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Sample records for mitochondrial gene expression

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  2. Mitochondrial gene expression: influence of nutrients and hormones.

    PubMed

    Berdanier, Carolyn D

    2006-11-01

    Mitochondrial gene transcription research has exploded over the last decade. Nuclear-encoded proteins, nutrients, and hormones all work to regulate the transcription of this genome. To date, very few of the transcription factors have been shown to have negative effects on mitochondrial gene expression, although there are likely conditions where such downregulation may occur.

  3. Regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, the epigenetic enigma.

    PubMed

    Mposhi, Archibold; Van der Wijst, Monique Gp; Faber, Klaas Nico; Rots, Marianne G

    2017-03-01

    Epigenetics provides an important layer of information on top of the DNA sequence and is essential for establishing gene expression profiles. Extensive studies have shown that nuclear DNA methylation and histone modifications influence nuclear gene expression. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) undergoes similar epigenetic changes to regulate mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, it has been shown that mtDNA is differentially methylated in various diseases such as diabetes and colorectal cancer. Interestingly, this differential methylation was often associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression. However, the direct role of mtDNA methylation on gene expression remains elusive. Alternatively, the activity of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), a protein involved in mtDNA packaging, might also influence gene expression. This review discusses the role of mtDNA methylation and potential epigenetic-like modifications of TFAM with respect to mtDNA transcription and replication. We suggest three mechanisms: (1) methylation within the non-coding D-loop, (2) methylation at gene start sites (GSS) and (3) post-translational modifications (PTMs) of TFAM. Unraveling mitochondrial gene expression regulation could open new therapeutic avenues for mitochondrial diseases.

  4. Expression of petite mitochondrial DNA in vivo: zygotic gene rescue.

    PubMed

    Strausberg, R L; Butow, R A

    1977-07-01

    A protocol is introduced for probing the organization and regulation of expression of the yeast mitochondrial genome, termed "zygotic gene rescue." The procedure is based on the notion that genes retained on mitochondrial DNA of on the notion that genes retained on mitochondrial DNA of petites can be expressed in zygotes of a cross between petite and wild type. To test the validity of this notion, we have taken advantage of our ability to discriminate, by mobility differences on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels, different forms of the product of alleles of the mitochondrial gene, varI. In petite strains that have retained the varI gene, its characteristic product appears in zygotes 4-5 hr after mating; no product is observed in petite strains deleted in the varI locus. Our studies indicate that (i) expression in the zygote of the varI gene in the petite genome is not exclusively the result of recombination with mitochondrial DNA of the wild-type tester, and (ii) the varI gene is probably reiterated in the petite mitochondrial genome. The strength of the technique of zygotic gene rescue in the analysis of the mitochondrial genome is discussed.

  5. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-12-15

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P<10-8) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P < 0.05) in an independent dataset of n = 452 unrelated individuals. There was no evidence for sexual dimorphic gene expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P≈10-7). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Mitochondrial and Metabolic Gene Expression in the Aged Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Gregory P.; Sepe, Joseph J.; McKiernan, Susan H.; Aiken, Judd M.; Diffee, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cardiac function. Exercise intervention has been suggested as a way to improve this decrement. Age-related decline in cardiac function is associated with decreases in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity. The molecular mechanisms involved with age-related changes in mitochondrial function and substrate metabolism are poorly understood. We determined gene expression differences in hearts of Young (6 mo), Old (33 mo), and old exercise trained (Old + EXE) (34 mo) FBN rats, using Qiagen PCR arrays for Glucose, Fatty acid, and Mitochondrial metabolism. Old rats demonstrated decreased (p < 0.05) expression for key genes in fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and AMPK signaling. There were no differences in the expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism with age. These gene expression changes occurred prior to altered protein translation as we found no differences in the protein content of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma, coactivators 1 alpha (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and AMPKα2 between young and old hearts. Four months of exercise training did not attenuate the decline in the gene expression in aged hearts. Despite this lack of change in gene expression, exercise-trained rats demonstrated increased exercise capacity compared to their sedentary counterparts. Taken together, our results show that differential expression of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function decrease in the aging heart which may play a role in age-related declines in fatty acid oxidation, AMPK activity, and mitochondrial function in the heart. PMID:27601998

  7. Cyclophilin-D: a resident regulator of mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Bazarek, Stanley; Chandran, Bala; Gazmuri, Raúl J

    2015-07-01

    Cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D) is a mitochondrial matrix peptidyl-prolyl isomerase. Because cyclophilins can regulate nuclear gene expression, we examined whether Cyp-D could regulate mitochondrial gene expression. We demonstrated in HEK 293T cells that transfected Cyp-D interacts with mitochondrial transcription factors B1 and B2 (TFB2M) but not with mitochondrial transcription factor A. We also demonstrated that Cyp-D interacts in vivo with TFB2M. Genetic silencing of Cyp-D and pharmacologic inhibition of Cyp-D markedly reduced mitochondrial transcription to 18 ± 5% (P < 0.05) and 24 ± 3% (P < 0.05) of respective controls. The level of interaction between Cyp-D and TFB2M correlated with the level of nascent mitochondrial RNA intensity (r = 0.896; P = 0.0156). Cyp-D silencing down-regulated mitochondrial transcripts initiated from the heavy strand promoter 2 [i.e., NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) by 11-fold, P < 0.005; cytochrome oxidase 1 (COX1) by 4-fold, P < 0.001; and ATP synthase subunit 6 (ATP6) by 6.5-fold, P < 0.005); but not NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6)], which is initiated from the light strand promoter. Cyp-D silencing reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular oxygen consumption (from 59 ± 5 to 34 ± 1 µmol oxygen/min/10(6) cells, P < 0.001); the latter without a statistically significant reversal after uncoupling electron transport from ATP synthesis, consistent with down-regulation of electron transport complexes. Accordingly, these studies provide novel evidence that Cyp-D could play a key role in regulating mitochondrial gene expression. © FASEB.

  8. Gemini surfactants mediate efficient mitochondrial gene delivery and expression.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Cardoso, Ana L; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-03-02

    Gene delivery targeting mitochondria has the potential to transform the therapeutic landscape of mitochondrial genetic diseases. Taking advantage of the nonuniversal genetic code used by mitochondria, a plasmid DNA construct able to be specifically expressed in these organelles was designed by including a codon, which codes for an amino acid only if read by the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the present work, gemini surfactants were shown to successfully deliver plasmid DNA to mitochondria. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were taken up by cells through a variety of routes, including endocytic pathways, and showed propensity for inducing membrane destabilization under acidic conditions, thus facilitating cytoplasmic release of DNA. Furthermore, the complexes interacted extensively with lipid membrane models mimicking the composition of the mitochondrial membrane, which predicts a favored interaction of the complexes with mitochondria in the intracellular environment. This work unravels new possibilities for gene therapy toward mitochondrial diseases.

  9. Gene Expression in a Drosophila Model of Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J. M.; Chen, Shanjun; Kemppainen, Esko; O'Dell, Kevin M. C.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2010-01-01

    Background A point mutation in the Drosophila gene technical knockout (tko), encoding mitoribosomal protein S12, was previously shown to cause a phenotype of respiratory chain deficiency, developmental delay, and neurological abnormalities similar to those presented in many human mitochondrial disorders, as well as defective courtship behavior. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe a transcriptome-wide analysis of gene expression in tko25t mutant flies that revealed systematic and compensatory changes in the expression of genes connected with metabolism, including up-regulation of lactate dehydrogenase and of many genes involved in the catabolism of fats and proteins, and various anaplerotic pathways. Gut-specific enzymes involved in the primary mobilization of dietary fats and proteins, as well as a number of transport functions, were also strongly up-regulated, consistent with the idea that oxidative phosphorylation OXPHOS dysfunction is perceived physiologically as a starvation for particular biomolecules. In addition, many stress-response genes were induced. Other changes may reflect a signature of developmental delay, notably a down-regulation of genes connected with reproduction, including gametogenesis, as well as courtship behavior in males; logically this represents a programmed response to a mitochondrially generated starvation signal. The underlying signalling pathway, if conserved, could influence many physiological processes in response to nutritional stress, although any such pathway involved remains unidentified. Conclusions/Significance These studies indicate that general and organ-specific metabolism is transformed in response to mitochondrial dysfunction, including digestive and absorptive functions, and give important clues as to how novel therapeutic strategies for mitochondrial disorders might be developed. PMID:20066047

  10. Mitochondrial gene expression, antioxidant responses, and histopathology after cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Al Kaddissi, Simone; Legeay, Alexia; Elia, Antonia Concetta; Gonzalez, Patrice; Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Simon, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    The present study investigates cadmium effects on the transcription of mitochondrial genes of Procambarus clarkii after acute (0.05, 0.5, and 5 mg Cd/L; 4-10 days) and chronic exposures (10 μg Cd/L; 30-60 days). Transcriptional responses of cox1, atp6, and 12S using quantitative real-time RT-PCR were assessed in gills and hepatopancreas. Additionally, the expression levels of genes involved in detoxification and/or oxidative stress responses [mt, sod(Mn)] and enzymatic activities of antioxidants (SOD, CAT, GPX, and GST) were analyzed. The histopathological effects in hepatopancreas of crayfish were evaluated by light microscopy. Relationships between endpoints at different levels of biological organization and Cd bioaccumulation were also examined. Cd induced high levels of bioaccumulation, which was followed by mitochondrial dysfunction and histological alterations in both experiments. Moreover, perturbations in the defence mechanisms against oxidative stress tended to increase with time. Results also showed that molecular responses can vary depending on the intensity and duration of the chemical stress applied to the organisms and that the study of mt gene expression levels seemed to be the best tool to assess Cd intoxication.

  11. Ancient Out-of-Africa Mitochondrial DNA Variants Associate with Distinct Mitochondrial Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mishmar, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants have been traditionally used as markers to trace ancient population migrations. Although experiments relying on model organisms and cytoplasmic hybrids, as well as disease association studies, have served to underline the functionality of certain mtDNA SNPs, only little is known of the regulatory impact of ancient mtDNA variants, especially in terms of gene expression. By analyzing RNA-seq data of 454 lymphoblast cell lines from the 1000 Genomes Project, we found that mtDNA variants defining the most common African genetic background, the L haplogroup, exhibit a distinct overall mtDNA gene expression pattern, which was independent of mtDNA copy numbers. Secondly, intra-population analysis revealed subtle, yet significant, expression differences in four tRNA genes. Strikingly, the more prominent African mtDNA gene expression pattern best correlated with the expression of nuclear DNA-encoded RNA-binding proteins, and with SNPs within the mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins PTCD1 and MRPS7. Our results thus support the concept of an ancient regulatory transition of mtDNA-encoded genes as humans left Africa to populate the rest of the world. PMID:27812116

  12. Mitochondrial respiratory gene expression is suppressed in many cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reznik, Ed; Wang, Qingguo; La, Konnor; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The fundamental metabolic decision of a cell, the balance between respiration and fermentation, rests in part on expression of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and coordination with expression of the nuclear genome (nuDNA). Previously we described mtDNA copy number depletion across many solid tumor types (Reznik et al., 2016). Here, we use orthogonal RNA-sequencing data to quantify mtDNA expression (mtRNA), and report analogously lower expression of mtRNA in tumors (relative to normal tissue) across a majority of cancer types. Several cancers exhibit a trio of mutually consistent evidence suggesting a drop in respiratory activity: depletion of mtDNA copy number, decreases in mtRNA levels, and decreases in expression of nuDNA-encoded respiratory proteins. Intriguingly, a minority of cancer types exhibit a drop in mtDNA expression but an increase in nuDNA expression of respiratory proteins, with unknown implications for respiratory activity. Our results indicate suppression of respiratory gene expression across many cancer types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21592.001 PMID:28099114

  13. Evidence of a bigenomic regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by thyroid hormone during rat brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Pathak, Amrita; Mohan, Vishwa; Babu, Satish; Pal, Amit; Khare, Drirh; Godbole, Madan M.

    2010-07-02

    Hypothyroidism during early mammalian brain development is associated with decreased expression of various mitochondrial encoded genes along with evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, in-spite of the similarities between neurological disorders caused by perinatal hypothyroidism and those caused by various genetic mitochondrial defects we still do not know as to how thyroid hormone (TH) regulates mitochondrial transcription during development and whether this regulation by TH is nuclear mediated or through mitochondrial TH receptors? We here in rat cerebellum show that hypothyroidism causes reduction in expression of nuclear encoded genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis like PGC-1{alpha}, NRF-1{alpha} and Tfam. Also, we for the first time demonstrate a mitochondrial localization of thyroid hormone receptor (mTR) isoform in developing brain capable of binding a TH response element (DR2) present in D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA. These results thus indicate an integrated nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk in regulation of mitochondrial transcription by TH during brain development.

  14. Nuclear gene dosage effects upon the expression of maize mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed Central

    Auger, D L; Newton, K J; Birchler, J A

    2001-01-01

    Each mitochondrion possesses a genome that encodes some of its own components. The nucleus encodes most of the mitochondrial proteins, including the polymerases and factors that regulate the expression of mitochondrial genes. Little is known about the number or location of these nuclear factors. B-A translocations were used to create dosage series for 14 different chromosome arms in maize plants with normal cytoplasm. The presence of one or more regulatory factors on a chromosome arm was indicated when variation of its dosage resulted in the alteration in the amount of a mitochondrial transcript. We used quantitative Northern analysis to assay the transcript levels of three mitochondrially encoded components of the cytochrome c oxidase complex (cox1, cox2, and cox3). Data for a nuclearly encoded component (cox5b) and for two mitochondrial genes that are unrelated to cytochrome c oxidase, ATP synthase alpha-subunit and 18S rRNA, were also determined. Two tissues, embryo and endosperm, were compared and most effects were found to be tissue specific. Significantly, the array of dosage effects upon mitochondrial genes was similar to what had been previously found for nuclear genes. These results support the concept that although mitochondrial genes are prokaryotic in origin, their regulation has been extensively integrated into the eukaryotic cell. PMID:11290725

  15. Reduced expression of Paternally Expressed Gene-3 enhances somatic cell reprogramming through mitochondrial activity perturbation.

    PubMed

    Theka, Ilda; Sottile, Francesco; Aulicino, Francesco; Garcia, Alvaro Castells; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2017-08-29

    Imprinted genes control several cellular and metabolic processes in embryonic and adult tissues. In particular, paternally expressed gene-3 (Peg3) is active in the adult stem cell population and during muscle and neuronal lineage development. Here we have investigated the role of Peg3 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and during the process of somatic cell reprogramming towards pluripotency. Our data show that Peg3 knockdown increases expression of pluripotency genes in ESCs and enhances reprogramming efficiency of both mouse embryonic fibroblasts and neural stem cells. Interestingly, we observed that altered activity of Peg3 correlates with major perturbations of mitochondrial gene expression and mitochondrial function, which drive metabolic changes during somatic cell reprogramming. Overall, our study shows that Peg3 is a regulator of pluripotent stem cells and somatic cell reprogramming.

  16. Effects of dietary fatty acids on mitochondrial phospholipid compositions, oxidative status and mitochondrial gene expression of zebrafish at different ages.

    PubMed

    Betancor, M B; Almaida-Pagán, P F; Hernández, A; Tocher, D R

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL) and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, oxidative status (TBARS content and SOD activity) and mtDNA gene expression of muscle and liver were analyzed in zebrafish fed two diets with lipid supplied either by rapeseed oil (RO) or a blend 60:40 of RO and DHA500 TG oil (DHA). Two feeding trials were performed using zebrafish from the same population of two ages (8 and 21 months). Dietary FA composition affected fish growth in 8-month-old animals, which could be related to an increase in stress promoted by diet composition. Lipid peroxidation was considerably higher in mitochondria of 8-month-old zebrafish fed the DHA diet than in animals fed the RO diet. This could indicate higher oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, very likely due to increased incorporation of DHA in PL of mitochondrial membranes. Lipids would be among the first molecules affected by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation could propagate oxidative reactions that would damage other molecules, including mtDNA. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and gene expression of 21-month-old fish showed lower responsiveness to diet composition than those of younger fish. Differences found in the effect of diet composition on mitochondrial lipids between the two age groups could be indicating age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes.

  17. Dysfunctional chloroplasts up-regulate the expression of mitochondrial genes in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jo-Chien; Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Tseng, Ching-Chih; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2016-02-01

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria play important roles in maintaining metabolic and energy homeostasis in the plant cell. The interactions between these two organelles, especially photosynthesis and respiration, have been intensively studied. Still, little is known about the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression by chloroplasts and vice versa. The gene expression machineries in chloroplasts and mitochondria rely heavily on the nuclear genome. Thus, the interactions between nucleus and these organelles, including anterograde and retrograde regulation, have been actively investigated in the last two decades. Norflurazon (NF) and lincomycin (Lin) are two commonly used inhibitors to study chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signaling in plants. We used NF and Lin to block the development and functions of chloroplasts and examined their effects on mitochondrial gene expression, RNA editing and splicing. The editing of most mitochondrial transcripts was not affected, but the editing extents of nad4-107, nad6-103, and ccmFc-1172 decreased slightly in NF- and Lin-treated seedlings. While the splicing of mitochondrial transcripts was not significantly affected, steady-state mRNA levels of several mitochondrial genes increased significantly in NF- and Lin-treated seedlings. Moreover, Lin seemed to have more profound effects than NF on the expression of mitochondrial genes, indicating that signals derived from these two inhibitors might be distinct. NF and Lin also significantly induced the expression of nuclear genes encoding subunits of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. Thus, dysfunctional chloroplasts may coordinately up-regulate the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory complexes.

  18. A focused microarray to study human mitochondrial and nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed

    Voss, Joachim G; Raju, Raghavan; Logun, Carolea; Danner, Robert L; Munson, Peter J; Rangel, Zoila; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-04-01

    A focused microarray (huMITOchip) was developed to study alterations of human mitochondrial and nuclear gene expression in health and disease. The huMITOchip contains 4,774 probe sets identical to the Affymetrix U 133 plus 2.0 chip covering genes affecting mitochondrial, lipid, cytokine, apoptosis, and muscle function transcripts. Unlike other gene chips, the huMITOchip has 51 probe sets that interrogate 37 genes of the mitochondrial genome. The human mitochondrial gene chip was validated against the Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array using an in vitro system of CCL136 muscle cell line stimulated with or without interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The 37 genes from the mtDNA demonstrated absolute gene expression levels ranging from 0.1 to 3,182. The comparison of the two gene chips yielded an excellent Pearson's correlation coefficient (r = 0.98). At least 17 probe sets were differentially expressed in response to IFN-gamma on both chips, with a high degree of concordance. This is the first report on the development of a focused oligonucleotide microarray containing genes of the mitochondrial genome.

  19. A Focused Microarray to Study Human Mitochondrial and Nuclear Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Joachim G.; Raju, Raghavan; Logun, Carolea; Danner, Robert L.; Munson, Peter J.; Rangel, Zoila; Dalakas, Marinos C.

    2016-01-01

    A focused microarray (huMITOchip) was developed to study alterations of human mitochondrial and nuclear gene expression in health and disease. The huMITOchip contains 4,774 probe sets identical to the Affymetrix U 133 plus 2.0 chip covering genes affecting mitochondrial, lipid, cytokine, apoptosis, and muscle function transcripts. Unlike other gene chips, the huMITOchip has 51 probe sets that interrogate 37 genes of the mitochondrial genome. The human mitochondrial gene chip was validated against the Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0 array using an in vitro system of CCL136 muscle cell line stimulated with or without interferon gamma (IFN-γ). The 37 genes from the mtDNA demonstrated absolute gene expression levels ranging from 0.1 to 3,182. The comparison of the two gene chips yielded an excellent Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.98). At least 17 probe sets were differentially expressed in response to IFN-γ on both chips, with a high degree of concordance. This is the first report on the development of a focused oligonucleotide microarray containing genes of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:18398222

  20. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ∼50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype.

  1. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content

    PubMed Central

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ∼50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype. PMID:25800673

  2. Dietary fatty acids affect mitochondrial phospholipid compositions and mitochondrial gene expression of rainbow trout liver at different ages.

    PubMed

    Almaida-Pagán, P F; De Santis, C; Rubio-Mejía, O L; Tocher, D R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are among the first responders to various stressors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and organisms. Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL), particularly cardiolipin (CL), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, liver mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, lipid peroxidation, and mtDNA gene expression were analyzed in rainbow trout fed three diets with the same base formulation but with lipid supplied either by fish oil (FO), rapeseed oil (RO), or high DHA oil (DHA) during 6 weeks. Specifically, two feeding trials were performed using fish from the same population of two ages (1 and 3 years), and PL class compositions of liver mitochondria, fatty acid composition of individual PL classes, TBARS content, and mtDNA expression were determined. Dietary fatty acid composition strongly affected mitochondrial membrane composition from trout liver but observed changes did not fully reflect the diet, particularly when it contained high DHA. The changes were PL specific, CL being particularly resistant to changes in DHA. Some significant differences observed in expression of mtDNA with diet may suggest long-term dietary effects in mitochondrial gene expression which could affect electron transport chain function. All the changes were influenced by fish age, which could be related to the different growth rates observed between 1- and 3-year-old trout but that could also indicate age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes.

  3. Control of gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in the muscular adaptation to endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anna-Maria; Pilegaard, Henriette; Litvintsev, Anastassia; Leick, Lotte; Hood, David A

    2006-01-01

    Every time a bout of exercise is performed, a change in gene expression occurs within the contracting muscle. Over the course of many repeated bouts of exercise (i.e. training), the cumulative effects of these alterations lead to a change in muscle phenotype. One of the most prominent of these adaptations is an increase in mitochondrial content, which confers a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. This essay reviews current knowledge on the regulation of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis at the molecular level. The major steps involved include, (i) transcriptional regulation of nuclear-encoded genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by the coactivator peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1, (ii) control of mitochondrial DNA gene expression by the transcription factor Tfam, (iii) mitochondrial fission and fusion mechanisms, and (iv) import of nuclear-derived gene products into the mitochondrion via the protein import machinery. It is now known that exercise can modify the rates of several of these steps, leading to mitochondrial biogenesis. An understanding of how exercise can produce this effect could help us decide whether exercise is beneficial for patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders, as well as a variety of metabolic diseases.

  4. Hypothalamic and amygdalar cell lines differ markedly in mitochondrial rather than nuclear encoded gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in regulating the mammalian stress response. Two of the most extensively studied neuronal populations that express CRH are in the hypothalamus and amygdala. Both regions are involved in the stress response, but the amygdala is also involved in mediating response to fear and anxiety. Given that both hypothalamus and amygdala have overlapping functions, but their CRH-expressing neurons may respond differently to a given perturbation, we sought to identify differentially expressed genes between two neuronal cell types, amygdalar AR-5 and hypothalamic IVB cells. Thus, we performed a microarray analysis. Our hypothesis was that we would identify differentially expressed transcription factors, coregulators and chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results A total of 31,042 genes were analyzed, 10,572 of which were consistently expressed in both cell lines at a 95% confidence level. Of the 10,572 genes, 2,320 genes in AR-5 were expressed at ≥ 2-fold relative to IVBs, 1,104 genes were expressed at ≥2-fold in IVB relative to AR-5 and 7,148 genes were expressed at similar levels between the two cell lines. The greatest difference was in six mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes, which were highly abundant in AR-5 relative to IVB cells. The relative abundance of these genes ranged from 413 to 885-fold according to the microarray results. Differential expression of these genes was verified by RTqPCR. The differentially expressed mitochondrial genes were cytochrome b (MT-CYB), cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 2 (MT-CO1 and MT-CO2) and NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 1, 2, and 3 (MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ND3). Conclusion As expected, the array revealed differential expression of transcription factors and coregulators; however the greatest difference between the two cell lines was in genes encoded by the mitochondrial genome. These genes were abundant in AR-5 relative to IVBs. At present, the reason for the marked

  5. Altered mitochondrial gene expression in the nonchromosomal stripe 2 mutant of maize

    PubMed Central

    Feiler, Heidi S.; Newton, Kathleen J.

    1987-01-01

    The genetic and molecular analyses of higher plant mitochondria can be facilitated by studying maternally-inherited mutations, such as the nonchromosomal stripe (NCS) mutants of maize, that have deleterious effects on plant growth. We have previously demonstrated a correlation between specific alterations in mitochondrial DNA and the expression of NCS phenotypes. In the present studies, the effects of the NCS2 mutation on mitochondrial gene expression are evaluated. Proteins synthesized by mitochondria isolated from NCS2 mutants and from related plants with normal growth have been compared. NCS2 mitochondria synthesize much reduced amounts of a single polypeptide. Probes corresponding to the mitochondrial DNA region altered in NCS2 hybridize to an aberrant set of transcripts in NCS2 mitochondria. Transcripts homologous to several previously characterized plant mitochondrial genes are similar in NCS2 and related non-mutant mitochondria. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453769

  6. Mitochondrial content is central to nuclear gene expression: Profound implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Muir, Rebecca; Diot, Alan; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    We review a recent paper in Genome Research by Guantes et al. showing that nuclear gene expression is influenced by the bioenergetic status of the mitochondria. The amount of energy that mitochondria make available for gene expression varies considerably. It depends on: the energetic demands of the tissue; the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutant load; the number of mitochondria; stressors present in the cell. Hence, when failing mitochondria place the cell in energy crisis there are major effects on gene expression affecting the risk of degenerative diseases, cancer and ageing. In 2015 the UK parliament approved a change in the regulation of IVF techniques, allowing "Mitochondrial replacement therapy" to become a reproductive choice for women at risk of transmitting mitochondrial disease to their children. This is the first time that this technique will be available. Therefore understanding the interaction between mitochondria and the nucleus has never been more important.

  7. Mitochondrial content is central to nuclear gene expression: Profound implications for human health

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Rebecca; Diot, Alan

    2016-01-01

    We review a recent paper in Genome Research by Guantes et al. showing that nuclear gene expression is influenced by the bioenergetic status of the mitochondria. The amount of energy that mitochondria make available for gene expression varies considerably. It depends on: the energetic demands of the tissue; the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutant load; the number of mitochondria; stressors present in the cell. Hence, when failing mitochondria place the cell in energy crisis there are major effects on gene expression affecting the risk of degenerative diseases, cancer and ageing. In 2015 the UK parliament approved a change in the regulation of IVF techniques, allowing “Mitochondrial replacement therapy” to become a reproductive choice for women at risk of transmitting mitochondrial disease to their children. This is the first time that this technique will be available. Therefore understanding the interaction between mitochondria and the nucleus has never been more important. PMID:26725055

  8. Classical and Novel TSPO Ligands for the Mitochondrial TSPO Can Modulate Nuclear Gene Expression: Implications for Mitochondrial Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Nasra; Veenman, Leo; Singh, Sukhdev; Azrad, Maya; Bode, Julia; Vainshtein, Alex; Caballero, Beatriz; Marek, Ilan; Gavish, Moshe

    2017-04-07

    It is known that knockdown of the mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) as well as TSPO ligands modulate various functions, including functions related to cancer. To study the ability of TSPO to regulate gene expression regarding such functions, we applied microarray analysis of gene expression to U118MG glioblastoma cells. Within 15 min, the classical TSPO ligand PK 11195 induced changes in expression of immediate early genes and transcription factors. These changes also included gene products that are part of the canonical pathway serving to modulate general gene expression. These changes are in accord with real-time, reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR. At the time points of 15, 30, 45, and 60 min, as well as 3 and 24 h of PK 11195 exposure, the functions associated with the changes in gene expression in these glioblastoma cells covered well known TSPO functions. These functions included cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. This was corroborated microscopically for cell migration, cell accumulation, adhesion, and neuronal differentiation. Changes in gene expression at 24 h of PK 11195 exposure were related to downregulation of tumorigenesis and upregulation of programmed cell death. In the vehicle treated as well as PK 11195 exposed cell cultures, our triple labeling showed intense TSPO labeling in the mitochondria but no TSPO signal in the cell nuclei. Thus, mitochondrial TSPO appears to be part of the mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling pathway for modulation of nuclear gene expression. The novel TSPO ligand 2-Cl-MGV-1 appeared to be very specific regarding modulation of gene expression of immediate early genes and transcription factors.

  9. Adult-onset obesity is triggered by impaired mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Kara L.; Ferreira, Nicola; Richman, Tara R.; Ermer, Judith A.; Kuznetsova, Irina; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.; Lee, Richard G.; Viola, Helena M.; Johnstone, Victoria P. A.; Matthews, Vance; Hool, Livia C.; Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential for energy production; however, an understanding of how it can influence physiology and metabolism is lacking. Several proteins from the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family are essential for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, but the functions of the remaining members of this family are poorly understood. We created knockout mice to investigate the role of the PPR domain 1 (PTCD1) protein and show that loss of PTCD1 is embryonic lethal, whereas haploinsufficient, heterozygous mice develop age-induced obesity. The molecular defects and metabolic consequences of mitochondrial protein haploinsufficiency in vivo have not been investigated previously. We show that PTCD1 haploinsufficiency results in increased RNA metabolism, in response to decreased protein synthesis and impaired RNA processing that affect the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, causing mild uncoupling and changes in mitochondrial morphology. We demonstrate that with age, these effects lead to adult-onset obesity that results in liver steatosis and cardiac hypertrophy in response to tissue-specific differential regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Our findings indicate that changes in mitochondrial gene expression have long-term consequences on energy metabolism, providing evidence that haploinsufficiency of PTCD1 can be a major predisposing factor for the development of metabolic syndrome. PMID:28835921

  10. Adult-onset obesity is triggered by impaired mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Perks, Kara L; Ferreira, Nicola; Richman, Tara R; Ermer, Judith A; Kuznetsova, Irina; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Lee, Richard G; Viola, Helena M; Johnstone, Victoria P A; Matthews, Vance; Hool, Livia C; Rackham, Oliver; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential for energy production; however, an understanding of how it can influence physiology and metabolism is lacking. Several proteins from the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family are essential for the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, but the functions of the remaining members of this family are poorly understood. We created knockout mice to investigate the role of the PPR domain 1 (PTCD1) protein and show that loss of PTCD1 is embryonic lethal, whereas haploinsufficient, heterozygous mice develop age-induced obesity. The molecular defects and metabolic consequences of mitochondrial protein haploinsufficiency in vivo have not been investigated previously. We show that PTCD1 haploinsufficiency results in increased RNA metabolism, in response to decreased protein synthesis and impaired RNA processing that affect the biogenesis of the respiratory chain, causing mild uncoupling and changes in mitochondrial morphology. We demonstrate that with age, these effects lead to adult-onset obesity that results in liver steatosis and cardiac hypertrophy in response to tissue-specific differential regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathways. Our findings indicate that changes in mitochondrial gene expression have long-term consequences on energy metabolism, providing evidence that haploinsufficiency of PTCD1 can be a major predisposing factor for the development of metabolic syndrome.

  11. Expression of genes related to mitochondrial function in Nellore cattle divergently ranked on residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Larissa Fernanda Simielli; Gimenez, Daniele Fernanda Jovino; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti; Bonilha, Sarah Figueiredo Martins; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Baldi, Fernando; de Souza, Fábio Ricardo Pablos; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão

    2015-02-01

    Several measures have been proposed to investigate and improve feed efficiency in cattle. One of the most commonly used measure of feed efficiency is residual feed intake (RFI), which is estimated as the difference between actual feed intake and expected feed intake based on the animal's average live weight. This measure permits to identify and select the most efficient animals without selecting for higher mature weight. Mitochondrial function has been indicated as a major factor that influences RFI. The analysis of genes involved in mitochondrial function is therefore an alternative to identify molecular markers associated with higher feed efficiency. This study analyzed the expression of PGC1α, TFAM, UCP2 and UCP3 genes by quantitative real-time PCR in liver and muscle tissues of two groups of Nellore cattle divergently ranked on RFI values in order to evaluate the relationship of these genes with RFI. In liver tissue, higher expression of TFAM and UCP2 genes was observed in the negative RFI group. Expression of PGC1α gene did not differ significantly between the two groups, whereas UCP3 gene was not expressed in liver tissue. In muscle tissue, higher expression of TFAM gene was observed in the positive RFI group. Expression of PGC1α, UCP2 and UCP3 genes did not differ significantly between the two groups. These results suggest the use of TFAM and UCP2 as possible candidate gene markers in breeding programs designed to increase the feed efficiency of Nellore cattle.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes induce differential patterns of DNA methylation that result in differential chromosomal gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William T; Sun, Xin; Tsai, Te-Sha; Johnson, Jacqueline L; Gould, Jodee A; Garama, Daniel J; Gough, Daniel J; McKenzie, Matthew; Trounce, Ian A; St. John, Justin C

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA copy number is strictly regulated during development as naive cells differentiate into mature cells to ensure that specific cell types have sufficient copies of mitochondrial DNA to perform their specialised functions. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are defined as specific regions of mitochondrial DNA that cluster with other mitochondrial sequences to show the phylogenetic origins of maternal lineages. Mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are associated with a range of phenotypes and disease. To understand how mitochondrial DNA haplotypes induce these characteristics, we used four embryonic stem cell lines that have the same set of chromosomes but possess different mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. We show that mitochondrial DNA haplotypes influence changes in chromosomal gene expression and affinity for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial DNA replication factors to modulate mitochondrial DNA copy number, two events that act synchronously during differentiation. Global DNA methylation analysis showed that each haplotype induces distinct DNA methylation patterns, which, when modulated by DNA demethylation agents, resulted in skewed gene expression patterns that highlight the effectiveness of the new DNA methylation patterns established by each haplotype. The haplotypes differentially regulate α-ketoglutarate, a metabolite from the TCA cycle that modulates the TET family of proteins, which catalyse the transition from 5-methylcytosine, indicative of DNA methylation, to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, indicative of DNA demethylation. Our outcomes show that mitochondrial DNA haplotypes differentially modulate chromosomal gene expression patterns of naive and differentiating cells by establishing mitochondrial DNA haplotype-specific DNA methylation patterns. PMID:28900542

  13. Mitochondrial electron transport regulation of nuclear gene expression. Studies with the alternative oxidase gene of tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Vanlerberghe, G C; McIntosh, L

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA representing the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) nuclear gene Aox1, which encodes the alternative oxidase of plant mitochondria. The clone contains the complete coding region (1059 base pairs) of a precursor protein of 353 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 39.8 kD. A putative transit peptide contains common signals believed to be important for import and processing of mitochondrially localized proteins. We have studied changes in Aox1 gene expression in tobacco in response to changes in cytochrome pathway activity. Inhibition of the cytochrome pathway by antimycin A resulted in a rapid and dramatic accumulation of Aox1 mRNA, whereas the level of mRNAs encoding two proteins of the cytochrome pathway did not change appreciably. This was accompanied by a dramatic increase in alternative pathway capacity and engagement in whole cells. Respiration under these conditions was unaffected by the uncoupler p-trifluoromethoxycarbonylcyanide (FCCP). When inhibition of the cytochrome pathway was relieved, levels of Aox1 mRNA returned to control levels, alternative pathway capacity and engagement declined, and respiration could once again be stimulated by FCCP. The results show that a mechanism involving changes in Aox1 gene expression exists whereby the capacity of the alternative pathway can be adjusted in response to changes in the activity of the cytochrome pathway. PMID:8058837

  14. Activation of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A gene by nuclear respiratory factors: a potential regulatory link between nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Virbasius, J V; Scarpulla, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), the product of a nuclear gene, stimulates transcription from the two divergent mitochondrial promoters and is likely the principal activator of mitochondrial gene expression in vertebrates. Here we establish that the proximal promoter of the human mtTFA gene is highly dependent upon recognition sites for the nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, for activity. These factors have been previously implicated in the activation of numerous nuclear genes that contribute to mitochondrial respiratory function. The affinity-purified factors from HeLa cells specifically bind to the mtTFA NRF-1 and NRF-2 sites through guanine nucleotide contacts that are characteristic for each site. Mutations in these contacts eliminate NRF-1 and NRF-2 binding and also dramatically reduce promoter activity in transfected cells. Although both factors contribute, NRF-1 binding appears to be the major determinant of promoter function. This dependence on NRF-1 activation is confirmed by in vitro transcription using highly purified recombinant proteins that display the same binding specificities as the HeLa cell factors. The activation of the mtTFA promoter by both NRF-1 and NRF-2 therefore provides a link between the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and suggests a mechanism for their coordinate regulation during organelle biogenesis. Images PMID:8108407

  15. Nuclear expression of a mitochondrial DNA gene: mitochondrial targeting of allotopically expressed mutant ATP6 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David A; Pinkert, Carl A

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear encoding of mitochondrial DNA transgenes followed by mitochondrial targeting of the expressed proteins (allotopic expression; AE) represents a potentially powerful strategy for creating animal models of mtDNA disease. Mice were created that allotopically express either a mutant (A6M) or wildtype (A6W) mt-Atp6 transgene. Compared to non-transgenic controls, A6M mice displayed neuromuscular and motor deficiencies (wire hang, pole, and balance beam analyses; P < 0.05), no locomotor differences (gait analysis; P < 0.05) and enhanced endurance in Rota-Rod evaluations (P < 0.05). A6W mice exhibited inferior muscle strength (wire hang test; P < 0.05), no difference in balance beam footsteps, accelerating Rota-Rod, pole test and gait analyses; (P < 0.05) and superior performance in balance beam time-to-cross and constant velocity Rota-Rod analyses (P < 0.05) in comparison to non-transgenic control mice. Mice of both transgenic lines did not differ from non-transgenic controls in a number of bioenergetic and biochemical tests including measurements of serum lactate and mitochondrial MnSOD protein levels, ATP synthesis rate, and oxygen consumption (P > 0.05). This study illustrates a mouse model capable of circumventing in vivo mitochondrial mutations. Moreover, it provides evidence supporting AE as a tool for mtDNA disease research with implications in development of DNA-based therapeutics.

  16. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E; Bravo-San Pedro, José M; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2014-02-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection.

  17. Effects of TCDD on the expression of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes

    SciTech Connect

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lynn, Scott G.; LaPres, John J.; Zacharewski, Timothy

    2010-07-15

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 {mu}g/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 h) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change| > 1.5 and P-value < 0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a sigmoidal or exponential dose-response profile (0.03 to 300 {mu}g/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 h. Dose-responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of all 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity.

  18. Modulation of mitochondrial gene expression in pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to oxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Y M; Driscoll, K E; Timblin, C R; Hassenbein, D; Mossman, B T

    1998-01-01

    Oxidants are important in the regulation of signal transduction and gene expression. Multiple classes of genes are transcriptionally activated by oxidants and are implicated in different phenotypic responses. In the present study, we performed differential mRNA display to elucidate genes that are induced or repressed after exposure of rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells to H2O2 or crocidolite asbestos, a pathogenic mineral that generates oxidants. After 8 or 24 hr of exposure, RNA was extracted, reverse transcribed, and amplified by polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers to visualize alterations in gene expression. The seven clones obtained were sequenced and encoded the mitochondrial genes, NADH dehydrogenase subunits ND5 and ND6, and 16S ribosomal RNA. Evaluation of their expression by Northern blot analysis revealed increased expression of 16S rRNA after 1 or 2 hr of exposure to H2O2. At later time periods (4 and 24 hr), mRNA levels of 16S rRNA and NADH dehydrogenase were decreased in H2O2-treated RLE cells when compared to sham controls. Crocidolite asbestos caused increases in 16S rRNA levels after 8 hr of exposure, whereas after 24 hr of exposure to asbestos, 16S rRNA levels were decreased in comparison to sham controls. In addition to these oxidants, the nitric oxide generator spermine NONOate caused similar decreases in NADH dehydrogenase mRNA levels after 4 hr of exposure. The present data and previous studies demonstrated that all oxidants examined resulted in apoptosis in RLE cells during the time frame where alterations of mitochondrial gene expression were observed. As the mitochondrion is a major organelle that controls apoptosis, alterations in expression of mitochondrial genes may be involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9788897

  19. Importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in oxidative stress response: A comparative study of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Shibanuma, Motoko; Inoue, Anna; Ushida, Kyota; Uchida, Tetsu; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Mori, Kazunori; Nose, Kiyoshi

    2011-06-01

    Mitochondria are considered to play an important role in oxidative stress response since they are a source of reactive oxygen species and are also targeted by these species. This study examined the mitochondrial conditions in cells of epithelial origin that were exposed to H(2)O(2) and found a decline in the membrane potential along with a specific loss of UQCRC1, a sub-unit of complex III, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs upon exposure to oxidative stress. This observation led to the hypothesis that certain cellular responses to oxidative stress occurred because of mitochondrial dysfunction. When mitochondria-less (pseudo ρ0) cells were examined as a model of mitochondrial dysfunction, striking similarities were found in their cellular responses compared with those found in cells exposed to oxidative stress, including changes in gene expression and gelatinolytic enzyme activities, thus suggesting that cellular responses to oxidative stress were partly mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. This possibility was further validated by microarray analysis, which suggested that almost one-fourth of the cellular responses to oxidative stress were mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction that accompanies oxidative stress, thereby warranting a therapeutic strategy that targets mitochondria for the treatment of oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  20. Population-level expression variability of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Mandhan, Ishita; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Human mitochondria contain multiple copies of a circular genome made up of double-stranded DNA (mtDNA) that encodes proteins involved in cellular respiration. Transcript abundance of mtDNA-encoded genes varies between human individuals, yet the level of variation in the general population has not been systematically assessed. In the present study, we revisited large-scale RNA sequencing data generated from lymphoblastoid cell lines of HapMap samples of European and African ancestry to estimate transcript abundance and quantify expression variation for mtDNA-encoded genes. In both populations, we detected up to over 100-fold difference in mtDNA gene expression between individuals. The marked variation was not due to differences in mtDNA copy number between individuals, but was shaped by the transcription of hundreds of nuclear genes. Many of these nuclear genes were co-expressed with one another, resulting in a module-enriched co-expression network. Significant correlations in expression between genes of the mtDNA and nuclear genomes were used to identify factors involved with the regulation of mitochondrial functions. In conclusion, we determined the baseline amount of variability in mtDNA gene expression in general human populations and cataloged a complete set of nuclear genes whose expression levels are correlated with those of mtDNA-encoded genes. Our findings will enable the integration of information from both mtDNA and nuclear genetic systems, and facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory pathways involving mitochondrial functions. PMID:24398800

  1. Gene expression profiling in equine polysaccharide storage myopathy revealed inflammation, glycogenesis inhibition, hypoxia and mitochondrial dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Eric; Mucher, Elodie; Jeansoule, Nicolas; Larcher, Thibaut; Guigand, Lydie; Herszberg, Bérénice; Chaffaux, Stéphane; Guérin, Gérard; Mata, Xavier; Benech, Philippe; Canale, Marielle; Alibert, Olivier; Maltere, Péguy; Gidrol, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Background Several cases of myopathies have been observed in the horse Norman Cob breed. Muscle histology examinations revealed that some families suffer from a polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). It is assumed that a gene expression signature related to PSSM should be observed at the transcriptional level because the glycogen storage disease could also be linked to other dysfunctions in gene regulation. Thus, the functional genomic approach could be conducted in order to provide new knowledge about the metabolic disorders related to PSSM. We propose exploring the PSSM muscle fiber metabolic disorders by measuring gene expression in relationship with the histological phenotype. Results Genotypying analysis of GYS1 mutation revealed 2 homozygous (AA) and 5 heterozygous (GA) PSSM horses. In the PSSM muscles, histological data revealed PAS positive amylase resistant abnormal polysaccharides, inflammation, necrosis, and lipomatosis and active regeneration of fibers. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed a decrease of mitochondrial number and structural disorders. Extensive accumulation of an abnormal polysaccharide displaced and partially replaced mitochondria and myofibrils. The severity of the disease was higher in the two homozygous PSSM horses. Gene expression analysis revealed 129 genes significantly modulated (p < 0.05). The following genes were up-regulated over 2 fold: IL18, CTSS, LUM, CD44, FN1, GST01. The most down-regulated genes were the following: mitochondrial tRNA, SLC2A2, PRKCα, VEGFα. Data mining analysis showed that protein synthesis, apoptosis, cellular movement, growth and proliferation were the main cellular functions significantly associated with the modulated genes (p < 0.05). Several up-regulated genes, especially IL18, revealed a severe muscular inflammation in PSSM muscles. The up-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3β) under its active form could be responsible for glycogen synthase (GYS1) inhibition and hypoxia-inducible factor

  2. Genes related to mitochondrial functions are differentially expressed in phosphine-resistant and -susceptible Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Oppert, Brenda; Guedes, Raul N C; Aikins, Michael J; Perkin, Lindsey; Chen, Zhaorigetu; Phillips, Thomas W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Opit, George P; Hoon, Kelly; Sun, Yongming; Meredith, Gavin; Bramlett, Kelli; Hernandez, Natalie Supunpong; Sanderson, Brian; Taylor, Madison W; Dhingra, Dalia; Blakey, Brandon; Lorenzen, Marcé; Adedipe, Folukemi; Arthur, Frank

    2015-11-18

    Phosphine is a valuable fumigant to control pest populations in stored grains and grain products. However, recent studies indicate a substantial increase in phosphine resistance in stored product pests worldwide. To understand the molecular bases of phosphine resistance in insects, we used RNA-Seq to compare gene expression in phosphine-resistant and susceptible laboratory populations of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Each population was evaluated as either phosphine-exposed or no phosphine (untreated controls) in triplicate biological replicates (12 samples total). Pairwise analysis indicated there were eight genes differentially expressed between susceptible and resistant insects not exposed to phosphine (i.e., basal expression) or those exposed to phopshine (>8-fold expression and 90 % C.I.). However, 214 genes were differentially expressed among all four treatment groups at a statistically significant level (ANOVA, p < 0.05). Increased expression of 44 cytochrome P450 genes was found in resistant vs. susceptible insects, and phosphine exposure resulted in additional increases of 21 of these genes, five of which were significant among all treatment groups (p < 0.05). Expression of two genes encoding anti-diruetic peptide was 2- to 8-fold reduced in phosphine-resistant insects, and when exposed to phosphine, expression was further reduced 36- to 500-fold compared to susceptible. Phosphine-resistant insects also displayed differential expression of cuticle, carbohydrate, protease, transporter, and many mitochondrial genes, among others. Gene ontology terms associated with mitochondrial functions (oxidation biological processes, monooxygenase and catalytic molecular functions, and iron, heme, and tetrapyyrole binding) were enriched in the significantly differentially expressed dataset. Sequence polymorphism was found in transcripts encoding a known phosphine resistance gene, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, in both susceptible and resistant

  3. Recombinant Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A with N-terminal Mitochondrial Transduction Domain Increases Respiration and Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Portell, Francisco R.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scalable procedure to produce human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) modified with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) and mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) that allow it to cross membranes and enter mitochondria through its “mitochondrial transduction domain” (MTD=PTD+MLS). Alexa488-labeled MTD-TFAM rapidly entered the mitochondrial compartment of cybrid cells carrying the G11778A LHON mutation. MTD-TFAM reversibly increased respiration and levels of respiratory proteins. In vivo treatment of mice with MTD-TFAM increased motor endurance and complex I-driven respiration in mitochondria from brain and skeletal muscle. MTD-TFAM increases mitochondrial bioenergetics and holds promise for treatment of mitochondrial diseases involving deficiencies of energy production. PMID:19460293

  4. Stress and corticosteroids regulate rat hippocampal mitochondrial DNA gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Richard G.; Seligsohn, Ma’ayan; Rubin, Todd G.; Griffiths, Brian B.; Ozdemir, Yildirim; Pfaff, Donald W.; Datson, Nicole A.; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in stress and circadian regulation, and produce many actions via the GC receptor (GR), which is classically understood to function as a nuclear transcription factor. However, the nuclear genome is not the only genome in eukaryotic cells. The mitochondria also contain a small circular genome, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that encodes 13 polypeptides. Recent work has established that, in the brain and other systems, the GR is translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondria and that stress and corticosteroids have a direct influence on mtDNA transcription and mitochondrial physiology. To determine if stress affects mitochondrially transcribed mRNA (mtRNA) expression, we exposed adult male rats to both acute and chronic immobilization stress and examined mtRNA expression using quantitative RT-PCR. We found that acute stress had a main effect on mtRNA expression and that expression of NADH dehydrogenase 1, 3, and 6 (ND-1, ND-3, ND-6) and ATP synthase 6 (ATP-6) genes was significantly down-regulated. Chronic stress induced a significant up-regulation of ND-6 expression. Adrenalectomy abolished acute stress-induced mtRNA regulation, demonstrating GC dependence. ChIP sequencing of GR showed that corticosterone treatment induced a dose-dependent association of the GR with the control region of the mitochondrial genome. These findings demonstrate GR and stress-dependent transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial genome in vivo and are consistent with previous work linking stress and GCs with changes in the function of brain mitochondria. PMID:27457949

  5. Differential Gene Expression Reveals Mitochondrial Dysfunction in an Imprinting Center Deletion Mouse Model of Prader–Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Puya G.; Su, Hailing; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Fan, Weiwei; Coskun, Pinar E.; Nalbandian, Angèle; Knoblach, Susan; Resnick, James L.; Hoffman, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) is a genetic disorder caused by deficiency of imprinted gene expression from the paternal chromosome 15q11–15q13 and clinically characterized by neonatal hypotonia, short stature, cognitive impairment, hypogonadism, hyperphagia, morbid obesity, and diabetes. Previous clinical studies suggest that a defect in energy metabolism may be involved in the pathogenesis of PWS. We focused our attention on the genes associated with energy metabolism and found that there were 95 and 66 mitochondrial genes differentially expressed in PWS muscle and brain, respectively. Assessment of enzyme activities of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes in the brain, heart, liver, and muscle were assessed. We found the enzyme activities of the cardiac mitochondrial complexes II‫III were up‐regulated in the PWS imprinting center deletion mice compared to the wild‐type littermates. These studies suggest that differential gene expression, especially of the mitochondrial genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of PWS. PMID:24127921

  6. Unequal and genotype-dependent expression of mitochondrial genes in larvae of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Curole, Jason P; Meyer, Eli; Manahan, Donal T; Hedgecock, Dennis

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential for regulation of energy metabolism, but little is known about patterns of mitochondrial genome expression in invertebrates. To explore the association of mitochondrial expression with differential growth of Crassostrea gigas, the Pacific oyster, we crossed two inbred lines to produce inbred and hybrid larvae, which grew at different rates under the same environmental conditions. Using high-throughput cloning and sequencing methods, we identified 1.1 million expressed sequence tags from the mitochondrial genome, 96.7% of which were perfect matches to genes targeted by the method. Expression varied significantly among genes, ranging over nearly four orders of magnitude, from mt:lRNA, which constituted 21% of all transcripts, to mt:CoII, which constituted less than 0.02% of all transcripts. Variable expression of genes coding for subunits of macromolecular complexes (e.g., mt:CoI and mt:CoII) implies that stoichiometry in these complexes must be regulated post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, the mitochondrial transcriptome contained non-coding transcripts, which may play a role in the regulation of mitochondrial function. Finally, mitochondrial expression depended strongly on maternal factors and nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions, which may explain previously observed growth differences between reciprocal hybrids. Differences in mitochondrial gene expression could provide a biochemical index for the metabolic basis of genetically determined differences in larval growth.

  7. Multi-focal control of mitochondrial gene expression by oncogenic MYC provides potential therapeutic targets in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Amanda R.; Adams, Clare M.; Zhang, Xiao-yong; Gennaro, Victoria J.; Pfeiffer, Harla K.; Mellert, Hestia S.; Seidel, Hans E.; Mascioli, Kirsten; Kaplan, Jordan; Gaballa, Mahmoud R.; Shen, Chen; Rigoutsos, Isidore; King, Michael P.; Cotney, Justin L.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Sharma, Suresh D.; Martinez, Ubaldo E.; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Thompson, James E.; Bradner, James E.; Cameron, Craig E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Eischen, Christine M.; McMahon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite ubiquitous activation in human cancer, essential downstream effector pathways of the MYC transcription factor have been difficult to define and target. Using a structure/function-based approach, we identified the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) locus as a critical downstream target of MYC. The multifunctional POLRMT enzyme controls mitochondrial gene expression, a process required both for mitochondrial function and mitochondrial biogenesis. We further demonstrate that inhibition of this newly defined MYC effector pathway causes robust and selective tumor cell apoptosis, via an acute, checkpoint-like mechanism linked to aberrant electron transport chain complex assembly and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Fortuitously, MYC-dependent tumor cell death can be induced by inhibiting the mitochondrial gene expression pathway using a variety of strategies, including treatment with FDA-approved antibiotics. In vivo studies using a mouse model of Burkitt's Lymphoma provide pre-clinical evidence that these antibiotics can successfully block progression of MYC-dependent tumors. PMID:27590350

  8. Mitochondrial-related gene expression changes are sensitive to agonal-pH state: implications for brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vawter, MP; Tomita, H; Meng, F; Bolstad, B; Li, J; Evans, S; Choudary, P; Atz, M; Shao, L; Neal, C; Walsh, DM; Burmeister, M; Speed, T; Myers, R; Jones, EG; Watson, SJ; Akil, H; Bunney, WE

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects in gene expression have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We have now contrasted control brains with low pH versus high pH and showed that 28% of genes in mitochondrial-related pathways meet criteria for differential expression. A majority of genes in the mitochondrial, chaperone and proteasome pathways of nuclear DNA-encoded gene expression were decreased with decreased brain pH, whereas a majority of genes in the apoptotic and reactive oxygen stress pathways showed an increased gene expression with a decreased brain pH. There was a significant increase in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial DNA gene expression with increased agonal duration. To minimize effects of agonal-pH state on mood disorder comparisons, two classic approaches were used, removing all subjects with low pH and agonal factors from analysis, or grouping low and high pH as a separate variable. Three groups of potential candidate genes emerged that may be mood disorder related: (a) genes that showed no sensitivity to pH but were differentially expressed in bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder; (b) genes that were altered by agonal-pH in one direction but altered in mood disorder in the opposite direction to agonal-pH and (c) genes with agonal-pH sensitivity that displayed the same direction of changes in mood disorder. Genes from these categories such as NR4A1 and HSPA2 were confirmed with Q-PCR. The interpretation of postmortem brain studies involving broad mitochondrial gene expression and related pathway alterations must be monitored against the strong effect of agonal-pH state. Genes with the least sensitivity to agonal-pH could present a starting point for candidate gene search in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:16636682

  9. Restoration of Mitochondrial Gene Expression Using a Cloned Human Gene in Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Zaki A; Broome, Carolyn W

    2015-01-01

    Background Gal−32 is a Chinese hamster lung cell nuclear mutant that is unable to grow in galactose due to a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis. Since the product of the Gal−32 gene was unknown, it was imperative to use phenotypic complementation to clone a human gene that corrected the Gal−32 mutation. Results Recessive Gal−32 cells were co-transformed with pSV2-neo plasmid DNA and recombinant DNA from a human genomic library containing the dominant human Gal+ gene and a chloramphenicol-resistance (camr) gene present in the pSV13 vector. Primary transformants were selected by growth in galactose and the neomycin analog G418. In order to rescue the human Gal+ gene, a genomic library was constructed with primary transformant DNA and the pCV108 cosmid vector. The camr gene was used to identify clones with the nearby human sequences. DNA from two camr, Alu-hybridizing clones was able to transform the recessive Gal−32 cells to the Gal+ phenotype and to restore mitochondrial protein synthesis. Conclusion These data demonstrate the isolation of two pCV108-transformant recombinant clones containing a human gene that complements the Chinese hamster Gal−32 mutation and restores galactose metabolism. PMID:26052559

  10. Regulation of the cell cycle via mitochondrial gene expression and energy metabolism in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Huang, Weiwei; Ma, Mingxing; Yu, Min; Cui, Qinghua; Tan, Deyong

    2012-04-01

    Human cervical cancer HeLa cells have functional mitochondria. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial metabolism plays an essential role in tumor cell proliferation. Nevertheless, how cells coordinate mitochondrial dynamics and cell cycle progression remains to be clarified. To investigate the relationship between mitochondrial function and cell cycle regulation, the mitochondrial gene expression profile and cellular ATP levels were determined by cell cycle progress analysis in the present study. HeLa cells were synchronized in the G0/G1 phase by serum starvation, and re-entered cell cycle by restoring serum culture, time course experiment was performed to analyze the expression of mitochondrial transcription regulators and mitochondrial genes, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cellular ATP levels, and cell cycle progression. The results showed that when arrested G0/G1 cells were stimulated in serum-containing medium, the amount of DNA and the expression levels of both mRNA and proteins in mitochondria started to increase at 2 h time point, whereas the MMP and ATP level elevated at 4 h. Furthermore, the cyclin D1 expression began to increase at 4 h after serum triggered cell cycle. ATP synthesis inhibitor-oligomycin-treatment suppressed the cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 expression levels and blocked cell cycle progression. Taken together, our results suggested that increased mitochondrial gene expression levels, oxidative phosphorylation activation, and cellular ATP content increase are important events for triggering cell cycle. Finally, we demonstrated that mitochondrial gene expression levels and cellular ATP content are tightly regulated and might play a central role in regulating cell proliferation.

  11. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea Gene Transiently Expressed in planta, Encodes a Mitochondrial Protein

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Eslava, Arturo P.; van Kan, Jan A. L.; Benito, Ernesto P.

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of reactive oxygen species, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor. PMID:26952144

  12. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea Gene Transiently Expressed in planta, Encodes a Mitochondrial Protein.

    PubMed

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Eslava, Arturo P; van Kan, Jan A L; Benito, Ernesto P

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of reactive oxygen species, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor.

  13. The dual role of cyclin C connects stress regulated gene expression to mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Cooper, Katrina F.

    2014-01-01

    Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, cellular damage is first recognized by a variety of sensor mechanisms. Thenceforth, the damage signal is transduced to the nucleus to install the correct gene expression program including the induction of genes whose products either detoxify destructive compounds or repair the damage they cause. Next, the stress signal is disseminated throughout the cell to effect the appropriate changes at organelles including the mitochondria. The mitochondria represent an important signaling platform for the stress response. An initial stress response of the mitochondria is extensive fragmentation. If the damage is prodigious, the mitochondria fragment (fission) and lose their outer membrane integrity leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors necessary for programmed cell death (PCD) execution. As this complex biological process contains many moving parts, it must be exquisitely coordinated as the ultimate decision is life or death. The conserved C-type cyclin plays an important role in executing this molecular Rubicon by coupling changes in gene expression to mitochondrial fission and PCD. Cyclin C, along with its cyclin dependent kinase partner Cdk8, associates with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to regulate transcription. In particular, cyclin C-Cdk8 repress many stress responsive genes. To relieve this repression, cyclin C is destroyed in cells exposed to pro-oxidants and other stressors. However, prior to its destruction, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is released from its nuclear anchor (Med13), translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it interacts with the fission machinery and is both necessary and sufficient to induce extensive mitochondria fragmentation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic cyclin C promotes PCD indicating that it mediates both mitochondrial fission and cell death pathways. This review will summarize the role cyclin C plays in regulating stress-responsive transcription. In addition, we will detail this new function

  14. Increased mitochondrial ROS formation by acetaminophen in human hepatic cells is associated with gene expression changes suggesting disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Briedé, Jacob J; Jennen, Danyel G J; Van Summeren, Anke; Saritas-Brauers, Karen; Schaart, Gert; Kleinjans, Jos C S; de Kok, Theo M C M

    2015-04-16

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdosage results in hepatotoxicity, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still not completely understood. In the current study, we focused on mitochondrial-specific oxidative liver injury induced by APAP exposure. Owning to genetic polymorphisms in the CYP2E1 gene or varying inducibility by xenobiotics, the CYP2E1 mRNA level and protein activity vary extensively among individuals. As CYP2E1 is a known ROS generating enzyme, we chose HepG2 to minimize CYP2E1-induced ROS formation, which will help us better understand the APAP induced mitochondrial-specific hepatotoxicity in a subpopulation with low CYP2E1 activity. HepG2 cells were exposed to a low and toxic dose (0.5 and 10mM) of APAP and analyzed at four time points for genome-wide gene expression. Mitochondria were isolated and electron spin resonance spectroscopy was performed to measure the formation of mitochondrial ROS. The yield of ATP was measured to confirm the impact of the toxic dose of APAP on cellular energy production. Our results indicate that 10mM APAP significantly influences the expression of mitochondrial protein-encoding genes in association with an increase in mitochondrial ROS formation. Additionally, 10mM APAP affects the expression of genes encoding the subunits of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which may alter normal mitochondrial functions by disrupting the assembly, stability, and structural integrity of ETC complexes, leading to a measurable depletion of ATP, and cell death. The expression of mitochondrium-specific antioxidant enzyme, SOD2, is reduced which may limit the ROS scavenging ability and cause imbalance of the mitochondrial ROS homeostasis. Overall, transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular processes involved in the observed APAP-induced increase of mitochondrial ROS formation and the associated APAP-induced oxidative stress.

  15. A mitochondrial complex I defect impairs cold-regulated nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong-ha; Lee, Hojoung; Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-06-01

    To study low-temperature signaling in plants, we previously screened for cold stress response mutants using bioluminescent Arabidopsis plants that express the firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the stress-responsive RD29A promoter. Here, we report on the characterization and cloning of one mutant, frostbite1 (fro1), which shows reduced luminescence induction by cold. fro1 plants display reduced cold induction of stress-responsive genes such as RD29A, KIN1, COR15A, and COR47. fro1 leaves have a reduced capacity for cold acclimation, appear water-soaked, leak electrolytes, and accumulate reactive oxygen species constitutively. FRO1 was isolated through positional cloning and found to encode a protein with high similarity to the 18-kD Fe-S subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase, EC 1.6.5.3) in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. Confocal imaging shows that the FRO1:green fluorescent protein fusion protein is localized in mitochondria. These results suggest that cold induction of nuclear gene expression is modulated by mitochondrial function.

  16. Expression of a gene encoding mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase in rice increases under submerged conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, M; Tsuji, H; Li, Y; Saisho, D; Arimura, S; Tsutsumi, N; Hirai, A

    2000-10-01

    It is known that alcoholic fermentation is important for survival of plants under anaerobic conditions. Acetaldehyde, one of the intermediates of alcoholic fermentation, is not only reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase but also can be oxidized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). To determine whether ALDH plays a role in anaerobic metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Nipponbare), we characterized a cDNA clone encoding mitochondrial ALDH from rice (Aldh2a). Analysis of sub-cellular localization of ALDH2a protein using green fluorescent protein and an in vitro ALDH assay using protein extracts from Escherichia coli cells that overexpressed ALDH2a indicated that ALDH2a functions in the oxidation of acetaldehyde in mitochondria. A Southern-blot analysis indicated that mitochondrial ALDH is encoded by at least two genes in rice. We found that the Aldh2a mRNA was present at high levels in leaves of dark-grown seedlings, mature leaf sheaths, and panicles. It is interesting that expression of the rice Aldh2a gene, unlike the expression of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Aldh2a gene, was induced in rice seedlings by submergence. Experiments with ruthenium red, which is a blocker of Ca(2+) fluxes in rice as well as maize (Zea mays), suggest that the induction of expression of Adh1 and Pdc1 by low oxygen stress is regulated by elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) level. However, the induction of Aldh2a gene expression may not be controlled by the cytosolic Ca(2+) level elevation. A possible involvement of ALDH2a in the submergence tolerance of rice is discussed.

  17. Unbiased Gene Expression Analysis Implicates the huntingtin Polyglutamine Tract in Extra-mitochondrial Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Ivanova, Elena V; Seong, Ihn Sik; Cashorali, Tanya; Kohane, Isaac; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E

    2007-01-01

    The Huntington's disease (HD) CAG repeat, encoding a polymorphic glutamine tract in huntingtin, is inversely correlated with cellular energy level, with alleles over ∼37 repeats leading to the loss of striatal neurons. This early HD neuronal specificity can be modeled by respiratory chain inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) and, like 3-NP, mutant huntingtin has been proposed to directly influence the mitochondrion, via interaction or decreased PGC-1α expression. We have tested this hypothesis by comparing the gene expression changes due to mutant huntingtin accurately expressed in STHdhQ111/Q111 cells with the changes produced by 3-NP treatment of wild-type striatal cells. In general, the HD mutation did not mimic 3-NP, although both produced a state of energy collapse that was mildly alleviated by the PGC-1α-coregulated nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1). Moreover, unlike 3-NP, the HD CAG repeat did not significantly alter mitochondrial pathways in STHdhQ111/Q111 cells, despite decreased Ppargc1a expression. Instead, the HD mutation enriched for processes linked to huntingtin normal function and Nf-κB signaling. Thus, rather than a direct impact on the mitochondrion, the polyglutamine tract may modulate some aspect of huntingtin's activity in extra-mitochondrial energy metabolism. Elucidation of this HD CAG-dependent pathway would spur efforts to achieve energy-based therapeutics in HD. PMID:17708681

  18. Structure and expression of mouse mitochondrial voltage dependent anion channel genes

    SciTech Connect

    Craigen, W.J.; Lovell, R.S.; Sampson, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs) are small abundant proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane that interact with the adenine nucleotide translocater and bind glycerol kinase and hexokinase. Kinase binding is developmentally regulated, tissue specific, and increased in various tumor cell lines. VDACs are also components of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor and GABA{sub A} receptor. Two human VDAC cDNAs have previously been reported, and expression of these isoforms appears ubiquitous. Genomic Southern analysis suggests the presence of other as yet uncharacterised VDAC genes. To study VDAC function in a mammal more amenable to experimental manipulation, we have isolated three mouse VDAC genes by cDNA cloning from a mouse brain cDNA library. DNA sequencing of the cDNAs shows that they share 65-75% amino acid identity. Northern analysis indicates that MVDAC1 is expressed most highly in kidney, heart, and brain. Using an MVDAC3 3{prime} untranslated exon as a probe, three distinct transcripts can be detected. The gene structure for MVDAC3 and MVDAC2 has been completed and suggests that the VDAC isoforms did not arise by gene duplication and divergence. The intron/exon boundaries are not conserved between MVDAC1 and MVDAC3, and MVDAC2 appears to be encoded by a single intronless gene.

  19. Maternal obesity programs mitochondrial and lipid metabolism gene expression in infant umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Costa, Suzana Maria; Isganaitis, Elvira; Matthews, Tucker; Hughes, Katelyn; Daher, Grace; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Pontes da Silva, Giselia Alves; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Maternal obesity increases risk for childhood obesity, but molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We hypothesized that primary umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) from infants of overweight and obese mothers would harbor transcriptional patterns reflecting offspring obesity risk. Subjects/Methods In this observational cohort study, we recruited 13 lean (pre-pregnancy BMI <25.0 kg/m2) and 24 overweight-obese (‘ov-ob’, BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2) women. We isolated primary HUVEC, and analyzed both gene expression (Primeview, Affymetrix) and cord blood levels of hormones and adipokines. Results 142 transcripts were differentially expressed in HUVEC from infants of overweight-obese mothers (false discovery rate, FDR <0.05). Pathway analysis revealed that genes involved in mitochondrial and lipid metabolism were negatively correlated with maternal BMI (FDR <0.05). To test whether these transcriptomic patterns were associated with distinct nutrient exposures in the setting of maternal obesity, we analyzed the cord blood lipidome and noted significant increases in levels of total free fatty acids (lean: 95.5 ± 37.1 ug/ml, ov-ob: 124.1 ± 46.0 ug/ml, P=0.049), palmitate (lean: 34.5 ± 12.7 ug/ml, ov-ob: 46.3 ± 18.4 ug/ml, P=0.03) and stearate (lean: 20.8 ± 8.2 ug/ml, ov-ob: 29.7 ± 17.2 ug/ml, P=0.04), in infants of overweight-obese mothers. Conclusion Prenatal exposure to maternal obesity alters HUVEC expression of genes involved in mitochondrial and lipid metabolism, potentially reflecting developmentally-programmed differences in oxidative and lipid metabolism. PMID:27531045

  20. Epigenetic regulation of human buccal mucosa mitochondrial superoxide dismutase gene expression by diet.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Roman; Karlic, Heidrun; Rust, Petra; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2009-03-01

    The impact of nutrition on the epigenetic machinery has increasingly attracted interest. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the effects of various diets on methylation and gene expression. The antioxidative enzyme mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) was chosen as the model system because epigenetic regulation has been previously shown in cell lines for this gene. Promoter methylation and gene expression of MnSOD in buccal swabs from three sample groups were analysed. The three groups included: (1) forty vegetarians (aged 20-30 years); (2) age-matched omnivores; (3) elderly omnivores (aged>85 years). A 3-fold increase in the expression of the MnSOD gene was associated with decreased CpG methylation of the analysed promoter region in the vegetarian group compared with the age-matched omnivores group. Expression and promoter methylation of the MnSOD gene in elderly omnivores showed no significant differences compared with younger omnivores. In accordance with previous findings in various tissues, DNA global methylation was found to be significantly higher (30 %) in buccal swabs of younger subjects (independent of the diet), than in those of elderly omnivores. In the control experiment which was designed to verify the findings of the human buccal swab studies, the Caco-2 cell line was treated with zebularine. Results of the control study showed a 6-fold increase of MnSOD expression, an approximately 40 % decreased methylation of specified CpG in the MnSOD promoter and a 50 % reduction of global DNA methylation. These results indicate that diet affects the epigenetic regulation of human MnSOD.

  1. Bendavia restores mitochondrial energy metabolism gene expression and suppresses cardiac fibrosis in the border zone of the infarcted heart

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianru; Dai, Wangde; Hale, Sharon L.; Brown, David A.; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Kloner, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We have observed that Bendavia, a mitochondrial-targeting peptide that binds the phospholipid cardiolipin and stabilizes the components of electron transport and ATP generation, improves cardiac function and prevents left ventricular remodeling in a 6 week rat myocardial infarction (MI) model. We hypothesized that Bendavia restores mitochondrial biogenesis and gene expression, suppresses cardiac fibrosis, and preserves sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2a) level in the noninfarcted border zone of infarcted hearts. Main methods Starting 2 hours after left coronary artery ligation, rats were randomized to receive Bendavia (3 mg/kg/day), water or sham operation. At 6 weeks, PCR array and qRT-PCR was performed to detect gene expression. Picrosirius red staining was used to analyze collagen deposition. Key findings There was decreased expression of 70 out of 84 genes related to mitochondrial energy metabolism in the border zone of untreated hearts. This down-regulation was largely reversed by Bendavia treatment. Downregulated mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose & fatty acid (FA) oxidation related genes were restored by administration of Bendavia. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP9) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP1) gene expression were significantly increased in the border zone of untreated hearts. Bendavia completely prevented up-regulation of MMP9, but maintained TIMP1 gene expression. Picrosirius red staining demonstrated that Bendavia suppressed collagen deposition within border zone. In addition, Bendavia showed a trend toward restoring SERCA2a expression. Significance Bendavia restored expression of mitochondrial energy metabolism related genes, prevented myocardial matrix remodeling and preserved SERCA2a expression in the noninfarcted border, which may have contributed to the preservation of cardiac structure and function. PMID:26431885

  2. Cadmium exposure affects mitochondrial bioenergetics and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Inna M; Sokolov, Eugene P; Ponnappa, Kavita M

    2005-07-01

    Cadmium is a ubiquitous and extremely toxic metal, which strongly affects mitochondrial function of aquatic organisms in vitro; however, nothing is known about the in vivo effects of sublethal concentrations of this metal on mitochondrial bioenergetics. We have studied the effects of exposure to 0 (control) or 25 microg L-1 (Cd-exposed) Cd2+ on mitochondrial function and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Cadmium exposure in vivo resulted in considerable accumulation of cadmium in oyster mitochondria and in a significant decrease of ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) by 30% indicating impaired capacity for ATP production. The decrease in state 3 respiration was similar to the level of inhibition expected from the direct effects of cadmium accumulated in oyster mitochondria. On the other hand, while no effect on proton leak was expected based on the mitochondrial accumulation of cadmium, Cd-exposed oysters in fact showed a significant decline of the proton leak rate (state 4+respiration) by 40%. This suggested a downregulation of proton leak, which correlated with a decrease in mRNA expression of a mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP6 and two other potential uncouplers, mitochondrial substrate carriers MSC-1 and MSC-2. Expression of other key mitochondrial proteins including cytochrome c oxidase, adenine nucleotide transporter and voltage dependent anion channel was not affected by cadmium exposure. Adenylate energy charge (AEC) was significantly lower in Cd-exposed oysters; however, this was due to higher steady state ADP levels and not to the decrease in tissue ATP levels. Our data show that adjustment of the proton leak in cadmium-exposed oysters may be a compensatory mechanism, which allows them to maintain normal mitochondrial coupling and ATP levels despite the cadmium-induced inhibition of capacity for ATP production.

  3. Expression of turtle riboflavin-binding protein represses mitochondrial electron transport gene expression and promotes flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Hu, Li; Han, Li-Ping; Ji, Hongtao; Zhu, Yueyue; Wang, Xiaobing; Ge, Jun; Xu, Manyu; Shen, Dan; Dong, Hansong

    2014-12-30

    Recently we showed that de novo expression of a turtle riboflavin-binding protein (RfBP) in transgenic Arabidopsis increased H2O2 concentrations inside leaf cells, enhanced the expression of floral regulatory gene FD and floral meristem identity gene AP1 at the shoot apex, and induced early flowering. Here we report that RfBP-induced H2O2 presumably results from electron leakage at the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) and this source of H2O2 contributes to the early flowering phenotype. While enhanced expression of FD and AP1 at the shoot apex was correlated with early flowering, the foliar expression of 13 of 19 METC genes was repressed in RfBP-expressing (RfBP+) plants. Inside RfBP+ leaf cells, cytosolic H2O2 concentrations were increased possibly through electron leakage because similar responses were also induced by a known inducer of electron leakage from METC. Early flowering no longer occurred when the repression on METC genes was eliminated by RfBP gene silencing, which restored RfBP+ to wild type in levels of FD and AP1 expression, H2O2, and flavins. Flowering was delayed by the external riboflavin application, which brought gene expression and flavins back to the steady-state levels but only caused 55% reduction of H2O2 concentrations in RfBP+ plants. RfBP-repressed METC gene expression remedied the cytosolic H2O2 diminution by genetic disruption of transcription factor NFXLl and compensated for compromises in FD and AP1 expression and flowering time. By contrast, RfBP resembled a peroxisomal catalase mutation, which augments the cytosolic H2O2, to enhance FD and AP1 expression and induce early flowering. RfBP-repressed METC gene expression potentially causes electron leakage as one of cellular sources for the generation of H2O2 with the promoting effect on flowering. The repressive effect on METC gene expression is not the only way by which RfBP induces H2O2 and currently unappreciated factors may also function under RfBP+ background.

  4. The effects of mitochondrial genotype on hypoxic survival and gene expression in a hybrid population of the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus

    PubMed Central

    Flight, Patrick A.; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Whitehead, Andrew; Rand, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study we draw on a population of the teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, where functionally distinct subspecies hybridize, likely as a result of past glacial events. We had two specific aims: 1) to determine the effect of mtDNA genotype on survivorship of male and female fish under hypoxic stress; 2) to determine the effect of hypoxic stress, sex and mtDNA genotype on gene expression. We found an unexpected and highly significant effect of sex on survivorship under hypoxic conditions, but no significant effect of mtDNA genotype. Gene expression analyses revealed hundreds of transcripts differentially regulated by sex and hypoxia. Mitochondrial transcripts and other predicted pathways were among those influenced by hypoxic stress, and a transcript corresponding to the mtDNA control region was the most highly suppressed transcript under conditions of hypoxia. An RT-PCR experiment on the control region was consistent with microarray results. Effects of mtDNA sequence variation on genome expression were limited, however a potentially important epistasis between mtDNA sequence and expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial translation protein was discovered. Overall, these results confirm that mitochondrial regulation is a major component of hypoxia tolerance and further suggest that purifying selection has been the predominant selective force on mitochondrial genomes in these two subspecies. PMID:21980951

  5. The effects of mitochondrial genotype on hypoxic survival and gene expression in a hybrid population of the killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Flight, Patrick A; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Whitehead, Andrew; Rand, David M

    2011-11-01

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study, we draw on a population of the teleost fish, Fundulus heteroclitus, where functionally distinct subspecies hybridize, likely as a result of past glacial events. We had two specific aims: (i) to determine the effect of mtDNA genotype on survivorship of male and female fish under hypoxic stress and (ii) to determine the effect of hypoxic stress, sex and mtDNA genotype on gene expression. We found an unexpected and highly significant effect of sex on survivorship under hypoxic conditions, but no significant effect of mtDNA genotype. Gene expression analyses revealed hundreds of transcripts differentially regulated by sex and hypoxia. Mitochondrial transcripts and other predicted pathways were among those influenced by hypoxic stress, and a transcript corresponding to the mtDNA control region was the most highly suppressed transcript under the conditions of hypoxia. An RT-PCR experiment on the control region was consistent with microarray results. Effects of mtDNA sequence variation on genome expression were limited; however, a potentially important epistasis between mtDNA sequence and expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial translation protein was discovered. Overall, these results confirm that mitochondrial regulation is a major component of hypoxia tolerance and further suggest that purifying selection has been the predominant selective force on mitochondrial genomes in these two subspecies.

  6. Expression of the Bcl-2 family genes and complexes involved in the mitochondrial transport in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Asmarinah, Asmarinah; Paradowska-Dogan, Agnieszka; Kodariah, Ria; Tanuhardja, Budiana; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Mochtar, Chaidir Arif; Weidner, Wolfgang; Hinsch, Elvira

    2014-10-01

    Alteration of molecular pathways triggering apoptosis gives raise to various pathological tissue processes, such as tumorigenesis. The mitochondrial pathway is regulated by both the genes of the Bcl-2 family and the genes encoding mitochondrial transport molecules. Those proteins allow a release of cyctochrome c through the outer mitochondrial membrane. This release activates the caspase cascade resulting in death of cells. There are at least two main transport systems associated with the family of Bcl-2 proteins that are involved in transport of molecules through the outer mitochondrial membrane, i.e., the voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs) and translocases of the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins (TOMs). We investigated the expression of genes of the Bcl-2 family, i.e., pro-apoptotic Bak and Bid, and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2; VDAC gene, i.e., VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3; and TOMM genes, i.e., TOMM20, TOMM22 and TOMM40. This study was performed at the mRNA and the protein level. Fourteen paraffin embedded prostate cancer tissues and five normal prostate tissues were analyzed by the quantitative PCR array and immunohistochemistry. We found a significant increase in both mRNA expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene and VDAC1 gene in prostate cancer tissue in comparison with their normal counterparts. Translation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and VDAC1 genes in prostate cancer tissue was slightly increased. We observed no significant differences in the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic Bak and Bid genes, VDAC2 or VDAC3 genes or the three TOMM genes in these tissues. The pro-apoptotic Bax protein was downtranslated significantly in secretory cells of prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate. We suggest that this protein is a good candidate as biomarker for prostate cancer.

  7. An araC-controlled bacterial cre expression system to produce DNA minicircle vectors for nuclear and mitochondrial gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bigger, B W; Tolmachov, O; Collombet, J M; Fragkos, M; Palaszewski, I; Coutelle, C

    2001-06-22

    The presence of CpG motifs and their associated sequences in bacterial DNA causes an immunotoxic response following the delivery of these plasmid vectors into mammalian hosts. We describe a biotechnological approach to the elimination of this problem by the creation of a bacterial cre recombinase expression system, tightly controlled by the arabinose regulon. This permits the Cre-mediated and -directed excision of the entire bacterial vector sequences from plasmid constructs to create supercoiled gene expression minicircles for gene therapy. Minicircle yields using standard culture volumes are sufficient for most in vitro and in vivo applications whereas minicircle expression in vitro is significantly increased over standard plasmid transfection. By the simple expedient of removing the bacterial DNA complement, we significantly reduce the size and CpG content of these expression vectors, which should also reduce DNA-induced inflammatory responses in a dose-dependent manner. We further describe the generation of minicircle expression vectors for mammalian mitochondrial gene therapy, for which no other vector systems currently exist. The removal of bacterial vector sequences should permit appropriate transcription and correct transcriptional cleavage from the mitochondrial minicircle constructs in a mitochondrial environment and brings the realization of mitochondrial gene therapy a step closer.

  8. HnRNPA2 is a novel histone acetyltransferase that mediates mitochondrial stress-induced nuclear gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Manti; Srinivasan, Satish; Guja, Kip; Mejia, Edison; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel; Johnson, F Brad; Ruthel, Gordon; Kaufman, Brett A; Rappaport, Eric F; Glineburg, M Rebecca; Fang, Ji-Kang; Szanto, Andres Klein; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Basha, Jeelan; Kundu, Tapas; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2016-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA mutations or disruption of electron transfer chain complexes induce mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling, which induces global change in nuclear gene expression ultimately contributing to various human pathologies including cancer. Recent studies suggest that these mitochondrial changes cause transcriptional reprogramming of nuclear genes although the mechanism of this cross talk remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling regulates chromatin acetylation and alters nuclear gene expression through the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNAP2). These processes are reversed when mitochondrial DNA content is restored to near normal cell levels. We show that the mitochondrial stress-induced transcription coactivator hnRNAP2 acetylates Lys 8 of H4 through an intrinsic histone lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) activity with Arg 48 and Arg 50 of hnRNAP2 being essential for acetyl-CoA binding and acetyltransferase activity. H4K8 acetylation at the mitochondrial stress-responsive promoters by hnRNAP2 is essential for transcriptional activation. We found that the previously described mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling-mediated transformation of C2C12 cells caused an increased expression of genes involved in various oncogenic processes, which is retarded in hnRNAP2 silenced or hnRNAP2 KAT mutant cells. Taken together, these data show that altered gene expression by mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde signaling involves a novel hnRNAP2-dependent epigenetic mechanism that may have a role in cancer and other pathologies. PMID:27990297

  9. Insulin Sensitizing Pharmacology of Thiazolidinediones Correlates with Mitochondrial Gene Expression rather than Activation of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Bolten, Charles W.; Blanner, Patrick M.; McDonald, William G.; Staten, Nicholas R.; Mazzarella, Richard A.; Arhancet, Graciela B.; Meier, Martin F.; Weiss, David J.; Sullivan, Patrick M.; Hromockyj, Alexander E.; Kletzien, Rolf F.; Colca, Jerry R.

    2007-01-01

    Insulin sensitizing thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are generally considered to work as agonists for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ). However, TZDs also have acute, non-genomic metabolic effects and it is unclear which actions are responsible for the beneficial pharmacology of these compounds. We have taken advantage of an analog, based on the metabolism of pioglitazone, which has much reduced ability to activate PPARγ. This analog (PNU-91325) was compared to rosiglitazone, the most potent PPARγ activator approved for human use, in a variety of studies both in vitro and in vivo. The data demonstrate that PNU-91325 is indeed much less effective than rosiglitazone at activating PPARγ both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, both compounds bound similarly to a mitochondrial binding site and acutely activated PI-3 kinase-directed phosphorylation of AKT, an action that was not affected by elimination of PPARγ activation. The two compounds were then compared in vivo in both normal C57 mice and diabetic KKAy mice to determine whether their pharmacology correlated with biomarkers of PPARγ activation or with the expression of other gene transcripts. As expected from previous studies, both compounds improved insulin sensitivity in the diabetic mice, and this occurred in spite of the fact that there was little increase in expression of the classic PPARγ target biomarker adipocyte binding protein-2 (aP2) with PNU-91325 under these conditions. An examination of transcriptional profiling of key target tissues from mice treated for one week with both compounds demonstrated that the relative pharmacology of the two thiazolidinediones correlated best with an increased expression of an array of mitochondrial proteins and with expression of PPARγ coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, important pharmacology of the insulin sensitizing TZDs may involve acute actions, perhaps on the

  10. Interactive effects of dietary lipid and phenotypic feed efficiency on the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Eya, Jonathan C; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L

    2015-04-07

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish.

  11. Interactive Effects of Dietary Lipid and Phenotypic Feed Efficiency on the Expression of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Involved in the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Eya, Jonathan C.; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O.; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish. PMID:25853266

  12. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M.; List, Edward O.; Stout, Michael B.; Berryman, Darlene E.; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J.; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria. PMID:25855408

  13. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M; List, Edward O; Stout, Michael B; Berryman, Darlene E; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria.

  14. Quercetin suppresses immune cell accumulation and improves mitochondrial gene expression in adipose tissue of diet‐induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yumiko; Sakurai, Mutsumi; Akimoto, Yukari; Tsushida, Tojiro; Oike, Hideaki; Ippoushi, Katsunari

    2015-01-01

    Scope To examine the effect of dietary quercetin on the function of epididymal adipose tissue (EAT) in Western diet‐induced obese mice. Methods and results C57BL/6J mice were fed a control diet; a Western diet high in fat, cholesterol, and sucrose; or the same Western diet containing 0.05% quercetin for 18 weeks. Supplementation with quercetin suppressed the increase in the number of macrophages, the decrease in the ratio of CD4+ to CD8+ T cells in EAT, and the elevation of plasma leptin and tumor necrosis factor α levels in mice fed the Western diet. Comprehensive gene expression analysis revealed that quercetin suppressed gene expression associated with the accumulation and activation of immune cells, including macrophages and lymphocytes in EAT. It also improved the expression of the oxidative stress‐sensitive transcription factor NFκB, NADPH oxidases, and antioxidant enzymes. Quercetin markedly increased gene expression associated with mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial DNA content. Conclusion Quercetin most likely universally suppresses the accumulation and activation of immune cells, including antiinflammatory cells, whereas it specifically increased gene expression associated with mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Suppression of oxidative stress and NFκB activity likely contributed to the prevention of the accumulation and activation of immune cells and resulting chronic inflammation. PMID:26499876

  15. Aging-dependent alterations in gene expression and a mitochondrial signature of responsiveness to human influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Juilee; Mohanty, Subhasis; West, A Phillip; Joshi, Samit R; Ueda, Ikuyo; Wilson, Jean; Meng, Hailong; Blevins, Tamara P; Tsang, Sui; Trentalange, Mark; Siconolfi, Barbara; Park, Koonam; Gill, Thomas M; Belshe, Robert B; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shaw, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate gene expression pathways underlying age-associated impairment in influenza vaccine response, we screened young (age 21-30) and older (age≥65) adults receiving influenza vaccine in two consecutive seasons and identified those with strong or absent response to vaccine, including a subset of older adults meeting criteria for frailty. PBMCs obtained prior to vaccination (Day 0) and at day 2 or 4, day 7 and day 28 post-vaccine were subjected to gene expression microarray analysis. We defined a response signature and also detected induction of a type I interferon response at day 2 and a plasma cell signature at day 7 post-vaccine in young responders. The response signature was dysregulated in older adults, with the plasma cell signature induced at day 2, and was never induced in frail subjects (who were all non-responders). We also identified a mitochondrial signature in young vaccine responders containing genes mediating mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation that was consistent in two different vaccine seasons and verified by analyses of mitochondrial content and protein expression. These results represent the first genome-wide transcriptional profiling analysis of age-associated dynamics following influenza vaccination, and implicate changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as a critical factor in human vaccine responsiveness.

  16. The mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 1 gene expression is regulated by CREB in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Menga, Alessio; Iacobazzi, Vito; Infantino, Vittoria; Avantaggiati, Maria Laura; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The aspartate/glutamate carrier isoform 1 is an essential mitochondrial transporter that exchanges intramitochondrial aspartate and cytosolic glutamate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. It is expressed in brain, heart and muscle and is involved in important biological processes, including myelination. However, the signals that regulate the expression of this transporter are still largely unknown. In this study we first identify a CREB binding site within the aspartate/glutamate carrier gene promoter that acts as a strong enhancer element in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. This element is regulated by active, phosphorylated CREB protein and by signal pathways that modify the activity of CREB itself and, most noticeably, by intracellular Ca2+ levels. Specifically, aspartate/glutamate carrier gene expression is induced via CREB by forskolin while it is inhibited by the PKA inhibitor, H89. Furthermore, the CREB-induced activation of gene expression is increased by thapsigargin, which enhances cytosolic Ca2+, while it is inhibited by BAPTA-AM that reduces cytosolic Ca2+ or by STO-609, which inhibits CaMK-IV phosphorylation. We further show that CREB-dependent regulation of aspartate/glutamate carrier gene expression occurs in neuronal cells in response to pathological (inflammation) and physiological (differentiation) conditions. Since this carrier is necessary for neuronal functions and is involved in myelinogenesis, our results highlight that targeting of CREB activity and Ca2+ might be therapeutically exploited to increase aspartate/glutamate carrier gene expression in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25597433

  17. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  18. The Infertility of Repeat-Breeder Cows During Summer Is Associated with Decreased Mitochondrial DNA and Increased Expression of Mitochondrial and Apoptotic Genes in Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Roberta Machado; Chiaratti, Marcos Roberto; Macabelli, Carolina Habermann; Rodrigues, Carlos Alberto; Ferraz, Márcio Leão; Watanabe, Yeda Fumie; Smith, Lawrence Charles; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Baruselli, Pietro Sampaio

    2016-03-01

    Oocyte quality is known to be a major cause of infertility in repeat-breeder (RB) and heat-stressed dairy cows. However, the mechanisms by which RB oocytes become less capable of supporting embryo development remain largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the decreased oocyte competence of RB cows (RBs) during summer is associated with an altered gene expression profile and a decrease in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. Therefore, oocytes collected from heifers, non-RBs in peak lactation (PLs), and RBs were used to evaluate mtDNA amounts as well as the expression levels of genes associated with the mitochondria (MT-CO1, NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM), apoptosis (BAX, BCL2, and ITM2B), and oocyte maturation (BMP15, FGF8, FGF10, FGF16, FGF17, and GDF9). The oocytes retrieved from RBs during winter contained over eight times more mtDNA than those retrieved from RBs during summer. They also contained significantly less mtDNA than oocytes retrieved from heifers and PLs during summer. Moreover, the expression of mitochondria- (NRF1, POLG, POLG2, PPARGC1A, and TFAM) and apoptosis-related (BAX and ITM2B) genes, as well as of GDF9, in RB oocytes collected during summer was significantly greater than that in oocytes collected from heifers and PLs during the same season. In oocytes from heifers and PLs, the expression levels of these genes were lower in those collected during summer compared with winter, but this difference was not observed in oocytes collected from RBs. Altogether, these data provide evidence of altered gene expression and reduced mtDNA copy number in the oocytes collected from RBs during summer. This indicates a loss of fertility in RBs during summer, which might be caused by a possible mitochondrial dysfunction associated with a greater chance of oocytes to undergo apoptosis.

  19. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Profiles and Metabolic Pathways in the Amygdala Associated with Exaggerated Fear in an Animal Model of PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Li, Xin; Smerin, Stanley E.; Zhang, Lei; Jia, Min; Xing, Guoqiang; Su, Yan A.; Wen, Jillian; Benedek, David; Ursano, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic mechanisms underlying the development of exaggerated fear in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are not well defined. In the present study, alteration in the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function in the amygdala of an animal model of PTSD was determined. Amygdala tissue samples were excised from 10 non-stressed control rats and 10 stressed rats, 14 days post-stress treatment. Total RNA was isolated, cDNA was synthesized, and gene expression levels were determined using a cDNA microarray. During the development of the exaggerated fear associated with PTSD, 48 genes were found to be significantly upregulated and 37 were significantly downregulated in the amygdala complex based on stringent criteria (p < 0.01). Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed up- or downregulation in the amygdala complex of four signaling networks – one associated with inflammatory and apoptotic pathways, one with immune mediators and metabolism, one with transcriptional factors, and one with chromatin remodeling. Thus, informatics of a neuronal gene array allowed us to determine the expression profile of mitochondrial genes in the amygdala complex of an animal model of PTSD. The result is a further understanding of the metabolic and neuronal signaling mechanisms associated with delayed and exaggerated fear. PMID:25295026

  20. Cloning, characterization, and expression of Cytochrome b ( Cytb)—a key mitochondrial gene from Prorocentrum donghaiense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liyuan; Mi, Tiezhu; Zhen, Yu; Yu, Zhigang

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome b (Cytb), one of the few proteins encoded by the mitochondrial DNA, plays an important role in transferring electrons. As a mitochondrial gene, it has been widely used for phylogenetic analysis. Previously, a 949-bp fragment of the coding gene and mRNA editing were characterized from Prorocentrum donghaiense, which might prove useful for resolving P. donghaiense from closely related species. However, the full-length coding region has not been characterized. In this study, we used rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) to obtain full-length, 1 124 bp cDNA. Cytb transcript contained a standard initiation codon ATG, but did not have a recognizable stop codon. Homology comparison showed that the P. donghaiense Cytb had a high sequence identity to Cytb sequences from other dinoflagellate species. Phylogenetic analysis placed Cytb from P. donghaiense in the clade of dinoflagellates and it clustered together strongly with that from P. minimum. Based on the full-length sequence, we inferred 32 editing events at different positions, accounting for 2.93% of the Cytb gene. 34.4% (11) of the changes were A to G, 25% (8) were T to C, and 25% (8) were C to U, with smaller proportions of G to C and G to A edits (9.4% (3) and 6.2% (2), respectively). The expression level of the Cytb transcript was quantified by real-time PCR with a TaqMan probe at different times during the whole growth phase. The average Cytb transcript was present at 39.27±7.46 copies of cDNA per cell during the whole growth cycle, and the expression of Cytb was relatively stable over the different phases. These results deepen our understanding of the structure and characteristics of Cytb in P. donghaiense, and confirmed that Cytb in P. donghaiense is a candidate reference gene for studying the expression of other genes.

  1. Ketogenic mitochondrial 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene expression in intestine and liver of suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Serra, D; Asins, G; Hegardt, F G

    1993-03-01

    The ketogenic mitochondrial 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase gene is expressed in intestine of suckling rats, its mRNA levels changing with age. Intestine mitochondrial mRNA values reach maximum levels on the 12th postnatal day and then decrease smoothly. Mother's milk may influence the intestine expression, since mRNA levels at birth are very low, increasing after the first lactation. Moreover, rats weaned at either Day 18 or 21 decrease their mRNA levels dramatically and there is no expression in adult rats. Mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase is also expressed in liver of suckling rats but the developmental pattern of mRNAs is different from that in intestine, showing the highest values at Day 3 of life. mRNA levels in liver are lower than in intestine for most of the suckling period, suggesting the physiological relevance of the intestine for the ketogenic process of the whole body. Liver mRNA levels on weaning and in adult rats are high enough to sustain hepatic ketogenesis.

  2. Genes Related to Mitochondrial Functions, Protein Degradation, and Chromatin Folding Are Differentially Expressed in Lymphomonocytes of Rett Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Guido; Cervellati, Franco; Canali, Raffaella; Cortelazzo, Alessio; De Felice, Claudio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Hayek, Joussef

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein (MeCP2) gene. By binding to methylated promoters on CpG islands, MeCP2 protein is able to modulate several genes and important cellular pathways. Therefore, mutations in MeCP2 can seriously affect the cellular phenotype. Today, the pathways that MeCP2 mutations are able to affect in RTT are not clear yet. The aim of our study was to investigate the gene expression profiles in peripheral blood lymphomonocytes (PBMC) isolated from RTT patients to try to evidence new genes and new pathways that are involved in RTT pathophysiology. LIMMA (Linear Models for MicroArray) and SAM (Significance Analysis of Microarrays) analyses on microarray data from 12 RTT patients and 7 control subjects identified 482 genes modulated in RTT, of which 430 were upregulated and 52 were downregulated. Functional clustering of a total of 146 genes in RTT identified key biological pathways related to mitochondrial function and organization, cellular ubiquitination and proteosome degradation, RNA processing, and chromatin folding. Our microarray data reveal an overexpression of genes involved in ATP synthesis suggesting altered energy requirement that parallels with increased activities of protein degradation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that mitochondrial-ATP-proteasome functions are likely to be involved in RTT clinical features. PMID:24453408

  3. Sequence and expression variations in 23 genes involved in mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial apoptotic pathways and risk of oral leukoplakia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sayantan; Ray, Anindita; Singh, Richa; Mondal, Pinaki; Basu, Analabha; De Sarkar, Navonil; Majumder, Mousumi; Maiti, Guruparasad; Baral, Aradhita; Jha, Ganga Nath; Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Panda, Chinmay; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Ghosh, Saurabh; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Roy, Bidyut

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is usually preceded by pre-cancerous lesion and related to tobacco abuse. Tobacco carcinogens damage DNA and cells harboring such damaged DNA normally undergo apoptotic death, but cancer cells are exceptionally resistant to apoptosis. Here we studied association between sequence and expression variations in apoptotic pathway genes and risk of oral cancer and precancer. Ninety nine tag SNPs in 23 genes, involved in mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial apoptotic pathways, were genotyped in 525 cancer and 253 leukoplakia patients and 538 healthy controls using Illumina Golden Gate assay. Six SNPs (rs1473418 at BCL2; rs1950252 at BCL2L2; rs8190315 at BID; rs511044 at CASP1; rs2227310 at CASP7 and rs13010627 at CASP10) significantly modified risk of oral cancer but SNPs only at BCL2, CASP1and CASP10 modulated risk of leukoplakia. Combination of SNPs showed a steep increase in risk of cancer with increase in "effective" number of risk alleles. In silico analysis of published data set and our unpublished RNAseq data suggest that change in expression of BID and CASP7 may have affected risk of cancer. In conclusion, three SNPs, rs1473418 in BCL2, rs1950252 in BCL2L2 and rs511044 in CASP1, are being implicated for the first time in oral cancer. Since SNPs at BCL2, CASP1 and CASP10 modulated risk of both leukoplakia and cancer, so, they should be studied in more details for possible biomarkers in transition of leukoplakia to cancer. This study also implies importance of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway gene (such as BCL2) in progression of leukoplakia to oral cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrial Gene Expression Profiles Are Associated with Maternal Psychosocial Stress in Pregnancy and Infant Temperament

    PubMed Central

    Lambertini, Luca; Chen, Jia; Nomura, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions mediate through the placenta and shape the fetal brain development. Between the environmental determinants of the fetal brain, maternal psychosocial stress in pregnancy has been shown to negatively influence the infant temperament development. This in turn may have adverse consequences on the infant neurodevelopment extending throughout the entire life-span. However little is known about the underlying biological mechanisms of the effects of maternal psychosocial stress in pregnancy on infant temperament. Environmental stressors such as maternal psychosocial stress in pregnancy activate the stress response cascade that in turn drives the increase in the cellular energy demand of vital organs with high metabolic rates such as, in pregnancy, the placenta. Key players of the stress response cascade are the mitochondria. Results Here, we tested the expression of all 13 protein-coding genes encoded by the mitochondria in 108 placenta samples from the Stress in Pregnancy birth cohort, a study that aims at determining the influence of in utero exposure to maternal psychosocial stress in pregnancy on infant temperament. We showed that the expression of the protein-coding mitochondrial-encoded gene MT-ND2 was positively associated with indices of maternal psychosocial stress in pregnancy including Prenatal Perceived Stress (β = 0.259; p-regression = 0.004; r2-regression = 0.120), State Anxiety (β = 0.218; p-regression = 0.003; r2-regression = 0.153), Trait Anxiety (β = 0.262; p-regression = 0.003; r2-regression = 0.129) and Pregnancy Anxiety Total (β = 0.208; p-regression = 0.010; r2-regression = 0.103). In the meantime MT-ND2 was negatively associated with the infant temperament indices of Activity Level (β = -0.257; p-regression = 0.008; r2-regression = 0.165) and Smile and Laughter (β = -0.286; p-regression = 0.036; r2-regression = 0.082). Additionally, MT-ND6 was associated with the maternal psychosocial stress in pregnancy

  5. Two ovine mitochondrial DNAs harboring a fifth 75/76 bp repeat motif without altered gene expression in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Oceja, A; Gamarra, D; Cardoso, S; Palencia-Madrid, L; Juste, R A; De Pancorbo, M M

    2017-03-01

    The Basque Country is home to the Latxa sheep breed, which is divided in several varieties such as Latxa Black Face (LBKF) and Latxa Blonde Face (LBLF). Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of 174 male sheep (97 LBKF and 77 LBLF) was performed with the objective of characterizing the maternal lineages of these two varieties that are the basis to produce the cheese with Idiazabal quality label. The percentage of unique haplotypes was 77.32% in LBKF and 67.53% in LBLF. Most of the individuals were classified into B haplogroup (98.85%), while A haplogroup was much less frequent. Two Latxa individuals (one LBKF and one LBLF), both belonging to B haplogroup, displayed an additional 75/76 bp tandem repeat motif. Only 33 other sequences with this repeat motif were found among 11 061 sheep sequences included in the GenBank database. Gene expression was analyzed in peripheral blood leukocytes since the additional 75/76 bp repeat motif falls within ETAS1, a domain with a possible function in regulation of replication and transcription. The mRNA expression from four mitochondrial genes (COI, cyt b, ND1, and ND2) was analyzed in the two individuals of this study with a fifth repeat motif and in four without it. Although lower transcription was observed when the additional 75/76 bp repeat motif was present, no statistically significant differences were observed. Therefore, the variation in the number of the 75/76 repeat motif does not seem to modify the gene expression rate in mitochondrial genes.

  6. Adipose Tissue Resting Energy Expenditure and Expression of Genes Involved in Mitochondrial Function Are Higher in Women than in Men

    PubMed Central

    Nookaew, Intawat; Jacobson, Peter; Jernås, Margareta; Taube, Magdalena; Larsson, Ingrid; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna C.; Sjöström, Lars; Froguel, Philippe; Walley, Andrew; Nielsen, Jens; Carlsson, Lena M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Men and women differ in body fat distribution and adipose tissue metabolism as well as in obesity comorbidities and their response to obesity treatment. Objective: The objective of the study was a search for sex differences in adipose tissue function. Design and Setting: This was an exploratory study performed at a university hospital. Participants and Main Outcome Measures: Resting metabolic rate (RMR), body composition, and sc adipose tissue genome-wide expression were measured in the SOS Sib Pair study (n = 732). Results: The relative contribution of fat mass to RMR and the metabolic rate per kilogram adipose tissue was higher in women than in men (P value for sex by fat mass interaction = .0019). Women had increased expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function, here referred to as a mitochondrial gene signature. Analysis of liver, muscle, and blood showed that the pronounced mitochondrial gene signature in women was specific for adipose tissue. Brown adipocytes are dense in mitochondria, and the expression of the brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 was 5-fold higher in women compared with men in the SOS Sib Pair Study (P = 7.43 × 10−7), and this was confirmed in a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 83, 6-fold higher in women, P = .00256). Conclusions: The increased expression of the brown adipocyte marker uncoupling protein 1 in women indicates that the higher relative contribution of the fat mass to RMR in women is in part explained by an increased number of brown adipocytes. PMID:23264395

  7. AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY63 Modulate the Expression of Stress-Responsive Nuclear Genes Encoding Mitochondrial and Chloroplast Proteins1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Van Aken, Olivier; Zhang, Botao; Law, Simon; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2013-01-01

    The expression of a variety of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins is known to adapt to changes in environmental conditions and retrograde signaling. The presence of putative WRKY transcription factor binding sites (W-boxes) in the promoters of many of these genes prompted a screen of 72 annotated WRKY factors in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome for regulators of transcripts encoding mitochondrial proteins. A large-scale yeast one-hybrid screen was used to identify WRKY factors that bind the promoters of marker genes (Alternative oxidase1a, NADH dehydrogenaseB2, and the AAA ATPase Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase synthesis1), and interactions were confirmed using electromobility shift assays. Transgenic overexpression and knockout lines for 12 binding WRKY factors were generated and tested for altered expression of the marker genes during normal and stress conditions. AtWRKY40 was found to be a repressor of antimycin A-induced mitochondrial retrograde expression and high-light-induced signaling, while AtWRKY63 was identified as an activator. Genome-wide expression analysis following high-light stress in transgenic lines with perturbed AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY63 function revealed that these factors are involved in regulating stress-responsive genes encoding mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins but have little effect on more constitutively expressed genes encoding organellar proteins. Furthermore, it appears that AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY63 are particularly involved in regulating the expression of genes responding commonly to both mitochondrial and chloroplast dysfunction but not of genes responding to either mitochondrial or chloroplast perturbation. In conclusion, this study establishes the role of WRKY transcription factors in the coordination of stress-responsive genes encoding mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins. PMID:23509177

  8. AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY63 modulate the expression of stress-responsive nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, Olivier; Zhang, Botao; Law, Simon; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2013-05-01

    The expression of a variety of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins is known to adapt to changes in environmental conditions and retrograde signaling. The presence of putative WRKY transcription factor binding sites (W-boxes) in the promoters of many of these genes prompted a screen of 72 annotated WRKY factors in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome for regulators of transcripts encoding mitochondrial proteins. A large-scale yeast one-hybrid screen was used to identify WRKY factors that bind the promoters of marker genes (Alternative oxidase1a, NADH dehydrogenaseB2, and the AAA ATPase Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase synthesis1), and interactions were confirmed using electromobility shift assays. Transgenic overexpression and knockout lines for 12 binding WRKY factors were generated and tested for altered expression of the marker genes during normal and stress conditions. AtWRKY40 was found to be a repressor of antimycin A-induced mitochondrial retrograde expression and high-light-induced signaling, while AtWRKY63 was identified as an activator. Genome-wide expression analysis following high-light stress in transgenic lines with perturbed AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY63 function revealed that these factors are involved in regulating stress-responsive genes encoding mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins but have little effect on more constitutively expressed genes encoding organellar proteins. Furthermore, it appears that AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY63 are particularly involved in regulating the expression of genes responding commonly to both mitochondrial and chloroplast dysfunction but not of genes responding to either mitochondrial or chloroplast perturbation. In conclusion, this study establishes the role of WRKY transcription factors in the coordination of stress-responsive genes encoding mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins.

  9. Expression of genes belonging to the interacting TLR cascades, NADPH-oxidase and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in septic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Laura A.; Santos, Sidnéia S.; Brunialti, Milena K. C.; Sharma, Narendra Kumar; Machado, Flavia R.; Assunção, Murillo; de Azevedo, Luciano C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Sepsis is a complex disease that is characterized by activation and inhibition of different cell signaling pathways according to the disease stage. Here, we evaluated genes involved in the TLR signaling pathway, oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative metabolism, aiming to assess their interactions and resulting cell functions and pathways that are disturbed in septic patients. Materials and methods Blood samples were obtained from 16 patients with sepsis secondary to community acquired pneumonia at admission (D0), and after 7 days (D7, N = 10) of therapy. Samples were also collected from 8 healthy volunteers who were matched according to age and gender. Gene expression of 84 genes was performed by real-time polymerase chain reactions. Their expression was considered up- or down-regulated when the fold change was greater than 1.5 compared to the healthy volunteers. A p-value of ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. Results Twenty-two genes were differently expressed in D0 samples; most of them were down-regulated. When gene expression was analyzed according to the outcomes, higher number of altered genes and a higher intensity in the disturbance was observed in non-survivor than in survivor patients. The canonical pathways altered in D0 samples included interferon and iNOS signaling; the role of JAK1, JAK2 and TYK2 in interferon signaling; mitochondrial dysfunction; and superoxide radical degradation pathways. When analyzed according to outcomes, different pathways were disturbed in surviving and non-surviving patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative phosphorylation and superoxide radical degradation pathway were among the most altered in non-surviving patients. Conclusion Our data show changes in the expression of genes belonging to the interacting TLR cascades, NADPH-oxidase and oxidative phosphorylation. Importantly, distinct patterns are clearly observed in surviving and non-surviving patients. Interferon signaling, marked by

  10. Expression Profiling of Mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel-1 Associated Genes Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival in Human Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Inja; Zhou, Tong; Bang, Hyoweon

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channels (VDACs) play a key role in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Both in vivo and in vitro evidences indicate that VDACs are actively involved in tumor progression. Specifically, VDAC-1, one member of the VDAC family, was thought to be a potential anti-cancer therapeutic target. Our previous study demonstrated that the human gene VDAC1 (encoding the VDAC-1 isoform) was significantly up-regulated in lung tumor tissue compared with normal tissue. Also, we found a significant positive correlation between the gene expression of VDAC1 and histological grade in breast cancer. However, the prognostic power of VDAC1 and its associated genes in human cancers is largely unknown. Methods We systematically analyzed the expression pattern of VDAC1 and its interacting genes in breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. The genes differentially expressed between normal and tumor tissues in human carcinomas were identified. Results The expression level of VDAC1 was uniformly up-regulated in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue in breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreatic, and thyroid cancers. Forty-four VDAC1 interacting genes were identified as being commonly differentially expressed between normal and tumor tissues in human carcinomas. We designated VDAC1 and the 44 dysregulated interacting genes as the VDAC1 associated gene signature (VAG). We demonstrate that the VAG signature is a robust prognostic biomarker to predict recurrence-free survival in breast, colon, and lung cancers, and is independent of standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Conclusions VAG represents a promising prognostic biomarker in human cancers, which may enhance prediction accuracy in identifying patients at higher risk for recurrence. Future therapies aimed specifically at VDAC1 associated genes may lead to novel agents in the treatment of cancer. PMID:25333947

  11. TGF-β suppresses the expression of genes related to mitochondrial function in lung A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, E J; Kim, J; Hwang, Y; Im, S; Moon, Y; Kang, D M

    2012-10-08

    TGF-β is a mediator of lung fibrosis and regulates the alveolar epithelial type II cell phenotype. TGF-β can induce epithelial mesenchymal transition of idiopathic pulmonary disease and cancer metastasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1 α) is a key metabolic regulator that stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and promotes remodeling of muscle tissue to oxidative fiber-type composition. Here, we report that the induction of TGF-β decreased mRNA expression of PGC-1α, and PGC-1 target genes, such as the transcription factors NRF-2, ERR-α, and PPAR-γ in lung epithelial A549 cells. In addition, TGF-β led to the reduction of super oxide dismutase 2 (anti-oxidant enzyme), cytochrome C (electron transport chain in mitochondria), and MCAD (a mitochondrial β-oxidant enzyme) in A549 cells. Together, our results suggest that TGF-β may suppress the transcriptional activity of the genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis or function. This mechanism may provide a novel insight into the understanding of fibrosis disease.

  12. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Expression Profiles of Mitochondrial-Encoded Genes in Early and Late Embryos.

    PubMed

    Perera, Omaththage P; Walsh, Thomas K; Luttrell, Randall G

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), was assembled using paired-end nucleotide sequence reads generated with a next-generation sequencing platform. Assembly resulted in a mitogenome of 15,348 bp with greater than 17,000-fold average coverage. Organization of the H. zea mitogenome (gene order and orientation) was identical to other known lepidopteran mitogenome sequences. Compared with Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) mitogenome, there were a few differences in the lengths of gaps between genes, but the lengths of nucleotide overlaps were essentially conserved between the two species. Nucleotide composition of the H. zea mitochondrial genome was very similar to those of the related species H. armigera and Helicoverpa punctigera Wallengren. Mapping of RNA-Seq reads obtained from 2-h eggs and 48-h embryos to protein coding genes (PCG) revealed that all H. zea PCGs were processed as single mature gene transcripts except for the bicistronic atp8 + atp6 transcript. A tRNA-like sequence predicted to form a hammer-head-like secondary structure that may play a role in transcription start and mitogenome replication was identified within the control region of the H. zea mitogenome. Similar structures were also found within the control regions of several other lepidopteran species. Expression analysis revealed significant differences in levels of expression of PCGs within each developmental stage, but the pattern of variation was similar in both developmental stages analyzed in this study. Mapping of RNA-Seq reads to PCG transcripts also identified transcription termination and polyadenylation sites that differed from the sites described in other lepidopteran species. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  13. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Expression Profiles of Mitochondrial-Encoded Genes in Early and Late Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Omaththage P.; Walsh, Thomas K.; Luttrell, Randall G.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), was assembled using paired-end nucleotide sequence reads generated with a next-generation sequencing platform. Assembly resulted in a mitogenome of 15,348 bp with greater than 17,000-fold average coverage. Organization of the H. zea mitogenome (gene order and orientation) was identical to other known lepidopteran mitogenome sequences. Compared with Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) mitogenome, there were a few differences in the lengths of gaps between genes, but the lengths of nucleotide overlaps were essentially conserved between the two species. Nucleotide composition of the H. zea mitochondrial genome was very similar to those of the related species H. armigera and Helicoverpa punctigera Wallengren. Mapping of RNA-Seq reads obtained from 2-h eggs and 48-h embryos to protein coding genes (PCG) revealed that all H. zea PCGs were processed as single mature gene transcripts except for the bicistronic atp8 + atp6 transcript. A tRNA-like sequence predicted to form a hammer-head-like secondary structure that may play a role in transcription start and mitogenome replication was identified within the control region of the H. zea mitogenome. Similar structures were also found within the control regions of several other lepidopteran species. Expression analysis revealed significant differences in levels of expression of PCGs within each developmental stage, but the pattern of variation was similar in both developmental stages analyzed in this study. Mapping of RNA-Seq reads to PCG transcripts also identified transcription termination and polyadenylation sites that differed from the sites described in other lepidopteran species. PMID:27126963

  14. Role of FAST Kinase Domains 3 (FASTKD3) in Post-transcriptional Regulation of Mitochondrial Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Erik; Zornoza, María; Jourdain, Alexis A; Delmiro Magdalena, Aitor; García-Consuegra, Inés; Torres Merino, Rebeca; Orduña, Antonio; Martín, Miguel A; Martinou, Jean-Claude; De la Fuente, Miguel A; Simarro, María

    2016-12-09

    The Fas-activated serine/threonine kinase (FASTK) family of proteins has recently emerged as a central regulator of mitochondrial gene expression through the function of an unusual RNA-binding domain named RAP (for RNA-binding domain abundant in Apicomplexans), shared by all six members of the family. Here we describe the role of one of the less characterized members, FASTKD3, in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. First, we show that, in contrast to FASTK, FASTKD2, and FASTKD5, FASTKD3 does not localize in mitochondrial RNA granules, which are sites of processing and maturation of mtRNAs and ribosome biogenesis. Second, we generated FASTKD3 homozygous knock-out cell lines by homologous recombination and observed that the absence of FASTKD3 resulted in increased steady-state levels and half-lives of a subset of mature mitochondrial mRNAs: ND2, ND3, CYTB, COX2, and ATP8/6. No aberrant processing of RNA precursors was observed. Rescue experiments demonstrated that RAP domain is required for FASTKD3 function in mRNA stability. Besides, we describe that FASTKD3 is required for efficient COX1 mRNA translation without altering mRNA levels, which results in a decrease in the steady-state levels of COX1 protein. This finding is associated with reduced mitochondrial complex IV assembly and activity. Our observations suggest that the function of this family of proteins goes beyond RNA processing and ribosome assembly and includes RNA stability and translation regulation within mitochondria.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) and expression profiles of mitochondrial-encoded genes in early and late embryos

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mitochondrial genome of the bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, was assembled using paired-end nucleotide sequence reads generated with a next-generation sequencing platform. Assembly resulted in a mitogenome of 15,348 bp with greater than 17,000-fold average coverage. Organization of the H. zea mitogen...

  16. A novel murrel Channa striatus mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase: gene silencing, SOD activity, superoxide anion production and expression.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Bhatt, Prasanth; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Kasi, Marimuthu

    2014-12-01

    We have reported the molecular characterization including gene silencing, superoxide activity, superoxide anion production, gene expression and molecular characterization of a mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mMnSOD) from striped murrel Channa striatus (named as CsmMnSOD). The CsmMnSOD polypeptide contains 225 amino acids with a molecular weight of 25 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 8.3. In the N-terminal region, CsmMnSOD carries a mitochondrial targeting sequence and a superoxide dismutases (SOD) Fe domain (28-109), and in C-terminal region, it carries another SOD Fe domain (114-220). The CsmMnSOD protein sequence shared significant similarity with its homolog of MnSOD from rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus (96%). The phylogenetic analysis showed that the CsmMnSOD fell in the clade of fish mMnSOD group. The monomeric structure of CsmMnSOD possesses 9 α-helices (52.4%), 3 β-sheets (8.8%) and 38.8% random coils. The highest gene expression was noticed in liver, and its expression was inducted with fungal (Aphanomyces invadans) and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) infections. The gene silencing results show that the fish that received dsRNA exhibited significant (P < 0.05) changes in expression when compared to their non-injected and fish physiological saline-injected controls. The SOD activity shows that the activity increases with the spread of infection and decreases once the molecule controls the pathogen. The capacity of superoxide anion production was determined by calculating the granular blood cell count during infection in murrel. It shows that the infection influenced the superoxide radical production which plays a major role in killing the pathogens. Overall, this study indicated the defense potentiality of CsmMnSOD; however, further research is necessary to explore its capability at protein level.

  17. Gene sequence variations and expression patterns of mitochondrial genes are associated with the adaptive evolution of two Gynaephora species (Lepidoptera: Lymantriinae) living in different high-elevation environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Tian-Xuan; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Qian-Hua; Chen, Jun-Yuan; Yuan, Ming-Long

    2017-04-30

    The adaptive evolution of animals to high-elevation environments has been extensively studied in vertebrates, while few studies have focused on insects. Gynaephora species (Lepidoptera: Lymantriinae) are endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) and represent an important insect pest of alpine meadows. Here, we present a detailed comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) of two Gynaephora species inhabiting different high-elevation environments: G. alpherakii and G. menyuanensis. The results indicated that the general mitogenomic features (genome size, nucleotide composition, codon usage and secondary structures of tRNAs) were well conserved between the two species. All of mitochondrial protein-coding genes were evolving under purifying selection, suggesting that selection constraints may play a role in ensuring adequate energy production. However, a number of substitutions and indels were identified that altered the protein conformations of ATP8 and NAD1, which may be the result of adaptive evolution of the two Gynaephora species to different high-elevation environments. Levels of gene expression for nine mitochondrial genes in nine different developmental stages were significantly suppressed in G. alpherakii, which lives at the higher elevation (~4800m above sea level), suggesting that gene expression patterns could be modulated by atmospheric oxygen content and environmental temperature. These results enhance our understanding of the genetic bases for the adaptive evolution of insects endemic to the QTP.

  18. Reference gene selection to determine differences in mitochondrial gene expressions in phosphine-susceptible and phosphine-resistant strains of Cryptolestes ferrugineus, using qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-An; Duan, Jin-Yan; Wu, Hai-Jing; Ju, Xing-Rong; Yuan, Ming-Long

    2017-08-01

    Cryptolestes ferrugineus is a serious pest of stored grain and has developed high levels of resistance to phosphine fumigants in many countries. Measuring differences in expression levels of certain 'resistant' genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) may provide insights into molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to phosphine in C. ferrugineus, but reliable qRT-PCR results depend on suitable reference genes (RGs). We evaluated the stability of nine candidate RGs across different developmental stages and phosphine strains of C. ferrugineus, using four softwares. The results showed that RPS13 and EF1α were the most stable RGs, whereas α-TUB was the least under developmental stages. Across the different strains, RPS13 and γ-TUB were the most stable RGs, whereas CycA and GAPDH were the least. We confirmed the reliability of the selected RGs by qRT-PCR analyses of the mitochondrial cox1 gene. Expression of cox1 was not significantly different in the phosphine-resistant strain compared with the phosphine-susceptible strain, but three mitochondrial genes (nad3, atp6 and cob) were significantly down-regulated. These results suggest that alterations in the expressions of these three genes may be associated with phosphine resistance in C. ferrugineus. The findings will facilitate future functional genomics studies on the development and phosphine resistance in C. ferrugineus.

  19. Effects of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Mitochondrial DNA Replication and PGC-1α Gene Expression in C2C12 Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Moon, Sohee; Kim, Seunghae; Kim, Yangha

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process requiring coordinated expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) is a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, and it controls mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication within diverse tissues, including muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on mtDNA copy number and PGC-1α promoter activity in C2C12 muscle cells. mtDNA copy number and mRNA levels of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR. The PGC-1α promoter from −970 to +412 bp was subcloned into the pGL3-basic vector, which includes a luciferase reporter gene. Both EPA and DHA significantly increased mtDNA copy number, dose and time dependently, and up-regulated mRNA levels of PGC-1α, NRF1, and Tfam. Furthermore, EPA and DHA stimulated PGC-1α promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that EPA and DHA may modulate mitochondrial biogenesis, which was partially associated with increased mtDNA replication and PGC-1α gene expression in C2C12 muscle cells. PMID:28078253

  20. Effects of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid on Mitochondrial DNA Replication and PGC-1α Gene Expression in C2C12 Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Moon, Sohee; Kim, Seunghae; Kim, Yangha

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process requiring coordinated expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) is a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, and it controls mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication within diverse tissues, including muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on mtDNA copy number and PGC-1α promoter activity in C2C12 muscle cells. mtDNA copy number and mRNA levels of genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) were assayed by quantitative real-time PCR. The PGC-1α promoter from -970 to +412 bp was subcloned into the pGL3-basic vector, which includes a luciferase reporter gene. Both EPA and DHA significantly increased mtDNA copy number, dose and time dependently, and up-regulated mRNA levels of PGC-1α, NRF1, and Tfam. Furthermore, EPA and DHA stimulated PGC-1α promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that EPA and DHA may modulate mitochondrial biogenesis, which was partially associated with increased mtDNA replication and PGC-1α gene expression in C2C12 muscle cells.

  1. ACE inhibition modifies exercise-induced pro-angiogenic and mitochondrial gene transcript expression.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, S; Ruoss, S; Valdivieso, P; Degens, H; Waldron, S; de Haan, A; Flück, M

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to endurance exercise with an improvement of biochemical pathways that support substrate supply and oxygen-dependent metabolism. This is reflected by enhanced expression of associated factors after exercise and is specifically modulated by tissue perfusion and oxygenation. We hypothesized that transcript expression of pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF, tenascin-C, Angpt1, Angpt1R) and oxygen metabolism (COX4I1, COX4I2, HIF-1α) in human muscle after an endurance stimulus depends on vasoconstriction, and would be modulated through angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition by intake of lisinopril. Fourteen non-specifically trained, male Caucasians subjects, carried out a single bout of standardized one-legged bicycle exercise. Seven of the participants consumed lisinopril in the 3 days before exercise. Biopsies were collected pre- and 3 h post-exercise from the m. vastus lateralis. COX4I1 (P = 0.03), COX4I2 (P = 0.04) mRNA and HIF-1α (P = 0.05) mRNA and protein levels (P = 0.01) showed an exercise-induced increase in the group not consuming the ACE inhibitor. Conversely, there was a specific exercise-induced increase in VEGF transcript (P = 0.04) and protein levels (P = 0.03) and a trend for increased tenascin-c transcript levels (P = 0.09) for subjects consuming lisinopril. The observations indicate that exercise-induced expression of transcripts involved in angiogenesis and mitochondrial energy metabolism are to some extent regulated via a hypoxia-related ACE-dependent mechanism.

  2. Mitochondrial gene cytochrome b developmental and environmental expression in Aedes aegypti.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cytochrome b, coded by mitochondrial DNA, is one of the cytochromes involved in electron transport in the respiratory chain of mitochondria. Cytochrome b is a critical intermediate in a mitochondrial death pathway. To reveal whether cytochrome b of the mosquito Aedes aegypti L. (AeaCytB) is developm...

  3. Mitochondrial Fitness, Gene Expression, and Hypoxic Stress in a Hybrid Population of the Killifish, Fundulus Heteroclitus

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study we draw on a popul...

  4. Mitochondrial Fitness, Gene Expression, and Hypoxic Stress in a Hybrid Population of the Killifish, Fundulus Heteroclitus

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physiological link between oxygen availability and mitochondrial function is well established. However, whether or not fitness variation is associated with mitochondrial genotypes in the field remains a contested topic in evolutionary biology. In this study we draw on a popul...

  5. Involvement of nutrients and nutritional mediators in mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rescigno, Tania; Capasso, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice

    2017-09-09

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase (HMGCS2) catalyses the first step of ketogenesis and is critical in various metabolic conditions. Several nutrient molecules were able to differentially modulate HMGCS2 expression levels. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6, n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5, n-3), arachidonic acid (AA, C20:4, n-6) and glucose increased HMGCS2 mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 hepatoma cells, while fructose decreased them. The effect of n-6 AA resulted significantly higher than that of n-3 PUFA, but when combined all these molecules were far less efficient. Insulin reduced HMGCS2 mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 cells, even when treated with PUFA and monosaccharides. Several nuclear receptors and transcription factors are involved in HMGCS2 expression regulation. While peroxysome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR-α) agonist WY14643 increased HMGCS2 expression, this treatment was unable to affect PUFA-mediated regulation of HMGCS2 expression. Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) inhibitor AS1842856 reduced HMGCS2 expression and suppressed induction promoted by fatty acids. Cells treatment with liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) agonist T0901317 reduced HMGCS2 mRNA, indicating a role for this transcription factor as suppressor of HMGCS2 gene. Previous observations already indicated HMGCS2 expression as possible nutrition status reference: our results show that several nutrients as well as specific nutritional related hormonal conditions are able to affect significantly HMGCS2 gene expression, indicating a relevant role for PUFA, which are mostly derived from nutritional intake. These insights into mechanisms of its regulation, specifically through nutrients commonly associated with disease risk, indicate HMGCS2 expression as possible reference marker of metabolic and nutritional status. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Transient expression of βC1 protein differentially regulates host genes related to stress response, chloroplast and mitochondrial functions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses are emerging plant pathogens that infect a wide variety of crops including cotton, cassava, vegetables, ornamental plants and cereals. The geminivirus disease complex consists of monopartite begomoviruses that require betasatellites for the expression of disease symptoms. These complexes are widespread throughout the Old World and cause economically important diseases on several crops. A single protein encoded by betasatellites, termed βC1, is a suppressor of gene silencing, inducer of disease symptoms and is possibly involved in virus movement. Studies of the interaction of βC1 with hosts can provide useful insight into virus-host interactions and aid in the development of novel control strategies. We have used the differential display technique to isolate host genes which are differentially regulated upon transient expression of the βC1 protein of chili leaf curl betasatellite (ChLCB) in Nicotiana tabacum. Results Through differential display analysis, eight genes were isolated from Nicotiana tabacum, at two and four days after infitration with βC1 of ChLCB, expressed under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Cloning and sequence analysis of differentially amplified products suggested that these genes were involved in ATP synthesis, and acted as electron carriers for respiration and photosynthesis processes. These differentially expressed genes (DEGs) play an important role in plant growth and development, cell protection, defence processes, replication mechanisms and detoxification responses. Kegg orthology based annotation system analysis of these DEGs demonstrated that one of the genes, coding for polynucleotide nucleotidyl transferase, is involved in purine and pyrimidine metabolic pathways and is an RNA binding protein which is involved in RNA degradation. Conclusion βC1 differentially regulated genes are mostly involved in chloroplast and mitochondrial functions. βC1 also increases the expression of those

  7. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav; Sligh, James E

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  8. Citrate-release-mediated aluminum resistance is coupled to the inducible expression of mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Paraserianthes falcataria.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Hiroki; Kojima, Katsumi

    2006-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) resistance in some leguminous plants is achieved by enhanced citrate release from roots. Enhancement requires several hours for complete activation and is postulated to involve Al-responsive genes or components. We examined the mechanism of Al-induced citrate release by studying the relationship between citrate release and expression of the mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) gene in three leguminous trees. Root elongation in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit was arrested within 24 h by 30 microM Al, whereas root elongation in Paraserianthes falcataria (L.) Neilson and Acacia mangium Willd. was inhibited < 50% by a 48-h treatment with 100 microM Al in calcium chloride solution. Roots of P. falcataria and A. mangium maintained enhanced release and accumulation of citrate for at least 28 days in response to Al treatment. Aluminum increased the accumulation of mCS transcripts in P. falcataria roots, but not in L. leucocephala roots, and thus up-regulation decreased following removal of Al. Lanthanum did not alter the expression level of mCS. Aluminum increased mCS activity concomitantly with enhanced mCS gene expression in P. falcataria, whereas it did not affect mCS activity in L. leucocephala. Aluminum content in root apices of P. falcataria was increased by cycloheximide, supporting the idea that de novo synthesis of proteins is a prerequisite for Al resistance. Our findings suggest that Al-inducible expression of mCS coupled with enhanced citrate release mediates Al resistance in P. falcataria.

  9. The tissue-specific expression and developmental regulation of two nuclear genes encoding rat mitochondrial proteins. Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D P; Gordon, J I; Alpers, R; Strauss, A W

    1989-11-15

    To study the regulation of nuclear genes which encode mitochondrial enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism, absolute levels of mRNA encoding rat medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) and rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) were determined in developing and adult male rat tissues. MCAD mRNA is expressed in a variety of adult male tissues with highest steady state levels in heart, adrenal, and skeletal muscle and lowest levels in brain, lung, and testes. In comparison, steady state levels of mMDH mRNA in adult male rat tissues were similar to those of MCAD mRNA in heart, small intestine, adrenal, and skeletal muscle but markedly different in brain, stomach, and testes. Thus, the steady-state levels of MCAD and mMDH mRNA are highest in adult tissues with high energy requirements. Dot blot analysis of RNA prepared from late fetal, suckling, and weaning rat heart, liver, and brain demonstrated the presence of MCAD and mMDH mRNA during the fetal period in all three tissues. Both MCAD and mMDH mRNA levels increased 2-2.5-fold at birth followed by a decline during the first postnatal week in heart and liver. The patterns of accumulation of these mRNAs in heart and liver during the weaning and early adult periods were also similar, although the absolute levels were significantly different. Brain MCAD mRNA levels were consistently low (less than 0.1 pg/micrograms total cellular RNA) throughout the developmental stages. However, brain mMDH mRNA levels exhibited a marked increase during the weaning period, reaching a peak concentration which is higher than the level of mMDH mRNA in heart and liver at any point during development. These results indicate that the level of expression of the nuclear genes encoding MCAD and mMDH is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. The patterns of MCAD and mMDH mRNA accumulation parallel the changes in energy metabolism which occur during development and among adult tissues.

  10. Mutations in nuclear genes alter post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial genes.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nuclear gene products are required for the expression of mitochondrial genes and elaboration of functional mitochondrial protein complexes. To better understand the roles of these nuclear genes, we exploited the mitochondrial encoded S-type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) and developed a nove...

  11. Post-transcriptional mending of gene sequences: Looking under the hood of mitochondrial gene expression in diplonemids.

    PubMed

    Valach, Matus; Moreira, Sandrine; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, Gertraud

    2016-12-01

    The instructions to make proteins and structural RNAs are laid down in gene sequences. Yet, in certain instances, these primary instructions need to be modified considerably during gene expression, most often at the transcript level. Here we review a case of massive post-transcriptional revisions via trans-splicing and RNA editing, a phenomenon occurring in mitochondria of a recently recognized protist group, the diplonemids. As of now, the various post-transcriptional steps have been cataloged in detail, but how these processes function is still unknown. Since genetic manipulation techniques such as gene replacement and RNA interference have not yet been established for these organisms, alternative strategies have to be deployed. Here, we discuss the experimental and bioinformatics approaches that promise to unravel the molecular machineries of trans-splicing and RNA editing in Diplonema mitochondria.

  12. Gene expression of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in a poorly ketogenic mammal: effect of starvation during the neonatal period of the piglet.

    PubMed

    Adams, S H; Alho, C S; Asins, G; Hegardt, F G; Marrero, P F

    1997-05-15

    The low ketogenic capacity of pigs correlates with a low activity of mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase. To identify the molecular mechanism controlling such activity, we isolated the pig cDNA encoding this enzyme and analysed changes in mRNA levels and mitochondrial specific activity induced during development and starvation. Pig mitochondrial synthase showed a tissue-specific expression pattern. As with rat and human, the gene is expressed in liver and large intestine; however, the pig differs in that mRNA was not detected in testis, kidney or small intestine. During development, pig mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene expression showed interesting differences from that in the rat: (1) there was a 2-3 week lag in the postnatal induction; (2) the mRNA levels remained relatively abundant through the suckling-weaning transition and at maturity, in contrast with the fall observed in rats at similar stages of development; and (3) the gene expression was highly induced by fasting during the suckling, whereas no such change in mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase mRNA levels has been observed in rat. The enzyme activity of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase increased 27-fold during starvation in piglets, but remained one order of magnitude lower than rats. These results indicate that post-transcriptional mechanism(s) and/or intrinsic differences in the encoded enzyme are responsible for the low activity of pig HMG-CoA synthase observed throughout development or after fasting.

  13. Tissue-specific expression and dietary regulation of chimeric mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase/human growth hormone gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serra, D; Fillat, C; Matas, R; Bosch, F; Hegardt, F G

    1996-03-29

    We have studied the role of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase gene in regulating ketogenesis. The gene exhibits expression in various tissues and it is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of this expression, we linked a 1148-base-pair portion of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene and analyzed the expression of the hGH reporter gene in transgenic mice. mRNA levels of hGH were observed in liver, testis, ovary, stomach, colon, cecum, brown adipose tissue, spleen, adrenal glands, and mammary glands from adult mice, and also in liver and stomach, duodenum, jejunum, brown adipose tissue, and heart of suckling mice. There was no expression either in kidney or in any other nonketogenic tissue. The comparison between these data and those of the endogenous mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene suggests that the 1148 base pairs of the promoter contain the elements necessary for expression in liver and testis, but an enhancer is necessary for full expression in intestine of suckling animals and that a silencer prevents expression in stomach, brown adipose tissue, spleen, adrenal glands, and mammary glands in wild type adult mice. In starvation, transgenic mice showed higher expression in liver than did wild type. Both refeeding and insulin injection reduced the expression. Fat diets, composed in each case of different fatty acids, produced similar expression levels, respectively, to those found in wild type animals, suggesting that long-, medium-, and short-chain fatty acids may exert a positive influence on the transcription rate in this 1148-base-pair portion of the promoter. The ketogenic capacity of liver and the blood ketone body levels were equal in transgenic mice and in nontransgenic mice.

  14. The gene expression landscape of thermogenic skunk cabbage suggests critical roles for mitochondrial and vacuolar metabolic pathways in the regulation of thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ito-Inaba, Yasuko; Hida, Yamato; Matsumura, Hideo; Masuko, Hiromi; Yazu, Fumiko; Terauchi, Ryohei; Watanabe, Masao; Inaba, Takehito

    2012-03-01

    Floral thermogenesis has been described in several plant species. Because of the lack of comprehensive gene expression profiles in thermogenic plants, the molecular mechanisms by which floral thermogenesis is regulated remain to be established. We examined the gene expression landscape of skunk cabbage (Symplocarpus renifolius) during thermogenic and post-thermogenic stages and identified expressed sequence tags from different developmental stages of the inflorescences using super serial analysis of gene expression (SuperSAGE). In-depth analysis suggested that cellular respiration and mitochondrial functions are significantly enhanced during the thermogenic stage. In contrast, genes involved in stress responses and protein degradation were significantly up-regulated during post-thermogenic stages. Quantitative comparisons indicated that the expression levels of genes involved in cellular respiration were higher in thermogenic spadices than in Arabidopsis inflorescences. Thermogenesis-associated genes seemed to be expressed abundantly in the peripheral tissues of the spadix. Our results suggest that cellular respiration and mitochondrial metabolism play key roles in heat production during floral thermogenesis. On the other hand, vacuolar cysteine protease and other degradative enzymes seem to accelerate senescence and terminate thermogenesis in the post-thermogenic stage.

  15. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  16. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  17. Development of mitochondrial gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaharyar M; Bennett, James P

    2004-08-01

    Many "classic" mitochondrial diseases have been described that arise from single homoplasmic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). These diseases typically affect nonmitotic tissues (brain, retina, muscle), present with variable phenotypes, can appear sporadically, and are untreatable. Evolving evidence implicates mtDNA abnormalities in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes, but specific causal mutations for these conditions remain to be defined. Understanding the mtDNA genotype-phenotype relationships and developing specific treatment for mtDNA-based diseases is hampered by inability to manipulate the mitochondrial genome. We present a novel protein transduction technology ("protofection") that allows insertion and expression of the human mitochondrial genome into mitochondria of living cells. With protofection, the mitochondrial genotype can be altered, or exogenous genes can be introduced to be expressed and either retained in mitochondria or be directed to other organelles. Protofection also delivers mtDNA in vivo, opening the way to rational development of mitochondrial gene replacement therapy of mtDNA-based diseases.

  18. Dietary fat proportionately enhances oxidative stress and glucose intolerance followed by impaired expression of the genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Das, Nabanita; Mandala, Ashok; Bhattacharjee, Sudarshan; Mukherjee, Debasri; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Roy, Sib Sankar

    2017-04-19

    Consumption of food that surpasses the metabolic necessity of the body leads to an epidemic condition termed obesity, which causes several metabolic disorders including oxidative damage. Dietary intervention can enlighten the mechanisms and therapeutics associated with these metabolic disorders. The reported studies related to diet include fat of different kinds and from different sources, however they lack dose response aspects. Our study highlighted the importance of dietary fat modification in modulating oxidative stress-induced glucose intolerance. Animals were maintained on a diet with a varied content of fat (30%/45%/60%) for 12 weeks and the 'withdrawal' group was fed a standard diet for another 10 weeks. The diet containing 60 energy% of fat displayed glucose intolerance, high ALT, low GSH levels and tissue-specific modulation of the prooxidant/antioxidant enzymatic activities in the liver/muscles. Prolonged sustenance of the 60 energy% fat containing diet-fed rats on standard diet led to the alteration of antioxidant activities, reversing the oxidative damage. Notably, the 'withdrawal' group displayed an organ-specific response towards dietary modification where the recovery of the antioxidant activities was observed to be much more pronounced in the liver as compared to the muscle. Further, we identified the differential expression of liver/muscle-specific genes associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial biogenesis in response to the differing fat content. These genes can serve as markers for HFD-induced metabolic complications involving the liver/muscle. Altogether, our study has highlighted the novel area where obesity-induced oxidative stress linked alterations expressed diet and organ specific responses that are recovered by altering the dietary regimen. Future investigation of dietary modulation will open nascent avenues for developing therapeutic modalities addressing obesity-related metabolic complications.

  19. Mitochondrial and oxidative stress genes are differentially expressed in neutrophils of sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab: a pilot microarray study.

    PubMed

    Omoyinmi, Ebun; Hamaoui, Raja; Bryant, Annette; Jiang, Mike Chao; Athigapanich, Trin; Eleftheriou, Despina; Hubank, Mike; Brogan, Paul; Woo, Patricia

    2016-02-09

    Various pathways involved in the pathogenesis of sJIA have been identified through gene expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not in neutrophils. Since neutrophils are important in tissue damage during inflammation, and are elevated as part of the acute phase response, we hypothesised that neutrophil pathways could also be important in the pathogenesis of sJIA. We therefore studied the gene profile in both PBMC and neutrophils of sJIA patients treated with tocilizumab. We studied the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and neutrophils from eight paired samples obtained from 4 sJIA patients taken before and after treatment, selected on the basis that they achieved ACR90 responses within 12 weeks of therapy initiation with tocilizumab. RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 microarray platform. A longitudinal analysis using paired t-test (p < 0.05 and FC ≥ 1.5) was applied to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two time points followed by ingenuity pathway analysis. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and quantitative real-time PCR were then performed to verify the microarray results. Gene ontology analysis in neutrophils revealed that response to tocilizumab significantly altered genes regulating mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress (p = 4.6E-05). This was independently verified with GSEA, by identifying a set of oxidative genes whose expression correlated with response to tocilizumab. In PBMC, treatment of sJIA with tocilizumab appeared to affect genes in Oncostatin M signalling and B cell pathways. For the first time we demonstrate that neutrophils from sJIA patients responding to tocilizumab showed significantly different changes in gene expression. These data could highlight the importance of mitochondrial genes that modulate oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of sJIA.

  20. In vivo import of a normal or mutagenized heterologous transfer RNA into the mitochondria of transgenic plants: towards novel ways of influencing mitochondrial gene expression?

    PubMed Central

    Small, I; Maréchal-Drouard, L; Masson, J; Pelletier, G; Cosset, A; Weil, J H; Dietrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Evidence that nuclear-encoded RNAs are present inside mitochondria has been reported from a wide variety of organisms, and is presumed to be due to import of specific cytosolic RNAs. In plants, the first examples were the mitochondrial leucine transfer RNAs of bean. In all cases, the evidence is circumstantial, based on hybridization of the mitochondrial RNAs to nuclear and not mitochondrial DNA. Here we show that transgenic potato plants carrying a leucine tRNA gene from bean nuclear DNA contain RNA transcribed from the introduced gene both in the cytosol and inside mitochondria, providing proof that the mitochondrial leucine tRNA is derived from a nuclear gene and imported into the mitochondria. The same bean gene carrying a 4 bp insertion in the anticodon loop was also expressed in transgenic potato plants and the transcript found to be present inside mitochondria, suggesting that this natural RNA import system could eventually be used to introduce foreign RNA sequences into mitochondria. Images PMID:1563345

  1. RNA sequencing reveals differential expression of mitochondrial and oxidation reduction genes in the long-lived naked mole-rat when compared to mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanfei; Li, Yang; Holmes, Andrew; Szafranski, Karol; Faulkes, Chris G; Coen, Clive W; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Platzer, Matthias; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Church, George M

    2011-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived, cancer resistant rodent and there is a great interest in identifying the adaptations responsible for these and other of its unique traits. We employed RNA sequencing to compare liver gene expression profiles between naked mole-rats and wild-derived mice. Our results indicate that genes associated with oxidoreduction and mitochondria were expressed at higher relative levels in naked mole-rats. The largest effect is nearly 300-fold higher expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Epcam), a tumour-associated protein. Also of interest are the protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin (A2m), and the mitochondrial complex II subunit Sdhc, both ageing-related genes found strongly over-expressed in the naked mole-rat. These results hint at possible candidates for specifying species differences in ageing and cancer, and in particular suggest complex alterations in mitochondrial and oxidation reduction pathways in the naked mole-rat. Our differential gene expression analysis obviated the need for a reference naked mole-rat genome by employing a combination of Illumina/Solexa and 454 platforms for transcriptome sequencing and assembling transcriptome contigs of the non-sequenced species. Overall, our work provides new research foci and methods for studying the naked mole-rat's fascinating characteristics.

  2. RNA Sequencing Reveals Differential Expression of Mitochondrial and Oxidation Reduction Genes in the Long-Lived Naked Mole-Rat When Compared to Mice

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Andrew; Szafranski, Karol; Faulkes, Chris G.; Coen, Clive W.; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Platzer, Matthias; de Magalhães, João Pedro; Church, George M.

    2011-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a long-lived, cancer resistant rodent and there is a great interest in identifying the adaptations responsible for these and other of its unique traits. We employed RNA sequencing to compare liver gene expression profiles between naked mole-rats and wild-derived mice. Our results indicate that genes associated with oxidoreduction and mitochondria were expressed at higher relative levels in naked mole-rats. The largest effect is nearly 300-fold higher expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Epcam), a tumour-associated protein. Also of interest are the protease inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin (A2m), and the mitochondrial complex II subunit Sdhc, both ageing-related genes found strongly over-expressed in the naked mole-rat. These results hint at possible candidates for specifying species differences in ageing and cancer, and in particular suggest complex alterations in mitochondrial and oxidation reduction pathways in the naked mole-rat. Our differential gene expression analysis obviated the need for a reference naked mole-rat genome by employing a combination of Illumina/Solexa and 454 platforms for transcriptome sequencing and assembling transcriptome contigs of the non-sequenced species. Overall, our work provides new research foci and methods for studying the naked mole-rat's fascinating characteristics. PMID:22073188

  3. Sickness behavior induced by cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a murine head and neck cancer model is associated with altered mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Molkentine, Jessica M; Vermeer, Daniel W; Walker, Adam K; Feng, Rebekah; Holder, Gerard; Luu, Katherine; Mason, Ryan M; Saligan, Leo; Heijnen, Cobi J; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2016-01-15

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possible mechanisms of the behavioral alterations that develop in response to cancer and to cancer therapy. For this purpose we used a syngeneic heterotopic mouse model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer in which cancer therapy is curative. Mice implanted or not with HPV+ tumor cells were exposed to sham treatment or a regimen of cisplatin and radiotherapy (chemoradiation). Sickness was measured by body weight loss and reduced food intake. Motivation was measured by burrowing, a highly prevalent species specific behavior. Tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual decrease in burrowing over time and increased brain and liver inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression by 28 days post tumor implantation. Chemoradiation administered to healthy mice resulted in a mild decrease in burrowing, body weight, and food intake. Chemoradiation in tumor-bearing mice decreased tumor growth and abrogated liver and brain inflammation, but failed to attenuate burrowing deficits. PCR array analysis of selected hypoxia and mitochondrial genes revealed that both the tumor and chemoradiation altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism within the liver and brain and increased expression of genes related to HIF-1α signaling within the brain. The most prominent changes in brain mitochondrial genes were noted in tumor-bearing mice treated with chemoradiation. These findings indicate that targeting mitochondrial dysfunction following cancer and cancer therapy may be a strategy for prevention of cancer-related symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo and in vitro maturation of rabbit oocytes differently affects the gene expression profile, mitochondrial distribution, apoptosis and early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Arias-Álvarez, M; García-García, R M; López-Tello, J; Rebollar, P G; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Lorenzo, P L

    2016-09-28

    In vivo-matured cumulus-oocyte complexes are valuable models in which to assess potential biomarkers of rabbit oocyte quality that contribute to enhanced IVM systems. In the present study we compared some gene markers of oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) from immature, in vivo-matured and IVM oocytes. Moreover, apoptosis in CCs, nuclear maturation, mitochondrial reallocation and the developmental potential of oocytes after IVF were assessed. In relation to cumulus expansion, gene expression of gap junction protein, alpha 1, 43 kDa (Gja1) and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (Ptgs2) was significantly lower in CCs after in vivo maturation than IVM. In addition, there were differences in gene expression after in vivo maturation versus IVM in both oocytes and CCs for genes related to cell cycle regulation and apoptosis (V-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homologue 1 (Akt1), tumour protein 53 (Tp53), caspase 3, apoptosis-related cysteine protease (Casp3)), oxidative response (superoxide dismutase 2, mitochondrial (Sod2)) and metabolism (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6pd), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh)). In vivo-matured CCs had a lower apoptosis rate than IVM and immature CCs. Meiotic progression, mitochondrial migration to the periphery and developmental competence were higher for in vivo-matured than IVM oocytes. In conclusion, differences in oocyte developmental capacity after IVM or in vivo maturation are accompanied by significant changes in transcript abundance in oocytes and their surrounding CCs, meiotic rate, mitochondrial distribution and apoptotic index. Some of the genes investigated, such as Gja1, could be potential biomarkers for oocyte developmental competence in the rabbit model, helping improve in vitro culture systems in these species.

  5. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Krishna; Douglas, Sophie; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU) but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  6. Adipose tissue gene expression analysis reveals changes in inflammatory, mitochondrial respiratory and lipid metabolic pathways in obese insulin-resistant subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To get insight into molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance, we compared acute in vivo effects of insulin on adipose tissue transcriptional profiles between obese insulin-resistant and lean insulin-sensitive women. Methods Subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were obtained before and after 3 and 6 hours of intravenously maintained euglycemic hyperinsulinemia from 9 insulin-resistant and 11 insulin-sensitive females. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2 microarrays and qRT-PCR. Microarray data and pathway analyses were performed with Chipster v1.4.2 and by using in-house developed nonparametric pathway analysis software. Results The most prominent difference in gene expression of the insulin-resistant group during hyperinsulinemia was reduced transcription of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial respiration (mitochondrial respiratory chain, GO:0001934). Inflammatory pathways with complement components (inflammatory response, GO:0006954) and cytokines (chemotaxis, GO:0042330) were strongly up-regulated in insulin-resistant as compared to insulin-sensitive subjects both before and during hyperinsulinemia. Furthermore, differences were observed in genes contributing to fatty acid, cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism (FATP2, ELOVL6, PNPLA3, SREBF1) and in genes involved in regulating lipolysis (ANGPTL4) between the insulin-resistant and -sensitive subjects especially during hyperinsulinemia. Conclusions The major finding of this study was lower expression of mitochondrial respiratory pathway and defective induction of lipid metabolism pathways by insulin in insulin-resistant subjects. Moreover, the study reveals several novel genes whose aberrant regulation is associated with the obese insulin-resistant phenotype. PMID:22471940

  7. Structure, organization and expression of the genes encoding mitochondrial cytochrome c(1) and the Rieske iron-sulfur protein in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Atteia, A; van Lis, R; Wetterskog, D; Gutiérrez-Cirlos, E-B; Ongay-Larios, L; Franzén, L-G; González-Halphen, D

    2003-02-01

    The sequence and organization of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genes encoding cytochrome c(1) ( Cyc1) and the Rieske-type iron-sulfur protein ( Isp), two key nucleus-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc(1) complex, are presented. Southern hybridization analysis indicates that both Cyc1 and Isp are present as single-copy genes in C. reinhardtii. The Cyc1 gene spans 6404 bp and contains six introns, ranging from 178 to 1134 bp in size. The Isp gene spans 1238 bp and contains four smaller introns, ranging in length from 83 to 167 bp. In both genes, the intron/exon junctions follow the GT/AG rule. Internal conserved sequences were identified in only some of the introns in the Cyc1 gene. The levels of expression of Isp and Cyc1 genes are comparable in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and in a mutant strain carrying a deletion in the mitochondrial gene for cytochrome b (dum-1). Nevertheless, no accumulation of the nucleus-encoded cytochrome c(1) or of core proteins I and II was observed in the membranes of the respiratory mutant. These data show that, in the green alga C. reinhardtii, the subunits of the cytochrome bc(1) complex fail to assemble properly in the absence of cytochrome b.

  8. ATP25, a New Nuclear Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Required for Expression and Assembly of the Atp9p Subunit of Mitochondrial ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiaomei; Barros, Mario H.; Shulman, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    We report a new nuclear gene, designated ATP25 (reading frame YMR098C on chromosome XIII), required for expression of Atp9p (subunit 9) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial proton translocating ATPase. Mutations in ATP25 elicit a deficit of ATP9 mRNA and of its translation product, thereby preventing assembly of functional F0. Unlike Atp9p, the other mitochondrial gene products, including ATPase subunits Atp6p and Atp8p, are synthesized normally in atp25 mutants. Northern analysis of mitochondrial RNAs in an atp25 temperature-sensitive mutant confirmed that Atp25p is required for stability of the ATP9 mRNA. Atp25p is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein with a predicted mass of 70 kDa. The primary translation product of ATP25 is cleaved in vivo after residue 292 to yield a 35-kDa C-terminal polypeptide. The C-terminal half of Atp25p is sufficient to stabilize the ATP9 mRNA and restore synthesis of Atp9p. Growth on respiratory substrates, however, depends on both halves of Atp25p, indicating that the N-terminal half has another function, which we propose to be oligomerization of Atp9p into a proper size ring structure. PMID:18216280

  9. The oxen gene of Drosophila encodes a homolog of subunit 9 of yeast ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase complex: evidence for modulation of gene expression in response to mitochondrial activity.

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, M V; Benevolenskaya, E V; Birchler, J A

    2000-01-01

    A P-element insertion in the oxen gene, ox(1), has been isolated in a search for modifiers of white gene expression. The mutation preferentially exerts a negative dosage effect upon the expression of three genes encoding ABC transporters involved in pigment precursor transport, white, brown, and scarlet. A precise excision of the P element reverts the mutant phenotype. Five different transcription units were identified around the insertion site. To distinguish a transcript responsible for the mutant phenotype, a set of deletions within the oxen region was generated. Analysis of gene expression within the oxen region in the case of deletions as well as generation of transgenic flies allowed us to identify the transcript responsible for oxen function. It encodes a 6.6-kD homolog of mitochondrial ubiquinol cytochrome c oxidoreductase (QCR9), subunit 9 of the bc(1) complex in yeast. In addition to white, brown, and scarlet, oxen regulates the expression of three of seven tested genes. Thus, our data provide additional evidence for a cellular response to changes in mitochondrial function. The oxen mutation provides a model for the genetic analysis in multicellular organisms of the effect of mitochondrial activity on nuclear gene expression. PMID:11102369

  10. Identification and developmental expression of the mitochondrial phosphate transport protein gene from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Feng, Q L; Ladd, T R; Retnakaran, A; Davey, K G; Palli, S R

    1998-10-01

    Phosphate transport protein (PTP) is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein responsible for the translocation of inorganic phosphate into the mitochondrial matrix. A full length cDNA clone encoding the PTP was isolated from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana. The deduced amino acid sequence of the longest ORF of CfPTP cDNA showed high similarity with the amino acid sequences of PTPs cloned from several species. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that CfPTP occupied an intermediate position between vertebrates on the one side and yeast and nematodes on the other side. Studies on the developmental expression of CfPTP mRNA showed that higher levels of mRNA were present during the feeding and growing stages than during molting periods.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Variants Mediate Energy Production and Expression Levels for CFH, C3 and EFEMP1 Genes: Implications for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, M. Cristina; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Pavlis, Janelle M.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Hsu, Tiffany; Woo, Grace; Soe, Kyaw; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Miceli, Michael V.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Recent studies using populations from the United States and Australia have demonstrated that AMD is associated with mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplogroups (as defined by combinations of mtDNA polymorphisms) that represent Northern European Caucasians. The aim of this study was to use the cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) model to investigate the molecular and biological functional consequences that occur when comparing the mtDNA H haplogroup (protective for AMD) versus J haplogroup (high risk for AMD). Methodology/Principal Findings Cybrids were created by introducing mitochondria from individuals with either H or J haplogroups into a human retinal epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) that was devoid of mitochondrial DNA (Rho0). In cybrid lines, all of the cells carry the same nuclear genes but vary in mtDNA content. The J cybrids had significantly lower levels of ATP and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species production, but increased lactate levels and rates of growth. Q-PCR analyses showed J cybrids had decreased expressions for CFH, C3, and EFEMP1 genes, high risk genes for AMD, and higher expression for MYO7A, a gene associated with retinal degeneration in Usher type IB syndrome. The H and J cybrids also have comparatively altered expression of nuclear genes involved in pathways for cell signaling, inflammation, and metabolism. Conclusion/Significance Our findings demonstrate that mtDNA haplogroup variants mediate not only energy production and cell growth, but also cell signaling for major molecular pathways. These data support the hypothesis that mtDNA variants play important roles in numerous cellular functions and disease processes, including AMD. PMID:23365660

  12. Echinochrome A Increases Mitochondrial Mass and Function by Modulating Mitochondrial Biogenesis Regulatory Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In-Sung; Noh, Su Jin; Marquez, Jubert; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Mishchenko, Natalia P.; Fedoreyev, Sergey A.; Stonik, Valentin A.; Han, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Echinochrome A (Ech A) is a natural pigment from sea urchins that has been reported to have antioxidant properties and a cardio protective effect against ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, we ascertained whether Ech A enhances the mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardio myoblast H9c2 cells. To study the effects of Ech A on mitochondrial biogenesis, we measured mitochondrial mass, level of oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory gene expression. Ech A treatment did not induce cytotoxicity. However, Ech A treatment enhanced oxygen consumption rate and mitochondrial ATP level. Likewise, Ech A treatment increased mitochondrial contents in H9c2 cells. Furthermore, Ech A treatment up-regulated biogenesis of regulatory transcription genes, including proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator (PGC)-1α, estrogen-related receptor (ERR)-α, peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR)-γ, and nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1 and such mitochondrial transcription regulatory genes as mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM), mitochondrial transcription factor B2 (TFB2M), mitochondrial DNA direct polymerase (POLMRT), single strand binding protein (SSBP) and Tu translation elongation factor (TUFM). In conclusion, these data suggest that Ech A is a potentiated marine drug which enhances mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25196935

  13. Abnormal expression of the genes involved in cytokine networks and mitochondrial function in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis identified by DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Mima, T; Aoki, C; Yoshio-Hoshino, N; Adachi, Y; Imagawa, T; Mori, M; Tomiita, M; Iwata, N; Murata, T; Miyoshi, M; Takei, S; Aihara, Y; Yokota, S; Matsubara, K; Nishimoto, N

    2009-02-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is a rheumatic disease in childhood characterised by systemic symptoms and a relatively poor prognosis. Peripheral leukocytes are thought to play a pathological role in sJIA although the exact cause of the disease is still obscure. In this study, we aimed to clarify cellular functional abnormalities in sJIA. We analysed the gene expression profile in peripheral leukocytes from 51 patients with sJIA, 6 patients with polyarticular type JIA (polyJIA) and 8 healthy children utilising DNA microarrays. Gene ontology analysis and network analysis were performed on the genes differentially expressed in sJIA to clarify the cellular functional abnormalities. A total of 3491 genes were differentially expressed in patients with sJIA compared to healthy individuals. They were functionally categorised mainly into a defence response group and a metabolism group according to gene ontology, suggesting the possible abnormalities in these functions. In the defence response group, molecules predominantly constituting interferon (IFN)gamma and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) network cascades were upregulated. In the metabolism group, oxidative phosphorylation-related genes were downregulated, suggesting a mitochondrial disorder. Expression of mitochondrial DNA-encoded genes including cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1(MT-CO1) and MT-CO2 were suppressed in patients with sJIA but not in patients with polyJIA or healthy children. However, nuclear DNA-encoded cytochrome c oxidases were intact. Our findings suggest that sJIA is not only an immunological disease but also a metabolic disease involving mitochondria disorder.

  14. FNDC5 relates to skeletal muscle IGF-I and mitochondrial function and gene expression in obese men with reduced growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Suman; Suresh, Caroline; Mottla, Jay; Hamarneh, Sulaiman R; Irazoqui, Javier E; Frontera, Walter; Torriani, Martin; Stanley, Takara; Makimura, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the relationship of skeletal muscle FNDC5 mRNA expression and circulating irisin to the GH/IGF-I axis and to skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and mitochondria-related gene expression in obese men. Fifteen abdominally obese men with reduced growth hormone received 12weeks of recombinant human GH (rhGH). Before and after treatment, they underwent (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to evaluate phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery as a measure of mitochondrial function and skeletal muscle biopsy to assess expression of mitochondrial-related genes. Serum irisin and IGF-I and skeletal muscle FNDC5 and IGF-I mRNA were measured. At baseline, skeletal muscle FNDC5 mRNA was significantly and positively associated with IGF-I mRNA (ρ=0.81, P=0.005) and rate of PCr recovery (ρ=0.79, P=0.006). Similar relationships of circulating irisin to IGF-I mRNA (ρ=0.63, P=0.05) and rate of PCr recovery (ρ=0.48, P=0.08) were demonstrated, but were not as robust as those with muscle FNDC5 expression. Both serum irisin and skeletal muscle FNDC5 mRNA were significantly associated with PPARγ (ρ=0.73, P=0.02 and ρ=0.85, P=0.002), respectively. In addition, FNDC5 mRNA was correlated with skeletal muscle PGC-1α (ρ=0.68, P=0.03), NRF1 (ρ=0.66, P=0.04) and TFAM (ρ=0.79, P=0.007) mRNA. Neither serum irisin nor muscle mRNA expression of FNDC5 changed with rhGH treatment. These novel data in skeletal muscle demonstrate that local expression of FNDC5 is associated with mRNA expression of IGF-I and mitochondrial function and mitochondria-related gene expression in obese subjects with reduced growth hormone and suggest a potential role for FNDC5 acting locally in muscle in a low GH state. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between the GH/IGF-I axis and irisin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An ordered Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial cDNA library on high-density filters allows rapid systematic analysis of plant gene expression: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Giegé, P; Konthur, Z; Walter, G; Brennicke, A

    1998-09-01

    The availability of the complete sequence of a genome allows a systematic analysis of its expression. Gene-specific variations of transcription levels and phenomena such as transcript processing and RNA editing require large numbers of clones to be examined. For the completely sequenced mitochondrial genome of Arabidopsis thaliana we adapted robot technology to identify and characterize expressed genes. A cDNA library of about 50,000 clones was constructed, robot-ordered into 384-well microtitre plates and spotted onto high-density filter membranes. These filters permit the isolation of large numbers of specific cDNA clones in a single hybridization step. The cox1, cox2 and cox3 genes were used to evaluate the feasibility and efficiency of this approach. A cluster of RNA editing sites observed outside the cox3 coding region identifies a novel reading frame orf95 in higher plants with significant similarity to a subunit of respiratory chain complex II.

  16. Identification of a gene for pyruvate-insensitive mitochondrial alternative oxidase expressed in the thermogenic appendices in Arum maculatum.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kikukatsu; Ogata, Takafumi; Kakizaki, Yusuke; Elliott, Catherine; Albury, Mary S; Moore, Anthony L

    2011-12-01

    Heat production in thermogenic plants has been attributed to a large increase in the expression of the alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX acts as an alternative terminal oxidase in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it reduces molecular oxygen to water. In contrast to the mitochondrial terminal oxidase, cytochrome c oxidase, AOX is nonprotonmotive and thus allows the dramatic drop in free energy between ubiquinol and oxygen to be dissipated as heat. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-based cloning, we reveal that, although at least seven cDNAs for AOX exist (AmAOX1a, -1b, -1c, -1d, -1e, -1f, and -1g) in Arum maculatum, the organ and developmental regulation for each is distinct. In particular, the expression of AmAOX1e transcripts appears to predominate in thermogenic appendices among the seven AmAOXs. Interestingly, the amino acid sequence of AmAOX1e indicates that the ENV element found in almost all other AOX sequences, including AmAOX1a, -1b, -1c, -1d, and -1f, is substituted by QNT. The existence of a QNT motif in AmAOX1e was confirmed by nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of mitochondrial proteins from thermogenic appendices. Further functional analyses with mitochondria prepared using a yeast heterologous expression system demonstrated that AmAOX1e is insensitive to stimulation by pyruvate. These data suggest that a QNT type of pyruvate-insensitive AOX, AmAOX1e, plays a crucial role in stage- and organ-specific heat production in the appendices of A. maculatum.

  17. Expression levels of meristem identity and homeotic genes are modified by nuclear-mitochondrial interactions in alloplasmic male-sterile lines of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rita Teresa; Farbos, Isabelle; Glimelius, Kristina

    2005-06-01

    Homeotic conversions of anthers were found in cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) plants of Brassica napus derived from somatic hybrids of B. napus and Arabidopsis thaliana. CMS line flowers displayed petals reduced in size and width and stamens replaced by carpelloid structures. In order to investigate when these developmental aberrations appeared, flower development was analysed histologically, ultrastructurally and molecularly. Disorganized cell divisions were detected in the floral meristems of the CMS lines at stage 4. As CMS is associated with mitochondrial aberrations, ultrastructural analysis of the mitochondria in the floral meristems was performed. Two mitochondrial populations were found in the CMS lines. One type had disrupted cristae, while the other resembled mitochondria typical of B. napus. Furthermore, expression patterns of genes expressed in particular floral whorls were determined. In spite of the aberrant development of the third whorl organs, BnAP3 was expressed as in B. napus during the first six stages of development. However, the levels of BnPI were reduced. At later developmental stages, the expression of both BnAP3 and BnPI was strongly reduced. Interestingly the expression levels of genes responsible for AP3 and PI activation such as LFY, UFO and ASK1 were higher in the CMS lines, which indicates that activation of B-genes in the CMS lines does not occur as in B. napus. Disrupted and dysfunctional mitochondria seem to be one of the first aberrations manifested in CMS which result in a retrograde influence of the expression levels of genes responsible for the second and third whorl organ differentiation.

  18. Approaches to mitochondrial gene therapy.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gerard G M; Weissig, Volkmar

    2004-09-01

    Since their discovery during the end of the 80's the number of diseases found to be associated with defects in the mitochondrial genome has grown significantly. Organs affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) include in decreasing order of vulnerability the brain, skeletal muscle, heart, kidney and liver. Hence neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases represent the two largest groups of mtDNA diseases. Despite major advances in understanding mtDNA defects at the genetic and biochemical level, there is however no satisfactory treatment available to the vast majority of patients. This is largely due to the fact that most of these patients have respiratory chain defects, i.e. defects that involve the final common pathway of oxidative metabolism, making it impossible to bypass the defect by administering alternative metabolic carriers of energy. Conventional biochemical treatment having reached an impasse, the exploration of gene therapeutic approaches for patients with mtDNA defects is warranted. For now mitochondrial gene therapy appears to be only theoretical and speculative. Any possibility for gene replacement is dependent on the development of an efficient mitochondrial transfection vector. In this review we describe the current state of the development of mitochondria-specific DNA delivery systems. We summarize our own efforts in exploring the properties of dequalinium and other similar cationic bolaamphiphiles with delocalized charge centers, for the design of a vector suited for the transport of DNA to mitochondria in living cells. Further, we outline some unique hurdles that need to be overcome if the development of such delivery systems is to progress.

  19. Mitochondrial capacity, oxidative damage and hypoxia gene expression are associated with age-related division of labor in honey bee, Apis mellifera L., workers.

    PubMed

    Cervoni, Mário S; Cardoso-Júnior, Carlos A M; Craveiro, Giovana; Souza, Anderson de O; Alberici, Luciane C; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2017-09-14

    During adult life, honeybee workers undergo a succession of behavioral states. Nurses bees perform tasks inside the nest, and when they are about 2-3 weeks old they initiate foraging. This switch is associated with alterations in diet, and with the levels of juvenile hormone and vitellogenin circulating in hemolymph. Less clear is whether this behavioral maturation involves major changes at the cellular level, such as mitochondrial activity and the redox environment in the head, thorax and abdomen. Using high-resolution respirometry, biochemical assays and RT-qPCR, we evaluated the association of these parameters with this behavioral change. We found that tissues from the head and abdomen of nurses have a higher OXPHOS capacity than those of foragers, while for the thorax we found an opposite situation. Since higher mitochondrial activity tends to generate more H2O2 and H2O2 is known to stabilize HIF-1α, this would be expected to stimulate hypoxia signaling. The positive correlation that we observed between mitochondrial activity and hif-1α gene expression in abdomen and head tissue of nurses would be in line with this hypothesis. Higher expression of antioxidant enzyme genes was observed in foragers, which could explain their low levels of protein carbonylation. No alterations were seen in NO levels, suggesting that NO signaling is unlikely to be involved in behavioral maturation. We conclude that the behavioral change seen in honeybee workers is reflected in differential mitochondrial activities and redox parameters, and we consider that this can provide insights into the underlying aging process. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Molecular Analysis by Gene Expression of Mitochondrial ATPase Subunits in Papillary Thyroid Cancer: Is ATP5E Transcript a Possible Early Tumor Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-López, Luis Mauricio; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Ruiz, José Damián Carrillo; González, Norma Estela Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer development involves an “injury” to the respiratory machinery (Warburg effect) due to decreased or impaired mitochondrial function. This circumstance results in a down regulation of some of the ATPase subunits of the malignant tissue. The objective of this work was to assess and compare the relative expression of mRNA of mitochondrial ATPase subunits between samples of thyroid cancer and benign nodules. Material/Methods Samples from 31 patients who had an operation for PTC at the General Hospital of Mexico were snap-frozen and stored at −70°C. Thirty-five patients who had an operation for benign tumors were also included in the study. mRNA expression levels of alpha, beta, gamma, and epsilon subunits of F1 and “c12” of subunit Fo were determined by real-time RT-PCR (by duplicate), in order to determine if abnormal expression of these genes could partially explain the Warburg effect in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Results ATP5E transcript alteration (down-expression) was highly associated to PTC diagnosis OR=11.76 (95% confidence interval, 1.245–237.98; p=0.04). Conclusions Relative down-expression of ATP5E transcript was highly associated with PTC diagnosis. This transcript alteration may be used as a tumoral marker in papillary thyroid cancer. PMID:26079849

  1. The Nuclear Gene Rf3 Affects the Expression of the Mitochondrial Chimeric Sequence R Implicated in S-Type Male Sterility in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, G.; Gabay-Laughnan, S.; Laughnan, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of maize plants exhibiting S-type cytoplasmic male sterility (cms-S) contain a repeated DNA region designated R. This region was found to be rearranged in the mitochondria of all cms-S cytoplasmically revertant fertile plants in all nuclear backgrounds analyzed. A 1.6-kb mRNA transcribed from the R region in mitochondria of sterile plants was absent from all cytoplasmic revertants examined. The nuclear gene Rf3, which suppresses the cms-S phenotype, was found to have a specific effect on the expression of the R sequence; the abundance of the major R transcripts, including the cms-S-specific 1.6-kb mRNA, is decreased in mitochondria of restored plants. Nucleotide sequence analysis of R has revealed similarities to the R1 plasmid found in some South American maize races with RU cytoplasm, to the M1 plasmid found in one source of Zea luxurians teosinte, to the atp9 mitochondrial gene and its 3' flanking sequence, and also to a region 3' to the orf221 gene. The derived amino acid sequence of the R region predicts two open reading frames (ORFs). These ORFs contain the similarities to R1, M1, atp9 and orf221. The present report reveals the chimeric nature of the R region, describes the complex effect of Rf3 on the expression of the R sequence and implicates R in the sterile phenotype of cms-S maize. PMID:9335619

  2. Mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles suggest an important role of PGC-1alpha in the compensatory mechanism of endemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shu-Lan; Tan, Wu-Hong; Zhang, Zeng-Tie; Zhang, Feng; Qu, Cheng-Juan; Lei, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Yan-He; Yu, Han-Jie; Xiang, You-Zhang; and others

    2013-10-15

    Keshan disease (KD) is an endemic dilated cardiomyopathy with unclear etiology. In this study, we compared mitochondrial-related gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from 16 KD patients and 16 normal controls in KD areas. Total RNA was isolated, amplified, labeled and hybridized to Agilent human 4×44k whole genome microarrays. Mitochondrial-related genes were screened out by the Third-Generation Human Mitochondria-Focused cDNA Microarray (hMitChip3). Quantitative real-time PCR, immunohistochemical and biochemical parameters related mitochondrial metabolism were conducted to validate our microarray results. In KD samples, 34 up-regulated genes (ratios≥2.0) were detected by significance analysis of microarrays and ingenuity systems pathway analysis (IPA). The highest ranked molecular and cellular functions of the differentially regulated genes were closely related to amino acid metabolism, free radical scavenging, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy production. Using IPA, 40 significant pathways and four significant networks, involved mainly in apoptosis, mitochondrion dysfunction, and nuclear receptor signaling were identified. Based on our results, we suggest that PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis might play an important role in the compensatory mechanism of KD. Our results may lead to the identification of potential diagnostic biomarkers for KD in PBMCs, and may help to understand the pathogenesis of KD. Highlights: • Thirty-four up-regulated genes were detected in KD versus health controls. • Forty pathways and four networks were detected in KD. • PGC-1alpha regulated energy metabolism and anti-apoptosis in KD.

  3. Salt shock enhances the expression of ZrATP2, the gene for the mitochondrial ATPase beta subunit of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuo; Hirasaki, Masataka; Tohnai, Naoko; Yagi, Kohsaku; Abe, Shunnosuke; Tamai, Youichi

    2003-01-01

    In the course of a study of cell wall proteins from the salt-tolerant yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, a protein that increased its expression as the NaCl concentration of the culture medium increased was identified. Several degenerate primers were constructed based on partial amino acid sequences of this protein and were used in PCR amplification of a gene termed ZrATP2. The amino acid sequence deduced from nucleotide sequence of the gene revealed that ZrATP2 encodes the beta subunit of mitochondrial F1 ATPase. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that NaCl shock induced an elevation in ZrATP2 expression, which corresponded with the resumption of Z. rouxii cell growth after salt shock.

  4. Expression of polyalanine stretches induces mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Kazuya; Oma, Yoko; Kino, Yoshihiro; Futai, Eugene; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2008-05-15

    In recent years, several novel types of disorders have been characterized, including what have been termed polyalanine diseases, in which patients have expanded triplet repeats in specific genes, resulting in the translation of aberrantly elongated polyalanine stretches. In this study, we showed that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-fused elongated polyalanine stretches localized exclusively to the cytoplasm and formed aggregates. Additionally, the polyalanine stretches themselves were toxic. We sought to identify proteins that bound directly to the polyalanine stretches, as factors that might be involved in triggering cell death. Many mitochondrial proteins were identified as polyalanine-binding proteins. We showed that one of the identified proteins, succinate dehydrogenase subunit A, was decreased in the mitochondria of cells expressing polyalanine stretches; as a result, succinate oxidative activity was decreased. Furthermore, the polyalanine stretches also associated directly with mitochondria. This suggests that polya-lanine stretches might directly induce cell death. Additionally, the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced in cells expressing polyalanine stretches. We propose a novel mechanism by which polyalanine stretches may cause cytotoxicity through mitochondrial dysfunction. This may be a common mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of all polyalanine diseases.

  5. Gene expression profiling for human iPS-derived motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients reveals a strong association between mitochondrial functions and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Chrystian J.; Dariolli, Rafael; Jorge, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Matheus R.; Maximino, Jessica R.; Martins, Roberto S.; Strauss, Bryan E.; Krieger, José E.; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. The most prevalent sporadic ALS form is not genetically inherited. Attempts to translate therapeutic strategies have failed because the described mechanisms of disease are based on animal models carrying specific gene mutations and thus do not address sporadic ALS. In order to achieve a better approach to study the human disease, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated motor neurons were obtained from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS and non-ALS subjects using the STEMCCA Cre-Excisable Constitutive Polycistronic Lentivirus system and submitted to microarray analyses using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function and biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology. REVIGO highlighted the related functions mRNA and DNA binding, GTP binding, transcription (co)-repressor activity, lipoprotein receptor binding, synapse organization, intracellular transport, mitotic cell cycle and cell death. KEGG showed pathways associated with Parkinson's disease and oxidative phosphorylation, highlighting iron homeostasis, neurotrophic functions, endosomal trafficking and ERK signaling. The analysis of most dysregulated genes and those representative of the majority of categorized genes indicates a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. In conclusion, iPSC-derived motor neurons from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS patients may recapitulate key mechanisms of neurodegeneration and may offer an opportunity for translational investigation of sporadic ALS. Large gene profiling of differentiated motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients highlights mitochondrial participation in the establishment of autonomous mechanisms associated with sporadic ALS

  6. Gene expression profiling for human iPS-derived motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients reveals a strong association between mitochondrial functions and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Alves, Chrystian J; Dariolli, Rafael; Jorge, Frederico M; Monteiro, Matheus R; Maximino, Jessica R; Martins, Roberto S; Strauss, Bryan E; Krieger, José E; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Chadi, Gerson

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. The most prevalent sporadic ALS form is not genetically inherited. Attempts to translate therapeutic strategies have failed because the described mechanisms of disease are based on animal models carrying specific gene mutations and thus do not address sporadic ALS. In order to achieve a better approach to study the human disease, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated motor neurons were obtained from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS and non-ALS subjects using the STEMCCA Cre-Excisable Constitutive Polycistronic Lentivirus system and submitted to microarray analyses using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function and biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology. REVIGO highlighted the related functions mRNA and DNA binding, GTP binding, transcription (co)-repressor activity, lipoprotein receptor binding, synapse organization, intracellular transport, mitotic cell cycle and cell death. KEGG showed pathways associated with Parkinson's disease and oxidative phosphorylation, highlighting iron homeostasis, neurotrophic functions, endosomal trafficking and ERK signaling. The analysis of most dysregulated genes and those representative of the majority of categorized genes indicates a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. In conclusion, iPSC-derived motor neurons from motor nerve fibroblasts of sporadic ALS patients may recapitulate key mechanisms of neurodegeneration and may offer an opportunity for translational investigation of sporadic ALS. Large gene profiling of differentiated motor neurons from sporadic ALS patients highlights mitochondrial participation in the establishment of autonomous mechanisms associated with sporadic ALS.

  7. The Expression of a Novel Mitochondrially-Encoded Gene in Gonadic Precursors May Drive Paternal Inheritance of Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Pecci, Andrea; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella; Passamonti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have an active role in germ line development, and their inheritance dynamics are relevant to this process. Recently, a novel protein (RPHM21) was shown to be encoded in sperm by the male-transmitted mtDNA of Ruditapes philippinarum, a species with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondria. In silico analyses suggested a viral origin of RPHM21, and we hypothesized that the endogenization of a viral element provided sperm mitochondria of R. philippinarum with the ability to invade male germ line, thus being transmitted to the progeny. In this work we investigated the dynamics of germ line development in relation to mitochondrial transcription and expression patterns using qPCR and specific antibodies targeting the germ line marker VASPH (R. philippinarum VASA homolog), and RPHM21. Based on the experimental results we conclude that both targets are localized in the primordial germ cells (PGCs) of males, but while VASPH is detected in all PGCs, RPHM21 appears to be expressed only in a subpopulation of them. Since it has been predicted that RPHM21 might have a role in cell proliferation and migration, we here suggest that PGCs expressing it might gain advantage over others and undertake spermatogenesis, accounting for RPHM21 presence in all spermatozoa. Understanding how foreign sequence endogenization and co-option can modify the biology of an organism is of particular importance to assess the impact of such events on evolution.

  8. The Expression of a Novel Mitochondrially-Encoded Gene in Gonadic Precursors May Drive Paternal Inheritance of Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Pecci, Andrea; Maurizii, Maria Gabriella; Passamonti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have an active role in germ line development, and their inheritance dynamics are relevant to this process. Recently, a novel protein (RPHM21) was shown to be encoded in sperm by the male-transmitted mtDNA of Ruditapes philippinarum, a species with Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondria. In silico analyses suggested a viral origin of RPHM21, and we hypothesized that the endogenization of a viral element provided sperm mitochondria of R. philippinarum with the ability to invade male germ line, thus being transmitted to the progeny. In this work we investigated the dynamics of germ line development in relation to mitochondrial transcription and expression patterns using qPCR and specific antibodies targeting the germ line marker VASPH (R. philippinarum VASA homolog), and RPHM21. Based on the experimental results we conclude that both targets are localized in the primordial germ cells (PGCs) of males, but while VASPH is detected in all PGCs, RPHM21 appears to be expressed only in a subpopulation of them. Since it has been predicted that RPHM21 might have a role in cell proliferation and migration, we here suggest that PGCs expressing it might gain advantage over others and undertake spermatogenesis, accounting for RPHM21 presence in all spermatozoa. Understanding how foreign sequence endogenization and co-option can modify the biology of an organism is of particular importance to assess the impact of such events on evolution. PMID:26339998

  9. Analysis of the mitochondrial ATP synthase beta-subunit gene in Drosophilidae: structure, transcriptional regulatory features and developmental pattern of expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Peña, P; Ugalde, C; Calleja, M; Garesse, R

    1995-01-01

    We have cloned and determined the structure of the gene encoding the H(+)-ATP synthase beta subunit in two distantly related Drosophila species, D. melanogaster and D. virilis. The gene contains three exons that are extremely well conserved at the amino acid level, not only in the region encoding the mature protein but also in that encoding the leader peptide. Primer extension analysis indicates that the 5' untranslated region is extremely short, and reveals the presence of multiple initiation sites of transcription in both Drosophila species. The promoters of D. melanogaster and D. virilis H(+)-ATP synthase beta-subunit genes contain a conserved region surrounding the initiation transcription sites. Nucleotide sequence analysis has revealed the absence of canonical TATA and CCAAT boxes and the presence of several putative regulatory elements in both promoter regions, including GAGA, GATA and Ets binding sites. We have analysed the pattern of gene expression during D. melanogaster development. The mRNA is stored in oocytes, and activation of transcription takes place after 10 h of development. The expression of the nuclear-encoded H(+)-ATP synthase beta subunit is strictly coordinated with the expression of subunits 6 and 8 of the same complex that are encoded in the mitochondrial genome. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8554535

  10. Differential expression of citA gene encoding the mitochondrial citrate synthase of Aspergillus nidulans in response to developmental status and carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Min, In Sook; Bang, Ji Young; Seo, Soon Won; Lee, Cheong Ho; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2010-04-01

    As an extension of our previous studies on the mitochondrial citrate synthase of Aspergillus nidulans and cloning of its coding gene (citA), we analyzed differential expression of citA in response to the progress of development and change of carbon source. The cDNA consisted of 1,700 nucleotides and was predicted to encode a 474-amino acid protein. By comparing the cDNA sequence with the corresponding genomic sequence, we confirmed that citA gene contains 7 introns and that its transcription starts at position -26 (26-nucleotide upstream from the initiation codon). Four putative CreA binding motifs and three putative stress-response elements (STREs) were found within the 1.45-kb citA promoter region. The mode of citA expression was examined by both Northern blot and confocal microscopy using green fluorescent protein (sGFP) as a vital reporter. During vegetative growth and asexual development, the expression of citA was ubiquitous throughout the whole fungal body including mycelia and conidiophores. During sexual development, the expression of citA was quite strong in cleistothecial shells, but significantly weak in the content of cleistothecia including ascospores. Acetate showed a strong inductive effect on citA expression, which is subjected to carbon catabolite repression (CCR) caused by glucose. The recombinant fusion protein CitA(40)::sGFP (sGFP containing the 40-amino acid N-terminal segment of CitA) was localized into mitochondria, which supports that a mitochondrial targeting signal is included within the 40-amino acid N-terminal segment of CitA.

  11. High-fat diet decreases energy expenditure and expression of genes controlling lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function and skeletal system development in the adipose tissue, along with increased expression of extracellular matrix remodelling- and inflammation-related genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Sook; Kim, Young-Je; Kwon, Eun-Young; Ryoo, Jae Young; Kim, Sang Ryong; Jung, Un Ju

    2015-03-28

    The aim of the present study was to identify the genes differentially expressed in the visceral adipose tissue in a well-characterised mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Male C57BL/6J mice (n 20) were fed either HFD (189 % of energy from fat) or low-fat diet (LFD, 42 % of energy from fat) for 16 weeks. HFD-fed mice exhibited obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and adipose collagen accumulation, along with higher levels of plasma leptin, resistin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, although there were no significant differences in plasma cytokine levels. Energy intake was similar in the two diet groups owing to lower food intake in the HFD group; however, energy expenditure was also lower in the HFD group than in the LFD group. Microarray analysis revealed that genes related to lipolysis, fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial energy transduction, oxidation-reduction, insulin sensitivity and skeletal system development were down-regulated in HFD-fed mice, and genes associated with extracellular matrix (ECM) components, ECM remodelling and inflammation were up-regulated. The top ten up- or down-regulated genes include Acsm3, mt-Nd6, Fam13a, Cyp2e1, Rgs1 and Gpnmb, whose roles in the deterioration of obesity-associated adipose tissue are poorly understood. In conclusion, the genes identified here provide new therapeutic opportunities for prevention and treatment of diet-induced obesity.

  12. Renin–angiotensin system inhibitors protect against age-related changes in rat liver mitochondrial DNA content and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    de Cavanagh, Elena M.V.; Flores, Idhaliz; Ferder, Marcelo; Inserra, Felipe; Ferder, León

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renin–angiotensin system inhibition protects against liver fibrosis, ameliorates age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction and increases rodent lifespan. We hypothesized that life-long angiotensin-II-mediated stimulation of oxidant generation might participate in mitochondrial DNA “common deletion” formation, and the resulting impairment of bioenergetic capacity. Enalapril (10 mg/kg/d) or losartan (30 mg/kg/d) administered during 16.5 months were unable to prevent the age-dependent accumulation of rat liver mitochondrial DNA “common deletion”, but attenuated the decrease of mitochondrial DNA content. This evidence – together with the enhancement of NRF-1 and PGC-1 mRNA contents – seems to explain why enalapril and losartan improved mitochondrial functioning and lowered oxidant production, since both the absolute number of mtDNA molecules and increased NRF-1 and PGC-1 transcription are positively related to mitochondrial respiratory capacity, and PGC-1 protects against increases in ROS production and damage. Oxidative stress evoked by abnormal respiratory function contributes to the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disease and human aging. If the present mitochondrial actions of renin–angiotensin system inhibitors are confirmed in humans they may modify the therapeutic significance of that strategy. PMID:18765277

  13. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes of Mitochondrial Components in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirches, E

    2009-01-01

    Although the observation of aerobic glycolysis of tumor cells by Otto v. Warburg had demonstrated abnormalities of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cancer decades ago, there was no clear evidence for a functional role of mutant mitochondrial proteins in cancer development until the early years of the 21st century. In the year 2000, a major breakthrough was achieved by the observation, that several genes coding for subunits of the respiratory chain (ETC) complex II, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are tumor suppressor genes in heritable paragangliomas, fulfilling Knudson’s classical two-hit hypothesis. A functional inactivation of both alleles by germline mutations and chromosomal losses in the tumor tissue was found in the patients. Later, SDH mutations were also identified in sporadic paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas. Genes of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase and of mitochondrial iron homeostasis have been implicated in cancer development at the level of cell culture and mouse experiments. In contrast to the well established role of some nuclear SDH genes, a functional impact of the mitochondrial genome itself (mtDNA) in cancer development remains unclear. Nevertheless, the extremely high frequency of mtDNA mutations in solid tumors raises the question, whether this small circular genome might be applicable to early cancer detection. This is a meaningful approach, especially in cancers, which tend to spread tumor cells early into bodily fluids or faeces, which can be screened by non-invasive methods. PMID:19949549

  14. Increased expressions of genes and proteins involved in mitochondrial oxidation and antioxidant pathway in adipose tissue of pigs selected for a low residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Louveau, I; Vincent, A; Tacher, S; Gilbert, H; Gondret, F

    2016-12-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary sensor for nutrient availability and regulates many functions including feed intake and energy homeostasis. This study was undertaken to determine the molecular responses of adipose tissue to differences in feed intake and feed efficiency. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was collected from two lines of pigs divergently selected for residual feed intake (RFI), a measure of feed efficiency defined as the difference between actual and expected feed intake, and from a subset of high-RFI pigs that were feed-restricted at the level of the voluntary feed intake of low-RFI pigs during the growing-finishing period. Transcriptomics analyses indicated that the number of genes that were differentially expressed ( < 0.01) between low- and high-RFI pigs ( = 8 per group at each stage) in adipose tissue was much lower when pigs were considered at 19 kg (postweaning) than at 115 kg BW (market weight). Extended investigations were performed at 115 kg BW to compare low-RFI ( = 8), high-RFI ( = 8), and feed-restricted high-RFI ( = 8) pigs. They included in silico pathway analyses of the differentially expressed (DE) genes ( < 0.01) and a complementary proteomic investigation to list adipose proteins with a differential abundance ( < 0.10). Only 23% of the DE genes were affected by both RFI and feed restriction. This indicates that the responses of adipose tissue to RFI difference shared only some common mechanisms with feed intake modulation, notably the regulation of cell cycle (including ) and transferase activity pathway. Two carboxylesterase genes (, ) involved in lipolysis, were among the most overexpressed genes in the low-RFI pigs; they were also affected by feed restriction within the high-RFI line. About 60% of the molecular changes between low- and high-RFI pigs were specific to genetic divergence in feed efficiency, independently of feed intake. Different genes and proteins known to be associated with mitochondrial oxidative metabolism were

  15. Two genes encoding the bovine mitochondrial ATP synthase proteolipid specify precursors with different import sequences and are expressed in a tissue-specific manner.

    PubMed Central

    Gay, N J; Walker, J E

    1985-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding different precursor proteins of the same mature proteolipid subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase have been cloned from a bovine cDNA library. The hybridisation probe was a mixture of 17-mer oligonucleotides containing 256 discrete sequences. The coding sequences of the two cDNAs differ in 25 silent positions of codons and the 3' non-coding sequences are only weakly related. The precursor sequences, which direct the import of the proteolipid into the mitochondrion, are 61 and 68 amino acids long. They are related to each other in regions which probably are recognition signals for the processing protease. The corresponding genes are expressed differently in various tissues in a way that reflects their embryonic origin. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2868890

  16. Isolation, chromosomal localization, and differential expression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase and chloroplastic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase genes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Wu, G; Wilen, R W; Robertson, A J; Gusta, L V

    1999-06-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene expression was investigated to elucidate its role in drought and freezing tolerance in spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum). cDNAs encoding chloroplastic Cu/ZnSODs and mitochondrial MnSODs were isolated from wheat. MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD genes were mapped to the long arms of the homologous group-2 and -7 chromosomes, respectively. Northern blots indicated that MnSOD genes were drought inducible and decreased after rehydration. In contrast, Cu/ZnSOD mRNA was not drought inducible but increased after rehydration. In both spring and winter wheat seedlings exposed to 2 degrees C, MnSOD transcripts attained maximum levels between 7 and 49 d. Transcripts of Cu/ZnSOD mRNA were detected sooner in winter than in spring wheat; however, they disappeared after 21 d of acclimation. Transcripts of both classes of SOD genes increased during natural acclimation in both spring and winter types. Exposure of fully hardened plants to three nonlethal freeze-thaw cycles resulted in Cu/Zn mRNA accumulation; however, MnSOD mRNA levels declined in spring wheat but remained unchanged in winter wheat. The results of the dehydration and freeze-thaw-cycle experiments suggest that winter wheat has evolved a more effective stress-repair mechanism than spring wheat.

  17. Mitochondrial genes are altered in blood early in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lunnon, Katie; Keohane, Aoife; Pidsley, Ruth; Newhouse, Stephen; Riddoch-Contreras, Joanna; Thubron, Elisabeth B; Devall, Matthew; Soininen, Hikka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Schalkwyk, Leonard; Dobson, Richard; Malik, Afshan N; Powell, John; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela

    2017-01-07

    Although mitochondrial dysfunction is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease in the brain and blood, the molecular mechanisms behind these phenomena are unknown. Here we have replicated our previous findings demonstrating reduced expression of nuclear-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits and subunits required for the translation of mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS genes in blood from people with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Interestingly this was accompanied by increased expression of some mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS genes, namely those residing closest to the transcription start site of the polycistronic heavy chain mitochondrial transcript (MT-ND1, MT-ND2, MT-ATP6, MT-CO1, MT-CO2, MT-C03) and MT-ND6 transcribed from the light chain. Further we show that mitochondrial DNA copy number was unchanged suggesting no change in steady-state numbers of mitochondria. We suggest that an imbalance in nuclear and mitochondrial genome-encoded OXPHOS transcripts may drive a negative feedback loop reducing mitochondrial translation and compromising OXPHOS efficiency, which is likely to generate damaging reactive oxygen species.

  18. Gene Conversion Shapes Linear Mitochondrial Genome Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that gene conversion between the ends of linear mitochondrial chromosomes can cause telomere expansion and the duplication of subtelomeric loci. However, it is not yet known how widespread this phenomenon is and how significantly it has impacted organelle genome architecture. Using linear mitochondrial DNAs and mitochondrial plasmids from diverse eukaryotes, we argue that telomeric recombination has played a major role in fashioning linear organelle chromosomes. We find that mitochondrial telomeres frequently expand into subtelomeric regions, resulting in gene duplications, homogenizations, and/or fragmentations. We suggest that these features are a product of subtelomeric gene conversion, provide a hypothetical model for this process, and employ genetic diversity data to support the idea that the greater the effective population size the greater the potential for gene conversion between subtelomeric loci. PMID:23572386

  19. Quality improvement of transgenic cloned bovine embryos using an aggregation method: Effects on cell number, cell ratio, embryo perimeter, mitochondrial distribution, and gene expression profile.

    PubMed

    Bang, J I; Jin, J I; Ghanem, N; Choi, B H; Fakruzzaman, M; Ha, A N; Lee, K L; Uhm, S J; Ko, D H; Koo, B C; Lee, J G; Kong, I K

    2015-09-01

    The production of cloned embryos using conventional methods has extremely low success rates owing to low embryo quality. To improve the quality of cloned bovine embryos expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), we applied an aggregation culture method. The EGFP gene was transfected into bovine fetal fibroblasts using a retroviral vector system. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was performed using these cells, and the resulting embryos were cultured in aggregates or individually. Gene expression was analyzed by a microarray, and differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The total number of cells per blastocyst and the ratio of inner cell mass cells to trophectoderm cells were higher in aggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (agBL; 368.7 ± 109.6 and 1:4.8, respectively) than in in vitro-fertilized blastocysts (ivfBL; 189.8 ± 65.8 and 1:2.6, respectively) and nonaggregated transgenic cloned blastocysts (sBL; 113.1 ± 36.3 and 1:1.5, respectively; P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, the blastocyst perimeter was larger in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (1168.8 ± 200.23 vs. 887.33 ± 187.62 and 678 ± 226.1 μm; P < 0.05). In addition, mitochondrial fluorescence intensity was higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL and sBL groups (P < 0.05). The number of apoptotic cells per blastocyst was lower in the ivfBL and agBL groups than in the sBL group (3.7 ± 2.2 and 3.4 ± 2.1 vs. 6.7 ± 6.8; P < 0.05). The genes identified in the microarray belonged to 18 categories. Expression of the Krüppel-like factor 4 gene, which is associated with cell proliferation, development, and transcription, was 7.2-fold higher in the agBL group than in the ivfBL group (P < 0.05) but did not differ between the sBL and ivfBL groups (P > 0.05). Expression of the heat shock 70-kDa protein 1A gene, which is associated with apoptosis, was 12-fold higher in the s

  20. Dynamic mitochondrial-nuclear redistribution of the immunophilin FKBP51 is regulated by the PKA signaling pathway to control gene expression during adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Toneatto, Judith; Guber, Sergio; Charó, Nancy L; Susperreguy, Sebastián; Schwartz, Jessica; Galigniana, Mario D; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids play an important role in adipogenesis through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that forms a heterocomplex with Hsp90•Hsp70 and one high molecular weight immunophilin, either FKBP51 or FKBP52. When 3T3-L1 preadipocytes are induced to differentiate, FKBP51 expression progressively increases, whereas FKBP52 decreases, and Hsp90, Hsp70, p23 and Cyp40 remain unchanged. Interestingly, FKBP51 rapidly translocates from mitochondria to the nucleus where it is retained upon its interaction with chromatin and the nuclear matrix. FKBP51 nuclear localization is transient, and after 48 hours it cycles back to mitochondria. Importantly, this dynamic FKBP51 mitochondrial-nuclear shuttling depends on PKA signaling, because its inhibition by PKI or knockdown of PKA-cα by siRNA, prevented FKBP51 nuclear translocation induced by IBMX. In addition, the electrophoretic pattern of migration of FKBP51 is altered by treatment of cells with PKI or knockdown of PKA-cα, suggesting that FKBP51 is a PKA substrate. In preadipocytes, FKBP51 colocalizes with PKA-cα in mitochondria. When adipogenesis is triggered, PKA-cα also moves to the nucleus colocalizing with FKBP51 mainly in the nuclear lamina. Moreover, FKBP51 and GR interaction increases when preadipocytes are induced to differentiate. GR transcriptional capacity is reduced when cells are incubated in the presence of IBMX, forskolin or dibutyryl-cAMP, compounds that induced FKBP51 nuclear translocation, but not by a specific activator of EPAC. FKBP51 knockdown facilitates adipogenesis, whereas ectopic expression of FKBP51 blocks adipogenesis. These findings indicate that the dynamic mitochondrial-nuclear shuttling of FKBP51 regulated by PKA may be key in fine-tuning the transcriptional control of GR target genes required for the acquisition of adipocyte phenotype.

  1. Inverse correlation between expression of the Wolfs Hirschhorn candidate gene Letm1 and mitochondrial volume in C. elegans and in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ayako; van der Bliek, Alexander M

    2007-09-01

    Deletion of the Letm1 gene correlates with the occurrence of epilepsy in patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. The Letm1 gene encodes a mitochondrial protein that is homologous to yeast Mdm38. Yeast Mdm38 is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane where it was proposed to act as a K+/H+ antiporter or alternatively as a chaperone for selected mitochondrial inner membrane proteins. Here, we present cellular and biochemical analysis of Letm1 in mammalian cells and an analysis of a C. elegans mutant that could serve as a model for Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. We localized the Letm1 protein to the mitochondrial inner membrane of mammalian cells, where it exists in a 550-kDa complex. We show that Letm1 can bind to itself in vitro, raising the possibility that it can form higher order multimers in vivo. Reduced levels of Letm1 in human cells and in C. elegans lead to swellings along the lengths of mitochondria, consistent with the phenotype observed in yeast. Electron micrographs show mitochondria with swollen matrices that are less electron-dense than matrices in normal mitochondria. The opposite effect is achieved by overexpression of Letm1. Overexpression increases the electron density of the mitochondrial matrix and swelling of cristae. Our results are therefore consistent with a protein that regulates the volume of the mitochondrial matrix.

  2. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 expression by exercise.

    PubMed

    Holloszy, John O

    2011-04-01

    Endurance exercise training can induce large increases mitochondria and the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter in skeletal muscle. For a long time after the discovery in the 1960s that exercise results in an increase in muscle mitochondria, there was no progress in elucidation of the mechanisms involved. The reason for this lack of progress was that nothing was known regarding how expression of the genes-encoding mitochondrial proteins is coordinately regulated. This situation changed rapidly after discovery of transcription factors that control transcription of genes-encoding mitochondrial proteins and, most importantly, the discovery of peroxisome proliferator-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). This transcription coactivator binds to and activates transcription factors that regulate transcription of genes-encoding mitochondrial proteins. Thus, PGC-1α activates and coordinates mitochondrial biogenesis. It is now known that exercise rapidly activates and induces increased expression of PGC-1α. The exercise-generated signals that lead to PGC-1α activation and increased expression are the increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and decreases in ATP and creatine phosphate (∼P). Ca(2+) mediates its effect by activating CAMKII, while the decrease in ∼P mediates its effect via activation of AMPK. Expression of the GLUT4 isoform of the glucose transporter is regulated in parallel with mitochondrial biogenesis via the same signaling pathways. This review describes what is known regarding the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and GLUT4 expression by exercise. A major component of this review deals with the physiological and metabolic consequences of the exercise-induced increase in mitochondria and GLUT4. © 2011 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 1:699-729, 2011.

  3. The effect of allopurinol administration on mitochondrial respiration and gene expression of xanthine oxidoreductase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inflammatory cytokines in selected tissues of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Settle, T; Falkenstein, E; Klandorf, H

    2015-10-01

    Birds have a remarkable longevity for their body size despite an increased body temperature, higher metabolic rate, and increased blood glucose concentrations compared to most mammals. As the end-product of purine degradation, uric acid (UA) is generated in the xanthine/hypoxanthine reactions catalyzed by xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). In the first study, Cobb × Cobb broilers (n = 12; 4 weeks old) were separated into 2 treatments (n = 6); control (CON) and allopurinol (AL) 35 mg/kg BW (ALLO). The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function in broiler chickens in response to potential oxidative stress generated from the administration of AL for 1 wk. There was a significant reduction in state 3 respiration (P = 0.01) and state 4 respiration (P = 0.007) in AL-treated birds compared to the controls. The purpose of the second study was to assess the effect of AL on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN)-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p35, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and XOR in liver tissue. Cobb × Cobb broilers were separated into two groups at 4 wk age (n = 10); CON and ALLO. After 1 wk AL treatment, half of the birds in each group (CON 1 and ALLO 1) were euthanized while the remaining birds continued on AL treatment for an additional week (CON 2 and ALLO 2). A significant increase in gene expression of XOR, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-12p35 in ALLO 2 birds as compared to birds in CON 2 was detected. Liver UA content was significantly decreased in both ALLO 1(P = 0.003) and ALLO 2 (P = 0.012) birds when compared to CON 1 and CON 2, respectively. The AL reduced liver UA concentrations and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. Additional studies are needed to determine if AL causes a direct effect on mitochondria or if mitochondrial dysfunction observed in liver mitochondria was due indirectly through increased oxidative stress or increased inflammation.

  4. Evolution of mitochondrial gene order in Annelida.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Anne; Golombek, Anja; Gerth, Michael; Schwarz, Francine; Struck, Torsten H; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Annelida is a highly diverse animal group with over 21,000 described species. As part of Lophotrochozoa, the vast majority of annelids are currently classified into two groups: Errantia and Sedentaria, together forming Pleistoannelida. Besides these taxa, Sipuncula, Amphinomidae, Chaetopteridae, Oweniidae and Magelonidae can be found branching at the base of the tree. Comparisons of mitochondrial genomes have been used to investigate phylogenetic relationship within animal taxa. Complete annelid mitochondrial genomes are available for some Sedentaria and Errantia and in most cases exhibit a highly conserved gene order. Only two complete genomes have been published from the basal branching lineages and these are restricted to Sipuncula. We describe the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences for all other basal branching annelid families: Owenia fusiformis (Oweniidae), Magelona mirabilis (Magelonidae), Eurythoe complanata (Amphinomidae), Chaetopterus variopedatus and Phyllochaetopterus sp. (Chaetopteridae). The mitochondrial gene order of all these taxa is substantially different from the pattern found in Pleistoannelida. Additionally, we report the first mitochondrial genomes in Annelida that encode genes on both strands. Our findings demonstrate that the supposedly highly conserved mitochondrial gene order suggested for Annelida is restricted to Pleistoannelida, representing the ground pattern of this group. All investigated basal branching annelid taxa show a completely different arrangement of genes than observed in Pleistoannelida. The gene order of protein coding and ribosomal genes in Magelona mirabilis differs only in two transposition events from a putative lophotrochozoan ground pattern and might be the closest to an ancestral annelid pattern. The mitochondrial genomes of Myzostomida show the conserved pattern of Pleistoannelida, thereby supporting their inclusion in this taxon.

  5. Evolution of mitochondrial gene orders in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Perseke, Marleen; Fritzsch, Guido; Ramsch, Kai; Bernt, Matthias; Merkle, Daniel; Middendorf, Martin; Bernhard, Detlef; Stadler, Peter F; Schlegel, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the mitochondrial gene orders of all previously published and two novel Antedon mediterranea (Crinoidea) and Ophiura albida (Ophiuroidea) complete echinoderm mitochondrial genomes shows that all major types of rearrangement operations are necessary to explain the evolution of mitochondrial genomes. In addition to protein coding genes we include all tRNA genes as well as the control region in our analysis. Surprisingly, 7 of the 16 genomes published in the GenBank database contain misannotations, mostly unannotated tRNAs and/or mistakes in the orientation of tRNAs, which we have corrected here. Although the gene orders of mt genomes appear very different, only 8 events are necessary to explain the evolutionary history of echinoderms with the exception of the ophiuroids. Only two of these rearrangements are inversions, while we identify three tandem-duplication-random-loss events and three transpositions.

  6. Mitochondrial gene therapy augments mitochondrial physiology in a Parkinson's disease cell model.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Paula M; Quigley, Caitlin K; Dunham, Lisa D; Papageorge, Christina M; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R; Schwarz, Kathleen M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Khan, Shaharyar M; Portell, Francisco R; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-08-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology ("ProtoFection") that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) followed by the SOD2 mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) to deliver mtDNA cargo to the mitochondria of living cells. MTD-TFAM (MTD = PTD + MLS = "mitochondrial transduction domain") binds mtDNA and rapidly transports it across plasma membranes to mitochondria. For therapeutic proof-of-principle we tested ProtoFection technology in Parkinson's disease cybrid cells, using mtDNA generated from commercially available human genomic DNA (gDNA; Roche). Nine to 11 weeks after single exposures to MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex, PD cybrid cells with impaired respiration and reduced mtDNA genes increased their mtDNA gene copy numbers up to 24-fold, mtDNA-derived RNAs up to 35-fold, TFAM and ETC proteins, cell respiration, and mitochondrial movement velocities. Cybrid cells with no or minimal basal mitochondrial impairments showed reduced or no responses to treatment, suggesting the possibility of therapeutic selectivity. Exposure of PD but not control cybrid cells to MTD-TFAM protein alone or MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex increased expression of PGC-1alpha, suggesting activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. ProtoFection technology for mitochondrial gene therapy holds promise for improving bioenergetic function in impaired PD neurons and needs additional development to define its pharmacodynamics and delineate its molecular mechanisms. It also is unclear whether single-donor gDNA for generating mtDNA would be a preferred therapeutic compared with the pooled

  7. Fish Oil Slows Prostate Cancer Xenograft Growth Relative to Other Dietary Fats and is Associated with Decreased Mitochondrial and Insulin Pathway Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Jessica C.; Masko, Elizabeth M.; Wu, Chenwei; Keenan, Melissa M.; Pilla, Danielle M.; Aronson, William J.; Chi, Jen-Tsan A.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous mouse studies suggest that decreasing dietary fat content can slow prostate cancer (PCa) growth. To our knowledge, no study has yet compared the effect of multiple different fats on PCa progression. We sought to systematically compare the effect of fish oil, olive oil, corn oil, and animal fat on PCa progression. Methods A total of 96 male SCID mice were injected with LAPC-4 human PCa cells. Two weeks following injection, mice were randomized to a fish oil, olive oil, corn oil, or animal fat-based Western diet (35% kcals from fat). Animals were euthanized when tumors reached 1,000mm3. Serum was collected at sacrifice and assayed for PSA, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and PGE-2 levels. Tumors were also assayed for PGE-2 and COX-2 levels and global gene expression analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays. Results Mice weights and tumor volumes were equivalent across groups at randomization. Overall, fish oil consumption was associated with improved survival, relative to other dietary groups (p=0.014). On gene expression analyses, the fish oil group had decreased signal in pathways related to mitochondrial physiology and insulin synthesis/secretion. Conclusions In this xenograft model, we found that consuming a diet in which fish oil was the only fat source slowed tumor growth and improved survival, compared to mice consuming diets composed of olive oil, corn oil, or animal fat. While prior studies showed that the amount of fat is important for PCa growth, the current study suggests that type of dietary fat consumed may also be important. PMID:23877027

  8. Fish oil slows prostate cancer xenograft growth relative to other dietary fats and is associated with decreased mitochondrial and insulin pathway gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J C; Masko, E M; Wu, C; Keenan, M M; Pilla, D M; Aronson, W J; Chi, J-Ta; Freedland, S J

    2013-12-01

    Previous mouse studies suggest that decreasing dietary fat content can slow prostate cancer (PCa) growth. To our knowledge, no study has yet compared the effect of multiple different fats on PCa progression. We sought to systematically compare the effect of fish oil, olive oil, corn oil and animal fat on PCa progression. A total of 96 male severe combined immunodeficient mice were injected with LAPC-4 human PCa cells. Two weeks following injection, mice were randomized to a Western diet based on fish oil, olive oil, corn oil or animal fat (35% kilocalories from fat). Animals were euthanized when tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3). Serum was collected at death and assayed for PSA, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF-1-binding protein-3 and prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) levels. Tumors were also assayed for PGE-2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels, and global gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays. Mice weights and tumor volumes were equivalent across groups at randomization. Overall, fish oil consumption was associated with improved survival relative to other dietary groups (P=0.014). On gene expression analyses, the fish oil group had decreased signal in pathways related to mitochondrial physiology and insulin synthesis/secretion. In this xenograft model, we found that consuming a diet in which fish oil was the only fat source slowed tumor growth and improved survival compared with that in mice consuming diets composed of olive oil, corn oil or animal fat. Although prior studies showed that the amount of fat is important for PCa growth, this study suggests that the type of dietary fat consumed may also be important.

  9. Evolutionary transfers of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus in the Populus lineage and coexpression of nuclear and mitochondrial Sdh4 genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine; Liu, Zhenlan; Adams, Keith L

    2006-01-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus is an ongoing evolutionary process in flowering plants. Evolutionarily recent gene transfers provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the process and the way in which transferred genes become functional in the nucleus. Genes that are present in the mitochondrion of some angiosperms but have been transferred to the nucleus in the Populus lineage were identified by searches of Populus sequence databases. Sequence analyses and expression experiments were used to characterize the transferred genes. Two succinate dehydrogenase genes and six mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes have been transferred to the nucleus in the Populus lineage and have become expressed. Three transferred genes have gained an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting presequence from other pre-existing genes and two of the transferred genes do not contain an N-terminal targeting presequence. Intact copies of the succinate dehydrogenase gene Sdh4 are present in both the mitochondrion and the nucleus. Both copies of Sdh4 are expressed in multiple organs of two Populus species and RNA editing occurs in the mitochondrial copy. These results provide a genome-wide perspective on mitochondrial genes that were transferred to the nucleus and became expressed, functional genes during the evolutionary history of Populus.

  10. Effects of Silica and Titanium Oxide Particles on a Human Neural Stem Cell Line: Morphology, Mitochondrial Activity, and Gene Expression of Differentiation Markers

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Inoue, Yuriko; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Ikeda, Keiichi; Usui, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kim, Seung U.; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm) have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs) line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 μm) and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 μm). Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker) at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations ≥62.5 μg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure. PMID:24992594

  11. The ketogenic diet upregulates expression of the gene encoding the key ketogenic enzyme mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Tim E; Eagles, Douglas A; Sato, Hitoshi

    2002-04-01

    The ketogenic diet is a clinically and experimentally effective anti-epileptic treatment whose molecular mechanism(s) of action remain to be elucidated. As a first step in defining its effects on regulation of fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis at the genetic level, we have administered to rats: (1) a calorie-restricted ketogenic diet (KCR); (2) a calorie-restricted normal diet (NCR); or (3) a normal diet ad libitum (NAL). We have used RNase protection to co-assay diet-induced changes in abundance of the mRNA encoding the critical enzyme of ketogenesis from acetyl-CoA namely mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (mHS) in liver and brain, together with mRNAs encoding three other key enzymes of fatty acid oxidation. We demonstrate that NCR-fed rats exhibit a significant 2-fold increase in liver mHS mRNA compared to NAL-fed rats, and that KCR-fed rats exhibit a significant 2-fold increase in both liver and brain mHS mRNA compared to NAL-fed rats. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, the effect of a ketogenic diet on gene expression in brain, and suggest possible anti-epileptic mechanisms for future investigation.

  12. Effects of silica and titanium oxide particles on a human neural stem cell line: morphology, mitochondrial activity, and gene expression of differentiation markers.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hanada, Sanshiro; Inoue, Yuriko; Sato, Keisuke; Hirakuri, Kenji; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kanaya, Fumihide; Ikeda, Keiichi; Usui, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kim, Seung U; Manome, Yoshinobu

    2014-07-02

    Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm) have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs) line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 µm) and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 µm). Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations = 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker) at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations =62.5 µg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure.

  13. Differential expression of genes involved with apoptosis, cell cycle, connective tissue proteins, fuel substrate utilization, inflammation and mitochondrial biogenesis in copper-deficient rat hearts: implication of a role for Nfkappab1.

    PubMed

    Klaahsen, Darcey; Ricklefs, Kristen; Medeiros, Denis M

    2007-11-01

    We hypothesized that the increase in mitochondrial proliferation in hearts from copper-deficient rats is due to an increase in expression of the transcriptional factor peroxisomal-like proliferating related coactivator 1alpha (Ppargc1a), which regulates transcriptional activity for many of the genes that encode for mitochondrial proteins. In addition to several transcriptional factors implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis, we also looked at a number of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and fuel substrate utilization. Long-Evans rats were placed on either a copper-adequate (n=4) or copper-deficient (n=4) diet 3 days post weaning and remained on the diet for 5 weeks; their copper deficiency status was confirmed using previously established assays. Custom oligo arrays spotted with genes pertinent to mitochondrial biogenesis were hybridized with cRNA probes synthesized from the collected heart tissue. Chemiluminescent array images from both groups were analyzed for gene spot intensities and differential gene expression. Our results did not demonstrate any significant increase in Ppargc1a or its implicated targets, as we had predicted. However, consistent with previous data, an up-regulation of genes that encode for collagen type 3, fibronectin and elastin were found. Interestingly, there was also a significant increase in the expression of the transcriptional factor nuclear factor kappaB1 (Nfkappab1) in the copper-deficient treatment animals, compared to the control group, and this was confirmed by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of this study merit the further investigation of the role of reactive oxidative species with regard to Nfkappab1 in the copper deficient rat heart.

  14. Expression and Purification of Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase and Transcription Factor A from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, John P; Arnold, Jamie J; Salminen, Tiina S; Kaguni, Laurie S; Cameron, Craig E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression is essential in all organisms. Our understanding of mitochondrial transcription on a biochemical level has been limited by the inability to purify the individual protein components involved in mitochondrial gene expression. Recently, new systems have been identified that permit purification of these proteins from bacteria. However, the generalizability of these systems is not clear. Here, we have applied the technology from the Cameron lab to express and purify mitochondrial RNA polymerase and transcription factor A from Drosophila melanogaster. We show that the use of SUMO system to produce SUMO fusion proteins in bacteria is effective not only for the human and mouse proteins, but also for the fly proteins. The application of this system to produce the mitochondrial proteins from other organisms should permit detailed understanding of mitochondrial transcription from any organism.

  15. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genomic Responses to Loss of LRPPRC Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Nilsson, Roland; Belcher-Timme, Casey A.; Luo, Biao; Root, David E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid advances in genotyping and sequencing technology have dramatically accelerated the discovery of genes underlying human disease. Elucidating the function of such genes and understanding their role in pathogenesis, however, remain challenging. Here, we introduce a genomic strategy to characterize such genes functionally, and we apply it to LRPPRC, a poorly studied gene that is mutated in Leigh syndrome, French-Canadian type (LSFC). We utilize RNA interference to engineer an allelic series of cellular models in which LRPPRC has been stably silenced to different levels of knockdown efficiency. We then combine genome-wide expression profiling with gene set enrichment analysis to identify cellular responses that correlate with the loss of LRPPRC. Using this strategy, we discovered a specific role for LRPPRC in the expression of all mitochondrial DNA-encoded mRNAs, but not the rRNAs, providing mechanistic insights into the enzymatic defects observed in the disease. Our analysis shows that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are not collectively affected by the loss of LRPPRC. We do observe altered expression of genes related to hexose metabolism, prostaglandin synthesis, and glycosphingolipid biology that may either play an adaptive role in cell survival or contribute to pathogenesis. The combination of genetic perturbation, genomic profiling, and pathway analysis represents a generic strategy for understanding disease pathogenesis. PMID:20220140

  16. Mitochondrial genes at Cold Spring Harbor.

    PubMed

    Grivell, L A

    1981-12-01

    The flowering dogwood trees and green lawns of Cold Spring Harbor provided the setting for a meeting devoted to Mitochondrial Genes from May 13-17th, 1981. Dedicated to the memory of Boris Ephrussi, who pioneered mitochondrial genetics at a time when the only kinds of genetics were nuclear or unclear, the meeting showed that the study of mtDNA has had impact on many areas of molecular biology including the genetic code and decoding, tRNA function, mechanisms of splicing and molecular evolution. Curiously, as Herschel Roman pointed out in his opening address, Ephrussi took great pains to avoid any mention of mitochondrial DNA in connection with his observations on cytoplasmic inheritance, preferring instead to refer to 'cytoplasmic particles, endowed with genetic continuity' (Ephrussi 1953). This reticence was not shared by participants at the meeting, as the following, brief report will show.

  17. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  18. Expression of a mitochondrial gene orfH79 from CMS-Honglian rice inhibits Escherichia coli growth via deficient oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xia; Chen, Qiusheng; Bao, Canming; Ai, Aihua; Zhou, Ying; Li, Shaobo; Xie, Hongwei; Zhu, Youlin; Cai, Yaohui; Peng, Xiaojue

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has often been associated with abnormal mitochondrial open frames (ORF), orfH79 is a mitochondrial chimeric gene responsible for the CMS trait in Honglian (HL) rice. In this study, the weakly produced ORFH79 protein significantly inhibited the growth of E. coli in an oxygen culture, however, the growth of the transformants producing ORFH79 was indistinguishable from the control under anaerobic incubation conditions. In addition, a lower respiration rate, wrinkled bacterial surfaces, and decreased pyruvate kinase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activities were observed in the ORFH79 produced E. coli. These results indicate that ORFH79 impairs the oxygen respiration of E. coli, which may inhibit E. coli growth.

  19. The Armc10/SVH gene: genome context, regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and protection against Aβ-induced mitochondrial fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, R; Mirra, S; Figueiro-Silva, J; Navas-Pérez, E; Quevedo, M; López-Doménech, G; Podlesniy, P; Ulloa, F; Garcia-Fernàndez, J; Trullas, R; Soriano, E

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial function and dynamics are essential for neurotransmission, neural function and neuronal viability. Recently, we showed that the eutherian-specific Armcx gene cluster (Armcx1–6 genes), located in the X chromosome, encodes for a new family of proteins that localise to mitochondria, regulating mitochondrial trafficking. The Armcx gene cluster evolved by retrotransposition of the Armc10 gene mRNA, which is present in all vertebrates and is considered to be the ancestor gene. Here we investigate the genomic organisation, mitochondrial functions and putative neuroprotective role of the Armc10 ancestor gene. The genomic context of the Armc10 locus shows considerable syntenic conservation among vertebrates, and sequence comparisons and CHIP-data suggest the presence of at least three conserved enhancers. We also show that the Armc10 protein localises to mitochondria and that it is highly expressed in the brain. Furthermore, we show that Armc10 levels regulate mitochondrial trafficking in neurons, but not mitochondrial aggregation, by controlling the number of moving mitochondria. We further demonstrate that the Armc10 protein interacts with the KIF5/Miro1-2/Trak2 trafficking complex. Finally, we show that overexpression of Armc10 in neurons prevents Aβ-induced mitochondrial fission and neuronal death. Our data suggest both conserved and differential roles of the Armc10/Armcx gene family in regulating mitochondrial dynamics in neurons, and underscore a protective effect of the Armc10 gene against Aβ-induced toxicity. Overall, our findings support a further degree of regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in the brain of more evolved mammals. PMID:24722288

  20. Higher plant mitochondrial DNA: Genomes, genes, mutants, transcription, translation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains brief summaries of 63 presentations given at the International Workshop on Higher Plant Mitochondrial DNA. The presentations are organized into topical discussions addressing plant genomes, mitochondrial genes, cytoplasmic male sterility, transcription, translation, plasmids and tissue culture. (DT)

  1. Mitochondrial Gene Therapy Augments Mitochondrial Physiology in a Parkinson's Disease Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Paula M.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Papageorge, Christina M.; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Schwarz, Kathleen M.; Trimmer, Patricia A.; Khan, Shaharyar M.; Portell, Francisco R.; Bergquist, Kristen E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology (“ProtoFection”) that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) followed by the SOD2 mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) to deliver mtDNA cargo to the mitochondria of living cells. MTD–TFAM (MTD = PTD + MLS = “mitochondrial transduction domain”) binds mtDNA and rapidly transports it across plasma membranes to mitochondria. For therapeutic proof-of-principle we tested ProtoFection technology in Parkinson's disease cybrid cells, using mtDNA generated from commercially available human genomic DNA (gDNA; Roche). Nine to 11 weeks after single exposures to MTD–TFAM + mtDNA complex, PD cybrid cells with impaired respiration and reduced mtDNA genes increased their mtDNA gene copy numbers up to 24-fold, mtDNA-derived RNAs up to 35-fold, TFAM and ETC proteins, cell respiration, and mitochondrial movement velocities. Cybrid cells with no or minimal basal mitochondrial impairments showed reduced or no responses to treatment, suggesting the possibility of therapeutic selectivity. Exposure of PD but not control cybrid cells to MTD–TFAM protein alone or MTD–TFAM + mtDNA complex increased expression of PGC-1α, suggesting activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. ProtoFection technology for mitochondrial gene therapy holds promise for improving bioenergetic function in impaired PD neurons and needs additional development to define its pharmacodynamics and delineate its molecular mechanisms. It also is unclear whether single-donor gDNA for generating mtDNA would be a

  2. Optimized Allotopic Expression of the Human Mitochondrial ND4 Prevents Blindness in a Rat Model of Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ellouze, Sami; Augustin, Sébastien; Bouaita, Aicha; Bonnet, Crystel; Simonutti, Manuel; Forster, Valérie; Picaud, Serge; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA can no longer be ignored in most medical areas. With prevalence certainly higher than one in 6000, they probably represent the most common form of metabolic disorders. Despite progress in identification of their molecular mechanisms, little has been done with regard to therapy. We have recently optimized the allotopic expression for the mitochondrial genes ATP6, ND1, and ND4 and obtained a complete and long-lasting rescue of mitochondrial dysfunction in the human fibroblasts in which these genes were mutated. However, biosafety and benefit to mitochondrial function must be validated in animal models prior to clinical applications. To create an animal model of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), we introduced the human ND4 gene harboring the G11778A mutation, responsible of 60% of LHON cases, to rat eyes by in vivo electroporation. The treatment induced the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which were 40% less abundant in treated eyes than in control eyes. This deleterious effect was also confirmed in primary cell culture, in which both RGC survival and neurite outgrowth were compromised. Importantly, RGC loss was clearly associated with a decline in visual performance. A subsequent electroporation with wild-type ND4 prevented both RGC loss and the impairment of visual function. Hence, these data provide the proof-of-principle that optimized allotopic expression can be an effective treatment for LHON, and they open the way to clinical studies on other devastating mitochondrial disorders. PMID:18771762

  3. Optimized allotopic expression of the human mitochondrial ND4 prevents blindness in a rat model of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellouze, Sami; Augustin, Sébastien; Bouaita, Aicha; Bonnet, Crystel; Simonutti, Manuel; Forster, Valérie; Picaud, Serge; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2008-09-01

    Mitochondrial diseases due to mutations in mitochondrial DNA can no longer be ignored in most medical areas. With prevalence certainly higher than one in 6000, they probably represent the most common form of metabolic disorders. Despite progress in identification of their molecular mechanisms, little has been done with regard to therapy. We have recently optimized the allotopic expression for the mitochondrial genes ATP6, ND1, and ND4 and obtained a complete and long-lasting rescue of mitochondrial dysfunction in the human fibroblasts in which these genes were mutated. However, biosafety and benefit to mitochondrial function must be validated in animal models prior to clinical applications. To create an animal model of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), we introduced the human ND4 gene harboring the G11778A mutation, responsible of 60% of LHON cases, to rat eyes by in vivo electroporation. The treatment induced the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which were 40% less abundant in treated eyes than in control eyes. This deleterious effect was also confirmed in primary cell culture, in which both RGC survival and neurite outgrowth were compromised. Importantly, RGC loss was clearly associated with a decline in visual performance. A subsequent electroporation with wild-type ND4 prevented both RGC loss and the impairment of visual function. Hence, these data provide the proof-of-principle that optimized allotopic expression can be an effective treatment for LHON, and they open the way to clinical studies on other devastating mitochondrial disorders.

  4. The mitochondrial genome of Raphanus sativus and gene evolution of cruciferous mitochondrial types.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shengxin; Chen, Jianmei; Wang, Yankun; Gu, Bingchao; He, Jianbo; Chu, Pu; Guan, Rongzhan

    2013-03-20

    To explore the mitochondrial genes of the Cruciferae family, the mitochondrial genome of Raphanus sativus (sat) was sequenced and annotated. The circular mitochondrial genome of sat is 239,723 bp and includes 33 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 17 tRNA genes. The mitochondrial genome also contains a pair of large repeat sequences 5.9 kb in length, which may mediate genome reorganization into two sub-genomic circles, with predicted sizes of 124.8 kb and 115.0 kb, respectively. Furthermore, gene evolution of mitochondrial genomes within the Cruciferae family was analyzed using sat mitochondrial type (mitotype), together with six other reported mitotypes. The cruciferous mitochondrial genomes have maintained almost the same set of functional genes. Compared with Cycas taitungensis (a representative gymnosperm), the mitochondrial genomes of the Cruciferae have lost nine protein-coding genes and seven mitochondrial-like tRNA genes, but acquired six chloroplast-like tRNAs. Among the Cruciferae, to maintain the same set of genes that are necessary for mitochondrial function, the exons of the genes have changed at the lowest rates, as indicated by the numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms. The open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function in the cruciferous genomes are not conserved. Evolutionary events, such as mutations, genome reorganizations and sequence insertions or deletions (indels), have resulted in the non-conserved ORFs in the cruciferous mitochondrial genomes, which is becoming significantly different among mitotypes. This work represents the first phylogenic explanation of the evolution of genes of known function in the Cruciferae family. It revealed significant variation in ORFs and the causes of such variation.

  5. Radiation response and regulation of apoptosis induced by a combination of TRAIL and CHX in cells lacking mitochondrial DNA: A role for NF-{kappa}B-STAT3-directed gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir N. Ghandhi, Shanaz A.; Zhou, Hongning; Huang, Sarah X.; Chai, Yunfei; Amundson, Sally A.; Hei, Tom K.

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depleted ({rho}{sup 0}) human skin fibroblasts (HSF) with suppressed oxidative phosphorylation were characterized by significant changes in the expression of 2100 nuclear genes, encoding numerous protein classes, in NF-{kappa}B and STAT3 signaling pathways, and by decreased activity of mitochondrial death pathway, compared to the parental {rho}{sup +} HSF. In contrast, the extrinsic TRAIL/TRAIL-Receptor mediated death pathway remained highly active, and exogenous TRAIL in a combination with cycloheximide (CHX) induced higher levels of apoptosis in {rho}{sup 0} cells compared to {rho}{sup +} HSF. Global gene expression analysis using microarray and qRT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA expression levels of many growth factors and their adaptor proteins (FGF13, HGF, IGFBP4, IGFBP6, and IGFL2), cytokines (IL6, {Oota}L17{Beta}, {Oota}L18, {Oota}L19, and {Oota}L28{Beta}) and cytokine receptors (IL1R1, IL21R, and IL31RA) were substantially decreased after mitochondrial DNA depletion. Some of these genes were targets of NF-{kappa}B and STAT3, and their protein products could regulate the STAT3 signaling pathway. Alpha-irradiation further induced expression of several NF-{kappa}B/STAT3 target genes, including IL1A, IL1B, IL6, PTGS2/COX2 and MMP12, in {rho}{sup +} HSF, but this response was substantially decreased in {rho}{sup 0} HSF. Suppression of the IKK-NF-{kappa}B pathway by the small molecular inhibitor BMS-345541 and of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by AG490 dramatically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the control and irradiated {rho}{sup +} HSF. Inhibitory antibodies against IL6, the main activator of JAK2-STAT3 pathway, added into the cell media, also increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in HSF, especially after alpha-irradiation. Collectively, our results indicated that NF-{kappa}B activation was partially lost in {rho}{sup 0} HSF resulting in downregulation of the basal or radiation-induced expression of numerous NF-{kappa}B targets, further suppressing IL6

  6. A peep into mitochondrial disorder: multifaceted from mitochondrial DNA mutations to nuclear gene modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Chen, Ye; Guan, Min-Xin

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial genome is responsible for multiple human diseases in a maternal inherited pattern, yet phenotypes of patients in a same pedigree frequently vary largely. Genes involving in epigenetic modification, RNA processing, and other biological pathways, rather than "threshold effect" and environmental factors, provide more specific explanation to the aberrant phenotype. Thus, the double hit theory, mutations both in mitochondrial DNA and modifying genes aggravating the symptom, throws new light on mitochondrial dysfunction processes. In addition, mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway that leads to reconfiguration of cell metabolism to adapt defects in mitochondria may as well play an active role. Here we review selected examples of modifier genes and mitochondrial retrograde signaling in mitochondrial disorders, which refine our understanding and will guide the rational design of clinical therapies.

  7. Molecular cloning of the yeast mitochondrial aconitase gene (ACO1) and evidence of a synergistic regulation of expression by glucose plus glutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, S P; Marguet, D; Lauquin, G J

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated genomic clones complementing the aconitase-deficient strain (glu1-1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Identification of the aconitase gene was established by enzymatic assays and molecular analyses. The corresponding mRNA has been characterized, and its direction of transcription has been determined. The complete nucleotide sequence revealed strong amino acid homologies with the sequences of some peptides isolated from the mammalian protein. Disruption of the gene by deletion-insertion led to glutamate auxotrophy. Expression of the aconitase gene was sensitive to glucose repression and was synergistically down regulated by glucose and glutamate. Images PMID:1972545

  8. Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit (MRPS) genes: A putative role in human disease.

    PubMed

    Gopisetty, Gopal; Thangarajan, Rajkumar

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are prominently understood as power houses producing ATP the primary energy currency of the cell. However, mitochondria are also known to play an important role in apoptosis and autophagy, and mitochondrial dysregulation can lead to pathological outcomes. Mitochondria are known to contain 1500 proteins of which only 13 are coded by mitochondrial DNA and the rest are coded by nuclear genes. Protein synthesis in mitochondria involves mitochondrial ribosomes which are 55-60S particles and are composed of small 28S and large 39S subunits. A feature of mammalian mitoribosome which differentiate it from bacterial ribosomes is the increased protein content. The human mitochondrial ribosomal protein (MRP) gene family comprises of 30 genes which code for mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit and 50 genes for the large subunit. The present review focuses on the mitochondrial ribosomal small subunit genes (MRPS), presents an overview of the literature and data gleaned from publicly available gene and protein expression databases. The survey revealed aberrations in MRPS gene expression patterns in varied human diseases indicating a putative role in their etiology.

  9. Horizontal acquisition of multiple mitochondrial genes from a parasitic plant followed by gene conversion with host mitochondrial genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is relatively common in plant mitochondrial genomes but the mechanisms, extent and consequences of transfer remain largely unknown. Previous results indicate that parasitic plants are often involved as either transfer donors or recipients, suggesting that direct contact between parasite and host facilitates genetic transfer among plants. Results In order to uncover the mechanistic details of plant-to-plant HGT, the extent and evolutionary fate of transfer was investigated between two groups: the parasitic genus Cuscuta and a small clade of Plantago species. A broad polymerase chain reaction (PCR) survey of mitochondrial genes revealed that at least three genes (atp1, atp6 and matR) were recently transferred from Cuscuta to Plantago. Quantitative PCR assays show that these three genes have a mitochondrial location in the one species line of Plantago examined. Patterns of sequence evolution suggest that these foreign genes degraded into pseudogenes shortly after transfer and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses demonstrate that none are detectably transcribed. Three cases of gene conversion were detected between native and foreign copies of the atp1 gene. The identical phylogenetic distribution of the three foreign genes within Plantago and the retention of cytidines at ancestral positions of RNA editing indicate that these genes were probably acquired via a single, DNA-mediated transfer event. However, samplings of multiple individuals from two of the three species in the recipient Plantago clade revealed complex and perplexing phylogenetic discrepancies and patterns of sequence divergence for all three of the foreign genes. Conclusions This study reports the best evidence to date that multiple mitochondrial genes can be transferred via a single HGT event and that transfer occurred via a strictly DNA-level intermediate. The discovery of gene conversion between co-resident foreign and native mitochondrial copies suggests

  10. Expression of bovine mitochondrial tRNASer GCU derivatives in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, I; Kawai, G; Watanabe, K

    1997-01-01

    By replacing a stretch of five A-U base pairs in the acceptor stem with G-C pairs, mitochondrial tRNA-SerGCU lacking a D arm could be expressed in Escherichia coli cells in considerable amounts. The expressed tRNA with no modified nucleoside was serylated in vitro with the mitochondrial enzyme. The tRNASerGCU derivatives carrying identity elements for alanine tRNA and the related anticodons were expressed. However, this expression event did not affect cell growth, probably because the expression started from the late log phase, which suggests that these mitochondrial tRNA derivatives are not involved in E.coli gene expression systems. Although there are some restrictions in the secondary structure of tRNAs that can be expressed by this method, it could prove useful for preparing large amounts of heterologous tRNAs in vivo. PMID:9254711

  11. Proliferation of mitochondria in chronically stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle--transcription of mitochondrial genes and copy number of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Schultz, J; Wiesner, R J

    2000-12-01

    Mitochondrial proliferation was studied in chronically stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle over a period of 50 days. After this time, subunits of COX had increased about fourfold. Corresponding mRNAs, encoded on mitochondrial DNA as well as on nuclear genes, were unchanged when related to total tissue RNA, however, they were elevated two- to fivefold when the massive increase of ribosomes per unit mass of muscle was taken into account. The same was true for the mRNA encoding mitochondrial transcription factor A. Surprisingly, tissue levels of mtTFA protein were reduced about twofold, together with mitochondrial DNA. In conclusion, mitochondria are able to maintain high rates of mitochondrial transcription even in the presence of reduced mtTFA protein and mtDNA levels. Therefore, stimulated mtTFA gene expression accompanies stimulated mitochondrial transcription, as in other models, but it is not sufficient for an increase of mtDNA copy number and other, yet unknown, factors have to be postulated.

  12. Analysis of mitochondrial respiratory-related genes reveals nuclear and mitochondrial genome cooperation in allotetraploid hybrid.

    PubMed

    Peng, L-Y; Wang, J; Tao, M; You, C-P; Ye, L; Xiao, J; Zhang, C; Liu, Y; Liu, S-J

    2014-01-01

    An allotetraploid hybrid lineage derived from the distant hybridization of red crucian carp (Carassius auratus red var., ♀, 2n =100) × common carp (Cyprinus carpio L., ♂, 2n =100) was investigated for its mitochondrial and nuclear genome inheritance patterns. Based on liver transcriptomic data for this hybrid, red crucian carp, and common carp, we identified 94, 136, and 86 contigs corresponding to 41, 46, and 37 mitochondrial respiratory chain nuclear genes, respectively. Mitochondrial respiratory chain nuclear gene sequences from red crucian carp and common carp were both detected in the allotetraploid hybrid, indicating that both parental nuclear genomes were participated in the synthesis of mitochondrial respiratory protein complexes in the hybrid. For mitochondrial respiratory related genes, high sequence similarity (>90%) and a low nucleotide divergence rate (<0.2) between red crucian carp and common carp could be a critical factor allowing cooperation of the three genomes (red crucian carp mitochondrial genome, red crucian and common carp nuclear genomes) in the allotetraploid hybrid lineage. Interestingly, gene duplication events were identified in the allotetraploid hybrid, red crucian and common carp, as confirmed by analysis of orthologous gene trees for these fish. Our findings provide valuable information with which to study cooperation between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of other hybrids, and will provide basic genetic information of relevance to mitochondrial-related diseases in humans and animals.

  13. Allotopic expression of ATP6 in the mouse as a transgenic model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Dunn, David A; Pinkert, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Progress in animal modeling of polymorphisms and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not as developed as nuclear transgenesis due to a host of cellular and physiological distinctions. mtDNA mutation modeling is of critical importance as mutations in the mitochondrial genome give rise to a variety of pathological conditions and play a contributing role in many others. Nuclear localization and transcription of mtDNA genes followed by cytoplasmic translation and transport into mitochondria (allotopic expression, AE) provide an opportunity to create in vivo modeling of a targeted mutation in mitochondrial genes and has been suggested as a strategy for gene replacement therapy in patients harboring mitochondrial DNA mutations. Here, we use our AE approach to transgenic mouse modeling of the pathogenic human T8993G mutation in mtATP6 as a case study for designing AE animal models.

  14. Analyses of nuclearly encoded mitochondrial genes suggest gene duplication as a mechanism for resolving intralocus sexually antagonistic conflict in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gallach, Miguel; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Betrán, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplication is probably the most important mechanism for generating new gene functions. However, gene duplication has been overlooked as a potentially effective way to resolve genetic conflicts. Here, we analyze the entire set of Drosophila melanogaster nuclearly encoded mitochondrial duplicate genes and show that both RNA- and DNA-mediated mitochondrial gene duplications exhibit an unexpectedly high rate of relocation (change in location between parental and duplicated gene) as well as an extreme tendency to avoid the X chromosome. These trends are likely related to our observation that relocated genes tend to have testis-specific expression. We also infer that these trends hold across the entire Drosophila genus. Importantly, analyses of gene ontology and functional interaction networks show that there is an overrepresentation of energy production-related functions in these mitochondrial duplicates. We discuss different hypotheses to explain our results and conclude that our findings substantiate the hypothesis that gene duplication for male germline function is likely a mechanism to resolve intralocus sexually antagonistic conflicts that we propose are common in testis. In the case of nuclearly encoded mitochondrial duplicates, our hypothesis is that past sexually antagonistic conflict related to mitochondrial energy function in Drosophila was resolved by gene duplication.

  15. Expression of a Mitochondrial Progesterone Receptor (PR-M) in Leiomyomata and Association With Increased Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Quanling; Crochet, John R.; Dai, Qunsheng; Leppert, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical evidence supports a role for progestins in the growth of leiomyomata (fibroids). The mechanism(s) for this is thought to involve gene regulation via the nuclear progesterone receptors. Recently a mitochondrial progesterone receptor (PR-M) has been identified with evidence of a progesterone/progestin-dependent increase in cellular respiration. This observation raises a possible new mechanism whereby progesterone/progestin may affect the growth of fibroids. Objective: The goals of this research were to determine differential expression of PR-M in normal myometrium compared with the edge of a fibroid within the same uterus, to demonstrate a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondria membrane potential using an immortalized human myometrial cell line and to examine mitochondrial membrane potential in transfected cells expressing the complete coding sequence of PR-M. Design: Protein levels of PR-M, PR-B, PR-A, mitochondrial porin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in the myometrium and adjacent edge of a fibroid in 10 subjects undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by fluorescent emission of 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazolecarbocyanide iodine in hTERT-HM cells treated with R5020 and in transfected hTERT-HM cells determined by the fluorescent emission of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester. Results: Higher levels of PR-M and mitochondrial porin were found in the fibroid edge compared with adjacent myometrium. Progestin increased mitochondrial membrane potential in hTERT-HM cells, which was not affected by a translation inhibitor. This effect was exaggerated in hTERT-HM cells expressing PR-M after transient transfection. Conclusion: These studies suggest a mechanism whereby progesterone/progestin may affect the growth of fibroids by altering mitochondrial activity. PMID:24423317

  16. A Moderate Zinc Deficiency Does Not Impair Gene Expression of PPARα, PPARγ, and Mitochondrial Enoyl-CoA Delta Isomerase in the Liver of Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on the mRNA expression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), and mitochondrial Δ3Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver. Weanling rats were assigned to five groups (eight animals each) and fed semi-synthetic, low-carbohydrate diets containing 7 or 50 mg Zn/kg (low-Zn (LZ) or high-Zn (HZ)) and 22% cocoa butter (CB) or 22% safflower (SF) oil for four weeks. One group each was fed the LZ-CB, LZ-SF, or HZ-SF diet free choice, and one group each was fed the HZ-CB and HZ-SF diets in restricted amounts according to intake of the respective LZ diets. The LZ diets markedly lowered growth and zinc concentrations in plasma and femur. Hepatic mRNA levels of PPARα, PPARγ, and ECI were not reduced by the moderate zinc deficiency. Overall, ECI-mRNA abundance was marginally higher in the SF-fed than in the CB-fed animals. PMID:24855375

  17. Combined gene and protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase, mitochondrial content, and adipocyte size in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue of morbidly obese men.

    PubMed

    De Naeyer, Hélène; Ouwens, D Margriet; Van Nieuwenhove, Yves; Pattyn, Piet; 't Hart, Leen M; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Sell, Henrike; Eckel, Juergen; Cuvelier, Claude; Taes, Youri E; Ruige, Johannes B

    2011-01-01

    Lipotoxicity in obesity might be a failure of adipocytes to respond sufficiently adequate to persistent energy surplus. To evaluate the role of lipolytic enzymes or mitochondria in lipotoxicity, we studied expression levels of genes and proteins involved in lipolysis and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content. As differences in lipid metabolism between men and women are extremely complex, we recruited only men (lean and morbidly obese) and collected subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue during abdominal surgery for real-time PCR gene expression, protein expression, and microscopic study. Although mRNA levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) were increased in visceral adipose tissue of morbidly obese men, this was not paralleled by alterations in protein expression and phosphorylation of HSL and ATGL. mtDNA content of visceral adipose tissue was increased in morbidly obese men as compared to lean controls (p < 0.013). Positive correlations were observed between visceral adipocyte size and serum triacylglycerol (r = 0.6, p < 0.007) as well as between visceral adipocyte size and CRP (r = 0.6, p < 0.009) in analyses performed separately in obese men. Lipotoxicity of morbidly obese men might be related to the quantitative impact of the visceral fat depot rather than to important dysregulation of involved lipolytic enzymes or adipocyte mitochondria. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The Parkinson's disease-related genes act in mitochondrial homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin; Peng, Kaige; Dong, Zhaojun

    2012-10-01

    Neurons are metabolically active cells with high energy demands. Thus, neurons are particularly reliant on mitochondrial function, especially on the homeostasis properties of mitochondria. This is reflected by the observation that mitochondrial abnormalities have been well recognized to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondria are highly complex and dynamic organelles continuously undergoing different alterations. The dynamic property of mitochondria is named as mitochondrial homeostasis. Imbalance of mitochondrial homeostasis is associated with neurodegenerative disease, such as Parkinson's diseases. Recently, the related genes of PD-familial, such as alpha-synuclein, Parkin, PINK1, DJ-1 and LRRK2, are observed to be associated with mitochondria, and capable of modulating normal mitochondrial integrity and functions under certain conditions. Therefore, in this review, we will focus on the action of PD-related genes in mitochondrial homeostasis. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensitivity of hematopoietic stem cells to mitochondrial dysfunction by SdhD gene deletion

    PubMed Central

    Bejarano-García, José Antonio; Millán-Uclés, África; Rosado, Iván V; Sánchez-Abarca, Luís Ignacio; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Durán-Galván, María José; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Piruat, José I

    2016-01-01

    It is established that hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the hypoxic bone marrow have adapted their metabolism to oxygen-limiting conditions. This adaptation includes suppression of mitochondrial activity, induction of anerobic glycolysis, and activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (Hif1α)-dependent gene expression. During progression of hematopoiesis, a metabolic switch towards mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is observed, making this organelle essential for determining cell fate choice in bone marrow. However, given that HSC metabolism is essentially oxygen-independent, it is still unclear whether functional mitochondria are absolutely required for their survival. To assess the actual dependency of these undifferentiated cells on mitochondrial function, we have performed an analysis of the hematopoiesis in a mouse mutant, named SDHD-ESR, with inducible deletion of the mitochondrial protein-encoding SdhD gene. This gene encodes one of the subunits of the mitochondrial complex II (MCII). In this study, we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has been previously established, survival of HSC, and also myeloid and B-lymphoid progenitors, depends on proper mitochondrial activity. In addition, gene expression analysis of these hematopoietic lineages in SDHD-ESR mutants calls into question the proposed activation of Hif1α in response to MCII dysfunction. PMID:27929539

  20. Gene expression profiling indicates an increased capacity for proline, serine, and ATP synthesis and mitochondrial mass by the liver of steers grazing high vs. low endophyte-infected tall fescue.

    PubMed

    Liao, S F; Boling, J A; Matthews, J C

    2015-12-01

    Grazing -infected forages results in a variety of reduced animal performance parameters, collectively known as "fescue toxicosis." The initial, limited evaluations of hepatic mechanisms affected by fescue toxicosis have used transcriptomic expression profiling of experimental phenotypes developed by short-term feeding of concentrated ergot alkaloids or fescue seeds to rodents and steers. To assess the effects of fescue toxicosis in growing cattle using a commercially relevant phenotype, we induced fescue toxicosis in beef steers by summer-long grazing (89 to 105 d) of a single high toxic endophyte-infected tall fescue pasture (HE; 0.746 μg/g ergot alkaloids; 5.7 ha; = 10; BW = 267 ± 14.5 kg) vs. a low toxic endophyte tall fescue-mixed pasture (LE; 0.023 μg/g ergot alkaloids; 5.7 ha; = 9; BW = 266 ± 10.9 kg). High toxic endophyte tall fescue-mixed pasture steers had decreased BW (313 vs. 338 kg) and an increased potential for hepatic gluconeogenesis from AA-derived carbons. To gain a greater perspective into fescue toxicosis-induced hepatic metabolism and identify candidate regulatory mechanisms, the goal of the current research was to examine liver samples for changes in gene (mRNA) expression profiles using a Bovine Affymetrix microarray and selected reverse-transcription PCR and immunoblot analyses. The expression (false discovery rate < 10%; < 0.01) of 147 genes was increased (7 to 268%) and that of 227 was decreased (4 to 87%) in livers of HE vs. LE steers. The top (1) functional gene category was cell-mediated immune response (33 genes; ≤ 0.012), (2) canonical cell signaling pathway was primary immunodeficiency signaling (8 genes; ≤ 0.0003), and (3) canonical metabolic pathways were oxidative phosphorylation (5 genes; ≤ 0.016) and purine metabolism (8 genes; ≤ 0.029). High toxic endophyte tall fescue-mixed pasture steers had increased ( ≤ 0.022) expression of genes critical for increased (1) Pro () and Ser () synthesis, (2) shunting of AA carbons

  1. The mitochondrial genome of the stramenopile alga Chrysodidymus synuroideus. Complete sequence, gene content and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Chesnick, J M; Goff, M; Graham, J; Ocampo, C; Lang, B F; Seif, E; Burger, G

    2000-07-01

    This is the first report of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence from a photosynthetic member of the stramenopiles, the chrysophyte alga Chrysodidymus synuroideus. The circular-mapping mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 34 119 bp contains 58 densely packed genes (all without introns) and five unique open reading frames (ORFs). Protein genes code for components of respiratory chain complexes, ATP synthase and the mitoribosome, as well as one product of unknown function, encoded in many other protist mtDNAs (YMF16). In addition to small and large subunit ribosomal RNAs, 23 tRNAs are mtDNA-encoded, permitting translation of all codons present in protein-coding genes except ACN (Thr) and CGN (Arg). The missing tRNAs are assumed to be imported from the cytosol. Comparison of the C.SYNUROIDEUS: mtDNA with that of other stramenopiles allowed us to draw conclusions about mitochondrial genome organization, expression and evolution. First, we provide evidence that mitochondrial ORFs code for highly derived, unrecognizable versions of ribosomal or respiratory genes otherwise 'missing' in a particular mtDNA. Secondly, the observed constraints in mitochondrial genome rearrangements suggest operon-based, co-ordinated expression of genes functioning in common biological processes. Finally, stramenopile mtDNAs reveal an unexpectedly low variability in genome size and gene complement, testifying to substantial differences in the tempo of mtDNA evolution between major eukaryotic lineages.

  2. Dietary isoflavone daidzein promotes Tfam expression that increases mitochondrial biogenesis in C2C12 muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Makiko; Naka, Ayano; Sakamoto, Yuri; Shibasaki, Ayako; Toh, Mariko; Tsukamoto, Sakuka; Kondo, Kazuo; Iida, Kaoruko

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in muscles leads to a wide range of metabolic and age-related disorders. Recently, it has been reported that a natural polyphenol, resveratrol, affects mitochondrial biogenesis. This study aimed to identify other natural polyphenolic compounds that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis in muscles. For this purpose, we used the C2C12 murine muscle cell line. Screening involved a reporter assay based on the promoter of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). We found that several polyphenols exhibited the ability to increase Tfam promoter activity and that the soy isoflavone daidzein was a most potent candidate that regulated mitochondrial biogenesis. When C2C12 myotubes were treated with 25-50 μM daidzein for 24h, there were significant increases in the expression of Tfam and mitochondrial genes such as COX1 and Cytb as well as the mitochondrial content. Using several mutant Tfam promoter fragments, we found that the transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) and its coactivator, PGC1α, were necessary for the effect of daidzein on Tfam expression. Finally, silencing of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) by shRNA resulted in inhibition of the daidzein effects on mitochondrial gene expression. In conclusion, daidzein regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle cells by regulating transcriptional networks through a SIRT1-associated pathway. These results suggest that daidzein would be beneficial to protect against a wide range of diseases caused by muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Successive bouts of cycling stimulates genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Charles L; Mark Davis, J; Angela Murphy, E; Nieman, David C; Carmichael, Martin D; Quindry, John C; Travis Triplett, N; Utter, Alan C; Gross Gowin, Sarah J; Henson, Dru A; McAnulty, Steven R; McAnulty, Lisa S

    2009-11-01

    Exercise increases mRNA for genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative enzyme capacity. However, little is known about how these genes respond to consecutive bouts of prolonged exercise. We examined the effects of 3 h of intensive cycling performed on three consecutive days on the mRNA associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in trained human subjects. Forty trained cyclists were tested for VO(2max) (54.7 +/- 1.1 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). The subjects cycled at 57% watts(max) for 3 h using their own bicycles on CompuTrainer Pro Model trainers (RacerMate, Seattle, WA) on three consecutive days. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis pre- and post-exercise on days one and three. Muscle samples were analyzed for mRNA content of peroxisome proliferator receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1alpha), sirtuin 1 (Sirt-1), cytochrome c, and citrate synthase. Data were analyzed using a 2 (time) x 2 (day) repeated measures ANOVA. Of the mRNA analyzed, the following increased from pre to post 3 h rides: cytochrome c (P = 0.006), citrate synthase (P = 0.03), PGC-1alpha (P < 0.001), and Sirt-1 (P = 0.005). The following mRNA showed significant effects from days one to three: cytochrome c (P < 0.001) and citrate synthase (P = 0.01). These data show that exhaustive cycling performed on three consecutive days resulted in both acute and chronic stimuli for mRNA associated with mitochondrial biogenesis in already trained subjects. This is the first study to illustrate an increase in sirtuin-1 mRNA with acute and chronic exercise. These data contribute to the understanding of mRNA expression during both acute and successive bouts of prolonged exercise.

  4. Nuclear and mitochondrial genes for inferring Trichuris phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Rocío; Cutillas, Cristina; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-12-01

    Nucleotide sequences of the triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) gene (624 bp) and mitochondrial cytochrome b (cob) gene (520 bp) were obtained by PCR and evaluated for utility in inferring the phylogenetic relationships among Trichuris species. Published sequences of one other nuclear gene (18S or SSU rRNA, 1816-1846 bp) and one additional mitochondrial (mtDNA) gene (cytochrome oxidase 1, cox1, 342 bp) were also analyzed. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods were used to infer phylogenies for each gene separately but also for the combined mitochondrial data (two genes), the combined nuclear data (two genes), and the total evidence (four gene) dataset. Few Trichuris clades were uniformly resolved across separate analyses of individual genes. For the mtDNA, the cob gene trees had greater phylogenetic resolution and tended to have higher support values than the cox1 analyses. For nuclear genes, the SSU gene trees had slightly greater resolution and support values than the TPI analyses, but TPI was the only gene with reliable support for the deepest nodes in the tree. Combined analyses of genes yielded strongly supported clades in most cases, with the exception of the relationship among Trichuris clades 1, 2, and 3, which showed conflicting results between nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Both the TPI and cob genes proved valuable for inferring Trichuris relationships, with greatest resolution and support values achieved through combined analysis of multiple genes. Based on the phylogeny of the combined analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, parsimony mapping of definitive host utilization depicts artiodactyls as the ancestral hosts for these Trichuris, with host-shifts into primates, rodents, and Carnivora.

  5. Decreased Mitochondrial OGG1 Expression is Linked to Mitochondrial Defects and Delayed Hepatoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Kyoung; Youn, Hwang-Guem; Wang, Hee-Jung; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2013-01-01

    Many solid tumor cells exhibit mitochondrial respiratory impairment; however, the mechanisms of such impairment in cancer development remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SNU human hepatoma cells with declined mitochondrial respiratory activity showed decreased expression of mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/lyase (mtOGG1), a mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme; similar results were obtained with human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Among several OGG1-2 variants with a mitochondrial- targeting sequence (OGG1-2a, -2b, -2c, -2d, and -2e), OGG1-2a was the major mitochondrial isoform in all examined hepatoma cells. Interestingly, hepatoma cells with low mtOGG1 levels showed delayed cell growth and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Knockdown of OGG1-2 isoforms in Chang-L cells, which have active mitochondrial respiration with high mtOGG1 levels, significantly decreased cellular respiration and cell growth, and increased intracellular ROS. Overexpression of OGG1-2a in SNU423 cells, which have low mtOGG1 levels, effectively recovered cellular respiration and cell growth activities, and decreased intracellular ROS. Taken together, our results suggest that mtOGG1 plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial respiration, thereby contributing to cell growth of hepatoma cells. PMID:23677377

  6. A One-Megabase Physical Map Provides Insights on Gene Organization in the Enormous Mitochondrial Genome of Cucumber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber has one of the largest mitochondrial genomes known among all eukaryotes, due in part to the accumulation of short repetitive-DNA motifs. Recombination among these repetitive DNAs produces rearrangements affecting organization and expression of mitochondrial genes. In order to more efficie...

  7. Expression of mitochondrial regulatory genes parallels respiratory capacity and contractile function in a rat model of hypoxia-induced right ventricular hypertrophy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) increases load on the right ventricle (RV) resulting in RV hypertrophy. We hypothesized that CHH elicits distinct responses, i.e., the hypertrophied RV, unlike the left ventricle (LV), displaying enhanced mitochondrial respiratory and contractile function. Wistar rats...

  8. Deregulation of Genes Related to Iron and Mitochondrial Metabolism in Refractory Anemia with Ring Sideroblasts

    PubMed Central

    del Rey, Mónica; Benito, Rocío; Fontanillo, Celia; Campos-Laborie, Francisco J.; Janusz, Kamila; Velasco-Hernández, Talía; Abáigar, María; Hernández, María; Cuello, Rebeca; Borrego, Daniel; Martín-Zanca, Dionisio; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mills, Ken I.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of SF3B1 gene mutations is a hallmark of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). However, the mechanisms responsible for iron accumulation that characterize the Myelodysplastic Syndrome with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS) are not completely understood. In order to gain insight in the molecular basis of MDS-RS, an integrative study of the expression and mutational status of genes related to iron and mitochondrial metabolism was carried out. A total of 231 low-risk MDS patients and 81 controls were studied. Gene expression analysis revealed that iron metabolism and mitochondrial function had the highest number of genes deregulated in RARS patients compared to controls and the refractory cytopenias with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD). Thus mitochondrial transporters SLC25 (SLC25A37 and SLC25A38) and ALAD genes were over-expressed in RARS. Moreover, significant differences were observed between patients with SF3B1 mutations and patients without the mutations. The deregulation of genes involved in iron and mitochondrial metabolism provides new insights in our knowledge of MDS-RS. New variants that could be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases have been identified. PMID:25955609

  9. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  10. Expression of Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Chaperone Gene (COX20) Improves Tolerance to Weak Acid and Oxidative Stress during Yeast Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Hart, Andrew J.; Keerthiraju, Ethiraju R.; Waldron, Paul R.; Tucker, Gregory A.; Greetham, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the micro-organism of choice for the conversion of fermentable sugars released by the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material into bioethanol. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material releases acetic acid and previous work identified a cytochrome oxidase chaperone gene (COX20) which was significantly up-regulated in yeast cells in the presence of acetic acid. Results A Δcox20 strain was sensitive to the presence of acetic acid compared with the background strain. Overexpressing COX20 using a tetracycline-regulatable expression vector system in a Δcox20 strain, resulted in tolerance to the presence of acetic acid and tolerance could be ablated with addition of tetracycline. Assays also revealed that overexpression improved tolerance to the presence of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Conclusion This is a study which has utilised tetracycline-regulated protein expression in a fermentation system, which was characterised by improved (or enhanced) tolerance to acetic acid and oxidative stress. PMID:26427054

  11. Genes of the Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathway in Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Bivalves play vital roles in marine, brackish, freshwater and terrestrial habitats. In recent years, these ecosystems have become affected through anthropogenic activities. The ecological success of marine bivalves is based on the ability to modify their physiological functions in response to environmental changes. One of the most important mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to environmental and biological stresses is apoptosis, which has been scarcely studied in mollusks, although the final consequence of this process, DNA fragmentation, has been frequently used for pollution monitoring. Environmental stressors induce apoptosis in molluscan cells via an intrinsic pathway. Many of the proteins involved in vertebrate apoptosis have been recognized in model invertebrates; however, this process might not be universally conserved. Mytilus galloprovincialis is presented here as a new model to study the linkage between molecular mechanisms that mediate apoptosis and marine bivalve ecological adaptations. Therefore, it is strictly necessary to identify the key elements involved in bivalve apoptosis. In the present study, six mitochondrial apoptotic-related genes were characterized, and their gene expression profiles following UV irradiation were evaluated. This is the first step for the development of potential biomarkers to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress. The results confirmed that apoptosis and, more specifically, the expression of the genes involved in this process can be used to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress. PMID:23626691

  12. A high-fat diet coordinately downregulates genes required for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Lauren M; Xie, Hui; Koza, Robert A; Mynatt, Randall; Hulver, Matthew W; Bray, George A; Smith, Steven R

    2005-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes have been associated with a high-fat diet (HFD) and reduced mitochondrial mass and function. We hypothesized a HFD may affect expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function and biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we fed 10 insulin-sensitive males an isoenergetic HFD for 3 days with muscle biopsies before and after intervention. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed 297 genes were differentially regulated by the HFD (Bonferonni adjusted P < 0.001). Six genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) decreased. Four were members of mitochondrial complex I: NDUFB3, NDUFB5, NDUFS1, and NDUFV1; one was SDHB in complex II and a mitochondrial carrier protein SLC25A12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 (PGC1) alpha and PGC1beta mRNA were decreased by -20%, P < 0.01, and -25%, P < 0.01, respectively. In a separate experiment, we fed C57Bl/6J mice a HFD for 3 weeks and found that the same OXPHOS and PGC1 mRNAs were downregulated by approximately 90%, cytochrome C and PGC1alpha protein by approximately 40%. Combined, these results suggest a mechanism whereby HFD downregulates genes necessary for OXPHOS and mitochondrial biogenesis. These changes mimic those observed in diabetes and insulin resistance and, if sustained, may result in mitochondrial dysfunction in the prediabetic/insulin-resistant state.

  13. Aging-induced alterations in gene transcripts and functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes in the heart.

    PubMed

    Preston, Claudia C; Oberlin, Andrew S; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Gupta, Anu; Sagar, Sandeep; Syed, Rashad H Khazi; Siddiqui, Sabeeh A; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2008-06-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in energetic reserves compromising cardiac performance and tolerance to injury. Although deviations in mitochondrial functions have been documented in senescent heart, the molecular bases for the decline in energy metabolism are only partially understood. Here, high-throughput transcription profiles of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in ventricles from adult (6-months) and aged (24-months) rats were compared using microarrays. Out of 614 genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins, 94 were differentially expressed with 95% downregulated in the aged. The majority of changes affected genes coding for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (39), substrate metabolism (14) and tricarboxylic acid cycle (6). Compared to adult, gene expression changes in aged hearts translated into a reduced mitochondrial functional capacity, with decreased NADH-dehydrogenase and F(0)F(1) ATPase complex activities and capacity for oxygen-utilization and ATP synthesis. Expression of genes coding for transcription co-activator factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis were downregulated in aged ventricles without reduction in mitochondrial density. Thus, aging induces a selective decline in activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and V within a broader transcriptional downregulation of mitochondrial genes, providing a substrate for reduced energetic efficiency associated with senescence.

  14. Aging-Induced Alterations in Gene Transcripts and Functional Activity of Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Claudia C.; Oberlin, Andrew S.; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Gupta, Anu; Sagar, Sandeep; Khazi Syed, Rashad H.; Siddiqui, Sabeeh; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad

    2008-01-01

    Aging is associated with progressive decline in energetic reserves compromising cardiac performance and tolerance to injury. Although deviations in mitochondrial functions have been documented in senescent heart, the molecular bases for the decline in energy metabolism are only partially understood. Here, high-throughput transcription profiles of genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in ventricles from adult (6-months) and aged (24-months) rats were compared using microarrays. Out of 614 genes encoding for mitochondrial proteins, 94 were differentially expressed with 95% downregulated in the aged. The majority of changes affected genes coding for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (39), substrate metabolism (14) and tricarboxylic acid cycle (6). Compared to adult, gene expression changes in aged hearts translated into a reduced mitochondrial functional capacity, with decreased NADH-dehydrogenase and F0F1-ATPase complex activities and capacity for oxygen-utilization and ATP synthesis. Expression of genes coding for transcription co-activator factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis were downregulated in aged ventricles without reduction in mitochondrial density. Thus, aging induces a selective decline in activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and V within a broader transcriptional downregulation of mitochondrial genes, providing a substrate for reduced energetic efficiency associated with senescence. PMID:18400259

  15. Adaptations required for mitochondrial import following mitochondrial to nucleus gene transfer of ribosomal protein S10.

    PubMed

    Murcha, Monika W; Rudhe, Charlotta; Elhafez, Dina; Adams, Keith L; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2005-08-01

    The minimal requirements to support protein import into mitochondria were investigated in the context of the phenomenon of ongoing gene transfer from the mitochondrion to the nucleus in plants. Ribosomal protein 10 of the small subunit is encoded in the mitochondrion in soybean and many other angiosperms, whereas in several other species it is nuclear encoded and thus must be imported into the mitochondrial matrix to function. When encoded by the nuclear genome, it has adopted different strategies for mitochondrial targeting and import. In lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and carrot (Daucus carota), Rps10 independently gained different N-terminal extensions from other genes, following transfer to the nucleus. (The designation of Rps10 follows the following convention. The gene is indicated in italics. If encoded in the mitochondrion, it is rps10; if encoded in the nucleus, it is Rps10.) Here, we show that the N-terminal extensions of Rps10 in lettuce and carrot are both essential for mitochondrial import. In maize (Zea mays), Rps10 has not acquired an extension upon transfer but can be readily imported into mitochondria. Deletion analysis located the mitochondrial targeting region to the first 20 amino acids. Using site directed mutagenesis, we changed residues in the first 20 amino acids of the mitochondrial encoded soybean (Glycine max) rps10 to the corresponding amino acids in the nuclear encoded maize Rps10 until import was achieved. Changes were required that altered charge, hydrophobicity, predicted ability to form an amphipathic alpha-helix, and generation of a binding motif for the outer mitochondrial membrane receptor, translocase of the outer membrane 20. In addition to defining the changes required to achieve mitochondrial localization, the results demonstrate that even proteins that do not present barriers to import can require substantial changes to acquire a mitochondrial targeting signal.

  16. Regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial function: genes to proteins.

    PubMed

    Lanza, I R; Sreekumaran Nair, K

    2010-08-01

    The impact of ageing on mitochondrial function and the deterministic role of mitochondria on senescence continue to be topics of vigorous debate. Many studies report that skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and function are reduced with ageing and metabolic diseases associated with insulin resistance. However, an accumulating body of literature suggests that physical inactivity typical of ageing may be a more important determinant of mitochondrial function than chronological age, per se. Reports of age-related declines in mitochondrial function have spawned a vast body of literature devoted to understanding the underlying mechanisms. These mechanisms include decreased abundance of mtDNA, reduced mRNA levels, as well as decreased synthesis and expression of mitochondrial proteins, ultimately resulting in decreased function of the whole organelle. Effective therapies to prevent, reverse or delay the onset of the aforementioned mitochondrial changes, regardless of their inevitability or precise underlying causes, require an intimate understanding of the processes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, which necessitates the coordinated regulation of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Herein we review the current thinking on regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by transcription factors and transcriptional co-activators and the role of hormones and exercise in initiating this process. We review how exercise may help preserve mitochondrial content and functionality across the lifespan, and how physical inactivity is emerging as a major determinant of many age-associated changes at the level of the mitochondrion. We also review evidence that some mitochondrial changes with ageing are independent of exercise or physical activity and appear to be inevitable consequences of old age.

  17. Expression changes in mRNAs and mitochondrial damage in lens epithelial cells with selenite.

    PubMed

    Belusko, P B; Nakajima, T; Azuma, M; Shearer, T R

    2003-10-13

    An overdose of sodium selenite induces cataracts in young rats. The mid-stage events producing the cataract include calpain-induced hydrolysis and precipitation of lens proteins. Apoptosis in lens epithelial cells has been suggested as an initial event in selenite cataracts. Expression levels of two genes associated with apoptosis were altered in lens epithelial cells from selenite-injected rats. The purpose of the present experiment was to perform a more comprehensive search for changes in expression of mRNAs in lens epithelial cells in order to more fully delineate the early events in selenite-induced cataracts. Lens epithelial cells were harvested at 1 and 2 days after a single subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (30 mumol/kg body weight) into 12-day-old rats. Gene expression was analyzed using a commercial DNA array (Rat Genome U34A GeneChip array, Affymetrix). Of approximately 8000 genes assayed by hybridization, 13 genes were decreased and 27 genes were increased in the rat lens epithelial cells after injection of selenite. Some of the up-regulated genes included apoptosis-related genes, and a majority of the down-regulated genes were mitochondrial genes. Previously observed changes in expression of EGR-1 mRNA were also confirmed. Changes in the expression patterns of mRNAs were also confirmed by RT-PCR. To determine the mechanism for damage of lens epithelial cells (alpha TN4 cell) by culture in selenite, leakage of cytochrome c from mitochondria was measured. Selenite caused significant leakage of cytochrome c into the cytosol of alpha TN4 cells. Our data suggested that the loss of integrity of lens epithelial cells by selenite might be caused by preferential down-regulation of mitochondrial RNAs, release of cytochrome c, and impaired mitochondrial function. Up-regulation of mRNAs involved in maintenance of DNA, regulation of metabolism, and induction of apoptosis may also play roles.

  18. StAR Enhances Transcription of Genes Encoding the Mitochondrial Proteases Involved in Its Own Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  19. StAR enhances transcription of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteases involved in its own degradation.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR.

  20. Computationally Driven, Quantitative Experiments Discover Genes Required for Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hess, David C.; Hayes, Alicia P.; Paw, Jadine; Clore, John J.; Mendoza, Rosa M.; Luis, Bryan San; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Costanzo, Michael; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Caudy, Amy A.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria are central to many cellular processes including respiration, ion homeostasis, and apoptosis. Using computational predictions combined with traditional quantitative experiments, we have identified 100 proteins whose deficiency alters mitochondrial biogenesis and inheritance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we used computational predictions to perform targeted double-mutant analysis detecting another nine genes with synthetic defects in mitochondrial biogenesis. This represents an increase of about 25% over previously known participants. Nearly half of these newly characterized proteins are conserved in mammals, including several orthologs known to be involved in human disease. Mutations in many of these genes demonstrate statistically significant mitochondrial transmission phenotypes more subtle than could be detected by traditional genetic screens or high-throughput techniques, and 47 have not been previously localized to mitochondria. We further characterized a subset of these genes using growth profiling and dual immunofluorescence, which identified genes specifically required for aerobic respiration and an uncharacterized cytoplasmic protein required for normal mitochondrial motility. Our results demonstrate that by leveraging computational analysis to direct quantitative experimental assays, we have characterized mutants with subtle mitochondrial defects whose phenotypes were undetected by high-throughput methods. PMID:19300474

  1. Inferring Kangaroo Phylogeny from Incongruent Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew J.; Haouchar, Dalal; Pratt, Renae C.; Gibb, Gillian C.; Bunce, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The marsupial genus Macropus includes three subgenera, the familiar large grazing kangaroos and wallaroos of M. (Macropus) and M. (Osphranter), as well as the smaller mixed grazing/browsing wallabies of M. (Notamacropus). A recent study of five concatenated nuclear genes recommended subsuming the predominantly browsing Wallabia bicolor (swamp wallaby) into Macropus. To further examine this proposal we sequenced partial mitochondrial genomes for kangaroos and wallabies. These sequences strongly favour the morphological placement of W. bicolor as sister to Macropus, although place M. irma (black-gloved wallaby) within M. (Osphranter) rather than as expected, with M. (Notamacropus). Species tree estimation from separately analysed mitochondrial and nuclear genes favours retaining Macropus and Wallabia as separate genera. A simulation study finds that incomplete lineage sorting among nuclear genes is a plausible explanation for incongruence with the mitochondrial placement of W. bicolor, while mitochondrial introgression from a wallaroo into M. irma is the deepest such event identified in marsupials. Similar such coalescent simulations for interpreting gene tree conflicts will increase in both relevance and statistical power as species-level phylogenetics enters the genomic age. Ecological considerations in turn, hint at a role for selection in accelerating the fixation of introgressed or incompletely sorted loci. More generally the inclusion of the mitochondrial sequences substantially enhanced phylogenetic resolution. However, we caution that the evolutionary dynamics that enhance mitochondria as speciation indicators in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting may also render them especially susceptible to introgression. PMID:23451266

  2. Inferring kangaroo phylogeny from incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Matthew J; Haouchar, Dalal; Pratt, Renae C; Gibb, Gillian C; Bunce, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The marsupial genus Macropus includes three subgenera, the familiar large grazing kangaroos and wallaroos of M. (Macropus) and M. (Osphranter), as well as the smaller mixed grazing/browsing wallabies of M. (Notamacropus). A recent study of five concatenated nuclear genes recommended subsuming the predominantly browsing Wallabia bicolor (swamp wallaby) into Macropus. To further examine this proposal we sequenced partial mitochondrial genomes for kangaroos and wallabies. These sequences strongly favour the morphological placement of W. bicolor as sister to Macropus, although place M. irma (black-gloved wallaby) within M. (Osphranter) rather than as expected, with M. (Notamacropus). Species tree estimation from separately analysed mitochondrial and nuclear genes favours retaining Macropus and Wallabia as separate genera. A simulation study finds that incomplete lineage sorting among nuclear genes is a plausible explanation for incongruence with the mitochondrial placement of W. bicolor, while mitochondrial introgression from a wallaroo into M. irma is the deepest such event identified in marsupials. Similar such coalescent simulations for interpreting gene tree conflicts will increase in both relevance and statistical power as species-level phylogenetics enters the genomic age. Ecological considerations in turn, hint at a role for selection in accelerating the fixation of introgressed or incompletely sorted loci. More generally the inclusion of the mitochondrial sequences substantially enhanced phylogenetic resolution. However, we caution that the evolutionary dynamics that enhance mitochondria as speciation indicators in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting may also render them especially susceptible to introgression.

  3. Dynamic regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription during mouse brown fat cell differentiation and recruitment.

    PubMed

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Qvortrup, Klaus; Hansen, Lillian H L; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Madsen, Lise; Barbatelli, Giorgio; Quistorff, Bjørn; Hansen, Jacob B

    2009-12-24

    Brown adipocytes are specialised in dissipating energy through adaptive thermogenesis, whereas white adipocytes are specialised in energy storage. These essentially opposite functions are possible for two reasons relating to mitochondria, namely expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and a remarkably higher mitochondrial abundance in brown adipocytes. Here we report a comprehensive characterisation of gene expression linked to mitochondrial DNA replication, transcription and function during white and brown fat cell differentiation in vitro as well as in white and brown fat, brown adipose tissue fractions and in selected adipose tissues during cold exposure. We find a massive induction of the majority of such genes during brown adipocyte differentiation and recruitment, e.g. of the mitochondrial transcription factors A (Tfam) and B2 (Tfb2m), whereas only a subset of the same genes were induced during white adipose conversion. In addition, PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16) was found to be expressed at substantially higher levels in brown compared to white pre-adipocytes and adipocytes. We demonstrate that forced expression of Tfam but not Tfb2m in brown adipocyte precursor cells promotes mitochondrial DNA replication, and that silencing of PRDM16 expression during brown fat cell differentiation blunts mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of brown fat cell markers. Using both in vitro and in vivo model systems of white and brown fat cell differentiation, we report a detailed characterisation of gene expression linked to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. We find significant differences in differentiating white and brown adipocytes, which might explain the notable increase in mitochondrial content observed during brown adipose conversion. In addition, our data support a key role of PRDM16 in triggering brown adipocyte differentiation, including mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of UCP1.

  4. Mitochondrial gene replacement in human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Iyer, S; Xiao, E; Alsayegh, K; Eroshenko, N; Riggs, M J; Bennett, J P; Rao, R R

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural progenitor (hNP) cells are an excellent resource for understanding early neural development and neurodegenerative disorders. Given that many neurodegenerative disorders can be correlated with defects in the mitochondrial genome, optimal utilization of hNP cells requires an ability to manipulate and monitor changes in the mitochondria. Here, we describe a novel approach that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (rhTFAM) protein to transfect and express a pathogenic mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) carrying the G11778A mutation associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) disease, into dideoxycytidine (ddC)-treated hNPs. Treatment with ddC reduced endogenous mtDNA and gene expression, without loss of hNP phenotypic markers. Entry of G11778A mtDNA complexed with the rhTFAM was observed in mitochondria of ddC-hNPs. Expression of the pathogenic RNA was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of the SfaN1-digested cDNA. On the basis of the expression of neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin, neuronal differentiation occurred. Our results show for the first time that pathogenic mtDNA can be introduced and expressed into hNPs without loss of phenotype or neuronal differentiation potential. This mitochondrial gene replacement technology allows for creation of in vitro stem cell-based models useful for understanding neuronal development and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Systematically fragmented genes in a multipartite mitochondrial genome

    PubMed Central

    Vlcek, Cestmir; Marande, William; Teijeiro, Shona; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, Gertraud

    2011-01-01

    Arguably, the most bizarre mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is that of the euglenozoan eukaryote Diplonema papillatum. The genome consists of numerous small circular chromosomes none of which appears to encode a complete gene. For instance, the cox1 coding sequence is spread out over nine different chromosomes in non-overlapping pieces (modules), which are transcribed separately and joined to a contiguous mRNA by trans-splicing. Here, we examine how many genes are encoded by Diplonema mtDNA and whether all are fragmented and their transcripts trans-spliced. Module identification is challenging due to the sequence divergence of Diplonema mitochondrial genes. By employing most sensitive protein profile search algorithms and comparing genomic with cDNA sequence, we recognize a total of 11 typical mitochondrial genes. The 10 protein-coding genes are systematically chopped up into three to 12 modules of 60–350 bp length. The corresponding mRNAs are all trans-spliced. Identification of ribosomal RNAs is most difficult. So far, we only detect the 3′-module of the large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA); it does not trans-splice with other pieces. The small subunit rRNA gene remains elusive. Our results open new intriguing questions about the biochemistry and evolution of mitochondrial trans-splicing in Diplonema. PMID:20935050

  6. Drosophila Erect wing (Ewg) controls mitochondrial fusion during muscle growth and maintenance by regulation of the Opa1-like gene.

    PubMed

    Rai, Mamta; Katti, Prasanna; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and morphological changes are associated with tissue-specific functional demand, but the factors and pathways that regulate these processes have not been completely identified. A lack of mitochondrial fusion has been implicated in various developmental and pathological defects. The spatiotemporal regulation of mitochondrial fusion in a tissue such as muscle is not well understood. Here, we show in Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) that the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane fusion gene, Opa1-like, is regulated in a spatiotemporal fashion by the transcription factor/co-activator Erect wing (Ewg). In IFMs null for Ewg, mitochondria undergo mitophagy and/or autophagy accompanied by reduced mitochondrial functioning and muscle degeneration. By following the dynamics of mitochondrial growth and shape in IFMs, we found that mitochondria grow extensively and fuse during late pupal development to form the large tubular mitochondria. Our evidence shows that Ewg expression during early IFM development is sufficient to upregulate Opa1-like, which itself is a requisite for both late pupal mitochondrial fusion and muscle maintenance. Concomitantly, by knocking down Opa1-like during early muscle development, we show that it is important for mitochondrial fusion, muscle differentiation and muscle organization. However, knocking down Opa1-like, after the expression window of Ewg did not cause mitochondrial or muscle defects. This study identifies a mechanism by which mitochondrial fusion is regulated spatiotemporally by Ewg through Opa1-like during IFM differentiation and growth.

  7. Mitochondrial impairment increases FL-PINK1 levels by calcium-dependent gene expression☆

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Gegg, Matthew E.; Bravo-San Pedro, José M.; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gutiérrez-Martín, Yolanda; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fuentes, José M.; González-Polo, Rosa Ana; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) gene are a cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). This gene encodes a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, which is partly localized to mitochondria, and has been shown to play a role in protecting neuronal cells from oxidative stress and cell death, perhaps related to its role in mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. In this study, we report that increased mitochondrial PINK1 levels observed in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells after carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophelyhydrazone (CCCP) treatment were due to de novo protein synthesis, and not just increased stabilization of full length PINK1 (FL-PINK1). PINK1 mRNA levels were significantly increased by 4-fold after 24 h. FL-PINK1 protein levels at this time point were significantly higher than vehicle-treated, or cells treated with CCCP for 3 h, despite mitochondrial content being decreased by 29%. We have also shown that CCCP dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and induced entry of extracellular calcium through L/N-type calcium channels. The calcium chelating agent BAPTA-AM impaired the CCCP-induced PINK1 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, CCCP treatment activated the transcription factor c-Fos in a calcium-dependent manner. These data indicate that PINK1 expression is significantly increased upon CCCP-induced mitophagy in a calcium-dependent manner. This increase in expression continues after peak Parkin mitochondrial translocation, suggesting a role for PINK1 in mitophagy that is downstream of ubiquitination of mitochondrial substrates. This sensitivity to intracellular calcium levels supports the hypothesis that PINK1 may also play a role in cellular calcium homeostasis and neuroprotection. PMID:24184327

  8. N-acetylcysteine inhibits the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in livers from rats fed ethanol chronically.

    PubMed

    Caro, Andres A; Bell, Matthew; Ejiofor, Shannon; Zurcher, Grant; Petersen, Dennis R; Ronis, Martin J J

    2014-12-01

    Chronic ethanol (EtOH) administration to experimental animals induces hepatic oxidative stress and up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis. The mechanisms by which chronic EtOH up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis have not been fully explored. In this work, we hypothesized that oxidative stress is a factor that triggers mitochondrial biogenesis after chronic EtOH feeding. If our hypothesis is correct, co-administration of antioxidants should prevent up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes. Rats were fed an EtOH-containing diet intragastrically by total enteral nutrition for 150 days, in the absence or presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at 1.7 g/kg/d; control rats were administered isocaloric diets where carbohydrates substituted for EtOH calories. EtOH administration significantly increased hepatic oxidative stress, evidenced as decreased liver total glutathione and reduced glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio. These effects were inhibited by co-administration of EtOH and NAC. Chronic EtOH increased the expression of mitochondrial biogenesis genes including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-coactivator-1 alpha and mitochondrial transcription factor A, and mitochondrial DNA; co-administration of EtOH and NAC prevented these effects. Chronic EtOH administration was associated with decreased mitochondrial mass, inactivation and depletion of mitochondrial complex I and complex IV, and increased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative damage, effects that were not prevented by NAC. These results suggest that oxidative stress caused by chronic EtOH triggered the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis genes in rat liver, because an antioxidant such as NAC prevented both effects. Because NAC did not prevent liver mitochondrial oxidative damage, extra-mitochondrial effects of reactive oxygen species may regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. In spite of the induction of hepatic mitochondrial biogenesis genes by chronic EtOH, mitochondrial

  9. Towards mitochondrial gene therapy: DQAsomes as a strategy.

    PubMed

    Weissig, V; Torchilin, V P

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a cause, or major contributing factor in the development, of degenerative diseases, aging, cancer, many cases of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease and Type II diabetes (D. C. Wallace, Science 283, 1482-1488, 1999). Despite major advances in understanding mtDNA defects at the genetic and biochemical level, there is no satisfactory treatment for the vast majority of patients available. Objective limitations of conventional biochemical treatment for patients with defects of mtDNA warrant the exploration of gene therapeutic approaches. However, mitochondrial gene therapy has been elusive, due to the lack of any mitochondria-specific transfection vector. We review here the current state of the development of mitochondrial DNA delivery systems. In particular, we are summarizing our own efforts in exploring the mitochondriotropic properties of dequalinium, a cationic bolaamphiphile with delocalized charge centers, for the design of a vector suited for the transport of DNA to mitochondria in living cells.

  10. The Agaricus bisporus cox1 gene: the longest mitochondrial gene and the largest reservoir of mitochondrial group i introns.

    PubMed

    Férandon, Cyril; Moukha, Serge; Callac, Philippe; Benedetto, Jean-Pierre; Castroviejo, Michel; Barroso, Gérard

    2010-11-18

    In eukaryotes, introns are located in nuclear and organelle genes from several kingdoms. Large introns (up to 5 kbp) are frequent in mitochondrial genomes of plant and fungi but scarce in Metazoa, even if these organisms are grouped with fungi among the Opisthokonts. Mitochondrial introns are classified in two groups (I and II) according to their RNA secondary structure involved in the intron self-splicing mechanism. Most of these mitochondrial group I introns carry a "Homing Endonuclease Gene" (heg) encoding a DNA endonuclease acting in transfer and site-specific integration ("homing") and allowing intron spreading and gain after lateral transfer even between species from different kingdoms. Opposed to this gain mechanism, is another which implies that introns, which would have been abundant in the ancestral genes, would mainly evolve by loss. The importance of both mechanisms (loss and gain) is matter of debate. Here we report the sequence of the cox1 gene of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus, the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world. This gene is both the longest mitochondrial gene (29,902 nt) and the largest group I intron reservoir reported to date with 18 group I and 1 group II. An exhaustive analysis of the group I introns available in cox1 genes shows that they are mobile genetic elements whose numerous events of loss and gain by lateral transfer combine to explain their wide and patchy distribution extending over several kingdoms. An overview of intron distribution, together with the high frequency of eroded heg, suggests that they are evolving towards loss. In this landscape of eroded and lost intron sequences, the A. bisporus cox1 gene exhibits a peculiar dynamics of intron keeping and catching, leading to the largest collection of mitochondrial group I introns reported to date in a Eukaryote.

  11. Mitochondrial genome dynamics in plants and animals: convergent gene fusions of a MutS homologue.

    PubMed

    Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Christensen, Alan C; Mohammed, Saleem; Munoz-Castillo, Bryan; Moriyama, Hideaki; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2006-08-01

    Mitochondrial processes influence a broad spectrum of physiological and developmental events in higher eukaryotes, and their aberrant function can lead to several familiar disease phenotypes in mammals. In plants, mitochondrial genes directly influence pollen development and the occurrence of male sterility in natural plant populations. Likewise, in animal systems evidence accumulates to suggest important mitochondrial functions in spermatogenesis and reproduction. Here we present evidence for a convergent gene fusion involving a MutS-homologous gene functioning within the mitochondrion and designated Msh1. In only plants and soft corals, the MutS homologue has fused with a homing endonuclease sequence at the carboxy terminus of the protein. However, the endonuclease domains in the plants and the soft corals are members of different groups. In plants, Msh1 can influence mitochondrial genome organization and male sterility expression. Based on parallels in Msh1 gene structure shared by plants and corals, and their similarities in reproductive behavior, we postulate that this convergent gene fusion might have occurred in response to coincident adaptive pressures on reproduction.

  12. Gene expression patterns associated with queen honey bee longevity.

    PubMed

    Corona, Miguel; Hughes, Kimberly A; Weaver, Daniel B; Robinson, Gene E

    2005-11-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that accumulation of oxidative damage is the main proximate cause of aging and that lifespan is determined by the rate at which this damage occurs. Two predictions from this theory are that long-lived organisms produce fewer ROS or have increased antioxidant production. Based in these predictions, molecular mechanisms to promote longevity could include either changes in the regulation of mitochondrial genes that affect ROS production or elevated expression of antioxidant genes. We explored these possibilities in the honey bee, a good model for the study of aging because it has a caste system in which the same genome produces both a long-lived queen and a short-lived worker. We measured mRNA levels for genes encoding eight of the most prominent antioxidant enzymes and five mitochondrial proteins involved in respiration. The expression of antioxidant genes generally decreased with age in queens, but not in workers. Expression of most mitochondrial genes, in particular CytC, was higher in young queens, but these genes showed a faster age-related decline relative to workers. One exception to this trend was COX-I in thorax. This resulted in higher COX-I/CytC ratios in old queens compared to old workers, which suggests caste-specific differences in mitochondrial function that might be related to the caste-specific differences in longevity. Queen honey bee longevity appears to have evolved via mechanisms other than increased antioxidant gene expression.

  13. Transcriptome-wide co-expression analysis identifies LRRC2 as a novel mediator of mitochondrial and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Leleu, Marion; Rowe, Glenn C.; Palygin, Oleg; Bukowy, John D.; Kuo, Judy; Rech, Monika; Hermans-Beijnsberger, Steffie; Schaefer, Sebastian; Adami, Eleonora; Creemers, Esther E.; Heinig, Matthias; Schroen, Blanche; Arany, Zoltan; Petretto, Enrico; Geurts, Aron M.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to myriad monogenic and complex pathologies. To understand the underlying mechanisms, it is essential to define the full complement of proteins that modulate mitochondrial function. To identify such proteins, we performed a meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression data. Gene co-expression analysis of a large and heterogeneous compendium of microarray data nominated a sub-population of transcripts that whilst highly correlated with known mitochondrial protein-encoding transcripts (MPETs), are not themselves recognized as generating proteins either localized to the mitochondrion or pertinent to functions therein. To focus the analysis on a medically-important condition with a strong yet incompletely understood mitochondrial component, candidates were cross-referenced with an MPET-enriched module independently generated via genome-wide co-expression network analysis of a human heart failure gene expression dataset. The strongest uncharacterized candidate in the analysis was Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 2 (LRRC2). LRRC2 was found to be localized to the mitochondria in human cells and transcriptionally-regulated by the mitochondrial master regulator Pgc-1α. We report that Lrrc2 transcript abundance correlates with that of β-MHC, a canonical marker of cardiac hypertrophy in humans and experimentally demonstrated an elevation in Lrrc2 transcript in in vitro and in vivo rodent models of cardiac hypertrophy as well as in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. RNAi-mediated Lrrc2 knockdown in a rat-derived cardiomyocyte cell line resulted in enhanced expression of canonical hypertrophic biomarkers as well as increased mitochondrial mass in the context of increased Pgc-1α expression. In conclusion, our meta-analysis represents a simple yet powerful springboard for the nomination of putative mitochondrially-pertinent proteins relevant to cardiac function and enabled the identification of LRRC2 as a novel mitochondrially

  14. Recombination sequences in plant mitochondrial genomes: diversity and homologies to known mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, D B; Palmer, J D

    1984-01-01

    Several plant mitochondrial genomes contain repeated sequences that are postulated to be sites of homologous intragenomic recombination (1-3). In this report, we have used filter hybridizations to investigate sequence relationships between the cloned mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination repeats from turnip, spinach and maize and total mtDNA isolated from thirteen species of angiosperms. We find that strong sequence homologies exist between the spinach and turnip recombination repeats and essentially all other mitochondrial genomes tested, whereas a major maize recombination repeat does not hybridize to any other mtDNA. The sequences homologous to the turnip repeat do not appear to function in recombination in any other genome, whereas the spinach repeat hybridizes to reiterated sequences within the mitochondrial genomes of wheat and two species of pokeweed that do appear to be sites of recombination. Thus, although intragenomic recombination is a widespread phenomenon in plant mitochondria, it appears that different sequences either serve as substrates for this function in different species, or else surround a relatively short common recombination site which does not cross-hybridize under our experimental conditions. Identified gene sequences from maize mtDNA were used in heterologous hybridizations to show that the repeated sequences implicated in recombination in turnip and spinach/pokeweed/wheat mitochondria include, or are closely linked to genes for subunit II of cytochrome c oxidase and 26S rRNA, respectively. Together with previous studies indicating that the 18S rRNA gene in wheat mtDNA is contained within a recombination repeat (3), these results imply an unexpectedly frequent association between recombination repeats and plant mitochondrial genes. Images PMID:6473104

  15. Photoperiod-sensitive cytoplasmic male sterility in wheat: nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility results in differential processing of the mitochondrial orf25 gene.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Y; Kurihara, Y; Futami, K; Tsuji, K; Murai, K

    1999-12-01

    An alloplasmic wheat line with the cytoplasm of Aegilops crassa expresses photoperiod-sensitive cytoplasmic male sterility (PCMS). Southern- and Northern-hybridization analyses showed that this line contains alterations in both the gene structure and transcription patterns of the mitochondrial gene orf25. In this study, the nucleotide sequence around the orf25 gene of Ae. crassa (CR-orf25) and common wheat (AE-orf25) was determined, and we found that the upstream region of CR-orf25 had been replaced by that of rps7 of common wheat (AE-rps7) through recombination. A novel open reading frame (orf48) is present upstream of CR-orf25. In these three genes, transcription was initiated from the consensus promoter motif of plant mitochondrial genes located in the upstream regions. Processing enzymes in Ae. crassa and common wheat cleave the respective precursor mRNAs, namely CR-orf25 and AE-rps7, at sites similar to that of the premature mitochondrial 26S rRNA. In contrast, the precursor mRNA is not effectively processed at the target sequence of CR-orf25 in the alloplasmic wheat line. Because major transcripts of the euplasmic CR-orf25 and AE-rps7 genes would result in a truncated orf48 product, one possibility is that the orf48 protein might disturb mitochondrial function at a specific stage and hence affect the expression of the PCMS trait.

  16. Independent replication of mitochondrial genes supports the transcriptional program in developing fiber cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Song, Xianliang; Naoumkina, Marina; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fang, David D

    2014-07-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants exist both as a "master circle" chromosome and as numerous subgenomic sublimons that are generated by intramolecular recombination. Differential stability or replication of these sublimons allows individual mitochondrial gene copy numbers to vary independently between different cell types and developmental stages. Our objective was to determine the relationship between mitochondrial gene copy number and transcript abundance in the elongating fiber cells of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). We compared RNA and DNA from cotton fiber cells at five developmental time points from early elongation through secondary cell wall thickening from the Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) short fiber mutant and its wild type near isogenic line (NIL) DP5690. Mitochondrial gene copy number decreased from 3 to 8-DPA in the developing cotton fiber cells while transcript levels remained low. As secondary cell wall biosynthesis began in developing fibers, the expression levels and copy numbers of mitochondrial genes involved in energy production and respiration were up-regulated in wild type cotton DP5690. However, the short fiber mutant Li2, failed to increase expression of these genes, which include three subunits of ATP synthase, atp1, atp8 and atp9 and two cytochrome genes cox1 and cob. At the same time, Li2 failed to increase the copy numbers of these highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, we found that when mitochondrial genes were highly transcribed, they also had very high copy numbers. This observation suggests that in developing cotton fibers, increased mitochondrial sublimon replication may support increases in gene transcription.

  17. The Agaricus bisporus cox1 Gene: The Longest Mitochondrial Gene and the Largest Reservoir of Mitochondrial Group I Introns

    PubMed Central

    Férandon, Cyril; Moukha, Serge; Callac, Philippe; Benedetto, Jean-Pierre; Castroviejo, Michel; Barroso, Gérard

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, introns are located in nuclear and organelle genes from several kingdoms. Large introns (up to 5 kbp) are frequent in mitochondrial genomes of plant and fungi but scarce in Metazoa, even if these organisms are grouped with fungi among the Opisthokonts. Mitochondrial introns are classified in two groups (I and II) according to their RNA secondary structure involved in the intron self-splicing mechanism. Most of these mitochondrial group I introns carry a “Homing Endonuclease Gene” (heg) encoding a DNA endonuclease acting in transfer and site-specific integration (“homing”) and allowing intron spreading and gain after lateral transfer even between species from different kingdoms. Opposed to this gain mechanism, is another which implies that introns, which would have been abundant in the ancestral genes, would mainly evolve by loss. The importance of both mechanisms (loss and gain) is matter of debate. Here we report the sequence of the cox1 gene of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus, the most widely cultivated mushroom in the world. This gene is both the longest mitochondrial gene (29,902 nt) and the largest group I intron reservoir reported to date with 18 group I and 1 group II. An exhaustive analysis of the group I introns available in cox1 genes shows that they are mobile genetic elements whose numerous events of loss and gain by lateral transfer combine to explain their wide and patchy distribution extending over several kingdoms. An overview of intron distribution, together with the high frequency of eroded heg, suggests that they are evolving towards loss. In this landscape of eroded and lost intron sequences, the A. bisporus cox1 gene exhibits a peculiar dynamics of intron keeping and catching, leading to the largest collection of mitochondrial group I introns reported to date in a Eukaryote. PMID:21124976

  18. Nicotinamide riboside restores cognition through an upregulation of proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α regulated β-secretase 1 degradation and mitochondrial gene expression in Alzheimer's mouse models.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Pan, Yong; Vempati, Prashant; Zhao, Wei; Knable, Lindsay; Ho, Lap; Wang, Jun; Sastre, Magdalena; Ono, Kenjiro; Sauve, Anthony A; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2013-06-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(+), a coenzyme involved in redox activities in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, has been identified as a key regulator of the lifespan-extending effects, and the activation of NAD(+) expression has been linked with a decrease in beta-amyloid (Aβ) toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nicotinamide riboside (NR) is a NAD(+) precursor, it promotes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 (PGC)-1α expression in the brain. Evidence has shown that PGC-1α is a crucial regulator of Aβ generation because it affects β-secretase (BACE1) degradation. In this study we tested the hypothesis that NR treatment in an AD mouse model could attenuate Aβ toxicity through the activation of PGC-1α-mediated BACE1 degradation. Using the Tg2576 AD mouse model, using in vivo behavioral analyses, biochemistry assays, small hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene silencing and electrophysiological recording, we found (1) dietary treatment of Tg2576 mice with 250 mg/kg/day of NR for 3 months significantly attenuates cognitive deterioration in Tg2576 mice and coincides with an increase in the steady-state levels of NAD(+) in the cerebral cortex; (2) application of NR to hippocampal slices (10 μM) for 4 hours abolishes the deficits in long-term potentiation recorded in the CA1 region of Tg2576 mice; (3) NR treatment promotes PGC-1α expression in the brain coinciding with enhanced degradation of BACE1 and the reduction of Aβ production in Tg2576 mice. Further in vitro studies confirmed that BACE1 protein content is decreased by NR treatment in primary neuronal cultures derived from Tg2576 embryos, in which BACE1 degradation was prevented by PGC-1α-shRNA gene silencing; and (4) NR treatment and PGC-1α overexpression enhance BACE1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Our studies suggest that dietary treatment with NR might benefit AD cognitive function and synaptic plasticity, in part by promoting PGC-1α-mediated BACE1

  19. MicroRNA-7 Regulates the Function of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore by Targeting VDAC1 Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Amrita Datta; Choi, Doo Chul; Kabaria, Savan; Tran, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the major contributors to neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. The mitochondrial permeability transition pore is a protein complex located on the mitochondrial membrane. Under cellular stress, the pore opens, increasing the release of pro-apoptotic proteins, and ultimately resulting in cell death. MicroRNA-7 (miR-7) is a small non-coding RNA that has been found to exhibit a protective role in the cellular models of Parkinson disease. In the present study, miR-7 was predicted to regulate the function of mitochondria, according to gene ontology analysis of proteins that are down-regulated by miR-7. Indeed, miR-7 overexpression inhibited mitochondrial fragmentation, mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, reactive oxygen species generation, and release of mitochondrial calcium in response to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, several of these findings were confirmed in mouse primary neurons. Among the mitochondrial proteins identified by gene ontology analysis, the expression of voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), a constituent of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, was down-regulated by miR-7 through targeting 3′-untranslated region of VDAC1 mRNA. Similar to miR-7 overexpression, knockdown of VDAC1 also led to a decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent cellular protection against MPP+. Notably, overexpression of VDAC1 without the 3′-UTR significantly abolished the protective effects of miR-7 against MPP+-induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the protective effect of miR-7 is partly exerted through promoting mitochondrial function by targeting VDAC1 expression. These findings point to a novel mechanism by which miR-7 accomplishes neuroprotection by improving mitochondrial health. PMID:26801612

  20. Mitochondrial gene order is not conserved in arthropods: prostriate and metastriate tick mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Black, W C; Roehrdanz, R L

    1998-12-01

    The entire mitochondrial genome was sequenced in a prostriate tick, Ixodes hexagonus, and a metastriate tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Both genomes encode 22 tRNAs, 13 proteins, and two ribosomal RNAs. Prostriate ticks are basal members of Ixodidae and have the same gene order as Limulus polyphemus. In contrast, in R. sanguineus, a block of genes encoding NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), tRNA(Leu)(UUR), tRNA(Leu)(CUN), 16S rDNA, tRNA(Val), 12S rDNA, the control region, and the tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Gln) have translocated to a position between the tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) genes. The tRNA(Cys) gene has translocated between the control region and the tRNA(Met) gene, and the tRNA(Leu)(CUN) gene has translocated between the tRNA(Ser)(UCN) gene and the control region. Furthermore, the control region is duplicated, and both copies undergo concerted evolution. Primers that flank these rearrangements confirm that this gene order is conserved in all metastriate ticks examined. Correspondence analysis of amino acid and codon use in the two ticks and in nine other arthropod mitochondrial genomes indicate a strong bias in R. sanguineus towards amino acids encoded by AT-rich codons.

  1. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  2. Systematic expression analysis of the mitochondrial complex III subunits identifies UQCRC1 as biomarker in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ellinger, Jörg; Gromes, Arabella; Poss, Mirjam; Brüggemann, Maria; Schmidt, Doris; Ellinger, Nadja; Tolkach, Yuri; Dietrich, Dimo; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is common in cancer, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain is often affected in carcinogenesis. So far, few is known about the expression of the mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase complex) subunits in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this study, the NextBio database was used to determine an expression profile of the mitochondrial complex III subunits based on published microarray studies. We observed that five out of 11 subunits of the complex III were downregulated in at least three microarray studies. The decreased mRNA expression level of UQCRFS1 and UQCRC1 in ccRCC was confirmed using PCR. Low mRNA levels UQCRC1 were also correlated with a shorter period of cancer-specific and overall survival. Furthermore, UQCRFS1 and UQCRC1 were also decreased in ccRCC on the protein level as determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. UQCRC1 protein expression was also lower in ccRCC than in papillary and chromophobe subtypes. Analyzing gene expression and DNA methylation in The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort revealed an inverse correlation of gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting that DNA hypermethylation is regulating the expression of UQCRC1 and UQCRFS1. Taken together, our data implicate that dysregulated UQCRC1 and UQCRFS1 are involved in impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain function. PMID:27845902

  3. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine.

  4. NADH dehydrogenase subunit genes in the mitochondrial DNA of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Nosek, J; Fukuhara, H

    1994-01-01

    The genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits of respiratory complex I have not been identified so far in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of yeasts. In the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis, we found six new open reading frames whose sequences were unambiguously homologous to those of the genes known to code for NADH dehydrogenase subunit proteins of different organisms, i.e., ND1, ND2, ND3, ND4L, ND5, and ND6. The gene for ND4 also appears to be present, as judged from hybridization experiments with a Podospora gene probe. Specific transcripts from these open reading frames (ND genes) could be detected in the mitochondria. Hybridization experiments using C. parapsilosis genes as probes suggested that ND genes are present in the mtDNAs of a wide range of yeast species including Candida catenulata, Pichia guilliermondii, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula polymorpha, and others. Images PMID:7521869

  5. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  6. Two-locus mitochondrial and nuclear gene models for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Bu, X; Yang, H Y; Shohat, M; Rotter, J I

    1992-01-01

    Stimulated by a large pedigree with a cochlear form of deafness, for which we considered a two-locus mitochondrial and nuclear gene model, we have extended the classic methods of segregation analysis to these classes of two-locus disorders. Based on the unique maternal transmission pattern of the mitochondria, we demonstrate that utilization of the maternal line pedigree allows us to simplify the various two-locus mitochondrial models to "one nuclear locus" models. Classifying the nuclear families into different independent groups by the mother's phenotypes allows us to estimate the nuclear gene frequency in one group and to use this estimate as the expected value to test the fitness of the model on the other group. In addition, if we restrict the analysis to specific subsets of the mating type(s), we can also test the model on specific groups of nuclear families without estimating the gene frequency. Goodness-of-fit tests can be performed on pooled sibship data as well as individual sibship data. These methods of analysis should assume increasing importance as more disorders with features of mitochondrial inheritance are identified.

  7. Effect of a polymorphism in the ND1 mitochondrial gene on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Matthew R; Ravussin, E; Rowe, M J; Pratley, R; Milner, M R; Willis, W T

    2008-02-01

    A non-silent polymorphism in the mitochondrial coding region of the ND1 gene, a subunit of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase is associated with resting metabolic rate (RMR) in 245 non-diabetic Pima Indians. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of the ND1 gene polymorphism on mitochondrial function in 14 male Pima Indians. Seven subjects with an A at site 3547 of the ND1 gene (Ile at amino acid 81), and seven with a G at this site (Val) were studied. Mitochondria were isolated from 0.8 to 1.5 g of skeletal muscle obtained by needle biopsy of the lateral quadriceps muscle. In intact mitochondria, maximal (state-3) and resting (state-4) respiration rates were measured polarographically at 37 degrees C with a variety of single substrates or substrate combinations. Disrupted mitochondria were analyzed for maximal capacities through the entire electron transport chain (ETC) (NADH oxidase (NADHOX)), as well as through a segment of Complex I that is independent of the ND1 component (NADH-ferricyanide (NADH-FeCN) reductase). Mitochondria were well coupled and exhibited higher respiratory control ratios (RCRs) than rodent muscle. There were no differences between the two groups for any of the measured parameters. These results indicate that the cause of the observed association between RMR and the ND1 polymorphism is not related to in vitro mitochondrial function.

  8. Nonadditive gene expression in polyploids.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Liu, Xiaoxian; Pires, J Chris; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Allopolyploidy involves hybridization and duplication of divergent parental genomes and provides new avenues for gene expression. The expression levels of duplicated genes in polyploids can show deviation from parental additivity (the arithmetic average of the parental expression levels). Nonadditive expression has been widely observed in diverse polyploids and comprises at least three possible scenarios: (a) The total gene expression level in a polyploid is similar to that of one of its parents (expression-level dominance); (b) total gene expression is lower or higher than in both parents (transgressive expression); and (c) the relative contribution of the parental copies (homeologs) to the total gene expression is unequal (homeolog expression bias). Several factors may result in expression nonadditivity in polyploids, including maternal-paternal influence, gene dosage balance, cis- and/or trans-regulatory networks, and epigenetic regulation. As our understanding of nonadditive gene expression in polyploids remains limited, a new generation of investigators should explore additional phenomena (i.e., alternative splicing) and use other high-throughput "omics" technologies to measure the impact of nonadditive expression on phenotype, proteome, and metabolome.

  9. Dietary wolfberry upregulates carotenoid metabolic genes and enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of db/db diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huifeng; Wark, Logan; Ji, Hua; Willard, Lloyd; Jaing, Yu; Han, Jing; He, Hui; Ortiz, Edlin; Zhang, Yunong; Medeiros, Denis M; Lin, Dingbo

    2013-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether dietary wolfberry altered carotenoid metabolic gene expression and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of diabetic mice. Six-week-old male db/db and wild-type mice were fed the control or wolfberry diets for 8 weeks. At study termination, liver and retinal tissues were collected for analysis by transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and HPLC. Wolfberry elevated zeaxanthin and lutein levels in the liver and retinal tissues and stimulated expression of retinal scavenger receptor class B type I, glutathione S-transferase Pi 1, and β,β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase 2, and induced activation and nuclear enrichment of retinal AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPK-α2). Furthermore, wolfberry attenuated hypoxia and mitochondrial stress as demonstrated by declined expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and heat shock protein 60. Wolfberry enhanced retinal mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetic retinas as demonstrated by reversed mitochondrial dispersion in the retinal pigment epithelium, increased mitochondrial copy number, elevated citrate synthase activity, and upregulated expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Consumption of dietary wolfberry could be beneficial to retinoprotection through reversal of mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Unusual organization of a developmentally regulated mitochondrial RNA polymerase (TBMTRNAP) gene in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Sandra L.; Koslowsky, Donna J.

    2009-01-01

    We report here the characterization of a developmentally regulated mitochondrial RNA polymerase transcript in the parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma brucei. The 3822 bp protein-coding region of the T. brucei mitochondrial RNA polymerase (TBMTRNAP) gene is predicted to encode a 1274 amino acid polypeptide, the carboxyl-terminal domain of which exhibits 29–37% identity with the mitochondrial RNA polymerases from other organisms in the molecular databases. Interestingly, the TBMTRNAP mRNA is one of several mature mRNA species post-transcriptionally processed from a stable, polycistronic precursor. Alternative polyadenylation of the TBMTRNAP mRNA produces two mature transcripts that differ by 500 nt and that show stage-specific differences in abundance during the T. brucei life cycle. This alternative polyadenylation event appears to be accompanied by the alternative splicing of a high abundance, non-coding downstream transcript of unknown function. Our finding that the TBMTRNAP gene is transcribed into two distinct mRNAs subject to differential regulation during the T. brucei life cycle suggests that mitochondrial differentiation might be achieved in part through the regulated expression of this gene. PMID:11470527

  11. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  12. The Bicoid Stability Factor Controls Polyadenylation and Expression of Specific Mitochondrial mRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Grönke, Sebastian; Stewart, James B.; Mourier, Arnaud; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Kukat, Christian; Wibom, Rolf; Habermann, Bianca; Partridge, Linda; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2011-01-01

    The bicoid stability factor (BSF) of Drosophila melanogaster has been reported to be present in the cytoplasm, where it stabilizes the maternally contributed bicoid mRNA and binds mRNAs expressed from early zygotic genes. BSF may also have other roles, as it is ubiquitously expressed and essential for survival of adult flies. We have performed immunofluorescence and cell fractionation analyses and show here that BSF is mainly a mitochondrial protein. We studied two independent RNAi knockdown fly lines and report that reduced BSF protein levels lead to a severe respiratory deficiency and delayed development at the late larvae stage. Ubiquitous knockdown of BSF results in a severe reduction of the polyadenylation tail lengths of specific mitochondrial mRNAs, accompanied by an enrichment of unprocessed polycistronic RNA intermediates. Furthermore, we observed a significant reduction in mRNA steady state levels, despite increased de novo transcription. Surprisingly, mitochondrial de novo translation is increased and abnormal mitochondrial translation products are present in knockdown flies, suggesting that BSF also has a role in coordinating the mitochondrial translation in addition to its role in mRNA maturation and stability. We thus report a novel function of BSF in flies and demonstrate that it has an important intra-mitochondrial role, which is essential for maintaining mtDNA gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22022283

  13. Genes and languages in Europe: an analysis of mitochondrial lineages.

    PubMed

    Sajantila, A; Lahermo, P; Anttinen, T; Lukka, M; Sistonen, P; Savontaus, M L; Aula, P; Beckman, L; Tranebjaerg, L; Gedde-Dahl, T; Issel-Tarver, L; DiRienzo, A; Pääbo, S

    1995-08-01

    When mitochondrial DNA sequence variation is analyzed from a sample of 637 individuals in 14 European populations, most populations show little differentiation with respect to each other. However, the Saami distinguish themselves by a comparatively large amount of sequence difference when compared with the other populations, by a different distribution of sequence diversity within the population, and by the occurrence of particular sequence motifs. Thus, the Saami seem to have a long history distinct from other European populations. Linguistic affiliations are not reflected in the patterns of relationships of mitochondrial lineages in European populations, whereas prior studies of nuclear gene frequencies have shown a correlation between genetic and linguistic evolution. It is argued that this apparent contradiction is attributable to the fact that genetic lineages and gene frequencies reflect different time perspectives on population history, the latter being more in concordance with linguistic evolution.

  14. Increased COUP-TFII expression in adult hearts induces mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, San-Pin; Kao, Chung-Yang; Wang, Leiming; Creighton, Chad J.; Yang, Jin; Donti, Taraka R.; Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan G.; Graham, Brett H.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chang, Ching-Pin; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Tsai, Sophia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic remodelling are pivotal in the development of cardiomyopathy. Here, we show that myocardial COUP-TFII overexpression causes heart failure in mice, suggesting a causal effect of elevated COUP-TFII levels on development of dilated cardiomyopathy. COUP-TFII represses genes critical for mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity, oxidative stress detoxification and mitochondrial dynamics, resulting in increased levels of reactive oxygen species and lower rates of oxygen consumption in mitochondria. COUP-TFII also suppresses the metabolic regulator PGC-1 network and decreases the expression of key glucose and lipid utilization genes, leading to a reduction in both glucose and oleate oxidation in the hearts. These data suggest that COUP-TFII affects mitochondrial function, impairs metabolic remodelling and has a key role in dilated cardiomyopathy. Last, COUP-TFII haploinsufficiency attenuates the progression of cardiac dilation and improves survival in a calcineurin transgenic mouse model, indicating that COUP-TFII may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:26356605

  15. Increased COUP-TFII expression in adult hearts induces mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wu, San-Pin; Kao, Chung-Yang; Wang, Leiming; Creighton, Chad J; Yang, Jin; Donti, Taraka R; Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan G; Graham, Brett H; Bellen, Hugo J; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chang, Ching-Pin; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Tsai, Sophia Y

    2015-09-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic remodelling are pivotal in the development of cardiomyopathy. Here, we show that myocardial COUP-TFII overexpression causes heart failure in mice, suggesting a causal effect of elevated COUP-TFII levels on development of dilated cardiomyopathy. COUP-TFII represses genes critical for mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity, oxidative stress detoxification and mitochondrial dynamics, resulting in increased levels of reactive oxygen species and lower rates of oxygen consumption in mitochondria. COUP-TFII also suppresses the metabolic regulator PGC-1 network and decreases the expression of key glucose and lipid utilization genes, leading to a reduction in both glucose and oleate oxidation in the hearts. These data suggest that COUP-TFII affects mitochondrial function, impairs metabolic remodelling and has a key role in dilated cardiomyopathy. Last, COUP-TFII haploinsufficiency attenuates the progression of cardiac dilation and improves survival in a calcineurin transgenic mouse model, indicating that COUP-TFII may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  16. Molecular anatomy of tunicate senescence: reversible function of mitochondrial and nuclear genes associated with budding cycles.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kaz; Kitamura, Seigo; Sekida, Satoko; Tsuda, Masayuki; Sunanaga, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Zooids of the asexual strain of Polyandrocarpa misakiensis have a lifespan of 4-5 months; before dying, they produce many buds, enabling continuation of the strain. This study was designed to investigate the nature of gene inactivation and reactivation during this continuous process of senescence and budding. During senescence, the zooidal epidermis showed acid β-galactosidase activity, lost proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunoreactivity and became ultrastructurally worn, indicating that the epidermis is a major tissue affected by the ageing process. Semi-quantitative PCR analysis showed that the genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory chains (MRCs) engaged in decreased transcriptional activity in senescent adults compared with younger adults. The results of in situ hybridization showed that the epidermis dramatically attenuates MRC expression during ageing but restores gene activity when budding commences. During budding and ageing, the nuclear gene Eed (a polycomb group component) was activated and inactivated in a pattern similar to that observed in MRCs. In buds, RNA interference (RNAi) of Eed attenuated Eed transcripts but did not affect the gene expression of pre-activated MRCs. A tunicate humoral factor, TC14-3, could induce Eed, accompanying the reactivation of MRC in adult zooids. When RNAi of Eed and Eed induction were performed simultaneously, zooidal cells and tissues failed to engage in MRC reactivation, indicating the involvement of Eed in MRC activation. Results of this study provide evidence that the mitochondrial gene activities of Polyandrocarpa can be reversed during senescence and budding, suggesting that they are regulated by nuclear polycomb group genes.

  17. Massive Mitochondrial Gene Transfer in a Parasitic Flowering Plant Clade

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert K.; Sugumaran, M.; Marx, Christopher J.; Rest, Joshua S.; Davis, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that plant genomes have undergone potentially rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT), especially in the mitochondrial genome. Parasitic plants have provided the strongest evidence of HGT, which appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasites and their hosts. A recent phylogenomic study demonstrated that in the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi (Rafflesiaceae), whose close relatives possess the world's largest flowers, about 2.1% of nuclear gene transcripts were likely acquired from its obligate host. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain the 38 protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes common to the mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms from R. cantleyi and five additional species, including two of its closest relatives and two host species. Strikingly, our phylogenetic analyses conservatively indicate that 24%–41% of these gene sequences show evidence of HGT in Rafflesiaceae, depending on the species. Most of these transgenic sequences possess intact reading frames and are actively transcribed, indicating that they are potentially functional. Additionally, some of these transgenes maintain synteny with their donor and recipient lineages, suggesting that native genes have likely been displaced via homologous recombination. Our study is the first to comprehensively assess the magnitude of HGT in plants involving a genome (i.e., mitochondria) and a species interaction (i.e., parasitism) where it has been hypothesized to be potentially rampant. Our results establish for the first time that, although the magnitude of HGT involving nuclear genes is appreciable in these parasitic plants, HGT involving mitochondrial genes is substantially higher. This may represent a more general pattern for other parasitic plant clades and perhaps more broadly for angiosperms. PMID:23459037

  18. Massive mitochondrial gene transfer in a parasitic flowering plant clade.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yuguo; Bradley, Robert K; Sugumaran, M; Marx, Christopher J; Rest, Joshua S; Davis, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that plant genomes have undergone potentially rampant horizontal gene transfer (HGT), especially in the mitochondrial genome. Parasitic plants have provided the strongest evidence of HGT, which appears to be facilitated by the intimate physical association between the parasites and their hosts. A recent phylogenomic study demonstrated that in the holoparasite Rafflesia cantleyi (Rafflesiaceae), whose close relatives possess the world's largest flowers, about 2.1% of nuclear gene transcripts were likely acquired from its obligate host. Here, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain the 38 protein-coding and ribosomal RNA genes common to the mitochondrial genomes of angiosperms from R. cantleyi and five additional species, including two of its closest relatives and two host species. Strikingly, our phylogenetic analyses conservatively indicate that 24%-41% of these gene sequences show evidence of HGT in Rafflesiaceae, depending on the species. Most of these transgenic sequences possess intact reading frames and are actively transcribed, indicating that they are potentially functional. Additionally, some of these transgenes maintain synteny with their donor and recipient lineages, suggesting that native genes have likely been displaced via homologous recombination. Our study is the first to comprehensively assess the magnitude of HGT in plants involving a genome (i.e., mitochondria) and a species interaction (i.e., parasitism) where it has been hypothesized to be potentially rampant. Our results establish for the first time that, although the magnitude of HGT involving nuclear genes is appreciable in these parasitic plants, HGT involving mitochondrial genes is substantially higher. This may represent a more general pattern for other parasitic plant clades and perhaps more broadly for angiosperms.

  19. Large gene overlaps and tRNA processing in the compact mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Doublet, Vincent; Ubrig, Elodie; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Bouchon, Didier; Marcadé, Isabelle; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    A faithful expression of the mitochondrial DNA is crucial for cell survival. Animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a highly compact gene organization. The typical 16.5 kbp animal mtDNA encodes 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. In the backyard pillbug Armadillidium vulgare, the rather small 13.9 kbp mtDNA encodes the same set of proteins and rRNAs as compared to animal kingdom mtDNA, but seems to harbor an incomplete set of tRNA genes. Here, we first confirm the expression of 13 tRNA genes in this mtDNA. Then we show the extensive repair of a truncated tRNA, the expression of tRNA involved in large gene overlaps and of tRNA genes partially or fully integrated within protein-coding genes in either direct or opposite orientation. Under selective pressure, overlaps between genes have been likely favored for strong genome size reduction. Our study underlines the existence of unknown biochemical mechanisms for the complete gene expression of A. vulgare mtDNA, and of co-evolutionary processes to keep overlapping genes functional in a compacted mitochondrial genome.

  20. Large gene overlaps and tRNA processing in the compact mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Armadillidium vulgare

    PubMed Central

    Doublet, Vincent; Ubrig, Elodie; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Bouchon, Didier; Marcadé, Isabelle; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    A faithful expression of the mitochondrial DNA is crucial for cell survival. Animal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) presents a highly compact gene organization. The typical 16.5 kbp animal mtDNA encodes 13 proteins, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. In the backyard pillbug Armadillidium vulgare, the rather small 13.9 kbp mtDNA encodes the same set of proteins and rRNAs as compared to animal kingdom mtDNA, but seems to harbor an incomplete set of tRNA genes. Here, we first confirm the expression of 13 tRNA genes in this mtDNA. Then we show the extensive repair of a truncated tRNA, the expression of tRNA involved in large gene overlaps and of tRNA genes partially or fully integrated within protein-coding genes in either direct or opposite orientation. Under selective pressure, overlaps between genes have been likely favored for strong genome size reduction. Our study underlines the existence of unknown biochemical mechanisms for the complete gene expression of A. vulgare mtDNA, and of co-evolutionary processes to keep overlapping genes functional in a compacted mitochondrial genome. PMID:26361137

  1. Molecular mechanisms of extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangementin plethodontid salamanders

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Rachel Lockridge; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-06-01

    Extensive gene rearrangement is reported in the mitochondrial genomes of lungless salamanders (Plethodontidae). In each genome with a novel gene order, there is evidence that the rearrangement was mediated by duplication of part of the mitochondrial genome, including the presence of both pseudogenes and additional, presumably functional, copies of duplicated genes. All rearrangement-mediating duplications include either the origin of light strand replication and the nearby tRNA genes or the regions flanking the origin of heavy strand replication. The latter regions comprise nad6, trnE, cob, trnT, an intergenic spacer between trnT and trnP and, in some genomes, trnP, the control region, trnF, rrnS, trnV, rrnL, trnL1, and nad1. In some cases, two copies of duplicated genes, presumptive regulatory regions, and/or sequences with no assignable function have been retained in the genome following the initial duplication; in other genomes, only one of the duplicated copies has been retained. Both tandem and non-tandem duplications are present in these genomes, suggesting different duplication mechanisms. In some of these mtDNAs, up to 25 percent of the total length is composed of tandem duplications of non-coding sequence that includes putative regulatory regions and/or pseudogenes of tRNAs and protein-coding genes along with otherwise unassignable sequences. These data indicate that imprecise initiation and termination of replication, slipped-strand mispairing, and intra-molecular recombination may all have played a role in generating repeats during the evolutionary history of plethodontid mitochondrial genomes.

  2. Insertion near the mitochondrial tyrosine tRNA gene in patients with mitochondrial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Y.; Nonaka, I.; Horai, S.

    1994-09-01

    The 3243 mutation commonly found in patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) has been occasionally detected in patients with chronic progressive external opthalmoplegia (CPEO). To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon, an extensive mitochondrial (mt) DNA study was performed on such a patient (3243-CPEO). The newly discovered insertion was located in the noncoding region between cytrochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and tyrosine tRNA. The insertion was not found in 58 or 22 CPEO patients with or without mtDNA large-scale deletion but in another 3243-CPEO patient. In addition, the insertion was present in 1 of 116 normal Japanese, who had no 3243 mutation, and in 3 of 68 3243-MELAS patients. These results raise the possibility that the phenotypic expression of the 3243 mutation could be modulated or arranged by additional mtDNA mutations.

  3. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  4. The flow of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  5. Discovering modulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Özgün; Demir, Emek; Gönen, Mithat; Sander, Chris; Dogrusoz, Ugur

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that modulate the activity of transcription factors, often called modulators, play a critical role in creating tissue- and context-specific gene expression responses to the signals cells receive. GEM (Gene Expression Modulation) is a probabilistic framework that predicts modulators, their affected targets and mode of action by combining gene expression profiles, protein–protein interactions and transcription factor–target relationships. Using GEM, we correctly predicted a significant number of androgen receptor modulators and observed that most modulators can both act as co-activators and co-repressors for different target genes. PMID:20466809

  6. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  7. The same Arabidopsis gene encodes both cytosolic and mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetases.

    PubMed Central

    Mireau, H; Lancelin, D; Small, I D

    1996-01-01

    In plants, all aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are nuclearly encoded, despite the fact that their activities are required in the three protein-synthesizing cell compartments (cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplasts). To investigate targeting of these enzymes, we cloned cDNAs encoding alanyl-tRNA synthetase (AlaRS) and the corresponding nuclear gene, ALATS, from Arabidopsis by using degenerate polymerase chain reaction primers based on highly conserved regions shared between known AlaRSs from other organisms. Analysis of the transcription of the gene showed the presence of two potential translation initiation codons in some ALATS mRNAs. Translation from the upstream AUG would generate an N-terminal extension with features characteristic of mitochondrial targeting peptides. A polyclonal antibody raised against part of the Arabidopsis AlaRS revealed that the Arabidopsis cytosolic and mitochondrial AlaRSs are immunologically similar, suggesting that both isoforms are encoded by the ALATS gene. In vitro experiments confirmed that two polypeptides can be translated from AlATS transcripts, with most ribosomes initiating on the downstream AUG to give the shorter polypeptide corresponding in size to the cytosolic enzyme. The ability of the presequence encoded between the two initiation codons to direct polypeptides to mitochondria was demonstrated by expression of fusion proteins in tobacco protoplasts and in yeast. We conclude that the ALATS gene encodes both the cytosolic and the mitochondrial forms of AlaRS, depending on which of the two AUG codons is used to initiate translation. PMID:8672889

  8. The 18-kDa Translocator Protein Inhibits Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression via Inhibition of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Kang, Gun; Choi, Sunga; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Translocator protein 18 kDa (TSPO) is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein and is abundantly expressed in a variety of organ and tissues. To date, the functional role of TSPO on vascular endothelial cell activation has yet to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 250 nM), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC), was used to induce vascular endothelial activation. Adenoviral TSPO overexpression (10–100 MOI) inhibited PMA-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression in a dose dependent manner. PMA-induced VCAM-1 expressions were inhibited by Mito-TEMPO (0.1–0.5 μM), a specific mitochondrial antioxidants, and cyclosporin A (1–5 μM), a mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor, implying on an important role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the endothelial activation. Moreover, adenoviral TSPO overexpression inhibited mitochondrial ROS production and manganese superoxide dismutase expression. On contrasts, gene silencing of TSPO with siRNA increased PMA-induced VCAM-1 expression and mitochondrial ROS production. Midazolam (1–50 μM), TSPO ligands, inhibited PMA-induced VCAM-1 and mitochondrial ROS production in endothelial cells. These results suggest that mitochondrial TSPO can inhibit PMA-induced endothelial inflammation via suppression of VCAM-1 and mitochondrial ROS production in endothelial cells. PMID:26608360

  9. Decrypting the Mitochondrial Gene Pool of Modern Panamanians

    PubMed Central

    Angerhofer, Norman; Ekins, Jayne E.; Olivieri, Anna; Woodward, Scott R.; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Motta, Jorge; Achilli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The Isthmus of Panama–the narrow neck of land connecting the northern and southern American landmasses–was an obligatory corridor for the Paleo-Indians as they moved into South America. Archaeological evidence suggests an unbroken link between modern natives and their Paleo-Indian ancestors in some areas of Panama, even if the surviving indigenous groups account for only 12.3% of the total population. To evaluate if modern Panamanians have retained a larger fraction of the native pre-Columbian gene pool in their maternally-inherited mitochondrial genome, DNA samples and historical records were collected from more than 1500 volunteer participants living in the nine provinces and four indigenous territories of the Republic. Due to recent gene-flow, we detected ∼14% African mitochondrial lineages, confirming the demographic impact of the Atlantic slave trade and subsequent African immigration into Panama from Caribbean islands, and a small European (∼2%) component, indicating only a minor influence of colonialism on the maternal side. The majority (∼83%) of Panamanian mtDNAs clustered into native pan-American lineages, mostly represented by haplogroup A2 (51%). These findings reveal an overwhelming native maternal legacy in today's Panama, which is in contrast with the overall concept of personal identity shared by many Panamanians. Moreover, the A2 sub-clades A2ad and A2af (with the previously named 6 bp Huetar deletion), when analyzed at the maximum level of resolution (26 entire mitochondrial genomes), confirm the major role of the Pacific coastal path in the peopling of North, Central and South America, and testify to the antiquity of native mitochondrial genomes in Panama. PMID:22675545

  10. Decrypting the mitochondrial gene pool of modern Panamanians.

    PubMed

    Perego, Ugo A; Lancioni, Hovirag; Tribaldos, Maribel; Angerhofer, Norman; Ekins, Jayne E; Olivieri, Anna; Woodward, Scott R; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Motta, Jorge; Achilli, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The Isthmus of Panama--the narrow neck of land connecting the northern and southern American landmasses--was an obligatory corridor for the Paleo-Indians as they moved into South America. Archaeological evidence suggests an unbroken link between modern natives and their Paleo-Indian ancestors in some areas of Panama, even if the surviving indigenous groups account for only 12.3% of the total population. To evaluate if modern Panamanians have retained a larger fraction of the native pre-Columbian gene pool in their maternally-inherited mitochondrial genome, DNA samples and historical records were collected from more than 1500 volunteer participants living in the nine provinces and four indigenous territories of the Republic. Due to recent gene-flow, we detected ~14% African mitochondrial lineages, confirming the demographic impact of the Atlantic slave trade and subsequent African immigration into Panama from Caribbean islands, and a small European (~2%) component, indicating only a minor influence of colonialism on the maternal side. The majority (~83%) of Panamanian mtDNAs clustered into native pan-American lineages, mostly represented by haplogroup A2 (51%). These findings reveal an overwhelming native maternal legacy in today's Panama, which is in contrast with the overall concept of personal identity shared by many Panamanians. Moreover, the A2 sub-clades A2ad and A2af (with the previously named 6 bp Huetar deletion), when analyzed at the maximum level of resolution (26 entire mitochondrial genomes), confirm the major role of the Pacific coastal path in the peopling of North, Central and South America, and testify to the antiquity of native mitochondrial genomes in Panama.

  11. Mitochondrial gene polymorphisms alter hepatic cellular energy metabolism and aggravate diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Torsten; Kucharczyk, David; Bär, Florian; Pagel, René; Derer, Stefanie; Jendrek, Sebastian Torben; Sünderhauf, Annika; Brethack, Ann-Kathrin; Hirose, Misa; Möller, Steffen; Künstner, Axel; Bischof, Julia; Weyers, Imke; Heeren, Jörg; Koczan, Dirk; Schmid, Sebastian Michael; Divanovic, Senad; Giles, Daniel Aaron; Adamski, Jerzy; Fellermann, Klaus; Lehnert, Hendrik; Köhl, Jörg; Ibrahim, Saleh; Sina, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease and is associated with an enhanced risk for liver and cardiovascular diseases and mortality. NAFLD can progress from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). However, the mechanisms predisposing to this progression remain undefined. Notably, hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is a common finding in patients with NASH. Due to a lack of appropriate experimental animal models, it has not been evaluated whether this mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causative role for the development of NASH. To determine the effect of a well-defined mitochondrial dysfunction on liver physiology at baseline and during dietary challenge, C57BL/6J-mt(FVB/N) mice were employed. This conplastic inbred strain has been previously reported to exhibit decreased mitochondrial respiration likely linked to a non-synonymous gene variation (nt7778 G/T) of the mitochondrial ATP synthase protein 8 (mt-ATP8). At baseline conditions, C57BL/6J-mt(FVB/N) mice displayed hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by decreased ATP production and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, genes affecting lipid metabolism were differentially expressed, hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels were changed in these animals, and various acyl-carnitines were altered, pointing towards an impaired mitochondrial carnitine shuttle. However, over a period of twelve months, no spontaneous hepatic steatosis or inflammation was observed. On the other hand, upon dietary challenge with either a methionine and choline deficient diet or a western-style diet, C57BL/6J-mt(FVB/N) mice developed aggravated steatohepatitis as characterized by lipid accumulation, ballooning of hepatocytes and infiltration of immune cells. We observed distinct metabolic alterations in mice with a mitochondrial polymorphism associated hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction. However, a second hit, such as dietary stress

  12. Multiregional gene expression profiling identifies MRPS6 as a possible candidate gene for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Papapetropoulos, Spiridon; Ffrench-Mullen, Jarlath; McCorquodale, Donald; Qin, Yujing; Pablo, John; Mash, Deborah C

    2006-01-01

    Combining large-scale gene expression approaches and bioinformatics may provide insights into the molecular variability of biological processes underlying neurodegeneration. To identify novel candidate genes and mechanisms, we conducted a multiregional gene expression analysis in postmortem brain. Gene arrays were performed utilizing Affymetrix HG U133 Plus 2.0 gene chips. Brain specimens from 21 different brain regions were taken from Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 22) and normal aged (n = 23) brain donors. The rationale for conducting a multiregional survey of gene expression changes was based on the assumption that if a gene is changed in more than one brain region, it may be a higher probability candidate gene compared to genes that are changed in a single region. Although no gene was significantly changed in all of the 21 brain regions surveyed, we identified 11 candidate genes whose pattern of expression was regulated in at least 18 out of 21 regions. The expression of a gene encoding the mitochondria ribosomal protein S6 (MRPS6) had the highest combined mean fold change and topped the list of regulated genes. The analysis revealed other genes related to apoptosis, cell signaling, and cell cycle that may be of importance to disease pathophysiology. High throughput gene expression is an emerging technology for molecular target discovery in neurological and psychiatric disorders. The top gene reported here is the nuclear encoded MRPS6, a building block of the human mitoribosome of the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Impairments in mitochondrial OXPHOS have been linked to the pathogenesis of PD.

  13. Cell-specific regulation of gene expression in mitochondria during anther development in sunflower.

    PubMed Central

    Smart, C J; Monéger, F; Leaver, C J

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial gene expression was characterized during meiosis in sunflower anthers. In situ hybridization experiments showed that there was a marked accumulation of four mitochondrial gene transcripts (atpA, atp9, cob, and rrn26) in young meiotic cells. This pattern of transcript accumulation was only detected for mitochondrial genes and not for transcripts of two nuclear genes (atpB and ANT) encoding mitochondrial proteins or another nuclear gene transcript (25S rRNA). Immunolocalization studies showed that the pattern of accumulation of the protein product of the atpA gene, the F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, reflects that of the transcript. The expression of the novel mitochondrial orf522, which is associated with the cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) phenotype, was also studied by in situ hybridization. The orf522 transcripts were reduced in abundance in meiotic cells in the presence of fertility restorer genes. These results suggest that mitochondrial gene expression is regulated in a cell-specific fashion in developing anthers and that the restorer gene(s) may act cell specifically. PMID:8061519

  14. Probable presence of an ubiquitous cryptic mitochondrial gene on the antisense strand of the cytochrome oxidase I gene

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondria mediate most of the energy production that occurs in the majority of eukaryotic organisms. These subcellular organelles contain a genome that differs from the nuclear genome and is referred to as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Despite a disparity in gene content, all mtDNAs encode at least two components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, including cytochrome c oxidase I (Cox1). Presentation of the hypothesis A positionally conserved ORF has been found on the complementary strand of the cox1 genes of both eukaryotic mitochondria (protist, plant, fungal and animal) and alpha-proteobacteria. This putative gene has been named gau for gene antisense ubiquitous in mtDNAs. The length of the deduced protein is approximately 100 amino acids. In vertebrates, several stop codons have been found in the mt gau region, and potentially functional gau regions have been found in nuclear genomes. However, a recent bioinformatics study showed that several hypothetical overlapping mt genes could be predicted, including gau; this involves the possible import of the cytosolic AGR tRNA into the mitochondria and/or the expression of mt antisense tRNAs with anticodons recognizing AGR codons according to an alternative genetic code that is induced by the presence of suppressor tRNAs. Despite an evolutionary distance of at least 1.5 to 2.0 billion years, the deduced Gau proteins share some conserved amino acid signatures and structure, which suggests a possible conserved function. Moreover, BLAST analysis identified rare, sense-oriented ESTs with poly(A) tails that include the entire gau region. Immunohistochemical analyses using an anti-Gau monoclonal antibody revealed strict co-localization of Gau proteins and a mitochondrial marker. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis could be tested by purifying the gau gene product and determining its sequence. Cell biological experiments are needed to determine the physiological role of this protein. Implications of

  15. EFFECT OF UNCOUPLING PROTEIN–1 EXPRESSION ON 3T3-L1 ADIPOCYTE GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Senocak, Fatih S.; Si, Yaguang; Moya, Colby; Russell, William K.; Russell, David H.; Lee, Kyongbum; Jayaraman, Arul

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) partially uncouples substrate oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation to promote the dissipation of cellular biochemical energy as heat in brown adipose tissue. We have recently shown that expression of UCP1 in 3T3-L1 white adipocytes reduces the accumulation of triglycerides. Here, we investigated the molecular basis underlying UCP1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Gene expression data show that forced UCP1 expression down-regulated several energy metabolism pathways; but ATP levels were constant. A metabolic flux analysis model was used to reflect the gene expression changes onto metabolic processes and concordance was observed in the down-regulation of energy consuming pathways. Our data suggest that adipocytes respond to long-term mitochondrial uncoupling by minimizing ATP utilization. PMID:18061577

  16. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  17. Syllidae mitochondrial gene order is unusually variable for Annelida.

    PubMed

    Aguado, M Teresa; Richter, Sandy; Sontowski, Rebekka; Golombek, Anja; Struck, Torsten H; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2016-12-05

    Complete mitochondrial genomes of five syllids (Streptosyllis sp., Eusyllis blomstrandi, Myrianida brachycephala, Typosyllis antoni and Typosyllis sp.) have been obtained using Illumina sequencing. Together with two previous studied taxa (Ramisyllis multicaudata and Trypanobia cryptica), the analysed sequences represent most of the main lineages within the family Syllidae (Anoplosyllinae, Eusyllinae, Autolytinae and Syllinae). The genomic features, gene order and phylogenetic relationships are examined. Unusual for annelids, syllid mitochondrial genomes are highly variable in their gene order. Considering genomic features, such as length, skewness, gene content, and codon bias, most similar to the rest of annelids are the genomes of E. blomstrandi and M. brachycephala, while Streptosyllis sp. and the analysed sylline taxa (R. multicaudata, T. cryptica, T. antoni and Typosyllis sp.) are the most dissimilar. Two methionine tRNA's (trnM) have been found in T. antoni and Typosyllis sp. The mt genomes of these latter taxa are the longest with numerous non-coding regions. The 13 protein coding genes, as well as the rRNA's are used to perform phylogenetic analyses that recovered the relationships within the family explored before by previous authors. The gene order in Syllidae shows very different patterns. E. blomstrandi and M. prolifera show a similar pattern to the one found in Pleistoannelida; however this might have changed at least twice within Syllidae: in Streptosyllis sp. and within Syllinae. All analysed Syllinae show different gene orders, thereby illustrating more variability as all other pleistoannelids analysed so far. The information provided herein allows a more accurate reconstruction of the possible evolutionary scenarios in Syllidae.

  18. Inhibition of mitochondrial function in HL60 cells is associated with an increased apoptosis and expression of CD14.

    PubMed

    Mills, K I; Woodgate, L J; Gilkes, A F; Walsh, V; Sweeney, M C; Brown, G; Burnett, A K

    1999-09-24

    The myelomonocytic cell line HL60 can be induced by a variety of chemical agents to differentiation to either neutrophils or monocytes. Examination of gene expression, by differential display, in cells induced to monocytes with 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) or neutrophils with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) identified a number of clones with altered patterns of expression over the period of differentiation. One of these clones was the mitochondrial gene NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) which showed a differential pattern of expression between the neutrophil and monocyte lineages. The potential of mitochondrial inhibitors to induce differentiation was investigated by treating the HL60 cells with either the NADH dehydrogenase inhibitor, Rotenone, the complex III inhibitor, Antimycin A, or the highly specific mitochondrial ATP-synthase inhibitor, Oligomycin. Although functional assays of differentiation did not produce any positive results, all the inhibitors resulted in a dramatic increase in CD14 expression at day 1, with CD38 markers not observed until day 3. The increased expression of CD14 was accompanied by a decrease in viability and all CD14 positive cells were also positive for Annexin V, a marker of apoptosis. These results suggest that inhibition of the components of the mitochondrial pathways may lead to the marking of some cells, via CD14, for cell death, whilst allowing commitment to differentiation to occur in the surviving population. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Massively convergent evolution for ribosomal protein gene content in plastid and mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force.

  20. Massively Convergent Evolution for Ribosomal Protein Gene Content in Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F.; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  1. Increased expression of humanin peptide in diffuse-type pigmented villonodular synovitis: implication of its mitochondrial abnormality.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, K; Tsuruga, H; Sakakima, H; Tomita, K; Taniguchi, N; Shimoonoda, K; Komiya, S; Goldring, M B; Majima, H J; Matsuyama, T

    2005-06-01

    To define the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), by searching for highly expressed genes in primary synovial cells from patients with PVNS. A combination of subtraction cloning and Southern colony hybridisation was used to detect highly expressed genes in PVNS in comparison with rheumatoid synovial cells. Northern hybridisation was performed to confirm the differential expression of the humanin gene in PVNS. Expression of the humanin peptide was analysed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopic immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate the distribution of this peptide within the cell. 68 highly expressed genes were identified in PVNS. Humanin genes were strongly expressed in diffuse-type PVNS, but were barely detected in nodular-type PVNS, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. Humanin peptide was identified in synovium from diffuse-type PVNS, and most of the positive cells were distributed in the deep layer of the synovial tissue. Double staining with anti-humanin and anti-heat shock protein 60 showed that humanin was expressed mainly in mitochondria. Electron microscopy disclosed immunolocalisation of this peptide, predominantly around dense iron deposits within the siderosome. Increased expression of the humanin peptide in mitochondria and siderosomes is characteristic of synovial cells from diffuse-type PVNS. Humanin is an anti-apoptotic peptide which is encoded in the mitochondrial genome. Present findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may be the principal factor in pathogenesis of diffuse-type PVNS and that humanin peptide may play a part in the neoplastic process in this form of PVNS.

  2. The role of SIGMAR1 gene mutation and mitochondrial dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kohji; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Tagashira, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients exhibit diverse pathologies such as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neurons. Five to ten percent of patients have familial ALS, a form of the disease caused by mutations in ALS-related genes, while sporadic forms of the disease occur in 90-95% of patients. Recently, it was reported that familial ALS patients exhibit a missense mutation in SIGMAR1 (c.304G > C), which encodes sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), substituting glutamine for glutamic acid at amino acid residue 102 (p.E102Q). Expression of that mutant Sig-1R(E102Q) protein reduces mitochondrial ATP production, inhibits proteasome activity and causes mitochondrial injury, aggravating ER stress-induced neuronal death in neuro2A cells. In this issue, we discuss mechanisms underlying mitochondrial impairment seen in ALS motor neurons and propose that therapies that protect mitochondria might improve the quality of life (QOL) of ALS patients and should be considered for clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interactions between nuclear genes and a foreign mitochondrial genome in the redbelly dace Chrosomus eos.

    PubMed

    Deremiens, Léo; Schwartz, Logan; Angers, Annie; Glémet, Hélène; Angers, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Given the coevolution process occurring between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, the effects of introgressive hybridization remain puzzling. In this study, we take advantage of the natural co-occurrence of two biotypes bearing a similar nuclear genome (Chrosomus eos) but harbouring mitochondria from different species (wild type: C. eos; cybrids: Chrosomus neogaeus) to determine the extent of phenotype changes linked to divergence in the mitochondrial genome. Changes were assessed through differences in gene expression, enzymatic activity, proteomic and swimming activity. Our data demonstrate that complex IV activity was significantly higher in cybrids compared to wild type. This difference could result from one variable amino acid on the COX3 mitochondrial subunit and/or from a tremendous change in the proteome. We also show that cybrids present a higher swimming performance than wild type. Ultimately, our results demonstrate that the absence of coevolution for a period of almost ten million years between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes does not appear to be necessarily deleterious but could even have beneficial effects. Indeed, the capture of foreign mitochondria could be an efficient way to circumvent the selection process of genomic coevolution, allowing the rapid accumulation of new mutations in C. eos cybrids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Iashikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-05-22

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes. PMID:26000717

  6. Mitochondrial-Targeted Nitroxides Disrupt Mitochondrial Architecture and Inhibit Expression of Peroxiredoxin 3 and FOXM1 in Malignant Mesothelioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Brian; Benson, Kira; Stumpff, Jason; Newick, Kheng; Held, Paul; Taatjes, Douglas; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Heintz, Nicholas H.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an intractable tumor of the peritoneal and pleural cavities primarily linked to exposure to asbestos. Recently, we described an interplay between mitochondrial-derived oxidants and expression of FOXM1, a redox-responsive transcription factor that has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in solid malignancies. Here we have investigated the effects of nitroxides targeted to mitochondria via triphenylphosphonium (TPP) moieties on mitochondrial oxidant production, expression of FOXM1 and peroxiredoxin 3 (PRX3), and cell viability in MM cells in culture. Both Mito-carboxy-proxyl (MCP) and Mito-TEMPOL (MT) caused dose-dependent increases in mitochondrial oxidant production that was accompanied by inhibition of expression of FOXM1 and PRX3 and loss of cell viability. At equivalent concentrations TPP, CP, and TEMPOL had no effect on these endpoints. Live cell ratiometric imaging with a redox-responsive green fluorescent protein targeted to mitochondria (mito-roGFP) showed that MCP and MT, but not CP, TEMPOL, or TPP, rapidly induced mitochondrial fragmentation and swelling, morphological transitions that were associated with diminished ATP levels and increased production of mitochondrial oxidants. Mdivi-1, an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission, did not rescue mitochondria from fragmentation by MCP. Immunofluorescence microscopy experiments indicate a fraction of FOXM1 coexists in the cytoplasm with mitochondrial PRX3. Our results indicate that MCP and MT inhibit FOXM1 expression and MM tumor cell viability via perturbations in redox homeostasis caused by marked disruption of mitochondrial architecture, and suggest that both compounds, either alone or in combination with thiostrepton or other agents, may provide credible therapeutic options for the management of MM. PMID:23018647

  7. Apolipoprotein O expression in mouse liver enhances hepatic lipid accumulation by impairing mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Wu, Chen-Lu; Yu, Bi-Lian; Liu, Ling; Hu, Jia-Rui

    2017-09-09

    Apolipoprotein O (ApoO) was recently observed in the cellular mitochondrial inner membrane, which plays a role in mitochondrial function and is associated with myocardiopathy. Empirical information on the physiological functions of apoO is therefore limited. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of apoO on hepatic fatty acid metabolism. An adenoviral vector expressing hApoO was constructed and introduced into chow diet and high-fat diet induced mice and the L02 human hepatoma cell line. High levels of hApoO mRNA and protein were detected in the liver, and the expression of lipid metabolism genes was significantly altered compared with negative controls. The liver function indices (serum ALT and AST) were clearly elevated, and the ultrastructure of cellular mitochondria was distinctly altered in the liver after apoO overexpression. Further, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased with hApoO treatment in L02 cells. These results establish a link between apoO and lipid accumulation and could suggest a new pathway for regulating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cholesterol can modulate mitochondrial aquaporin-8 expression in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Mauro; Capiglioni, Alejo M; Marrone, Julieta; Calamita, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2017-05-01

    Hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 (mtAQP8) works as a multifunctional membrane channel protein that facilitates the uptake of ammonia for its detoxification to urea as well as the mitochondrial release of hydrogen peroxide. Since early oligonucleotide microarray studies in liver of cholesterol-fed mice showed an AQP8 downregulation, we tested whether alterations of cholesterol content per se modulate mtAQP8 expression in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. Cholesterol loading with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD):cholesterol complexes downregulated the proteolytic activation of cholesterol-responsive sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptions factors 1 and 2, and the expression of the target gene 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR). Under such conditions, mtAQP8 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly reduced. In contrast, cholesterol depletion using mβCD alone increased SREBP-1 and 2 activation and upregulated HMGCR and mtAQP8 mRNA and protein expressions. The results suggest that cholesterol can regulate transcriptionally human hepatocyte mtAQP8 expression likely via SREBPs. The functional implications of our findings are discussed. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(5):341-346, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Villarroya, Joan; Lara, Mari-Carmen; Dorado, Beatriz; Garrido, Marta; Garcia-Arumi, Elena; Meseguer, Anna; Hirano, Michio; Vila, Maya R.

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2{sup -}). {yields} TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. {yields} Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2{sup -} cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. {yields} Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. {yields} Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol {gamma}, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2{sup -} cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed the first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1{sup -} cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase {gamma}, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity

  10. Mutations in the maize mitochondrial T-urf13 gene eliminate sensitivity to a fungal pathotoxin.

    PubMed

    Braun, C J; Siedow, J N; Williams, M E; Levings, C S

    1989-06-01

    URF13, the product of the mitochondrial T-urf13 gene, confers on Texas cytoplasmic male-steril maize (Zea mays L.) a unique susceptibility to a fungal pathogen (Bipolaris maydis race T) and sensitivity to its pathotoxin. Expression of URF13 in Escherichia coli imparts pathotoxin sensitivity to the bacterium. We show by ion uptake studies in E. coli that a pathotoxin-URF13 interaction causes membrane permeability. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction caused by membrane permeabilization probably accounts for increased colonization of maize carrying the Texas cytoplasm by toxin-producing pathogens. Site-directed mutagenesis studies show that approximately one-quarter of the amino acids at the carboxyl end of URF13 can be eliminated without affecting toxin sensitivity. We have identified two dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) binding sites in the URF13 protein and show that one of the sites is involved in conferring DCCD protection against the pathotoxin. Substitutional mutations at this DCCD binding site also eliminate toxin sensitivity.

  11. Dramatic mitochondrial gene rearrangements in the hermit crab Pagurus longicarpus (Crustacea, anomura).

    PubMed

    Hickerson, M J; Cunningham, C W

    2000-04-01

    The entire mitochondrial gene order of the crustacean Pagurus longicarpus was determined by sequencing all but approximately 300 bp of the mitochondrial genome. We report the first major gene rearrangements found in the clade including Crustacea and Insecta. At least eight mitochondrial gene rearrangements have dramatically altered the gene order of the hermit crab P. longicarpus relative to the putatively ancestral crustacean gene order. These include two rearrangements of protein-coding genes, the first reported for any nonchelicerate arthropod. Codon usage and amino acid sequences do not deviate substantially from those reported for other crustaceans. Investigating the phylogenetic distribution of these eight rearrangements will add additional characters to help resolve decapod phylogeny.

  12. Tuning noise in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Sanjay

    2015-05-05

    The relative contribution of promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment in regulating gene expression noise has remained elusive. In their recent work, Arkin, Schaffer and colleagues (Dey et al, 2015) show that mean expression and noise for a given promoter at different genomic loci are uncorrelated and influenced by the local chromatin environment.

  13. Monoallelic Gene Expression in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chess, Andrew

    2016-11-23

    Monoallelic expression not due to cis-regulatory sequence polymorphism poses an intriguing problem in epigenetics because it requires the unequal treatment of two segments of DNA that are present in the same nucleus and that can indeed have absolutely identical sequences. Here, I focus on a few recent developments in the field of monoallelic expression that are of particular interest and raise interesting questions for future work. One development is regarding analyses of imprinted genes, in which recent work suggests the possibility that intriguing networks of imprinted genes exist and are important for genetic and physiological studies. Another issue that has been raised in recent years by a number of publications is the question of how skewed allelic expression should be for it to be designated as monoallelic expression and, further, what methods are appropriate or inappropriate for analyzing genomic data to examine allele-specific expression. Perhaps the most exciting recent development in mammalian monoallelic expression is a clever and carefully executed analysis of genetic diversity of autosomal genes subject to random monoallelic expression (RMAE), which provides compelling evidence for distinct evolutionary forces acting on random monoallelically expressed genes.

  14. Interaction between yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes: null alleles of RTG genes affect resistance to the alkaloid lycorine in rho0 petites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Wolf, Klaus

    2005-07-18

    Some nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) respond to signals from the mitochondria in a process called by Butow (Cell Death Differ. 9 (2002) 1043-1045) retrograde regulation. Expression of these genes is activated in cells lacking mitochondrial function by involvement of RTG1, RTG2 and RTG3 genes whose protein products bind to "R-boxes" in the promoter region; RTG2p is a cytoplasmic protein. Since S. cerevisiae rho0 strains, lacking the entire mitochondrial genome, are resistant to lycorine, an alkaloid extracted from Amaryllis plants, it could be hypothesized that in rho0 cells the dysfunctional mitochondrial status stimulates overexpression of nuclear genes very likely involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication. In this report we show that the resistance of rho0 cells to lycorine is affected by the deletion of RTG genes.

  15. Interferon-stimulated gene ISG12b1 inhibits adipogenic differentiation and mitochondrial biogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Shin, Jonghyun; Lee, Kichoon

    2009-03-01

    Microarray analysis was performed to find a new group of genes or pathways that might be important in adipocyte development and metabolism. Among them, a mouse interferon-stimulated gene 12b1 (ISG12b1) is expressed at a 400-fold higher level in adipocytes compared with stromal-vascular cells. It is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue among other tissues we tested. Developmentally, ISG12b1 mRNA expression was initially inhibited followed by a dramatic induction during both in vivo and in vitro adipogenic differentiation. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ISG12b1 inhibited adipogenic differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells as shown by decreased lipid staining with Oil-Red-O and reduction in adipogenic marker proteins including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha (C/EBPalpha). Our bioinformatics analysis for the predicted localization of ISG12b1 protein suggested the mitochondrial localization, which was confirmed by the colocalization of hemagglutinin-tagged ISG12b1 protein with mitochondrial marker MitoTracker. In addition, ISG12b1 protein was exclusively detected in protein extract from the fractionated mitochondria by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, overexpression of ISG12b1 in adipocytes reduced mitochondrial DNA content and gene expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1), and cytochrome oxidase II, suggesting an inhibitory role of ISG12b1 in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function by treatment with PPARgamma and PPARalpha agonists in 3T3-L1 cells and cold exposure in mice induced mitochondrial transcription factors and reduced ISG12 expression. These data demonstrated that mitochondrial-localized ISG12b1 protein inhibits adipocyte differentiation and mitochondrial biogenesis and function, implying the important role of mitochondrial function in adipocyte development and associated

  16. Local similarity search to find gene indicators in mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Ruby L V; Bernt, Matthias; Middendorf, Martin

    2014-03-11

    Given a set of nucleotide sequences we consider the problem of identifying conserved substrings occurring in homologous genes in a large number of sequences. The problem is solved by identifying certain nodes in a suffix tree containing all substrings occurring in the given nucleotide sequences. Due to the large size of the targeted data set, our approach employs a truncated version of suffix trees. Two methods for this task are introduced: (1) The annotation guided marker detection method uses gene annotations which might contain a moderate number of errors; (2) The probability based marker detection method determines sequences that appear significantly more often than expected. The approach is successfully applied to the mitochondrial nucleotide sequences, and the corresponding annotations that are available in RefSeq for 2989 metazoan species. We demonstrate that the approach finds appropriate substrings.

  17. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert S.; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C.; Campbell, Peter C.; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P.; Wood, Craig C.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia. PMID:28316608

  18. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert S; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C; Campbell, Peter C; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P; Wood, Craig C

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia.

  19. Mitochondrial gene order change in Schistosoma (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Schistosomatidae).

    PubMed

    Webster, Bonnie L; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    In the flatworm genus Schistosoma, species of which include parasites of biomedical and veterinary importance, mitochondrial gene order is radically different in some species. A PCR-based survey of 19 schistosomatid spp. established which of 14 Schistosoma spp. have the ancestral (plesiomorphic) or derived gene order condition. A phylogeny for Schistosoma was estimated and used to infer the origin of the gene order change which is present in all members of a clade containing Schistosoma incognitum and members of the traditionally recognised Schistosoma indicum, Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosomahaematobium spp. groups. Schistosoma turkestanicum, with the plesiomorphic gene order state, is sister to this clade. Common interval analysis suggests change in gene order, from ancestral to derived, consisted of two sequential transposition events: (a) nad1_nad3 to nad3_nad1 and (b) [atp6,nad2]_[nad3,-nad1,cox1,rrnL,rrnS,cox2,nad6] to [nad3,nad1,cox1,rrnL,rrnS,cox2,nad6]_[atp6,nad2], where gene order offragments within square brackets remain unchanged. Gene order change is rare in parasitic flatworms and is a robust synapomorphy for schistosome spp. that exhibit it. The schistosomatid phylogeny casts some doubt on the origin of Schistosoma (Asian or African), highlights the propensity for species to hosts witch amongst mammalian (definitive) hosts, and indicates the likely importance of snail (intermediate)hosts in determining and defining patterns of schistosome radiation and continental invasion. Mitogenomic sampling of Schistosoma dattai and Schistosoma harinasutai to determine gene order, and within key species, especially S. turkestanicum and S. incognitum, to determine ancestral ranges, may help discover the geographic origins of gene order change in the genus. Samples of S. incognitum from India and Thailand suggest this taxon may include cryptic species. Crown Copyright 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Allrights

  20. An atlas of gene expression and gene co-regulation in the human retina

    PubMed Central

    Pinelli, Michele; Carissimo, Annamaria; Cutillo, Luisa; Lai, Ching-Hung; Mutarelli, Margherita; Moretti, Maria Nicoletta; Singh, Marwah Veer; Karali, Marianthi; Carrella, Diego; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Russo, Francesco; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego; Angelini, Claudia; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The human retina is a specialized tissue involved in light stimulus transduction. Despite its unique biology, an accurate reference transcriptome is still missing. Here, we performed gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of 50 retinal samples from non-visually impaired post-mortem donors. We identified novel transcripts with high confidence (Observed Transcriptome (ObsT)) and quantified the expression level of known transcripts (Reference Transcriptome (RefT)). The ObsT included 77 623 transcripts (23 960 genes) covering 137 Mb (35 Mb new transcribed genome). Most of the transcripts (92%) were multi-exonic: 81% with known isoforms, 16% with new isoforms and 3% belonging to new genes. The RefT included 13 792 genes across 94 521 known transcripts. Mitochondrial genes were among the most highly expressed, accounting for about 10% of the reads. Of all the protein-coding genes in Gencode, 65% are expressed in the retina. We exploited inter-individual variability in gene expression to infer a gene co-expression network and to identify genes specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells. We experimentally validated the photoreceptors localization of three genes in human retina that had not been previously reported. RNA-seq data and the gene co-expression network are available online (http://retina.tigem.it). PMID:27235414

  1. Enlightenment of Yeast Mitochondrial Homoplasmy: Diversified Roles of Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Feng; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Shibata, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria have their own genomic DNA. Unlike the nuclear genome, each cell contains hundreds to thousands of copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The copies of mtDNA tend to have heterogeneous sequences, due to the high frequency of mutagenesis, but are quickly homogenized within a cell (“homoplasmy”) during vegetative cell growth or through a few sexual generations. Heteroplasmy is strongly associated with mitochondrial diseases, diabetes and aging. Recent studies revealed that the yeast cell has the machinery to homogenize mtDNA, using a common DNA processing pathway with gene conversion; i.e., both genetic events are initiated by a double-stranded break, which is processed into 3′ single-stranded tails. One of the tails is base-paired with the complementary sequence of the recipient double-stranded DNA to form a D-loop (homologous pairing), in which repair DNA synthesis is initiated to restore the sequence lost by the breakage. Gene conversion generates sequence diversity, depending on the divergence between the donor and recipient sequences, especially when it occurs among a number of copies of a DNA sequence family with some sequence variations, such as in immunoglobulin diversification in chicken. MtDNA can be regarded as a sequence family, in which the members tend to be diversified by a high frequency of spontaneous mutagenesis. Thus, it would be interesting to determine why and how double-stranded breakage and D-loop formation induce sequence homogenization in mitochondria and sequence diversification in nuclear DNA. We will review the mechanisms and roles of mtDNA homoplasmy, in contrast to nuclear gene conversion, which diversifies gene and genome sequences, to provide clues toward understanding how the common DNA processing pathway results in such divergent outcomes. PMID:24710143

  2. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation. PMID:26415228

  3. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ling; Chen, Wun-Ke; Liu, Szu-Ting; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-10-13

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation.

  4. Meta-analysis of differentially expressed genes in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y H; Song, G G

    2015-05-18

    The purpose of this study was to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes and biological processes associated with changes in gene expression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We performed a meta-analysis using the integrative meta-analysis of expression data program on publicly available microarray AS Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets. We performed Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses and pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Four GEO datasets, including 31 patients with AS and 39 controls, were available for the meta-analysis. We identified 65 genes across the studies that were consistently DE in patients with AS vs controls (23 upregulated and 42 downregulated). The upregulated gene with the largest effect size (ES; -1.2628, P = 0.020951) was integral membrane protein 2A (ITM2A), which is expressed by CD4+ T cells and plays a role in activation of T cells. The downregulated gene with the largest ES (1.2299, P = 0.040075) was mitochondrial ribosomal protein S11 (MRPS11). The most significant GO enrichment was in the respiratory electron transport chain category (P = 1.67 x 10-9). Therefore, our meta-analysis identified genes that were consistently DE as well as biological pathways associated with gene expression changes in AS.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase 24-kDa gene

    SciTech Connect

    Coo, J. de; Buddiger, P.; Kessel, A.G. van

    1994-09-01

    The mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) of the respiratory chain is composed of at least 41 individual proteins. Seven are encoded for by the mitochondrial genome and 34 are of nuclear origin. Mutations in the mitochondrial encoded subunits have been observed in a number of different mitochondrial encephalomyopathies. In order to investigate the contribution of mutations in the nuclearly encoded subunits, we started to characterize the human gene for the 24 kDa flavoprotein fragment, one of the three key subunits of complex I. Two gene loci were detected with a human cDNA as a probe using somatic cell hybrids, one on chromosome 18 and one on chromosome 19. Cosmid clones were isolated containing the two genes. Using FISH analysis the map position was further refined to 18p11.2-18p11.31 and 19qter, respectively. RNA studies showed that only the chromosome 18 gene was expressed. This gene spans approximately 20 kb and consists of 8 exons. Exon and flanking intron sequences were characterized. The pseudogene differs from the intact cDNA by the lack of the methionine initiator codon. Currently, we are testing patients with complex I deficiencies for mutations in their 24 kDa gene.

  6. Human biallelic MFN2 mutations induce mitochondrial dysfunction, upper body adipose hyperplasia, and suppression of leptin expression

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Nuno; Bulger, David A; Frontini, Andrea; Titheradge, Hannah; Gribsholt, Sigrid Bjerge; Knox, Rachel; Page, Matthew; Harris, Julie; Payne, Felicity; Adams, Claire; Sleigh, Alison; Crawford, John; Gjesing, Anette Prior; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Pedersen, Oluf; Barroso, Inês; Hansen, Torben; Cox, Helen; Reilly, Mary; Rossor, Alex; Brown, Rebecca J; Taylor, Simeon I; McHale, Duncan; Armstrong, Martin; Oral, Elif A; Saudek, Vladimir; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Maher, Eamonn R; Richelsen, Bjørn; Savage, David B; Semple, Robert K

    2017-01-01

    MFN2 encodes mitofusin 2, a membrane-bound mediator of mitochondrial membrane fusion and inter-organelle communication. MFN2 mutations cause axonal neuropathy, with associated lipodystrophy only occasionally noted, however homozygosity for the p.Arg707Trp mutation was recently associated with upper body adipose overgrowth. We describe similar massive adipose overgrowth with suppressed leptin expression in four further patients with biallelic MFN2 mutations and at least one p.Arg707Trp allele. Overgrown tissue was composed of normal-sized, UCP1-negative unilocular adipocytes, with mitochondrial network fragmentation, disorganised cristae, and increased autophagosomes. There was strong transcriptional evidence of mitochondrial stress signalling, increased protein synthesis, and suppression of signatures of cell death in affected tissue, whereas mitochondrial morphology and gene expression were normal in skin fibroblasts. These findings suggest that specific MFN2 mutations cause tissue-selective mitochondrial dysfunction with increased adipocyte proliferation and survival, confirm a novel form of excess adiposity with paradoxical suppression of leptin expression, and suggest potential targeted therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23813.001 PMID:28414270

  7. Overexpression of Citrus junos mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Nicotiana benthamiana confers aluminum tolerance.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Luo, Keming; Li, Zhengguo; Yang, Yingwu; Hu, Nan; Wu, Yu

    2009-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the major factors that limit plant growth in acid soils. Al-induced release of organic acids into rhizosphere from the root apex has been identified as a major Al-tolerance mechanism in many plant species. In this study, Al tolerance of Yuzu (Citrus Junos Sieb. ex Tanaka) was tested on the basis of root elongation and the results demonstrated that Yuzu was Al tolerant compared with other plant species. Exposure to Al triggered the exudation of citrate from the Yuzu root. Thus, the mechanism of Al tolerance in Yuzu involved an Al-inducible increase in citrate release. Aluminum also elicited an increase of citrate content and increased the expression level of mitochondrial citrate synthase (CjCS) gene and enzyme activity in Yuzu. The CjCS gene was cloned from Yuzu and overexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated methods. Increased expression level of the CjCS gene and enhanced enzyme activity were observed in transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants. Root growth experiments showed that transgenic plants have enhanced levels of Al tolerance. The transgenic Nicotiana plants showed increased levels of citrate in roots compared to wild-type plants. The exudation of citrate from roots of the transgenic plants significantly increased when exposed to Al. The results with transgenic plants suggest that overexpression of mitochondrial CS can be a useful tool to achieve Al tolerance.

  8. Eliminate mitochondrial diseases by gene editing in germ-line cells and embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Yi, Fei; Qu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Nuclease-based gene editing technologies have opened up opportunities for correcting human genetic diseases. For the first time, scientists achieved targeted gene editing of mitochondrial DNA in mouse oocytes fused with patient cells. This fascinating progression may encourage the development of novel therapy for human maternally inherent mitochondrial diseases.

  9. Fragmentary 5S rRNA gene in the human mitochondrial genome

    SciTech Connect

    Nierlich, D.P.

    1982-02-01

    The human mitochondrial genoma contains a 23-nucleodtide sequence that is homologous to a part of the 5S rRNA's of bacteria. This homology, the structure of the likely transcript, and the location of the sequence relative to the mitochondrial rRNA genes suggest that the sequence represents a fragmentary 5S rRNA gene.

  10. Expression and putative role of mitochondrial transport proteins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2017-03-22

    Cancer cells undergo major changes in energy and biosynthetic metabolism. One of them is the Warburg effect, in which pyruvate is used for fermentation rather for oxidative phosphorylation. Another major one is their increased reliance on glutamine, which helps to replenish the pool of Krebs cycle metabolites used for other purposes, such as amino acid or lipid biosynthesis. Mitochondria are central to these alterations, as the biochemical pathways linking these processes run through these organelles. Two membranes, an outer and inner membrane, surround mitochondria, the latter being impermeable to most organic compounds. Therefore, a large number of transport proteins are needed to link the biochemical pathways of the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix. Since the transport steps are relatively slow, it is expected that many of these transport steps are altered when cells become cancerous. In this review, changes in expression and regulation of these transport proteins are discussed as well as the role of the transported substrates.

  11. Expression of mitochondria-related genes is elevated in overfeeding-induced goose fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Osman, Rashid H; Shao, Dan; Liu, Long; Xia, Lili; Sun, Xiaoxian; Zheng, Yun; Wang, Laidi; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yihui; Zhang, Jun; Gong, Daoqing; Geng, Tuoyu

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrion, the power house of the cell, is an important organelle involving in energy homeostasis. Change in mitochondrial mass and function may lead to metabolic disorders. Previous studies indicate that mitochondrial mass loss and dysfunction are associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and mouse. However, it is unclear whether mitochondrial genes are involved in the development of goose fatty liver. To address this, we determined the response of goose mitochondrial genes to overfeeding and other fatty liver-related factors (e.g., hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia). We first employed RNA-seq technology to determine the differentially expressed genes in the livers from normally-fed vs. overfed geese, followed by bioinformatics analysis and quantitative PCR validation. Data indicated that a majority of mitochondrial genes in the liver were induced by overfeeding. To understand how these genes are regulated in the context of fatty liver, we treated goose primary hepatocytes with high levels of glucose, fatty acids and insulin. The results indicated that these factors had an influence on the expression of some mitochondria related genes. Together, these findings suggest that the induction of mitochondrial gene expression by overfeeding is required for the development of goose fatty liver, and this induction is partially attributable to hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Profiling of genes central to human mitochondrial energy metabolism following low intensity laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.; Masha, Roland; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    Background: Wound healing involves three overlapping phases: inflammation, granulation and tissue remodelling. If this process is disrupted, delayed wound healing ensues, a common complication seen in diabetic patients. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been found to promote healing in such patients. However, the exact mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Purpose: This study aimed to profile the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial respiration. Materials and Methods: Diabetic wounded fibroblast cells were exposed to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 and incubated for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis. The array contained genes important for each of the mitochondrial complexes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were also determined post-irradiation by ATP luminescence. Results: Genes involved in complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), COX6B2 and COX6C, and PPA1 which is involved in complex V (ATP synthase) were significantly up-regulated. There was a significant increase in ATP levels in diabetic wounded cells post-irradiation. Discussion and Conclusion: LILI stimulates the ETC at a transcriptional level, resulting in an increase in ATP. This study helps understand the mechanisms of LILI in diabetic wound healing, and gives information on activation of genes in response to LILI.

  13. PGC-1 alpha regulates HO-1 expression, mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis: Role of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailendra P; Schragenheim, Joseph; Cao, Jian; Falck, John R; Abraham, Nader G; Bellner, Lars

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a risk factor in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, predominantly as a result of cardiovascular complications. Increased adiposity is a systemic condition characterized by increased oxidative stress (ROS), increased inflammation, inhibition of anti-oxidant genes such as HO-1 and increased degradation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). We previously demonstrated that EETs attenuate mitochondrial ROS. We postulate that EETs increase peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), which controls mitochondrial function, oxidative metabolism and induction of HO-1. Cultured murine adipocytes and mice fed a high fat (HF) diet were used to assess functional relationship between EETs, HO-1 and (PGC-1α) using an EET analogue (EET-A) and lentivirus to knock down the PPARGC1A gene. EET-A increased PGC-1α and HO-1 in cultured adipocytes and increased the expression of genes involved in thermogenesis and adipocyte browning (UCP1 and PRDM16, respectively). PGC-1α knockdown prevented EET-A-induced HO-1expression, suggesting that PGC-1α is upstream of HO-1. MRI data obtained from fat tissues showed that EET-A administration to mice on a HF diet significantly reduced total body fat content, subcutaneous and visceral fat deposits and reduced the VAT: SAT ratio. Moreover EET-A normalized the VO2 and RQ (VCO2/VO2) in mice fed a HF diet, an effect that was completely prevented in PGC-1α deficient mice. In addition, EET-A increased mitochondrial biogenesis and function as measured by OPA1, MnSOD, Mfn1, Mfn2, and SIRT3, an effect that was inhibited by knockdown of PGC-1α. Taken together, our findings show that EET-A increased PGC-1α thereby increasing mitochondrial viability, increased fusion potential thereby providing metabolic protection and increased VO2 consumption in HF-induced obesity in mice, thus demonstrating that the EET-mediated increase in HO-1

  14. Physella acuta: atypical mitochondrial gene order among panpulmonates (Gastropoda)

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Journey R.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Adema, Coen M.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) sequences are frequently used for phylogenetic reconstruction and for identification of species of molluscs. This study expands the phylogenetic range of Hygrophila (Panpulmonata) for which such sequence data are available by characterizing the full mt genome of the invasive freshwater snail Physella acuta (Physidae). The mt genome sequences of two P. acuta isolates from Stubblefield Lake, New Mexico, USA, differed in length (14,490 vs 14,314 bp) and showed 11.49% sequence divergence, whereas ITS1 and ITS2 sequences from the nuclear genome differed by 1.75%. The mt gene order of P. acuta (cox1, P, nad6, nad5, nad1, D, F, cox2, Y, W, nad4L, C, Q, atp6, R, E, rrnS, M, T, cox3, I, nad2, K, V, rrnL, L1, A, cytb, G, H, L2, atp8, N, nad2, S1, S2, nad4) differs considerably from the relatively conserved gene order within Panpulmonata. Phylogenetic trees show that the 13 protein-encoding mt gene sequences (equivalent codons) of P. acuta group according to gastropod phylogeny, yet branch lengths and dN/dS ratios for P. acuta indicate elevated amino acid substitutions relative to other gastropods. This study indicates that mt sequences of P. acuta are phylogenetically informative despite a considerable intraspecific divergence and the atypical gene order in its mt genome. PMID:25368439

  15. Physella acuta: atypical mitochondrial gene order among panpulmonates (Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Nolan, Journey R; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Adema, Coen M

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) sequences are frequently used for phylogenetic reconstruction and for identification of species of molluscs. This study expands the phylogenetic range of Hygrophila (Panpulmonata) for which such sequence data are available by characterizing the full mt genome of the invasive freshwater snail Physella acuta (Physidae). The mt genome sequences of two P. acuta isolates from Stubblefield Lake, New Mexico, USA, differed in length (14,490 vs 14,314 bp) and showed 11.49% sequence divergence, whereas ITS1 and ITS2 sequences from the nuclear genome differed by 1.75%. The mt gene order of P. acuta (cox1, P, nad6, nad5, nad1, D, F, cox2, Y, W, nad4L, C, Q, atp6, R, E, rrnS, M, T, cox3, I, nad2, K, V, rrnL, L1, A, cytb, G, H, L2, atp8, N, nad2, S1, S2, nad4) differs considerably from the relatively conserved gene order within Panpulmonata. Phylogenetic trees show that the 13 protein-encoding mt gene sequences (equivalent codons) of P. acuta group according to gastropod phylogeny, yet branch lengths and dN/dS ratios for P. acuta indicate elevated amino acid substitutions relative to other gastropods. This study indicates that mt sequences of P. acuta are phylogenetically informative despite a considerable intraspecific divergence and the atypical gene order in its mt genome.

  16. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and redox state are unaltered in Trypanosoma cruzi isolates with compromised mitochondrial complex I subunit genes.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Julio César; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Mendonça, Marco Aurélio G; de Oliveira, Thays C; Gadelha, Fernanda R; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-06-01

    In trypanosomatids the involvement of mitochondrial complex I in NADH oxidation has long been debated. Here, we took advantage of natural Trypanosoma cruzi mutants which present conspicuous deletions in ND4, ND5 and ND7 genes coding for complex I subunits to further investigate its functionality. Mitochondrial bioenergetics of wild type and complex I mutants showed no significant differences in oxygen consumption or respiratory control ratios in the presence of NADH-linked substrates or FADH(2)-generating succinate. No correlation could be established between mitochondrial membrane potentials and ND deletions. Since release of reactive oxygen species occurs at complex I, we measured mitochondrial H(2)O(2) formation induced by different substrates. Significant differences not associated to ND deletions were observed among the parasite isolates, demonstrating that these mutations are not important for the control of oxidant production. Our data support the notion that complex I has a limited function in T. cruzi.

  17. Differential gene expression in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2014-07-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell-matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system.

  18. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  19. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  20. Stochastic Mechanisms in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Harley H.; Arkin, Adam

    1997-02-01

    In cellular regulatory networks, genetic activity is controlled by molecular signals that determine when and how often a given gene is transcribed. In genetically controlled pathways, the protein product encoded by one gene often regulates expression of other genes. The time delay, after activation of the first promoter, to reach an effective level to control the next promoter depends on the rate of protein accumulation. We have analyzed the chemical reactions controlling transcript initiation and translation termination in a single such ``genetically coupled'' link as a precursor to modeling networks constructed from many such links. Simulation of the processes of gene expression shows that proteins are produced from an activated promoter in short bursts of variable numbers of proteins that occur at random time intervals. As a result, there can be large differences in the time between successive events in regulatory cascades across a cell population. In addition, the random pattern of expression of competitive effectors can produce probabilistic outcomes in switching mechanisms that select between alternative regulatory paths. The result can be a partitioning of the cell population into different phenotypes as the cells follow different paths. There are numerous unexplained examples of phenotypic variations in isogenic populations of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells that may be the result of these stochastic gene expression mechanisms.

  1. Flower-enhanced expression of a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial respiratory protein is associated with changes in mitochondrion number.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Struck, F; Matzinger, D F; Levings, C S

    1994-01-01

    The mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein is an obligatory component of the respiratory electron transport chain that is encoded by a single-copy gene in mammals and fungi. In contrast, this protein is encoded by a small gene family in dicotyledonous tobacco and monocotyledonous maize. We cloned four cDNAs from tobacco that encode the mitochondrial Rieske iron-sulfur protein. These clones, along with a previously isolated cDNA, represent five independent members of the gene family that can be divided into three subfamilies. All of these genes were derived from the two progenitor species and were expressed in amphidiploid tobacco. The proteins encoded by these five genes are probably functional because they all contain the universally conserved hexyl peptides necessary for the 2Fe-2S cluster formation. The expression of the Rieske protein gene family is differentially regulated; a 6- to 11-fold higher level of steady state transcripts was found in flowers than in leaves, stems, and roots. Members of at least two subfamilies were preferentially expressed in flowers, indicating that they share a common cis-regulatory element(s), which can respond to a flower-specific signal(s). Although approximately 10 times more transcripts occurred in flowers than in leaves, flower and leaf mitochondria contained a similar amount of the Rieske protein. Flowers, however, contained seven times more Rieske proteins than leaves. These results indicated an increase in mitochondrion number in flowers. High-energy demands during anther development might bring about an increase in mitochondrion numbers in flowers and the flower-enhanced expression of the Rieske protein gene family. Our results suggested that nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory proteins could sense and respond to changes in energy metabolism and/or changes in mitochondrion numbers. PMID:8180500

  2. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  3. Functional characterization of an N-terminally-truncated mitochondrial porin expressed in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Shuvo, Sabbir R; Kovaltchouk, Uliana; Zubaer, Abdullah; Kumar, Ayush; Summers, William A T; Donald, Lynda J; Hausner, Georg; Court, Deborah A

    2017-08-01

    Mitochondrial porin, which forms voltage-dependent anion-selective channels (VDAC) in the outer membrane, can be folded into a 19-β-stranded barrel. The N terminus of the protein is external to the barrel and contains α-helical structure. Targeted modifications of the N-terminal region have been assessed in artificial membranes, leading to different models for gating in vitro. However, the in vivo requirements for gating and the N-terminal segment of porin are less well-understood. Using Neurospora crassa porin as a model, the effects of a partial deletion of the N-terminal segment were investigated. The protein, ΔN2-12porin, is assembled into the outer membrane, albeit at lower levels than the wild-type protein. The resulting strain displays electron transport chain deficiencies, concomitant expression of alternative oxidase, and decreased growth rates. Nonetheless, its mitochondrial genome does not contain any significant mutations. Most of the genes that are expressed in high levels in porin-less N. crassa are expressed at levels similar to that of wild type or are slightly increased in ΔN2-12porin strains. Thus, although the N-terminal segment of VDAC is required for complete function in vivo, low levels of a protein lacking part of the N terminus are able to rescue some of the defects associated with the absence of porin.

  4. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  5. Cigarette smoke decreases mitochondrial porin expression and steroidogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Mahuya; Whittal, Randy M.; Gairola, C. Gary; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2008-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) facilitates the movement of cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane for steroidogenesis. Here, we investigated the effect of cigarette smoke (CS) on steroidogenesis using adrenal mitochondria isolated from mice chronically exposed to CS. Steroidogenesis was decreased approximately 78% in CS-exposed mitochondria, as measured by synthesis of the steroid hormone precursor pregnenolone. This effect was accompanied by decreased mitochondrial import of {sup 35}S-StAR. Further characterization of the imported {sup 35}S-StAR by native gradient PAGE revealed the presence of a high molecular weight complex in both control and CS-exposed groups. Following density gradient fractionation of {sup 35}S-StAR that had been extracted from control mitochondria, precursor StAR could be found in fractions 2-6 and smaller-sized StAR complexes in fractions 6-13. In the CS-exposed group, the appearance of precursor shifted from fraction 1-6 and the smaller complexes in fractions 6-9 disappeared. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the {sup 35}S-StAR-associated protein complex was composed of several resident matrix proteins as well as the OMM resident, VDAC. VDAC expression was greatly reduced by CS, and blockage of VDAC with Koenig's polyanion decreased pregnenolone synthesis in isolated mitochondria. Taken together, these results suggest that VDAC may participate in steroidogenesis by promoting StAR interaction with the OMM and that CS may inhibit steroidogenesis by reducing VDAC-StAR interactions.

  6. Gene trees reveal repeated instances of mitochondrial DNA introgression in orangethroat darters (percidae: etheostoma).

    PubMed

    Bossu, Christen M; Near, Thomas J

    2009-02-01

    Phylogenies of closely related animal species are often inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene sequences. The accuracy of mtDNA gene trees is compromised through hybridization that leads to introgression of mitochondrial genomes. Using DNA sequences from 6 single-copy nuclear genes and 2 regions of the mitochondrial genome, we investigated the temporal and geographic signature of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression in the Etheostoma spectabile darter clade. Phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear genes result in the monophyly of the E. spectabile clade; however, with respect to sampled specimens of 5 species (Etheostoma fragi, Etheostoma uniporum, Etheostoma pulchellum, Etheostoma burri, and E. spectabile), the mitochondrial phylogeny is inconsistent with E. spectabile clade monophyly. Etheostoma uniporum and E. fragi are both fixed for heterospecific mitochondrial genomes. Limited nuclear introgression is restricted to E. uniporum. Our analyses show that the pattern of introgression is consistently asymmetric, with movement of heterospecific mitochondrial haplotypes and nuclear alleles into E. spectabile clade species; introgressive hybridization spans broad temporal scales; and introgression is restricted to species and populations in the Ozarks. The introgressed mitochondrial genome observed in E. fragi has an obscure phylogenetic placement among darters, an ancient age, and is possibly a mitochondrial fossil from an Etheostoma species that has subsequently gone extinct. These results indicate that introgression, both ancient and more contemporaneous, characterizes the history of diversification in the E. spectabile species clade and may be relatively common among clades comprising the species-rich North American freshwater fauna.

  7. Clock genes-dependent acetylation of complex I sets rhythmic activity of mitochondrial OxPhos.

    PubMed

    Cela, Olga; Scrima, Rosella; Pazienza, Valerio; Merla, Giuseppe; Benegiamo, Giorgia; Augello, Bartolomeo; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Rubino, Rosa; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-04-01

    Physiology of living beings show circadian rhythms entrained by a central timekeeper present in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei. Nevertheless, virtually all peripheral tissues hold autonomous molecular oscillators constituted essentially by circuits of gene expression that are organized in negative and positive feed-back loops. Accumulating evidence reveals that cell metabolism is rhythmically controlled by cell-intrinsic molecular clocks and the specific pathways involved are being elucidated. Here, we show that in vitro-synchronized cultured cells exhibit BMAL1-dependent oscillation in mitochondrial respiratory activity, which occurs irrespective of the cell type tested, the protocol of synchronization used and the carbon source in the medium. We demonstrate that the rhythmic respiratory activity is associated to oscillation in cellular NAD content and clock-genes-dependent expression of NAMPT and Sirtuins 1/3 and is traceable back to the reversible acetylation of a single subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I. Our findings provide evidence for a new interlocked transcriptional-enzymatic feedback loop controlling the molecular interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  9. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder. Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing. A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient’s fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient’s fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNA We describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  10. Chloroplast localization of methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway enzymes and regulation of mitochondrial genes in ispD and ispE albino mutants in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Chang, Chiung-Yun; Hsu, Shih-Jui; Chen, Ju-Jiun

    2008-04-01

    Plant isoprenoids are derived from two independent pathways, the cytosolic mevalonate pathway and the plastid methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. We used green fluorescent fusion protein assays to demonstrate that the Arabidopsis MEP pathway enzymes are localized to the chloroplast. We have also characterized three Arabidopsis albino mutants, ispD-1, ispD-2 and ispE-1, which have T-DNA insertions in the IspD and IspE genes of the MEP pathway. Levels of photosynthetic pigments are almost undetectable in these albino mutants. Instead of thylakoids, the ispD and ispE mutant chloroplasts are filled with large vesicles. Impairments in chloroplast development and functions may signal changes in the expression of nuclear, chloroplast and mitochondrial genes. We used northern blot analysis to examine the expression of photosynthetic and respiratory genes in the ispD and ispE albino mutants. Steady-state mRNA levels of nucleus- and chloroplast-encoded photosynthetic genes are significantly decreased in the albino mutants. In contrast, transcript levels of nuclear and mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain are increased or not affected in these mutants. Genomic Southern blot analysis revealed that the DNA amounts of mitochondrial genes are not enhanced in the ispD and ispE albino mutants. These results support the notion that the functional state of chloroplasts may affect the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes. The up-regulation of mitochondrial genes in the albino mutants is not caused by changes of mitochondrial DNA copy number in Arabidopsis.

  11. Gene Therapy Corrects Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells and Fibroblasts from Coq9R239X Mice

    PubMed Central

    Benabdellah, Karim; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, Alejandra; Cobo, Marién; Hidalgo-Gutiérrez, Agustín; Rodríguez-Sevilla, Juan José; Martín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy strategies can be an option for the treatment of several neurological disorders. Both strategies require efficient and safe vectors to 1) deliver the therapeutic gene directly into the CNS or 2) to genetically modify stem cells that will be used as Trojan horses for the systemic delivery of the therapeutic protein. A group of target diseases for these therapeutic strategies are mitochondrial encephalopathies due to mutations in nuclear DNA genes. In this study, we have developed a lentiviral vector (CCoq9WP) able to overexpress Coq9 mRNA and COQ9 protein in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from Coq9R239X mice, an animal model of mitochondrial encephalopathy due to primary Coenzyme Q (CoQ) deficiency. Ectopic over-expression of Coq9 in both cell types restored the CoQ biosynthetic pathway and mitochondrial function, improving the fitness of the transduced cells. These results show the potential of the CCoq9WP lentiviral vector as a tool for gene therapy to treat mitochondrial encephalopathies. PMID:27341668

  12. Gene Therapy Corrects Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells and Fibroblasts from Coq9R239X Mice.

    PubMed

    Barriocanal-Casado, Eliana; Cueto-Ureña, Cristina; Benabdellah, Karim; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, Alejandra; Cobo, Marién; Hidalgo-Gutiérrez, Agustín; Rodríguez-Sevilla, Juan José; Martín, Francisco; López, Luis C

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown that in vivo and ex vivo gene therapy strategies can be an option for the treatment of several neurological disorders. Both strategies require efficient and safe vectors to 1) deliver the therapeutic gene directly into the CNS or 2) to genetically modify stem cells that will be used as Trojan horses for the systemic delivery of the therapeutic protein. A group of target diseases for these therapeutic strategies are mitochondrial encephalopathies due to mutations in nuclear DNA genes. In this study, we have developed a lentiviral vector (CCoq9WP) able to overexpress Coq9 mRNA and COQ9 protein in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) from Coq9R239X mice, an animal model of mitochondrial encephalopathy due to primary Coenzyme Q (CoQ) deficiency. Ectopic over-expression of Coq9 in both cell types restored the CoQ biosynthetic pathway and mitochondrial function, improving the fitness of the transduced cells. These results show the potential of the CCoq9WP lentiviral vector as a tool for gene therapy to treat mitochondrial encephalopathies.

  13. A complete mitochondrial genome of wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai), and fast evolving mitochondrial genes in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Liu, Huitao; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Zhuo, Guoyin; Hu, Songnian; Liu, Dongcheng; Yang, Wenlong; Zhan, Kehui; Zhang, Aimin; Yu, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Plant mitochondrial genomes, encoding necessary proteins involved in the system of energy production, play an important role in the development and reproduction of the plant. They occupy a specific evolutionary pattern relative to their nuclear counterparts. Here, we determined the winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Chinese Yumai) mitochondrial genome in a length of 452 and 526 bp by shotgun sequencing its BAC library. It contains 202 genes, including 35 known protein-coding genes, three rRNA and 17 tRNA genes, as well as 149 open reading frames (ORFs; greater than 300 bp in length). The sequence is almost identical to the previously reported sequence of the spring wheat (T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring); we only identified seven SNPs (three transitions and four transversions) and 10 indels (insertions and deletions) between the two independently acquired sequences, and all variations were found in non-coding regions. This result confirmed the accuracy of the previously reported mitochondrial sequence of the Chinese Spring wheat. The nucleotide frequency and codon usage of wheat are common among the lineage of higher plant with a high AT-content of 58%. Molecular evolutionary analysis demonstrated that plant mitochondrial genomes evolved at different rates, which may correlate with substantial variations in metabolic rate and generation time among plant lineages. In addition, through the estimation of the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates between orthologous mitochondrion-encoded genes of higher plants, we found an accelerated evolutionary rate that seems to be the result of relaxed selection.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA variants can mediate methylation status of inflammation, angiogenesis and signaling genes

    PubMed Central

    Atilano, Shari R.; Malik, Deepika; Chwa, Marilyn; Cáceres-Del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Miceli, Michael V.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin; Kenney, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA can be classified into haplogroups representing different geographic and/or racial origins of populations. The H haplogroup is protective against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), while the J haplogroup is high risk for AMD. In the present study, we performed comparison analyses of human retinal cell cybrids, which possess identical nuclei, but mtDNA from subjects with either the H or J haplogroups, and demonstrate differences in total global methylation, and expression patterns for two genes related to acetylation and five genes related to methylation. Analyses revealed that untreated-H and -J cybrids have different expression levels for nuclear genes (CFH, EFEMP1, VEGFA and NFkB2). However, expression levels for these genes become equivalent after treatment with a methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Moreover, sequencing of the entire mtDNA suggests that differences in epigenetic status found in cybrids are likely due to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the haplogroup profiles rather than rare variants or private SNPs. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mtDNA variants can mediate methylation profiles and transcription for inflammation, angiogenesis and various signaling pathways, which are important in several common diseases. PMID:25964427

  15. Regulation of ABO gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Hata, Yukiko; Matsui, Kazuhiro; Takizawa, Hisao

    2005-07-01

    The ABO blood group system is important in blood transfusions and in identifying individuals during criminal investigations. Two carbohydrate antigens, the A and B antigens, and their antibodies constitute this system. Although biochemical and molecular genetic studies have demonstrated the molecular basis of the histo-blood group ABO system, some aspects remain to be elucidated. To explain the molecular basis of how the ABO genes are controlled in cell type-specific expression, during normal cell differentiation, and in cancer cells with invasive and metastatic potential that lack A/B antigens, it is essential to understand the regulatory mechanism of ABO gene transcription. We review the transcriptional regulation of the ABO gene, including positive and negative elements in the upstream region of the gene, and draw some inferences that help to explain the phenomena described above.

  16. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial matrix proteases Lon and ClpP in cells from a patient with hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG13).

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Corydon, T J; Palmfeldt, J; Dürr, A; Fontaine, B; Nielsen, M N; Christensen, J H; Gregersen, N; Bross, P

    2008-05-02

    The mitochondrial chaperonin heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) assists the folding of a subset of proteins localized in mitochondria and is an essential component of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. Mutations in the HSPD1 gene that encodes Hsp60 have been identified in patients with an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG13), a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive paraparesis of the lower limbs. The disease-associated Hsp60-(p.Val98Ile) protein, encoded by the c.292G>A HSPD1 allele, has reduced chaperonin activity, but how its expression affects mitochondrial functions has not been investigated. We have studied mitochondrial function and expression of genes encoding mitochondrial chaperones and proteases in a human lymphoblastoid cell line and fibroblast cells from a patient who is heterozygous for the c.292G>A HSPD1 allele. We found that both the c.292G>A RNA transcript and the corresponding Hsp60-(p.Val98Ile) protein were present at comparable levels to their wild-type counterparts in SPG13 patient cells. Compared with control cells, we found no significant cellular or mitochondrial dysfunctions in SPG13 patient cells by assessing the mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, and sensitivity toward oxidative stress. However, a decreased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control proteases Lon and ClpP, both at the RNA and protein level, was demonstrated in SPG13 patient cells. We propose that decreased levels of mitochondrial proteases Lon and ClpP may allow Hsp60 substrate proteins to go through more folding attempts instead of being prematurely degraded, thereby supporting productive folding in cells with reduced Hsp60 chaperonin activity. In conclusion, our studies with SPG13 patient cells expressing the functionally impaired mutant Hsp60 chaperonin suggest that reduction of the degradative activity of the protein quality control system may represent a previously

  17. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  18. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  19. Rapidly Evolving Mitochondrial Genome and Directional Selection in Mitochondrial Genes in the Parasitic Wasp Nasonia (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Lavrov, Dennis V.; Werren, John H.

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mtDNA of 3 species of parasitic wasps, Nasonia vitripennis (2 strains), Nasonia giraulti, and Nasonia longicornis, including all 13 protein-coding genes and the 2 rRNAs, and found unusual patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The Nasonia mtDNA has a unique gene order compared with other insect mtDNAs due to multiple rearrangements. The mtDNAs of these wasps also show nucleotide substitution rates over 30 times faster than nuclear protein-coding genes, indicating among the highest substitution rates found in animal mitochondria (normally <10 times faster). A McDonald and Kreitman test shows that the between-species frequency of fixed replacement sites relative to silent sites is significantly higher compared with within-species polymorphisms in 2 mitochondrial genes of Nasonia, atp6 and atp8, indicating directional selection. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ka/Ks (nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates) ratios are higher between species than within species. In contrast, cox1 shows a signature of purifying selection for amino acid sequence conservation, although rates of amino acid substitutions are still higher than for comparable insects. The mitochondrial-encoded polypeptides atp6 and atp8 both occur in F0F1ATP synthase of the electron transport chain. Because malfunction in this fundamental protein severely affects fitness, we suggest that the accelerated accumulation of replacements is due to beneficial mutations necessary to compensate mild-deleterious mutations fixed by random genetic drift or Wolbachia sweeps in the fast evolving mitochondria of Nasonia. We further propose that relatively high rates of amino acid substitution in some mitochondrial genes can be driven by a “Compensation-Draft Feedback”; increased fixation of mildly deleterious mutations results in selection for compensatory mutations, which lead to fixation of additional deleterious mutations in nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, thus

  20. Rapidly evolving mitochondrial genome and directional selection in mitochondrial genes in the parasitic wasp nasonia (hymenoptera: pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Deodoro C S G; Raychoudhury, Rhitoban; Lavrov, Dennis V; Werren, John H

    2008-10-01

    We sequenced the nearly complete mtDNA of 3 species of parasitic wasps, Nasonia vitripennis (2 strains), Nasonia giraulti, and Nasonia longicornis, including all 13 protein-coding genes and the 2 rRNAs, and found unusual patterns of mitochondrial evolution. The Nasonia mtDNA has a unique gene order compared with other insect mtDNAs due to multiple rearrangements. The mtDNAs of these wasps also show nucleotide substitution rates over 30 times faster than nuclear protein-coding genes, indicating among the highest substitution rates found in animal mitochondria (normally <10 times faster). A McDonald and Kreitman test shows that the between-species frequency of fixed replacement sites relative to silent sites is significantly higher compared with within-species polymorphisms in 2 mitochondrial genes of Nasonia, atp6 and atp8, indicating directional selection. Consistent with this interpretation, the Ka/Ks (nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution rates) ratios are higher between species than within species. In contrast, cox1 shows a signature of purifying selection for amino acid sequence conservation, although rates of amino acid substitutions are still higher than for comparable insects. The mitochondrial-encoded polypeptides atp6 and atp8 both occur in F0F1ATP synthase of the electron transport chain. Because malfunction in this fundamental protein severely affects fitness, we suggest that the accelerated accumulation of replacements is due to beneficial mutations necessary to compensate mild-deleterious mutations fixed by random genetic drift or Wolbachia sweeps in the fast evolving mitochondria of Nasonia. We further propose that relatively high rates of amino acid substitution in some mitochondrial genes can be driven by a "Compensation-Draft Feedback"; increased fixation of mildly deleterious mutations results in selection for compensatory mutations, which lead to fixation of additional deleterious mutations in nonrecombining mitochondrial genomes, thus

  1. The mitochondrial genome of the onychophoran Opisthopatus cinctipes (Peripatopsidae) reflects the ancestral mitochondrial gene arrangement of Panarthropoda and Ecdysozoa.

    PubMed

    Braband, Anke; Cameron, Stephen L; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Daniels, Savel R; Mayer, Georg

    2010-10-01

    The ancestral genome composition in Onychophora (velvet worms) is unknown since only a single species of Peripatidae has been studied thus far, which shows a highly derived gene order with numerous translocated genes. Due to this lack of information from Onychophora, it is difficult to infer the ancestral mitochondrial gene arrangement patterns for Panarthropoda and Ecdysozoa. Hence, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of the onychophoran Opisthopatus cinctipes, a representative of Peripatopsidae. Our data show that O. cinctipes possesses a highly conserved gene order, similar to that found in various arthropods. By comparing our results to those from different outgroups, we reconstruct the ancestral gene arrangement in Panarthropoda and Ecdysozoa. Our phylogenetic analysis of protein-coding gene sequences from 60 protostome species (including outgroups) provides some support for the sister group relationship of Onychophora and Arthropoda, which was not recovered by using a single species of Peripatidae, Epiperipatus biolleyi, in a previous study. A comparison of the strand-specific bias between onychophorans, arthropods, and a priapulid suggests that the peripatid E. biolleyi is less suitable for phylogenetic analyses of Ecdysozoa using mitochondrial genomic data than the peripatopsid O. cinctipes.

  2. Mitochondrial Matrix Ca2+ Accumulation Regulates Cytosolic NAD+/NADH Metabolism, Protein Acetylation, and Sirtuin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Raluca; Wiczer, Brian M.; Neeley, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uptake stimulates bioenergetics and drives energy production in metabolic tissue. It is unknown how a calcium-mediated acceleration in matrix bioenergetics would influence cellular metabolism in glycolytic cells that do not require mitochondria for ATP production. Using primary human endothelial cells (ECs), we discovered that repetitive cytosolic calcium signals (oscillations) chronically loaded into the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial calcium loading in turn stimulated bioenergetics and a persistent elevation in NADH. Rather than serving as an impetus for mitochondrial ATP generation, matrix NADH rapidly transmitted to the cytosol to influence the activity and expression of cytosolic sirtuins, resulting in global changes in protein acetylation. In endothelial cells, the mitochondrion-driven reduction in both the cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD+/NADH ratio stimulated a compensatory increase in SIRT1 protein levels that had an anti-inflammatory effect. Our studies reveal the physiologic importance of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the metabolic regulation of sirtuins and cytosolic signaling cascades. PMID:24865966

  3. Widespread expression of the Supv3L1 mitochondrial RNA helicase in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Erin; Kielbasinski, Marissa; Sedivy, John M.; Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Khanna, Hemant; Klysik, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    Supv3L1 is an evolutionarily conserved helicase that plays a critical role in the mitochondrial RNA surveillance and degradation machinery. Conditional ablation of Supv3L1 in adult mice leads to premature aging phenotypes including loss of muscle mass and adipose tissue and severe skin abnormalities. To get insights into the spatial and temporal expression of Supv3L1 in the mouse, we generated knock-in and transgenic strains in which an EGFP reporter was placed under control of the Supv3L1 native promoter. During development, expression of Supv3L1 begins at the blastocyst stage, becomes widespread and strong in all fetal tissues and cell types, and continues during postnatal growth. In mature animals reporter expression is only slightly diminished in most tissues and continues to be highly expressed in the brain, peripheral sensory organs, and testis. Together, these data confirm that Supv3L1 is an important developmentally regulated gene, which continues to be expressed in all mature tissues, particularly the rapidly proliferating cells of testes, but also in the brain and sensory organs. The transgenic mice and cell lines derived from them constitute a valuable tool for the examination of the spatial and temporal aspects of Supv3L1 promoter activity, and should facilitate future screens for small molecules that regulate Supv3L1 expression. PMID:19937380

  4. Sexual dimorphism in miR-210 expression and mitochondrial dysfunction in the placenta with maternal obesity

    PubMed Central

    Muralimanoharan, S; Guo, C; Myatt, L; Maloyan, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal obesity is a major problem in obstetrics, and the placenta is involved in obesity-related complications via its roles at the maternal–fetal interface. We have recently shown a causative role for micro(mi)RNA-210, a so called ‘hypoxamir’ regulated by HIF-1α, in mitochondrial dysfunction in placentas from women with preeclampsia. We also reported mitochondrial dysfunction in placentas with maternal obesity. Here we hypothesized that expression of miR-210 is dysregulated in the placentas with obesity. METHODS Placentas from uncomplicated pregnancies were collected at term from healthy weight or control (CTRL, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI)<25), overweight (OW, BMI = 25–24.9) and obese (OB, BMI>30) women following C-section with no labor. Expression of miRNA-210 and its target genes was measured by reverse transcription–PCR and Western Blot, respectively. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by Seahorse Analyzer in syncytiotrophoblast (ST) 72 h after cytotrophoblast isolation. RESULTS Expression of miR-210 was significantly increased in placentas of OB and OW women with female but not male fetuses compared with CTRL placentas of females. However, expression of HIF-1α in these placentas remained unchanged. Levels of tumor-necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were increased in OW and OB placentas of females but not males, and in silico analysis suggested that activation of miR-210 expression in these placentas might be activated by NFκB1 (p50) signaling. Indeed, chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay showed that NFkB1 binds to placental miR-210 promoter in a fetal sex-dependent manner. Female but not male STs treated with TNFα showed overexpression of miR-210, reduction of mitochondrial target genes and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Pre-treatment of these STs with small interfering RNA to NFkB1 or antagomiR-210 prevented the TNFα-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that the inflammatory

  5. Extensive mitochondrial gene rearrangement in a genus of plant parasitic nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The nematodes Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis are two of the only animals known to have multipartite mitochondrial genomes. In such genomes, mitochondrial genes are distributed on multiple circles. The entire sequence of a nematode (Radopholus similis) that belongs to the same superfamily (...

  6. Evolution of the mitochondrial genome in snakes: Gene rearrangements and phylogenetic relationships

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jie; Li, Hongdan; Zhou, Kaiya

    2008-01-01

    Background Snakes as a major reptile group display a variety of morphological characteristics pertaining to their diverse behaviours. Despite abundant analyses of morphological characters, molecular studies using mitochondrial and nuclear genes are limited. As a result, the phylogeny of snakes remains controversial. Previous studies on mitochondrial genomes of snakes have demonstrated duplication of the control region and translocation of trnL to be two notable features of the alethinophidian (all serpents except blindsnakes and threadsnakes) mtDNAs. Our purpose is to further investigate the gene organizations, evolution of the snake mitochondrial genome, and phylogenetic relationships among several major snake families. Results The mitochondrial genomes were sequenced for four taxa representing four different families, and each had a different gene arrangement. Comparative analyses with other snake mitochondrial genomes allowed us to summarize six types of mitochondrial gene arrangement in snakes. Phylogenetic reconstruction with commonly used methods of phylogenetic inference (BI, ML, MP, NJ) arrived at a similar topology, which was used to reconstruct the evolution of mitochondrial gene arrangements in snakes. Conclusion The phylogenetic relationships among the major families of snakes are in accordance with the mitochondrial genomes in terms of gene arrangements. The gene arrangement in Ramphotyphlops braminus mtDNA is inferred to be ancestral for snakes. After the divergence of the early Ramphotyphlops lineage, three types of rearrangements occurred. These changes involve translocations within the IQM tRNA gene cluster and the duplication of the CR. All phylogenetic methods support the placement of Enhydris plumbea outside of the (Colubridae + Elapidae) cluster, providing mitochondrial genomic evidence for the familial rank of Homalopsidae. PMID:19038056

  7. Regulation of the AEFG1 gene, a mitochondrial elongation factor G from the dimorphic yeast Arxula adeninivorans LS3.

    PubMed

    Wartmann, T; Gellissen, G; Kunze, G

    2001-10-01

    Oxygen influences the synthesis of mitochondrial proteins by alteration of the expression of mitochondrial genes and several nuclear genes. One of the genes localised in the nucleus is the EFG1 gene that encodes the mitochondrial elongation factor G (MEF-G). This unique gene (AEFG1) has been isolated from the non-conventional dimorphic yeast, Arxula adeninivorans LS3. The AEFG1 gene comprises a ORF of 2,274 bp, which corresponds to 757 amino acids. In the present study, the regulation of AEFG1 has been analysed for different morphological stages of A. adeninivorans and various culture conditions. It was demonstrated that the transfer of aerobically growing cultures to anaerobic conditions resulted in an accumulation of AEFG1 transcript, correlating with an increase in AMEF-G protein concentration. Since this regulation occurred in budding-cell culture growing at 30 degrees C and in both of the mycelial cultures grown at 45 degrees C and 30 degrees C, respectively, it was the oxygen level (but not the cultivation temperature or the morphological stage) which influenced the AEFG1 regulation.

  8. Extensive mitochondrial gene arrangements in coleoid Cephalopoda and their phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Akasaki, Tetsuya; Nikaido, Masato; Tsuchiya, Kotaro; Segawa, Susumu; Hasegawa, Masami; Okada, Norihiro

    2006-03-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of five cephalopods of the Subclass Coleoidea (Suborder Oegopsida: Watasenia scintillans, Todarodes pacificus, Suborder Myopsida: Sepioteuthis lessoniana, Order Sepiida: Sepia officinalis, and Order Octopoda: Octopus ocellatus) and used them to infer phylogenetic relationships. In our Maximum Likelihood (ML) tree, sepiids (cuttlefish) are at the most basal position of all decapodiformes, and oegopsids and myopsids form a monophyletic clade, thus supporting the traditional classification of the Order Teuthida. We detected extensive gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of broad cephalopod groups. It is likely that the arrangements of mitochondrial genes in Oegopsida and Sepiida were derived from those of Octopoda, which is thought to be the ancestral order, by entire gene duplication and random gene loss. Oegopsida in particular has undergone long-range gene duplications. We also found that the mitochondrial gene arrangement of Sepioteuthis lessoniana differs from that of Loligo bleekeri, although they belong to the same family. Analysis of both the phylogenetic tree and mitochondrial gene rearrangements of coleoid Cephalopoda suggests that each mitochondrial gene arrangement was acquired after the divergence of each lineage.

  9. Afrobatrachian mitochondrial genomes: genome reorganization, gene rearrangement mechanisms, and evolutionary trends of duplicated and rearranged genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial genomic (mitogenomic) reorganizations are rarely found in closely-related animals, yet drastic reorganizations have been found in the Ranoides frogs. The phylogenetic relationships of the three major ranoid taxa (Natatanura, Microhylidae, and Afrobatrachia) have been problematic, and mitogenomic information for afrobatrachians has not been available. Several molecular models for mitochondrial (mt) gene rearrangements have been proposed, but observational evidence has been insufficient to evaluate them. Furthermore, evolutionary trends in rearranged mt genes have not been well understood. To gain molecular and phylogenetic insights into these issues, we analyzed the mt genomes of four afrobatrachian species (Breviceps adspersus, Hemisus marmoratus, Hyperolius marmoratus, and Trichobatrachus robustus) and performed molecular phylogenetic analyses. Furthermore we searched for two evolutionary patterns expected in the rearranged mt genes of ranoids. Results Extensively reorganized mt genomes having many duplicated and rearranged genes were found in three of the four afrobatrachians analyzed. In fact, Breviceps has the largest known mt genome among vertebrates. Although the kinds of duplicated and rearranged genes differed among these species, a remarkable gene rearrangement pattern of non-tandemly copied genes situated within tandemly-copied regions was commonly found. Furthermore, the existence of concerted evolution was observed between non-neighboring copies of triplicated 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA regions. Conclusions Phylogenetic analyses based on mitogenomic data support a close relationship between Afrobatrachia and Microhylidae, with their estimated divergence 100 million years ago consistent with present-day endemism of afrobatrachians on the African continent. The afrobatrachian mt data supported the first tandem and second non-tandem duplication model for mt gene rearrangements and the recombination-based model for concerted

  10. Dietary wolfberry up-regulates carotenoid metabolic genes and enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of db/db diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huifeng; Wark, Logan; Ji, Hua; Willard, Lloyd; Jaing, Yu; Han, Jing; He, Hui; Ortiz, Edlin; Zhang, Yunong; Medeiros, Denis M; Lin, Dingbo

    2013-01-01

    Scope Our aim was to investigate whether dietary wolfberry altered carotenoid metabolic gene expression and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of diabetic mice. Methods and Results Six-week-old male db/db and wild type mice were fed the control or wolfberry diets for 8 weeks. At study termination, liver and retinal tissues were collected for analysis by transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and HPLC. Wolfberry elevated zeaxanthin and lutein levels in the liver and retinal tissues and stimulated expression of retinal scavenger receptor class B type I, glutathione S-transferase Pi 1, and β,β-carotene 9’,10’-oxygenase 2, and induced activation and nuclear enrichment of retinal AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2). Furthermore, wolfberry attenuated hypoxia and mitochondrial stress as demonstrated by declined expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and heat shock protein 60. Wolfberry enhanced retinal mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetic retinas as demonstrated by reversed mitochondrial dispersion in the retinal pigment epithelium, increased mitochondrial copy number, elevated citrate synthase activity, and up-regulated expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1 α, nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Conclusion Consumption of dietary wolfberry could be beneficial to retinoprotection through reversal of mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. PMID:23505020

  11. Phylogenetics of advanced snakes (Caenophidia) based on four mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Christopher M R; Barker, Nigel P; Villet, Martin H

    2003-08-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among advanced snakes (Acrochordus + Colubroidea = Caenophidia) and the position of the genus Acrochordus relative to colubroid taxa are contentious. These concerns were investigated by phylogenetic analysis of fragments from four mitochondrial genes representing 62 caenophidian genera and 5 noncaenophidian taxa. Four methods of phylogeny reconstruction were applied: matrix representation with parsimony (MRP) supertree consensus, maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analysis. Because of incomplete sampling, extensive missing data were inherent in this study. Analyses of individual genes retrieved roughly the same clades, but branching order varied greatly between gene trees, and nodal support was poor. Trees generated from combined data sets using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analysis had medium to low nodal support but were largely congruent with each other and with MRP supertrees. Conclusions about caenophidian relationships were based on these combined analyses. The Xenoderminae, Viperidae, Pareatinae, Psammophiinae, Pseudoxyrophiinae, Homalopsinae, Natricinae, Xenodontinae, and Colubrinae (redefined) emerged as monophyletic, whereas Lamprophiinae, Atractaspididae, and Elapidae were not in one or more topologies. A clade comprising Acrochordus and Xenoderminae branched closest to the root, and when Acrochordus was assessed in relation to a colubroid subsample and all five noncaenophidians, it remained associated with the Colubroidea. Thus, Acrochordus + Xenoderminae appears to be the sister group to the Colubroidea, and Xenoderminae should be excluded from Colubroidea. Within Colubroidea, Viperidae was the most basal clade. Other relationships appearing in all final topologies were (1) a clade comprising Psammophiinae, Lamprophiinae, Atractaspididae, Pseudoxyrophiinae, and Elapidae, within which the latter four taxa formed a subclade, and (2) a clade comprising Colubrinae, Natricinae, and

  12. Mitochondrial disease genetic diagnostics: optimized whole-exome analysis for all MitoCarta nuclear genes and the mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Falk, Marni J; Pierce, Eric A; Consugar, Mark; Xie, Michael H; Guadalupe, Moraima; Hardy, Owen; Rappaport, Eric F; Wallace, Douglas C; LeProust, Emily; Gai, Xiaowu

    2012-12-01

    Discovering causative genetic variants in individual cases of suspected mitochondrial disease requires interrogation of both the mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear genomes. Whole-exome sequencing can support simultaneous dual-genome analysis, although currently available capture kits do not target the mtDNA genome and provide insufficient capture for some nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. To optimize interrogation of nuclear and mtDNA genes relevant to mitochondrial biology and disease, a custom SureSelect "Mito-Plus" whole-exome library was formulated by blending RNA "baits" from three separate designs: (A) Agilent Technologies SureSelectXT 50 Mb All Exon PLUS Targeted Enrichment Kit, (B) 16-gene nuclear panel targeting sequences for known MitoCarta proteins not included in the 50 Mb All Exon design, and (C) sequences targeting the entire mtDNA genome. The final custom formulations consisted of a 1:1 ratio of nuclear baits to which a 1 to 1,000-fold diluted ratio of mtDNA genome baits were blended. Patient sample capture libraries were paired-end sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 system using v3.0 SBS chemistry. mtDNA genome coverage varied depending on the mtDNA:nuclear blend ratio, where a 1:100 ratio provided optimal dual-genome coverage with 10X coverage for over 97.5% of all targeted nuclear regions and 1,000X coverage for 99.8% of the mtDNA genome. mtDNA mutations were reliably detected to at least an 8% heteroplasmy level, as discriminated both from sequencing errors and potential contamination from nuclear mtDNA transcripts (Numts). The "1:100 Mito-Plus Whole-Exome" Agilent capture kit offers an optimized tool for whole-exome analysis of nuclear and mtDNA genes relevant to the diagnostic evaluation of mitochondrial disease.

  13. Constitutive androstane receptor activation evokes the expression of glycolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Prokopyeva, Elena A; Markova, Diana N; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2016-09-23

    It is well-known that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) increases the liver-to-body weight ratio. CAR-mediated liver growth is correlated with increased expression of the pleiotropic transcription factor cMyc, which stimulates cell cycle regulatory genes and drives proliferating cells into S phase. Because glycolysis supports cell proliferation and cMyc is essential for the activation of glycolytic genes, we hypothesized that CAR-mediated up-regulation of cMyc in mouse livers might play a role in inducing the expression of glycolytic genes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term CAR activation on glycolytic genes in a mouse model not subjected to metabolic stress. We demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increases expression of cMyc, which was correlated with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes and up-regulation of glucose transporter, glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate metabolising genes. These changes in gene expression after TCPOBOP treatment were strongly correlated with changes in levels of glycolytic intermediates in mouse livers. Moreover, we demonstrated a significant positive regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on both mRNA and protein levels of Pkm2, a master regulator of glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, our findings provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation initiates a transcriptional program that facilitates the coordinated metabolic activities required for cell proliferation.

  14. Progress in mitochondrial epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria, intracellular organelles with their own genome, have been shown capable of interacting with epigenetic mechanisms in at least four different ways. First, epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of nuclear genome influence mitochondria by modulating the expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Second, a cell-specific mitochondrial DNA content (copy number) and mitochondrial activity determine the methylation pattern of nuclear genes. Third, mitochondrial DNA variants influence the nuclear gene expression patterns and the nuclear DNA (ncDNA) methylation levels. Fourth and most recent line of evidence indicates that mitochondrial DNA similar to ncDNA also is subject to epigenetic modifications, particularly by the 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine marks. The latter interaction of mitochondria with epigenetics has been termed 'mitochondrial epigenetics'. Here we summarize recent developments in this particular area of epigenetic research. Furthermore, we propose the term 'mitoepigenetics' to include all four above-noted types of interactions between mitochondria and epigenetics, and we suggest a more restricted usage of the term 'mitochondrial epigenetics' for molecular events dealing solely with the intra-mitochondrial epigenetics and the modifications of mitochondrial genome.

  15. Deceleration of liver regeneration by knockdown of augmenter of liver regeneration gene is associated with impairment of mitochondrial DNA synthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Li-hong; Dong, Ling-yue; Yu, Hao; Sun, Guang-yong; Wu, Yuan; Gao, Jian; Thasler, Wolfgang; An, Wei

    2015-07-15

    Hepatic stimulator substance, also known as augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR), is a novel hepatic mitogen that stimulates liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH). Recent work has indicated that a lack of ALR expression inhibited liver regeneration in rats, and the mechanism seems to be related to increased cell apoptosis. The mitochondria play an important role during liver regeneration. Adequate ATP supply, which is largely dependent on effective mitochondrial biogenesis, is essential for progress of liver regeneration. However, ALR gene expression during liver regeneration, particularly its function with mitochondrial DNA synthesis, remains poorly understood. In this study, ALR expression in hepatocytes of mice was suppressed with ALR short-hairpin RNA interference or ALR deletion (knockout, KO). The ALR-defective mice underwent PH, and the liver was allowed to regenerate for 1 wk. Analysis of liver growth and its correlation with mitochondrial biogenesis showed that both ALR mRNA and protein levels increased robustly in control mice with a maximum at days 3 and 4 post-PH. However, ALR knockdown inhibited hepatic DNA synthesis and decelerated liver regeneration after PH. Furthermore, both in the ALR-knockdown and ALR-KO mice, expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α were reduced, resulting in impaired mitochondrial biogenesis. In conclusion, ALR is apparently required to ensure appropriate liver regeneration following PH in mice, and deletion of the ALR gene may delay liver regeneration in part due to impaired mitochondrial biogenesis.

  16. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  17. Does FACS perturb gene expression?

    PubMed

    Richardson, Graham M; Lannigan, Joanne; Macara, Ian G

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence activated cell sorting is the technique most commonly used to separate primary mammary epithelial sub-populations. Many studies incorporate this technique before analyzing gene expression within specific cellular lineages. However, to our knowledge, no one has examined the effects of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) separation on short-term transcriptional profiles. In this study, we isolated a heterogeneous mixture of cells from the mouse mammary gland. To determine the effects of the isolation and separation process on gene expression, we harvested RNA from the cells before enzymatic digestion, following enzymatic digestion, and following a mock FACS sort where the entire cohort of cells was retained. A strict protocol was followed to minimize disruption to the cells, and to ensure that no subpopulations were enriched or lost. Microarray analysis demonstrated that FACS causes minimal disruptions to gene expression patterns, but prior steps in the mammary cell isolation process are followed by upregulation of 18 miRNA's and rapid decreases in their predicted target transcripts. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/.

  19. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  20. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64%) consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial) proteins (mt-cy families) while the remaining 33 (36%) were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families). Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1) relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2) from cytosol to mitochondria and 3) multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on the genomic scale was

  1. Novel homoplasmic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNATyr gene associated with atypical mitochondrial cytopathy presenting with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Vogel, Hannes; Hawkins, Edith P; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Liu, Ling-Ling; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2003-12-01

    We report a 9-year-old girl with a mitochondrial cytopathy preceded by steroid-resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The proband presented at the age of 2 years with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by FSGS. Her renal function progressively deteriorated and a dilated cardiomyopathy developed at the age of 7 years. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed a combined respiratory chain (RC) defect and a partial deficiency of coenzyme Q(10). A novel mutation in the evolutionary highly conserved region of the mitochondrial tRNA(Tyr) gene was found in homoplasmic state in skeletal muscle, blood, and renal tissue. The mutation was also found in homoplasmic state in her mildly symptomatic mother. No other maternal family members were available for testing. The present case of mitochondrial cytopathy initially presenting with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome, unusual biochemical and renal findings associated with a novel tRNA point mutation suggests that steroid-resistant FSGS can predate other features of mitochondrial disease for a prolonged period of time and that the progressive glomerulopathy associated with combined mitochondrial RC defects is genetically heterogeneous. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Increased expression of humanin peptide in diffuse-type pigmented villonodular synovitis: implication of its mitochondrial abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, K; Tsuruga, H; Sakakima, H; Tomita, K; Taniguchi, N; Shimoonoda, K; Komiya, S; Goldring, M; Majima, H; Matsuyama, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To define the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), by searching for highly expressed genes in primary synovial cells from patients with PVNS. Methods: A combination of subtraction cloning and Southern colony hybridisation was used to detect highly expressed genes in PVNS in comparison with rheumatoid synovial cells. Northern hybridisation was performed to confirm the differential expression of the humanin gene in PVNS. Expression of the humanin peptide was analysed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopic immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate the distribution of this peptide within the cell. Results: 68 highly expressed genes were identified in PVNS. Humanin genes were strongly expressed in diffuse-type PVNS, but were barely detected in nodular-type PVNS, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. Humanin peptide was identified in synovium from diffuse-type PVNS, and most of the positive cells were distributed in the deep layer of the synovial tissue. Double staining with anti-humanin and anti-heat shock protein 60 showed that humanin was expressed mainly in mitochondria. Electron microscopy disclosed immunolocalisation of this peptide, predominantly around dense iron deposits within the siderosome. Conclusions: Increased expression of the humanin peptide in mitochondria and siderosomes is characteristic of synovial cells from diffuse-type PVNS. Humanin is an anti-apoptotic peptide which is encoded in the mitochondrial genome. Present findings suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction may be the principal factor in pathogenesis of diffuse-type PVNS and that humanin peptide may play a part in the neoplastic process in this form of PVNS. PMID:15567815

  3. Transgenic expression of the deoxynucleotide carrier causes mitochondrial damage that is enhanced by NRTIs for AIDS.

    PubMed

    Lewis, William; Haase, Chad P; Miller, Yoon K; Ferguson, Brandy; Stuart, Tami; Ludaway, Tomika; McNaught, Jamie; Russ, Rodney; Steltzer, Jeffrey; Santoianni, Robert; Long, Robert; Fiermonte, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Ferdinando

    2005-08-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are antiretrovirals for AIDS with limiting mitochondrial side effects. The mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier (DNC) transports phosphorylated nucleosides for mitochondrial DNA replication and can transport phosphorylated NRTIs into mitochondria. Transgenic mice (TG) that exclusively overexpress DNC in the heart tested DNC's role in mitochondrial dysfunction from NRTIs. Two TG lines were created that overexpressed the human DNC gene in murine myocardium. Cardiac and mitochondrial structure and function were examined by magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, electrocardiography, transmission electron microscopy, and plasma lactate. Antiretroviral combinations (HAART) that contained NRTIs (stavudine (2', 3'-didehydro-2', 3'-deoxythymidine or d4T)/lamivudine/indinavir; or zidovudine (3' azido-3'-deoxythymidine or AZT)/lamivudine/indinavir; 35 days) were administered to simulate AIDS therapy. In parallel, a HAART combination without NRTIs (nevirapine/efavirenz/indinavir; 35 days) served as an NRTI-sparing, control regimen. Untreated DNC TGs exhibited normal cardiac function but abnormal mitochondrial ultrastructure. HAART that contained NRTIs caused cardiomyopathy in TGs with increased left ventricle mass and volume, heart rate variability, and worse mitochondrial ultrastructural defects. In contrast, treatment with an NRTI-sparing HAART regimen caused no cardiac changes. Data suggest the DNC is integral to mitochondrial homeostasis in vivo and may relate mechanistically to mitochondrial dysfunction in patients treated with HAART regimens that contain NRTIs.

  4. [MITO-Porter; a cutting-edge technology for mitochondrial gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryo; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy, for not only targeting nuclear genome, but the mitochondrial genome as well. Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 subunits of the electron transport chain, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs and their mutations cause a wide range of mitochondrial diseases. Each cell contains hundreds to thousands of mtDNAs, and in the case of a diseased cell, the mitochondrion possesses both mutant mtDNA and wild-type mtDNA. It is generally accepted that the disease phenotype appears when the proportion of the pathogenic mutant mtDNA exceeds a certain threshold. Therefore, the suppression of mutant mtDNA or supplementing wild-type mtDNA will control the onset of mitochondrial disease. To achieve the transfection of an exogenous therapeutic gene to the mitochondrial matrix where mtDNA is transcribed and translated, it is necessary to transfer cargos through mitochondrial outer and inner membranes. Several methods have been examined for mitochondrial transfection, but a universal, wide-ranging transfection technique has yet not been established. We recently developed a mitochondrial targeting delivery system, namely the MITO-Porter. The MITO-Porter is liposomal nanocarrier with a mitochondrial fusogenic lipid composition. We reported that the MITO-Porter could deliver chemical compounds and proteins to the mitochondrial matrix via membrane fusion. In this review, we report (1) on the pharmacological enhancement of lecithinized superoxide dismutase (PC-SOD) using MITO-Porter, (2) the transcription activation of exogenous DNA by mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and (3) perspectives on a mitochondrial targeting device.

  5. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  6. Mitochondrial Genomes of Kinorhyncha: trnM Duplication and New Gene Orders within Animals

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Olga V.; Mikhailov, Kirill V.; Nikitin, Mikhail A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Muntyan, Maria S.; Kedrova, Olga S.; Petrov, Nikolai B.; Panchin, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    Many features of mitochondrial genomes of animals, such as patterns of gene arrangement, nucleotide content and substitution rate variation are extensively used in evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Nearly 6,000 mitochondrial genomes of animals have already been sequenced, covering the majority of animal phyla. One of the groups that escaped mitogenome sequencing is phylum Kinorhyncha—an isolated taxon of microscopic worm-like ecdysozoans. The kinorhynchs are thought to be one of the early-branching lineages of Ecdysozoa, and their mitochondrial genomes may be important for resolving evolutionary relations between major animal taxa. Here we present the results of sequencing and analysis of mitochondrial genomes from two members of Kinorhyncha, Echinoderes svetlanae (Cyclorhagida) and Pycnophyes kielensis (Allomalorhagida). Their mitochondrial genomes are circular molecules approximately 15 Kbp in size. The kinorhynch mitochondrial gene sequences are highly divergent, which precludes accurate phylogenetic inference. The mitogenomes of both species encode a typical metazoan complement of 37 genes, which are all positioned on the major strand, but the gene order is distinct and unique among Ecdysozoa or animals as a whole. We predict four types of start codons for protein-coding genes in E. svetlanae and five in P. kielensis with a consensus DTD in single letter code. The mitochondrial genomes of E. svetlanae and P. kielensis encode duplicated methionine tRNA genes that display compensatory nucleotide substitutions. Two distant species of Kinorhyncha demonstrate similar patterns of gene arrangements in their mitogenomes. Both genomes have duplicated methionine tRNA genes; the duplication predates the divergence of two species. The kinorhynchs share a few features pertaining to gene order that align them with Priapulida. Gene order analysis reveals that gene arrangement specific of Priapulida may be ancestral for Scalidophora, Ecdysozoa, and even Protostomia

  7. Mitochondrial Genomes of Kinorhyncha: trnM Duplication and New Gene Orders within Animals.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga V; Mikhailov, Kirill V; Nikitin, Mikhail A; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Muntyan, Maria S; Kedrova, Olga S; Petrov, Nikolai B; Panchin, Yuri V; Aleoshin, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    Many features of mitochondrial genomes of animals, such as patterns of gene arrangement, nucleotide content and substitution rate variation are extensively used in evolutionary and phylogenetic studies. Nearly 6,000 mitochondrial genomes of animals have already been sequenced, covering the majority of animal phyla. One of the groups that escaped mitogenome sequencing is phylum Kinorhyncha-an isolated taxon of microscopic worm-like ecdysozoans. The kinorhynchs are thought to be one of the early-branching lineages of Ecdysozoa, and their mitochondrial genomes may be important for resolving evolutionary relations between major animal taxa. Here we present the results of sequencing and analysis of mitochondrial genomes from two members of Kinorhyncha, Echinoderes svetlanae (Cyclorhagida) and Pycnophyes kielensis (Allomalorhagida). Their mitochondrial genomes are circular molecules approximately 15 Kbp in size. The kinorhynch mitochondrial gene sequences are highly divergent, which precludes accurate phylogenetic inference. The mitogenomes of both species encode a typical metazoan complement of 37 genes, which are all positioned on the major strand, but the gene order is distinct and unique among Ecdysozoa or animals as a whole. We predict four types of start codons for protein-coding genes in E. svetlanae and five in P. kielensis with a consensus DTD in single letter code. The mitochondrial genomes of E. svetlanae and P. kielensis encode duplicated methionine tRNA genes that display compensatory nucleotide substitutions. Two distant species of Kinorhyncha demonstrate similar patterns of gene arrangements in their mitogenomes. Both genomes have duplicated methionine tRNA genes; the duplication predates the divergence of two species. The kinorhynchs share a few features pertaining to gene order that align them with Priapulida. Gene order analysis reveals that gene arrangement specific of Priapulida may be ancestral for Scalidophora, Ecdysozoa, and even Protostomia.

  8. Independent replication of mitochondrial genes supports the transcriptional program in developing fiber cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants exist both as a "master circle" chromosome and as numerous subgenomic sublimons that are generated by intramolecular recombination. Differential stability or replication of these sublimons allows individual mitochondrial gene copy numbers to vary indepe...

  9. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Hebebrand, Johannes; Scherag, André; Hinney, Anke

    2013-01-01

    There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1) 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2) 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3) 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide association study (GWAS) data from a case-control approach on 453 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls were used for GSEA. For independent confirmation, we analyzed 705 obesity GWAS trios (extremely obese child and both biological parents) and a population-based GWAS sample (KORA F4, n = 1,743). A meta-analysis was performed on all three samples. In each sample, the distribution of significance levels between the respective gene set and those of all genes was compared using the leading-edge-fraction-comparison test (cut-offs between the 50(th) and 95(th) percentile of the set of all gene-wise corrected p-values) as implemented in the MAGENTA software. In the case-control sample, significant enrichment of associations with obesity was observed above the 50(th) percentile for the set of the 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes (p(GSEA,50) = 0.0103). This finding was not confirmed in the trios (p(GSEA,50) = 0.5991), but in KORA (p(GSEA,50) = 0.0398). The meta-analysis again indicated a trend for enrichment (p(MAGENTA,50) = 0.1052, p(MAGENTA,75) = 0.0251). The GSEA revealed that weak association signals for obesity might be enriched in the gene set of 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes.

  10. A screen for nigericin-resistant yeast mutants revealed genes controlling mitochondrial volume and mitochondrial cation homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kucejova, Blanka; Kucej, Martin; Petrezselyova, Silvia; Abelovska, Lenka; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2005-10-01

    Little is known about the regulation of ion transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To approach this problem, we devised a screening procedure for facilitating the identification of proteins involved in mitochondrial ion homeostasis. Taking advantage of the growth inhibition of yeast cells by electroneutral K(+)/H(+) ionophore nigericin, we screened for genetic mutations that would render cells tolerant to this drug when grown on a nonfermentable carbon source and identified several candidate genes including MDM31, MDM32, NDI1, YMR088C (VBA1), CSR2, RSA1, YLR024C, and YNL136W (EAF7). Direct examination of intact cells by electron microscopy indicated that mutants lacking MDM31 and/or MDM32 genes contain dramatically enlarged, spherical mitochondria and that these morphological abnormalities can be alleviated by nigericin. Mitochondria isolated from the Deltamdm31 and Deltamdm32 mutants exhibited limited swelling in an isotonic solution of potassium acetate even in the presence of an exogenous K(+)/H(+) antiport. In addition, growth of the mutants was inhibited on ethanol-containing media in the presence of high concentrations of salts (KCl, NaCl, or MgSO(4)) and their mitochondria exhibited two- (Deltamdm31 and Deltamdm32) to threefold (Deltamdm31Deltamdm32) elevation in magnesium content. Taken together, these data indicate that Mdm31p and Mdm32p control mitochondrial morphology through regulation of mitochondrial cation homeostasis and the maintenance of proper matrix osmolarity.

  11. PCR-based bioprospecting for homing endonucleases in fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed; Guha, Tuhin Kumar; Shen, Chen; Sethuraman, Jyothi; Hausner, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Fungal mitochondrial genomes act as "reservoirs" for homing endonucleases. These enzymes with their DNA site-specific cleavage activities are attractive tools for genome editing and gene therapy applications. Bioprospecting and characterization of naturally occurring homing endonucleases offers an alternative to synthesizing artificial endonucleases. Here, we describe methods for PCR-based screening of fungal mitochondrial rRNA genes for homing endonuclease encoding sequences, and we also provide protocols for the purification and biochemical characterization of putative native homing endonucleases.

  12. Gene expression changes in response to aging compared to heat stress, oxidative stress and ionizing radiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Gary; Shen, Jie; Tower, John

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression changes in response to aging, heat stress, hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and ionizing radiation were compared using microarrays. A set of 18 genes were up-regulated across all conditions, indicating a general stress response shared with aging, including the heat shock protein (Hsp) genes Hsp70, Hsp83 and l(2)efl, the glutathione-S-transferase gene GstD2, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mUPR) gene ref(2)P. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed using quantitative PCR, Northern analysis and GstD-GFP reporter constructs. Certain genes were altered in only a subset of the conditions, for example, up-regulation of numerous developmental pathway and signaling genes in response to hydrogen peroxide. While aging shared features with each stress, aging was more similar to the stresses most associated with oxidative stress (hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, ionizing radiation) than to heat stress. Aging is associated with down-regulation of numerous mitochondrial genes, including electron-transport-chain (ETC) genes and mitochondrial metabolism genes, and a sub-set of these changes was also observed upon hydrogen peroxide stress and ionizing radiation stress. Aging shared the largest number of gene expression changes with hyperoxia. The extensive down-regulation of mitochondrial and ETC genes during aging is consistent with an aging-associated failure in mitochondrial maintenance, which may underlie the oxidative stress-like and proteotoxic stress-like responses observed during aging. PMID:23211361

  13. Gene expression changes in response to aging compared to heat stress, oxidative stress and ionizing radiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Landis, Gary; Shen, Jie; Tower, John

    2012-11-01

    Gene expression changes in response to aging, heat stress, hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and ionizing radiation were compared using microarrays. A set of 18 genes were up-regulated across all conditions, indicating a general stress response shared with aging, including the heat shock protein (Hsp) genes Hsp70, Hsp83 and l(2)efl, the glutathione-S-transferase gene GstD2, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mUPR) gene ref(2)P. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed using quantitative PCR, Northern analysis and GstD-GFP reporter constructs. Certain genes were altered in only a subset of the conditions, for example, up-regulation of numerous developmental pathway and signaling genes in response to hydrogen peroxide. While aging shared features with each stress, aging was more similar to the stresses most associated with oxidative stress (hyperoxia, hydrogen peroxide, ionizing radiation) than to heat stress. Aging is associated with down-regulation of numerous mitochondrial genes, including electron-transport-chain (ETC) genes and mitochondrial metabolism genes, and a sub-set of these changes was also observed upon hydrogen peroxide stress and ionizing radiation stress. Aging shared the largest number of gene expression changes with hyperoxia. The extensive down-regulation of mitochondrial and ETC genes during aging is consistent with an aging-associated failure in mitochondrial maintenance, which may underlie the oxidative stress-like and proteotoxic stress-like responses observed during aging.

  14. Identification of the human mitochondrial S-adenosylmethionine transporter: bacterial expression, reconstitution, functional characterization and tissue distribution.

    PubMed Central

    Agrimi, G; Di Noia, M A; Marobbio, C M T; Fiermonte, G; Lasorsa, F M; Palmieri, F

    2004-01-01

    The mitochondrial carriers are a family of transport proteins that, with a few exceptions, are found in the inner membranes of mitochondria. They shuttle metabolites and cofactors through this membrane, and connect cytoplasmic functions with others in the matrix. SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) has to be transported into the mitochondria where it is converted into S-adenosylhomocysteine in methylation reactions of DNA, RNA and proteins. The transport of SAM has been investigated in rat liver mitochondria, but no protein has ever been associated with this activity. By using information derived from the phylogenetically distant yeast mitochondrial carrier for SAM and from related human expressed sequence tags, a human cDNA sequence was completed. This sequence was overexpressed in bacteria, and its product was purified, reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles and identified from its transport properties as the human mitochondrial SAM carrier (SAMC). Unlike the yeast orthologue, SAMC catalysed virtually only countertransport, exhibited a higher transport affinity for SAM and was strongly inhibited by tannic acid and Bromocresol Purple. SAMC was found to be expressed in all human tissues examined and was localized to the mitochondria. The physiological role of SAMC is probably to exchange cytosolic SAM for mitochondrial S-adenosylhomocysteine. This is the first report describing the identification and characterization of the human SAMC and its gene. PMID:14674884

  15. Identification of the human mitochondrial S-adenosylmethionine transporter: bacterial expression, reconstitution, functional characterization and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Agrimi, G; Di Noia, M A; Marobbio, C M T; Fiermonte, G; Lasorsa, F M; Palmieri, F

    2004-04-01

    The mitochondrial carriers are a family of transport proteins that, with a few exceptions, are found in the inner membranes of mitochondria. They shuttle metabolites and cofactors through this membrane, and connect cytoplasmic functions with others in the matrix. SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) has to be transported into the mitochondria where it is converted into S-adenosylhomocysteine in methylation reactions of DNA, RNA and proteins. The transport of SAM has been investigated in rat liver mitochondria, but no protein has ever been associated with this activity. By using information derived from the phylogenetically distant yeast mitochondrial carrier for SAM and from related human expressed sequence tags, a human cDNA sequence was completed. This sequence was overexpressed in bacteria, and its product was purified, reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles and identified from its transport properties as the human mitochondrial SAM carrier (SAMC). Unlike the yeast orthologue, SAMC catalysed virtually only countertransport, exhibited a higher transport affinity for SAM and was strongly inhibited by tannic acid and Bromocresol Purple. SAMC was found to be expressed in all human tissues examined and was localized to the mitochondria. The physiological role of SAMC is probably to exchange cytosolic SAM for mitochondrial S-adenosylhomocysteine. This is the first report describing the identification and characterization of the human SAMC and its gene.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of Setaria digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea): Mitochondrial gene content, arrangement and composition compared with other nematodes.

    PubMed

    Yatawara, Lalani; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Rajapakse, R P V J; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence (13,839bp) of parasitic nematode Setaria digitata and its structure and organization compared with Onchocerca volvulus, Dirofilaria immitis and Brugia malayi. The mt genome of S. digitata is slightly larger than the mt genomes of other filarial nematodes. S. digitata mt genome contains 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs) that are typically found in metazoans. This genome contains a high A+T (75.1%) content and low G+C content (24.9%). The mt gene order for S. digitata is the same as those for O. volvulus, D. immitis and B. malayi but it is distinctly different from other nematodes compared. The start codons inferred in the mt genome of S. digitata are TTT, ATT, TTG, ATG, GTT and ATA. Interestingly, the initiation codon TTT is unique to S. digitata mt genome and four protein-coding genes use this codon as a translation initiation codon. Five protein-coding genes use TAG as a stop codon whereas three genes use TAA and four genes use T as a termination codon. Out of 64 possible codons, only 57 are used for mitochondrial protein-coding genes of S. digitata. T-rich codons such as TTT (18.9%), GTT (7.9%), TTG (7.8%), TAT (7%), ATT (5.7%), TCT (4.8%) and TTA (4.1%) are used more frequently. This pattern of codon usage reflects the strong bias for T in the mt genome of S. digitata. In conclusion, the present investigation provides new molecular data for future studies of the comparative mitochondrial genomics and systematic of parasitic nematodes of socio-economic importance. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel mitochondrial tRNAAla gene variant causes chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia in a patient with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Filosto, Massimiliano; Lanzi, Gaetana; Nesti, Claudia; Vielmi, Valentina; Marchina, Eleonora; Galvagni, Anna; Giliani, Silvia; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Padovani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia is a mitochondrial disorder usually caused by single or multiple mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions and, more rarely, by maternally inherited mtDNA point mutations, most frequently in tRNA genes (MTT). We report on a patient presenting with a progressive eyelid ptosis with bilateral ophthalmoparesis, dysphagia, dysphonia and mild proximal limb weakness associate with a mild movement disorder characterized by abnormal involuntary movements involving head and limbs, imbalance and gait instability. Muscle biopsy demonstrated the presence of ragged red fibers and several cytochrome-C-oxidase negative fibers. Molecular analysis showed the novel m.5613T > C heteroplasmic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNAAla gene (MTTA) which disrupts a conserved site and fulfills the accepted criteria of pathogenicity. Moreover, a 38 CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion was found on the huntingtin gene, thus configuring a singular CPEO/“reduced penetrance” Huntington disease “double trouble”. With this novel MTTA point mutation, we extend the spectrum of provisional pathogenic changes in this gene, which is a very rare site of pathogenic mutation, and confirm that clinical expression of these mutations is hardly ever heterogeneous, including myopathy and CPEO. Mitochondrial involvement is an emerging key determinant in the pathogenesis of Huntington disease and it is well known that mutant huntingtin influences the mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and III. A synergist effect of the HTT and MTTA mutations on respiratory chain function may be hypothesized in our patient and should be regarded as a spur for further studies on the mtDNA/HTT reciprocal interactions. PMID:27014581

  18. A horizontally transferred tRNA(Cys) gene in the sugar beet mitochondrial genome: evidence that the gene is present in diverse angiosperms and its transcript is aminoacylated.

    PubMed

    Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Kubo, Tomohiko; Kagami, Hiroyo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Fujita, Asami; Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2011-10-01

    Of the two tRNA(Cys) (GCA) genes, trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA, previously identified in mitochondrial genome of sugar beet, the former is a native gene and probably a pseudo-copy, whereas the latter, of unknown origin, is transcribed into a tRNA [tRNA(Cys2) (GCA)]. In this study, the trnC2-GCA sequence was mined from various public databases. To evaluate whether or not the trnC2-GCA sequence is located in the mitochondrial genome, the relative copy number of its sequence to nuclear gene was assessed in a number of angiosperm species, using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The trnC2-GCA sequence was found to exist sporadically in the mitochondrial genomes of a wide range of angiosperms. The mitochondrial tRNA(Cys2) (GCA) species from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), spinach (Spinacea oleracea) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) were found to be aminoacylated, indicating that they may participate in translation. We also identified a sugar beet nuclear gene that encodes cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, which is dual-targeted to mitochondria and plastids, and may aminoacylate tRNA(Cys2) (GCA). What is of particular interest is that trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA co-exist in the mitochondrial genomes of eight diverse angiosperms, including spinach, and that the spinach tRNA(Cys1) (GCA) is also aminoacylated. Taken together, our observations lead us to surmise that trnC2-GCA may have been horizontally transferred to a common ancestor of eudicots, followed by co-existence and dual expression of trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA in mitochondria with occasional loss or inactivation of either trnC-GCA gene during evolution.

  19. Implication of synapse-related genes in bipolar disorder by linkage and gene expression analyses

    PubMed Central

    de Lara, Catalina Lopez; Jaitovich-Groisman, Iris; Cruceanu, Cristiana; Mamdani, Firoza; Lebel, Véronique; Yerko, Volodymyr; Beck, Angus; Young, L. Trevor; Rouleau, Guy; Grof, Paul; Alda, Martin; Turecki, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Several chromosomal regions have been linked to bipolar disorder (BD). However, the search for specific genes has been hampered by inconsistent findings, partly due to genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. We focused on lithium-responsive bipolar patients, a subgroup thought to be more homogeneous and conducted a multistage study including an initial linkage study followed up by fine mapping and gene expression. Our sample consisted of 36 families (275 genotyped individuals, 132 affected) recruited through probands who were responders to long-term lithium treatment. We conducted a genome-wide scan with 811 microsatellite markers followed by fine mapping. Gene expression studies of candidate regions were conducted on six post-mortem prefrontal brain regions of 20 individuals (8 BD and 12 controls). We identified regions 3p25, 3p14 and 14q11 as showing the highest genome-wide linkage signal (LOD 2.53, 2.04 and 3.19, respectively). Fine mapping provided further support for 3p25, while only modest support was found in the other two regions. We identified a group of synaptic, mitochondrial and apoptotic genes with altered expression patterns in BD. Analysis of an independent microarray dataset supported the implication of synapse-related and mitochondrial genes in BD. In conclusion, using two complementary strategies, we found evidence of linkage to lithium-responsive BD on 3p25, 3p14 and 14q11 as well as significantly dysregulated genes on these regions suggesting altered synaptic and mitochondrial function in BD. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate the functional role of these genes in BD. PMID:20667171

  20. Noise in eukaryotic gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, William J.; KÆrn, Mads; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Transcription in eukaryotic cells has been described as quantal, with pulses of messenger RNA produced in a probabilistic manner. This description reflects the inherently stochastic nature of gene expression, known to be a major factor in the heterogeneous response of individual cells within a clonal population to an inducing stimulus. Here we show in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that stochasticity (noise) arising from transcription contributes significantly to the level of heterogeneity within a eukaryotic clonal population, in contrast to observations in prokaryotes, and that such noise can be modulated at the translational level. We use a stochastic model of transcription initiation specific to eukaryotes to show that pulsatile mRNA production, through reinitiation, is crucial for the dependence of noise on transcriptional efficiency, highlighting a key difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic sources of noise. Furthermore, we explore the propagation of noise in a gene cascade network and demonstrate experimentally that increased noise in the transcription of a regulatory protein leads to increased cell-cell variability in the target gene output, resulting in prolonged bistable expression states. This result has implications for the role of noise in phenotypic variation and cellular differentiation.

  1. Harnessing gene expression networks to prioritize candidate epileptic encephalopathy genes.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Karen L; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets.

  2. Harnessing Gene Expression Networks to Prioritize Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy Genes

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Karen L.; Lukic, Vesna; Thorne, Natalie P.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    We apply a novel gene expression network analysis to a cohort of 182 recently reported candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes to identify those most likely to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. These candidate genes were identified as having single variants of likely pathogenic significance discovered in a large-scale massively parallel sequencing study. Candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes were prioritized according to their co-expression with 29 known Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. We utilized developing brain and adult brain gene expression data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas (AHBA) and compared this to data from Celsius: a large, heterogeneous gene expression data warehouse. We show replicable prioritization results using these three independent gene expression resources, two of which are brain-specific, with small sample size, and the third derived from a heterogeneous collection of tissues with large sample size. Of the nineteen genes that we predicted with the highest likelihood to be true Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, two (GNAO1 and GRIN2B) have recently been independently reported and confirmed. We compare our results to those produced by an established in silico prioritization approach called Endeavour, and finally present gene expression networks for the known and candidate Epileptic Encephalopathy genes. This highlights sub-networks of gene expression, particularly in the network derived from the adult AHBA gene expression dataset. These networks give clues to the likely biological interactions between Epileptic Encephalopathy genes, potentially highlighting underlying mechanisms and avenues for therapeutic targets. PMID:25014031

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the sea spider Achelia bituberculata (Pycnogonida, Ammotheidae): arthropod ground pattern of gene arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Ju; Lee, Yong-Seok; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2007-01-01

    Background The phylogenetic position of pycnogonids is a long-standing and controversial issue in arthropod phylogeny. This controversy has recently been rekindled by differences in the conclusions based on neuroanatomical data concerning the chelifore and the patterns of Hox expression. The mitochondrial genome of a sea spider, Nymphon gracile (Pycnogonida, Nymphonidae), was recently reported in an attempt to address this issue. However, N. gracile appears to be a long-branch taxon on the phylogenetic tree and exhibits a number of peculiar features, such as 10 tRNA translocations and even an inversion of several protein-coding genes. Sequences of other pycnogonid mitochondrial genomes are needed if the position of pycnogonids is to be elucidated on this basis. Results The complete mitochondrial genome (15,474 bp) of a sea spider (Achelia bituberculata) belonging to the family Ammotheidae, which combines a number of anatomical features considered plesiomorphic with respect to other pycnogonids, was sequenced and characterized. The genome organization shows the features typical of most metazoan animal genomes (37 tightly-packed genes). The overall gene arrangement is completely identical to the arthropod ground pattern, with one exception: the position of the trnQ gene between the rrnS gene and the control region. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference trees inferred from the amino acid sequences of mitochondrial protein-coding genes consistently indicate that the pycnogonids (A. bituberculata and N. gracile) may be closely related to the clade of Acari and Araneae. Conclusion The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of A. bituberculata (Family Ammotheidae) and the previously-reported partial sequence of Endeis spinosa show the gene arrangement patterns typical of arthropods (Limulus-like), but they differ markedly from that of N. gracile. Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial protein-coding genes showed that Pycnogonida may be authentic arachnids

  4. Mitochondrial proteins differential expression during honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) queen and worker larvae caste determination.

    PubMed

    Begna, Desalegn; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2011-09-02

    Despite their similar genetic makeup, honeybee (A. mellifera) queens and workers show alternative morphologies driven by nutritional difference during the larval stage. Although much research have been done to investigate the causes of honeybee caste polymorphism, information at subcellular protein levels is limited. We analyzed queen- and worker-destined larvae mitochondrial proteome at three early developmental stages using combinations of differential centrifugation, two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, bioinformatics, and quantitative real time PCR. In total, 67, 69, and 97 protein spots were reproducibly identified as mitochondrial proteins at 72, 96, and 120 h, respectively. There were significant qualitative and quantitative protein expression differences between the two castes at three developmental stages. In general, the queen-destined larvae up-regulated large proportions of proteins at all of the developmental stages and, in particular, 95% at 72 h. An overwhelming majority of the queen larvae up-regulated proteins were physiometabolic-enriched proteins (metabolism of carbohydrate and energy, amino acid, and fatty acid) and involved in protein folding, and this was further verified by functional enrichment and biological interaction network analyses as a direct link with metabolic rates and cellular responses to hormones. Although wide-ranging mitochondrial proteomes participate to shape the metabolic, physiologic, and anatomic differences between the two castes at 72 h, physiometabolic-enriched proteins were found as the major modulators of the profound marking of this caste differentiation. Owing to nutritional difference, prospective queen larvae showed enhanced growth, and this was manifested through the overexpression of metabolic enzymes. Differently from similar studies targeting the causes of honeybee caste polymorphism, this subcellular level study provides an in-depth insight into mitochondrial proteins-mediated caste

  5. iTRAQ-based analysis of progerin expression reveals mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species accumulation and altered proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Jesús; Landeira-Abia, Arancha; Fafián-Labora, Juan Antonio; Fernández-Pernas, Pablo; Lesende-Rodríguez, Iván; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Delmiro, Aitor; Martín, Miguel A; Blanco, Francisco J; Arufe, María C

    2015-06-12

    Nuclear accumulation of a mutant form of the nuclear protein Lamin-A, called Progerin (PG) or Lamin AΔ50, occurs in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) or Progeria, an accelerated aging disease. One of the main symptoms of this genetic disorder is a loss of sub-cutaneous fat due to a dramatic lipodystrophy. We stably induced the expression of human PG and GFP -Green Fluorescent Protein- as control in 3T3L1 cells using a lentiviral system to study the effect of PG expression in the differentiation capacity of this cell line, one of the most used adipogenic models. Quantitative proteomics (iTRAQ) was done to study the effect of the PG accumulation. Several of the modulated proteins were validated by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. Mitochondrial function was analyzed by measurement of a) the mitochondrial basal activity, b) the superoxide anion production and c) the individual efficiency of the different complex of the respiratory chain. We found that over-expression PG by lentiviral gene delivery leads to a decrease in the proliferation rate and to defects in adipogenic capacity when compared to the control. Quantitative proteomics analysis showed 181 proteins significantly (p<0.05) modulated in PG-expressing preadipocytes. Mitochondrial function is impaired in PG-expressing cells. Specifically, we have detected an increase in the activity of the complex I and an overproduction of Superoxide anion. Incubation with Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) scavenger agents drives to a decrease in autophagic proteolysis as revealed by LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. PG expression in 3T3L1 cells promotes changes in several Biological Processes, including structure of cytoskeleton, lipid metabolism, calcium regulation, translation, protein folding and energy generation by the mitochondria. Our data strengthen the contribution of ROS accumulation to the premature aging phenotype and establish a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of proteostasis in HGPS.

  6. Deficiency in the mouse mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 2 gene is associated with cardiac noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Jason E; Waymire, Katrina G; Flierl, Adrian; Sweeney, Katelyn M; Angelin, Alessia; MacGregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    The mouse fetal and adult hearts express two adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoform genes. The predominant isoform is the heart-muscle-brain ANT-isoform gene 1 (Ant1) while the other is the systemic Ant2 gene. Genetic inactivation of the Ant1 gene does not impair fetal development but results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in postnatal mice. Using a knockin X-linked Ant2 allele in which exons 3 and 4 are flanked by loxP sites combined in males with a protamine 1 promoter driven Cre recombinase we created females heterozygous for a null Ant2 allele. Crossing the heterozygous females with the Ant2(fl), PrmCre(+) males resulted in male and female ANT2-null embryos. These fetuses proved to be embryonic lethal by day E14.5 in association with cardiac developmental failure, immature cardiomyocytes having swollen mitochondria, cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation, and cardiac failure due to hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. ANTs have two main functions, mitochondrial-cytosol ATP/ADP exchange and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). Previous studies imply that ANT2 biases the mtPTP toward closed while ANT1 biases the mtPTP toward open. It has been reported that immature cardiomyocytes have a constitutively opened mtPTP, the closure of which signals the maturation of cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesize that the developmental toxicity of the Ant2 null mutation may be the result of biasing the cardiomyocyte mtPTP to remain open thus impairing cardiomyocyte maturation and resulting in cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation and failure of trabecular maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  8. Mitochondrial DNA of Vitis vinifera and the issue of rampant horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Goremykin, Vadim V; Salamini, Francesco; Velasco, Riccardo; Viola, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome of grape (Vitis vinifera), the largest organelle genome sequenced so far, is presented. The genome is 773,279 nt long and has the highest coding capacity among known angiosperm mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs). The proportion of promiscuous DNA of plastid origin in the genome is also the largest ever reported for an angiosperm mtDNA, both in absolute and relative terms. In all, 42.4% of chloroplast genome of Vitis has been incorporated into its mitochondrial genome. In order to test if horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has also contributed to the gene content of the grape mtDNA, we built phylogenetic trees with the coding sequences of mitochondrial genes of grape and their homologs from plant mitochondrial genomes. Many incongruent gene tree topologies were obtained. However, the extent of incongruence between these gene trees is not significantly greater than that observed among optimal trees for chloroplast genes, the common ancestry of which has never been in doubt. In both cases, we attribute this incongruence to artifacts of tree reconstruction, insufficient numbers of characters, and gene paralogy. This finding leads us to question the recent phylogenetic interpretation of Bergthorsson et al. (2003, 2004) and Richardson and Palmer (2007) that rampant HGT into the mtDNA of Amborella best explains phylogenetic incongruence between mitochondrial gene trees for angiosperms. The only evidence for HGT into the Vitis mtDNA found involves fragments of two coding sequences stemming from two closteroviruses that cause the leaf roll disease of this plant. We also report that analysis of sequences shared by both chloroplast and mitochondrial genomes provides evidence for a previously unknown gene transfer route from the mitochondrion to the chloroplast.

  9. [Neuronal plasticity and gene expression].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O O; Shtark, M B; Lisachev, P D

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity--a fundamental feature of brain--provides adequate interactions with dynamic environment. One of the most deeply investigated forms of the neuronal plasticity is a long-term potentiation (LTP)--a phenomenon underlying learning and memory. Signal paths activated during LTP converge into the nuclear of the neuron, giving rise to launch of the molecular-genetic programs, which mediate structural and functional remodeling of synapses. In the review data concerning involvement of multilevel gene expression into plastic change under neuronal activation are summarized.

  10. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-09-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular.

  11. A comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial genes variants and their association with antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Kirti; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Harripaul, Ricardo; Cuperfain, Ari B; Rollins, Brandi; Tiwari, Arun K; Zai, Clement C; Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Müller, Daniel J; Vawter, Marquis P; Kennedy, James L

    2017-09-01

    Antipsychotic Induced Weight Gain (AIWG) is a common and severe side effect of many antipsychotic medications. Mitochondria play a vital role for whole-body energy homeostasis and there is increasing evidence that antipsychotics modulate mitochondrial function. This study aimed to examine the role of variants in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes and the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in conferring risk for AIWG. We selected 168 European-Caucasian individuals from the CATIE sample based upon meeting criteria of multiple weight measures while taking selected antipsychotics (risperidone, quetiapine or olanzapine). We tested the association of 670 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes with weight change (%) using MAGMA software. Thirty of these genes showed nominally significant P-values (<0.05). We were able to replicate the association of three genes, CLPB, PARL, and ACAD10, with weight change (%) in an independent prospectively assessed AIWG sample. We analyzed mtDNA variants in a subset of 74 of these individuals using next-generation sequencing. No common or rare mtDNA variants were found to be significantly associated with weight change (%) in our sample. Additionally, analysis of mitochondrial haplogroups showed no association with weight change (%). In conclusion, our findings suggest nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes play a role in AIWG. Replication in larger sample is required to validate our initial report of mtDNA variants in AIWG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Timothy A; MacInnis, Martin J; Bieler, Rüdiger; Boore, Jeffrey L; Collins, Timothy M

    2010-07-19

    Widespread sampling of vertebrates, which comprise the majority of published animal mitochondrial genomes, has led to the view that mitochondrial gene rearrangements are relatively rare, and that gene orders are typically stable across major taxonomic groups. In contrast, more limited sampling within the Phylum Mollusca has revealed an unusually high number of gene order arrangements. Here we provide evidence that the lability of the molluscan mitochondrial genome extends to the family level by describing extensive gene order changes that have occurred within the Vermetidae, a family of sessile marine gastropods that radiated from a basal caenogastropod stock during the Cenozoic Era. Major mitochondrial gene rearrangements have occurred within this family at a scale unexpected for such an evolutionarily young group and unprecedented for any caenogastropod examined to date. We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of four species (Dendropoma maximum, D. gregarium, Eualetes tulipa, and Thylacodes squamigerus) and the partial mitochondrial genomes of two others (Vermetus erectus and Thylaeodus sp.). Each of the six vermetid gastropods assayed possessed a unique gene order. In addition to the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 37 genes, additional tRNA genes were evident in D. gregarium (trnK) and Thylacodes squamigerus (trnV, trnLUUR). Three pseudogenes and additional tRNAs found within the genome of Thylacodes squamigerus provide evidence of a past duplication event in this taxon. Likewise, high sequence similarities between isoaccepting leucine tRNAs in Thylacodes, Eualetes, and Thylaeodus suggest that tRNA remolding has been rife within this family. While vermetids exhibit gene arrangements diagnostic of this family, they also share arrangements with littorinimorph caenogastropods, with which they have been linked based on sperm morphology and primary sequence-based phylogenies. We have uncovered major changes in gene order within a family of

  13. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Widespread sampling of vertebrates, which comprise the majority of published animal mitochondrial genomes, has led to the view that mitochondrial gene rearrangements are relatively rare, and that gene orders are typically stable across major taxonomic groups. In contrast, more limited sampling within the Phylum Mollusca has revealed an unusually high number of gene order arrangements. Here we provide evidence that the lability of the molluscan mitochondrial genome extends to the family level by describing extensive gene order changes that have occurred within the Vermetidae, a family of sessile marine gastropods that radiated from a basal caenogastropod stock during the Cenozoic Era. Results Major mitochondrial gene rearrangements have occurred within this family at a scale unexpected for such an evolutionarily young group and unprecedented for any caenogastropod examined to date. We determined the complete mitochondrial genomes of four species (Dendropoma maximum, D. gregarium, Eualetes tulipa, and Thylacodes squamigerus) and the partial mitochondrial genomes of two others (Vermetus erectus and Thylaeodus sp.). Each of the six vermetid gastropods assayed possessed a unique gene order. In addition to the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 37 genes, additional tRNA genes were evident in D. gregarium (trnK) and Thylacodes squamigerus (trnV, trnLUUR). Three pseudogenes and additional tRNAs found within the genome of Thylacodes squamigerus provide evidence of a past duplication event in this taxon. Likewise, high sequence similarities between isoaccepting leucine tRNAs in Thylacodes, Eualetes, and Thylaeodus suggest that tRNA remolding has been rife within this family. While vermetids exhibit gene arrangements diagnostic of this family, they also share arrangements with littorinimorph caenogastropods, with which they have been linked based on sperm morphology and primary sequence-based phylogenies. Conclusions We have uncovered major changes in gene

  14. Extraordinary number of gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of lice (Phthiraptera: Insecta).

    PubMed

    Covacin, C; Shao, R; Cameron, S; Barker, S C

    2006-02-01

    The arrangement of genes in the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of most insects is the same, or near-identical, to that inferred to be ancestral for insects. We sequenced the entire mt genome of the small pigeon louse, Campanulotes bidentatus compar, and part of the mt genomes of nine other species of lice. These species were from six families and the three main suborders of the order Phthiraptera. There was no variation in gene arrangement among species within a family but there was much variation in gene arrangement among the three suborders of lice. There has been an extraordinary number of gene rearrangements in the mitochondrial genomes of lice!

  15. Establishment of mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) gene knockout mice with preliminary gene function analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Li, Yaqing; Han, Gaoyang; Li, Xiaoran; Ji, Yasai; Fan, Zhirui; Zhong, Yali; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Mariusz, Goscinski; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jianguo; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate plays a critical role in the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and it is the center product for the synthesis of amino acids, carbohydrates and fatty acids. Pyruvate transported across the inner mitochondrial membrane appears to be essential in anabolic and catabolic intermediary metabolism. The mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) mounted in the inner membrane of mitochondria serves as the channel to facilitate pyruvate permeating. In mammals, the MPC is formed by two paralogous subunits, MPC1 and MPC2. It is known that complete ablation of MPC2 in mice causes death on the 11th or 12th day of the embryonic period. However, MPC1 deletion and the knowledge of gene function in vivo are lacking. Using the new technology of gene manipulation known as Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) systems, we gained stable MPC1 gene heterozygous mutation mice models, and the heterozygous mutations could be stably maintained in their offsprings. Only one line with homozygous 27 bases deletion in the first exon was established, but no offsprings could be obtained after four months of mating experiments, indicating infertility of the mice with such homozygous deletion. The other line of MPC1 knockout (KO) mice was only heterozygous, which mutated in the first exon with a terminator shortly afterwards. These two lines of MPC1 KO mice showed lower fertility and significantly higher bodyweight in the females. We concluded that heterozygous MPC1 KO weakens fertility and influences the metabolism of glucose and fatty acid and bodyweight in mice. PMID:27835892

  16. Validation of endogenous control reference genes for normalizing gene expression studies in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ayakannu, Thangesweran; Taylor, Anthony H; Willets, Jonathon M; Brown, Laurence; Lambert, David G; McDonald, John; Davies, Quentin; Moss, Esther L; Konje, Justin C

    2015-09-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique used for the relative quantification of target genes, using reference (housekeeping) genes for normalization to ensure the generation of accurate and robust data. A systematic examination of the suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in endometrial cancer tissues is absent. The aims of this study were therefore to identify and evaluate from the thirty-two possible reference genes from a TaqMan(®) array panel their suitability as an internal control gene. The mathematical software packages geNorm qBasePLUS identified Pumilio homolog 1 (Drosophila) (PUM1), ubiquitin C (UBC), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L19 (MRPL19) and peptidylpropyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A) (PPIA) as the best reference gene combination, whilst NormFinder identified MRPL19 as the best single reference gene, with importin 8 (IPO8) and PPIA being the best combination of two reference genes. BestKeeper ranked MRPL19 as the most stably expressed gene. In addition, the study was validated by examining the relative expression of a test gene, which encodes the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). A significant difference in CB1 mRNA expression between malignant and normal endometrium using MRPL19, PPIA, and IP08 in combination was observed. The use of MRPL19, IPO8 and PPIA was identified as the best reference gene combination for the normalization of gene expression levels in endometrial carcinoma. This study demonstrates that the arbitrary selection of endogenous control reference genes for normalization in qRT-PCR studies of endometrial carcinoma, without validation, risks the production of inaccurate data and should therefore be discouraged.

  17. Gene expression in plant mitochondria: transcriptional and post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan; Brennicke, Axel

    2003-01-01

    The informational content of the mitochondrial genome in plants is, although small, essential for each cell. Gene expression in these organelles involves a number of distinct transcriptional and post-transcriptional steps. The complex post-transcriptional processes of plant mitochondria such as 5' and 3' RNA processing, intron splicing, RNA editing and controlled RNA stability extensively modify individual steady-state RNA levels and influence the mRNA quantities available for translation. In this overview of the processes in mitochondrial gene expression, we focus on confirmed and potential sites of regulatory interference and discuss the evolutionary origins of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes. PMID:12594926

  18. Mitochondrial nad2 gene is co-transcripted with CMS-associated orfB gene in cytoplasmic male-sterile stem mustard (Brassica juncea).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Ming-Fang; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional patterns of mitochondrial respiratory related genes were investigated in cytoplasmic male-sterile and fertile maintainer lines of stem mustard, Brassica juncea. There were numerous differences in nad2 (subunit 2 of NADH dehydrogenase) between stem mustard CMS and its maintainer line. One novel open reading frame, hereafter named orfB gene, was located at the downstream of mitochondrial nad2 gene in the CMS. The novel orfB gene had high similarity with YMF19 family protein, orfB in Raphanus sativus, Helianthus annuus, Nicotiana tabacum and Beta vulgaris, orfB-CMS in Daucus carota, atp8 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, 5' flanking of orf224 in B. napus (nap CMS) and 5' flanking of orf220 gene in CMS Brassica juncea. Three copies probed by specific fragment (amplified by primers of nad2F and nad2R from CMS) were found in the CMS line following Southern blotting digested with HindIII, but only a single copy in its maintainer line. Meanwhile, two transcripts were shown in the CMS line following Northern blotting while only one transcript was detected in the maintainer line, which were probed by specific fragment (amplified by primers of nad2F and nad2R from CMS). Meanwhile, the expression of nad2 gene was reduced in CMS bud compared to that in its maintainer line. We thus suggested that nad2 gene may be co-transcripted with CMS-associated orfB gene in the CMS. In addition, the specific fragment that was amplified by primers of nad2F and nad2R just spanned partial sequences of nad2 gene and orfB gene. Such alterations in the nad2 gene would impact the activity of NADH dehydrogenase, and subsequently signaling, inducing the expression of nuclear genes involved in male sterility in this type of cytoplasmic male sterility.

  19. Mitochondrial tRNAArg T10454C variant may not influence the clinical expression of deafness associated 12S rRNA A1555G mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the "pathogenic" role of the T10454C mutation in mitochondrial tRNA(Arg) gene in deafness expression as increasing reports provided an active role of this mutation in clinical manifestation of deafness associated 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. For this purpose, we reanalyzed the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data containing the T10454C mutation. Moreover, we analyzed the reported "polymorphisms" of mtDNA in the proband using the phylogentic approach. To our surprise, other mutations which occurred at protein-coding genes played more important roles in resulting mitochondrial dysfunctions by using the bioinformatic tool. In addition, evolutionary conservation analysis of the T10454C mutation indicated that this mutation was not conserved between different species. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the T10454C variant may not modulate the phenotypic expression of the deafness associated A1555G mutation.

  20. Reconstitution of CKMT1 expression fails to rescue cells from mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation: implications for controlling RNAi experiments.

    PubMed

    Datler, Christoph; Grimm, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an essential method in molecular biology to reduce the expression of target genes and thereby determine their function. Since this tool is known to also have unspecific effects, control experiments are needed, chiefly among them the exclusion of off-target effects and the reconstitution of the genes' expression for the rescue of the cellular RNAi effects. We show here that the knock-down of the mitochondrial creatine kinase-1 (CKMT1) by RNA interference causes the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm. This was accomplished with 11 different RNAi constructs designed to target 7 distinct exons as well as exon/intron junctions making unspecific off-target effects unlikely. However, all our attempts failed to rescue human cells from ΔΨm dissipation by the expression of CKMT1 alleles not targeted