for studies of recombination and evolutionary dynamics of mitochondrial genomes.

  8. Psychiatric symptoms of patients with primary mitochondrial DNA disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to assess psychiatric symptoms in patients with genetically proven primary mutation of the mitochondrial DNA. Methods 19 adults with known mitochondrial mutation (MT) have been assessed with the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire 20-item Disability Index (HAQ-DI), the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form (BDI-SF), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the clinical version of the Structured Clinical Interview for the the DSM-IV (SCID-I and SCID-II) As control, 10 patients with hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy (HN), harboring the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) mutation were examined with the same tools. Results The two groups did not differ significantly in gender, age or education. Mean HAQ-DI score was 0.82 in the MT (range: 0-1.625) and 0.71 in the HN group (range: 0-1.625). Level of disability between the two groups did not differ significantly (p = 0.6076). MT patients scored significantly higher on the BDI-SF and HDRS than HN patients (12.85 versus 4.40, p = 0.031, and 15.62 vs 7.30, p = 0.043, respectively). The Global Severity Index (GSI) of SCL-90-R also showed significant difference (1.44 vs 0.46, p = 0.013) as well as the subscales except for somatization. SCID-I interview yielded a variety of mood disorders in both groups. Eight MT patient (42%) had past, 6 (31%) had current, 5 (26%) had both past and current psychiatric diagnosis, yielding a lifetime prevalence of 9/19 (47%) in the MT group. In the HN group, 3 patients had both past and current diagnosis showing a lifetime prevalence of 3/10 (30%) in this group. SCID-II detected personality disorder in 8 MT cases (42%), yielding 3 avoidant, 2 obsessive-compulsive and 3 personality disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) diagnosis. No personality disorder was identified in the HN group. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in patients with mitochondrial

  9. Geographical structuring of mitochondrial DNA in Chalcides sexlineatus within the island of Gran Canaria

    PubMed Central

    Pestano, J.; Brown, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    The skink Chalcides sexlineatus shows clear north-south ecology-correlated variation in morphology within the island of Gran Canaria. Detailed study of this variation previously supported the hypothesis of in situ differentiation arising through climate-mediated variation in selection pressures. The more recent discovery of substantial within-island mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence divergence suggested an alternative historical vicariance scenario. This paper provides a detailed analysis of geographical structuring in mtDNA, based on a fragment amplified from the 12S rRNA region in 96 individuals. A very clear phylogeographic pattern was detected: three 'deep' lineages were evident corresponding to northern, south-eastern and south-western parts of Gran Canaria with generally low levels of mtDNA introgression. The pattern of among-site differentiation was highly concordant with the pattern of morphological variation. It also provided a close fit to a simple microevolutionary model based on population vicariance during volcanic eruptions known to have occurred during the past 2.8 million years in the north of the island. The minimum number of historical migration events required to explain the mtDNA tree was calculated and a novel randomization test used to show that there were a lower number of putative migrations across the morphology transition zone, relative to migrations within northern and southern zones. Differential adaptation to the two major habitat types and selection against hybrids may explain why the morphology transition zone coincides with the main ecotone and is relatively narrow, respectively.

  10. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  11. Mitochondrial replacement therapies can circumvent mtDNA-based disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Don P; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA diseases are relatively common, sometimes devastating, and transmitted exclusively through the egg to children of carrier mothers. A study in Cell by Wang et al. (2014) adds the exciting possibility of a new therapy for preventing mitochondrial disease transmission predicated on the use of polar body genomes in mice.

  12. Effects of Fcj1-Mos1 and mitochondrial division on aggregation of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids and organelle morphology.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kie; Tamura, Yasushi; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packaged into DNA-protein complexes called nucleoids, which are distributed as many small foci in mitochondria. Nucleoids are crucial for the biogenesis and function of mtDNA. Here, using a yeast genetic screen for components that control nucleoid distribution and size, we identify Fcj1 and Mos1, two evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial proteins that maintain the connection between the cristae and boundary membranes. These two proteins are also important for establishing tubular morphology of mitochondria, as mitochondria lacking Fcj1 and Mos1 form lamellar sheets. We find that nucleoids aggregate, increase in size, and decrease in number in fcj1 and mos1 cells. In addition, Fcj1 form punctate structures and localized adjacent to nucleoids. Moreover, connecting mitochondria by deleting the DNM1 gene required for organelle division enhances aggregation of mtDNA nucleoids in fcj1 and mos1 cells, whereas single deletion of DNM1 does not affect nucleoids. Conversely, deleting F1Fo-ATP synthase dimerization factors generates concentric ring-like cristae, restores tubular mitochondrial morphology, and suppresses nucleoid aggregation in these mutants. Our findings suggest an unexpected role of Fcj1-Mos1 and organelle division in maintaining the distribution and size of mtDNA nucleoids.

  13. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and drug-induced toxicity in a panel of mouse embryonic fibroblasts with mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Claudia V.; Oliveira, Paulo J.; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2012-10-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been proposed to be involved in idiosyncratic drug reactions. However, current in vitro and in vivo models lack the genetic diversity seen in the human population. Our hypothesis is that different cell strains with distinct mtDNA SNPs may have different mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles and may therefore vary in their response to drug-induced toxicity. Therefore, we used an in vitro system composed of four strains of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with mtDNA polymorphisms. We sequenced mtDNA from embryonic fibroblasts isolated from four mouse strains, C57BL/6J, MOLF/EiJ, CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ, with the latter two being sequenced for the first time. The bioenergetic profile of the four strains of MEFs was investigated at both passages 3 and 10. Our results showed that there were clear differences among the four strains of MEFs at both passages, with CZECHII/EiJ having a lower mitochondrial robustness when compared to C57BL/6J, followed by MOLF/EiJ and PERA/EiJ. Seven drugs known to impair mitochondrial function were tested for their effect on the ATP content of the four strains of MEFs in both glucose- and galactose-containing media. Our results showed that there were strain-dependent differences in the response to some of the drugs. We propose that this model is a useful starting point to study compounds that may cause mitochondrial off-target toxicity in early stages of drug development, thus decreasing the number of experimental animals used. -- Highlights: ► mtDNA SNPs may be linked to individual predisposition to drug-induced toxicity. ► CZECHII/EiJ and PERA/EiJ mtDNA was sequenced for the first time in this study. ► Strain-dependent mitochondrial capacity differences were measured. ► Strain-dependent differences in response to mitochondrial toxicants were observed.

  14. Mitochondria: Biogenesis and mitophagy balance in segregation and clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Maresca, Alessandra; Caporali, Leonardo; Trifunov, Selena; Zanna, Claudia; Rugolo, Michela

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles containing their own multi-copy genome. They are organized in a highly dynamic network, resulting from balance between fission and fusion, which maintains homeostasis of mitochondrial mass through mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutates much faster than nuclear DNA. In particular, mtDNA point mutations and deletions may occur somatically and accumulate with aging, coexisting with the wild type, a condition known as heteroplasmy. Under specific circumstances, clonal expansion of mutant mtDNA may occur within single cells, causing a wide range of severe human diseases when mutant overcomes wild type. Furthermore, mtDNA deletions accumulate and clonally expand as a consequence of deleterious mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance, as well as in mitochondrial fusion genes (mitofusin-2 and OPA1), possibly implicating mtDNA nucleoids segregation. We here discuss how the intricacies of mitochondrial homeostasis impinge on the intracellular propagation of mutant mtDNA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  15. Nondestructive DNA extraction method for mitochondrial DNA analyses of museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Rohland, Nadin; Siedel, Heike; Hofreiter, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Museum specimens have provided the material for a large proportion of ancient DNA studies conducted during the last 20 years. However, a major drawback of the genetic analyses is that the specimens investigated are usually damaged, as parts of skin, bone, or a tooth have to be removed for DNA extraction. To get around these limitations, we have developed a nondestructive extraction method for bone, tooth, and skin samples. We found that it is possible to amplify mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences up to at least 414 bp long from samples up to 164 years old. Using this method, almost 90% (35 of 40) of the investigated samples yielded amplifiable mtDNA. Moreover, we found that repeated extractions of the same samples allowed amplifications of the expected length for all samples at least three times and for some samples up to at least five times. Thus this method opens up the possibility to repeatedly use museum collections for mtDNA analyses without damaging the specimens and thus without reducing the value of irreplaceable collections for morphological analyses.

  16. Distribution of mitochondrial DNA fragments in the nuclear genome of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Du, W X; Qin, Y C

    2015-10-27

    Nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (numts), which originated from mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) insertions in the nuclear genome, have been detected in many species. The distribution of numts in the honeybee nuclear genome has not yet been fully reported. By referring to the whole honeybee mtDNA sequence and to the recent version of the honeybee nuclear genome, 236 reference sequences were identified by BLAST, with 90 unmapped. The size of the numts ranged from 219 to 3788 bp, and the homologous identity between numts and their corresponding mtDNA fragments varied from 71 to 93%. Furthermore, identified honeybee numts covered nearly all mitochondrial genes and were distributed over all chromosomes. This study provides useful information for further research related to mitochondrial genes and the evolution of the honeybee.

  17. Mitochondria and the success of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: from nuclear-mitochondrial interactions to mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, Stefan; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard

    2005-01-01

    The overall success of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is rather unsatisfactory, both in terms of efficacy and from an animal health and welfare point of view. Most research activities have concentrated on epigenetic reprogramming problems as one major cause of SCNT failure. The present review addresses the limited success of mammalian SCNT from yet another viewpoint, the mitochondrial perspective. Mitochondria have a broad range of critical functions in cellular energy supply, cell signalling and programmed cell death and, thus, affect embryonic and fetal development, suggesting that inadequate or perturbed mitochondrial functions may adversely affect SCNT success. A survey of perinatal clinical data from human subjects with deficient mitochondrial respiratory chain activity has revealed a plethora of phenotypes that have striking similarities with abnormalities commonly encountered in SCNT fetuses and offspring. We discuss the limited experimental data on nuclear-mitochondrial interaction effects in SCNT and explore the potential effects in the context of new findings about the biology of mitochondria. These include mitochondrial fusion/fission, mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination, processes that are likely to be affected by and impact on SCNT cloning. Furthermore, we indicate pathways that could link epigenetic reprogramming and mitochondria effects in SCNT and address questions and perspectives for future research.

  18. Whole mitochondrial genome screening in maternally inherited non-syndromic hearing impairment using a microarray resequencing mitochondrial DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Marianne; Marlin, Sandrine; Jonard, Laurence; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Baulande, Sylvain; Pierron, Denis; Lacombe, Didier; Duriez, Françoise; Francannet, Christine; Mom, Thierry; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Faivre, Laurence; Duvillard, Christian; Couderc, Remy; Garabedian, Eréa-Noël; Petit, Christine; Feldmann, Delphine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been implicated in non-syndromic hearing loss either as primary or as predisposing factors. As only a part of the mitochondrial genome is usually explored in deafness, its prevalence is probably under-estimated. Among 1350 families with non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss collected through a French collaborative network, we selected 29 large families with a clear maternal lineage and screened them for known mtDNA mutations in 12S rRNA, tRNASer(UCN) and tRNALeu(UUR) genes. When no mutation could be identified, a whole mitochondrial genome screening was performed, using a microarray resequencing chip: the MitoChip version 2.0 developed by Affymetrix Inc. Known mtDNA mutations was found in nine of the 29 families, which are described in the article: five with A1555G, two with the T7511C, one with 7472insC and one with A3243G mutation. In the remaining 20 families, the resequencing Mitochip detected 258 mitochondrial homoplasmic variants and 107 potentially heteroplasmic variants. Controls were made by direct sequencing on selected fragments and showed a high sensibility of the MitoChip but a low specificity, especially for heteroplasmic variations. An original analysis on the basis of species conservation, frequency and phylogenetic investigation was performed to select the more probably pathogenic variants. The entire genome analysis allowed us to identify five additional families with a putatively pathogenic mitochondrial variant: T669C, C1537T, G8078A, G12236A and G15077A. These results indicate that the new MitoChip platform is a rapid and valuable tool for identification of new mtDNA mutations in deafness.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Variation and the Evolution of Robertsonian Chromosomal Races of House Mice, Mus Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, M. W.; Boyer, S. N.; Searle, J. B.; Aquadro, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    The house mouse, Mus domesticus, includes many distinct Robertsonian (Rb) chromosomal races with diploid numbers from 2n = 22 to 2n = 38. Although these races are highly differentiated karyotypically, they are otherwise indistinguishable from standard karyotype (i.e., 2n = 40) mice, and consequently their evolutionary histories are not well understood. We have examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation from the control region and the ND3 gene region among 56 M. domesticus from Western Europe, including 15 Rb populations and 13 standard karyotype populations, and two individuals of the sister species, Mus musculus. mtDNA exhibited an average sequence divergence of 0.84% within M. domesticus and 3.4% between M. domesticus and M. musculus. The transition/transversion bias for the regions sequenced is 5.7:1, and the overall rate of sequence evolution is approximately 10% divergence per million years. The amount of mtDNA variation was as great among different Rb races as among different populations of standard karyotype mice, suggesting that different Rb races do not derive from a single recent maternal lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of the mtDNA sequences resulted in a parsimony tree which contained six major clades. Each of these clades contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice, consistent with the hypothesis that Rb races have arisen independently multiple times. Discordance between phylogeny and geography was attributable to ancestral polymorphism as a consequence of the recent colonization of Western Europe by mice. Two major mtDNA lineages were geographically localized and contained both Rb and standard karyotype mice. The age of these lineages suggests that mice have moved into Europe only within the last 10,000 years and that Rb populations in different geographic regions arose during this time. PMID:8005418

  20. Origin and spread of human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U7.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Tamang, Rakesh; Kushniarevich, Alena; Francis, Amirtharaj; Costa, Marta D; Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Khachatryan, Zaruhi; Sharma, Indu; van Oven, Mannis; Parik, Jüri; Hovhannisyan, Hrant; Metspalu, Ene; Pennarun, Erwan; Karmin, Monika; Tamm, Erika; Tambets, Kristiina; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reisberg, Tuuli; Reidla, Maere; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Gandini, Francesca; Perego, Ugo A; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Houshmand, Massoud; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Soares, Pedro; Rai, Ekta; Šarac, Jelena; Šarić, Tena; Sharma, Varun; Pereira, Luisa; Fernandes, Veronica; Černý, Viktor; Farjadian, Shirin; Singh, Deepankar Pratap; Azakli, Hülya; Üstek, Duran; Ekomasova Trofimova, Natalia; Kutuev, Ildus; Litvinov, Sergei; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Rai, Niraj; Singh, Manvendra; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Reddy, Alla G; Tolk, Helle-Viivi; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Rudan, Pavao; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel N; Anagnou, Nicholas P; Pappa, Kalliopi I; Golubenko, Maria V; Orekhov, Vladimir; Borinskaya, Svetlana A; Kaldma, Katrin; Schauer, Monica A; Simionescu, Maya; Gusar, Vladislava; Grechanina, Elena; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Voevoda, Mikhail; Damba, Larissa; Sharma, Swarkar; Singh, Lalji; Semino, Ornella; Behar, Doron M; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Richards, Martin B; Metspalu, Mait; Kivisild, Toomas; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Endicott, Phillip; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Torroni, Antonio; Villems, Richard

    2017-04-07

    Human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U is among the initial maternal founders in Southwest Asia and Europe and one that best indicates matrilineal genetic continuity between late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer groups and present-day populations of Europe. While most haplogroup U subclades are older than 30 thousand years, the comparatively recent coalescence time of the extant variation of haplogroup U7 (~16-19 thousand years ago) suggests that its current distribution is the consequence of more recent dispersal events, despite its wide geographical range across Europe, the Near East and South Asia. Here we report 267 new U7 mitogenomes that - analysed alongside 100 published ones - enable us to discern at least two distinct temporal phases of dispersal, both of which most likely emanated from the Near East. The earlier one began prior to the Holocene (~11.5 thousand years ago) towards South Asia, while the later dispersal took place more recently towards Mediterranean Europe during the Neolithic (~8 thousand years ago). These findings imply that the carriers of haplogroup U7 spread to South Asia and Europe before the suggested Bronze Age expansion of Indo-European languages from the Pontic-Caspian Steppe region.

  1. Origin and spread of human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U7

    PubMed Central

    Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Tamang, Rakesh; Kushniarevich, Alena; Francis, Amirtharaj; Costa, Marta D; Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Khachatryan, Zaruhi; Sharma, Indu; van Oven, Mannis; Parik, Jüri; Hovhannisyan, Hrant; Metspalu, Ene; Pennarun, Erwan; Karmin, Monika; Tamm, Erika; Tambets, Kristiina; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Reisberg, Tuuli; Reidla, Maere; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Gandini, Francesca; Perego, Ugo A.; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Houshmand, Massoud; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Soares, Pedro; Rai, Ekta; Šarac, Jelena; Šarić, Tena; Sharma, Varun; Pereira, Luisa; Fernandes, Veronica; Černý, Viktor; Farjadian, Shirin; Singh, Deepankar Pratap; Azakli, Hülya; Üstek, Duran; Ekomasova (Trofimova), Natalia; Kutuev, Ildus; Litvinov, Sergei; Bermisheva, Marina; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Rai, Niraj; Singh, Manvendra; Singh, Vijay Kumar; Reddy, Alla G.; Tolk, Helle-Viivi; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Rudan, Pavao; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel N.; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Pappa, Kalliopi I.; Golubenko, Maria V.; Orekhov, Vladimir; Borinskaya, Svetlana A; Kaldma, Katrin; Schauer, Monica A.; Simionescu, Maya; Gusar, Vladislava; Grechanina, Elena; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Voevoda, Mikhail; Damba, Larissa; Sharma, Swarkar; Singh, Lalji; Semino, Ornella; Behar, Doron M.; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Richards, Martin B.; Metspalu, Mait; Kivisild, Toomas; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Endicott, Phillip; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Torroni, Antonio; Villems, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U is among the initial maternal founders in Southwest Asia and Europe and one that best indicates matrilineal genetic continuity between late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer groups and present-day populations of Europe. While most haplogroup U subclades are older than 30 thousand years, the comparatively recent coalescence time of the extant variation of haplogroup U7 (~16–19 thousand years ago) suggests that its current distribution is the consequence of more recent dispersal events, despite its wide geographical range across Europe, the Near East and South Asia. Here we report 267 new U7 mitogenomes that – analysed alongside 100 published ones – enable us to discern at least two distinct temporal phases of dispersal, both of which most likely emanated from the Near East. The earlier one began prior to the Holocene (~11.5 thousand years ago) towards South Asia, while the later dispersal took place more recently towards Mediterranean Europe during the Neolithic (~8 thousand years ago). These findings imply that the carriers of haplogroup U7 spread to South Asia and Europe before the suggested Bronze Age expansion of Indo-European languages from the Pontic-Caspian Steppe region. PMID:28387361

  2. Mitochondrial DNA diversity of Anatolian indigenous domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Akis, I; Oztabak, K; Mengi, A; Un, C

    2014-12-01

    Anatolia has been an important region for civilizations and agricultural revolution as a major domestication centre for livestock species. Goats (Capra hircus) were among the earliest domesticated animals in this region. In this study, genetic diversity of Anatolian goat breeds was characterized by comparison of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region 1. A total of 295 individuals, including 99 Anatolian Black goats, 96 Angora goats and 100 Kilis goats, were used. Haplogroup A was found to be the dominant haplogroup in all three breeds. The highest haplogroup diversity, including haplogroups A, B2, C and G, was observed in the Anatolian Black breed. Haplogroup D was only observed in Kilis and Angora goats. Haplogroup G was found in Angora and Anatolian Black breeds. The Anatolian goat breeds had high genetic diversity values and a weak phylogeographical structure. The nucleotide diversity values were found to be higher than those in previously studied goat breeds. The fact that Anatolia is a domestication centre and its geographical position as a junction of trade routes may have caused the higher genetic diversity of Anatolian goat breeds.

  3. Paternal transmission of mitochondrial DNA as an integral part of mitochondrial inheritance in metapopulations of Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J N; Nafisinia, M; Sutovsky, P; Ballard, J W O

    2013-01-01

    Maternal inheritance is one of the hallmarks of animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and central to its success as a molecular marker. This mode of inheritance and subsequent lack of heterologous recombination allows us to retrace evolutionary relationships unambiguously down the matriline and without the confounding effects of recombinant genetic information. Accumulating evidence of biparental inheritance of mtDNA (paternal leakage), however, challenges our current understanding of how this molecule is inherited. Here, using Drosophila simulans collected from an East African metapopulation exhibiting recurring mitochondrial heteroplasmy, we conducted single fly matings and screened F1 offspring for the presence of paternal mtDNA using allele-specific PCR assays (AS-PCR). In all, 27 out of 4092 offspring were identified as harboring paternal mtDNA, suggesting a frequency of 0.66% paternal leakage in this species. Our findings strongly suggest that recurring mtDNA heteroplasmy as observed in natural populations of Drosophila simulans is most likely caused by repeated paternal leakage. Our findings further suggest that this phenomenon to potentially be an integral part of mtDNA inheritance in these populations and consequently of significance for mtDNA as a molecular marker.

  4. The Role of Mitochondrial DNA in Mediating Alveolar Epithelial Cell Apoptosis and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jo; Cheresh, Paul; Jablonski, Renea P.; Williams, David B.; Kamp, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Convincing evidence has emerged demonstrating that impairment of mitochondrial function is critically important in regulating alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) programmed cell death (apoptosis) that may contribute to aging-related lung diseases, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and asbestosis (pulmonary fibrosis following asbestos exposure). The mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes for 13 proteins, including several essential for oxidative phosphorylation. We review the evidence implicating that oxidative stress-induced mtDNA damage promotes AEC apoptosis and pulmonary fibrosis. We focus on the emerging role for AEC mtDNA damage repair by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO-2) in maintaining mtDNA integrity which is important in preventing AEC apoptosis and asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model. We then review recent studies linking the sirtuin (SIRT) family members, especially SIRT3, to mitochondrial integrity and mtDNA damage repair and aging. We present a conceptual model of how SIRTs modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven mitochondrial metabolism that may be important for their tumor suppressor function. The emerging insights into the pathobiology underlying AEC mtDNA damage and apoptosis is suggesting novel therapeutic targets that may prove useful for the management of age-related diseases, including pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:26370974

  5. Peripheral blood mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA (mtDNA/nDNA) ratio as a marker of mitochondrial toxicities of stavudine containing antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Malawian patients.

    PubMed

    Kampira, Elizabeth; Dzobo, Kevin; Kumwenda, Johnstone; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Parker, M Iqbal; Dandara, Collet

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is a major concern related to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Common manifestations are peripheral neuropathy and lipodystrophy. Depletion of mitochondria has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) levels in peripheral blood can be used as biomarker of stavudine-associated mitochondrial toxicities. We enrolled 203 HIV-infected Malawian adult patients on stavudine-containing ART and 64 healthy controls of Bantu origin in a cross-sectional study. Total DNA was extracted from whole blood.The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was used to estimate nuclear DNA (nDNA) levels and the ATP synthase-8 mitochondrial DNA gene to estimate mtDNA levels, from which mtDNA/nDNA ratios were determined. MtDNA subhaplogroups were established by sequencing. Among patients, peripheral neuropathy was present in 21% (43/203), lipodystrophy in 18% (20/112), elevated lactate level (>2.5 mmol/L) in 17% (19/113). Healthy controls had a higher median mtDNA/nDNA ratio when compared to HIV/AIDS patients (6.64 vs. 5.08; p=0.05), patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy (6.64 vs. 3.40, p=0.039), and patients with high lactate levels (6.64 vs. 0.68, p=0.024), respectively. Significant differences in median mtDNA/nDNA ratios were observed between patients with high and normal lactate levels (5.88 vs. 0.68, p=0.018). The median mtDNA/nDNA ratio of patients in subhaplogroup L0a2 was much lower (0.62 vs. 8.50, p=0.01) than that of those in subhaplogroup L2a. Our data indicate that peripheral blood mtDNA/nDNA ratio is a marker of mitochondrial toxicities of stavudine and is associated with elevated lactate levels and mtDNA subhaplogroups. This could open the prospect to select a substantial group of patients who will not have problematic side effects from stavudine, an affordable and effective antiretroviral drug that is being phased out in Africa due to its toxicity.

  6. Deep sequencing unearths nuclear mitochondrial sequences under Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated false heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA variants.

    PubMed

    Petruzzella, Vittoria; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Calabrese, Claudia; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Trentadue, Raffaella; Piredda, Roberta; Artuso, Lucia; Rizza, Teresa; Bianchi, Marzia; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Guerriero, Silvana; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Attimonelli, Marcella

    2012-09-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ND mutations that are mostly homoplasmic. However, these mutations are not sufficient to explain the peculiar features of penetrance and the tissue-specific expression of the disease and are believed to be causative in association with unknown environmental or other genetic factors. Discerning between clear-cut pathogenetic variants, such as those that appear to be heteroplasmic, and less penetrant variants, such as the homoplasmic, remains a challenging issue that we have addressed here using next-generation sequencing approach. We set up a protocol to quantify MTND5 heteroplasmy levels in a family in which the proband manifests a LHON phenotype. Furthermore, to study this mtDNA haplotype, we applied the cybridization protocol. The results demonstrate that the mutations are mostly homoplasmic, whereas the suspected heteroplasmic feature of the observed mutations is due to the co-amplification of Nuclear mitochondrial Sequences.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variations associated with recurrent pregnancy loss among Indian women.

    PubMed

    Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Carlus, S Justin; Aruna, Meka; Aruna, P; Kumar, Ajay; Jayakar, Richard Issac; Lionel, Anath C; Gupta, Sandeep; Rao, Lakshmi; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakravarthy, Baidyanath; Deenadayal, Mamatha; Selvaraj, Kamala; Andal, Sadaranga; Reddy, B Mohan; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2011-05-01

    Several genetic factors have been found to be associated with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). However, not many attempts have been made to associate the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations with RPL. Therefore, we have analyzed the complete mtDNA of 100 women with RPL and 12 aborted fetal tissues. Our analysis revealed a total of 681 variations, most of which were in NADH Dehydrogenase (ND) genes that encode mitochondrial enzyme Complex I. Presence of T4216C variation (ND1 gene) in 9% of the RPL women and several pathogenic, and novel mutations suggest the role of mtDNA variations in RPL.

  8. Intraspecific nucleotide sequence differences in the major noncoding region of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Horai, S; Hayasaka, K

    1990-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the major noncoding region of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from 95 human placentas have been determined. These sequences include at least a 482-bp-long region encompassing most of the D-loop-forming region. Comparisons of these sequences with those previously determined have revealed remarkable features of nucleotide substitutions and insertion/deletion events. The nucleotide diversity among the sequences is estimated as 1.45%, which is three- to fourfold higher than the corresponding value estimated from restriction-enzyme analysis of whole mtDNA genome. A hypervariable region has also been defined. In this 14-bp region, 17 different sequences were detected. More than 97% of the base changes are transitions. A significantly nonrandom distribution of nucleotide substitutions and sequence length variations were also noted. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that diversity among the negroids is much larger than that among the caucasoids or the mongoloids. In fact, part of the negroids first diverged from other humans in the phylogenetic tree. A striking finding in the phylogenetic analysis is that the mongoloids can be separated into two distinct groups. Divergence of part of the mongoloids follows the earliest divergence of part of the negroids. The remainder of the mongoloids subsequently diverged together with the caucasoids. This observation confirmed our earlier study, which clearly demonstrated, by the restriction-enzyme analysis, existence of two distinct groups in the Japanese. Images Figure 3 PMID:2316527

  9. Analysis of sequence variation in Gnathostoma spinigerum mitochondrial DNA by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Ngarmamonpirat, Charinthon; Waikagul, Jitra; Petmitr, Songsak; Dekumyoy, Paron; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Anantapruti, Malinee T

    2005-03-01

    Morphological variations were observed in the advance third stage larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum collected from swamp eel (Fluta alba), the second intermediate host. Larvae with typical and three atypical types were chosen for partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analysis. A 450 bp polymerase chain reaction product of the COI gene was amplified from mitochondrial DNA. The variations were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The nucleotide variations of the COI gene in the four types of larvae indicated the presence of an intra-specific variation of mitochondrial DNA in the G. spinigerum population.

  10. Troglitazone, but not rosiglitazone, damages mitochondrial DNA and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rachek, Lyudmila I.; Yuzefovych, Larysa V.; LeDoux, Susan P.; Julie, Neil L.; Wilson, Glenn L.

    2009-11-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone (TRO) and rosiglitazone (ROSI), improve insulin resistance by acting as ligands for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma). TRO was withdrawn from the market because of reports of serious hepatotoxicity. A growing body of evidence suggests that TRO caused mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of apoptosis in human hepatocytes but its mechanisms of action remain unclear. We hypothesized that damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an initiating event involved in TRO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and hepatotoxicity. Primary human hepatocytes were exposed to TRO and ROSI. The results obtained revealed that TRO, but not ROSI at equimolar concentrations, caused a substantial increase in mtDNA damage and decreased ATP production and cellular viability. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetyl cystein (NAC), significantly diminished the TRO-induced cytotoxicity, suggesting involvement of ROS in TRO-induced hepatocyte cytotoxicity. The PPARgamma antagonist (GW9662) did not block the TRO-induced decrease in cell viability, indicating that the TRO-induced hepatotoxicity is PPARgamma-independent. Furthermore, TRO induced hepatocyte apoptosis, caspase-3 cleavage and cytochrome c release. Targeting of a DNA repair protein to mitochondria by protein transduction using a fusion protein containing the DNA repair enzyme Endonuclease III (EndoIII) from Escherichia coli, a mitochondrial translocation sequence (MTS) and the protein transduction domain (PTD) from HIV-1 TAT protein protected hepatocytes against TRO-induced toxicity. Overall, our results indicate that significant mtDNA damage caused by TRO is a prime initiator of the hepatoxicity caused by this drug.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA acquires immunogenicity on exposure to nitrosative stress in patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A; Rasheed, Zafar

    2014-10-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary skin disorder of unknown etiology. Many studies show the defective mitochondrial functionality in vitiligo patients, but the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains to be investigated. Recent evidences demonstrate that mitochondria possess their own nitric-oxide-synthase and can produce endogenous peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). This study was undertaken to investigate the role of ONOO(-)-modified-mitochondrial-DNA (ONOO(-)-mtDNA) in vitiligo autoimmunity. Our data revealed that ONOO(-)-induced modifications in mtDNA caused structural alterations. Specificity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) from vitiligo patients (n=26) and controls (n=25) were analysed towards ONOO(-)-mtDNA. Vitligo-IgG samples (Vt-IgG) show preferential binding to ONOO(-)-mtDNA in comparison with native mtDNA (p<0.01). Anti-ONOO(-)-mtDNA-IgG show cross-reactivity with isolated DNA from vitiligo patients. Furthermore, levels of anti-ONOO(-)-mtDNA-IgG, inducible-nitric-oxide-synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrotyrosine were higher among vitiligo patients whose disease durations (DD) were ⩾5 years as compared to patients with lower DD (DD<5 years). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the role of ONOO(-)-modified mtDNA in vitiligo patients. Our data provide an important insight into the immunological mechanisms occur in vitiligo. The ONOO(-)-mtDNA may be useful in elucidating the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis.

  12. Thymidine kinase 2 enzyme kinetics elucidate the mechanism of thymidine-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ren; Wang, Liya

    2014-10-07

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein, synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently translocated into the mitochondrial matrix, where it catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine (dT) and deoxycytidine (dC). The kinetics of dT phosphorylation exhibits negative cooperativity, but dC phosphorylation follows hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The two substrates compete with each other in that dT is a competitive inhibitor of dC phosphorylation, while dC acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of dT phosphorylation. In addition, TK2 is feedback inhibited by dTTP and dCTP. TK2 also phosphorylates a number of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapy and thus plays an important role in mitochondrial toxicities caused by nucleoside analogues. Deficiency in TK2 activity due to genetic alterations causes devastating mitochondrial diseases, which are characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion or multiple deletions in the affected tissues. Severe TK2 deficiency is associated with early-onset fatal mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, while less severe deficiencies result in late-onset phenotypes. In this review, studies of the enzyme kinetic behavior of TK2 enzyme variants are used to explain the mechanism of mtDNA depletion caused by TK2 mutations, thymidine overload due to thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, and mitochondrial toxicity caused by antiviral thymidine analogues.

  13. ER-associated mitochondrial division links the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA in yeast.

    PubMed

    Murley, Andrew; Lackner, Laura L; Osman, Christof; West, Matthew; Voeltz, Gia K; Walter, Peter; Nunnari, Jodi

    2013-05-14

    Mitochondrial division is important for mitochondrial distribution and function. Recent data have demonstrated that ER-mitochondria contacts mark mitochondrial division sites, but the molecular basis and functions of these contacts are not understood. Here we show that in yeast, the ER-mitochondria tethering complex, ERMES, and the highly conserved Miro GTPase, Gem1, are spatially and functionally linked to ER-associated mitochondrial division. Gem1 acts as a negative regulator of ER-mitochondria contacts, an activity required for the spatial resolution and distribution of newly generated mitochondrial tips following division. Previous data have demonstrated that ERMES localizes with a subset of actively replicating mitochondrial nucleoids. We show that mitochondrial division is spatially linked to nucleoids and that a majority of these nucleoids segregate prior to division, resulting in their distribution into newly generated tips in the mitochondrial network. Thus, we postulate that ER-associated division serves to link the distribution of mitochondria and mitochondrial nucleoids in cells. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00422.001.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA Aberrations and Pathophysiological Implications in Hematopoietic Diseases, Chronic Inflammatory Diseases, and Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Ran; Won, Stephanie Jane; Fabian, Claire; Kang, Min-Gu; Szardenings, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are important intracellular organelles that produce energy for cellular development, differentiation, and growth. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a 10- to 20-fold higher susceptibility to genetic mutations owing to the lack of introns and histone proteins. The mtDNA repair system is relatively inefficient, rendering it vulnerable to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during ATP synthesis within the mitochondria, which can then target the mtDNA. Under conditions of chronic inflammation and excess stress, increased ROS production can overwhelm the antioxidant system, resulting in mtDNA damage. This paper reviews recent literature describing the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and mitochondrial genome aberrations in aging hematopoietic stem cells, bone marrow failure syndromes, hematological malignancies, solid organ cancers, chronic inflammatory diseases, and other diseases caused by exposure to environmental hazards. PMID:25553274

  15. Melting transition of directly linked gold nanoparticle DNA assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Harris, N. C.; Kiang, C.-H.

    2005-05-01

    DNA melting and hybridization is a fundamental biological process as well as a crucial step in many modern biotechnology applications. DNA confined on surfaces exhibits a behavior different from that in free solutions. The system of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles exhibits unique phase transitions and represents a new class of complex fluids. Depending on the sequence of the DNA, particles can be linked to each other through direct complementary DNA sequences or via a ‘linker’ DNA, whose sequence is complementary to the sequence attached to the gold nanoparticles. We observed different melting transitions for these two distinct systems.

  16. XPD localizes in mitochondria and protects the mitochondrial genome from oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Fang, Hongbo; Chi, Zhenfen; Wu, Zan; Wei, Di; Mo, Dongliang; Niu, Kaifeng; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Hei, Tom K; Nie, Linghu; Zhao, Yongliang

    2015-06-23

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD/ERCC2) encodes an ATP-dependent helicase that plays essential roles in both transcription and nucleotide excision repair of nuclear DNA, however, whether or not XPD exerts similar functions in mitochondria remains elusive. In this study, we provide the first evidence that XPD is localized in the inner membrane of mitochondria, and cells under oxidative stress showed an enhanced recruitment of XPD into mitochondrial compartment. Furthermore, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and levels of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) common deletion were significantly elevated, whereas capacity for oxidative damage repair of mtDNA was markedly reduced in both XPD-suppressed human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and XPD-deficient human fibroblasts. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify interacting factor(s) with XPD and TUFM, a mitochondrial Tu translation elongation factor was detected to be physically interacted with XPD. Similar to the findings in XPD-deficient cells, mitochondrial common deletion and oxidative damage repair capacity in U2OS cells were found to be significantly altered after TUFM knock-down. Our findings clearly demonstrate that XPD plays crucial role(s) in protecting mitochondrial genome stability by facilitating an efficient repair of oxidative DNA damage in mitochondria.

  17. Altered Mitochondrial DNA Methylation Pattern in Alzheimer Disease-Related Pathology and in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Blanch, Marta; Mosquera, Jose Luis; Ansoleaga, Belén; Ferrer, Isidre; Barrachina, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked with the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles essential for cell viability and are characterized by the presence of the mitochondrial (mt)DNA. DNA methylation is a well-known epigenetic mechanism that regulates nuclear gene transcription. However, mtDNA methylation is not the subject of the same research attention. The present study shows the presence of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in CpG and non-CpG sites in the entorhinal cortex and substantia nigra of control human postmortem brains, using the 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencer. Moreover, increased mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels are found in the D-loop region of mtDNA in the entorhinal cortex in brain samples with Alzheimer disease-related pathology (stages I to II and stages III to IV of Braak and Braak; n = 8) with respect to control cases. Interestingly, this region shows a dynamic pattern in the content of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 mice along with Alzheimer disease pathology progression (3, 6, and 12 months of age). Finally, a loss of mitochondrial 5-methylcytosine levels in the D-loop region is found in the substantia nigra in Parkinson disease (n = 10) with respect to control cases. In summary, the present findings suggest mtDNA epigenetic modulation in human brain is vulnerable to neurodegenerative disease states.

  18. Uniparental Inheritance of Mitochondrial Genes in Yeast: Dependence on Input Bias of Mitochondrial DNA and Preliminary Investigations of the Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Birky, C. William; Demko, Catherine A.; Perlman, Philip S.; Strausberg, Robert

    1978-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previous studies on the inheritance of mitochondrial genes controlling antibiotic resistance have shown that some crosses produce a substantial number of uniparental zygotes , which transmit to their diploid progeny mitochondrial alleles from only one parent. In this paper, we show that uniparental zygotes are formed especially when one parent (majority parent) contributes substantially more mitochondrial DNA molecules to the zygote than does the other (minority) parent. Cellular contents of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are increased in these experiments by treatment with cycloheximide, alpha-factor, or the uvsρ5 nuclear mutation. In such a biased cross, some zygotes are uniparental for mitochondrial alleles from the majority parent, and the frequency of such zygotes increases with increasing bias. In two- and three-factor crosses, the cap1, ery1, and oli1 loci behave coordinately, rather than independently; minority markers tend to be transmitted or lost as a unit, suggesting that the uniparental mechanism acts on entire mtDNA molecules rather than on individual loci. This rules out the possibility that uniparental inheritance can be explained by the conversion of minority markers to the majority alleles during recombination. Exceptions to the coordinate behavior of different loci can be explained by marker rescue via recombination. Uniparental inheritance is largely independent of the position of buds on the zygote. We conclude that it is due to the failure of minority markers to replicate in some zygotes, possibly involving the rapid enzymatic destruction of such markers. We have considered two general classes of mechanisms: (1) random selection of molecules for replication, as for example by competition for replicating sites on a membrane; and (2) differential marking of mtDNA molecules in the two parents, possibly by modification enzymes, followed by a mechanism that "counts" molecules and replicates only the majority type. These

  19. A connection between the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, autophagy, and cerebral amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Soskić, Vukić; Klemm, Martina; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Schwall, Gerhard P; Poznanović, Slobodan; Stegmann, Werner; Groebe, Karlfried; Zengerling, Helmut; Schoepf, Rainer; Burnet, Michael; Schrattenholz, André

    2008-06-01

    In a drug reprofiling attempt, we explored novel neuroprotective properties of 4-azasteroids by synthesizing chemical affinity tags capturing adenine nucleotide translocator-1, as a potential target. Dutasteride inhibits the mitochondrial transition pore and induces an increase of autophagosomal structures in human cell lines. In vivo, a surprising reduction of the beta-amyloid plaque load in a model for cerebral amyloidosis appears to connect release of neurotoxic peptides, mitochondrial apoptosis and autophagy.

  20. Dose-related inversion of cinnarizine and flunarizine effects on mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Elimadi, A; Bouillot, L; Sapena, R; Tillement, J P; Morin, D

    1998-05-01

    We investigated the effects of cinnarizine and flunarizine on mitochondrial permeability transition, ATP synthesis, membrane potential and NAD(P)H oxidation. Both drugs were effective in inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition induced either by Ca2+ alone or in the presence of tert-butylhydroperoxide. This protective effect occurred at low concentrations (< 50 microM) of these drugs and was accompanied by the inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidation and the restoration of the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased by a high concentration of Ca2+ (25 microM). However, at higher concentrations (> 50 microM) of cinnarizine and flunarizine and in the absence of both tert-butylhydroperoxide and Ca2+, their effects on the mitochondria were reversed as follows: mitochondrial permeability transition was generated, mitochondrial NAD(P)H was oxidized and membrane potential collapsed. These deleterious effects were not antagonized by cyclosporine A, the most potent inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition, but by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol, a known antioxidant agent. This mitochondrial effect was neither accompanied by an increase in malondialdehyde production nor by an increase in H2O2 generation, which attested that the effect of both drugs was not due to an increase in reactive oxygen species production. The dual effects of both cinnarizine and flunarizine on mitochondrial functions is discussed with regard to both the protective effect afforded by these drugs against ischemia-reperfusion injury and their side effect observed in some therapeutic situations where an overdosage seems likely.

  1. Identification of two homologous mitochondrial DNA sequences, which bind strongly and specifically to a mitochondrial protein of Paracentrotus lividus.

    PubMed Central

    Roberti, M; Mustich, A; Gadaleta, M N; Cantatore, P

    1991-01-01

    Using a combination of band shift and DNasel protection experiments, two Paracentrotus lividus mitochondrial sequences, able to bind tightly and selectively to a mitochondrial protein from sea urchin embryos, have been found. The two sequences, which compete with each other for binding to the protein, are located in two genome regions which are thought to contain regulatory signals for mitochondrial replication and transcription. A computer analysis suggests that the sequence TTTTRTANNTCYYATCAYA, common to the two binding regions, is the minimal recognition signal for the binding to the protein. We discuss the hypothesis that the protein binding capacity of these two sequences is involved in the control of sea urchin mtDNA replication during developmental stages. Images PMID:1956785

  2. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Mitochondrial Accrual of the 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase DNA Repair Enzyme in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Raquel R.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Fu, Ping; Welty-Wolf, Karen; Carraway, Martha Sue; MacGarvey, Nancy Chou; Withers, Crystal M.; Sweeney, Timothy E.; Piantadosi, Claude A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by the production of reactive oxygen species during inflammatory states, such as sepsis, is repaired by poorly understood mechanisms. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that the DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), contributes to mtDNA repair in sepsis. Methods: Using a well-characterized mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we analyzed molecular markers for mitochondrial biogenesis and OGG1 translocation into liver mitochondria as well as OGG1 mRNA expression at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after infection. The effects of OGG1 RNA silencing on mtDNA content were determined in control, tumor necrosis factor-α, and peptidoglycan-exposed rat hepatoma cells. Based on in situ analysis of the OGG1 promoter region, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were performed for nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and NRF-2α GA-binding protein (GABP) binding to the promoter of OGG1. Measurements and Main Results: Mice infected with 107 cfu S. aureus intraperitoneally demonstrated hepatic oxidative mtDNA damage and significantly lower hepatic mtDNA content as well as increased mitochondrial OGG1 protein and enzyme activity compared with control mice. The infection also caused increases in hepatic OGG1 transcript levels and NRF-1 and NRF-2α transcript and protein levels. A bioinformatics analysis of the Ogg1 gene locus identified several promoter sites containing NRF-1 and NRF-2α DNA binding motifs, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed in situ binding of both transcription factors to the Ogg1 promoter within 24 hours of infection. Conclusions: These studies identify OGG1 as an early mitochondrial response protein during sepsis under regulation by the NRF-1 and NRF-2α transcription factors that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:20732986

  4. Advances in the understanding of mitochondrial DNA as a pathogenic factor in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boyapati, Ray K.; Tamborska, Arina; Dorward, David A.; Ho, Gwo-Tzer

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has many similarities with bacterial DNA because of their shared common ancestry. Increasing evidence demonstrates mtDNA to be a potent danger signal that is recognised by the innate immune system and can directly modulate the inflammatory response. In humans, elevated circulating mtDNA is found in conditions with significant tissue injury such as trauma and sepsis and increasingly in chronic organ-specific and systemic illnesses such as steatohepatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we examine our current understanding of mtDNA-mediated inflammation and how the mechanisms regulating mitochondrial homeostasis and mtDNA release represent exciting and previously under-recognised important factors in many human inflammatory diseases, offering many new translational opportunities. PMID:28299196

  5. Differential Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Preservation in Post-Mortem Teeth with Implications for Forensic and Ancient DNA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B.; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Futhermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  6. Differential nuclear and mitochondrial DNA preservation in post-mortem teeth with implications for forensic and ancient DNA studies.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Denice; Rohrlach, Adam B; Kaidonis, John; Townsend, Grant; Austin, Jeremy J

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in genetic analysis of skeletal remains have been made over the last decade, primarily due to improvements in post-DNA-extraction techniques. Despite this, a key challenge for DNA analysis of skeletal remains is the limited yield of DNA recovered from these poorly preserved samples. Enhanced DNA recovery by improved sampling and extraction techniques would allow further advancements. However, little is known about the post-mortem kinetics of DNA degradation and whether the rate of degradation varies between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA or across different skeletal tissues. This knowledge, along with information regarding ante-mortem DNA distribution within skeletal elements, would inform sampling protocols facilitating development of improved extraction processes. Here we present a combined genetic and histological examination of DNA content and rates of DNA degradation in the different tooth tissues of 150 human molars over short-medium post-mortem intervals. DNA was extracted from coronal dentine, root dentine, cementum and pulp of 114 teeth via a silica column method and the remaining 36 teeth were examined histologically. Real time quantification assays based on two nuclear DNA fragments (67 bp and 156 bp) and one mitochondrial DNA fragment (77 bp) showed nuclear and mitochondrial DNA degraded exponentially, but at different rates, depending on post-mortem interval and soil temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we identified differential survival of nuclear and mtDNA in different tooth tissues. Furthermore histological examination showed pulp and dentine were rapidly affected by loss of structural integrity, and pulp was completely destroyed in a relatively short time period. Conversely, cementum showed little structural change over the same time period. Finally, we confirm that targeted sampling of cementum from teeth buried for up to 16 months can provide a reliable source of nuclear DNA for STR-based genotyping using standard

  7. Mitochondrial inheritance and the detection of non-parental mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in crosses of Agaricus bisporus homokaryons.

    PubMed

    de la Bastide, Paul Y; Horgen, Paul A

    2003-04-01

    This study evaluates mtDNA transmission in Agaricus bisporus, as well as the occurrence of non-parental haplotypes in heterokaryons produced by controlled crosses. Sixteen crosses were performed with blended liquid cultures, using different combinations of 13 homokaryotic strains. For each cross, different mtDNA haplotypes were present in each homokaryon. Heterokaryons generated from these crosses were subject to genetic analysis with RFLP markers to identify (i). karyotic status, (ii). mtDNA haplotype, and (iii). the occurrence of non-parental mtDNA haplotypes. These analyses generally supported the occurrence of uniparental mitochondrial (mt) inheritance in A. bisporus, with one mtDNA haplotype usually favoured in the new heterokaryon. The preponderance of one mtDNA haplotype in a new heterokaryon did not necessarily show a correlation with a greater mycelial growth rate for the parent homokaryon possessing that haplotype. Mixed mtDNA haplotypes and non-parental haplotypes were also identified in the heterokaryons from some crosses. Evidence for the occurrence of two mtDNA haplotypes in one heterokaryotic mycelium was observed in 8 of 16 crosses, suggesting the maintenance of true heteroplasmons after three successive subculturing steps. Non-parental mtDNA haplotypes were seen in heterokaryons produced from 7 of 16 crosses. The mating protocol described can be utilized to generate novel mtDNA haplotypes for strain improvement and the development of strain-specific markers. Mechanisms of mt selection and inheritance are discussed.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA toxicity in forebrain neurons causes apoptosis, neurodegeneration, and impaired behavior.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Moldestad, Olve; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Nesse, Gaute; Storm, Johan F; Mansuy, Isabelle M; Bergersen, Linda H; Klungland, Arne

    2010-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying changes in neurodegenerative diseases is often associated with apoptosis and a progressive loss of neurons, and damage to the mitochondrial genome is proposed to be involved in such pathologies. In the present study we designed a mouse model that allows us to specifically induce mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain neurons of adult mice. This is achieved by CaMKIIalpha-regulated inducible expression of a mutated version of the mitochondrial UNG DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1). This enzyme is capable of removing thymine from the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate that a continual generation of apyrimidinic sites causes apoptosis and neuronal death. These defects are associated with behavioral alterations characterized by increased locomotor activity, impaired cognitive abilities, and lack of anxietylike responses. In summary, whereas mitochondrial base substitution and deletions previously have been shown to correlate with premature and natural aging, respectively, we show that a high level of apyrimidinic sites lead to mitochondrial DNA cytotoxicity, which causes apoptosis, followed by neurodegeneration.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA replication proceeds via a ‘bootlace’ mechanism involving the incorporation of processed transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Aurelio; Kazak, Lawrence; Wood, Stuart R.; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Jacobs, Howard T.; Holt, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation that long tracts of RNA are associated with replicating molecules of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that the mitochondrial genome of mammals is copied by an unorthodox mechanism. Here we show that these RNA-containing species are present in living cells and tissue, based on interstrand cross-linking. Using DNA synthesis in organello, we demonstrate that isolated mitochondria incorporate radiolabeled RNA precursors, as well as DNA precursors, into replicating DNA molecules. RNA-containing replication intermediates are chased into mature mtDNA, to which they are thus in precursor–product relationship. While a DNA chain terminator rapidly blocks the labeling of mitochondrial replication intermediates, an RNA chain terminator does not. Furthermore, processed L-strand transcripts can be recovered from gel-extracted mtDNA replication intermediates. Therefore, instead of concurrent DNA and RNA synthesis, respectively, on the leading and lagging strands, preformed processed RNA is incorporated as a provisional lagging strand during mtDNA replication. These findings indicate that RITOLS is a physiological mechanism of mtDNA replication, and that it involves a ‘bootlace' mechanism, in which processed transcripts are successively hybridized to the lagging-strand template, as the replication fork advances. PMID:23595151

  10. Reoxygenation-induced mitochondrial damage is caused by the Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Hakoda, S; Takeyama, N

    1998-07-01

    Anoxia/reoxygenation injury of isolated rat liver mitochondria was investigated. During anoxia of up to 60 min, the membrane potential was largely preserved and mitochondrial swelling was not observed. Reoxygenation of anoxic mitochondria rapidly caused swelling, cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux, [14C]sucrose trapping, and loss of the membrane potential along with increased generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Although pretreatment with catalase and superoxide dismutase completely abolished reoxygenation-induced generation of ROI, mitochondrial damage was not prevented, as indicated by swelling, loss of the membrane potential, a decrease of the ATP content, and cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux. However, addition of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A or addition of ADP completely prevented the mitochondrial damage induced by reoxygenation. The same protective effect was noted when Ca2+ cycling was prevented, either by chelating Ca2+ with EGTA or by inhibiting Ca2+ reuptake with ruthenium red. These findings indicate that mitochondrial anoxia/reoxygenation injury is caused by the cyclosporin A-sensitive and Ca2+-dependent membrane permeability transition. In contrast, reoxygenation injury does not appear to be triggered by the enhanced production of ROI.

  11. Base composition at mtDNA boundaries suggests a DNA triple helix model for human mitochondrial DNA large-scale rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Christophe; Letellier, Thierry; Copeland, William C; Lestienne, Patrick

    2002-06-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to account for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability based on the presence of short homologous sequences (direct repeats, DR) at the potential boundaries of mtDNA rearrangements. Among them, slippage-mispairing of the replication complex during the asymmetric replication cycle of the mammalian mitochondrial DNA has been proposed to account for the preferential localization of deletions. This mechanism involves a transfer of the replication complex from the first neo-synthesized heavy (H) strand of the DR1, to the DR2, thus bypassing the intervening sequence and producing a deleted molecule. Nevertheless, the nature of the bonds between the DNA strands remains unknown as the forward sequence of DR2, beyond the replication complex, stays double-stranded. Here, we have analyzed the base composition of the DR at the boundaries of mtDNA deletions and duplications and found a skewed pyrimidine content of about 75% in the light-strand DNA template. This suggests the possible building of a DNA triple helix between the G-rich neo-synthesized DR1 and the base-paired homologous G.C-rich DR2. In vitro experiments with the purified human DNA polymerase gamma subunits enabled us to show that the third DNA strand may be used as a primer for DNA replication, using a template with the direct repeat forming a hairpin, with which the primer could initiate DNA replication. These data suggest a novel molecular basis for mitochondrial DNA rearrangements through the distributive nature of the DNA polymerase gamma, at the level of the direct repeats. A general model accounting for large-scale mitochondrial DNA deletion and duplication is proposed. These experiments extend to a DNA polymerase from an eucaryote source the use of a DNA triple helix strand as a primer, like other DNA polymerases from phage and bacterial origins.

  12. Effects of Wolbachia on mitochondrial DNA variation in populations of Athetis lepigone (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wolbachia are endosymbiotic bacteria that infect arthropods and incompatibility among strains can affect gene flow within host insect populations, that can result in significant host mitochondrial DNA (MtD) variation. The effects of Wolbachia infection on mtDNA variation was studied in Athetis lepi...

  13. Introducing Human Population Biology through an Easy Laboratory Exercise on Mitochondrial DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardinas, Antonio F.; Dopico, Eduardo; Roca, Agustin; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Lopez, Belen

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an easy and cheap laboratory exercise for students to discover their own mitochondrial haplogroup. Students use buccal swabs to obtain mucosa cells as noninvasive tissue samples, extract DNA, and with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis they can obtain DNA fragments of…

  14. Replication of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA entails transient ribonucleotide incorporation throughout the lagging strand

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Takehiro; Reyes, Aurelio; Cluett, Tricia J; Yang, Ming-Yao; Bowmaker, Mark; Jacobs, Howard T; Holt, Ian J

    2006-01-01

    Using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, we show that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication of birds and mammals frequently entails ribonucleotide incorporation throughout the lagging strand (RITOLS). Based on a combination of two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoretic analysis and mapping of 5′ ends of DNA, initiation of RITOLS replication occurs in the major non-coding region of vertebrate mtDNA and is effectively unidirectional. In some cases, conversion of nascent RNA strands to DNA starts at defined loci, the most prominent of which maps, in mammalian mtDNA, in the vicinity of the site known as the light-strand origin. PMID:17066082

  15. Comprehensive scanning of somatic mitochondrial DNA alterations in acute leukemia developing from myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bjoern; Anglmayer, Roswitha; Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-03-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis resulting in refractory cytopenias. Transformation resulting in acute myeloblastic leukemia is the final stage in the multistep process of MDS evolution. Functional relevant mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been related to sideroblastic anemia and MDS. To investigate the role of mtDNA in malignant transformation to acute leukemia, we used high-resolution techniques such as single-strand conformational polymorphism and fluorescence sequencing for investigation of the whole mitochondrial genome from blood cells of 10 patients with MDS. Functionally relevant point mutations in mitochondrial RNA and polypeptide-encoding genes were detected in 50% of patients with MDS. Their increasing mutation load connects MDS and the developing acute myeloid leukemias. Several point mutations of mtDNA, including secondary point mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, occur in one bone marrow and may synergically affect bone marrow stem cells by an apoptotic pathway.

  16. Human Mitochondrial DNA-Protein Complexes Attach to a Cholesterol-Rich Membrane Structure

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Joachim M.; Cansiz-Arda, Şirin; Lõhmus, Madis; Engberg, Oskar; Reyes, Aurelio; van Rennes, Helga; Sanz, Alberto; Holt, Ian J.; Cooper, Helen M.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    The helicase Twinkle is indispensable for mtDNA replication in nucleoids. Previously, we showed that Twinkle is tightly membrane-associated even in the absence of mtDNA, which suggests that Twinkle is part of a membrane-attached replication platform. Here we show that this platform is a cholesterol-rich membrane structure. We fractionated mitochondrial membrane preparations on flotation gradients and show that membrane-associated nucleoids accumulate at the top of the gradient. This fraction was shown to be highly enriched in cholesterol, a lipid that is otherwise low abundant in mitochondria. In contrast, more common mitochondrial lipids, and abundant inner-membrane associated proteins concentrated in the bottom-half of these gradients. Gene silencing of ATAD3, a protein with proposed functions related to nucleoid and mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis, modified the distribution of cholesterol and nucleoids in the gradient in an identical fashion. Both cholesterol and ATAD3 were previously shown to be enriched in ER-mitochondrial junctions, and we detect nucleoid components in biochemical isolates of these structures. Our data suggest an uncommon membrane composition that accommodates platforms for replicating mtDNA, and reconcile apparently disparate functions of ATAD3. We suggest that mtDNA replication platforms are organized in connection with ER-mitochondrial junctions, facilitated by a specialized membrane architecture involving mitochondrial cholesterol. PMID:26478270

  17. The Yeast Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor Complex Catalyzes Efficient Priming of DNA Synthesis on Single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Aparna; Nandakumar, Divya; Deshpande, Aishwarya P; Lucas, Thomas P; R-Bhojappa, Ramanagouda; Tang, Guo-Qing; Raney, Kevin; Yin, Y Whitney; Patel, Smita S

    2016-08-05

    Primases use single-stranded (ss) DNAs as templates to synthesize short oligoribonucleotide primers that initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis or reprime DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse, but the origin of this activity in the mitochondria remains unclear. Herein, we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial RNA polymerase (Rpo41) and its transcription factor (Mtf1) is an efficient primase that initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA coated with the yeast mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Both Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 can synthesize short and long RNAs on ssDNA template and prime DNA synthesis by the yeast mitochondrial DNA polymerase Mip1. However, the ssDNA-binding protein Rim1 severely inhibits the RNA synthesis activity of Rpo41, but not the Rpo41-Mtf1 complex, which continues to prime DNA synthesis efficiently in the presence of Rim1. We show that RNAs as short as 10-12 nt serve as primers for DNA synthesis. Characterization of the RNA-DNA products shows that Rpo41 and Rpo41-Mtf1 have slightly different priming specificity. However, both prefer to initiate with ATP from short priming sequences such as 3'-TCC, TTC, and TTT, and the consensus sequence is 3'-Pu(Py)2-3 Based on our studies, we propose that Rpo41-Mtf1 is an attractive candidate for serving as the primase to initiate lagging strand DNA synthesis during normal replication and/or to restart stalled replication from downstream ssDNA.

  18. Water percolation governs polymorphic transitions and conductivity of DNA.

    PubMed

    Brovchenko, Ivan; Krukau, Aliaksei; Oleinikova, Alla; Mazur, Alexey K

    2006-09-29

    We report on the first computer simulation studies of the percolation transition of water at the surface of the DNA double helix. With increased hydration, the ensemble of small clusters merges into a spanning water network via a quasi-two-dimensional percolation transition. This transition occurs strikingly close to the hydration level where the B form of DNA becomes stable in experiment. Formation of spanning water networks results in sigmoidlike acceleration of long-range ion transport in good agreement with experiment.

  19. Nucleotide pools dictate the identity and frequency of ribonucleotide incorporation in mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoberg, Emily; Szilagyi, Zsolt; Taylor, Robert W.; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Falkenberg, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the presence of ribonucleotides in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and in the present study we use a genome-wide approach to precisely map the location of these. We find that ribonucleotides are distributed evenly between the heavy- and light-strand of mtDNA. The relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides reflect that DNA polymerase γ discriminates the four ribonucleotides differentially during DNA synthesis. The observed pattern is also dependent on the mitochondrial deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pools and disease-causing mutations that change these pools alter both the absolute and relative levels of incorporated ribonucleotides. Our analyses strongly suggest that DNA polymerase γ-dependent incorporation is the main source of ribonucleotides in mtDNA and argues against the existence of a mitochondrial ribonucleotide excision repair pathway in human cells. Furthermore, we clearly demonstrate that when dNTP pools are limiting, ribonucleotides serve as a source of building blocks to maintain DNA replication. Increased levels of embedded ribonucleotides in patient cells with disturbed nucleotide pools may contribute to a pathogenic mechanism that affects mtDNA stability and impair new rounds of mtDNA replication. PMID:28207748

  20. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Neil Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-16

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  1. Microsatellite DNA and mitochondrial DNA variation in remnant and translocated sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Shawn E.; Jameson, Ronald J.; Bodkin, James L.; Staedler, Michelle; Bentzen, Paul

    2002-01-01

    All existing sea otter (Enhydra lutris) populations have suffered at least 1, and in some cases 2, population bottlenecks. The 1st occurred during the 18th and 19th centuries as a result of commercial hunting that eliminated sea otters from much their native range and reduced surviving populations to small remnants. The 2nd bottleneck occurred when small numbers of otters were reintroduced, via translocation, to areas where the species had been eliminated. We examined genetic variation at 7 microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region in 3 remnant populations, Amchitka Island (Aleutian Islands, Alaska), central coastal California, and Prince William Sound (Alaska), and in 2 reintroduced populations, southeast Alaska and Washington, that were founded with transplants from Amchitka, and in the case of southeast Alaska, individuals from Prince William Sound as well. We found no evidence of reduced genetic diversity in translocated populations. Average expected microsatellite heterozygosities (HE) were similar in all populations (range, 0.40–0.47), and mtDNA haplotype diversities were higher in reintroduced populations (0.51 for both Washington and southeast Alaska) than in remnant populations (X̄ = 0.35; range, 0.18–0.45). The levels of genetic diversity we observed within sea otter populations were relatively low when compared with other mammals and are thought to be the result of fur trade exploitation.

  2. Inorganic polyphosphate is a potent activator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Seidlmayer, Lea K; Gomez-Garcia, Maria R; Blatter, Lothar A; Pavlov, Evgeny; Dedkova, Elena N

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction caused by excessive Ca2+ accumulation is a major contributor to cardiac cell and tissue damage during myocardial infarction and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). At the molecular level, mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by Ca2+-dependent opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) in the inner mitochondrial membrane, which leads to the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), disruption of adenosine triphosphate production, and ultimately cell death. Although the role of Ca2+ for induction of mPTP opening is established, the exact molecular mechanism of this process is not understood. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the adverse effect of mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation is mediated by its interaction with inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a polymer of orthophosphates linked by phosphoanhydride bonds. We found that cardiac mitochondria contained significant amounts (280±60 pmol/mg of protein) of short-chain polyP with an average length of 25 orthophosphates. To test the role of polyP for mPTP activity, we investigated kinetics of Ca2+ uptake and release, ΔΨm and Ca2+-induced mPTP opening in polyP-depleted mitochondria. polyP depletion was achieved by mitochondria-targeted expression of a polyP-hydrolyzing enzyme. Depletion of polyP in mitochondria of rabbit ventricular myocytes led to significant inhibition of mPTP opening without affecting mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration by itself. This effect was observed when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was stimulated by increasing cytosolic [Ca2+] in permeabilized myocytes mimicking mitochondrial Ca2+ overload observed during IRI. Our findings suggest that inorganic polyP is a previously unrecognized major activator of mPTP. We propose that the adverse effect of polyphosphate might be caused by its ability to form stable complexes with Ca2+ and directly contribute to inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

  3. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  4. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and short-term neurological outcomes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Biyang; Zhang, Zhizhong; Liu, Keting; Fan, Wenping; Zhang, Yumeng; Xie, Xia; Dai, Minhui; Cao, Liping; Bai, Wen; Du, Juan; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Shuyu; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Wusheng; Ma, Minmin; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Xinfeng; Xu, Gelin

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability worldwide. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a potential contributor for the sex differences of ischemic stroke heritability. Although mtDNA haplogroups were associated with stroke onset, their impacts on stroke outcomes remain unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the impacts of mtDNA haplogroups on short-term outcomes of neurological functions in patients with ischemic stroke. A total of 303 patients were included, and their clinical data and mtDNA sequences were analyzed. Based on the changes between baseline and 14-day follow-up stroke severity, our results showed that haplogroup N9 was an independent protective factor against neurological worsening in acute ischemic stroke patients. These findings supported that mtDNA variants play a role in post-stroke neurological recovery, thus providing evidences for future pharmacological intervention in mitochondrial function. PMID:25993529

  5. Aspects of Ancient Mitochondrial DNA Analysis in Different Populations for Understanding Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nesheva, DV

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of modern humans is a long and difficult process which started from their first appearance and continues to the present day. The study of the genetic origin of populations can help to determine population kinship and to better understand the gradual changes of the gene pool in space and time. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a proper tool for the determination of the origin of populations due to its high evolutionary importance. Ancient mitochondrial DNA retrieved from museum specimens, archaeological finds and fossil remains can provide direct evidence for population origins and migration processes. Despite the problems with contaminations and authenticity of ancient mitochondrial DNA, there is a developed set of criteria and platforms for obtaining authentic ancient DNA. During the last two decades, the application of different methods and techniques for analysis of ancient mitochondrial DNA gave promising results. Still, the literature is relatively poor with information for the origin of human populations. Using comprehensive phylogeographic and population analyses we can observe the development and formation of the contemporary populations. The aim of this study was to shed light on human migratory processes and the formation of populations based on available ancient mtDNA data. PMID:25741209

  6. Visualization of mitochondrial DNA replication in individual cells by EdU signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L; Lentz, Stephen I

    2010-11-15

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential component of regulating mitochondria numbers in healthy cells. One approach for monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to label newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells in order to study mtDNA biogenesis. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) with a tyramide signal amplification (TSA) protocol to visualize mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. EdU is superior to other thymidine analogs, such as 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), because the initial click reaction to label EdU does not require the harsh acid treatments or enzyme digests that are required for exposing the BrdU epitope. The milder labeling of EdU allows for direct comparison of its incorporation with other cellular markers. The ability to visualize and quantify mtDNA biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the mechanisms used to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and would provide insight into the pathogenesis associated with drug toxicity, aging, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Our technique is applicable to sensory neurons as well as other cell types. The use of this technique to measure mtDNA biogenesis has significant implications in furthering the understanding of both normal cellular physiology as well as impaired disease states.

  7. Molecular diversification of Trichuris spp. from Sigmodontinae (Cricetidae) rodents from Argentina based on mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Robles, María Del Rosario; Panei, Carlos Javier; Cutillas, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    A molecular phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for the genus Trichuris based on sequence data from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1) and cytochrome b (cob). The taxa consisted of nine populations of whipworm from five species of Sigmodontinae rodents from Argentina. Bayesian Inference, Maximum Parsimony, and Maximum Likelihood methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data and the combined mitochondrial and nuclear dataset. Phylogenetic results based on cox1 and cob mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) revealed three clades strongly resolved corresponding to three different species (Trichuris navonae, Trichuris bainae, and Trichuris pardinasi) showing phylogeographic variation, but relationships among Trichuris species were poorly resolved. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on concatenated sequences had greater phylogenetic resolution for delimiting species and populations intra-specific of Trichuris than those based on partitioned genes. Thus, populations of T. bainae and T. pardinasi could be affected by geographical factors and co-divergence parasite-host.

  8. Sulfite disrupts brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis and induces mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening via thiol group modification.

    PubMed

    Grings, Mateus; Moura, Alana P; Amaral, Alexandre U; Parmeggiani, Belisa; Gasparotto, Juciano; Moreira, José C F; Gelain, Daniel P; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir; Leipnitz, Guilhian

    2014-09-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is biochemically characterized by the accumulation of sulfite, thiosulfate and S-sulfocysteine in tissues and biological fluids of the affected patients. The main clinical symptoms include severe neurological dysfunction and brain abnormalities, whose pathophysiology is still unknown. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of sulfite and thiosulfate on mitochondrial homeostasis in rat brain mitochondria. It was verified that sulfite per se, but not thiosulfate, decreased state 3, CCCP-stimulated state and respiratory control ratio in mitochondria respiring with glutamate plus malate. In line with this, we found that sulfite inhibited the activities of glutamate and malate (MDH) dehydrogenases. In addition, sulfite decreased the activity of a commercial solution of MDH, that was prevented by antioxidants and dithiothreitol. Sulfite also induced mitochondrial swelling and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) retention capacity, NAD(P)H pool and cytochrome c immunocontent when Ca(2+) was present in the medium. These alterations were prevented by ruthenium red, cyclosporine A (CsA) and ADP, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in these effects. We further observed that N-ethylmaleimide prevented the sulfite-elicited swelling and that sulfite decreased free thiol group content in brain mitochondria. These findings indicate that sulfite acts directly on MPT pore containing thiol groups. Finally, we verified that sulfite reduced cell viability in cerebral cortex slices and that this effect was prevented by CsA. Therefore, it may be presumed that disturbance of mitochondrial energy homeostasis and MPT induced by sulfite could be involved in the neuronal damage characteristic of SO deficiency.

  9. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore: a promising target for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Md Zeeshan; Tabassum, Heena; Parvez, Suhel

    2017-01-01

    Among the neurodegenerative diseases (ND), Parkinson's disease affects 6.3 million people worldwide characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) is a non-selective voltage-dependent mitochondrial channel whose opening modifies the permeability properties of the mitochondrial inner membrane. It is recognized as a potent pharmacological target for diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive cell death including ND such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Imbalance in Ca(2+) concentration, change in mitochondrial membrane potential, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), or mutation in mitochondrial genome has been implicated in the pathophysiology of the opening of the mtPTP. Different proteins are released by permeability transition including cytochrome c which is responsible for apoptosis. This review aims to discuss the importance of PTP in the pathophysiology of PD and puts together different positive as well as negative aspects of drugs such as pramipexole, ropinirole, minocyclin, rasagilin, and safinamide which act as a blocker or modifier for mtPTP. Some of them may be detrimental in their neuroprotective nature.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Possible role of mitochondrial permeability transition pore in the pathogenesis of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; Tapia, Cheril; Pérez, María José

    2017-02-19

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating neurological disorder that affects the striatum and cortex of patients. HD patients develop progressive motor dysfunction and psychiatric disturbances with gradual dementia. HD is caused by a pathological expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene that codifies for a protein called huntingtin (Htt), which principal function is not completely understood. Accumulative evidence shows that this pathological expansion modifies Htt function affecting different neuronal targets, including mitochondrial function which is an important factor that contributes to HD. Interestingly, several groups have shown mitochondrial disturbances including calcium handling defects, depolarization, decrease of mitochondrial transport, ATP reduction, and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cellular and murine HD models. Systematic analysis of this evidence indicates that a mitochondrial structure, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), could be responsible for these changes that affect mitochondria. The mPTP plays an important role in apoptosis and neurodegeneration. It has also been reported to have some physiological functions in heart development and synaptic communication. In HD, the presence of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) activates this mechanism producing a significant compromise of mitochondrial metabolism and bioenergetics. Considering these findings this review explores the evidence that suggests the important role of mPTP in the mitochondrial impairment induced by mHtt, which leads to calcium derangement and contributes to neuronal dysfunction in HD.

  12. Yeast mitochondrial HMG proteins: DNA-binding properties of the most evolutionarily divergent component of mitochondrial nucleoids

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Marini, Victoria; Willcox, Smaranda; Nosek, Jozef; Griffith, Jack D.; Krejci, Lumir; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2015-01-01

    Yeast mtDNA is compacted into nucleoprotein structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The principal mediators of nucleoid formation are mitochondrial high-mobility group (HMG)-box containing (mtHMG) proteins. Although these proteins are some of the fastest evolving components of mt-nucleoids, it is not known whether the divergence of mtHMG proteins on the level of their amino acid sequences is accompanied by diversification of their biochemical properties. In the present study we performed a comparative biochemical analysis of yeast mtHMG proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScAbf2p), Yarrowia lipolytica (YlMhb1p) and Candida parapsilosis (CpGcf1p). We found that all three proteins exhibit relatively weak binding to intact dsDNA. In fact, ScAbf2p and YlMhb1p bind quantitatively to this substrate only at very high protein to DNA ratios and CpGcf1p shows only negligible binding to dsDNA. In contrast, the proteins exhibit much higher preference for recombination intermediates such as Holliday junctions (HJ) and replication forks (RF). Therefore, we hypothesize that the roles of the yeast mtHMG proteins in maintenance and compaction of mtDNA in vivo are in large part mediated by their binding to recombination/replication intermediates. We also speculate that the distinct biochemical properties of CpGcf1p may represent one of the prerequisites for frequent evolutionary tinkering with the form of the mitochondrial genome in the CTG-clade of hemiascomycetous yeast species. PMID:26647378

  13. Complete sequence and characterization of mitochondrial DNA genome of Channa asiatica (Perciformes: Channidae).

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Channa asiatica mitochondrial (mtDNA) genome was determined in this study. The genome sequence (GenBank accession number KJ930190) was 16,550 base pairs in length, and the gene content and organization on the mitochondrial genome were similar to the other Channa fishes. The overall base composition of C. asiatica mitogenome is 29.4% A, 26.3% T, 15.3% G, 29.0% C, with a high A + T content of 55.7%. The mitochondrial sequence could provide useful genetic information for studying the molecular identification, population genetics, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics.

  14. A ketogenic diet accelerates neurodegeneration in mice with induced mitochondrial DNA toxicity in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi; Regnell, Christine E; Kleppa, Liv; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Gjedde, Albert; Klungland, Arne; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome maintenance plays a central role in preserving brain health. We previously demonstrated accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and severe neurodegeneration in transgenic mice inducibly expressing a mutated mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme (mutUNG1) selectively in forebrain neurons. Here, we examine whether severe neurodegeneration in mutUNG1-expressing mice could be rescued by feeding the mice a ketogenic diet, which is known to have beneficial effects in several neurological disorders. The diet increased the levels of superoxide dismutase 2, and mitochondrial mass, enzymes, and regulators such as SIRT1 and FIS1, and appeared to downregulate N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits NR2A/B and upregulate γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunits α1. However, unexpectedly, the ketogenic diet aggravated neurodegeneration and mitochondrial deterioration. Electron microscopy showed structurally impaired mitochondria accumulating in neuronal perikarya. We propose that aggravation is caused by increased mitochondrial biogenesis of generally dysfunctional mitochondria. This study thereby questions the dogma that a ketogenic diet is unambiguously beneficial in mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Energy, ageing, fidelity and sex: oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Wilson B. M.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Agip, Ahmed-Noor A.; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Allen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation couples ATP synthesis to respiratory electron transport. In eukaryotes, this coupling occurs in mitochondria, which carry DNA. Respiratory electron transport in the presence of molecular oxygen generates free radicals, reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are mutagenic. In animals, mutational damage to mitochondrial DNA therefore accumulates within the lifespan of the individual. Fertilization generally requires motility of one gamete, and motility requires ATP. It has been proposed that oxidative phosphorylation is nevertheless absent in the special case of quiescent, template mitochondria, that these remain sequestered in oocytes and female germ lines and that oocyte mitochondrial DNA is thus protected from damage, but evidence to support that view has hitherto been lacking. Here we show that female gametes of Aurelia aurita, the common jellyfish, do not transcribe mitochondrial DNA, lack electron transport, and produce no free radicals. In contrast, male gametes actively transcribe mitochondrial genes for respiratory chain components and produce ROS. Electron microscopy shows that this functional division of labour between sperm and egg is accompanied by contrasting mitochondrial morphology. We suggest that mitochondrial anisogamy underlies division of any animal species into two sexes with complementary roles in sexual reproduction. We predict that quiescent oocyte mitochondria contain DNA as an unexpressed template that avoids mutational accumulation by being transmitted through the female germ line. The active descendants of oocyte mitochondria perform oxidative phosphorylation in somatic cells and in male gametes of each new generation, and the mutations that they accumulated are not inherited. We propose that the avoidance of ROS-dependent mutation is the evolutionary pressure underlying maternal mitochondrial inheritance and the developmental origin of the female germ line. PMID:23754815

  16. Energy, ageing, fidelity and sex: oocyte mitochondrial DNA as a protected genetic template.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Wilson B M; Lucas, Cathy H; Agip, Ahmed-Noor A; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Allen, John F

    2013-07-19

    Oxidative phosphorylation couples ATP synthesis to respiratory electron transport. In eukaryotes, this coupling occurs in mitochondria, which carry DNA. Respiratory electron transport in the presence of molecular oxygen generates free radicals, reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are mutagenic. In animals, mutational damage to mitochondrial DNA therefore accumulates within the lifespan of the individual. Fertilization generally requires motility of one gamete, and motility requires ATP. It has been proposed that oxidative phosphorylation is nevertheless absent in the special case of quiescent, template mitochondria, that these remain sequestered in oocytes and female germ lines and that oocyte mitochondrial DNA is thus protected from damage, but evidence to support that view has hitherto been lacking. Here we show that female gametes of Aurelia aurita, the common jellyfish, do not transcribe mitochondrial DNA, lack electron transport, and produce no free radicals. In contrast, male gametes actively transcribe mitochondrial genes for respiratory chain components and produce ROS. Electron microscopy shows that this functional division of labour between sperm and egg is accompanied by contrasting mitochondrial morphology. We suggest that mitochondrial anisogamy underlies division of any animal species into two sexes with complementary roles in sexual reproduction. We predict that quiescent oocyte mitochondria contain DNA as an unexpressed template that avoids mutational accumulation by being transmitted through the female germ line. The active descendants of oocyte mitochondria perform oxidative phosphorylation in somatic cells and in male gametes of each new generation, and the mutations that they accumulated are not inherited. We propose that the avoidance of ROS-dependent mutation is the evolutionary pressure underlying maternal mitochondrial inheritance and the developmental origin of the female germ line.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA of Vitis vinifera and the issue of rampant horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Salamini, Francesco; Velasco, Riccardo; Viola, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of grape (Vitis vinifera), the largest organelle genome sequenced so far, is presented. The genome is 773,279 nt long and has the highest coding capacity among known angiosperm mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs). The proportion of promiscuous DNA of plastid origin in the genome is also the largest ever reported for an angiosperm mtDNA, both in absolute and relative terms. In all, 42.4% of chloroplast genome of Vitis has been incorporated into its mitochondrial genome. In order to test if horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has also contributed to the gene content of the grape mtDNA, we built phylogenetic trees with the coding sequences of mitochondrial genes of grape and their homologs from plant mitochondrial genomes. Many incongruent gene tree topologies were obtained. However, the extent of incongruence between these gene trees is not significantly greater than that observed among optimal trees for chloroplast genes, the common ancestry of which has never been in doubt. In both cases, we attribute this incongruence to artifacts of tree reconstruction, insufficient numbers of characters, and gene paralogy. This finding leads us to question the recent phylogenetic interpretation of Bergthorsson et al. (2003, 2004) and Richardson and Palmer (2007) that rampant HGT into the mtDNA of Amborella best explains phylogenetic incongruence between mitochondrial gene trees for angiosperms. The only evidence for HGT into the Vitis mtDNA found involves fragments of two coding sequences stemming from two closteroviruses that cause the leaf roll disease of this plant. We also report that analysis of sequences shared by both chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes provides evidence for a previously unknown gene transfer route from the mitochondrion to the chloroplast.

  18. In vivo levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide increase with age in mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angela; Shabalina, Irina G; Prime, Tracy A; Rogatti, Sebastian; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Hartley, Richard C; Budd, Ralph C; Cannon, Barbara; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    In mtDNA mutator mice, mtDNA mutations accumulate leading to a rapidly aging phenotype. However, there is little evidence of oxidative damage to tissues, and when analyzed ex vivo, no change in production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria has been reported, undermining the mitochondrial oxidative damage theory of aging. Paradoxically, interventions that decrease mitochondrial ROS levels in vivo delay onset of aging. To reconcile these findings, we used the mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe MitoB to measure hydrogen peroxide within mitochondria of living mice. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide was the same in young mutator and control mice, but as the mutator mice aged, hydrogen peroxide increased. This suggests that the prolonged presence of mtDNA mutations in vivo increases hydrogen peroxide that contributes to an accelerated aging phenotype, perhaps through the activation of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory redox signaling pathways.

  19. Fast-Evolving Mitochondrial DNA in Ceriantharia: A Reflection of Hexacorallia Paraphyly?

    PubMed Central

    Stampar, Sérgio N.; Maronna, Maximiliano M.; Kitahara, Marcelo V.; Reimer, James D.; Morandini, André C.

    2014-01-01

    The low evolutionary rate of mitochondrial genes in Anthozoa has challenged their utility for phylogenetic and systematic purposes, especially for DNA barcoding. However, the evolutionary rate of Ceriantharia, one of the most enigmatic “orders” within Anthozoa, has never been specifically examined. In this study, the divergence of mitochondrial DNA of Ceriantharia was compared to members of other Anthozoa and Medusozoa groups. In addition, nuclear markers were used to check the relative phylogenetic position of Ceriantharia in relation to other Cnidaria members. The results demonstrated a pattern of divergence of mitochondrial DNA completely different from those estimated for other anthozoans, and phylogenetic analyses indicate that Ceriantharia is not included within hexacorallians in most performed analyses. Thus, we propose that the Ceriantharia should be addressed as a separate clade. PMID:24475157

  20. In Situ Labeling of Mitochondrial DNA Replication in Drosophila Adult Ovaries by EdU Staining.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2016-10-15

    The mitochondrial genome is inherited exclusively through the maternal line. Understanding of how the mitochondrion and its genome are proliferated and transmitted from one generation to the next through the female oocyte is of fundamental importance. Because of the genetic tractability, and the elegant, ordered simplicity by which oocyte development proceeds, Drosophila oogenesis has become an invaluable system for mitochondrial study. An EdU (5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine) labeling method was utilized to detect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication in Drosophila ovaries. This method is superior to the BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) labeling method in that it allows for good structural preservation and efficient fluorescent dye penetration of whole-mount tissues. Here we describe a detailed protocol for labeling replicating mitochondrial DNA in Drosophila adult ovaries with EdU. Some technical solutions are offered to improve the viability of the ovaries, maintain their health during preparation, and ensure high-quality imaging. Visualization of newly synthesized mtDNA in the ovaries not only reveals the striking temporal and spatial pattern of mtDNA replication through oogenesis, but also allows for simple quantification of mtDNA replication under various genetic and pharmacological perturbations.

  1. In Situ Labeling of Mitochondrial DNA Replication in Drosophila Adult Ovaries by EdU Staining

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome is inherited exclusively through the maternal line. Understanding of how the mitochondrion and its genome are proliferated and transmitted from one generation to the next through the female oocyte is of fundamental importance. Because of the genetic tractability, and the elegant, ordered simplicity by which oocyte development proceeds, Drosophila oogenesis has become an invaluable system for mitochondrial study. An EdU (5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine) labeling method was utilized to detect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication in Drosophila ovaries. This method is superior to the BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) labeling method in that it allows for good structural preservation and efficient fluorescent dye penetration of whole-mount tissues. Here we describe a detailed protocol for labeling replicating mitochondrial DNA in Drosophila adult ovaries with EdU. Some technical solutions are offered to improve the viability of the ovaries, maintain their health during preparation, and ensure high-quality imaging. Visualization of newly synthesized mtDNA in the ovaries not only reveals the striking temporal and spatial pattern of mtDNA replication through oogenesis, but also allows for simple quantification of mtDNA replication under various genetic and pharmacological perturbations. PMID:27805603

  2. Mitochondrial DNA Rearrangement Spectrum in Brain Tissue of Alzheimer’s Disease: Analysis of 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yucai; Liu, Changsheng; Parker, William Davis; Chen, Hongyi; Beach, Thomas G.; Liu, Xinhua; Serrano, Geidy E.; Lu, Yanfen; Huang, Jianjun; Yang, Kunfang; Wang, Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction may play a central role in the pathologic process of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but there is still a scarcity of data that directly links the pathology of AD with the alteration of mitochondrial DNA. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive assessment of mtDNA rearrangement events in AD brain tissue. Patients and Methods Postmortem frozen human brain cerebral cortex samples were obtained from the Banner Sun Health Research Institute Brain and Body Donation Program, Sun City, AZ. Mitochondria were isolated and direct sequence by using MiSeq®, and analyzed by relative software. Results Three types of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been seen in post mortem human brain tissue from patients with AD and age matched control. These observed rearrangements include a deletion, F-type rearrangement, and R-type rearrangement. We detected a high level of mtDNA rearrangement in brain tissue from cognitively normal subjects, as well as the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rate of rearrangements was calculated by dividing the number of positive rearrangements by the coverage depth. The rearrangement rate was significantly higher in AD brain tissue than in control brain tissue (17.9%versus 6.7%; p = 0.0052). Of specific types of rearrangement, deletions were markedly increased in AD (9.2% versus 2.3%; p = 0.0005). Conclusions Our data showed that failure of mitochondrial DNA in AD brain might be important etiology of AD pathology. PMID:27299301

  3. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing of beetle larvae (Nitidulidae: Omosita) recovered from human bone.

    PubMed

    DiZinno, Joseph A; Lord, Wayne D; Collins-Morton, Mary B; Wilson, Mark R; Goff, M Lee

    2002-11-01

    The isolation, amplification, and characterization of human DNA from hematophagous (blood feeding) and necrophagous (carrion feeding) arthropods have been advanced significantly by the development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA sequencing methodologies. Historically, DNA technology has been successfully utilized to identify individual hosts upon which species of hematophagous arthropods have fed. The analysis of hematophagous insects' gut content blood meals has led to major advances in medical entomology and vector-borne disease epidemiology. In the forensic arena, the ability to apply similar techniques to insects recovered from badly decomposed remains has been greatly enhanced through the advent of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) techniques. Mitochondrial DNA analyses have been utilized to identify both the human remains upon which fly larvae (maggots) have fed and the species of the larvae themselves. The preliminary work detailed here demonstrates, for the first time, the successful application of mtDNA sequencing techniques to the analysis of necrophagous beetle larvae. A small sample of sap beetle larvae, Omosita spp. (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), was collected from human skeletal remains during anthropological examination and analyzed for human DNA using mtDNA sequencing. The beetle larvae yielded mtDNA matching that of the host human bone. The results detailed here further demonstrate the robust nature of human mtDNA and the ability to recover valuable mtDNA evidence from forensically important, late decompositional stage insect species.

  4. Correlates of Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA Content in a General Population

    PubMed Central

    Knez, Judita; Winckelmans, Ellen; Plusquin, Michelle; Thijs, Lutgarde; Cauwenberghs, Nicholas; Gu, Yumei; Staessen, Jan A.; Nawrot, Tim S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leads to alterations of mitochondrial biogenesis and function that might produce a decrease in mtDNA content within cells. This implies that mtDNA content might be a potential biomarker associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. However, data on correlates of mtDNA content in a general population are sparse. Our goal in the present study was to describe in a randomly recruited population sample the distribution and determinants of peripheral blood mtDNA content. From 2009 to 2013, we examined 689 persons (50.4% women; mean age = 54.4 years) randomly selected from a Flemish population (Flemish Study on Environment, Genes, and Health Outcomes). Relative mtDNA copy number as compared with nuclear DNA was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in peripheral blood. There was a curvilinear relationship between relative mtDNA copy number and age. mtDNA content slightly increased until the fifth decade of life and declined in older subjects (Page2 = 0.0002). mtDNA content was significantly higher in women (P = 0.007) and increased with platelet count (P < 0.0001), whereas it was inversely associated with white blood cell count (P < 0.0001). We also observed lower mtDNA content in women using estroprogestogens (P = 0.044). This study demonstrated in a general population that peripheral blood mtDNA content is significantly associated with sex and age. Blood mtDNA content is also influenced by platelet and white blood cell counts and estroprogestogen intake. Further studies are required to clarify the impact of chronic inflammation and hormone therapy on mitochondrial function. PMID:26702630

  5. Human REV3 DNA Polymerase Zeta Localizes to Mitochondria and Protects the Mitochondrial Genome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Li, Xiurong; Owens, Kjerstin M; Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    To date, mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) is the only polymerase known to be present in mammalian mitochondria. A dogma in the mitochondria field is that there is no other polymerase present in the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate localization of REV3 DNA polymerase in the mammalian mitochondria. We demonstrate localization of REV3 in the mitochondria of mammalian tissue as well as cell lines. REV3 associates with POLG and mitochondrial DNA and protects the mitochondrial genome from DNA damage. Inactivation of Rev3 leads to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced OXPHOS activity, and increased glucose consumption. Conversely, inhibition of the OXPHOS increases expression of Rev3. Rev3 expression is increased in human primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Inactivation of Rev3 decreases cell migration and invasion, and localization of Rev3 in mitochondria increases survival and the invasive potential of cancer cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that REV3 functions in mammalian mitochondria and that mitochondrial REV3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cells.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA damage: molecular marker of vulnerable nigral neurons in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Laurie H; McCoy, Jennifer; Hu, Xiaoping; Mastroberardino, Pier G; Dickinson, Bryan C; Chang, Christopher J; Chu, Charleen T; Van Houten, Bennett; Greenamyre, J T

    2014-10-01

    DNA damage can cause (and result from) oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment, both of which are implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore examined the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in human postmortem brain tissue and in in vivo and in vitro models of PD, using a newly adapted histochemical assay for abasic sites and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)-based assay. We identified the molecular identity of mtDNA damage to be apurinic/apyrimidinic (abasic) sites in substantia nigra dopamine neurons, but not in cortical neurons from postmortem PD specimens. To model the systemic mitochondrial impairment of PD, rats were exposed to the pesticide rotenone. After rotenone treatment that does not cause neurodegeneration, abasic sites were visualized in nigral neurons, but not in cortex. Using a QPCR-based assay, a single rotenone dose induced mtDNA damage in midbrain neurons, but not in cortical neurons; similar results were obtained in vitro in cultured neurons. Importantly, these results indicate that mtDNA damage is detectable prior to any signs of degeneration - and is produced selectively in midbrain neurons under conditions of mitochondrial impairment. The selective vulnerability of midbrain neurons to mtDNA damage was not due to differential effects of rotenone on complex I since rotenone suppressed respiration equally in midbrain and cortical neurons. However, in response to complex I inhibition, midbrain neurons produced more mitochondrial H2O2 than cortical neurons. We report selective mtDNA damage as a molecular marker of vulnerable nigral neurons in PD and suggest that this may result from intrinsic differences in how these neurons respond to complex I defects. Further, the persistence of abasic sites suggests an ineffective base excision repair response in PD.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA variation and HIV-associated sensory neuropathy in CHARTER.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Emily R; Hulgan, Todd; Ellis, Ronald J; Samuels, David C; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Haas, David W; Kallianpur, Asha R; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Clifford, David B; Collier, Ann C; Gelman, Benjamin B; Marra, Christina M; McArthur, Justin C; McCutchan, J Allen; Morgello, Susan; Simpson, David M; Franklin, Donald R; Rosario, Debralee; Selph, Doug; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor

    2012-12-01

    HIV-associated sensory neuropathy remains an important complication of combination antiretroviral therapy and HIV infection. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have previously been associated with symptomatic neuropathy in clinical trial participants. We examined associations between mitochondrial DNA variation and HIV-associated sensory neuropathy in CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER). CHARTER is a USA-based longitudinal observational study of HIV-infected adults who underwent a structured interview and standardized examination. HIV-associated sensory neuropathy was determined by trained examiners as ≥1 sign (diminished vibratory and sharp-dull discrimination or ankle reflexes) bilaterally. Mitochondrial DNA sequencing was performed and haplogroups were assigned by published algorithms. Multivariable logistic regression of associations between mitochondrial DNA SNPs, haplogroups, and HIV-associated sensory neuropathy were performed. In analyses of associations of each mitochondrial DNA SNP with HIV-associated sensory neuropathy, the two most significant SNPs were at positions A12810G [odds ratio (95 % confidence interval) = 0.27 (0.11-0.65); p = 0.004] and T489C [odds ratio (95 % confidence interval) = 0.41 (0.21-0.80); p = 0.009]. These synonymous changes are known to define African haplogroup L1c and European haplogroup J, respectively. Both haplogroups were associated with decreased prevalence of HIV-associated sensory neuropathy compared with all other haplogroups [odds ratio (95 % confidence interval) = 0.29 (0.12-0.71); p = 0.007 and odds ratio (95 % confidence interval) = 0.42 (0.18-1.0); p = 0.05, respectively]. In conclusion, in this cohort of mostly combination antiretroviral therapy-treated subjects, two common mitochondrial DNA SNPs and their corresponding haplogroups were associated with a markedly decreased prevalence of HIV-associated sensory neuropathy.

  8. Lack of founding Amerindian mitochondrial DNA lineages in extinct aborigines from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Lalueza, C; Pérez-Pérez, A; Prats, E; Cornudella, L; Turbón, D

    1997-01-01

    Ancient DNA from bones and teeth of 60 individuals from four extinct human populations from Tierra del Fuego-Patagonia (Selknam, Yamana, Kaweskar and Aonikenk) has been extracted and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amplified by using the polymerase chain reaction. High-resolution analysis of endonuclease restriction site variation in the mtDNA and sequencing of its hypervariable non-coding control region, revealed complete absence of two of the four primary mitochondrial haplotype groups present in contemporary Amerinds, namely A and B. In contrast, haplogroups C and D were found in all but one sample with frequencies of approximately 38% and 60%. These results, together with the decreasing incidence of group A in more southerly latitudes in the American continent and the absence of cluster B above 55 degrees North in America and Asia, argue that the first settlers entering America 21000-14000 years ago already lacked both mtDNA lineages.

  9. Analysis of Replicating Mitochondrial DNA by In Organello Labeling and Two-Dimensional Agarose Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holt, Ian J; Kazak, Lawrence; Reyes, Aurelio; Wood, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms of DNA replication in a broad range of organisms and viruses has benefited from the application of two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis (2D-AGE). The method resolves DNA molecules on the basis of size and shape and is technically straightforward. 2D-AGE sparked controversy in the field of mitochondria when it revealed replicating molecules with lengthy tracts of RNA, a phenomenon never before reported in nature. More recently, radioisotope labeling of the DNA in the mitochondria has been coupled with 2D-AGE. In its first application, this procedure helped to delineate the "bootlace mechanism of mitochondrial DNA replication," in which processed mitochondrial transcripts are hybridized to the lagging strand template at the replication fork as the leading DNA strand is synthesized. This chapter provides details of the method, how it has been applied to date and concludes with some potential future applications of the technique.

  10. Random Intracellular Drift Explains the Clonal Expansion of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations with Age

    PubMed Central

    Elson, J. L.; Samuels, D. C.; Turnbull, D. M.; Chinnery, P. F.

    2001-01-01

    Human tissues acquire somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations with age. Very high levels of specific mtDNA mutations accumulate within individual cells, causing a defect of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. This is a fundamental property of nondividing tissues, but it is not known how it comes about. To explore this problem, we developed a model of mtDNA replication within single human cells. Using this model, we show that relaxed replication of mtDNA alone can lead, through random genetic drift, to the clonal expansion of single mutant events during human life. Significant expansions primarily develop from mutations acquired during a critical period in childhood or early adult life. PMID:11179029

  11. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA in the sea urchin Arbacia lixula: conserved features of the echinoid mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, C; Martiradonna, A; Lanave, C; Saccone, C

    1996-04-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (15,719 nucleotides) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the sea urchin Arbacia lixula is presented. The comparison of gene arrangement between different echinoderm orders of the same class provides evidence that the gene organization is conserved within the same echinoderm class. The peculiarities of sea urchin mtDNA features, already described, are confirmed by the A. lixula mtDNA sequence. The comparison of the entire sequences of mtDNA among A. lixula, Paracentrotus lividus, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus allowed us to detect peculiar features, common to the three sea urchin species, that can represent the molecular signature of the mt genome in the sea urchin group. Analysis of the nucleotide composition indicates that A. lixula mtDNA, in contrast with the mtDNA of other sea urchins, shows a bias in the use of T and tends to avoid the use of C, most evident in the neutral part of the molecule, such as the third codon positions. This observation indicates that the three sea urchin mtDNAs evolve under different mutation pressure. Analysis of the sequence evolution allowed us to confirm the phylogenetic tree. However, the absolute divergence time, calculated on the basis of paleontological estimates, largely diverged from the expected one.

  12. Spastic Paraplegia Type 7 Is Associated with Multiple Mitochondrial DNA Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Wedding, Iselin Marie; Koht, Jeanette; Tran, Gia Tuong; Misceo, Doriana; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Holmgren, Asbjørn; Frengen, Eirik; Bindoff, Laurence; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Tzoulis, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    Spastic paraplegia 7 is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding paraplegin, a protein located at the inner mitochondrial membrane and involved in the processing of other mitochondrial proteins. The mechanism whereby paraplegin mutations cause disease is unknown. We studied two female and two male adult patients from two Norwegian families with a combination of progressive external ophthalmoplegia and spastic paraplegia. Sequencing of SPG7 revealed a novel missense mutation, c.2102A>C, p.H 701P, which was homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in trans with a known pathogenic mutation c.1454_1462del in the other. Muscle was examined from an additional, unrelated adult female patient with a similar phenotype caused by a homozygous c.1047insC mutation in SPG7. Immunohistochemical studies in skeletal muscle showed mosaic deficiency predominantly affecting respiratory complex I, but also complexes III and IV. Molecular studies in single, microdissected fibres showed multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions segregating at high levels (38–97%) in respiratory deficient fibres. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that paraplegin mutations cause accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. While paraplegin is not known to be directly associated with the mitochondrial nucleoid, it is known to process other mitochondrial proteins and it is possible therefore that paraplegin mutations lead to mitochondrial DNA deletions by impairing proteins involved in the homeostasis of the mitochondrial genome. These studies increase our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of SPG7 mutations and suggest that SPG7 testing should be included in the diagnostic workup of autosomal recessive, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, especially if spasticity is present. PMID:24466038

  13. Introducing human population biology through an easy laboratory exercise on mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Pardiñas, Antonio F; Dopico, Eduardo; Roca, Agustín; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Lopez, Belen

    2010-03-01

    This article describes an easy and cheap laboratory exercise for students to discover their own mitochondrial haplogroup. Students use buccal swabs to obtain mucosa cells as noninvasive tissue samples, extract DNA, and with a simple polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis they can obtain DNA fragments of different sizes that can be visualized in agarose gels. The analysis of these fragments can reveal the mitochondrial haplogroup of each student. The results of the exercise can be used to provide additional insights into the genetic variation of human populations.

  14. Mitonuclear coevolution as the genesis of speciation and the mitochondrial DNA barcode gap.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey E

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial genes are widely used in taxonomy and systematics because high mutation rates lead to rapid sequence divergence and because such changes have long been assumed to be neutral with respect to function. In particular, the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 has been established as a highly effective DNA barcode for diagnosing the species boundaries of animals. Rarely considered in discussions of mitochondrial evolution in the context of systematics, speciation, or DNA barcodes, however, is the genomic architecture of the eukaryotes: Mitochondrial and nuclear genes must function in tight coordination to produce the complexes of the electron transport chain and enable cellular respiration. Coadaptation of these interacting gene products is essential for organism function. I extend the hypothesis that mitonuclear interactions are integral to the process of speciation. To maintain mitonuclear coadaptation, nuclear genes, which code for proteins in mitochondria that cofunction with the products of mitochondrial genes, must coevolve with rapidly changing mitochondrial genes. Mitonuclear coevolution in isolated populations leads to speciation because population-specific mitonuclear coadaptations create between-population mitonuclear incompatibilities and hence barriers to gene flow between populations. In addition, selection for adaptive divergence of products of mitochondrial genes, particularly in response to climate or altitude, can lead to rapid fixation of novel mitochondrial genotypes between populations and consequently to disruption in gene flow between populations as the initiating step in animal speciation. By this model, the defining characteristic of a metazoan species is a coadapted mitonuclear genotype that is incompatible with the coadapted mitochondrial and nuclear genotype of any other population.

  15. Evidence for Non-Neutrality of Mitochondrial DNA Haplotypes in Drosophila Pseudoobscura

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, A. F.; Anderson, W. W.

    1988-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes usually are assumed to be neutral, unselected markers of evolving female lineages. This assumption was tested by monitoring haplotype frequencies in 12 experimental populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura which were polymorphic for mtDNA haplotypes. Populations were maintained for at least 10 generations, and in one case for 32 generations, while tests of mtDNA selective neutrality were conducted. In an initial population, formed from a mixture of two strains with different mitochondrial haplotypes, the frequency of the Bogota haplotype increased 46% in 3 generations, reaching an apparent equilibrium frequency of 82% after 32 generations. Perturbation of this equilibrium by addition of the less common haplotype resulted in a rapid, dramatic increase in frequency of the second haplotype, and a return to essentially the same equilibrium frequency as before perturbation. This behavior is not consistent with mtDNA neutrality, nor is the equilibrium consistent with a simple model of constant selection on the haploid mtDNAs. Replicate cage experiments with mtDNA haplotypes did not always generate the same result as the initial cage. Several lines of evidence, including manipulations of the nuclear genome, support the idea that both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes are involved in the dramatic mtDNA frequency changes. In another experiment, strong female viability selection was implicated via mtDNA frequency changes. Although the causes of the dramatic mtDNA frequency changes in our populations are not obvious, it is clear that Drosophila mitochondrial haplotypes are not always simply neutral markers. Our findings are relevant to the introduction of a novel mtDNA variant from one species or one population into another. Such introductions could be strongly favored by selection, even if it is sporadic. PMID:3197957

  16. Could we offer mitochondrial donation or similar assisted reproductive technology to South African patients with mitochondrial DNA disease?

    PubMed

    Meldau, Surita; Riordan, Gillian; Van der Westhuizen, Francois; Elson, Joanna L; Smuts, Izelle; Pepper, Michael S; Soodyall, Himla

    2016-02-02

    The decision of the UK House of Commons in 2015 to endorse the use of pioneering in vitro fertilisation techniques to protect future generations from the risk of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disease has sparked worldwide controversy and debate. The availability of such technologies could benefit women at risk of transmitting deleterious mutations. MtDNA disease certainly occurs in South Africa (SA) in all population groups. However, diagnostic strategies and practices for identifying individuals who would benefit from technologies such as IVF have in the past been suboptimal in this country. New developments in the molecular diagnostic services available to SA patients, as well as better education of referring clinicians and the implementation of more structured, population-appropriate diagnostic strategies, may open the floor to this debate in SA.

  17. Ca2+ acting at the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane can stimulate mitochondrial permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide.

    PubMed

    Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F

    1997-12-15

    Mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) induced by the thiol cross-linker phenylarsine oxide (PhAsO) in Ca(2+)-depleted mitochondria incubated in the presence of ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the Ca2+ uniporter, is stimulated by the addition of extramitochondrial Ca2+. The presence of extramitochondrial Ca2+ stimulates the reaction of mitochondrial membrane protein thiol groups with PhAsO. Both Ca(2+)-induced increase in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and protein thiol group reaction with PhAsO are dependent on time (5-10 min to be complete) and the concentration of Ca2+ (1-25 microM). Mitochondrial permeabilization induced by PhAsO (15 microM) and extramitochondrial Ca2+ is inhibited by ADP, cyclosporin A, dibucaine and Mg2+, while mitochondrial permeabilization induced by high concentrations of PhAsO (60 microM) in the absence of Ca2+ is inhibited only by ADP and cyclosporin A. These results suggest that dibucaine and Mg2+ can inhibit mitochondrial permeabilization by antagonizing the effect of Ca2+ on the mitochondrial membrane. Once mitochondrial permeabilization induced by 15 microM PhAsO and extramitochondrial Ca2+ has already occurred, the addition of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA restores mitochondrial membrane potential (MPT pore closure), suggesting that the presence of Ca2+ is essential for the maintenance of the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane to protons (MPT pore opening). In conclusion, the results presented indicate that low Ca2+ concentrations acting at the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane can stimulate mitochondrial permeability transition induced by PhAsO, due to increased accessibility of protein thiol groups to the reaction with PhAsO and increased probability of MPT pore opening.

  18. Microhomology-mediated end joining is the principal mediator of double-strand break repair during mitochondrial DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Tadi, Satish Kumar; Sebastian, Robin; Dahal, Sumedha; Babu, Ravi K; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions are associated with various mitochondrial disorders. The deletions identified in humans are flanked by short, directly repeated mitochondrial DNA sequences; however, the mechanism of such DNA rearrangements has yet to be elucidated. In contrast to nuclear DNA (nDNA), mtDNA is more exposed to oxidative damage, which may result in double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although DSB repair in nDNA is well studied, repair mechanisms in mitochondria are not characterized. In the present study, we investigate the mechanisms of DSB repair in mitochondria using in vitro and ex vivo assays. Whereas classical NHEJ (C-NHEJ) is undetectable, microhomology-mediated alternative NHEJ efficiently repairs DSBs in mitochondria. Of interest, robust microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) was observed with DNA substrates bearing 5-, 8-, 10-, 13-, 16-, 19-, and 22-nt microhomology. Furthermore, MMEJ efficiency was enhanced with an increase in the length of homology. Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and protein inhibition assays suggest the involvement of CtIP, FEN1, MRE11, and PARP1 in mitochondrial MMEJ. Knockdown studies, in conjunction with other experiments, demonstrated that DNA ligase III, but not ligase IV or ligase I, is primarily responsible for the final sealing of DSBs during mitochondrial MMEJ. These observations highlight the central role of MMEJ in maintenance of mammalian mitochondrial genome integrity and is likely relevant for deletions observed in many human mitochondrial disorders.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA divergence in Lygus lineolaris (Hemiptera: Miridae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Lygus is widely distributed in North America and Eurasia. The tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, is one of the most serious pest species within this genus having >300 different plant hosts. The intra-specific genetic diversity of L. lineolaris is being examined by employing mitochondri...

  20. Decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA in patients with statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Henry A J; Sohi, Gurmeet K; Maguire, John A; Côté, Hélène C F

    2013-02-15

    Statins are widely used to treat hyperlipidemia and lower cardiovascular disease risk. While statins are generally well tolerated, some patients experience statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Statin treatment has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. In this retrospective study, skeletal muscle biopsies from patients diagnosed with SIM were studied. These were compared with biopsies from patients clinically assessed as having statin-unrelated myopathy but whose biopsy showed no or negligible pathology. For each biopsy sample, mtDNA was quantified relative to nuclear DNA (mtDNA content) by qPCR, mtDNA deletions were investigated by long-template PCR followed by gel densitometry, and mtDNA oxidative damage was quantified using a qPCR-based assay. For a subset of matched samples, mtDNA heteroplasmy and mutations were investigated by cloning/sequencing. Skeletal muscle mtDNA content was significantly lower in SIM patients (N=23, mean±SD, 2036±1146) than in comparators (N=24, 3220±1594), p=0.006. There was no difference in mtDNA deletion score or oxidative mtDNA damage between the two groups, and no evidence of increased mtDNA heteroplasmy or somatic mutations was detected. The significant difference in skeletal muscle mtDNA suggests that SIM or statin treatments are associated with depletion of skeletal muscle mtDNA or that patients with an underlying predisposition to SIM have lower mtDNA levels. If statins induce mtDNA depletion, this would likely reflect decreased mitochondria biogenesis and/or increased mitochondria autophagy. Further work is necessary to distinguish between the lower mtDNA as a predisposition to SIM or an effect of SIM or statin treatment.

  1. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations.

    PubMed

    Aanen, Duur K; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Beekman, Madeleine

    2014-07-05

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is relaxed. Furthermore, because mtDNA replication is not strictly regulated, within-cell selection may favour mtDNA variants with a replication advantage, but a deleterious effect on cell fitness. The opportunities for selfish mtDNA mutations to spread are restricted by various organism-level adaptations, such as uniparental transmission, germline mtDNA bottlenecks, germline selection and, during somatic growth, regular alternation between fusion and fission of mitochondria. These mechanisms are all hypothesized to maintain functional mtDNA. However, the strength of selection for maintenance of functional mtDNA progressively declines with age, resulting in age-related diseases. Furthermore, organismal adaptations that most probably evolved to restrict the opportunities for selfish mtDNA create secondary problems. Owing to predominantly maternal mtDNA transmission, recombination among mtDNA from different individuals is highly restricted or absent, reducing the scope for repair. Moreover, maternal inheritance precludes selection against mtDNA variants with male-specific effects. We finish by discussing the consequences of life-history differences among taxa with respect to mtDNA evolution and make a case for the use of microorganisms to experimentally manipulate levels of selection.

  2. Mitochondrial-targeted DNA delivery using a DF-MITO-Porter, an innovative nano carrier with cytoplasmic and mitochondrial fusogenic envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial gene therapy has the potential for curing a variety of diseases that are associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations and/or defects. To achieve this, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents into the mitochondria in diseased cells. A number of mitochondrial drug delivery systems have been reported to date. However, reports of mitochondrial-targeted DNA delivery are limited. To achieve this, the therapeutic agent must be taken up by the cell (1), after which, the multi-processes associated with intracellular trafficking must be sophisticatedly regulated so as to release the agent from the endosome and deliver it to the cytosol (2) and to pass through the mitochondrial membrane (3). We report herein on the mitochondrial delivery of oligo DNA as a model therapeutic using a Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter, an innovative nano carrier designed for mitochondrial delivery. The critical structural elements of the DF-MITO-Porter include mitochondria-fusogenic inner envelopes and endosome-fusogenic outer envelopes, modified with octaarginine which greatly assists in cellular uptake. Inside the cell, the carrier passes through the endosomal and mitochondrial membranes via step-wise membrane fusion. When the oligo DNA was packaged in the DF-MITO-Porter, cellular uptake efficiency was strongly enhanced. Intracellular observation using confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the DF-MITO-Porter was effectively released from endosomes. Moreover, the findings confirmed that the mitochondrial targeting activity of the DF-MITO-Porter was significantly higher than that of a carrier without outer endosome-fusogenic envelopes. These results support the conclusion that mitochondrial-targeted DNA delivery using a DF-MITO-Porter can be achieved when intracellular trafficking is optimally regulated.

  3. Low Mitochondrial DNA Diversity in an Ancient Population from China: Insight into Social Organization at the Fujia Site.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Li, Chunxiang; Luan, Fengshi; Li, Zhenguang; Li, Hongjie; Cui, Yinqiu; Zhou, Hui; Malhi, Ripan S

    2015-01-01

    To gain insight into the social organization of a population associated with the Dawenkou period, we performed ancient DNA analysis of 18 individuals from human remains from the Fujia site in Shandong Province, China. Directly radiocarbon dated to 4800-4500 cal BP, the Fujia site is assumed to be associated with a transitional phase from matrilineal clans to patrilineal monogamous families. Our results reveal a low mitochondrial DNA diversity from the site and population. Combined with Y chromosome data, the pattern observed at the Fujia site is most consistent with a matrilineal community. The patterns also suggest that the bond of marriage was de-emphasized compared with the bonds of descent at Fujia.

  4. Resistance training in patients with single, large-scale deletions of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Julie L; Blakely, Emma L; Schaefer, Andrew M; He, Langping; Wyrick, Phil; Haller, Ronald G; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Douglass M; Taivassalo, Tanja

    2008-11-01

    Dramatic tissue variation in mitochondrial heteroplasmy has been found to exist in patients with sporadic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. Despite high abundance in mature skeletal muscle, levels of the causative mutation are low or undetectable in satellite cells. The activation of these typically quiescent mitotic cells and subsequent shifting of wild-type mtDNA templates to mature muscle have been proposed as a means of restoring a more normal mitochondrial genotype and function in these patients. Because resistance exercise is known to serve as a stimulus for satellite cell induction within active skeletal muscle, this study sought to assess the therapeutic potential of resistance training in eight patients with single, large-scale mtDNA deletions by assessing: physiological determinants of peak muscle strength and oxidative capacity and muscle biopsy-derived measures of damage, mtDNA mutation load, level of oxidative impairment and satellite cell numbers. Our results show that 12 weeks of progressive overload leg resistance training led to: (i) increased muscle strength; (ii) myofibre damage and regeneration; (iii) increased proportion of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-positive satellite cells; (iv) improved muscle oxidative capacity. Taken together, we believe these findings support the hypothesis of resistance exercise-induced mitochondrial gene-shifting in muscle containing satellite cells which have low or absent levels of deleted mtDNA. Further investigation is warranted to refine parameters of the exercise training protocol in order to maximize the training effect on mitochondrial genotype and treatment potential for patients with selected, sporadic mutations of mtDNA in skeletal muscle.

  5. Method for assessing damage to mitochondrial DNA caused by radiation and epichlorohydrin

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, G.; Hauswirth, W.W.; Ross, W.E.; Neims, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid and reliable method for quantification of damage to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), especially strand breaks. The degree of damage to mtDNA is assessed by the proportion of physical forms (i.e., supercoiled versus open-circular and linear forms) upon agarose gel electrophoresis, blotting, and visualization by hybridization with (/sup 32/P)mtDNA probes. The use of a radiolabeled probe is a crucial step in the procedure because it provides both a means to quantify by radioautography and to obtain the mtDNA specificity required to eliminate misinterpretation due to nuclear DNA contamination. To demonstrate the utility of this technique, X-irradiation and epichlorohydrin are shown to damage both isolated mtDNA and mtDNA in whole cells in a dose-dependent fashion.

  6. Characterization of chemically modified oligonucleotides targeting a pathogenic mutation in human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Yann; Heckel, Anne-Marie; Dovydenko, Ilya; Meschaninova, Mariya; Comte, Caroline; Venyaminova, Alya; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii; Tarassov, Ivan; Entelis, Nina

    2014-05-01

    Defects in mitochondrial genome can cause a wide range of clinical disorders, mainly neuromuscular diseases. Most of the deleterious mitochondrial mutations are heteroplasmic, meaning that wild type and mutated forms of mtDNA coexist in the same cell. Therefore, a shift in the proportion between mutant and wild type molecules could restore mitochondrial functions. The anti-replicative strategy aims to induce such a shift in heteroplasmy by mitochondrial targeting specifically designed molecules in order to inhibit replication of mutant mtDNA. Recently, we developed mitochondrial RNA vectors that can be used to address anti-replicative oligoribonucleotides into human mitochondria and impact heteroplasmy level, however, the effect was mainly transient, probably due to a rapid degradation of RNA molecules. In the present study, we introduced various chemically modified oligonucleotides in anti-replicative RNAs. We show that the most important increase of anti-replicative molecules' lifetime can be achieved by using synthetic RNA-DNA chimerical molecules or by ribose 2'-O-methylation in nuclease-sensitive sites. The presence of inverted thymidine at 3' terminus and modifications of 2'-OH ribose group did not prevent the mitochondrial uptake of the recombinant molecules. All the modified oligonucleotides were able to anneal specifically with the mutant mtDNA fragment, but not with the wild-type one. Nevertheless, the modified oligonucleotides did not cause a significant effect on the heteroplasmy level in transfected transmitochondrial cybrid cells bearing a pathogenic mtDNA deletion, proving to be less efficient than non-modified RNA molecules.

  7. Liver ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection: no evidence of mitochondrial damage with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Motoi; Chu, Fanny F S; Au, May; Lu, Helen; Chen, Jennifer; Rietkerk, Sonja; Barrios, Rolando; Farley, John D; Montaner, Julio S; Montessori, Valentina C; Walker, David C; Côté, Hélène C F

    2008-06-19

    Liver mitochondrial toxicity is a concern, particularly in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Liver biopsies from HIV/HCV co-infected patients, 14 ON-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and nine OFF-HAART, were assessed by electron microscopy quantitative morphometric analyses. Hepatocytes tended to be larger ON-HAART than OFF-HAART (P = 0.05), but mitochondrial volume, cristae density, lipid volume, mitochondrial DNA and RNA levels were similar. We found no evidence of increased mitochondrial toxicity in individuals currently on HAART, suggesting that concomitant HAART should not delay HCV therapy.

  8. Not all mitochondrial carrier proteins support permeability transition pore formation: no involvement of uncoupling protein 1.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Paul G; Parker, Nadeene; Vidal-Puig, Antonio J; Brand, Martin D

    2009-12-15

    The mPTP (mitochondrial permeability transition pore) is a non-specific channel that is formed in the mitochondrial inner membrane in response to several stimuli, including elevated levels of matrix calcium. The pore is proposed to be composed of the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), voltage-dependent anion channel and cyclophilin D. Knockout studies, however, have demonstrated that ANT is not essential for permeability transition, which has led to the proposal that other members of the mitochondrial carrier protein family may be able to play a similar function to ANT in pore formation. To investigate this possibility, we have studied the permeability transition properties of BAT (brown adipose tissue) mitochondria in which levels of the mitochondrial carrier protein, UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1), can exceed those of ANT. Using an improved spectroscopic assay, we have quantified mPTP formation in de-energized mitochondria from wild-type and Ucp1KO (Ucp1-knockout) mice and assessed the dependence of pore formation on UCP1. When correctly normalized for differences in mitochondrial morphology, we find that calcium-induced mPTP activity is the same in both types of mitochondria, with similar sensitivity to GDP (approximately 50% inhibited), although the portion sensitive to cyclosporin A is higher in mitochondria lacking UCP1 (approximately 80% inhibited, compared with approximately 60% in mitochondria containing UCP1). We conclude that UCP1 is not a component of the cyclosporin A-sensitive mPTP in BAT and that playing a role in mPTP formation is not a general characteristic of the mitochondrial carrier protein family but is, more likely, restricted to specific members including ANT.

  9. Simultaneous detection of human mitochondrial DNA and nuclear-inserted mitochondrial-origin sequences (NumtS) using forensic mtDNA amplification strategies and pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Bintz, Brittania J; Dixon, Groves B; Wilson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the identification of minor mitochondrial DNA variants with higher sensitivity than Sanger methods, allowing for enhanced identification of minor variants. In this study, mixtures of human mtDNA control region amplicons were subjected to pyrosequencing to determine the detection threshold of the Roche GS Junior(®) instrument (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, IN). In addition to expected variants, a set of reproducible variants was consistently found in reads from one particular amplicon. A BLASTn search of the variant sequence revealed identity to a segment of a 611-bp nuclear insertion of the mitochondrial control region (NumtS) spanning the primer-binding sites of this amplicon (Nature 1995;378:489). Primers (Hum Genet 2012;131:757; Hum Biol 1996;68:847) flanking the insertion were used to confirm the presence or absence of the NumtS in buccal DNA extracts from twenty donors. These results further our understanding of human mtDNA variation and are expected to have a positive impact on the interpretation of mtDNA profiles using deep-sequencing methods in casework.

  10. Regulated mitochondrial DNA replication during oocyte maturation is essential for successful porcine embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Spikings, Emma C; Alderson, Jon; St John, Justin C

    2007-02-01

    Cellular ATP is mainly generated through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have previously demonstrated the importance of oocyte mtDNA for porcine and human fertilization. However, the role of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial replication factors during oocyte and embryo development is not yet understood. We have analyzed two key factors, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and polymerase gamma (POLG), to determine their role in oocyte and early embryo development. Competent and incompetent oocytes, as determined by brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) dye, were assessed intermittently during the maturation process for TFAM and POLG mRNA using real-time RT-PCR, for TFAM and POLG protein using immunocytochemistry, and for mtDNA copy number using real-time PCR. Analysis was also carried out following treatment of maturing oocytes with the mtDNA replication inhibitor, 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC). Following in vitro fertilization, preimplantation embryos were also analyzed. Despite increased levels of TFAM and POLG mRNA and protein at the four-cell stage, no increase in mtDNA copy number was observed in early preimplantation development. To compensate for this, mtDNA appeared to be replicated during oocyte maturation. However, significant differences in nuclear-encoded regulatory protein expression were observed between BCB(+) and BCB(-) oocytes and between untreated oocytes and those treated with ddC. These changes resulted in delayed mtDNA replication, which correlated to reduced fertilization and embryonic development. We therefore conclude that adherence to the regulation of the timing of mtDNA replication during oocyte maturation is essential for successful embryonic development.

  11. Phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites (Acari: Demodicidae) based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-09-01

    To confirm phylogenetic relationships in Demodex mites based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA partial sequences, mtDNA 16S partial sequences of ten isolates of three Demodex species from China were amplified, recombined, and sequenced and then analyzed with two Demodex folliculorum isolates from Spain. Lastly, genetic distance was computed, and phylogenetic tree was reconstructed. MEGA 4.0 analysis showed high sequence identity among 16S rDNA partial sequences of three Demodex species, which were 95.85 % in D. folliculorum, 98.53 % in Demodex canis, and 99.71 % in Demodex brevis. The divergence, genetic distance, and transition/transversions of the three Demodex species reached interspecies level, whereas there was no significant difference of the divergence (1.1 %), genetic distance (0.011), and transition/transversions (3/1) of the two geographic D. folliculorum isolates (Spain and China). Phylogenetic trees reveal that the three Demodex species formed three separate branches of one clade, where D. folliculorum and D. canis gathered first, and then gathered with D. brevis. The two Spain and five China D. folliculorum isolates did not form sister clades. In conclusion, 16S mtDNA are suitable for phylogenetic relationship analysis in low taxa (genus or species), but not for intraspecies determination of Demodex. The differentiation among the three Demodex species has reached interspecies level.

  12. MPV17 encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protein and is mutated in infantile hepatic mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Spinazzola, Antonella; Viscomi, Carlo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Carrara, Franco; D'Adamo, Pio; Calvo, Sarah; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Donnini, Claudia; Weiher, Hans; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Parini, Rossella; Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Chan, Alicia; DiMauro, Salvatore; Rötig, Agnes; Gasparini, Paolo; Ferrero, Iliana; Mootha, Vamsi K; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) DNA depletion syndromes (MDDS) are genetic disorders characterized by a severe, tissue-specific decrease of mtDNA copy number, leading to organ failure. There are two main clinical presentations: myopathic (OMIM 609560) and hepatocerebral (OMIM 251880). Known mutant genes, including TK2, SUCLA2, DGUOK and POLG, account for only a fraction of MDDS cases. We found a new locus for hepatocerebral MDDS on chromosome 2p21-23 and prioritized the genes on this locus using a new integrative genomics strategy. One of the top-scoring candidates was the human ortholog of the mouse kidney disease gene Mpv17. We found disease-segregating mutations in three families with hepatocerebral MDDS and demonstrated that, contrary to the alleged peroxisomal localization of the MPV17 gene product, MPV17 is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, and its absence or malfunction causes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) failure and mtDNA depletion, not only in affected individuals but also in Mpv17-/- mice.

  13. A cardiac mitochondrial cAMP signaling pathway regulates calcium accumulation, permeability transition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Liu, D; Varin, A; Nicolas, V; Courilleau, D; Mateo, P; Caubere, C; Rouet, P; Gomez, A-M; Vandecasteele, G; Fischmeister, R; Brenner, C

    2016-01-01

    Although cardiac cytosolic cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates multiple processes, such as beating, contractility, metabolism and apoptosis, little is known yet on the role of this second messenger within cardiac mitochondria. Using cellular and subcellular approaches, we demonstrate here the local expression of several actors of cAMP signaling within cardiac mitochondria, namely a truncated form of soluble AC (sACt) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), and show a protective role for sACt against cell death, apoptosis as well as necrosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Upon stimulation with bicarbonate (HCO3−) and Ca2+, sACt produces cAMP, which in turn stimulates oxygen consumption, increases the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and ATP production. cAMP is rate limiting for matrix Ca2+ entry via Epac1 and the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and, as a consequence, prevents mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The mitochondrial cAMP effects involve neither protein kinase A, Epac2 nor the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. In addition, in mitochondria isolated from failing rat hearts, stimulation of the mitochondrial cAMP pathway by HCO3− rescued the sensitization of mitochondria to Ca2+-induced MPT. Thus, our study identifies a link between mitochondrial cAMP, mitochondrial metabolism and cell death in the heart, which is independent of cytosolic cAMP signaling. Our results might have implications for therapeutic prevention of cell death in cardiac pathologies. PMID:27100892

  14. The Helix Coil Transition of DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinert, Roger; Hudson, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    This transition, observed with an inexpensive ultraviolet photometer, is a potentially useful experiment for an advanced freshman class because it introduces several concepts of general physical interest. (DF)

  15. Novel large-range mitochondrial DNA deletions and fatal multisystemic disorder with prominent hepatopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Marzia; Rizza, Teresa; Verrigni, Daniela; Martinelli, Diego; Tozzi, Giulia; Torraco, Alessandra; Piemonte, Fiorella; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Nobili, Valerio; Francalanci, Paola; Boldrini, Renata; Callea, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; and others

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expanded array of mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pearson syndrome with prominent hepatopathy associated with single mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of deletions in fibroblasts and blood avoids muscle and liver biopsy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Look for mtDNA deletions before to study nuclear genes related to mtDNA depletion. -- Abstract: Hepatic involvement in mitochondrial cytopathies rarely manifests in adulthood, but is a common feature in children. Multiple OXPHOS enzyme defects in children with liver involvement are often associated with dramatically reduced amounts of mtDNA. We investigated two novel large scale deletions in two infants with a multisystem disorder and prominent hepatopathy. Amount of mtDNA deletions and protein content were measured in different post-mortem tissues. The highest levels of deleted mtDNA were in liver, kidney, pancreas of both patients. Moreover, mtDNA deletions were detected in cultured skin fibroblasts in both patients and in blood of one during life. Biochemical analysis showed impairment of mainly complex I enzyme activity. Patients manifesting multisystem disorders in childhood may harbour rare mtDNA deletions in multiple tissues. For these patients, less invasive blood specimens or cultured fibroblasts can be used for molecular diagnosis. Our data further expand the array of deletions in the mitochondrial genomes in association with liver failure. Thus analysis of mtDNA should be considered in the diagnosis of childhood-onset hepatopathies.

  16. Complete mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis of Bison bison and bison-cattle hybrids: function and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kory C; Halbert, Natalie D; Kolenda, Claire; Childers, Christopher; Hunter, David L; Derr, James N

    2011-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from 43 bison and bison-cattle hybrids were sequenced and compared with other bovids. Selected animals reflect the historical range and current taxonomic structure of bison. This study identified regions of potential nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibilities in hybrids, provided a complete mtDNA phylogenetic tree for this species, and uncovered evidence of bison population substructure. Seventeen bison haplotypes defined by 66 polymorphic sites were discovered, whereas 728 fixed differences and 86 non-synonymous mutations were identified between bison and bison-cattle hybrid sequences. The potential roles of the mtDNA genome in the function of hybrid animals and bison taxonomy are discussed.

  17. Intracellular mitochondrial DNA transfers to the nucleus in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok

    2016-06-01

    Genome instability is a well-known hallmark of cancer cells. With the revolution of high-throughput sequencing technologies, our knowledge of somatically acquired genome structural variation (SV) has greatly improved over the last decade. Remarkably, surveys of thousands of human whole-cancer genomes have shown that chromosomal rearrangements are frequently combined with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments somatically transferred to the nucleus. The high transfer rate and features of integration breakpoints provide clues for understanding the potential mechanisms underlying these events and provide insights into the role of mtDNA segments transferred into the nucleus. In this review, I discuss our current understanding of somatic nuclear transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA from hepatocytes as a ligand for TLR9: Drivers of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Priya; Vemulakonda, Akhila; Kowdley, Kris V; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease worldwide, affecting approximately one third of the Western world. It consists of a wide spectrum of liver disorders, ranging from fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which consists of steatosis, ballooning injury and inflammation. Despite an alarming growth in the statistics surrounding NAFLD, there are as yet no effective therapies for its treatment. Innate immune signaling has been thought to play a significant role in initiating and augmenting hepatic inflammation, contributing to the transition from nonalcoholic fatty liver to NASH. An immune response is triggered by countless signals called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) elicited by lipid-laden and damaged hepatocytes, which are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on hepatic immune cells to initiate inflammatory signaling. In this editorial, in addition to summarizing innate immune signaling in NAFLD and discussing potential therapies that target innate immune pathways, we have described a recent study that demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA serves as a DAMP activating a hepatic PRR, TLR9, in mice and in the plasma of NASH patients. In addition to identifying a new ligand for TLR9 during NASH progression, the study shows that blocking TLR9 reverses NASH, paving the way for the development of future NASH therapy. PMID:27610009

  19. Mitochondrial DNA Variability within Uromastyx ornata philbyi (Agamidae: Squamata) from Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Sayed A. M.; Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Wilms, Thomas M.; Shobrak, Mohammed; Kumazawa, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 2.4 kbp of mitochondrial DNA was sequenced from 9 individuals of Uromastyx ornata philbyi originating from Taif, Namas, Al-Baha, and Jazan in southwestern Saudi Arabia. The sequenced regions cover eight tRNA genes (tRNAGln, tRNAIle, tRNAMet, tRNATrp, tRNAAla, tRNAAsn, tRNACys, and tRNATyr) and two protein-coding genes (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 and cytochrome b). U. ornata philbyi had an insertion of 170 bp length between tRNAGln and tRNAIle genes. The first 128 bp of this insertion was similar to the one identified earlier in U. ornata ornata and can be folded into a stem-and-loop structure, which was less stable in U. ornata philbyi than in U. ornata ornata, or the second tRNAGln gene. The next 42 bp of the insertion was unique in U. ornata philbyi and additionally retained a stable stem-and-loop structure. Most base substitutions found in the sequenced genes were synonymous transitions rather than transversions. Tree analyses supported the sister group relationship between the two U. ornata subspecies and divided U. ornata philbyi into two groups: Taif+Namas group in the east of Sarawat and Al-Baha+Jazan group in the west of Sarawat. These molecular data are in agreement with current classification of U. ornata. PMID:22312319

  20. Dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids regulated by mitochondrial fission is essential for maintenance of homogeneously active mitochondria during neonatal heart development.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takaya; Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Maeda, Maki; Matsunaga, Yui; Ichimura, Ayaka; Kyogoku, Sachiko; Aoki, Hiroki; Katada, Shun; Nakada, Kazuto; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mizushima, Noboru; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, and their fusion and fission regulate cellular signaling, development, and mitochondrial homeostasis, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) distribution. Cardiac myocytes have a specialized cytoplasmic structure where large mitochondria are aligned into tightly packed myofibril bundles; however, recent studies have revealed that mitochondrial dynamics also plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of cardiomyocytes. Here, we precisely analyzed the role of mitochondrial fission in vivo. The mitochondrial fission GTPase, Drp1, is highly expressed in the developing neonatal heart, and muscle-specific Drp1 knockout (Drp1-KO) mice showed neonatal lethality due to dilated cardiomyopathy. The Drp1 ablation in heart and primary cultured cardiomyocytes resulted in severe mtDNA nucleoid clustering and led to mosaic deficiency of mitochondrial respiration. The functional and structural alteration of mitochondria also led to immature myofibril assembly and defective cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thus, the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids regulated by mitochondrial fission is required for neonatal cardiomyocyte development by promoting homogeneous distribution of active mitochondria throughout the cardiomyocytes.

  1. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Zou, Gui-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced from the tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio in this study. The genome sequence was 16,576 bp in length. The mitochondrial genome contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and 2 non-coding regions (control region and origin of light-strand replication). All genes were encoded on the heavy strain except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The overall base composition is 31.61% A, 25.81% T, 26.62% G, 15.96% C, with an A+T bias of 57.42%. The complete mitogenome data provides useful genetic markers for the studies on the molecular identification, population genetics, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA variations in Madras motor neuron disease

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nalini, Atchayaram; Krishna, Nithin; Sharath, Anugula; Khan, Nahid Akhtar; Tamang, Rakesh; Devi, M. Gourie; Brown, Robert H.; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-01-01

    Although the Madras Motor Neuron Disease (MMND) was found three decades ago, its genetic basis has not been elucidated, so far. The symptom at onset was impaired hearing, upper limb weakness and atrophy. Since some clinical features of MMND overlap with mitochondrial disorders, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of 45 MMND patients and found 396 variations, including 13 disease-associated, 2 mt-tRNA and 33 non-synonymous (16 MT-ND, 10 MT-CO, 3 MT-CYB and 4 MT-ATPase). A rare variant (m.8302A>G) in mt-tRNALeu was found in three patients. We predict that these variation(s) may influence the disease pathogenesis along with some unknown factor(s). PMID:23419391

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Epithelial Ovarian Tumor Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    histological subtype of ovarian cancer and is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. The relationship between stage at presentation and survival in serous ...among and within stages of epithelial ovarian cancer , focusing on serous , mucinous and endometrioid subtypes (1-18 Months). a. Collections and...not serous or mucinous epithelial ovarian tumors. Cancer Res 58: 2095-2097, 1998. 7. Aikhionbare FO et al:.: Is cumulative frequency of mitochondrial

  4. Analysis of Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Segments of Nine Plant Species: Size, Distribution, and Insertion Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear mitochondrial DNA segment (Numt) insertion describes a well-known phenomenon of mitochondrial DNA transfer into a eukaryotic nuclear genome. However, it has not been well understood, especially in plants. Numt insertion patterns vary from species to species in different kingdoms. In this study, the patterns were surveyed in nine plant species, and we found some tip-offs. First, when the mitochondrial genome size is relatively large, the portion of the longer Numt is also larger than the short one. Second, the whole genome duplication event increases the ratio of the shorter Numt portion in the size distribution. Third, Numt insertions are enriched in exon regions. This analysis may be helpful for understanding plant evolution. PMID:27729838

  5. Transmission, inheritance and replication of mitochondrial DNA in mammals: implications for reproductive processes and infertility.

    PubMed

    St John, Justin C

    2012-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome contributes key proteins to the electron-transfer chain, which through oxidative phosphorylation, generates the vast majority of cellular ATP. This maternally inherited genome is transmitted to subsequent generations through the oocyte. Its transmission, inheritance and replication are strictly regulated so that fully mature cells can be appropriately populated with mitochondrial DNA once they mature into adult cells. However, gametes do not always acquire the appropriate numbers of mitochondrial DNA copy; this often renders them inappropriate for successful fertilisation outcome. Furthermore, the number of assisted reproductive technologies that can overcome problems associated with infertility and that can provide enhanced genetic outcomes for the offspring is increasing. However, such techniques could also have a detrimental effect on offspring survival. If we are to introduce these technologies into in vitro fertilisation clinics and animal production, then we first need to validate their use carefully.

  6. Recurrent De Novo Dominant Mutations in SLC25A4 Cause Severe Early-Onset Mitochondrial Disease and Loss of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kyle; Majd, Homa; Dallabona, Christina; Reinson, Karit; King, Martin S; Alston, Charlotte L; He, Langping; Lodi, Tiziana; Jones, Simon A; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Fraenkel, Nitay D; Saada, Ann; Haham, Alon; Isohanni, Pirjo; Vara, Roshni; Barbosa, Inês A; Simpson, Michael A; Deshpande, Charu; Puusepp, Sanna; Bonnen, Penelope E; Rodenburg, Richard J; Suomalainen, Anu; Õunap, Katrin; Elpeleg, Orly; Ferrero, Ileana; McFarland, Robert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-10-06

    Mutations in SLC25A4 encoding the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier AAC1 are well-recognized causes of mitochondrial disease. Several heterozygous SLC25A4 mutations cause adult-onset autosomal-dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions, whereas recessive SLC25A4 mutations cause childhood-onset mitochondrial myopathy and cardiomyopathy. Here, we describe the identification by whole-exome sequencing of seven probands harboring dominant, de novo SLC25A4 mutations. All affected individuals presented at birth, were ventilator dependent and, where tested, revealed severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies associated with a marked loss of mitochondrial DNA copy number in skeletal muscle. Strikingly, an identical c.239G>A (p.Arg80His) mutation was present in four of the seven subjects, and the other three case subjects harbored the same c.703C>G (p.Arg235Gly) mutation. Analysis of skeletal muscle revealed a marked decrease of AAC1 protein levels and loss of respiratory chain complexes containing mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits. We show that both recombinant AAC1 mutant proteins are severely impaired in ADP/ATP transport, affecting most likely the substrate binding and mechanics of the carrier, respectively. This highly reduced capacity for transport probably affects mitochondrial DNA maintenance and in turn respiration, causing a severe energy crisis. The confirmation of the pathogenicity of these de novo SLC25A4 mutations highlights a third distinct clinical phenotype associated with mutation of this gene and demonstrates that early-onset mitochondrial disease can be caused by recurrent de novo mutations, which has significant implications for the application and analysis of whole-exome sequencing data in mitochondrial disease.

  7. Parental diabetes status reveals association of mitochondrial DNA haplogroup J1 with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Feder, Jeanette; Ovadia, Ofer; Blech, Ilana; Cohen, Josef; Wainstein, Julio; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Background Although mitochondrial dysfunction is consistently manifested in patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the association of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variants with T2DM varies among populations. These differences might stem from differing environmental influences among populations. However, other potentially important considerations emanate from the very nature of mitochondrial genetics, namely the notable high degree of partitioning in the distribution of human mtDNA variants among populations, as well as the interaction of mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors working in concert to govern mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that association of mtDNA genetic variants with T2DM could be revealed while controlling for the effect of additional inherited factors, reflected in family history information. Methods To test this hypothesis we set out to investigate whether mtDNA genetic variants will be differentially associated with T2DM depending on the diabetes status of the parents. To this end, association of mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplogroups) with T2DM was assessed in 1055 Jewish patients with and without T2DM parents ('DP' and 'HP', respectively). Results Haplogroup J1 was found to be 2.4 fold under-represented in the 'HP' patients (p = 0.0035). These results are consistent with a previous observation made in Finnish T2DM patients. Moreover, assessing the haplogroup distribution in 'DP' versus 'HP' patients having diabetic siblings revealed that haplogroup J1 was virtually absent in the 'HP' group. Conclusion These results imply the involvement of inherited factors, which modulate the susceptibility of haplogroup J1 to T2DM. PMID:19534826

  8. Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-06-23

    In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

  9. Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future. PMID:26100509

  10. Import of desired nucleic acid sequences using addressing motif of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA for fluorescent in vivo hybridization of mitochondrial DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Alán, Lukáš; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2014-04-01

    Based on the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mitochondria, we have constructed an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mt-mRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. Thus DNA oligonucleotides were constructed, containing the 5'-flanked T7 RNA polymerase promoter. After in vitro transcription and fluorescent labeling with Alexa Fluor(®) 488 or 647 dye, we obtained the fluorescent "L-ND5 probe" containing MAM and exemplar cargo, i.e., annealing sequence to a short portion of ND5 mRNA and to the light-strand mtDNA complementary to the heavy strand nd5 mt gene (5'-end 21 base pair sequence). For mitochondrial in vivo fluorescent hybridization, HepG2 cells were treated with dequalinium micelles, containing the fluorescent probes, bringing the probes proximally to the mitochondrial outer membrane and to the natural import system. A verification of import into the mitochondrial matrix of cultured HepG2 cells was provided by confocal microscopy colocalizations. Transfections using lipofectamine or probes without 5S-rRNA addressing MAM sequence or with MAM only were ineffective. Alternatively, the same DNA oligonucleotides with 5'-CACC overhang (substituting T7 promoter) were transcribed from the tetracycline-inducible pENTRH1/TO vector in human embryonic kidney T-REx®-293 cells, while mitochondrial matrix localization after import of the resulting unlabeled RNA was detected by PCR. The MAM-containing probe was then enriched by three-order of magnitude over the natural ND5 mRNA in the mitochondrial matrix. In conclusion, we present a proof-of-principle for mitochondrial in vivo hybridization and mitochondrial nucleic acid import.

  11. Therapeutic potential of somatic cell nuclear transfer for degenerative disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Greggains, Gareth D.; Lister, Lisa M.; Tuppen, Helen A. L.; Zhang, Qi; Needham, Louise H.; Prathalingam, Nilendran; Hyslop, Louise A.; Craven, Lyndsey; Polanski, Zbigniew; Murdoch, Alison P.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Herbert, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold much promise in the quest for personalised cell therapies. However, the persistence of founder cell mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations limits the potential of iPSCs in the development of treatments for mtDNA disease. This problem may be overcome by using oocytes containing healthy mtDNA, to induce somatic cell nuclear reprogramming. However, the extent to which somatic cell mtDNA persists following fusion with human oocytes is unknown. Here we show that human nuclear transfer (NT) embryos contain very low levels of somatic cell mtDNA. In light of a recent report that embryonic stem cells can be derived from human NT embryos, our results highlight the therapeutic potential of NT for mtDNA disease, and underscore the importance of using human oocytes to pursue this goal. PMID:24457623

  12. Sequencing mitochondrial DNA from a tooth and application to forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Ohira, H; Iwase, H; Takatori, T; Nagao, M; Ohtani, S

    1997-06-01

    Genetic identification can be complicated by long intervals between the time of death and examination of tissues, and sometimes only bone and teeth may be available for analysis. Several investigators have described the isolation of nuclear DNA from these materials, but all have indicated that the DNA is significantly degraded. Recently, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct DNA sequencing have enabled rapid and reliable characterization of specific highly polymorphic DNA sequences from different individuals. Above all, mitochondrial DNA sequences offer several unique advantages for the identification of human remains. The isolation of mtDNA from a tooth and the symmetrical PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing of its most polymorphic regions are reported.

  13. Persistence and protection of mitochondrial DNA in the generative cell of cucumber is consistent with its paternal transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber, unlike most plants, shows paternal inheritance of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); however, the mechanisms regulating this unique transmission mode are unclear. Here we monitored the amounts of mtDNA through the development of cucumber microspores to pollen and observed that mtDNA decreases ...

  14. Horizontal transfer of whole mitochondria restores tumorigenic potential in mitochondrial DNA-deficient cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lan-Feng; Kovarova, Jaromira; Bajzikova, Martina; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Svec, David; Endaya, Berwini; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Coelho, Ana R; Sebkova, Natasa; Ruzickova, Anna; Tan, An S; Kluckova, Katarina; Judasova, Kristyna; Zamecnikova, Katerina; Rychtarcikova, Zuzana; Gopalan, Vinod; Andera, Ladislav; Sobol, Margarita; Yan, Bing; Pattnaik, Bijay; Bhatraju, Naveen; Truksa, Jaroslav; Stopka, Pavel; Hozak, Pavel; Lam, Alfred K; Sedlacek, Radislav; Oliveira, Paulo J; Kubista, Mikael; Agrawal, Anurag; Dvorakova-Hortova, Katerina; Rohlena, Jakub; Berridge, Michael V; Neuzil, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we showed that generation of tumours in syngeneic mice by cells devoid of mitochondrial (mt) DNA (ρ0 cells) is linked to the acquisition of the host mtDNA. However, the mechanism of mtDNA movement between cells remains unresolved. To determine whether the transfer of mtDNA involves whole mitochondria, we injected B16ρ0 mouse melanoma cells into syngeneic C57BL/6Nsu9-DsRed2 mice that express red fluorescent protein in their mitochondria. We document that mtDNA is acquired by transfer of whole mitochondria from the host animal, leading to normalisation of mitochondrial respiration. Additionally, knockdown of key mitochondrial complex I (NDUFV1) and complex II (SDHC) subunits by shRNA in B16ρ0 cells abolished or significantly retarded their ability to form tumours. Collectively, these results show that intact mitochondria with their mtDNA payload are transferred in the developing tumour, and provide functional evidence for an essential role of oxidative phosphorylation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22187.001 PMID:28195532

  15. Exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency radiation induces oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA in primary cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shangcheng; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Zhengping; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Xubu; Li, Maoquan; Chen, Yang; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Zhang, Guangbin; Zhong, Min

    2010-01-22

    Increasing evidence indicates that oxidative stress may be involved in the adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on the brain. Because mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are closely associated with various nervous system diseases and mtDNA is particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, the purpose of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency radiation can cause oxidative damage to mtDNA. In this study, we exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to pulsed RF electromagnetic fields at a frequency of 1800 MHz modulated by 217 Hz at an average special absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg. At 24 h after exposure, we found that RF radiation induced a significant increase in the levels of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OHdG), a common biomarker of DNA oxidative damage, in the mitochondria of neurons. Concomitant with this finding, the copy number of mtDNA and the levels of mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) transcripts showed an obvious reduction after RF exposure. Each of these mtDNA disturbances could be reversed by pretreatment with melatonin, which is known to be an efficient antioxidant in the brain. Together, these results suggested that 1800 MHz RF radiation could cause oxidative damage to mtDNA in primary cultured neurons. Oxidative damage to mtDNA may account for the neurotoxicity of RF radiation in the brain.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence and phylogenetic evaluation of geographically disparate Sus scrofa breeds.

    PubMed

    Cannon, M V; Brandebourg, T D; Kohn, M C; Ðikić, D; Irwin, M H; Pinkert, C A

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) facilitates studies into the metabolic characteristics of production animals and their relation to production traits. Sequence analysis of mtDNA from pure-bred swine with highly disparate production characteristics (Mangalica Blonde, Mangalica Swallow-bellied, Meishan, Turopolje, and Yorkshire) was initiated to evaluate the influence of mtDNA polymorphisms on mitochondrial function. Herein, we report the complete mtDNA sequences of five Sus scrofa breeds and evaluate their position within the phylogeny of domestic swine. Phenotypic traits of Yorkshire, Mangalica Blonde, and Swallow-belly swine are presented to demonstrate their metabolic characteristics. Our data support the division of European and Asian breeds noted previously and confirm European ancestry of Mangalica and Turopolje breeds. Furthermore, mtDNA differences between breeds suggest function-altering changes in proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation such as ATP synthase 6 (MT-ATP6), cytochrome oxidase I (MT-CO1), cytochrome oxidase III (MT-CO3), and cytochrome b (MT-CYB), supporting the hypothesis that mtDNA polymorphisms contribute to differences in metabolic traits between swine breeds. Our sequence data form the basis for future research into the roles of mtDNA in determining production traits in domestic animals. Additionally, such studies should provide insight into how mtDNA haplotype influences the extreme adiposity observed in Mangalica breeds.

  17. Alterations to the expression level of mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, modify the mode of mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Goffart, Steffi; Holt, Ian J.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an abundant mitochondrial protein of the HMG superfamily, with various putative roles in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) metabolism. In this study we have investigated the effects on mtDNA replication of manipulating TFAM expression in cultured human cells. Mammalian mtDNA replication intermediates (RIs) fall into two classes, whose mechanistic relationship is not properly understood. One class is characterized by extensive RNA incorporation on the lagging strand, whereas the other has the structure of products of conventional, strand-coupled replication. TFAM overexpression increased the overall abundance of RIs and shifted them substantially towards those of the conventional, strand-coupled type. The shift was most pronounced in the rDNA region and at various replication pause sites and was accompanied by a drop in the relative amount of replication-termination intermediates, a substantial reduction in mitochondrial transcripts, mtDNA decatenation and progressive copy number depletion. TFAM overexpression could be partially phenocopied by treatment of cells with dideoxycytidine, suggesting that its effects are partially attributable to a decreased rate of fork progression. TFAM knockdown also resulted in mtDNA depletion, but RIs remained mainly of the ribosubstituted type, although termination intermediates were enhanced. We propose that TFAM influences the mode of mtDNA replication via its combined effects on different aspects of mtDNA metabolism. PMID:17062618

  18. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    PubMed

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches.

  19. Quantitative Changes in Gimap3 and Gimap5 Expression Modify Mitochondrial DNA Segregation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jokinen, Riikka; Lahtinen, Taina; Marttinen, Paula; Myöhänen, Maarit; Ruotsalainen, Pilvi; Yeung, Nicolas; Shvetsova, Antonina; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Öhman, Tiina; Nyman, Tuula A.; Weiler, Hartmut; Battersby, Brendan J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a high-copy maternally inherited genome essential for aerobic energy metabolism. Mutations in mtDNA can lead to heteroplasmy, the co-occurence of two different mtDNA variants in the same cell, which can segregate in a tissue-specific manner affecting the onset and severity of mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate mechanisms regulating mtDNA segregation we use a heteroplasmic mouse model with two polymorphic neutral mtDNA haplotypes (NZB and BALB) that displays tissue-specific and age-dependent selection for mtDNA haplotypes. In the hematopoietic compartment there is selection for the BALB mtDNA haplotype, a phenotype that can be modified by allelic variants of Gimap3. Gimap3 is a tail-anchored member of the GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (Gimap) family of protein scaffolds important for leukocyte development and survival. Here we show how the expression of two murine Gimap3 alleles from Mus musculus domesticus and M. m. castaneus differentially affect mtDNA segregation. The castaneus allele has incorporated a uORF (upstream open reading frame) in-frame with the Gimap3 mRNA that impairs translation and imparts a negative effect on the steady-state protein abundance. We found that quantitative changes in the expression of Gimap3 and the paralogue Gimap5, which encodes a lysosomal protein, affect mtDNA segregation in the mouse hematopoietic tissues. We also show that Gimap3 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and not mitochondria as previously reported. Collectively these data show that the abundance of protein scaffolds on the endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are important to the segregation of the mitochondrial genome in the mouse hematopoietic compartment. PMID:25808953

  20. Association between Leukocyte Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Regular Exercise in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu Kyung; Kim, Da Eun; Cho, Soo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that habitual exercise can improve skeletal mitochondrial function; however, to date, the association between exercise and mitochondrial function in peripheral leukocytes has not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between regular exercise and mitochondrial function by measuring leukocyte mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in postmenopausal women. Methods This cross-sectional study included 144 relatively healthy, non-diabetic, non-smoking, postmenopausal women. Clinical parameters, including anthropometric measurements and cardio-metabolic parameters, were assessed. Regular exercise was defined as at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate and vigorous-intensity activity, over a duration of at least 6 months. Leukocyte mtDNA copy numbers were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays, and these were normalized to the β-globin copy number to give the relative mtDNA copy number. Results The mtDNA copy number of peripheral leukocytes was significantly greater in the exercise group (1.33±0.02) than in the no exercise group (1.05±0.02, P<0.01). Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that regular exercise was independently associated with mtDNA copy number (β=0.25, P<0.01) after adjusting for the variables age, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance value, and levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and homocysteine. Conclusion Regular exercise is associated with greater leukocyte mtDNA copy number in postmenopausal women. PMID:27900071

  1. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA in Tibetan gastric cancer patients at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Wang, Xue-Lian; DI, J I; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Li, Guo-Yuan; Wang, Miao-Zhou; Li, Yan; Chen, Rong; Ge, Ri-Li

    2015-07-01

    The highest risk areas of gastric cancer are currently Japan, Korea and China; Qinghai, a high-altitude area, has one of the highest gastric cancer rates in China. The incidence of gastric cancer is higher in the Tibetan ethnic group compared to that in the Han ethnic group in Qinghai. This study was conducted to determine the clinical characteristics of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and copy numbers among Tibetans with gastric cancer residing at high altitudes and investigate the association between adaptations to hypoxic conditions and oncogenesis. A total of 23 Tibetan gastric cancer patients and 40 matched controls were recruited in this study. Leukocyte mtDNA genes and copy numbers were analyzed. The haplogroups were classified based on mitochondrial gene sequences. A total of 56.5% of the study participants had used alcohol at some point in their lives and 73.9% were positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Eight mutations in 8 mitochondrial genes were identified in 43.4% of the Tibetan cancer patient group. There were no significant differences in leukocyte mtDNA copy number levels based on smoking status, alchohol consumption, obesity or H. pylori infection between the control and cancer groups. Statistical differences were also not found between gastric cancer patients with and those without mtDNA mutations. The majority of Tibetan patients with gastric cancer belonged to the mitochondrial haplogroup M9. In conclusion, Tibetans with gastric cancer residing at high altitudes exhibited a wide spectrum of mtDNA mutations. However, leukocyte mtDNA copy numbers in stage II gastric cancer were not statistically different compared to those in healthy Tibetans.

  2. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA in Tibetan gastric cancer patients at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, JUN; ZHAO, JUN-HUI; WANG, XUE-LIAN; DI, JI; LIU, ZHI-BO; LI, GUO-YUAN; WANG, MIAO-ZHOU; LI, YAN; CHEN, RONG; GE, RI-LI

    2015-01-01

    The highest risk areas of gastric cancer are currently Japan, Korea and China; Qinghai, a high-altitude area, has one of the highest gastric cancer rates in China. The incidence of gastric cancer is higher in the Tibetan ethnic group compared to that in the Han ethnic group in Qinghai. This study was conducted to determine the clinical characteristics of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and copy numbers among Tibetans with gastric cancer residing at high altitudes and investigate the association between adaptations to hypoxic conditions and oncogenesis. A total of 23 Tibetan gastric cancer patients and 40 matched controls were recruited in this study. Leukocyte mtDNA genes and copy numbers were analyzed. The haplogroups were classified based on mitochondrial gene sequences. A total of 56.5% of the study participants had used alcohol at some point in their lives and 73.9% were positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Eight mutations in 8 mitochondrial genes were identified in 43.4% of the Tibetan cancer patient group. There were no significant differences in leukocyte mtDNA copy number levels based on smoking status, alchohol consumption, obesity or H. pylori infection between the control and cancer groups. Statistical differences were also not found between gastric cancer patients with and those without mtDNA mutations. The majority of Tibetan patients with gastric cancer belonged to the mitochondrial haplogroup M9. In conclusion, Tibetans with gastric cancer residing at high altitudes exhibited a wide spectrum of mtDNA mutations. However, leukocyte mtDNA copy numbers in stage II gastric cancer were not statistically different compared to those in healthy Tibetans. PMID:26171199

  3. Quality Assessment of Human Mitochondrial DNA Quantification: MITONAUTS, an International Multicentre Survey

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Hélène C.F.; Gerschenson, Mariana; Walker, Ulrich A.; Miro, Oscar; Garrabou, Gloria; Hammond, Emma; Villarroya, Joan; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc; Cinque, Paola; Garcia-Arumi, Elena; Periz, Antonio L. Andreu; Pinti, Marcello; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA quantification by qPCR is used in the context of many diseases and toxicity studies but comparison of results between laboratories is challenging. Through two multigroup distributions of DNA samples from human cell lines, the MITONAUTS group anonymously compared mtDNA/nDNA quantification across nine laboratories involved in HIV research worldwide. Eight of the nine sites showed significant correlation between them (mean raw data R2=0.664; log10-transformed data R2=0.844). Although mtDNA/nDNA values were well correlated between sites, the inter-site variability on the absolute measurements remained high with a mean (range) coefficient of variation of 71 (37–212)%. Some variability appeared cell line-specific, probably due to chromosomal alterations or pseudogenes affecting the quantification of certain genes, while within cell line variability was likely due to differences in calibration of the standard curves. The use of two mtDNA and two single copy nDNA genes with highly specific primers to quantify each genome would help address copy number variants. Our results indicate that sample shipment must be done frozen and that absolute mtDNA/nDNA ratio values cannot readily be compared between laboratories, especially if assessing cultured cell mtDNA content. However, within laboratory and relative mtDNA/nDNA comparisons between laboratories should be reliable. PMID:21303702

  4. Nimesulide aggravates redox imbalance and calcium dependent mitochondrial permeability transition leading to dysfunction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Tripathi, Madhulika; Pandey, Pramod Kumar; Kakkar, Poonam

    2010-09-10

    Nimesulide (selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug for the symptomatic treatment of painful conditions like osteoarthritis, spondilitis and primary dysmenorrhoea. Nimesulide induced liver damage is a serious side effect of this otherwise popular drug. The mechanism involved in nimesulide induced hepatotoxicity is still not fully elucidated. However, both mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress have been implicated in contributing to liver injury in susceptible patients. Mitochondria besides being the primary source of energy, act as a hub of signals responsible for initiating cell death, irrespective of the pathway, i.e. apoptosis or necrosis. The present study was aimed to explore the role of compounding stress, i.e. Ca(2+) overload and GSH depletion in nimesulide induced mitochondrial toxicity and dysfunction. Our study showed that, nimesulide (100 microM) treatment resulted into rapid depletion of GSH (60%) in isolated rat liver mitochondria and significant Ca(2+) dependent MPT changed. Enhanced ROS generation (DCF fluorescence) was also observed in mitochondria treated with nimesulide. An important finding was that the concentration at which nimesulide oxidized reduced pyridine nucleotides (autofluorescence of NAD(P)H), it affected mitochondrial electron flow (MTT activity decreased by 75%) and enhanced mitochondrial depolarization significantly as assessed by Rhodamine 123 fluorescent probe. Therefore, nimesulide was found to aggravate redox imbalance and affect Ca(2+) dependent mitochondrial membrane permeability transition leading to dysfunction and ultimately cell death.

  5. Permeability transition pore-mediated mitochondrial superoxide flashes regulate cortical neural progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan; Mattson, Mark P; Cheng, Aiwu

    2013-01-01

    In the process of neurogenesis, neural progenitor cells (NPCs) cease dividing and differentiate into postmitotic neurons that grow dendrites and an axon, become excitable, and establish synapses with other neurons. Mitochondrial biogenesis and aerobic metabolism provide energy substrates required to support the differentiation, growth and synaptic activity of neurons. Mitochondria may also serve signaling functions and, in this regard, it was recently reported that mitochondria can generate rapid bursts of superoxide (superoxide flashes), the frequency of which changes in response to environmental conditions and signals including oxygen levels and Ca(2+) fluxes. Here we show that the frequency of mitochondrial superoxide flashes increases as embryonic cerebral cortical neurons differentiate from NPCs, and provide evidence that the superoxide flashes serve a signaling function that is critical for the differentiation process. The superoxide flashes are mediated by mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, and pharmacological inhibition of the mPTP suppresses neuronal differentiation. Moreover, superoxide flashes and neuronal differentiation are inhibited by scavenging of mitochondrial superoxide. Conversely, manipulations that increase superoxide flash frequency accelerate neuronal differentiation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for mitochondrial superoxide flashes, mediated by mPTP opening, in neuronal differentiation.

  6. Saami and Berbers--an unexpected mitochondrial DNA link.

    PubMed

    Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Battaglia, Vincenza; Pala, Maria; Olivieri, Anna; Fornarino, Simona; Magri, Chiara; Scozzari, Rosaria; Babudri, Nora; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A Silvana; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Semino, Ornella; Torroni, Antonio

    2005-05-01

    The sequencing of entire human mitochondrial DNAs belonging to haplogroup U reveals that this clade arose shortly after the "out of Africa" exit and rapidly radiated into numerous regionally distinct subclades. Intriguingly, the Saami of Scandinavia and the Berbers of North Africa were found to share an extremely young branch, aged merely approximately 9,000 years. This unexpected finding not only confirms that the Franco-Cantabrian refuge area of southwestern Europe was the source of late-glacial expansions of hunter-gatherers that repopulated northern Europe after the Last Glacial Maximum but also reveals a direct maternal link between those European hunter-gatherer populations and the Berbers.

  7. History of plastid DNA insertions reveals weak deletion and at mutation biases in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-21

    Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes exhibit many unusual properties, including heterogeneous nucleotide composition and exceptionally large and variable genome sizes. Determining the role of nonadaptive mechanisms such as mutation bias in shaping the molecular evolution of these unique genomes has proven challenging because their dynamic structures generally prevent identification of homologous intergenic sequences for comparative analyses. Here, we report an analysis of angiosperm mitochondrial DNA sequences that are derived from inserted plastid DNA (mtpts). The availability of numerous completely sequenced plastid genomes allows us to infer the evolutionary history of these insertions, including the specific nucleotide substitutions and indels that have occurred because their incorporation into the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis confirmed that many mtpts have a complex history, including frequent gene conversion and multiple examples of horizontal transfer between divergent angiosperm lineages. Nevertheless, it is clear that the majority of extant mtpt sequence in angiosperms is the product of recent transfer (or gene conversion) and is subject to rapid loss/deterioration, suggesting that most mtpts are evolving relatively free from functional constraint. The evolution of mtpt sequences reveals a pattern of biased mutational input in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes, including an excess of small deletions over insertions and a skew toward nucleotide substitutions that increase AT content. However, these mutation biases are far weaker than have been observed in many other cellular genomes, providing insight into some of the notable features of angiosperm mitochondrial architecture, including the retention of large intergenic regions and the relatively neutral GC content found in these regions.

  8. Peripheral Blood Mitochondrial DNA Damage as a Potential Noninvasive Biomarker of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manish; Lillvis, John; Seyoum, Berhane; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the development of diabetic retinopathy, retinal mitochondria become dysfunctional, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is damaged. Because retinopathy is a progressive disease, and circulating glucose levels are high in diabetes, our aim was to investigate if peripheral blood mtDNA damage can serve as a potential biomarker of diabetic retinopathy. Methods Peripheral blood mtDNA damage was investigated by extended-length PCR in rats and mice, diabetic for 10 to 12 months (streptozotocin-induced, type 1 model), and in 12- and 40-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF, type 2). Mitochondrial copy number (in gDNA) and transcription (in cDNA) were quantified by qPCR. Similar parameters were measured in blood from diabetic patients with/without retinopathy. Results Peripheral blood from diabetic rodents had significantly increased mtDNA damage and decreased copy numbers and transcription. Lipoic acid administration in diabetic rats, or Sod2 overexpression or MMP-9 knockdown in mice, the therapies that prevent diabetic retinopathy, also ameliorated blood mtDNA damage and restored copy numbers and transcription. Although blood from 40-week-old ZDF rats had significant mtDNA damage, 12-week-old rats had normal mtDNA. Diabetic patients with retinopathy had increased blood mtDNA damage, and decreased transcription and copy numbers compared with diabetic patients without retinopathy and nondiabetic individuals. Conclusions Type 1 diabetic rodents with oxidative stress modulated by pharmacologic/genetic means, and type 2 animal model and patients with/without diabetic retinopathy, demonstrate a strong relation between peripheral blood mtDNA damage and diabetic retinopathy, and suggest the possibility of use of peripheral blood mtDNA as a noninvasive biomarker of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27494345

  9. Germline mitochondrial DNA mutations aggravate ageing and can impair brain development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jaime M; Stewart, James B; Hagström, Erik; Brené, Stefan; Mourier, Arnaud; Coppotelli, Giuseppe; Freyer, Christoph; Lagouge, Marie; Hoffer, Barry J; Olson, Lars; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-09-19

    Ageing is due to an accumulation of various types of damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction has long been considered to be important in this process. There is substantial sequence variation in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and the high mutation rate is counteracted by different mechanisms that decrease maternal transmission of mutated mtDNA. Despite these protective mechanisms, it is becoming increasingly clear that low-level mtDNA heteroplasmy is quite common and often inherited in humans. We designed a series of mouse mutants to investigate the extent to which inherited mtDNA mutations can contribute to ageing. Here we report that maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations can induce mild ageing phenotypes in mice with a wild-type nuclear genome. Furthermore, maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations lead to anticipation of reduced fertility in mice that are heterozygous for the mtDNA mutator allele (PolgA(wt/mut)) and aggravate premature ageing phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice (PolgA(mut/mut)). Unexpectedly, a combination of maternally transmitted and somatic mtDNA mutations also leads to stochastic brain malformations. Our findings show that a pre-existing mutation load will not only allow somatic mutagenesis to create a critically high total mtDNA mutation load sooner but will also increase clonal expansion of mtDNA mutations to enhance the normally occurring mosaic respiratory chain deficiency in ageing tissues. Our findings suggest that maternally transmitted mtDNA mutations may have a similar role in aggravating aspects of normal human ageing.

  10. Therapeutic Targeting of the Mitochondria Initiates Excessive Superoxide Production and Mitochondrial Depolarization Causing Decreased mtDNA Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L.; Biel, Thomas G.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Rao, V. Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation is closely associated with excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Altered redox homeostasis has been implicated in the onset of several diseases including cancer. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and proteins are particularly sensitive to ROS as they are in close proximity to the respiratory chain (RC). Mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted redox agent, selectively damages breast cancer cells possibly through damage induced via enhanced ROS production. However, the effects of MitoQ and other triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) conjugated agents on cancer mitochondrial homeostasis remain unknown. The primary objective of this study was to determine the impact of mitochondria-targeted agent [(MTAs) conjugated to TPP+: mitoTEMPOL, mitoquinone and mitochromanol-acetate] on mitochondrial physiology and mtDNA integrity in breast (MDA-MB-231) and lung (H23) cancer cells. The integrity of the mtDNA was assessed by quantifying the degree of mtDNA fragmentation and copy number, as well as by measuring mitochondrial proteins essential to mtDNA stability and maintenance (TFAM, SSBP1, TWINKLE, POLG and POLRMT). Mitochondrial status was evaluated by measuring superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification and mRNA or protein levels of the RC complexes along with TCA cycle activity. In this study, we demonstrated that all investigated MTAs impair mitochondrial health and decrease mtDNA integrity in MDA-MB-231 and H23 cells. However, differences in the degree of mitochondrial damage and mtDNA degradation suggest unique properties among each MTA that may be cell line, dose and time dependent. Collectively, our study indicates the potential for TPP+ conjugated molecules to impair breast and lung cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:28030582

  11. Ancient mitochondrial DNA from Malaysian hair samples: some indications of Southeast Asian population movements.

    PubMed

    Ricaut, François-X; Bellatti, M; Lahr, Marta Mirazon

    2006-01-01

    The late Pleistocene and early Holocene population history of Southeast Asia is not well-known. Our study provides new data on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages of the aboriginal inhabitants of the Malay Peninsula, and through an extensive comparison to the known mtDNA diversity in Southeast and East Asia, provides some new insights into the origins and historical geography of certain mtDNA lineages in the region. We extracted DNA from hair samples (dating back 100 years) preserved in the Duckworth Collection and belonging to two Peninsular Malaysian individuals identified as "Negrito." Ancient DNA was analyzed by sequencing hypervariable region I (HVS-I) of the mtDNA control region and the mtDNA region V length polymorphism. The results show that the maternal lineages of these individuals belong to a recently defined haplogroup B sub-branch called B4c2. A comparison of mitochondrial haplotypes and haplogroups with those of 10,349 East Asian individuals indicates their very restricted geographical distribution (southwestern China, Southeast Asia Peninsula, and Indonesia). Recalculation of the B4c2 age across all of East Asia ( approximately 13,000 years) and in different subregions/populations suggests its rapid diffusion in Southeast Asia between the end of the Last Glacial Maximum and the Neolithic expansion of the Holocene.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA content contributes to healthy aging in Chinese: a study from nonagenarians and centenarians.

    PubMed

    He, Yong-Han; Lu, Xiang; Wu, Huan; Cai, Wang-Wei; Yang, Li-Qin; Xu, Liang-You; Sun, Hong-Peng; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content plays an important role in energy production and sustaining normal physiological function. A decline in the mtDNA content and subsequent dysfunction cause various senile diseases, with decreasing mtDNA content observed in the elderly individuals with age-related diseases. In contrast, the oldest old individuals, for example, centenarians, have a delayed or reduced prevalence of these diseases, suggesting centenarians may have a different pattern of the mtDNA content, enabling them to keep normal mitochondrial functions to help delay or escape senile diseases. To test this hypothesis, a total of 961 subjects, consisting of 424 longevity subjects and 537 younger control subjects from Hainan and Sichuan provinces of China, were recruited for this study. The mtDNA content was found to be inversely associated with age among the age of group 40-70 years. Surprisingly, no reduction of mtDNA content was observed in nonagenarians and centenarians; instead, these oldest old showed a significant increase than the elderly people aged between 50 and 70 years. The results suggest the higher mtDNA content may convey a beneficial effect to the longevity of people through assuring sufficient energy supply.

  13. p-Bromophenacyl bromide prevents cumene hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial permeability transition by inhibiting pyridine nucleotide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, A; Gogvadze, G; Gogvadze, V

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial permeability transition is commonly characterized as a Ca2+ -dependent non-specific increase in inner membrane permeability that results in swelling of mitochondria and their de-energization. In the present study, the effect of different inhibitors of phospholipase A2--p-bromophenacyl bromide, dibucaine, and aristolochic acid--on hydroperoxide-induced permeability transitions in rat liver mitochondria was tested. p-Bromophenacyl bromide completely prevented the hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial permeability transition while the effects of dibucaine or aristolochic acid were negligible. Organic hydroperoxides added to mitochondria undergo reduction to corresponding alcohols by mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase. This reduction occurs at the expense of GSH which, in turn, can be reduced by glutathione reductase via oxidation of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides. The latter is considered a prerequisite step for mitochondrial permeability transition. Among all the inhibitors tested, only p-bromophenacyl bromide completely prevented hydroperoxide-induced oxidation of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides. Interestingly, p-bromophenacyl bromide had no affect on mitochondrial glutathione peroxidase, but reacted with mitochondrial glutathione that prevented pyridine nucleotides from being oxidized. Our data suggest that p-bromophenacyl bromide prevents hydroperoxide-induced deterioration of mitochondria via interaction with glutathione rather than through inhibition of phospholipase A2.

  14. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore: molecular nature and role as a target in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Paolo; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) - an abrupt increase permeability of the inner membrane to solutes - is a causative event in ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart, and the focus of intense research in cardioprotection. The PT is due to opening of the PT pore (PTP), a high conductance channel that is critically regulated by a variety of pathophysiological effectors. Very recent work indicates that the PTP forms from the F-ATP synthase, which would switch from an energy-conserving to an energy-dissipating device. This review provides an update on the current debate on how this transition is achieved, and on the PTP as a target for therapeutic intervention. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Mitochondria: from basic mitochondrial biology to cardiovascular disease".

  15. Nondestructive sampling of human skeletal remains yields ancient nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Bolnick, Deborah A; Bonine, Holly M; Mata-Míguez, Jaime; Kemp, Brian M; Snow, Meradeth H; LeBlanc, Steven A

    2012-02-01

    Museum curators and living communities are sometimes reluctant to permit ancient DNA (aDNA) studies of human skeletal remains because the extraction of aDNA usually requires the destruction of at least some skeletal material. Whether these views stem from a desire to conserve precious materials or an objection to destroying ancestral remains, they limit the potential of aDNA research. To help address concerns about destructive analysis and to minimize damage to valuable specimens, we describe a nondestructive method for extracting DNA from ancient human remains. This method can be used with both teeth and bone, but it preserves the structural integrity of teeth much more effectively than that of bone. Using this method, we demonstrate that it is possible to extract both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from human remains dating between 300 BC and 1600 AD. Importantly, the method does not expose the remains to hazardous chemicals, allowing them to be safely returned to curators, custodians, and/or owners of the samples. We successfully amplified mitochondrial DNA from 90% of the individuals tested, and we were able to analyze 1-9 nuclear loci in 70% of individuals. We also show that repeated nondestructive extractions from the same tooth can yield amplifiable mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. The high success rate of this method and its ability to yield DNA from samples spanning a wide geographic and temporal range without destroying the structural integrity of the sampled material may make possible the genetic study of skeletal collections that are not available for destructive analysis.

  16. CARDIOSELECTIVE OXIDATION OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA FOLLOWING SUBCHRONIC ADMINISTRATION OF DOXORUBICIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This preferential oxidation of cardiac mtDNA is consistent with the bioenergetic failure and the cumulative and irreversible cardiomyopathy that limits the clinical utility of this important antineoplastic drug.

  17. Complete Sequence of the Mitochondrial DNA of the Annelid Worm Lumbricus Terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Boore, J. L.; Brown, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have determined the complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of the mitochondrial genome of an oligochaete annelid, the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. This genome contains the 37 genes typical of metazoan mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), including ATPase8, which is missing from some invertebrate mtDNAs. ATPase8 is not immediately upstream of ATPase6, a condition found previously only in the mtDNA of snails. All genes are transcribed from the same DNA strand. The largest noncoding region is 384 nt and is characterized by se