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Sample records for mitochondrial membrane potential

  1. [Modulation of myometrium mitochondrial membrane potential by calmodulin antagonists].

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S H; Babich, L H; Ievtushenko, M Ie; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    Influence of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was investigated using a flow cytometry method, confocal microscopy and fluorescent potential-sensitive probes TMRM and MTG. Influence of different concentrations of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was studied using flow cytometry method and a fraction of myometrium mitochondria of unpregnant rats. It was shown that 1-10 microM calmidazolium gradually reduced mitochondria membrane potential. At the same time 10-100 microM trifluoperazine influenced as follows: 10 microM--increased polarization, while 100 microM--caused almost complete depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In experiments which were conducted with the use of confocal microscopy method and myometrium cells it was shown, that MTG addition to the incubation medium led to the appearance of fluorescence signal in a green range. Addition of the second probe (TMRM) resulted in the appearance of fluorescent signal in a red range. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization by 1 microM CCCP or 10 mM NaN3 was accompanied by the decline of "red" fluorescence intensity, "green" fluorescence was kept. The 10-15 minute incubation of myometrium cells in the presence 10 microM calmidazolium or 100 microM trifluoperazine was accompanied by almost complete decrease of the TMRM fluorescent signal. Thus, with the use of potential-sensitive fluorescent probes TMRM and MTG it was shown, that calmodulin antagonists modulate mitochondrial membrane potential of myometrium cells.

  2. T-2307 causes collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Toshinari; Yamada, Eio; Kimura, Akiko; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Hiroyoshi; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi

    2012-11-01

    T-2307, an arylamidine compound, has been previously reported to have broad-spectrum in vitro and in vivo antifungal activities against clinically significant pathogens, including Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Aspergillus species, and is now undergoing clinical trials. Here we investigated the mechanism of action of T-2307 using yeast cells and mitochondria isolated from yeast and rat liver. Nonfermentative growth of Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in glycerol medium, in which yeasts relied on mitochondrial respiratory function, was inhibited at 0.001 to 0.002 μg/ml (0.002 to 0.004 μM) of T-2307. However, fermentative growth in dextrose medium was not inhibited by T-2307. Microscopic examination using Mitotracker fluorescent dye, a cell-permeant mitochondrion-specific probe, demonstrated that T-2307 impaired the mitochondrial function of C. albicans and S. cerevisiae at concentrations near the MIC in glycerol medium. T-2307 collapsed the mitochondrial membrane potential in mitochondria isolated from S. cerevisiae at 20 μM. On the other hand, in isolated rat liver mitochondria, T-2307 did not have any effect on the mitochondrial membrane potential at 10 mM. Moreover, T-2307 had little inhibitory and stimulatory effect on mitochondrial respiration in rat liver mitochondria. In conclusion, T-2307 selectively disrupted yeast mitochondrial function, and it was also demonstrated that the fungal mitochondrion is an attractive antifungal target.

  3. Proteasome Impairment Induces Recovery of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and an Alternative Pathway of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Ryohei; Yashiroda, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital and highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse and divide to maintain mitochondrial quality. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs cellular integrity and is known to be associated with various human diseases. However, the mechanism by which the quality of mitochondria is maintained remains largely unexplored. Here we show that impaired proteasome function recovers the growth of yeast cells lacking Fzo1, a pivotal protein for mitochondrial fusion. Decreased proteasome activity increased the mitochondrial oxidoreductase protein Mia40 and the ratio of the short isoform of mitochondrial intermembrane protein Mgm1 (s-Mgm1) to the long isoform (l-Mgm1). The increase in Mia40 restored mitochondrial membrane potential, while the increase in the s-Mgm1/l-Mgm1 ratio promoted mitochondrial fusion in an Fzo1-independent manner. Our findings demonstrate a new pathway for mitochondrial quality control that is induced by proteasome impairment. PMID:26552703

  4. Mitochondrial membrane potential is regulated by vimentin intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Chernoivanenko, Ivan S; Matveeva, Elena A; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Goldman, Robert D; Minin, Alexander A

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates that the association of mitochondria with vimentin intermediate filaments (VIFs) measurably increases their membrane potential. This increase is detected by quantitatively comparing the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria stained with the membrane potential-sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine-ethyl ester (TMRE) in murine vimentin-null fibroblasts with that in the same cells expressing human vimentin (∼35% rise). When vimentin expression is silenced by small hairpin RNA (shRNA) to reduce vimentin by 90%, the fluorescence intensity of mitochondria decreases by 20%. The increase in membrane potential is caused by specific interactions between a subdomain of the non-α-helical N terminus (residues 40 to 93) of vimentin and mitochondria. In rho 0 cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and consequently missing several key proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (ρ(0) cells), the membrane potential generated by an alternative anaerobic process is insensitive to the interactions between mitochondria and VIF. The results of our studies show that the close association between mitochondria and VIF is important both for determining their position in cells and their physiologic activity.

  5. Simultaneous imaging of cell and mitochondrial membrane potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, D L; Wei, M D; Febbroriello, P; Carson, J H; Loew, L M

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of charged membrane-permeable molecular probes between intracellular organelles, the cytoplasm, and the outside medium is governed by the relative membrane electrical potentials of these regions through coupled equilibria described by the Nernst equation. A series of highly fluorescent cationic dyes of low membrane binding and toxicity (Ehrenberg, B., V. Montana, M.-D. Wei, J. P. Wuskell, and L. M. Loew, 1988. Biophys. J. 53:785-794) allows the monitoring of these equilibria through digital imaging video microscopy. We employ this combination of technologies to assess, simultaneously, the membrane potentials of cells and of their organelles in situ. We describe the methodology and optimal conditions for such measurements, and apply the technique to concomitantly follow, with good time resolution, the mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in several cultured cell lines. The time course of variations induced by chemical agents (ionophores, uncouplers, electron transport, and energy transfer inhibitors) in either or both these potentials is easily quantitated, and in accordance with mechanistic expectations. The methodology should therefore be applicable to the study of more subtle and specific, biologically induced potential changes in cells. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 PMID:2611324

  6. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  7. Screen for small molecules increasing the mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Montague, Christine R; Fitzmaurice, Aileen; Hover, Bradley M; Salazar, Noe A; Fey, Julien P

    2014-03-01

    The identification of small molecules that positively modulate the mitochondrial respiratory function has broad applications in fundamental research, therapeutic target validation, and drug discovery. We present an approach in which primary screens for mitochondrial function in yeast are used to efficiently identify a subset of high-value compounds that can in turn be rapidly tested against a broad range of mammalian cell lines. The ability of the yeast assay to successfully identify in a high-throughput format hit compounds that increase the mitochondrial membrane potential and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels by as little as 15% was demonstrated. In this study, 14 hits were identified from a collection of 13,680 compounds. Secondary testing with myotubes, fibroblasts, and PC-12 and HepG2 cells identified two compounds increasing ATP levels in hepatocytes and two other compounds increasing ATP in fibroblasts. The effect on hepatocytes was further studied using genomic and mitochondrial proteomic tools to characterize the changes induced by the two compounds. Changes in the accumulation of a series of factors involved in early gene response or apoptosis or linked to metabolic functions (i.e., β-Klotho, RORα, PGC-1α, G6PC, IGFBP1, FTL) were discovered.

  8. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission. PMID:26490419

  9. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission.

  10. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential by ferulenol and restoration by propolis extract: antiapoptotic role of propolis.

    PubMed

    Nadia, Boussenane H; Wided, Kebsa; Kheira, Boutabet; Hassiba, Rouibah; Lamia, Benguedouar; Rhouati, S; Alyane, M; Zellagui, A; Lahouel, M

    2009-12-01

    This paper reports an investigation of the ability of propolis extract (a resinous substance collected by honeybees from various plant sources) to restore the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by ferulenol, a sesquiterpene prenylated coumarin derivative isolated from the plant Ferula vesceritensis . We show that ferulenol was able to induce the permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. This effect is caused by the interaction of the compound with the mitochondrial respiratory chain, more particularly by the fall of membrane potential and the inhibition of complex II. We have previously demonstrated that this inhibition results from a limitation of electron transfers involved in the respiratory chain and initiated by the reduction of ubiquinone. We hypothesized that the protective effect of propolis could be due to a direct action on mitochondrial functions. So we have investigated in vitro the mitochondrial effects of Algerian propolis using rat liver mitochondria, by analysing their effects on membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial swelling. We show that propolis extract was able to restore the fall of mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together these data reveal that propolis extract may be an interesting inhibitor of PTP and provide an additional mechanism by which the natural product propolis extract may restore the mitochondrial membrane potential and to prevent apoptotic process.

  11. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  12. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2014-01-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between meso-scale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The 2D axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (PMF) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high PMF is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the meso-scale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function. PMID:24483502

  13. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  14. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death.

  15. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Dian-Lothrop, Elke A; Meinecke, Michael; Kepp, Oliver; Ross, Katharina; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Harsman, Anke; Hauf, Eva; Brinkmann, Volker; Günther, Dirk; Herrmann, Ines; Hurwitz, Robert; Rassow, Joachim; Wagner, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m). The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m) loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m) is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection. PMID:19851451

  16. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  17. VDAC electronics: 1. VDAC-hexo(gluco)kinase generator of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-05-01

    The simplest mechanism of the generation of the mitochondrial outer membrane potential (OMP) by the VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)-hexokinase complex (VHC), suggested earlier, and by the VDAC-glucokinase complex (VGC), was computationally analyzed. Even at less than 4% of VDACs bound to hexokinase, the calculated OMP is high enough to trigger the electrical closure of VDACs beyond the complexes at threshold concentrations of glucose. These results confirmed our previous hypothesis that the Warburg effect is caused by the electrical closure of VDACs, leading to global restriction of the outer membrane permeability coupled to aerobic glycolysis. The model showed that the inhibition of the conductance and/or an increase in the voltage sensitivity of a relatively small fraction of VDACs by factors like tubulin potentiate the electrical closure of the remaining free VDACs. The extrusion of calcium ions from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the generated OMP, positive inside, might increase cancer cell resistance to death. Within the VGC model, the known effect of induction of ATP release from mitochondria by accumulated glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic beta cells might result not only of the known effect of GK dissociation from the VDAC-GK complex, but also of a decrease in the free energy of glucokinase reaction, leading to the OMP decrease and VDAC opening. We suggest that the VDAC-mediated electrical control of the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, dependent on metabolic conditions, is a fundamental physiological mechanism of global regulation of mitochondrial functions and of cell death. PMID:24412217

  18. Modulation of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species production by copper in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gyulkhandanyan, Armen V; Feeney, Chris J; Pennefather, Peter S

    2003-10-01

    In monolayers of cultured rat astrocytes a number of agents that induce oxidative stress act synergistically with exposure to copper leading to rapid depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Psi m) and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Copper sensitized astrocytes to the action of menadione, an intracellular generator of superoxide anion radical, exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I. However, significant differences were observed in the ability to modulate the copper-enhanced oxidative stress depending on which stressor was used. The inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition cyclosporin A attenuated the effect of copper and rotenone, but had no protective action in the case of H2O2/copper and menadione/copper combinations. The H2O2 scavenger pyruvate was effective at protecting mitochondria against damage associated with the combined exposure to H2O2/copper and menadione/copper but not to the rotenone/copper combination. The antioxidant Trolox was ineffective at protecting against any of these actions and indeed had a damaging effect when combined with copper. The membrane-permeable copper chelator neocuproine combined with sensitizing concentrations of menadione caused a decrease in Psi m, mimicking the action of copper. Penicillamine, a membrane-impermeable copper chelator, was effective at reducing copper sensitization. Endogenous copper, mobilized during periods of oxidative stress, may play a role in the pathophysiology of brain injury. Our results suggest that this might be particularly dangerous in dysfunctional conditions in which the mitochondrial electron transport chain is compromised.

  19. Peroxynitrite-mediated nitrosative stress decreases motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Treulen, F; Sánchez, R; Villegas, J V

    2015-03-01

    Nitrosative stress is produced by high levels of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The RNS include peroxynitrite, a highly reactive free radical produced from a diffusion-controlled reaction between nitric oxide and superoxide anion. Peroxynitrite causes nitration and oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA, and is thus considered an important pathogenic mechanism in various diseases. Although high levels of peroxynitrite are associated with astenozoospermia, few reports exist regarding the in vitro effect of high levels of this RNS on human sperm. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of nitrosative stress caused by peroxynitrite on the viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of human spermatozoa. To do this, human spermatozoa from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a molecule that generates peroxynitrite. Incubations were done at 37°C for up to 4 h with SIN-1 concentrations between 0.2 and 1.0 mmol/l. Generation of peroxynitrite was confirmed using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) by spectrophotometry and flow cytometry. Sperm viability was assessed by propidium iodide staining; sperm motility was analyzed by CASA, and the state of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by JC-1 staining. Viability and ΔΨm were measured by flow cytometry. The results showed an increase in DHR oxidation, demonstrating the generation of peroxynitrite through SIN-1. Peroxynitrite decreased progressive and total motility, as well as some sperm kinetic parameters. Mitochondrial membrane potential also decreased. These alterations occurred with no decrease in sperm viability. In conclusion, peroxynitrite-induced nitrosative stress impairs vital functions in the male gamete, possibly contributing to male infertility. PMID:25425609

  20. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  1. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification.

  2. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  3. The Force Exerted by the Membrane Potential During Protein Import into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The electrostatic force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated and found to vary from 1.4 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 12 to 6.5 Angstroms, its measured range. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a nonaqueous pore gives a force of 3.1 pN per unit charge, which represents an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein harness, these results imply that a force of 11 plus or minus 4 pN is sufficient to catalyze the unfolding of harness during import. Comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy suggests that the two are not inconsistent.

  4. Old is new again: a chemical probe for targeting mitochondria and monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Liu, Wenwen; Huang, Xianhong; Zhang, Guanxin; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Deqing; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-09-01

    Here, we explore the new application of an old molecule. We find that the tetraphenylethene-indolium molecule (TPE-indo) can both image the mitochondria (in the aggregated state), and indicate mitochondrial activity by the fluorescence change of TPE-indo. TPE-indo shows good photostability, longer emission wavelength, targeting effect for mitochondria, and better response to the changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm).

  5. Mitochondrial Ca2+ and membrane potential, an alternative pathway for Interleukin 6 to regulate CD4 cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Lirussi, Dario; Thornton, Tina M; Jelley-Gibbs, Dawn M; Diehl, Sean A; Case, Laure K; Madesh, Muniswamy; Taatjes, Douglas J; Teuscher, Cory; Haynes, Laura; Rincón, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    IL-6 plays an important role in determining the fate of effector CD4 cells and the cytokines that these cells produce. Here we identify a novel molecular mechanism by which IL-6 regulates CD4 cell effector function. We show that IL-6-dependent signal facilitates the formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes to sustain high mitochondrial membrane potential late during activation of CD4 cells. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization caused by IL-6 is uncoupled from the production of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. However, it is a mechanism to raise the levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ late during activation of CD4 cells. Increased levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ in the presence of IL-6 are used to prolong Il4 and Il21 expression in effector CD4 cells. Thus, the effect of IL-6 on mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial Ca2+ is an alternative pathway by which IL-6 regulates effector function of CD4 cells and it could contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06376.001 PMID:25974216

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi infection disturbs mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production rate in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivali; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Wen, Jian-jun; Wu, Yewen; Huang, Ming-He; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of Trypanosoma cruzi invasion and inflammatory processes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mouse atrial cardiomyocyte line (HL-1) and primary adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes were incubated with T. cruzi (Tc) trypomastigotes, Tc lysate (TcTL) or Tc secreted proteins (TcSP) for 0-72 h, and ROS measured by amplex red assay. Cardiomyocytes infected by T. cruzi (but not those incubated with TcTL or TcSP) exhibited a linear increase in ROS production during 2-48 h post-infection (max.18-fold increase) which was further enhanced by recombinant cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ). We observed no increase in NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, and myeloperoxidase activities, and specific inhibitor of these enzymes did not block the increased rate of ROS production in infected cardiomyocytes. Instead, the mitochondrial membrane potential was perturbed, and resulted in inefficient electron transport chain (ETC) activity, and enhanced electron leakage and ROS formation in infected cardiomyocytes. HL-1 rho (ρ) cardiomyocytes lacked a functional ETC, and exhibited no increase in ROS formation in response to T. cruzi. Together, these results demonstrate that invasion by T. cruzi and inflammatory milieu affect mitochondrial integrity and contribute to electron transport chain inefficiency and ROS production in cardiomyocytes. PMID:19686837

  7. Mitochondrial membrane potential in single living adult rat cardiac myocytes exposed to anoxia or metabolic inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Di Lisa, F; Blank, P S; Colonna, R; Gambassi, G; Silverman, H S; Stern, M D; Hansford, R G

    1995-01-01

    1. The relation between mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) and cell function was investigated in single adult rat cardiac myocytes during anoxia and reoxygenation. delta psi m was studied by loading myocytes with JC-1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetra-ethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide), a fluorescent probe characterized by two emission peaks (539 and 597 nm with excitation at 490 nm) corresponding to monomer and aggregate forms of the dye. 2. De-energizing conditions applied to mitochondria, cell suspensions or single cells decreased the aggregate emission and increased the monomer emission. This latter result cannot be explained by changes of JC-1 concentration in the aqueous mitochondrial matrix phase indicating that hydrophobic interaction of the probe with membranes has to be taken into account to explain JC-1 fluorescence properties in isolated mitochondria or intact cells. 3. A different sensitivity of the two JC-1 forms to delta psi m changes was shown in isolated mitochondria by the effects of ADP and FCCP and the calibration with K+ diffusion potentials. The monomer emission was responsive to values of delta psi m below 140 mV, which hardly modified the aggregate emission. Thus JC-1 represents a unique double sensor which can provide semi-quantitative information in both low and high potential ranges. 4. At the onset of glucose-free anoxia the epifluorescence of individual myocytes studied in the single excitation (490 nm)-double emission (530 and 590 nm) mode showed a gradual decline of the aggregate emission, which reached a plateau while electrically stimulated (0.2 Hz) contraction was still retained. The subsequent failure of contraction was followed by the rise of the emission at 530 nm, corresponding to the monomer form of the dye, concomitantly with the development of rigor contracture. 5. The onset of the rigor was preceded by the increase in intracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) monitored by mag-indo-1 epifluorescence

  8. In vitro effect of pulsed 900 MHz GSM radiation on mitochondrial membrane potential and motility of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Nadia; Huyser, Carin; Fourie, Francois; Toivo, Tim; Leszczynski, Dariusz; Franken, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    Ejaculated, density purified, human spermatozoa were exposed to pulsed 900 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation at two specific absorption rate levels (SAR 2.0 and 5.7 W/kg) and compared with controls over time. Change in sperm mitochondrial membrane potential was analysed using flow cytometry. Sperm motility was determined by computer assisted sperm analysis (CASA). There was no effect of pulsed 900 MHz GSM radiation on mitochondrial membrane potential. This was also the case for all kinematic parameters assessed at a SAR of 2.0 W/kg. However, over time, the two kinematic parameters straight line velocity (VSL) and beat-cross frequency (BCF) were significantly impaired (P < 0.05) after the exposure at SAR 5.7 W/kg and no exposure by time interaction was present. This result should not be ascribed to thermal effects, due to the cooling methods employed in the RF chamber and temperature control within the incubator.

  9. Protective effect of silymarin on viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm treated with sodium arsenite

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Farzaneh; Momeni, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sodium arsenite can impair male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress. Silymarin is known as a potent antioxidant. Objective: This study was performed to investigate if silymarin can prevent the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on ram sperm viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential. Materials and Methods: Epidydimal spermatozoa obtained from ram were divided into five groups: 1) Spermatozoa at 0 hr, 2) spermatozoa at 180 min (control), 3) spermatozoa treated with sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min, 4) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) + sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min and 5) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) for 180 min. MTT assay and Rhodamine 123 staining were used to assess sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential respectively. Sperm motility was performed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Results: Viability (p<0.01), nonprogressive motility (p<0.001) and intact mitochondrial membrane potential (p<0.001) of the spermatozoa were significantly decreased in sodium arsenite treated group compared to control group. In silymarin + sodium arsenite group, silymarin could significantly reverse the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on these sperm parameters compared to sodium arsenite group (p<0.001). In addition, the application of silymarin alone for 180 minutes could significantly increase progressively motile sperm (p<0.001) and decrease non motile sperm (p<0.01) compared to the control. Conclusion: Silymarin could compensate the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on viability, nonprogressive motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm. PMID:27525323

  10. Investigation of cyanine dyes for in vivo optical imaging of altered mitochondrial membrane potential in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Satoru; Temma, Takashi; Shimizu, Yoichi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) alteration is an important target for cancer diagnosis. In this study, we designed a series of near-infrared fluorescent cationic cyanine dyes with varying alkyl chain lengths (IC7-1 derivatives) to provide diverse lipophilicities and serum albumin-binding rates, and we evaluated the usefulness of these derivatives for in vivo Δψm imaging. IC7-1 derivatives with side chains from methyl to hexyl (IC7-1-Me to IC7-1-He) were synthesized, and their optical properties were measured. Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution were investigated with depolarized HeLa cells from carbonyl cyanine m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) treatment using a spectrofluorometer and a fluorescence microscope. Serum albumin-binding rates were evaluated using albumin-binding inhibitors. In vivo optical imaging was performed with HeLa cell xenograft mice following intravenous administration of IC7-1 derivatives with or without warfarin and CCCP as in vivo blocking agents. IC7-1 derivatives showing maximum excitation and emission wavelengths at 823 nm and ∼845 nm, respectively, were synthesized. IC7-1-Me to -Bu showed fluorescence in mitochondria that decreased with CCCP treatment in a concentration-dependent manner, which showed that IC7-1-Me to -Bu successfully indicated Δψm. Tumors were clearly visualized after IC7-1-Bu administration. Treatment with warfarin or CCCP significantly decreased IC7-1-Bu fluorescence in the tumor region. In summary, IC7-1-Bu exhibited fluorescence localized to mitochondria dependent on Δψm, which enabled clear in vivo tumor imaging via serum albumin as a drug carrier for effective tumor targeting. Our data suggest that IC7-1-Bu is a promising NIR probe for in vivo imaging of the altered Δψm of tumor cells. PMID:24737784

  11. Fibrates inhibit the apoptosis of Batten disease lymphoblast cells via autophagy recovery and regulation of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hong, Minho; Song, Ki Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Yi, SunShin; Lee, Yong Seok; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Jun, Hyun Sik; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2016-03-01

    Batten disease (BD; also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a genetic disorder inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and is characterized by blindness, seizures, cognitive decline, and early death resulting from the inherited mutation of the CLN3 gene. Mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, disrupted autophagy, and enhanced apoptosis have been suggested to play a role in BD pathogenesis. Fibrates, a class of lipid-lowering drugs that induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activation, are the most commonly used PPAR agonists. Assuming that fibrates have a neuroprotective effect, we studied the effects of fibrates, fenofibrate, bezafibrate, and gemfibrozil on apoptosis, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, and defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells. The viability of fibrate-treated BD lymphoblast cells increased to levels of normal lymphoblast cells. In addition, treatment with fibrates inhibited depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential in BD lymphoblast cells. Defective autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells was normalized when treated with fibrates as indicated by increased acridine orange staining. The recovery of autophagy in BD lymphoblast cells is most likely attributed to the upregulation of autophagy proteins, lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), and LC3 I/II, after treatment with fibrates. This study therefore suggests that fibrates may have a therapeutic potential against BD. PMID:26659390

  12. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  13. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R; Shaffer, Karl J; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J; Robb, Ellen L; Prime, Tracy A; Chouchani, Edward T; Cochemé, Helena M; Fearnley, Ian M; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M; Porteous, Carolyn M; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by "click" chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo.

  14. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R.; Shaffer, Karl J.; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J.; Robb, Ellen L.; Prime, Tracy A.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M.; Porteous, Carolyn M.; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by “click” chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. PMID:26712463

  15. Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome after Contentious-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation and Change in Platelet Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Nandan K.; Sorensen, Erik N.; Feller, Erika D.; Pham, Si M.; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the change of platelet function and platelet mitochondrial membrane potential in contentious-flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) implanted heart failure (HF) patients with or without systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Methods and Results We recruited 31 CF-LVAD patients (16 SIRS and 15 Non-SIRS) and 11 healthy volunteers as the control. Pre and post implant blood samples were collected. We used PFA-100 to test the platelet functionality. Mitochondrial potential sensitive dye was used to detect platelet dysfunction (ΔΨm) via flow cytometry. The percentage of depolarized ΔΨm platelets was found to be pre-existing conditions in all HF patients prior to CF-LVAD implantation compared to controls (10.3±6.3vs.2.8±2.2%,p<0.001). As evident from PFA-100 test, The HF patients who developed SIRS after CF-LVAD implantation had significantly higher qualitative platelet defects and thrombocytopathies compared to baseline level. After implantation, the depolarized platelets in the SIRS patients increased by 2-fold compared to the baseline (18.2±8.4vs.9.0±6.6%,p<0.01); while no change was noticed in the Non-SIRS patients (10.9±6.2vs.11.7±5.8%,p=0.75). Conclusions We identified that the platelet function and mitochondrial damage were enhanced in CFLVAD patients with SIRS. Our findings suggest that depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential is associated with SIRS after CF-LVAD implant surgery. PMID:25921521

  16. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  17. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30–35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  18. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-12-08

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances.

  19. Microcystic cyanobacteria causes mitochondrial membrane potential alteration and reactive oxygen species formation in primary cultured rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ding, W X; Shen, H M; Shen, Y; Zhu, H G; Ong, C N

    1998-01-01

    Cyanobacteria contamination of water has become a growing public health problem worldwide. Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the most common toxic cyanobacteria. It is capable of producing microcystins, a group of cyclic heptapeptide compounds with potent hepatotoxicity and tumor promotion activity. The present study investigated the effect of microcystic cyanobacteria on primary cultured rat hepatocytes by examining mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) changes and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in cells treated with lyophilized freshwater microcystic cyanobacteria extract (MCE). Rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) was used as a fluorescent probe for changes in mitochondrial fluorescence intensity. The mitochondrial Rh-123 fluorescence intensity in MCE-treated hepatocytes, examined using a laser confocal microscope, responded in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The results thus indicate that the alteration of MMP might be an important event in the hepatotoxicity caused by cyanobacteria. Moreover, the parallel increase of ROS formation detected using another fluorescent probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate also suggests the involvement of oxidative stress in the hepatotoxicity caused by cyanobacteria. The fact that MMP changes precede other cytotoxic parameters such as nuclear staining by propidium iodide and cell morphological changes suggests that mitochondrial damage is closely associated with MCE-induced cell injury in cultured rat hepatocytes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9637798

  20. Relation between cell death progression, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential in fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells under heat-shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyatrikas, Darya V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Stepanov, Alexei V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Borovskii, Gennadii B; Rikhvanov, Eugene G

    2015-06-01

    Moderate heat shock increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that led to cell death in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Conditions that disturb mitochondrial functions such as treatment by uncouplers and petite mutation were shown to inhibit ROS production and protects cell from thermal death. Hence, mitochondria are responsible for ROS production and play an active role in cell death. An increase in ROS production was accompanied by hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane. All agents suppressing hyperpolarization also suppressed heat-induced ROS production. It was supposed that generation of ROS under moderate heat shock in glucose-grown S. cerevisiae cells is driven by the mitochondrial membrane potential.

  1. The MEF2 gene is essential for yeast longevity, with a dual role in cell respiration and maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Sylvie; McKinnon, Ross A; Andrews, Stuart; de Barros Lopes, Miguel A

    2011-04-20

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEF2 gene is a mitochondrial protein translation factor. Formerly believed to catalyze peptide elongation, evidence now suggests its involvement in ribosome recycling. This study confirms the role of the MEF2 gene for cell respiration and further uncovers a slow growth phenotype and reduced chronological lifespan. Furthermore, in comparison with cytoplasmic ρ(0) strains, mef2Δ strains have a marked reduction of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondria show a tendency to aggregate, suggesting an additional role for the MEF2 gene in maintenance of mitochondrial health, a role that may also be shared by other mitochondrial protein synthesis factors.

  2. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka=1.2×10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow cytometry analysis of annexin V(-)/7-AAD(+) stained cells demonstrated substantial reduction in live population due to complete loss of cell membrane integrity. Overall the data suggested the formation of butachlor-DNA complex, as an initiating event in butachlor-induced DNA damage. The results elucidated the oxidative role of butachlor in intracellular ROS production, and

  3. Pharmacologic manipulations of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) selectively in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Griguer, Corinne E; Oliva, Claudia R; Gillespie, G Yancey; Gobin, Eric; Marcorelles, Pascale; Yancey Gillespie, G

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic control theory applies principles of bioenergetics for the control or management of complex diseases. Since metabolism is a general process underlying all biologic phenotypes, changes in metabolism can potentially modify phenotype. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that experimental modulation of the availability of cellular energy can potentially alter cell phenotypes and cell functions critical to tumor progression including cell division. The purpose of this study was to determine if OMX-2, a methylquinone system designed to shuttle electrons from mitochondrial complexes, was able to target mitochondria in cancer cells and trigger cell death. Using flow cytometry, cell viability assays, and ATP measurements, we found that OMX-2 differentially decreased DeltaPsim without triggering cell death. In contrast, known blockers of the Electron Transport Chain (ETC) decreased DeltaPsim and triggered cell death. When normal cells were treated with OMX-2, neither DeltaPsim or cell death was triggered. Furthermore, OMX-2 modulated intracellular ATP and decreased cell numbers of glioma cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that OMX-2 induced a reversible cell cycle arrest in G1/S. Finally, impairment of glycolysis by 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DOG) acted synergistically with OMX-2 to trigger cell death. Overall, these results indicate that it is possible to selectively target cancer cells by decreasing DeltaPsim and induced cell cycle arrest without triggering cell death. Moreover, pharmacological approaches designed to act on both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation can be considered as a new approach to selectively kill cancer cells.

  4. Overexpression of the human 2-oxoglutarate carrier lowers mitochondrial membrane potential in HEK-293 cells: contrast with the unique cold-induced mitochondrial carrier CGI-69.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X X; Lewin, D A; Zhong, A; Brush, J; Schow, P W; Sherwood, S W; Pan, G; Adams, S H

    2001-01-01

    Using differential mRNA expression analysis, a previously uncharacterized gene was found to be up-regulated 2-fold in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of mice exposed to cold (4 degrees C) for 48 h. Contig and homology analysis revealed that the gene represents the murine orthologue to a sequence from a public database encoding a putative human protein (CGI-69). The presence of mitochondrial carrier domains in the human protein, its transmembrane topology and cold-induction of the mouse CGI-69 gene in BAT prompted an analysis of the idea that CGI-69 may represent a new uncoupling protein (UCP) functional homologue. However, transfection of human CGI-69 isoforms in HEK-293 cells yielded no change in mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), despite localization of FLAG-tagged CGI-69 to mitochondria of MCF7 cells. Surprisingly, overexpression of the human 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC) protein (originally designed as a negative control) sparked a significant drop in Deltapsi(m), possibly signalling a previously unappreciated uncoupling activity for the OGC. PMID:11139402

  5. Effects of transmembrane potential and pH gradient on the cytochrome c-promoted fusion of mitochondrial mimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Cintia; Pessoto, Felipe S; Graves, Catharine V; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Nantes, Iseli L

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of ΔΨ and ΔpH (pH gradient) on the interaction of cytochrome c with a mitochondrial mimetic membrane composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and cardiolipin (CL) leading to vesicle fusion. ΔpH generated by lowered bulk pH (pH(out)) of PCPECL liposomes, with an internal pH (pH(in)) of 8.0, favored vesicle fusion with a titration sigmoidal profile (pK(a) ~ 6.9). Conversely, ΔpH generated by enhanced pH(in) of PCPECL at a pH(out) of 6.0 favored the fusion of vesicles with a linear profile. We did not observe a significant amount of liposome fusion when ΔpH was generated by lowered pH(in) at a pH(out) of 8.0. At bulk acidic pH, ΔΨ generated by Na⁺ gradient also favored cyt c-promoted vesicle fusion. At acidic and alkaline pH(out), the presence of ΔpH and ΔΨ did not affect cytochrome c binding affinity measured by pyrene quenching. Therefore, cytochrome c-mediated PC/PE/CL vesicle fusion is dependent of ionization of the protein site L (acidic pH) and the presence of transmembrane potential. The effect of transmembrane potential is probably related to the generation of defects on the lipid bilayer. These results are consistent with previous reports showing that cytochrome c release prior to the dissipation of the ΔΨ(M) blocks inner mitochondrial membrane fusion during apoptosis.

  6. Synthesis, Molecular Structure, DNA/Protein Binding, Cytotoxicity, Apoptosis, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Dibenzoxanthenes Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Hui; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yun-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Two dibenzoxanthene isomers 3 and 4 were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of the two compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Binding of two compounds with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and BSA (bovine serum albumin) has been thoroughly investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The DNA-binding constants were determined to be 2.51 (± 0.09) × 10(3) for compound 3 and 4.55 (± 0.10) × 10(3) for compound 4. Two compounds can cleave pBR322 DNA upon irradiation. Significant nuclear damages of BEL-7402 cells were observed with compound treatment in a comet assay. The cytotoxicity in vitro was investigated by MTT method. These compounds have been found to induce nuclear condensation and fragmentation in BEL-7402 cells. The two compounds can enhance intracellular reactive oxygen species and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. The compounds activated caspase-3 and caspase-7, down-regulated the expression levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and up-regulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. These compounds induce apoptosis of BEL-7402 cells through an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  7. SB203580 enhances the RV-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-yang; Zhuang, Cai-ping; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    Resveratrol (RV), a naturally occurring phytoalexin, is known to possess a wide spectrum of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects in various stages of human tumors. p38, a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily, is always activated by some extracellular stimulus to regulate many cellular signal transduction pathways, such as apoptosis, proliferation, and inflammation and so on. In this report, we assessed the effect of SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK signaling pathway, on the RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. CCK-8 assay showed that pretreatment with SB203580 significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of RV, which was further verified by analyzing the phosphatidylserine externalization using flow cytometry. In order to further confirm whether SB203580 accelerated apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, we analyzed the dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) of cells stained with rhodamine 123 by using flow cytometry after treatment with RV in the absence and presence of SB203580. Our data for the first time reported that p38 inhibitor SB203580 enhanced the RV-induced apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway.

  8. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  9. Quantitative measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in cultured cells: calcium-induced de- and hyperpolarization of neuronal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, Akos A; Chinopoulos, Christos; Birket, Matthew J; Jastroch, Martin; Vitelli, Cathy; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨM) is a central intermediate in oxidative energy metabolism. Although ΔΨM is routinely measured qualitatively or semi-quantitatively using fluorescent probes, its quantitative assay in intact cells has been limited mostly to slow, bulk-scale radioisotope distribution methods. Here we derive and verify a biophysical model of fluorescent potentiometric probe compartmentation and dynamics using a bis-oxonol-type indicator of plasma membrane potential (ΔΨP) and the ΔΨM probe tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) using fluorescence imaging and voltage clamp. Using this model we introduce a purely fluorescence-based quantitative assay to measure absolute values of ΔΨM in millivolts as they vary in time in individual cells in monolayer culture. The ΔΨP-dependent distribution of the probes is modelled by Eyring rate theory. Solutions of the model are used to deconvolute ΔΨP and ΔΨM in time from the probe fluorescence intensities, taking into account their slow, ΔΨP-dependent redistribution and Nernstian behaviour. The calibration accounts for matrix:cell volume ratio, high- and low-affinity binding, activity coefficients, background fluorescence and optical dilution, allowing comparisons of potentials in cells or cell types differing in these properties. In cultured rat cortical neurons, ΔΨM is −139 mV at rest, and is regulated between −108 mV and −158 mV by concerted increases in ATP demand and Ca2+-dependent metabolic activation. Sensitivity analysis showed that the standard error of the mean in the absolute calibrated values of resting ΔΨM including all biological and systematic measurement errors introduced by the calibration parameters is less than 11 mV. Between samples treated in different ways, the typical equivalent error is ∼5 mV. PMID:22495585

  10. Simultaneous Single Neuron Recording of O2 Consumption, [Ca2+]i and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Glutamate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gleichmann, Marc; Collis, Leon P.; Smith, Peter J.S.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    To order the cellular processes in glutamate toxicity, we simultaneously recorded O2 consumption, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) in single cortical neurons. O2 consumption was measured using an amperometric self-referencing platinum electrode adjacent to neurons in which [Ca2+]i and mΔψ were monitored with Fluo-4 and TMRE+, respectively using a spinning disk laser confocal microscope. Excitotoxic doses of glutamate caused an elevation of [Ca2+]i followed seconds afterwards by an increase in O2 consumption which reached a maximum level within 1 to 5 min. A modest increase in mΔψ occurred during this time period, and then, shortly before maximal O2 consumption was reached, the mΔψ, as indicated by TMRE+ fluorescence, dissipated. Maximal O2 consumption lasted up to 5 min and then declined together with mΔψ and ATP levels, while [Ca2+]i further increased. mΔψ and [Ca2+]i returned to baseline levels when neurons were treated with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shortly after the [Ca2+]i increased. Our unprecedented spatial and time resolution revealed that this sequence of events is identical in all neurons, albeit with considerable variability in magnitude and kinetics of changes in O2 consumption, [Ca2+]i and mΔψ. The data obtained using this new method are consistent with a model where Ca2+ influx causes ATP depletion, despite maximal mitochondrial respiration, minutes after glutamate receptor activation. PMID:19226367

  11. Ram spermatozoa migrating through artificial mucus in vitro have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential but retain their viability.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Carmen; Alvarez, Mercedes; López-Urueña, Elena; Gomes-Alves, Susana; Anel-López, Luis; Chamorro, Cesar A; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino

    2015-06-01

    Sperm motility in vitro is one of the most common predictors of fertility in male screening. We propose that a mucus-penetration assay can isolate a cellular subpopulation critical to reproductive success. To this end, a device was designed with three modules (sample, test and collection) and its conditions of use evaluated (length of mucus, incubation time, mucus medium, sperm concentration and position in relation to the horizontal). The number of spermatozoa migrating and the viability and acrosomal status of the spermatozoa not migrating were calculated. The second objective was to evaluate the qualitative parameters of the spermatozoa migrating in 1.6% polyacrylamide for 30min. The number of spermatozoa migrating and the sperm motility, viability and the acrosomal and mitochondrial status of three sperm populations (fresh, not migrating and migrating) were determined. A higher number of migrating spermatozoa were observed after 60min of incubation, but this situation adversely affected sperm quality. The methylcellulose-based test showed a significantly lower number of migrating spermatozoa than the polyacrylamide test. The position at an angle of 45° resulted in a higher number of migrating spermatozoa in the polyacrylamide-based test. The sperm counts for three consecutive assays indicated an acceptable repeatability of the method. The viability and acrosomal status of the migrating spermatozoa showed no significant changes with regard to the control when the device was placed at 45°, whereas these parameters showed lower values at 0°. The percentage of high mitochondrial membrane potential spermatozoa was significantly reduced in the population of migrating spermatozoa.

  12. Involvement of seminal leukocytes, reactive oxygen species, and sperm mitochondrial membrane potential in the DNA damage of the human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lobascio, A M; De Felici, M; Anibaldi, M; Greco, P; Minasi, M G; Greco, E

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing leukocytes in semen has been a standard component of the semen analysis, but its true significance remains still unknown. In this study, we have correlated the number of seminal leukocytes to various semen parameters. We found a negative correlation between the leukocyte number and sperm concentration (rs  = -0.22; p = 0.01) and motility (rs  = -0.20; p = 0.02). In contrast, a positive correlation between the number of leukocytes and both seminal ROS (rs  = 0.70, p < 0.001; n = 125) and the number of spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation (rs  = 0.43, p = 0.032; n = 25) was found. However, only a trend of positive correlation between ROS and the number of spermatozoa with TUNEL-detected DNA fragmentation was observed. Moreover, this latter was not correlated with loss of sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) (10% vs 35%, rs  = 0.25, p = 0.08; n = 50). Overall these results indicate that the presence of high number of leukocytes in the ejaculate negatively affects key semen parameters, as sperm concentration and motility, associated with infertility conditions. Moreover, they suggest that leukocytes are the major source of the seminal ROS and cause of sperm DNA fragmentation. However, the absence of a clear correlation between ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation, and spermatozoa with damaged DNA and MMP loss, suggest that ROS produced by leukocytes might be not the only cause of DNA damage in spermatozoa and that intrinsic mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathways might not have a major impact on sperm DNA fragmentation.

  13. Ram spermatozoa migrating through artificial mucus in vitro have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential but retain their viability.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Carmen; Alvarez, Mercedes; López-Urueña, Elena; Gomes-Alves, Susana; Anel-López, Luis; Chamorro, Cesar A; Anel, Luis; de Paz, Paulino

    2015-06-01

    Sperm motility in vitro is one of the most common predictors of fertility in male screening. We propose that a mucus-penetration assay can isolate a cellular subpopulation critical to reproductive success. To this end, a device was designed with three modules (sample, test and collection) and its conditions of use evaluated (length of mucus, incubation time, mucus medium, sperm concentration and position in relation to the horizontal). The number of spermatozoa migrating and the viability and acrosomal status of the spermatozoa not migrating were calculated. The second objective was to evaluate the qualitative parameters of the spermatozoa migrating in 1.6% polyacrylamide for 30min. The number of spermatozoa migrating and the sperm motility, viability and the acrosomal and mitochondrial status of three sperm populations (fresh, not migrating and migrating) were determined. A higher number of migrating spermatozoa were observed after 60min of incubation, but this situation adversely affected sperm quality. The methylcellulose-based test showed a significantly lower number of migrating spermatozoa than the polyacrylamide test. The position at an angle of 45° resulted in a higher number of migrating spermatozoa in the polyacrylamide-based test. The sperm counts for three consecutive assays indicated an acceptable repeatability of the method. The viability and acrosomal status of the migrating spermatozoa showed no significant changes with regard to the control when the device was placed at 45°, whereas these parameters showed lower values at 0°. The percentage of high mitochondrial membrane potential spermatozoa was significantly reduced in the population of migrating spermatozoa. PMID:25413445

  14. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H; Bongard, Robert D; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Merker, Marilyn P

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψ(m) and Δψ(p)) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([R(e)]) were measured over time. R123 [R(e)] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [R(e)] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K(+) concentration ([K(+)]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [R(e)], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [R(e)]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [R(e)] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψ(m) (-130 ± 7 and -133 ± 4 mV), Δψ(p) (-36 ± 4 and -49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (K(Pgp), 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψ(m) (-124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψ(m) and Δψ(p.) Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O(2) for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψ(m), hyperoxic cell Δψ(m) was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions.

  16. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schenkel, Laila Cigana

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:24578708

  17. Influence of mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa on in vitro fertilisation outcome.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, P; Ballot, C; Jouy, N; Thomas, P; Marchetti, C

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the outcome of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) is influenced by the percentage of spermatozoa with functional mitochondria, a total of 91 random couples undergoing IVF were included. Mitochondrial function was determined by flow cytometry and expressed as percentage of spermatozoa. Conventional sperm parameters were studied by light microscopy. Reproductive outcome parameters were fertilisation rate, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy. It was found that the fertilisation rate was correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa (r = 0.24, P = 0.01) as well as with the percentage of highly motile spermatozoa. However, we did not find any relationship between the percentage of spermatozoa and embryo quality. Nevertheless, no patient who exhibited less than 64% of spermatozoa achieved pregnancy. It is concluded that determination of Δψ(m) provides accurate information to guide physicians to identify male patients for whom IVF will be unlikely to result in pregnancy. Therefore, we suggest that the percentage of spermatozoa may contribute to identify the most appropriate treatment for an individual patient.

  18. Influence of mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa on in vitro fertilisation outcome.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, P; Ballot, C; Jouy, N; Thomas, P; Marchetti, C

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the outcome of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) is influenced by the percentage of spermatozoa with functional mitochondria, a total of 91 random couples undergoing IVF were included. Mitochondrial function was determined by flow cytometry and expressed as percentage of spermatozoa. Conventional sperm parameters were studied by light microscopy. Reproductive outcome parameters were fertilisation rate, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy. It was found that the fertilisation rate was correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa (r = 0.24, P = 0.01) as well as with the percentage of highly motile spermatozoa. However, we did not find any relationship between the percentage of spermatozoa and embryo quality. Nevertheless, no patient who exhibited less than 64% of spermatozoa achieved pregnancy. It is concluded that determination of Δψ(m) provides accurate information to guide physicians to identify male patients for whom IVF will be unlikely to result in pregnancy. Therefore, we suggest that the percentage of spermatozoa may contribute to identify the most appropriate treatment for an individual patient. PMID:21714802

  19. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions. PMID:27404273

  20. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, Akos A.; Mookerjee, Shona A.; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions. PMID:27404273

  1. Plasma Membrane Potential Oscillations in Insulin Secreting Ins-1 832/13 Cells Do Not Require Glycolysis and Are Not Initiated by Fluctuations in Mitochondrial Bioenergetics*

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Isabel; Gerencser, Akos A.; Schmidt, Sara; Brand, Martin D.; Mulder, Hindrik; Nicholls, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Oscillations in plasma membrane potential play a central role in glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells and related insulinoma cell lines. We have employed a novel fluorescent plasma membrane potential (Δψp) indicator in combination with indicators of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), matrix ATP concentration, and NAD(P)H fluorescence to investigate the role of mitochondria in the generation of plasma membrane potential oscillations in clonal INS-1 832/13 β-cells. Elevated glucose caused oscillations in plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration over the same concentration range required for insulin release, although considerable cell-to-cell heterogeneity was observed. Exogenous pyruvate was as effective as glucose in inducing oscillations, both in the presence and absence of 2.8 mm glucose. Increased glucose and pyruvate each produced a concentration-dependent mitochondrial hyperpolarization. The causal relationships between pairs of parameters (Δψp and [Ca2+]c, Δψp and NAD(P)H, matrix ATP and [Ca2+]c, and Δψm and [Ca2+]c) were investigated at single cell level. It is concluded that, in these β-cells, depolarizing oscillations in Δψp are not initiated by mitochondrial bioenergetic changes. Instead, regardless of substrate, it appears that the mitochondria may simply be required to exceed a critical bioenergetic threshold to allow release of insulin. Once this threshold is exceeded, an autonomous Δψp oscillatory mechanism is initiated. PMID:22418435

  2. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24h and then treated with HBCDD+hCG for additional 2h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD+hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2h of HBCDD+hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD+hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. PMID:25447410

  3. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24h and then treated with HBCDD+hCG for additional 2h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD+hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2h of HBCDD+hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD+hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells.

  4. Preservation of Cellular Glutathione Status and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential by N-Acetylcysteine and Insulin Sensitizers Prevent Carbonyl Stress-Induced Human Brain Endothelial Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Okouchi, Masahiro; Okayama, Naotsuka; Aw, Tak Yee

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cerebral endothelial cell dysfunction is associated with cerebral microvascular complication of primary diabetic encephaolopathy, a neurodegenerative disorder of long-standing diabetes, but the injury mechanisms are poorly understood. This study sought to determine the contribution of carbonyl (methylglyoxal, MG) stress to human brain endothelial cell (IHEC) apoptosis, the relationship to cellular redox status and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the protection by thiol antioxidant and insulin sensitizers. MG exposure induced IHEC apoptosis in association with perturbed cellular glutathione (GSH) redox status, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), activation of caspase-9 and -3, and cleavage of polyADP-ribose polymerase. Insulin sensitizers such as biguanides or AMP-activated protein kinase activator, but not glitazones, afforded cytoprotection through preventing Δψm collapse and activation of caspase-9 that was independent of cellular GSH. Similarly, cyclosporine A prevented Δψm collapse, while N-acetylcysteine (NAC) mediated the recovery of cellular GSH redox balance that secondarily preserved Δψm. Collectively, these results provide mechanistic insights into the role of GSH redox status and mitochondrial potential in carbonyl stress-induced apoptosis of brain endothelial cells, with implications for cerebral microvascular complications associated with primary diabetic encephalopathy. The findings that thiol antioxidant and insulin sensitizers afforded cytoprotection suggest potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:19807652

  5. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24 h and then treated with HBCDD + hCG for additional 2 h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24 h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD + hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2 h of HBCDD + hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30 kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD + hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. - Highlights: • HBCDD causes a sustained reduction in ΔΨm and ATP level in Leydig cells. • Prolonged HBCDD exposure decreases hCG-supported steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. • HBCDD targets StAR, HSD17β and CYP11A1 in Leydig

  6. Study on the mitochondrial activity and membrane potential after exposing later stage oocytes of two gorgonian corals (Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis) to cryoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Spikings, E; Huang, I-C; Lin, C

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs provide a valuable habitat for many economically valuable fish and invertebrates. However, they are in serious jeopardy, threatened by increasing over-exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, disease and global climate change. Here, we examined the effect of cryoprotectant exposure on mitochondrial activity and membrane potential in coral oocytes in order to find suitable cryoprotectants towards their successful cryopreservation. According to the No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs), methanol was found to be the least toxic cryoprotectant whilst DMSO was the most toxic cryoprotectant. The results also demonstrated that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in ATP concentrations between Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis after exposure to all concentrations of all cryoprotectants for 30 min. Using confocal microscopy, JC-1 (5,50,6,60-tetrachloro-1,10,3,30-tetraethyl-imidacarbocyanine iodide) staining indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential of Junceella fragilis oocytes reduced after 1 M and 2 M methanol treatment and a loss of the mitochondrial distribution pattern and poor green fluorescence after 3M methanol treatment. Therefore, even oocytes that show no adverse effect of cryoprotectants on survival might suffer some more subtle impacts. The results obtained from this study will provide a basis for development of protocols to cryopreserve the oocytes of gorgonian corals.

  7. Molecular mechanism of mitochondrial membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Erik E; Detmer, Scott A; Chan, David C

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion requires coordinated fusion of the outer and inner membranes. This process leads to exchange of contents, controls the shape of mitochondria, and is important for mitochondrial function. Two types of mitochondrial GTPases are essential for mitochondrial fusion. On the outer membrane, the fuzzy onions/mitofusin proteins form complexes in trans that mediate homotypic physical interactions between adjacent mitochondria and are likely directly involved in outer membrane fusion. Associated with the inner membrane, the OPA1 dynamin-family GTPase maintains membrane structure and is a good candidate for mediating inner membrane fusion. In yeast, Ugo1p binds to both of these GTPases to form a fusion complex, although a related protein has yet to be found in mammals. An understanding of the molecular mechanism of fusion may have implications for Charcot-Marie-Tooth subtype 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy, neurodegenerative diseases caused by mutations in Mfn2 and OPA1.

  8. Levetiracetam Differentially Alters CD95 Expression of Neuronal Cells and the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Immune and Neuronal Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Susannah K.; Shapiro, Lee A.; Tobin, Richard P.; Tow, Benjamin; Zuzek, Aleksej; Mukherjee, Sanjib; Newell-Rogers, M. Karen

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological seizure disorder that affects over 100 million people worldwide. Levetiracetam, either alone, as monotherapy, or as adjunctive treatment, is widely used to control certain types of seizures. Despite its increasing popularity as a relatively safe and effective anti-convulsive treatment option, its mechanism(s) of action are poorly understood. Studies have suggested neuronal, glial, and immune mechanisms of action. Understanding the precise mechanisms of action of levetiracetam would be extremely beneficial in helping to understand the processes involved in seizure generation and epilepsy. Moreover, a full understanding of these mechanisms would help to create more efficacious treatments while minimizing side-effects. The current study examined the effects of levetiracetam on the mitochondrial membrane potential of neuronal and non-neuronal cells, in vitro, in order to determine if levetiracetam influences metabolic processes in these cell types. In addition, this study sought to address possible immune-mediated mechanisms by determining if levetiracetam alters the expression of immune receptor–ligand pairs. The results show that levetiracetam induces expression of CD95 and CD178 on NGF-treated C17.2 neuronal cells. The results also show that levetiracetam increases mitochondrial membrane potential on C17.2 neuronal cells in the presence of nerve growth factor. In contrast, levetiracetam decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential of splenocytes and this effect was dependent on intact invariant chain, thus implicating immune cell interactions. These results suggest that both neuronal and non-neuronal anti-epileptic activities of levetiracetam involve control over energy metabolism, more specifically, mΔΨ. Future studies are needed to further investigate this potential mechanism of action. PMID:24600432

  9. Luteolin induces apoptosis, G0/G1 cell cycle growth arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential loss in neuroblastoma brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Gao, F; Pan, S; Zhao, S; Xue, Y

    2015-02-01

    The objective of the present research work was to evaluate the anticancer properties of luteolin against SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma tumor cell line. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay after luteolin treatment. Lactate dehydrogenase assay (LDH) was used to evaluate the extent of cell death induced by luteolin. Flow-cytometry was used to examine the effect of luteolin on cell cycle progression and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) in SH-SY5Y cells. Phase-contrast microscopy detected the morphological changes in SH-SY5Y cells after luteolin treatment. Our results demonstrated that luteolin induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent growth inhibition of SH-SY5Y cells with IC50 value of 27.1 µM after 12 h of incubation. Further, luteolin induced significant release of LDH from SH-SY5Y cell cultures following luteolin treatment significantly at 25 and 50 µM doses which corresponds to significant cell death. Phase-contrast microscopy revealed characteristic morphological features of apoptosis induced by luteolin. Flow-cytometry revealed that luteolin induced G0/G1 cell cycle growth arrest in SH-SY5Y cells. Luteolin also induced a progressive and dose-dependent reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, our results revealed that luteolin significantly induces growth inhibition of SH-SY5Y tumor cells by inducing apoptosis accompanied with G0/G1 cell cycle growth arrest and concomitant loss in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm). As such luteolin can be developed as a potent anticancer agent against brain tumor disorders.

  10. Dysfunction of Rice Mitochondrial Membrane Induced by Yb3+.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jia-Ling; Wu, Man; Liu, Wen; Feng, Zhi-Jiang; Zhang, Ye-Zhong; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi; Dai, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Ytterbium (Yb), a widely used rare earth element, is treated as highly toxic to human being and adverseness to plant. Mitochondria play a significant role in plant growth and development, and are proposed as a potential target for ytterbium toxicity. In this paper, the biological effect of Yb(3+) on isolated rice mitochondria was investigated. We found that Yb(3+) with high concentrations (200 ~ 600 μM) not only induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (mtMPT), but also disturbed the mitochondrial ultrastructure. Moreover, Yb(3+) caused the respiratory chain damage, ROS formation, membrane potential decrease, and mitochondrial complex II activity reverse. The results above suggested that Yb(3+) with high concentrations could induce mitochondrial membrane dysfunction. These findings will support some valuable information to the safe application of Yb-based agents. PMID:26305923

  11. Determination of high mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa loaded with the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) by using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2008-01-01

    A flow cytometric method was developed to identify viable, energized sperm cells with high mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)), >80-100 mV using the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and the impermeant nuclear stain propidium iodine (PI). This flow cytometric method is described in detail here. When in contact with membranes possessing a high Deltapsi(m), JC-1 forms aggregates (J(agg)) that are fluorescent at 590 nm in response to 488 nm excitation. We found that the reactive oxygen species generator, menadione reduced sperm motility and reduced Deltapsi(m) in a dose responsive fashion that was closely correlated with the loss of motility. PMID:19082941

  12. Fusion of Liposomes with Mitochondrial Inner Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Heinz; Lemasters, John J.; Hochli, Matthias; Hackenbrock, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure is outlined for the fusion of mixed phospholipid liposomes (small unilamellar vesicles) with the mitochondrial inner membrane, which enriches the membrane lipid bilayer 30-700% in a controlled fashion. Fusion was initiated by manipulation of the pH of a mixture of freshly sonicated liposomes and the functional inner membrane/matrix fraction of rat liver mitochondria. During the pH fusion procedure, liposomes became closely apposed with and sequestered by the inner membranes as revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. After the pH fusion procedure, a number of ultrastructural, compositional, and functional characteristics were found to be proportionally related: the membrane surface area increased; the lateral density distribution of intramembrane particles (integral proteins) in the plane of the membrane decreased whereas the particles remained random; the membrane became more buoyant; the ratio of membrane lipid phosphorus to total membrane protein increased; the ratio of membrane lipid phosphorus to heme a of cytochrome c oxidase increased; and the rate of electron transfer between some interacting membrane oxidoreduction proteins decreased. These data reveal that liposomal phospholipid was incorporated into the membrane bilayer (not simply adsorbed to the membrane surface) and that integral membrane proteins diffused freely into the laterally expanding bilayer. Furthermore, the data suggest that the rate of electron transfer may be limited by the rate of lateral diffusion of oxidoreduction components in the bilayer of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  13. Protein Kinase Cδ Targets Mitochondria, Alters Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, and Induces Apoptosis in Normal and Neoplastic Keratinocytes When Overexpressed by an Adenoviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luowei; Lorenzo, Patricia S.; Bogi, Krisztina; Blumberg, Peter M.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) is associated with resistance to terminal cell death in epidermal tumor cells, suggesting that activation of PKCδ in normal epidermis may be a component of a cell death pathway. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an adenovirus vector carrying an epitope-tagged PKCδ under a cytomegalovirus promoter to overexpress PKCδ in normal and neoplastic keratinocytes. While PKCδ overexpression was detected by immunoblotting in keratinocytes, the expression level of other PKC isozymes, including PKCα, PKCɛ, PKCζ, and PKCη, did not change. Calcium-independent PKC-specific kinase activity increased after infection of keratinocytes with the PKCδ adenovirus. Activation of PKCδ by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) at a nanomolar concentration was lethal to normal and neoplastic mouse and human keratinocytes overexpressing PKCδ. Lethality was inhibited by PKC selective inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro-32-0432. TPA-induced cell death was apoptotic as evidenced by morphological criteria, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling) assay, DNA fragmentation, and increased caspase activity. Subcellular fractionation indicated that PKCδ translocated to a mitochondrial enriched fraction after TPA activation, and this finding was confirmed by confocal microscopy of cells expressing a transfected PKCδ-green fluorescent protein fusion protein. Furthermore, activation of PKCδ in keratinocytes altered mitochondrial membrane potential, as indicated by rhodamine-123 fluorescence. Mitochondrial inhibitors, rotenone and antimycin A, reduced TPA-induced cell death in PKCδ-overexpressing keratinocytes. These results indicate that PKCδ can initiate a death pathway in keratinocytes that involves direct interaction with mitochondria and alterations of mitochondrial function. PMID:10567579

  14. In boar sperm capacitation L-lactate and succinate, but not pyruvate and citrate, contribute to the mitochondrial membrane potential increase as monitored via safranine O fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Paventi, Gianluca; Lessard, Christian; Bailey, Janice L; Passarella, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    Having ascertained using JC-1 as a probe that, in distinction with the controls, during capacitation boar sperm maintains high mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), to gain some insight into the role of mitochondria in capacitation, we monitored ΔΨ generation due to externally added metabolites either in hypotonically-treated spermatozoa (HTS) or in intact cells by using safranine O as a probe. During capacitation, the addition to HTS of L-lactate and succinate but not those of pyruvate, citrate and ascorbate + TMPD resulted in increase of ΔΨ generation. Accordingly, the addition of L-lactate and succinate, but not that of citrate, to intact sperm resulted in ΔΨ generation increased in capacitation.

  15. Radiosensitization by fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene on human malignant melanoma through lipid peroxidation and enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    We examined fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene (C60/Sqe) for the ability to potentiate the radiosensitization under X-ray irradiation on human malignant melanoma HMV-II cells, which were treated with C60/Sqe and thereafter irradiated with X-ray. The cell proliferation for C60/Sqe was inhibited more markedly than for Sqe alone. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was almost unaltered for C60/squalane (Sqa) or Sqa, a hydrogenated form of Sqe, as compared to no-additive control. Thus radiosensitization of C60/Sqe is attributed to peroxidation of unsaturated bonds of squalene by X-ray-excited C60 in contrast to squalane. The fluorescence images of HMV-II cells stained with Rhodamine123, an indicator for mitochondrial membrane potential, were monitored for 6 h after X-ray irradiation. C60/Sqe obviously exhibited more augmented fluorescence intensity on perinuclear region of HMV-II cells than Sqe alone. TBARS assay showed that the lipid peroxidation level as malondialdehyde-equivalent increased by combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray dose-dependently on X-ray doses. C60/Sqe exhibited lipid peroxidation more markedly by 1.2-fold than Sqe alone. Thus the level of lipid peroxidation of squalene was sufficiently higher in C60/Sqe than in Sqe in the absence of C60 under X-ray irradiation, suggesting the combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray irradiation induced radiosensitization on HMV-II cells by peroxidation of absorbed Sqe in mitochondrial membrane via oxidative stress mediated by fullerene-C60.

  16. α-Synuclein amino terminus regulates mitochondrial membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiamei; Du, Tingting; Wang, Xue; Duan, Chunli; Gao, Ge; Zhang, Jianliang; Lu, Lingling; Yang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative movement disorder affecting an increasing number of elderly. Various studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal protein aggregation are two major contributors to the progression of PD. The N terminus of α-synuclein (α-Syn/N), which adopts an α-helical conformation upon lipid binding, is essential for membrane interaction; yet its role in mitochondria remains poorly defined. A functional characterization of the α-Syn N-terminal domain and investigation of its effect on mitochondrial membrane permeability were undertaken in this study. α-Syn/N and α-Syn/delN (amino acids 1-65 and 61-140, respectively) constructs were overexpressed in dopaminergic MN9D cells and primary cortical neurons. A decrease in cell viability was observed in cells transfected with α-Syn/N but not α-Syn/delN. In addition, an α-Syn/N-induced increase in the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, alteration in mitochondrial morphology, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential were accompanied by the activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP). These changes were also associated with a decline in mitochondrial cardiolipin content and interaction with the voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide translocator in the mitochondrial membrane. The activation of mPTPs and reduction in cell viability were partially reversed by bongkrekic acid, an inhibitor of adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), suggesting that the interaction between α-Syn and ANT promoted mPTP activation and was toxic to cells. BKA treatment reduced interaction of α-Syn/N with ANT and VDAC. These results suggest that the N terminus of α-Syn is essential for the regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability and is a likely factor in the neurodegeneration associated with PD.

  17. Low-level laser (light) therapy increases mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP synthesis in C2C12 myotubes with a peak response at 3-6 h.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Kaippert, Beatriz; Avci, Pinar; Huang, Ying-Ying; de Sousa, Marcelo V P; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy has been used before exercise to increase muscle performance in both experimental animals and in humans. However, uncertainty exists concerning the optimum time to apply the light before exercise. The mechanism of action is thought to be stimulation of mitochondrial respiration in muscles, and to increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP) needed to perform exercise. The goal of this study was to investigate the time course of the increases in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP in myotubes formed from C2C12 mouse muscle cells and exposed to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT). LEDT employed a cluster of LEDs with 20 red (630 ± 10 nm, 25 mW) and 20 near-infrared (850 ± 10 nm, 50 mW) delivering 28 mW cm(2) for 90 s (2.5 J cm(2)) with analysis at 5 min, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h post-LEDT. LEDT-6 h had the highest MMP, followed by LEDT-3 h, LEDT-24 h, LEDT-5 min and Control with significant differences. The same order (6 h > 3 h > 24 h > 5 min > Control) was found for ATP with significant differences. A good correlation was found (r = 0.89) between MMP and ATP. These data suggest an optimum time window of 3-6 h for LEDT stimulate muscle cells.

  18. Cryotolerance of stallion spermatozoa is related to ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential rather than to the integrity of sperm nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yeste, M; Estrada, E; Rocha, L G; Marín, H; Rodríguez-Gil, J E; Miró, J

    2015-03-01

    Although cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa allows long-term preservation of spermatozoa from particular stallions and facilitates international trade, it is understood to inflict damages on sperm cells that may finally reduce their fertilizing ability. In addition, individual differences are known to exist in the sperm ability to withstand freeze-thawing protocols. To date, these differences have mainly been reported on the basis of sperm motility and membrane integrity. For this reason, the present work sought to determine differences between good (good freezability ejaculates: GFE) and poor (poor freezability ejaculates: PFE) freezability stallion ejaculates in other sperm parameters, including peroxide and superoxide levels, potential of mitochondrial membrane and nuclear integrity. With this purpose, a total of 24 stallion ejaculates were cryopreserved and classified into two groups (GFE vs. PFE), depending on their sperm membrane integrity and motility after freeze-thawing. From the total of 24 ejaculates, 13 were classified as GFE and the other 11 were classified as PFE. Apart from differences in sperm membrane permeability and lipid disorder after freeze-thawing, GFE presented significantly (p < 0.05) higher percentages of viable spermatozoa with high content of peroxides and of superoxides than PFE. In contrast, and despite cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa increasing DNA fragmentation and disrupting disulphide bonds in sperm head proteins, no significant differences between GFE and PFE were seen. We can thus conclude that good and poor freezability stallion ejaculates differ in their reactive oxygen species levels after cryopreservation, but not in the damage extent on sperm nucleus.

  19. Non-ohmic proton conductance of the mitochondrial inner membrane in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Nobes, C D; Brown, G C; Olive, P N; Brand, M D

    1990-08-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential in isolated hepatocytes was measured using the distribution of the lipophilic cation triphenylmethylphosphonium (TPMP+) with appropriate corrections for plasma membrane potential, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial binding of TPMP+, and other factors. The relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration rate in hepatocytes was examined as the respiratory chain was titrated with myxothiazol in the presence of oligomycin. This relationship was nonproportional and similar to results with isolated mitochondria respiring on succinate. This shows that there is an increased proton conductance of the mitochondrial inner membrane in situ at high values of membrane potential. From the respiration rate and mitochondrial membrane potential of hepatocytes in the absence of oligomycin, we estimate that the passive proton permeability of the mitochondrial inner membrane accounts for 20-40% of the basal respiration rate of hepatocytes. The relationship between log[TPMP+]tot/[TPMP+]e and respiration rate in thymocytes was also nonproportional suggesting that the phenomenon is not peculiar to hepatocytes. There is less mitochondrial proton leak in hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats. A large proportion of the difference in basal respiration rate between hepatocytes from normal and hypothyroid rats can be accounted for by differences in the proton permeability characteristics of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  20. Determination of high mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa loaded with the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A flow cytometric method was developed to identify viable, energized sperm cells with high mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (''m), > 80-100 mV using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and the impermeant nuclear ...

  1. Moderate activation of autophagy regulates the intracellular calcium ion concentration and mitochondrial membrane potential in beta-amyloid-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhongfeng; Guo, Yalei; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related and progressive neurodegenerative disease. Aggregated beta-amyloid (Aβ) disturbs Ca(2+) homeostasis and causes mitochondrial dysfunction and finally underlies AD. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy initiation by Beclin-1 protein might be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the effects of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy on intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) is unclear. The effects of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy that were activated by a gradient concentration of autophagy activator rapamycin or inhibited by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) on cell viability and cell morphology were examined. Pretreatment with rapamycin significantly up-regulated the expression of Beclin-1 in response to Aβ1-42 application, but after pretreatment with 3-MA it was significantly down-regulated. Moderate activation of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy had an up regulation effect on cell viability and could maintain the original morphology of cells. Furthermore, rapamycin or 3-MA on [Ca(2+)]i and MMP in Aβ1-42 treatment of PC12 cells were evaluated. We also report that PC12 cells treated with Aβ1-42 showed an increase in [Ca(2+)]i but a decrease in MMP when compared to the normal control. However the application of rapamycin prior to this prevented the increase in [Ca(2+)]i and the decrease in MMP in response to Aβ1-42. When 3-MA was applied this exacerbated the effect of Aβ1-42 on the [Ca(2+)]i and the MMP. This shows that moderate activation of Beclin-1 dependent autophagy by rapamycin can modulate Ca(2+) homeostasis and maintain MMP in response to Aβ1-42 induced cytotoxicity and so may have a preventive function in AD. PMID:26923671

  2. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Methodology/Principal Findings Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Conclusions/Significance Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial

  3. The production of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial membrane potential are modulated during onion oil-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-jiang; Stahl, Thorsten; Hu, Ying; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2006-03-01

    Protective effects of Allium vegetables against cancers have been shown extensively in experimental animals and epidemiologic studies. We investigated cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by onion oil extracted from Allium cepa, a widely consumed Allium vegetable, in human lung cancer A549 cells. GC/MS analysis suggested that propyl sulfides but not allyl sulfides are major sulfur-containing constituents of onion oil. Onion oil at 12.5 mg/L significantly induced apoptosis (13% increase of apoptotic cells) as indicated by sub-G1 DNA content. It also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase; 25 mg/L onion oil increased the percentage of G2/M cells almost 6-fold compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide control. The action of onion oil may occur via a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway because cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were blocked by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and exogenous glutathione. Marked collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that dysfunction of the mitochondria may be involved in the oxidative burst and apoptosis induced by onion oil. Expression of phospho-cdc2 and phospho-cyclin B1 were downregulated by onion oil, perhaps accounting for the G2/M arrest. Overall, these results suggest that onion oil may exert chemopreventive action by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells.

  4. Cytotoxic effects induced by interferon-ω gene lipofection through ROS generation and mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in feline mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Marcela Solange; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Miranda, María Victoria; Finocchiaro, Liliana María Elena; Glikin, Gerardo Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Progress in comparative oncology promises advances in clinical cancer treatments for both companion animals and humans. In this context, feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) cells have been proposed as a suitable model to study human breast cancer. Based on our previous data about the advantages of using type I interferon gene therapy over the respective recombinant DNA derived protein, the present work explored the effects of feline interferon-ω gene (fIFNω) transfer on FMC cells. Three different cell variants derived from a single spontaneous highly aggressive FMC tumor were successfully established and characterized. Lipofection of the fIFNω gene displayed a significant cytotoxic effect on the three cell variants. The extent of the response was proportional to ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and calcium uptake. Moreover, a lower sensitivity to the treatment correlated with a higher malignant phenotype. Our results suggest that fIFNω lipofection could offer an alternative approach in veterinary oncology with equal or superior outcome and with less adverse effects than recombinant fIFNω therapy.

  5. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase. PMID:25954808

  6. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase.

  7. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  8. Uranyl Acetate Induces Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Collapse in the Human Dermal Fibroblast Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daraie, Bahram; Pourahmad, Jalal; Hamidi-Pour, Neda; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Shaki, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxicity of depleted uranium, as a byproduct of military has been came to spotlight in recent decades. DU is known as a chemical rather than radioactive hazard and efforts to illustrating its mechanism is undergo, but the precise complete molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Recent studies showed that uranium induces biological changes in many different target tissues, such as the kidney, brain and skin. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of depleted uranium exposure at the cellular level in the human dermal fibroblast primary cells. The human dermal fibroblast primary cells incubated with different concentration (250-750 μM) of depleted uranium. Cytotoxicity and mitochondrial function in this cell lines were determined with the LDH leakage assay and the MTT test respectively. MDA levels were measured for determination of Lipid peroxidation in DU treated cells. Besides glutathione depletion and apoptosis phenotype detection were also assessed to complete the mechanistic screening. Results showed that the cell viability ameliorates in concentration and time dependent manners following in 24, 48 and 72 h incubation with DU. Moreover the significant increase in lipid peroxidation and significant decrease in cellular GSH recorded in DU treated human dermal fibroblast primary cells suggesting the preoxidant effect of uranyl ions. Cytoprotective effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dramatic decrease of cell viability in buthionin sulfoxamid (BSO) pretreated cells indicated the possibility of a critical role for glutathione system in DU detoxification. Death pattern, in fibroblast cells following DU treatment was varied from apoptosis to necrosis while the time and concentration increased. Since ROS formation is the initiation step for cell apoptosis, the present studies suggest Uranyl-induced toxicity in the human dermal fibroblast primary cells originated from oxidative stress and lead to occurrence of programmed cell death. PMID:24250472

  9. Inhibition of N-Methyl-D-aspartate-induced Retinal Neuronal Death by Polyarginine Peptides Is Linked to the Attenuation of Stress-induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John; Wong, Kwoon Y; Rupasinghe, Chamila N; Tiwari, Rakesh; Zhao, Xiwu; Berberoglu, Eren D; Sinkler, Christopher; Liu, Jenney; Lee, Icksoo; Parang, Keykavous; Spaller, Mark R; Hüttemann, Maik; Goebel, Dennis J

    2015-09-01

    It is widely accepted that overactivation of NMDA receptors, resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ-binding cyclic peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced pro-survival signaling. Here, we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell death and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long term ganglion cell viability. Although neuroprotection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), linked to the PDZ-PSD-95-binding cyclic peptide, was sufficient to mediate short and long term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons.

  10. Inhibition of N-Methyl-d-aspartate-induced Retinal Neuronal Death by Polyarginine Peptides Is Linked to the Attenuation of Stress-induced Hyperpolarization of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Potential*

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, John; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Rupasinghe, Chamila N.; Tiwari, Rakesh; Zhao, Xiwu; Berberoglu, Eren D.; Sinkler, Christopher; Liu, Jenney; Lee, Icksoo; Parang, Keykavous; Spaller, Mark R.; Hüttemann, Maik; Goebel, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that overactivation of NMDA receptors, resulting in calcium overload and consequent mitochondrial dysfunction in retinal ganglion neurons, plays a significant role in promoting neurodegenerative disorders such as glaucoma. Calcium has been shown to initiate a transient hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential triggering a burst of reactive oxygen species leading to apoptosis. Strategies that enhance cell survival signaling pathways aimed at preventing this adverse hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential may provide a novel therapeutic intervention in retinal disease. In the retina, brain-derived neurotrophic factor has been shown to be neuroprotective, and our group previously reported a PSD-95/PDZ-binding cyclic peptide (CN2097) that augments brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced pro-survival signaling. Here, we examined the neuroprotective properties of CN2097 using an established retinal in vivo NMDA toxicity model. CN2097 completely attenuated NMDA-induced caspase 3-dependent and -independent cell death and PARP-1 activation pathways, blocked necrosis, and fully prevented the loss of long term ganglion cell viability. Although neuroprotection was partially dependent upon CN2097 binding to the PDZ domain of PSD-95, our results show that the polyarginine-rich transport moiety C-R(7), linked to the PDZ-PSD-95-binding cyclic peptide, was sufficient to mediate short and long term protection via a mitochondrial targeting mechanism. C-R(7) localized to mitochondria and was found to reduce mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and the generation of reactive oxygen species, promoting survival of retinal neurons. PMID:26100636

  11. Mitochondrial accumulation of a lipophilic cation conjugated to an ionisable group depends on membrane potential, pH gradient and pK(a): implications for the design of mitochondrial probes and therapies.

    PubMed

    Finichiu, Peter G; James, Andrew M; Larsen, Lesley; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria play key roles in a broad range of biomedical situations, consequently there is a need to direct bioactive compounds to mitochondria as both therapies and probes. A successful approach has been to target compounds to mitochondria by conjugation to lipophilic cations, such as triphenylphosphonium (TPP), which utilize the large mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m), negative inside) to drive accumulation. This has proven effective both in vitro and in vivo for a range of bioactive compounds and probes. However so far only neutral appendages have been targeted to mitochondria in this way. Many bioactive functional moieties that we would like to send to mitochondria contain ionisable groups with pK (a) in the range that creates an assortment of charged species under physiological conditions. To see if such ionisable compounds can also be taken up by mitochondria, we determined the general requirements for the accumulation within mitochondria of a TPP cation conjugated to a carboxylic acid or an amine. Both were taken up by energised mitochondria in response to the protonmotive force. A lipophilic TPP cation attached to a carboxylic acid was accumulated to a greater extent than a simple TPP cation due to the interaction of the weakly acidic group with the pH gradient (ΔpH). In contrast, a lipophilic TPP cation attached to an amine was accumulated less than the simple cation due to exclusion of the weakly basic group by the ΔpH. From these data we derived a simple equation that describes the uptake of lipophilic cations containing ionisable groups as a function of Δψ(m), ΔpH and pK(a). These findings may facilitate the rational design of additional mitochondrial targeted probes and therapies.

  12. The novel ruthenium-gamma-linolenic complex [Ru(2)(aGLA)(4)Cl] inhibits C6 rat glioma cell proliferation and induces changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Geise; Benadiba, Marcel; de Oliveira Silva, Denise; Colquhoun, Alison

    2010-01-01

    The present study reports the synthesis of a novel compound with the formula [Ru(2)(aGLA)4Cl] according to elemental analyses data, referred to as Ru(2)GLA. The electronic spectra of Ru(2)GLA is typical of a mixed valent diruthenium(II,III) carboxylate. Ru(2)GLA was synthesized with the aim of combining and possibly improving the anti-tumour properties of the two active components ruthenium and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA). The properties of Ru(2)GLA were tested in C6 rat glioma cells by analysing cell number, viability, lipid droplet formation, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species. Ru(2)GLA inhibited cell proliferation in a time and concentration dependent manner. Nile Red staining suggested that Ru(2)GLA enters the cells and ICP-AES elemental analysis found an increase in ruthenium from <0.02 to 425 mg/Kg in treated cells. The sub-G1 apoptotic cell population was increased by Ru(2)GLA (22 +/- 5.2%) when analysed by FACS and this was confirmed by Hoechst staining of nuclei. Mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased in the presence of Ru(2)GLA (44 +/- 2.3%). In contrast, the cells which maintained a high mitochondrial membrane potential had an increase (18 +/- 1.5%) in reactive oxygen species generation. Both decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased reactive oxygen species generation may be involved in triggering apoptosis in Ru(2)GLA exposed cells. The EC(50) for Ru(2)GLA decreased with increasing time of exposure from 285 microM at 24 h, 211 microM at 48 h to 81 microM at 72 h. In conclusion, Ru(2)GLA is a novel drug with antiproliferative properties in C6 glioma cells and is a potential candidate for novel therapies in gliomas.

  13. Removal of spermatozoa with externalized phosphatidylserine from sperm preparation in human assisted medical procreation: effects on viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    de Vantéry Arrighi, Corinne; Lucas, Hervé; Chardonnens, Didier; de Agostini, Ariane

    2009-01-01

    Background Externalization of phosphatidylserine (EPS) occurs in apoptotic-like spermatozoa and could be used to remove them from sperm preparations to enhance sperm quality for assisted medical procreation. We first characterized EPS in sperms from infertile patients in terms of frequency of EPS spermatozoa as well as localization of phosphatidylserine (PS) on spermatozoa. Subsequently, we determined the impact of depleting EPS spermatozoa on sperm quality. Methods EPS were visualized by fluorescently-labeled annexin V binding assay. Double staining with annexin V and Hoechst differentiates apoptotic from necrotic spermatozoa. We used magnetic-activated cell sorting using annexin V-conjugated microbeads (MACS-ANMB) technique to remove EPS spermatozoa from sperm prepared by density gradient centrifugation (DGC). The impact of this technique on sperm quality was evaluated by measuring progressive motility, viability, and the integrity of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by Rhodamine 123. Results Mean percentages of EPS spermatozoa were 14% in DGC sperm. Four subpopulations of spermatozoa were identified: 70% alive, 3% early apoptotic, 16% necrotic and 11% late apoptotic or necrotic. PS were localized on head and/or midpiece or on the whole spermatozoa. MACS efficiently eliminates EPS spermatozoa. MACS combined with DGC allows a mean reduction of 70% in EPS and of 60% in MMP-disrupted spermatozoa with a mean increase of 50% in sperm survival at 24 h. Conclusion Human ejaculates contain EPS spermatozoa which can mostly be eliminated by DGC plus MACS resulting in improved sperm long term viability, motility and MMP integrity. EPS may be used as an indicator of sperm quality and removal of EPS spermatozoa may enhance fertility potential in assisted medical procreation. PMID:19133142

  14. Sclareol, a plant diterpene, exhibits potent antiproliferative effects via the induction of apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss in osteosarcoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; He, Hong-Sheng; Yu, Hua-Long; Zeng, Yun; Han, Heng; He, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Shou-Jia; Xiong, Min

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of sclareol against MG63 osteosarcoma cells. A 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the cell viability of cells following treatment with sclareol. The extent of cell death induced by sclareol was evaluated using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The effect of sclareol on cell cycle progression and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) was evaluated with flow cytometry using the DNA‑binding fluorescent dyes propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes in the MG63 osteosarcoma cancer cells and the appearance of apoptotic bodies following sclareol treatment. The results revealed that sclareol induced dose‑ and time‑dependent growth inhibition of MG63 cancer cells with an IC50 value of 65.2 µM following a 12‑h incubation. Furthermore, sclareol induced a significant increase in the release of LDH from MG63 cell cultures, which was much more pronounced at higher doses. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sclareol induced characteristic morphological features of apoptosis and the appearance of apoptotic bodies. Flow cytometry revealed that sclareol induced G1‑phase cell cycle arrest, which showed significant dose‑dependence. Additionally, sclareol induced a progressive and dose‑dependent reduction in the ΛΨm. In summary, sclareol inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma cancer cells via the induction of apoptosis, which is accompanied by G1‑phase cell cycle arrest and loss of ΛΨm.

  15. Sulforaphene-Carboplatin Combination Synergistically Enhances Apoptosis by Disruption of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saswata; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-09-01

    Worldwide non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) causes substantial morbidity and mortality among human populations. Due to the severe side effects and low survival rate of patients with the conventional drugs, implementation of new combination therapies is much needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a combination therapy with a conventional drug and a natural medicine. We compared the combination of chemotherapy drug carboplatin and the radish-derived isothiocyanate compound sulforaphene, which synergistically induces higher apoptosis and growth inhibition in A549, to the drug alone in human NSCLC cells. We found that this combination group significantly induced higher depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation than the single drug dose, followed by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase after 24 h of incubation. In addition to that, the Western blot assays showed that combination treatment inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and successively upregulated the expression of Bax, cytochrome C, apoptosis-inducing factor, caspase-9 and -3, and cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase. It also modulated the expression of PI3K, p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (1/2), and p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase indicating the involvement of antiproliferative properties. Further pretreatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk was carried out to confirm the effect of caspases in the combination therapy-induced apoptosis. To summarize, this is the first report that sulforaphene-carboplatin combination treatment synergistically promotes enhanced apoptosis and antiproliferative effect over single drug treatment against A549, human NSCLC cells through caspase activation, MMP disruption, and cell cycle arrest. This study demonstrates that the duel character of this combination therapy may be an effective replacement for conventional therapy alone against NSCLC. PMID:27467015

  16. Bcl-2 apoptosis proteins, mitochondrial membrane curvature, and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Sanders, Lori; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard; Ivashyna, Olena; Christenson, Eric; Schlesinger, Paul; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Santangelo, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Critical interactions between Bcl-2 family proteins permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane, a common decision point early in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway that irreversibly commits the cell to death. However, a unified picture integrating the essential non-passive role of lipid membranes with the contested dynamics of Bcl-2 regulation remains unresolved. Correlating results between synchrotron x-ray diffraction and microscopy in cell-free assays, we report activation of pro-apoptotic Bax induces strong pure negative Gaussian membrane curvature topologically necessary for pore formation and membrane remodeling events. Strikingly, Bcl-xL suppresses not only Bax-induced pore formation, but also membrane remodeling by disparate systems including cell penetrating, antimicrobial or viral fusion peptides, and bacterial toxin, none of which have BH3 allosteric domains to mediate direct binding. We propose a parallel mode of Bcl-2 pore regulation in which Bax and Bcl-xL induce antagonistic and mutually interacting Gaussian membrane curvatures. The universal nature of curvature-mediated interactions allows synergy with direct binding mechanisms, and potentially accounts for the Bcl-2 family modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics.

  17. Dibenzofuran induces oxidative stress, disruption of trans-mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and G1 arrest in human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Prashant Kumar; Srivastava, Shaili; Gupta, Jyotsana; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2012-10-17

    Dioxins are a class of extremely toxic environmentally persistent pollutant, comprised of halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls. Despite significant human exposure via multiple routes, very little is known about toxicity induced by dibenzofuran (DF). Current study shed lights on the potential toxicity mechanism of DF using human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). It was observed that the exposure to DF potentiate oxidative stress, apoptosis and necrosis at 10μM within 8h in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, when we pre-incubated the cells with α-NF (1nM) for 12h, an aromatic hydrocarbon receptor antagonist, the IC(50) of DF increased by 14 folds indicating the cytoprotective ability of α-NF from DF induced toxicity. Furthermore, three additional metabolites were observed while studying the metabolic profile of DF in HepG2 cells with and without pre-incubation with α-NF using chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Of these, two metabolites were characterized as dihydroxylated derivative of DF and third metabolite was characterized as quinone derivative of DF. By flow cytometry and confocal laser microscopy analysis we followed the ROS formation after DF (10μM) exposure for 3h. Significantly low ROS was generated in cells which were pre-incubated with α-NF than cells which were not pre-incubated with α-NF underlining the importance of metabolism in DF toxicity. The same pattern of protection was consistent while measuring mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), i.e., less MMP dip was observed in 'with α-NF pre-incubated and DF (10μM) exposed cells' than 'without α-NF pre-incubated but DF exposed cells'. In cell cycle studies, it was confirmed that cell population of HepG2 at G1 stage progressively increased in number (∼74%) within 24h. Thus, DF and its metabolites induce significantly higher cytotoxicity after metabolism in HepG2 cells than its parent compound (DF) by ROS formation, MMP dip and impaired cell cycle.

  18. Sanguinarine inhibits angiotensin II-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cardiac cells via restoring reactive oxygen species-mediated decreases in the mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN; JIAO, RONG; MA, ZHEN-GUO; LIU, WEI; WU, QING-QING; YANG, ZHENG; LI, FANG-FANG; YUAN, YUAN; BIAN, ZHOU-YAN; TANG, QI-ZHU

    2015-01-01

    Cell apoptosis induced by Angiotensin II (Ang II) has a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether sanguinarine (SAN), a drug which was proved to have anti-oxidant, anti-proliferative and immune enhancing effects, can abolish cell apoptosis induced by Ang II. In the present study, H9c2 cardiac cells were stimulated with 10 µM Ang II with or without SAN. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed using dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, and changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were assessed using JC-1 staining. Furthermore, mRNA expression of NOX2 was determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. The expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) as well as cleaved (c)-caspase 3 and -9 were detected by western blot analysis, and the activity of caspase 3 and -9 was detected using an ELISA. The results of the present study showed that NOX2 expression and ROS generation induced by Ang II were inhibited by SAN, and the Ang 2-induced MMP loss was also ameliorated. Furthermore, Ang II-induced H9c2 cardiac cell apoptosis as well as c-caspase 3 and -9 levels were significantly reduced by SAN. Investigation of the possible pathway involved in the anti-apoptotic effect of SAN showed that the expression of Bcl-2 was decreased, while that of Bax was increased following stimulation with Ang II, which was reversed following treatment with SAN. In addition, Ang II enhanced the activity of caspase 9 and cleaved downstream caspases such as caspase-3, initiating the caspase cascade, while pre-treatment of H9c2 cardiac cells with SAN blocked these effects. In conclusion, the findings of the present study indicated that SAN inhibits the apoptosis of H9c2 cardiac cells induced by Ang II, most likely via restoring

  19. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    PubMed Central

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  20. Clueless is a conserved ribonucleoprotein that binds the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Aditya; Cox, Rachel T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial function is tied to the nucleus, in that hundreds of proteins encoded by nuclear genes must be imported into mitochondria. While post-translational import is fairly well understood, emerging evidence supports that mitochondrial site-specific import, or co-translational import, also occurs. However, the mechanism and the extent to which it is used are not fully understood. We have previously shown Clueless (Clu), a conserved multi-domain protein, associates with mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including Translocase of outer membrane 20, and genetically and physically interacts with the PINK1–Parkin pathway. The human ortholog of Clu, Cluh, was shown to bind nuclear-encoded mitochondrially destined mRNAs. Here we identify the conserved tetratricopeptide domain of Clu as predominantly responsible for binding mRNA. In addition, we show Clu interacts with the ribosome at the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taken together, these data support a model whereby Clu binds to and mitochondrially targets mRNAs to facilitate mRNA localization to the outer mitochondrial membrane, potentially for site-specific or co-translational import. This role may link the presence of efficient mitochondrial protein import to mitochondrial quality control through the PINK1–Parkin pathway. PMID:26834020

  1. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  2. Isolation and quantification of major chlorogenic acids in three major instant coffee brands and their potential effects on H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and apoptosis in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2013-11-01

    Coffee is a most consumed drink worldwide, with potential health effects on several chronic diseases including neuronal degenerative diseases. Chlorogenic acids (CHAs) are phenolic compounds found in coffee and they are reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the amounts of CHAs often vary in coffee drinks and their potential effects on ROS-induced neuronal cell death still require more investigation. Therefore, in this paper, major CHAs were isolated from three major instant coffee brands, confirmed and quantified using HPLC and NMR spectroscopic methods. Then, their antioxidant activities and protective effects on H2O2-induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells were investigated using radical scavenging, mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase assays. In the coffee samples, three major CHAs (3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid) and some minor CHAs (3-O-feruloylquinic acid, 4-O-feruloylquinic acid, 5-O-feruloylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,4-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid) were detected. The three major CHAs were further isolated and their chemical structures were confirmed using NMR spectroscopic techniques. Also, the amounts of the three major CHAs were individually quantified using a HPLC method. At the concentration of 10 μM, all three major CHAs quenched DPPH and/or xanthine oxidase-generated radical species by 21-51% (P < 0.014). They also inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-9 activation by 27% (P < 0.034) and 50% (P < 0.05), respectively. This study suggests that the major CHAs found in coffee are likely to be potent antioxidant compounds able to quench radical species as well as inhibit H2O2-induced apoptosis via suppressing mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-9 activation in the cells.

  3. Determination of intracellular reactive oxygen species and high mitochondrial membrane potential in Percoll-treated viable boar sperm using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2006-08-01

    The use of frozen semen in the swine industry is limited by problems with viability and fertility compared with liquid semen. Part of the reduction in sperm motility and fertility associated with cryopreservation may be due to oxidative damage from excessive or inappropriate formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chemiluminescence measurements of ROS are not possible in live cells and are problematic because of poor specificity. An alternative approach, flow cytometry, was developed to identify viable boar sperm containing ROS utilizing the dyes hydroethidine and 2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate as oxidizable substrates and impermeant DNA dyes to exclude dead sperm. The percentage of sperm with high mitochondrial transmembrane potential was determined by flow cytometry using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide with propidium iodide staining to exclude nonviable cells. Sperm were incubated with and without ROS generators and free radical scavengers. Basal ROS formation was low (less than 4%) and did not differ (P = 0.26) between viable fresh and frozen-thawed boar sperm. In addition, fresh and frozen-thawed viable sperm were equally susceptible (P = 0.20) to intracellular formation of ROS produced by xanthine/xanthine oxidase (94.4 and 87.9% of sperm, respectively). Menadione increased (P < 0.05) ROS formation, decreased (P < 0.05) JC-1-aggregate fluorescence intensity, and decreased (P < 0.05) motion variables by 25 to 60%. The mechanism of inhibition of motility by ROS formation may be related to a decrease in mitochondrial charge potential below a critical threshold. Catalase and superoxide dismutase treatment in the presence of xanthine/xanthine oxidase indicated that hydrogen peroxide was the primary intracellular ROS measured. Further, catalase, but not superoxide dismutase, was capable of attenuating ROS-induced inhibition of motility. Whereas basal intracellular hydrogen

  4. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serasinghe, Madhavika N.; Yoon, Yisang

    2008-11-15

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six {alpha}-helices ({alpha}1-{alpha}6) out of which {alpha}2-{alpha}5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the {alpha}1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that {alpha}1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the {alpha}5 helix and the linker between {alpha}3 and {alpha}4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by {alpha}1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment.

  5. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G₂ /M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harish C; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), one of the most common neoplasms, cause serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and antiproliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fisetin (5-80 μm) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G₂ /M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2; Bcl-xL and Mcl-1); (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad); (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential; (iv) release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria; (v) activation of caspases; and (vi) cleavage of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs.

  6. Aqueous Cinnamon Extract (ACE-c) from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia causes apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line (SiHa) through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemoprevention, which includes the use of synthetic or natural agents (alone or in combination) to block the development of cancer in human beings, is an extremely promising strategy for cancer prevention. Cinnamon is one of the most widely used herbal medicines with diverse biological activities including anti-tumor activity. In the present study, we have reported the anti-neoplastic activity of cinnamon in cervical cancer cell line, SiHa. Methods The aqueous cinnamon extract (ACE-c) was analyzed for its cinnamaldehyde content by HPTLC analysis. The polyphenol content of ACE-c was measured by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Cytotoxicity analysis was performed by MTT assay. We studied the effect of cinnamon on growth kinetics by performing growth curve, colony formation and soft agar assays. The cells treated with ACE-c were analyzed for wound healing assay as well as for matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression at mRNA and protein level by RT-PCR and zymography, respectively. Her-2 protein expression was analyzed in the control and ACE-c treated samples by immunoblotting as well as confocal microscopy. Apoptosis studies and calcium signaling assays were analyzed by FACS. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in cinnamon treated cells was studied by JC-1 staining and analyzed by confocal microscopy as well as FACS. Results Cinnamon alters the growth kinetics of SiHa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with ACE-c exhibited reduced number of colonies compared to the control cells. The treated cells exhibited reduced migration potential that could be explained due to downregulation of MMP-2 expression. Interestingly, the expression of Her-2 oncoprotein was significantly reduced in the presence of ACE-c. Cinnamon extract induced apoptosis in the cervical cancer cells through increase in intracellular calcium signaling as well as loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion Cinnamon could be used as a potent chemopreventive drug

  7. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  8. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Habicht, K-L; Singh, N S; Indig, F E; Wainer, I W; Moaddel, R; Shimmo, R

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized onto immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary, resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC (U87MG) column, and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08±0.49 and 0.0086±0.0006μM, respectively, consistent with previously reported values. Furthermore, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX, and rotenone. In addition, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC (U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  9. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  10. Sensitization of U937 leukemia cells to doxorubicin by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor induces an increase in apoptosis by suppressing NF-kappa B and mitochondrial membrane potential loss

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The resistance of cancerous cells to chemotherapy remains the main limitation for cancer treatment at present. Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent antitumor drug that activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system, but unfortunately it also activates the Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-кB) pathway leading to the promotion of tumor cell survival. MG132 is a drug that inhibits I kappa B degradation by the proteasome-avoiding activation of NF-кB. In this work, we studied the sensitizing effect of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor on the antitumor activity of DOX. Methods U937 human leukemia cells were treated with MG132, DOX, or both drugs. We evaluated proliferation, viability, apoptosis, caspase-3, -8, and −9 activity and cleavage, cytochrome c release, mitochondrial membrane potential, the Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL antiapoptotic proteins, senescence, p65 phosphorylation, and pro- and antiapoptotic genes. Results The greatest apoptosis percentage in U937 cells was obtained with a combination of MG132 + DOX. Likewise, employing both drugs, we observed a decrease in tumor cell proliferation and important caspase-3 activation, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Therefore, MG132 decreases senescence, p65 phosphorylation, and the DOX-induced Bcl-2 antiapoptotic protein. The MG132 + DOX treatment induced upregulation of proapoptotic genes BAX, DIABLO, NOXA, DR4, and FAS. It also induced downregulation of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-XL and SURVIVIN. Conclusion MG132 sensitizes U937 leukemia cells to DOX-induced apoptosis, increasing its anti-leukemic effectiveness. PMID:24495648

  11. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L.; Tudella, Valeria G.

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions

  12. Investigation of the effects of 2.1 GHz microwave radiation on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), apoptotic activity and cell viability in human breast fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Seyhan, Nesrin; Kayhan, Handan; Tuysuz, Mehmet Zahid; Kurşun, Ayşe Canseven; Yağcı, Münci

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we aimed to investigate the effects of 2.1 GHz Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated Microwave (MW) Radiation on cell survival and apoptotic activity of human breast fibroblast cells. The cell cultures were exposed to W-CDMA modulated MW at 2.1 GHz at a SAR level of 0.607 W/kg for 4 and 24 h. The cell viability was assessed by MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The percentage of apoptotic cells was analyzed by Annexin V-FITC and PI staining. 5,5',6,6'-Tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) was used to measure Mitochondrial Membrane Potential (ΔΨm). sFasL and Fas/APO-1 protein levels were determined by ELISA method. 2.1 GHz MW radiation was shown to be able to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in human breast fibroblast cells. The cell viability of MW-exposed cells was decreased significantly. The percentages of Annexin V-FITC positive cells were higher in MW groups. ΔΨm was decreased significantly due to MW radiation exposure. However, neither sFas nor FasL level was significantly changed in MW-exposed fibroblast cells. The results of this study showed that 2.1 GHz W-CDMA modulated MW radiation-induced apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial pathway.

  13. Transient assembly of F-actin on the outer mitochondrial membrane contributes to mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sunan; Xu, Shan; Roelofs, Brian A.; Boyman, Liron; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    In addition to established membrane remodeling roles in various cellular locations, actin has recently emerged as a participant in mitochondrial fission. However, the underlying mechanisms of its participation remain largely unknown. We report that transient de novo F-actin assembly on the mitochondria occurs upon induction of mitochondrial fission and F-actin accumulates on the mitochondria without forming detectable submitochondrial foci. Impairing mitochondrial division through Drp1 knockout or inhibition prolonged the time of mitochondrial accumulation of F-actin and also led to abnormal mitochondrial accumulation of the actin regulatory factors cortactin, cofilin, and Arp2/3 complexes, suggesting that disassembly of mitochondrial F-actin depends on Drp1 activity. Furthermore, down-regulation of actin regulatory proteins led to elongation of mitochondria, associated with mitochondrial accumulation of Drp1. In addition, depletion of cortactin inhibited Mfn2 down-regulation– or FCCP-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. These data indicate that the dynamic assembly and disassembly of F-actin on the mitochondria participates in Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission. PMID:25547155

  14. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  15. Membrane-lipid unsaturation and mitochondrial function in Saacharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K; Houghton, R L; Bertoli, E; Griffiths, D E

    1975-01-01

    The lipid composition of yeast cells was manipulated by the use of an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a 2-3-fold decrease in the concentration of cytochromes a+a3 when the unsaturated fatty acid content of the cells was decreased from 60-70% of the total fatty acid to 20-30%. The amounts of cytochromes b and c were also decreased under these conditions, but to a lesser extent. Further lipid depletion, to proportions of less than 20% unsaturated fatty acid, led to a dramatic decrease in the content of all cytochromes, particularly cytochromes a+a3. The ATPase (adenosine triphosphatase), succinate oxidase and NADH oxidase activities of the isolated mitochondria also varied with the degree of unsaturation of the membrane lipids. The lower the percentage of unsaturated fatty acid, the lower was the enzymic activity. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATPase by oligomycin, on the other hand, was not markedly influenced by the membrane-lipid unsaturation. Npn-linear Arrenius plots of mitochondrial membrane-bound enzymes showed transition temperatures that were dependent on the degree of membrane-lipid unsaturation. The greater the degree of lipid unsaturation, the lower was the transition temperature. It was concluded that the degree of unsaturation of the membrane lipids plays an important role in determining the properties of mitochondrial membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:125585

  16. How membrane proteins travel across the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

    PubMed

    Koehler, C M; Merchant, S; Schatz, G

    1999-11-01

    A newly discovered family of small proteins in the yeast mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates import of hydrophobic proteins from the cytoplasm into the inner membrane. Loss of one of these chaperone-like proteins from human mitochondria results in a disease that causes deafness, muscle weakness and blindness.

  17. The sigma-1 receptor agonist 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects against newborn excitotoxic brain injury by stabilizing the mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro and inhibiting microglial activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wegleiter, Karina; Hermann, Martin; Posod, Anna; Wechselberger, Karina; Stanika, Ruslan I; Obermair, Gerald J; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Urbanek, Martina; Griesmaier, Elke

    2014-11-01

    Premature birth represents a clinical situation of risk for brain injury. The diversity of pathophysiological processes complicates efforts to find effective therapeutic strategies. Excitotoxicity is one important factor in the pathogenesis of preterm brain injury. The observation that sigma-1 receptor agonists possess neuroprotective potential, at least partly mediated by a variety of anti-excitotoxic mechanisms, has generated great interest in targeting those receptors to counteract brain injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the highly specific sigma-1 receptor agonist, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) to protect against excitotoxic developmental brain injury in vivo and in vitro. Primary hippocampal neurons were pre-treated with PPBP before glutamate was applied and subsequently analyzed for cell death (PI/calcein AM), mitochondrial activity (TMRM) and morphology of the neuronal network (WGA) using confocal microscopy. Using an established neonatal mouse model we also determined whether systemic injection of PPBP significantly attenuates excitotoxic brain injury. PPBP significantly reduced neuronal cell death in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to glutamate. Neurons treated with PPBP showed a less pronounced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and fewer morphological changes after glutamate exposure. A single intraperitoneal injection of PPBP given one hour after the excitotoxic insult significantly reduced microglial cell activation and lesion size in cortical gray and white matter. The present study provides strong support for the consideration of sigma-1 receptor agonists as a candidate therapy for the reduction of neonatal excitotoxic brain lesions and might offer a novel target to counteract developmental brain injury.

  18. MICOS coordinates with respiratory complexes and lipids to establish mitochondrial inner membrane architecture

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan R; Mourier, Arnaud; Yamada, Justin; McCaffery, J Michael; Nunnari, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    The conserved MICOS complex functions as a primary determinant of mitochondrial inner membrane structure. We address the organization and functional roles of MICOS and identify two independent MICOS subcomplexes: Mic27/Mic10/Mic12, whose assembly is dependent on respiratory complexes and the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and Mic60/Mic19, which assembles independent of these factors. Our data suggest that MICOS subcomplexes independently localize to cristae junctions and are connected via Mic19, which functions to regulate subcomplex distribution, and thus, potentially also cristae junction copy number. MICOS subunits have non-redundant functions as the absence of both MICOS subcomplexes results in more severe morphological and respiratory growth defects than deletion of single MICOS subunits or subcomplexes. Mitochondrial defects resulting from MICOS loss are caused by misdistribution of respiratory complexes in the inner membrane. Together, our data are consistent with a model where MICOS, mitochondrial lipids and respiratory complexes coordinately build a functional and correctly shaped mitochondrial inner membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07739.001 PMID:25918844

  19. Localized translation near the mitochondrial outer membrane: An update

    PubMed Central

    Lesnik, Chen; Golani-Armon, Adi; Arava, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Local synthesis of proteins near their activity site has been demonstrated in many biological systems, and has diverse contributions to cellular functions. Studies in recent years have revealed that hundreds of mitochondria-destined proteins are synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes near the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that localized translation also occurs at this cellular locus. Furthermore, in the last year central factors that are involved in this process were identified in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. Herein we review the experimental evidence for localized translation on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane; in addition, we describe the factors that are involved in this process and discuss the conservation of this mechanism among various species. We also describe the relationship between localized translation and import into the mitochondria and suggest avenues of study that look beyond cotranslational import. Finally we discuss future challenges in characterizing the mechanisms for localized translation and its physiological significance. PMID:26151724

  20. Motility, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content of rabbit spermatozoa stored in extender supplemented with GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide.

    PubMed

    Gogol, P; Trzcińska, M; Bryła, M

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the effect of GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide on the quality of rabbit spermatozoa stored at 17°C for 3 days. Semen from 5 bucks (13 ejaculates) was used in the experiment. Ejaculates were divided and diluted at a 1:10 ratio with rabbit semen extender Galap (IMV, France) (Control) or with Galap extender supplemented with GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide (50 μg/ml) and stored for 3 days. Sperm motility parameters, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP content were as- sessed on each day of the experiment. Motility analysis was performed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system. The following sperm motility parameters were recorded: total motile spermatozoa, progressively motile spermatozoa, curvilinear velocity, straight-line velocity, average path velocity, linearity, straightness and amplitude of lateral head displacement. MMP was evaluated using JC-1 fluorescent dye. ATP content was assessed using a bioluminescence method. The addition of GnRH analogue [des-Gly10, D-Ala6]-LH-RH ethylamide to Galap extender did not affect any of the quality parameters studied. However, in both groups (Control and GnRH), significant changes in motility parameters (except straight-line velocity) and proportion of spermatozoa showing high MMP and ATP content were observed throughout 3 days of storage. PMID:25638968

  1. Translocation of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteins: conformation matters.

    PubMed

    de Marcos-Lousa, Carine; Sideris, Dionisia P; Tokatlidis, Kostas

    2006-05-01

    Most of the mitochondrial inner-membrane proteins are generated without a presequence and their targeting depends on inadequately defined internal segments. Despite the numerous components of the import machinery identified by proteomics, the properties of hydrophobic import substrates remain poorly understood. Recent studies support several principles for these membrane proteins: first, they become organized into partially assembled forms within the translocon; second, they present noncontiguous targeting signals; and third, they induce conformational changes in translocase subunits, thereby mediating "assembly on demand" of the import machinery. It is possible that the energy needed for these proteins to pass across the outer membrane, to travel through the intermembrane space and to target the inner-membrane surface is provided by conformational changes involving import components that seem to have natively unfolded structures. Such structural malleability might render some of the translocase subunits more adept at driving the protein import process.

  2. Condurango (Gonolobus condurango) Extract Activates Fas Receptor and Depolarizes Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Induce ROS-dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Kausik; Mondal, Jesmin; Sikdar, Sourav; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Condurango (Gonolobus condurango) extract is used by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners as a traditional medicine, including homeopathy, mainly for the treatment of syphilis. Condurango bark extract is also known to reduce tumor volume, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Methods: Using a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) as our model, the molecular events behind condurango extract’s (CE’s) anticancer effect were investigated by using flow cytometry, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other included cell types were prostate cancer cells (PC3), transformed liver cells (WRL-68), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results: Condurango extract (CE) was found to be cytotoxic against target cells, and this was significantly deactivated in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that its action could be mediated through ROS generation. CE caused an increase in the HeLa cell population containing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage at the G zero/Growth 1 (G0/G1) stage. Further, CE increased the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and the fas receptor (FasR) levels both at the ribonucleic acid (RNA) and the protein levels, indicating that CE might have a cytotoxic mechanism of action. CE also triggered a sharp decrease in the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB ) both at the RNA and the protein levels, a possible route to attenuation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and caused an opening of the mitochondrial membrane’s permeability transition (MPT) pores, thus enhancing caspase activities. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest possible pathways for CE mediated cytotoxicity in model cancer cells. PMID:26389000

  3. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  4. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  5. Membrane Potentials at Zero Current

    PubMed Central

    Sandblom, John P.; Eisenman, George

    1967-01-01

    The possibility has been examined that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for V0, the total membrane potential at zero current, can be derived with constant permeability ratios from a thermodynamic treatment. The flux equations have been integrated under zero current conditions subject only to the restriction that the total membrane potential should be independent of internal concentration profiles, which is the requirement for the premeability ratios to be phenomenological constants, independent of solution conditions. No assumptions have been made concerning the electric potential profile. It was found that a constant permeability ratio can only be characteristic of systems satisfying certain relationships between ionic conductances and chemical potentials. From these relationships it was possible to define the permeability ratio in terms of the thermodynamic properties of the membrane quite generally and to identify the permeability ratio as the product of mobility ratio and ratio of partition coefficients. Moreover, the ionic conductance ratio at any point in the membrane has been shown to be expressable explicitly in terms of the permeability ratio and the activities of an external solution which would be in equilibrium with the point under consideration. Lastly, a number of conclusions have been reached regarding the range of applicability of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation with constant permeability ratios. PMID:6035122

  6. Function of the mitochondrial outer membrane as a diffusion barrier in health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, F N; Trumbeckaite, S; Opalka, J R; Seppet, E; Rasmussen, H N; Neuhoff, C; Zierz, S

    2000-02-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane separates the intermembrane space from the cytosol. The whole exchange of metabolites, cations and information between mitochondria and the cell occurs through the outer membrane. Experimental evidence is reviewed supporting the hypothesis of dynamic ADP compartmentation within the intermembrane space. The outer membrane creates a diffusion barrier for small molecules (adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, creatine etc.) causing rate-dependent concentration gradients as a prerequisite for the action of ADP shuttles via creatine kinases or adenylate kinases. If the outer membrane becomes leaky, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor can be released, leading to apoptosis, and as a bioenergetic consequence the cytosolic phosphorylation potential decreases. Leaky outer membranes can be detected in saponin-skinned fibres with spectrophotometric and oxygraphic methods. This is of special interest in respect to acute impairment of mitochondria during ischaemia/reperfusion.

  7. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca2+ transients which are further transduced by Ca2+ sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca2+ signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca2+ across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca2+ signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca2+ signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca2+ concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca2+ across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  8. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players.

    PubMed

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca(2+) transients which are further transduced by Ca(2+) sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca(2+) signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca(2+) across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca(2+) signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca(2+) signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca(2+) concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca(2+) across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  9. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Korenić, Andrej; Boltze, Johannes; Deten, Alexander; Peters, Myriam; Andjus, Pavle; Radenović, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD), OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m), visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m) during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m) negativation. In case no Δψ(m) negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD) induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m) hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen) and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m) during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury. PMID:24587410

  10. Membrane Potential Generated by Ion Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Morita, Sachi

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely acknowledged that the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) equation fully explains membrane potential behavior. The fundamental facet of the GHK equation lies in its consideration of permeability of membrane to ions, when the membrane serves as a separator for separating two electrolytic solutions. The GHK equation describes that: variation of membrane permeability to ion in accordance with ion species results in the variation of the membrane potential. However, nonzero potential was observed even across the impermeable membrane (or separator) separating two electrolytic solutions. It gave rise to a question concerning the validity of the GHK equation for explaining the membrane potential generation. In this work, an alternative theory was proposed. It is the adsorption theory. The adsorption theory attributes the membrane potential generation to the ion adsorption onto the membrane (or separator) surface not to the ion passage through the membrane (or separator). The computationally obtained potential behavior based on the adsorption theory was in good agreement with the experimentally observed potential whether the membrane (or separator) was permeable to ions or not. It was strongly speculated that the membrane potential origin could lie primarily in the ion adsorption on the membrane (or separator) rather than the membrane permeability to ions. It might be necessary to reconsider the origin of membrane potential which has been so far believed explicable by the GHK equation. PMID:24957176

  11. Mitochondrial swelling and incipient outer membrane rupture in preapoptotic and apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Sesso, A; Belizário, J E; Marques, M M; Higuchi, M L; Schumacher, R I; Colquhoun, A; Ito, E; Kawakami, J

    2012-10-01

    Outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) rupture was first noted in isolated mitochondria in which the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) had lost its selective permeability. This phenomenon referred to as mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) refers to a permeabilized inner membrane that originates a large swelling in the mitochondrial matrix, which distends the outer membrane until it ruptures. Here, we have expanded previous electron microscopic observations that in apoptotic cells, OMM rupture is not caused by a membrane stretching promoted by a markedly swollen matrix. It is shown that the widths of the ruptured regions of the OMM vary from 6 to 250 nm. Independent of the perforation size, herniation of the mitochondrial matrix appeared to have resulted in pushing the IMM through the perforation. A large, long focal herniation of the mitochondrial matrix, covered with the IMM, was associated with a rupture of the OMM that was as small as 6 nm. Contextually, the collapse of the selective permeability of the IMM may precede or follow the release of the mitochondrial proteins of the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm. When the MPT is a late event, exit of the intermembrane space proteins to the cytoplasm is unimpeded and occurs through channels that transverse the outer membrane, because so far, the inner membrane is impermeable. No channel within the outer membrane can expose to the cytoplasm a permeable inner membrane, because it would serve as a conduit for local herniation of the mitochondrial matrix.

  12. Plasma membrane depolarization and Na,K-ATPase impairment induced by mitochondrial toxins augment leukemia cell apoptosis via a novel mitochondrial amplification mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wu; Li, Xiang; Feng, Su; Cheng, Wei; Tang, Bo; Shi, Yi-Lin; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2009-07-15

    Na,K-ATPase is a ubiquitous transmembrane protein that regulates and maintains the intracellular Na(+) and K(+) gradient necessary for cell homeostasis. Recently, the importance of this pump in external stimuli-induced leukemia cell apoptosis has been increasingly appreciated, however, the exact role of Na,K-ATPase in mitochondrial apoptotic pathway still remains little understood. In this study, we found mitochondrial toxin rotenone caused a rapid mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse in Jurkat cells followed by plasma membrane depolarization (PMP). Similar results were also obtained in human U937 cells and non-cancerous mouse primary T cells. Rotenone-induced PMP depolarization occurred before apoptosis and well correlated with Na,K-ATPase impairment. To understand the mechanisms, Jurkat cells with mtDNA depletion and catalase overexpression were used. The results demonstrated that both PMP depolarization and Na,K-ATPase impairment induced by rotenone were regulated by mitochondrial H(2)O(2) and Bcl-2. Finally, Na,K-ATPase suppression by ouabain greatly accelerated and enhanced mitochondrial toxins-induced cells apoptosis in Jurkat, U937 and primary T cells. In sum, by using leukemia cells and mouse primary T cells, we confirmed that mitochondria-to-Na,K-ATPase and PMP depolarization might represent a novel mechanism for mitochondria to amplify death signals in the initiation stage of cells apoptosis induced by mitochondrial toxins.

  13. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 kills cancer cells through Bax/Bak-regulated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng; Forveille, Sabrina; Sauvat, Allan; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Durand, Sylvère; Müller, Kevin; Liu, Peng; Zitvogel, Laurence; Rekdal, Øystein; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-09-29

    LTX-315 has been developed as an amphipathic cationic peptide that kills cancer cells. Here, we investigated the putative involvement of mitochondria in the cytotoxic action of LTX-315. Subcellular fractionation of LTX-315-treated cells, followed by mass spectrometric quantification, revealed that the agent was enriched in mitochondria. LTX-315 caused an immediate arrest of mitochondrial respiration without any major uncoupling effect. Accordingly, LTX-315 disrupted the mitochondrial network, dissipated the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, and caused the release of mitochondrial intermembrane proteins into the cytosol. LTX-315 was relatively inefficient in stimulating mitophagy. Cells lacking the two pro-apoptotic multidomain proteins from the BCL-2 family, BAX and BAK, were less susceptible to LTX-315-mediated killing. Moreover, cells engineered to lose their mitochondria (by transfection with Parkin combined with treatment with a protonophore causing mitophagy) were relatively resistant against LTX-315, underscoring the importance of this organelle for LTX-315-mediated cytotoxicity. Altogether, these results support the notion that LTX-315 kills cancer cells by virtue of its capacity to permeabilize mitochondrial membranes.

  14. Calcium transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane: molecular mechanisms and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Csordás, György; Várnai, Peter; Golenár, Tünde; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Hajnóczky, György

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence supports that mitochondrial calcium uptake is important for cell metabolism, signaling and survival. However, both the molecular nature of the mitochondrial Ca2+ transport sites and the calcium signals they respond to remained elusive. Recent RNA interference studies have identified new candidate proteins for Ca2+ uptake across the inner mitochondrial membrane, including LETM1, MCU, MICU1 and NCLX. The sensitivity of these factors to several drugs has been tested and in parallel, some new inhibitors of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake have been described. This paper provides an update on the pharmacological aspects of the molecular mechanisms of the inner mitochondrial membrane Ca2+ transport. PMID:22123069

  15. Membrane potential governs lateral segregation of plasma membrane proteins and lipids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Guido; Opekarová, Miroslava; Malinsky, Jan; Weig-Meckl, Ina; Tanner, Widmar

    2007-01-10

    The plasma membrane potential is mainly considered as the driving force for ion and nutrient translocation. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism, we have discovered a novel role of the membrane potential in the organization of the plasma membrane. Within the yeast plasma membrane, two non-overlapping sub-compartments can be visualized. The first one, represented by a network-like structure, is occupied by the proton ATPase, Pma1, and the second one, forming 300-nm patches, houses a number of proton symporters (Can1, Fur4, Tat2 and HUP1) and Sur7, a component of the recently described eisosomes. Evidence is presented that sterols, the main lipid constituent of the plasma membrane, also accumulate within the patchy compartment. It is documented that this compartmentation is highly dependent on the energization of the membrane. Plasma membrane depolarization causes reversible dispersion of the H(+)-symporters, not however of the Sur7 protein. Mitochondrial mutants, affected in plasma membrane energization, show a significantly lower degree of membrane protein segregation. In accordance with these observations, depolarized membranes also considerably change their physical properties (detergent sensitivity).

  16. Berberine inhibits growth, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells by regulating Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP.

    PubMed

    Mantena, Sudheer K; Sharma, Som D; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2006-10-01

    Chemotherapeutic approach using non-toxic botanicals may be one of the strategies for the management of the skin cancers. Here we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, decreased cell viability (3-77%, P < 0.05-0.001) and induced cell death (3-51%, P < 0.01-0.001) in a dose (5-75 microM)- and time (12-72 h)-dependent manner, which was associated with an increase in G(1) arrest. G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle is known to be controlled by cyclin dependent kinases (Cdk), cyclin kinase inhibitors (Cdki) and cyclins. Our western blot analysis showed that berberine-induced G(1) cell cycle arrest was mediated through the increased expression of Cdki proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27), a simultaneous decrease in Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. In additional studies, treatment of A431 cells with berberine (15-75 microM) for 72 h resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in apoptosis (31-60%, P < 0.05-0.001) than non-berberine-treated control (11.7%), which was associated with an increased expression of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of caspases 9, 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) significantly blocked the berberine-induced apoptosis in A431 cells confirmed that berberine-induced apoptosis is mediated through activation of caspase 3-dependent pathway. Together, this study for the first time identified berberine as a chemotherapeutic agent against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells in vitro, further in vivo studies are required to determine whether berberine could be an effective chemotherapeutic agent for the management of non-melanoma skin cancers.

  17. Cristae remodeling causes acidification detected by integrated graphene sensor during mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ted D.; Pham, Phi Q.; Li, Jinfeng; Letai, Anthony G.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the resultant mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) via BAK and BAX oligomerization, cytochrome c (cytc) release, and caspase activation are well studied, but their effect on cytosolic pH is poorly understood. Using isolated mitochondria, we show that MOMP results in acidification of the surrounding medium. BAK conformational changes associated with MOMP activate the OMA1 protease to cleave OPA1 resulting in remodeling of the cristae and release of the highly concentrated protons within the cristae invaginations. This was revealed by utilizing a nanomaterial graphene as an optically clear and ultrasensitive pH sensor that can measure ionic changes induced by tethered mitochondria. With this platform, we have found that activation of mitochondrial apoptosis is accompanied by a gradual drop in extra-mitochondrial pH and a decline in membrane potential, both of which can be rescued by adding exogenous cytc. These findings have importance for potential pharmacological manipulation of apoptosis, in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27786282

  18. Instability in mitochondrial membranes in Polima cytoplasmic male sterility of Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Tongkun; Duan, Weike; Song, Xiaoming; Shi, Gongjun; Zhang, Jingyi; Deng, Xiaohui; Zhang, Shuning; Hou, Xilin

    2014-06-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is an important factor to observe heterosis in Brassica rapa. Although several studies have documented the rearrangements of mitochondrial DNA and dysfunction in the mitochondria have been observed in most types of CMS, the basis of the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes and other effects on CMS remain unclear. In this study, suppression subtractive hybridization was performed in the flowers of an alloplasmic Polima CMS system from B. rapa ssp. chinensis to identify genes that are differentially expressed between fertile and sterile plants. A total of 443 clones were isolated (156 were upregulated in fertile buds, and 287 were upregulated in sterile ones). Real-time RT-PCR further demonstrated the credibility of SSH. Among these genes, many membrane protein genes (LTP12, PIP2A, and GRP14) were inhibited in the sterile male line. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) assay was then performed. Results showed that the sterile MMP was unstable and failed to create a potential difference; thus, mitochondrial dysfunction occurred. Moreover, abnormal microtubules and photosynthetic pathways were found in sterile male cells. Unstable MMP, nutritional deficiency, and abnormal microtubules were the causes of Polima CMS in Brassica campestris. H2O2, MDA, and O(2-), accumulated as byproducts of energy metabolism disorder in sterile male cells.

  19. Membrane potential and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming; Brackenbury, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane potential (Vm), the voltage across the plasma membrane, arises because of the presence of different ion channels/transporters with specific ion selectivity and permeability. Vm is a key biophysical signal in non-excitable cells, modulating important cellular activities, such as proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, the multiplicities of various ion channels/transporters expressed on different cells are finely tuned in order to regulate the Vm. It is well-established that cancer cells possess distinct bioelectrical properties. Notably, electrophysiological analyses in many cancer cell types have revealed a depolarized Vm that favors cell proliferation. Ion channels/transporters control cell volume and migration, and emerging data also suggest that the level of Vm has functional roles in cancer cell migration. In addition, hyperpolarization is necessary for stem cell differentiation. For example, both osteogenesis and adipogenesis are hindered in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) under depolarizing conditions. Therefore, in the context of cancer, membrane depolarization might be important for the emergence and maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), giving rise to sustained tumor growth. This review aims to provide a broad understanding of the Vm as a bioelectrical signal in cancer cells by examining several key types of ion channels that contribute to its regulation. The mechanisms by which Vm regulates cancer cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation will be discussed. In the long term, Vm might be a valuable clinical marker for tumor detection with prognostic value, and could even be artificially modified in order to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:23882223

  20. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    activate the apoptotic machinery in neural cells. Toxicity occurs through a mitochondrial-dependent pathway, which in part involves opening of the permeability transition pore. Furthermore, membrane permeabilization is required for cytochrome c release from mitochondria and can be prevented by UDC or TUDC. These data suggest that the mitochondria is a pharmacological target for cytoprotection during unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and neurodegenerative disorders, and that UDC or TUDC may be potential therapeutic agents. PMID:11147571

  1. Mitoguardin-1 and -2 promote maturation and the developmental potential of mouse oocytes by maintaining mitochondrial dynamics and functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Ji, Shu-Yan; Li, Bo-Tai; Tian, Xuejun; Li, Dali; Tong, Chao; Fan, Heng-Yu

    2016-01-12

    Mitochondrial dynamics change mitochondrial morphological features and numbers as a part of adaptive cellular metabolism, which is vital for most eukaryotic cells and organisms. A disease or even death of an animal can occur if these dynamics are disrupted. Using large-scale genetic screening in fruit flies, we previously found the gene mitoguardin (Miga), which encodes a mitochondrial outer-membrane protein and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Knockout mouse strains were generated for the mammalian Miga homologs Miga1 and Miga2. Miga1/2-/- females show greatly reduced quality of oocytes and early embryos and are subfertile. Mitochondria became clustered in the cytoplasm of oocytes from the germinal-vesicle stage to meiosis II; production of reactive oxygen species increased in mitochondria and caused damage to mitochondrial ultrastructures. Additionally, reduced ATP production, a decreased mitochondrial-DNA copy number, and lower mitochondrial membrane potential were detected in Miga1/2-/- oocytes during meiotic maturation. These changes resulted in low rates of polar-body extrusion during oocyte maturation, reduced developmental potential of the resulting early embryos, and consequently female subfertility. We provide direct evidence that MIGA1/2-regulated mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for mitochondrial functions, ensure oocyte maturation, and maintain the developmental potential. PMID:26716412

  2. Mitoguardin-1 and -2 promote maturation and the developmental potential of mouse oocytes by maintaining mitochondrial dynamics and functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Ji, Shu-Yan; Li, Bo-Tai; Tian, Xuejun; Li, Dali; Tong, Chao; Fan, Heng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics change mitochondrial morphological features and numbers as a part of adaptive cellular metabolism, which is vital for most eukaryotic cells and organisms. A disease or even death of an animal can occur if these dynamics are disrupted. Using large-scale genetic screening in fruit flies, we previously found the gene mitoguardin (Miga), which encodes a mitochondrial outer-membrane protein and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Knockout mouse strains were generated for the mammalian Miga homologs Miga1 and Miga2. Miga1/2−/− females show greatly reduced quality of oocytes and early embryos and are subfertile. Mitochondria became clustered in the cytoplasm of oocytes from the germinal-vesicle stage to meiosis II; production of reactive oxygen species increased in mitochondria and caused damage to mitochondrial ultrastructures. Additionally, reduced ATP production, a decreased mitochondrial-DNA copy number, and lower mitochondrial membrane potential were detected in Miga1/2−/− oocytes during meiotic maturation. These changes resulted in low rates of polar-body extrusion during oocyte maturation, reduced developmental potential of the resulting early embryos, and consequently female subfertility. We provide direct evidence that MIGA1/2-regulated mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for mitochondrial functions, ensure oocyte maturation, and maintain the developmental potential. PMID:26716412

  3. Role of Mitochondrial Membrane Spherules in Flock House Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Short, James R.; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Gopal, Radhika; Pankratz, Logan M.; Lanman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses that generate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) during replication must overcome host defense systems designed to detect this infection intermediate. All positive-sense RNA viruses studied to date modify host membranes to help facilitate the sequestration of dsRNA from host defenses and concentrate replication factors to enhance RNA production. Flock House virus (FHV) is an attractive model for the study of these processes since it is well characterized and infects Drosophila cells, which are known to have a highly effective RNA silencing system. During infection, FHV modifies the outer membrane of host mitochondria to form numerous membrane invaginations, called spherules, that are ∼50 nm in diameter and known to be the site of viral RNA replication. While previous studies have outlined basic structural features of these invaginations, very little is known about the mechanism underlying their formation. Here we describe the optimization of an experimental system for the analysis of FHV host membrane modifications using crude mitochondrial preparations from infected Drosophila cells. These preparations can be programmed to synthesize both single- and double-stranded FHV RNA. The system was used to demonstrate that dsRNA is protected from nuclease digestion by virus-induced membrane invaginations and that spherules play an important role in stimulating RNA replication. Finally, we show that spherules generated during FHV infection appear to be dynamic as evidenced by their ability to form or disperse based on the presence or absence of RNA synthesis. IMPORTANCE It is well established that positive-sense RNA viruses induce significant membrane rearrangements in infected cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these rearrangements, particularly membrane invagination and spherule formation, remain essentially unknown. How the formation of spherules enhances viral RNA synthesis is also not understood, although it is assumed to be partly a result

  4. Role of MINOS in mitochondrial membrane architecture: cristae morphology and outer membrane interactions differentially depend on mitofilin domains.

    PubMed

    Zerbes, Ralf M; Bohnert, Maria; Stroud, David A; von der Malsburg, Karina; Kram, Anita; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J; Pfanner, Nikolaus; van der Laan, Martin

    2012-09-14

    The mitochondrial inner membrane contains a large protein complex crucial for membrane architecture, the mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). MINOS is required for keeping cristae membranes attached to the inner boundary membrane via crista junctions and interacts with protein complexes of the mitochondrial outer membrane. To study if outer membrane interactions and maintenance of cristae morphology are directly coupled, we generated mutant forms of mitofilin/Fcj1 (formation of crista junction protein 1), a core component of MINOS. Mitofilin consists of a transmembrane anchor in the inner membrane and intermembrane space domains, including a coiled-coil domain and a conserved C-terminal domain. Deletion of the C-terminal domain disrupted the MINOS complex and led to release of cristae membranes from the inner boundary membrane, whereas the interaction of mitofilin with the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) were enhanced. Deletion of the coiled-coil domain also disturbed the MINOS complex and cristae morphology; however, the interactions of mitofilin with TOM and SAM were differentially affected. Finally, deletion of both intermembrane space domains disturbed MINOS integrity as well as interactions with TOM and SAM. Thus, the intermembrane space domains of mitofilin play distinct roles in interactions with outer membrane complexes and maintenance of MINOS and cristae morphology, demonstrating that MINOS contacts to TOM and SAM are not sufficient for the maintenance of inner membrane architecture.

  5. Regulation of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion: divergent evolution with similar solutions?

    PubMed

    Wagener, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Continuous mitochondrial fusion and fission define the dynamic shape of mitochondria. One essential player of mitochondrial fusion is the conserved inner membrane dynamin-like GTPase Mgm1/OPA1. Limited proteolysis of this protein has been proposed as a mechanism to separate and subsequently eliminate dysfunctional parts from the mitochondrial network. Here, I briefly summarize our current knowledge about the underlying proteolytic processing steps in mammals, baker's yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Aspergillus fumigatus. The apparent great diversity in Mgm1/OPA1 processing among the analyzed species indicates a surprising mechanistic heterogeneity in the regulation of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion. PMID:26613727

  6. The control of mitochondrial respiration in yeast: a possible role of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, M; Horng, A; Colombini, M

    1996-09-01

    Mitochondrial respiration in yeast (S. cerevisiae) is regulated by the level of glucose in the medium. Glucose is known to inhibit respiration by repressing key enzymes in the respiratory chain. We present evidence that the early events in this inhibition include the closure of VDAC channels, the primary pathway for metabolite flow across the outer membrane. Aluminum hydroxide is known to inhibit the closure of VDAC. Addition of aluminum acetylacetonate to yeast cells, which should elevate the aluminum hydroxide concentrations in the cytoplasm, caused the inhibition of cell respiration by glucose to be delayed for up to 100 min. No significant effect of aluminum was observed in cells grown on glycerol. Yeast cells lacking the VDAC gene were also unresponsive to the addition of aluminum salt in the presence of glucose. Therefore, the closure of VDAC channels may be an early step in the inhibition of the respiration of yeast by glucose.

  7. Dietary lipid quality and mitochondrial membrane composition in trout: responses of membrane enzymes and oxidative capacities.

    PubMed

    Martin, N; Bureau, D P; Marty, Y; Kraffe, E; Guderley, H

    2013-04-01

    To examine whether membrane fatty acid (FA) composition has a greater impact upon specific components of oxidative phosphorylation or on overall properties of muscle mitochondria, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were fed two diets differing only in FA composition. Diet 1 was enriched in 18:1n-9 and 18:2n-6 while Diet 2 was enriched in 22:6n-3. The FA composition of mitochondrial phospholipids was strongly affected by diet. 22:6n-3 levels were twice as high (49%) in mitochondrial phospholipids of fish fed Diet 2 than in those fed Diet 1. 18:2n-6 content of the phospholipids also followed the diets, whereas 18:1n-9 changed little. All n-6 FA, most notably 22:5n-6, were significantly higher in fish fed Diet 1. Nonetheless, total saturated FA, total monounsaturated FA and total polyunsaturated FA in mitochondrial phospholipids varied little. Despite a marked impact of diet on specific FA levels in mitochondrial phospholipids, only non-phosphorylating (state 4) rates were higher in fish fed Diet 2. Phosphorylating rates (state 3), oxygen consumption due to flux through the electron transport chain complexes as well as the corresponding spectrophotometric activities did not differ with diet. Body mass affected state 4 rates and cytochrome c oxidase and F 0 F 1 ATPase activities while complex I showed a diet-specific effect of body mass. Only the minor FA that were affected by body mass were correlated with functional properties. The regulated incorporation of dietary FA into phospholipids seems to allow fish to maintain critical membrane functions even when the lipid quality of their diets varies considerably, as is likely in their natural environment. PMID:23052948

  8. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  9. Interaction of MDM33 with mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Till; Wemmer, Megan; Haag, Mathias; Weig, Alfons; Böckler, Stefan; Langer, Thomas; Nunnari, Jodi; Westermann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Membrane homeostasis affects mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and function. Here we report genetic and proteomic data that reveal multiple interactions of Mdm33, a protein essential for normal mitochondrial structure, with components of phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. We screened for suppressors of MDM33 overexpression-induced growth arrest and isolated binding partners by immunoprecipitation of cross-linked cell extracts. These approaches revealed genetic and proteomic interactions of Mdm33 with prohibitins, Phb1 and Phb2, which are key components of mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. Lipid profiling by mass spectrometry of mitochondria isolated from Mdm33-overexpressing cells revealed that high levels of Mdm33 affect the levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, the two key inner membrane phospholipids. Furthermore, we show that cells lacking Mdm33 show strongly decreased mitochondrial fission activity indicating that Mdm33 is critical for mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Our data suggest that MDM33 functionally interacts with components important for inner membrane homeostasis and thereby supports mitochondrial division. PMID:26669658

  10. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13943.001 PMID:27097106

  11. The Taz1p transacylase is imported and sorted into the outer mitochondrial membrane via a membrane anchor domain.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Jenny D; Claypool, Steven M; Koehler, Carla M

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial transacylase tafazzin, Taz1p, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cause Barth syndrome, a disease of defective cardiolipin remodeling. Taz1p is an interfacial membrane protein that localizes to both the outer and inner membranes, lining the intermembrane space. Pathogenic point mutations in Taz1p that alter import and membrane insertion result in accumulation of monolysocardiolipin. In this study, we used yeast as a model to investigate the biogenesis of Taz1p. We show that to achieve this unique topology in mitochondria, Taz1p follows a novel import pathway in which it crosses the outer membrane via the translocase of the outer membrane and then uses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex of the intermembrane space to insert into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Taz1p is then transported to membranes of an intermediate density to reach a location in the inner membrane. Moreover, a pathogenic mutation within the membrane anchor (V224R) alters Taz1p import so that it bypasses the Tim9p-Tim10p complex and interacts with the translocase of the inner membrane, TIM23, to reach the matrix. Critical targeting information for Taz1p resides in the membrane anchor and flanking sequences, which are often mutated in Barth syndrome patients. These studies suggest that altering the mitochondrial import pathway of Taz1p may be important in understanding the molecular basis of Barth syndrome.

  12. HIV-1 Tat protein directly induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and inactivates cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lecoeur, H; Borgne-Sanchez, A; Chaloin, O; El-Khoury, R; Brabant, M; Langonné, A; Porceddu, M; Brière, J-J; Buron, N; Rebouillat, D; Péchoux, C; Deniaud, A; Brenner, C; Briand, J-P; Muller, S; Rustin, P; Jacotot, E

    2012-01-01

    The Trans-activator protein (Tat) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a pleiotropic protein involved in different aspects of AIDS pathogenesis. As a number of viral proteins Tat is suspected to disturb mitochondrial function. We prepared pure synthetic full-length Tat by native chemical ligation (NCL), and Tat peptides, to evaluate their direct effects on isolated mitochondria. Submicromolar doses of synthetic Tat cause a rapid dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) as well as cytochrome c release in mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, heart, and brain. Accordingly, Tat decreases substrate oxidation by mitochondria isolated from these tissues, with oxygen uptake being initially restored by adding cytochrome c. The anion-channel inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS) protects isolated mitochondria against Tat-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), whereas ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor blocker, does not. Pharmacologic inhibitors of the permeability transition pore, Bax/Bak inhibitors, and recombinant Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL proteins do not reduce Tat-induced MMP. We finally observed that Tat inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity in disrupted mitochondria isolated from liver, heart, and brain of both mouse and human samples, making it the first described viral protein to be a potential COX inhibitor. PMID:22419111

  13. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  14. Isoliquiritigenin induces apoptosis by depolarizing mitochondrial membranes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae In; Lim, Soon Sung; Choi, Hyun Ju; Cho, Han Jin; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Eun Ji; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2006-10-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a simple chalcone derivative, 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone, found in licorice, shallot and bean sprouts, has been reported to have chemoprotective effects. To examine the effects of ISL on the growth of prostate cancer cells, we cultured MAT-LyLu (MLL) rat and DU145 human prostate cancer cells with various concentrations (0-20 micromol/L) of ISL. Treatment of the cells with increasing concentrations of ISL led to dose-dependent decreases in the viable cell numbers in both DU145 and MLL cells (P<.05). Hoechst 33258 dye staining of condensed nuclei and annexin V binding to surface phosphatidylserine revealed increased numbers of apoptotic cells after ISL treatment. Western blot analysis revealed that ISL increased the levels of membrane-bound Fas ligand (FasL), Fas, cleaved casapse-8, truncated Bid (tBid), Bax and Bad in DU145 cells (P<.05). Isoliquiritigenin increased the percentage of cells with depolarized mitochondrial membranes, in a concentration-dependent manner (P<.05). Isoliquiritigenin induced the release of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm (P<.05). Isoliquiritigenin dose-dependently increased the levels of cleaved caspase-9, caspase-7, caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (P<.05). The present results indicate that ISL inhibits prostate cancer cell growth by the induction of apoptosis, which is mediated through mitochondrial events, which are associated with an evident disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, and the activation of caspase-9. PMID:16517140

  15. VDAC electronics: 2. A new, anaerobic mechanism of generation of the membrane potentials in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial hexokinase (HK) and creatine kinase (CK) known to form complexes with a voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) have been reported to increase cell death resistance under hypoxia/anoxia. In this work we propose a new, non-Mitchell mechanism of generation of the inner and outer membrane potentials at anaerobic conditions. The driving force is provided by the Gibbs free energy of the HK and CK reactions associated with the VDAC-HK and the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator)-CK-VDAC complexes, respectively, both functioning as voltage generators. In the absence of oxygen, the cytosolic creatine phosphate can be directly used by the ANT-CK-VDAC contact sites to produce ATP from ADP in the mitochondrial matrix. After that, ATP released through the fraction of unbound ANTs in exchange for ADP is used in the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the outer membrane VDAC-HK electrogenic complexes to convert cytosolic glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. A simple computational model based on the application of Ohm's law to an equivalent electrical circuit showed a possibility of generation of the inner membrane potential up to -160mV, under certain conditions, and of relatively high outer membrane potential without wasting of ATP that normally leads to cell death. The calculated membrane potentials depended on the restriction of ATP/ADP diffusion in narrow cristae and through the cristae junctions. We suggest that high inner membrane potential and calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by generated positive outer membrane potential prevent mitochondrial permeability transition, thus allowing the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and cell survival in the absence of oxygen.

  16. Identification of a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that does not depolarize the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kenwood, Brandon M; Weaver, Janelle L; Bajwa, Amandeep; Poon, Ivan K; Byrne, Frances L; Murrow, Beverley A; Calderone, Joseph A; Huang, Liping; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Tomsig, Jose L; Okabe, Kohki; Lo, Ryan H; Cameron Coleman, G; Columbus, Linda; Yan, Zhen; Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Smith, Jeffrey S; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Lynch, Kevin R; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Santos, Webster L; Rogers, George W; Okusa, Mark D; Bayliss, Douglas A; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2014-04-01

    Dysregulation of oxidative phosphorylation is associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and some of the most prevalent human diseases including obesity, cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Chemical 'mitochondrial uncouplers' are lipophilic weak acids that transport protons into the mitochondrial matrix via a pathway that is independent of ATP synthase, thereby uncoupling nutrient oxidation from ATP production. Mitochondrial uncouplers also lessen the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane and thereby increase the rate of mitochondrial respiration while decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mitochondrial uncouplers are valuable chemical tools that enable the measurement of maximal mitochondrial respiration and they have been used therapeutically to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. However, the most widely used protonophore uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol have off-target activity at other membranes that lead to a range of undesired effects including plasma membrane depolarization, mitochondrial inhibition, and cytotoxicity. These unwanted properties interfere with the measurement of mitochondrial function and result in a narrow therapeutic index that limits their usefulness in the clinic. To identify new mitochondrial uncouplers that lack off-target activity at the plasma membrane we screened a small molecule chemical library. Herein we report the identification and validation of a novel mitochondrial protonophore uncoupler (2-fluorophenyl){6-[(2-fluorophenyl)amino](1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-e]pyrazin-5-yl)}amine, named BAM15, that does not depolarize the plasma membrane. Compared to FCCP, an uncoupler of equal potency, BAM15 treatment of cultured cells stimulates a higher maximum rate of mitochondrial respiration and is less cytotoxic. Furthermore, BAM15 is bioactive in vivo and dose

  17. Effects of high ambient temperature on fish sperm plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity - A flow cytometric study.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Szabolcs Tamás; Kakasi, Balázs; Pál, László; Havasi, Máté; Bercsényi, Miklós; Husvéth, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    Local extreme climatic conditions occurring as a result of global climate change may interfere with the reproduction of animals. In the present study fish spermatozoa were incubated at different temperatures (20, 25, 30 and 40 °C) for 10 and 30 minutes, respectively and plasma membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were evaluated with flow cytometry using SYBR-14/PI and Mitotracker Deep Red FM fluorescent dyes. No significant differences were found in plasma membrane integrity at either incubation temperatures or time points. Mitotracker Deep Red FM histogram profiles indicating mitochondrial activity showed significant (p < 0.001) alterations in all cases of higher (25, 30 and 40 °C) temperature treatments as compared to the samples incubated at 20 °C. Our results indicate that fish spermatozoa exposed to high temperatures suffer sublethal damage that cannot be detected with conventional, vital staining techniques. PMID:27165524

  18. Biochemical and molecular characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase in Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2016-05-01

    The two predominant forms of arginase, cytosolic Arginase-I and mitochondrial Arginase-II, catalyze hydrolysis of arginine into ornithine and urea. Based on presence of arginase activity in extracts using potassium chloride (KCl), mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been suggested. However, the activity of arginase in fractions obtained after KCl-treatment may be either due to leakage of mitochondrial arginase or release of adhered cytosolic arginase to cell organelles having altered net charge. Therefore, it has been intended to analyse impact of KCl on ultra-structural properties of mitochondria, and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins and arginase of Heteropneustes fossilis. Liver of H. fossilis was used for isolating mitochondria for analysis of ultrastructural properties, preparing cytosolic, mitochondrial, and mitochondrial-membrane bound extracts after treatment of KCl. Extracts were analysed for arginase activity assay, protein profiling through SDS-PAGE and MALDI MS/MS. The KCl-mediated modulation in polypeptides and arginase were also evaluated by PANTHER, MitoProt and IPSORT servers. The effects of KCl on ultra-structural integrity of mitochondria, activity of arginase, modulation on mitochondrial proteins and enzymes including arginase were observed. The 48 kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial fraction, that showed KCl-dependent alteration matched with Myb binding protein and 30 kDa bands resembles to arginase after MALDI MS/MS analysis. Results indicate KCl-dependent ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and release of mitochondrial arginase. The proposed membrane bound mitochondrial arginase could be mitochondrial arginase-II or altered form of cytosolic arginase-I contributing to KCl-induced arginase activity in H. fossilis. PMID:26922180

  19. Mitochondrial metals as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, A; White, A R; Liddell, J R

    2014-01-01

    Transition metals are critical for enzyme function and protein folding, but in excess can mediate neurotoxic oxidative processes. As mitochondria are particularly vulnerable to oxidative damage due to radicals generated during ATP production, mitochondrial biometal homeostasis must therefore be tightly controlled to safely harness the redox potential of metal enzyme cofactors. Dysregulation of metal functions is evident in numerous neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Friedrich's ataxia. This review describes the mitochondrial metal defects in these disorders and highlights novel metal-based therapeutic approaches that target mitochondrial metal homeostasis in neurological disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24206195

  20. Assembly of β-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Höhr, Alexandra I C; Straub, Sebastian P; Warscheid, Bettina; Becker, Thomas; Wiedemann, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria evolved through endosymbiosis of a Gram-negative progenitor with a host cell to generate eukaryotes. Therefore, the outer membrane of mitochondria and Gram-negative bacteria contain pore proteins with β-barrel topology. After synthesis in the cytosol, β-barrel precursor proteins are first transported into the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Folding and membrane integration of β-barrel proteins depend on the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) located in the outer membrane, which is related to the β-barrel assembly machinery (BAM) in bacteria. The SAM complex recognizes β-barrel proteins by a β-signal in the C-terminal β-strand that is required to initiate β-barrel protein insertion into the outer membrane. In addition, the SAM complex is crucial to form membrane contacts with the inner mitochondrial membrane by interacting with the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) and shares a subunit with the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) that links the outer mitochondrial membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).

  1. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  2. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    SciTech Connect

    Josyula, Ratnakar; Jin, Zhongmin; McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence; Sha, Bingdong

    2006-02-01

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  3. Lipid unsaturation per se does not explain the physical state of mitochondrial membranes in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Rosamaria; Pagliarani, Alessandra; Nesci, Salvatore; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Fabbri, Micaela; Ventrella, Vittoria

    2016-01-01

    Through a multiple approach, the present study on the mitochondrial membranes from mussel gills and swine heart combines some biochemical information on fatty acid composition, sterol pattern, and temperature dependence of the F1FO-ATPase activity (EC 3.6.3.14.) with fluorescence data on mitochondrial membranes and on liposomes obtained from lipid extracts of mitochondria. The physical state of mussel gills and swine heart was investigated by Laurdan steady state fluorescence. Quite surprisingly, the similar temperature dependence of the F1FO complex, illustrated as Arrhenius plot which in both mitochondria exhibits the same discontinuity at approximately 21°C and overlapping activation energies above and below the discontinuity, is apparently compatible with a different composition and physical state of mitochondrial membranes. Accordingly, mussel membranes contain highly unsaturated fatty acids, abundant sterols, including phytosterols, while mammalian membranes only contain cholesterol and in prevalence shorter and less unsaturated fatty acids, leading to a lower membrane unsaturation with respect to mussel mitochondria. As suggested by fluorescence data, the likely formation of peculiar microdomains interacting with the membrane-bound enzyme complex in mussel mitochondria could produce an environment which somehow approaches the physical state of mammalian mitochondrial membranes. Thus, as an adaptive strategy, the interaction between sterols, highly unsaturated phospholipids and proteins in mussel gill mitochondria could allow the F1FO-ATPase activity to maintain the same activation energy as the mammalian enzyme.

  4. Effect of the triaminopyridine flupirtine on calcium uptake, membrane potential and ATP synthesis in rat heart mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Guido; Balakirev, Maxim; Zwicker, Klaus; Hofmann, Michael; Woodcock, Barry G; Pergande, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    Flupirtine is an analgesic agent which exhibits neuronal cytoprotective activity and may have value in the treatment of conditions involving cell injury and apoptosis. Since flupirtine has no action on known receptor sites we have investigated the effect of this drug on mitochondrial membrane potential, and the changes in intramitochondrial calcium concentration in particular.The findings show that flupirtine increases Ca2+ uptake in mitochondria in vitro. At clinically relevant flupirtine concentrations, corresponding to flupirtine levels in vitro of 0.2 to 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein, there was a 2 to 3 fold increase in mitochondrial calcium levels (P<0.01). At supra-physiological flupirtine concentrations of 20 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein and above, the mitochondrial calcium concentrations were indistinguishable from those in untreated mitochondria.Mitochondrial membrane potential closely paralleled the changes in mitochondrial calcium levels showing a 20% (P<0.01) increase when the flupirtine concentration was raised from 0.2 nmol to 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein and a return to control values at 20 nmol mg−1 protein.The increase in mitochondrial calcium uptake and membrane potential were accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial ATP synthesis (30%; P<0.05) and a similar percentage reduction in mitochondrial volume.Calcium at 80 and 160 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein decreased ATP synthesis by 20–25% (P<0.001). This decrease was prevented or diminished if flupirtine at 10 nmol mg−1 protein was added before the addition of calcium.Since intracellular levels of flupirtine in intact cells never exceeded 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein, these findings are supportive evidence for an in vivo cytoprotective action of flupirtine at the mitochondrial level. PMID:9559899

  5. Loss of Prohibitin Membrane Scaffolds Impairs Mitochondrial Architecture and Leads to Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merkwirth, Carsten; Morbin, Michela; Brönneke, Hella S.; Jordan, Sabine D.; Rugarli, Elena I.; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fusion and fission of mitochondria maintain the functional integrity of mitochondria and protect against neurodegeneration, but how mitochondrial dysfunctions trigger neuronal loss remains ill-defined. Prohibitins form large ring complexes in the inner membrane that are composed of PHB1 and PHB2 subunits and are thought to function as membrane scaffolds. In Caenorhabditis elegans, prohibitin genes affect aging by moderating fat metabolism and energy production. Knockdown experiments in mammalian cells link the function of prohibitins to membrane fusion, as they were found to stabilize the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 (optic atrophy 1), which mediates mitochondrial inner membrane fusion and cristae morphogenesis. Mutations in OPA1 are associated with dominant optic atrophy characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, highlighting the importance of OPA1 function in neurons. Here, we show that neuron-specific inactivation of Phb2 in the mouse forebrain causes extensive neurodegeneration associated with behavioral impairments and cognitive deficiencies. We observe early onset tau hyperphosphorylation and filament formation in the hippocampus, demonstrating a direct link between mitochondrial defects and tau pathology. Loss of PHB2 impairs the stability of OPA1, affects mitochondrial ultrastructure, and induces the perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in hippocampal neurons. A destabilization of the mitochondrial genome and respiratory deficiencies manifest in aged neurons only, while the appearance of mitochondrial morphology defects correlates with tau hyperphosphorylation in the absence of PHB2. These results establish an essential role of prohibitin complexes for neuronal survival in vivo and demonstrate that OPA1 stability, mitochondrial fusion, and the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome in neurons depend on these scaffolding proteins. Moreover, our findings establish prohibitin-deficient mice as a novel genetic model for tau pathologies

  6. The presequence pathway is involved in protein sorting to the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Opaliński, Lukasz; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Ellenrieder, Lars; Ieva, Raffaele; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; van der Laan, Martin; Wiedemann, Nils; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains integral α-helical and β-barrel proteins that are imported from the cytosol. The machineries importing β-barrel proteins have been identified, however, different views exist on the import of α-helical proteins. It has been reported that the biogenesis of Om45, the most abundant signal-anchored protein, does not depend on proteinaceous components, but involves direct insertion into the outer membrane. We show that import of Om45 occurs via the translocase of the outer membrane and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. Assembly of Om45 in the outer membrane involves the MIM machinery. Om45 thus follows a new mitochondrial biogenesis pathway that uses elements of the presequence import pathway to direct a protein to the outer membrane.

  7. TIM23-mediated insertion of transmembrane α-helices into the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Salomé Calado; Osterberg, Marie; Reichert, Andreas S; Yamano, Koji; Björkholm, Patrik; Endo, Toshiya; von Heijne, Gunnar; Kim, Hyun

    2011-03-16

    While overall hydrophobicity is generally recognized as the main characteristic of transmembrane (TM) α-helices, the only membrane system for which there are detailed quantitative data on how different amino acids contribute to the overall efficiency of membrane insertion is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells. Here, we provide comparable data for TIM23-mediated membrane protein insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane of yeast cells. We find that hydrophobicity and the location of polar and aromatic residues are strong determinants of membrane insertion. These results parallel what has been found previously for the ER. However, we see striking differences between the effects elicited by charged residues flanking the TM segments when comparing the mitochondrial inner membrane and the ER, pointing to an unanticipated difference between the two insertion systems.

  8. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor–Couette–Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. PMID:25742953

  9. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis.

  10. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators differentially potentiate brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Irwin, R W; Yao, J; To, J; Hamilton, R T; Cadenas, E; Brinton, R D

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity of the brain is important for long-term neurological health and is influenced by endocrine hormone responsiveness. The present study aimed to determine the role of oestrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in regulating mitochondrial function using selective agonists for ERα (propylpyrazoletriol; PPT) and ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). Ovariectomised female rats were treated with 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ), PPT, DPN or vehicle control. Both ER selective agonists significantly increased the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity relative to vehicle. Western blots of purified whole brain mitochondria detected ERα and, to a greater extent, ERβ localisation. Pre-treatment with DPN, an ERβ agonist, significantly increased ERβ association with mitochondria. In the hippocampus, DPN activated mitochondrial DNA-encoded COX I expression, whereas PPT was ineffective, indicating that mechanistically ERβ, and not ERα, activated mitochondrial transcriptional machinery. Both selective ER agonists increased protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COX IV, suggesting that activation of ERβ or ERα is sufficient. Selective ER agonists up-regulated a panel of bioenergetic enzymes and antioxidant defence proteins. Up-regulated proteins included pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin V. In vitro, whole cell metabolism was assessed in live primary cultured hippocampal neurones and mixed glia. The results of analyses conducted in vitro were consistent with data obtained in vivo. Furthermore, lipid peroxides, accumulated as a result of hormone deprivation, were significantly reduced by E(2) , PPT and DPN. These findings suggest that the activation of both ERα and ERβ is differentially required to potentiate mitochondrial function in brain. As active components in hormone therapy, synthetically designed oestrogens as well as natural phyto-oestrogen cocktails

  11. Mitochondrial membrane fluidity is consistently increased in different models of Huntington disease: restorative effects of olesoxime.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, Janett; Clemens, Laura E; Eckert, Schamim H; Hagl, Stephanie; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Muller, Walter E; Leuner, Kristina; Nguyen, Huu P; Eckert, Gunter P

    2014-08-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (HTT). One prominent target of the mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) is the mitochondrion, affecting its morphology, distribution, and function. Thus, mitochondria have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of HD. Olesoxime, a cholesterol-like compound, promotes motor neuron survival and neurite outgrowth in vitro, and its effects are presumed to occur via a direct interaction with mitochondrial membranes (MMs). We examined the properties of MMs isolated from cell and animal models of HD as well as the effects of olesoxime on MM fluidity and cholesterol levels. MMs isolated from brains of aged Hdh Q111/Q111 knock-in mice showed a significant decrease in 1,6-diphenyl-hexatriene (DPH) anisotropy, which is inversely correlated with membrane fluidity. Similar increases in MM fluidity were observed in striatal STHdh Q111/Q111 cells as well as in MMs isolated from brains of BACHD transgenic rats. Treatment of STHdh cells with olesoxime decreased the fluidity of isolated MMs. Decreased membrane fluidity was also measured in olesoxime-treated MMs isolated from brains of HD knock-in mice. In both models, treatment with olesoxime restored HD-specific changes in MMs. Accordingly, olesoxime significantly counteracted the mhtt-induced increase in MM fluidity of MMs isolated from brains of BACHD rats after 12 months of treatment in vivo, possibly by enhancing MM cholesterol levels. Thus, olesoxime may represent a novel pharmacological tool to treat mitochondrial dysfunction in HD.

  12. Comparative kinetics of damage to the plasma and mitochondrial membranes by intra-cellularly synthesized and externally-provided photosensitizers using multi-color FACS.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Sara; Malik, Zvi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer involves inflicting lethal damage to the cells of malignant tumors, primarily by singlet oxygen that is generated following light-absorption in a photosensitizer molecule. Dysfunction of cells is manifested in many ways, including peroxidation of cellular components, membrane rupture, depolarization of electric potentials, termination of mitochondrial activity, onset of apoptosis and necrosis and eventually cell lysis. These events do not necessarily occur in linear fashion and different types of damage to cell components occur, most probably, in parallel. In this report we measured the relative rates of damage to two cellular membranes: the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. We employed photosensitizers of diverse hydrophobicities and used different incubation procedures, which lead to their different intra-cellular localizations. We monitored the damage that was inflicted on these membranes, by employing optical probes of membrane integrity, in a multi-color FACS experiment. The potentiometric indicator JC-1 monitored the electric cross-membrane potential of the mitochondria and the fluorometric indicator Draq7 monitored the rupture of the plasma membrane. We show that the electric depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and the damage to the enveloping plasma membrane proceed with different kinetics that reflect the molecular character and intracellular location of the sensitizer: PpIX that is synthesized in the cells from ALA causes rapid mitochondrial damage and very slow damage to the plasma membrane, while externally added PpIX has an opposite effect. The hydrophilic sensitizer HypS4 can be taken up by the cells by different incubation conditions, and these affect its intracellular location, and as a consequence either the plasma membrane or the mitochondria is damaged first. A similar correlation was found for additional extracellularly-provided photosensitizers HP and PpIX. PMID:24173598

  13. Mitochondrial protein import: modification of sulfhydryl groups of the inner mitochondrial membrane import machinery in Solanum tuberosum inhibits protein import.

    PubMed

    von Stedingk, E M; Pavlov, P F; Grinkevich, V A; Glaser, E

    1997-12-01

    Protein import into mitochondria involves several components of the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes as well as molecular chaperones located inside mitochondria. Here, we have investigated the effect of sulfhydryl group reagents on import of the in vitro transcribed/translated precursor of the F1 beta subunit of the ATP synthase (pF1 beta) into Solanum tuberosum mitochondria. We have used a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT), a membrane-permeant alkylating agent, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), a non-permeant alkylating agent, 3-(N-maleimidopropionyl)biocytin (MPB), an SH-group specific agent and cross-linker 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) as well as an oxidizing cross-linker, copper sulfate. DTT stimulated the mitochondrial protein import, whereas NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ were inhibitory. Inhibition by Cu2+ could be reversed by addition of DTT. The efficiency of inhibition was higher in energized mitochondrial than in non-energized. We have dissected the effect of the SH-group reagents on binding, unfolding and transport of the precursor into mitochondria. Our results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of NEM, DTNB and Cu2+ on the efficiency of import was not due to the interaction of the SH-group reagents with import receptors. Modification of pF1 beta with NEM prior to the import resulted in stimulation of import, whereas DTNB and Cu2+ were inhibitory. NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ inhibited import of the NEM-modified pF1 beta into intact mitochondria. Import of pF1 beta through a receptor-independent bypass-route as well as import into mitoplasts were sensitive to DTT, NEM, MPB, DTNB and Cu2+ in a similar manner as import into mitochondria. As MPB does not cross the inner membrane, these results indicated that redox and conformational status of SH groups located on the outer surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane were essential for protein import.

  14. Myo19 is an outer mitochondrial membrane motor and effector of starvation-induced filopodia.

    PubMed

    Shneyer, Boris I; Ušaj, Marko; Henn, Arnon

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondria respond to environmental cues and stress conditions. Additionally, the disruption of the mitochondrial network dynamics and its distribution is implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we reveal a new function for Myo19 in mitochondrial dynamics and localization during the cellular response to glucose starvation. Ectopically expressed Myo19 localized with mitochondria to the tips of starvation-induced filopodia. Corollary to this, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of Myo19 diminished filopodia formation without evident effects on the mitochondrial network. We analyzed the Myo19-mitochondria interaction, and demonstrated that Myo19 is uniquely anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) through a 30-45-residue motif, indicating that Myo19 is a stably attached OMM molecular motor. Our work reveals a new function for Myo19 in mitochondrial positioning under stress.

  15. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    PubMed

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2A (PP-PP2A) pathway, induced mitochondria fission, and impaired respiration. Blocking MAM reduction counteracted glucose-induced mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, disruption of MAM integrity mimicked effects of glucose on mitochondria dynamics and function. This glucose-sensing system is deficient in the liver of insulin-resistant ob/ob and cyclophilin D-KO mice, both characterized by chronic disruption of MAM integrity, mitochondrial fission, and altered mitochondrial respiration. These data indicate that MAM contribute to the hepatic glucose-sensing system, allowing regulation of mitochondria dynamics and function during nutritional transition. Chronic disruption of MAM may participate in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance.

  16. Death upon a kiss: mitochondrial outer membrane composition and organelle communication govern sensitivity to BAK/BAX-dependent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Thibaud T.; Chipuk, Jerry E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In order for stressed cells to induce the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, a cohort of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins must collaborate with the outer mitochondrial membrane to permeabilize it. BAK and BAX are the two pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family members that are required for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. While biochemical and structural insights of BAK/BAX function have expanded in the recent years, very little is known about the role of the outer mitochondrial membrane in regulating BAK/BAX activity. In this review, we will highlight the impact of mitochondrial composition (both protein and lipid), and mitochondrial interactions with cellular organelles, on BAK/BAX function and cellular commitment to apoptosis. A better understanding of how BAK/BAX and mitochondrial biology are mechanistically linked will likely reveal novel insights into homeostatic and pathological mechanisms associated with apoptosis. PMID:24269152

  17. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  18. Quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of breast cancer metastatic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Nioka, Shoko; Glickson, Jerry D.; Chance, Britton; Li, Lin Z.

    2010-05-01

    Predicting tumor metastatic potential remains a challenge in cancer research and clinical practice. Our goal was to identify novel biomarkers for differentiating human breast tumors with different metastatic potentials by imaging the in vivo mitochondrial redox states of tumor tissues. The more metastatic (aggressive) MDA-MB-231 and less metastatic (indolent) MCF-7 human breast cancer mouse xenografts were imaged with the low-temperature redox scanner to obtain multi-slice fluorescence images of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp). The nominal concentrations of NADH and Fp in tissue were measured using reference standards and used to calculate the Fp redox ratio, Fp/(NADH+Fp). We observed significant core-rim differences, with the core being more oxidized than the rim in all aggressive tumors but not in the indolent tumors. These results are consistent with our previous observations on human melanoma mouse xenografts, indicating that mitochondrial redox imaging potentially provides sensitive markers for distinguishing aggressive from indolent breast tumor xenografts. Mitochondrial redox imaging can be clinically implemented utilizing cryogenic biopsy specimens and is useful for drug development and for clinical diagnosis of breast cancer.

  19. Induction of rat hepatic mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore opening by leaf extract of Olax subscorpioidea

    PubMed Central

    Adegbite, Oluwatobi Samuel; Akinsanya, Yetunde Ifeoma; Kukoyi, Ayobami Jahdahunsi; Iyanda-Joel, Wisdom O.; Daniel, Oluwatoyin O.; Adebayo, Abiodun Humphrey

    2015-01-01

    Background: The induction of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MMPT) pore has been implicated in the cascade of events involved in apoptosis (programmed cell death). Olax subscorpioidea is traditionally used for the treatment of several diseases and infection. However, its role on MMPT is not yet established. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of varying concentrations of the methanol leaf extract of O. subscorpioidea (MEOS) on MMPT pore opening, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), and mitochondrial lipid peroxidation. Materials and Methods: Opening of the pore was spectrophotometrically assayed under succinate-energized conditions. Results: In the absence of triggering agent (calcium), MEOS induced MMPT pore opening by 350, 612, 827, 845% at 36, 60, 86 and 112 μg/ml, respectively. MEOS further induced MMPT pore opening in the presence of a triggering agent by 866, 905, 831, 840, 949% at 12, 36, 60, 86 and 112 μg/ml, respectively. The extract significantly induced mitochondrial membrane lipid peroxidation in all the concentration used. MEOS also significantly increased mitochondrial ATP hydrolysis by mitochondrial ATPase in all concentration of the extract used. Conclusion: It may be deduced from this results, that MEOS contains certain bioactive components that may find use in pathological conditions that require an enhanced rate of apoptosis. PMID:26109790

  20. Heinrich Wieland--prize lecture. Transport of proteins across mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Neupert, W

    1994-03-01

    The vast majority of proteins comprising the mitochondrion are encoded by nuclear genes, synthesized on ribosomes in the cytosol, and translocated into the various mitochondrial subcompartments. During this process proteins must cross the lipid membranes of the mitochondrion without interfering with the integrity or functions of the organelle. In recent years an approach combining biochemical, molecular, genetic, and morphological methodology has provided insights into various aspects of this complex process of intracellular protein sorting. In particular, a greater understanding of the molecular specificity and mechanism of targeting of mitochondrial preproteins has been reached, as a protein complex of the outer membrane which facilitates recognition and initial membrane insertion has been identified and characterized. Furthermore, pathways and components involved in the translocation of pre-proteins across the two mitochondrial membranes are being dissected and defined. The energetics of translocation and the processes of unfolding and folding of proteins during transmembrane transfer are closely linked to the function of a host of proteins known as heat-shock proteins or molecular chaperones, present both outside and inside the mitochondrion. In addition, the analysis of the process of folding of polypeptides in the mitochondrial matrix has allowed novel and unexpected insights into general pathways of protein folding assisted by folding factors. Pathways of sorting of proteins to the four different mitochondrial subcompartments--the outer membrane (OM), intermembrane space, inner membrane (IM) and matrix--are only partly understood and reveal an amazing complexity and variation. Many additional protein factors are involved in these latter processes, a few of which have been analyzed, such as cytochrome c heme lyase and cytochrome c1 heme lyase, enzymes that catalyze the covalent addition of the heme group to cytochrome c and c1 preproteins, and the

  1. Liver mitochondrial membrane crosslinking and destruction in a rat model of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Zischka, Hans; Lichtmannegger, Josef; Schmitt, Sabine; Jägemann, Nora; Schulz, Sabine; Wartini, Daniela; Jennen, Luise; Rust, Christian; Larochette, Nathanael; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Chajes, Veronique; Bandow, Nathan; Gilles, Valérie S; DiSpirito, Alan A; Esposito, Irene; Goettlicher, Martin; Summer, Karl H; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-04-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a rare hereditary condition that is caused by a genetic defect in the copper-transporting ATPase ATP7B that results in hepatic copper accumulation and lethal liver failure. The present study focuses on the structural mitochondrial alterations that precede clinical symptoms in the livers of rats lacking Atp7b, an animal model for WD. Liver mitochondria from these Atp7b–/– rats contained enlarged cristae and widened intermembrane spaces, which coincided with a massive mitochondrial accumulation of copper. These changes, however, preceded detectable deficits in oxidative phosphorylation and biochemical signs of oxidative damage, suggesting that the ultrastructural modifications were not the result of oxidative stress imposed by copper- dependent Fenton chemistry. In a cell-free system containing a reducing dithiol agent, isolated mitochondria exposed to copper underwent modifications that were closely related to those observed in vivo. In this cell-free system, copper induced thiol modifications of three abundant mitochondrial membrane proteins, and this correlated with reversible intramitochondrial membrane crosslinking, which was also observed in liver mitochondria from Atp7b–/– rats. In vivo, copper-chelating agents reversed mitochondrial accumulation of copper, as well as signs of intra-mitochondrial membrane crosslinking, thereby preserving the functional and structural integrity of mitochondria. Together, these findings suggest that the mitochondrion constitutes a pivotal target of copper in WD. PMID:21364284

  2. Liver mitochondrial membrane crosslinking and destruction in a rat model of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Zischka, Hans; Lichtmannegger, Josef; Schmitt, Sabine; Jägemann, Nora; Schulz, Sabine; Wartini, Daniela; Jennen, Luise; Rust, Christian; Larochette, Nathanael; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Chajes, Veronique; Bandow, Nathan; Gilles, Valérie S; DiSpirito, Alan A; Esposito, Irene; Goettlicher, Martin; Summer, Karl H; Kroemer, Guido

    2011-04-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a rare hereditary condition that is caused by a genetic defect in the copper-transporting ATPase ATP7B that results in hepatic copper accumulation and lethal liver failure. The present study focuses on the structural mitochondrial alterations that precede clinical symptoms in the livers of rats lacking Atp7b, an animal model for WD. Liver mitochondria from these Atp7b–/– rats contained enlarged cristae and widened intermembrane spaces, which coincided with a massive mitochondrial accumulation of copper. These changes, however, preceded detectable deficits in oxidative phosphorylation and biochemical signs of oxidative damage, suggesting that the ultrastructural modifications were not the result of oxidative stress imposed by copper- dependent Fenton chemistry. In a cell-free system containing a reducing dithiol agent, isolated mitochondria exposed to copper underwent modifications that were closely related to those observed in vivo. In this cell-free system, copper induced thiol modifications of three abundant mitochondrial membrane proteins, and this correlated with reversible intramitochondrial membrane crosslinking, which was also observed in liver mitochondria from Atp7b–/– rats. In vivo, copper-chelating agents reversed mitochondrial accumulation of copper, as well as signs of intra-mitochondrial membrane crosslinking, thereby preserving the functional and structural integrity of mitochondria. Together, these findings suggest that the mitochondrion constitutes a pivotal target of copper in WD.

  3. Coupling of lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization in trypanolysis by APOL1

    PubMed Central

    Vanwalleghem, Gilles; Fontaine, Frédéric; Lecordier, Laurence; Tebabi, Patricia; Klewe, Kristoffer; Nolan, Derek P.; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille; Kremer, Anneke; Burkard, Gabriela Schumann; Rassow, Joachim; Roditi, Isabel; Pérez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Humans resist infection by the African parasite Trypanosoma brucei owing to the trypanolytic activity of the serum apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1). Following uptake by endocytosis in the parasite, APOL1 forms pores in endolysosomal membranes and triggers lysosome swelling. Here we show that APOL1 induces both lysosomal and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (LMP and MMP). Trypanolysis coincides with MMP and consecutive release of the mitochondrial TbEndoG endonuclease to the nucleus. APOL1 is associated with the kinesin TbKIFC1, of which both the motor and vesicular trafficking VHS domains are required for MMP, but not for LMP. The presence of APOL1 in the mitochondrion is accompanied by mitochondrial membrane fenestration, which can be mimicked by knockdown of a mitochondrial mitofusin-like protein (TbMFNL). The BH3-like peptide of APOL1 is required for LMP, MMP and trypanolysis. Thus, trypanolysis by APOL1 is linked to apoptosis-like MMP occurring together with TbKIFC1-mediated transport of APOL1 from endolysosomal membranes to the mitochondrion. PMID:26307671

  4. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  5. [Measurements of electric membrane potentials in lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Kowal, E; Malofiejew, M; Kostrzewska, A

    1975-01-01

    The interior of vital lymphocytes, as opposed to their outer environment, has a negative electric potential (rest potential), the magnitude of which depends on the potassium ion concentration of the extracellular medium. The bioelectric phenomena at the lymphocyte are determined not only by the functional state of the cell membrane, but also by the milieu of the blood cells which includes also the adsorbed proteins and lipids. PMID:1199616

  6. Mitochondrial outer membrane forms bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria are double-membrane organelles that move around and change their shapes dynamically. In plants, the dynamics of the outer membrane is not well understood. We recently demonstrated that mitochondria had tubular protrusions of the outer membrane with little or no matrix, called MOPs (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs). Here we show that a MOP can form a bridge between two mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana. The bridge does not appear to involve the inner membranes. Live imaging revealed stretching of the MOP bridge, demonstrating the flexibility of the outer membrane. Mitochondria frequently undergo fission and fusion. These observations raise the possibility that MOPs bridges have a role in these processes. PMID:27031262

  7. alpha-Latrotoxin affects mitochondrial potential and synaptic vesicle proton gradient of nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A S; Storchak, L G; Himmelreich, N H

    2008-02-01

    Ca(2+)-independent [(3)H]GABA release induced by alpha-latrotoxin was found to consist of two sequential processes: a fast initial release realized via exocytosis and more delayed outflow through the plasma membrane GABA transporters [Linetska, M.V., Storchak, L.G., Tarasenko, A.S., Himmelreich, N.H., 2004. Involvement of membrane GABA transporters in alpha-latrotoxin-stimulated [(3)H]GABA release. Neurochem. Int. 44, 303-312]. To characterize the toxin-stimulated events attributable to the transporter-mediated [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain synaptosomes we studied the effect of alpha-latrotoxin on membrane potentials and generation of the synaptic vesicles proton gradient, using fluorescent dyes: potential-sensitive rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive acridine orange. We revealed that alpha-latrotoxin induced a progressive dose-dependent depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and an irreversible run-down of the synaptic vesicle proton gradient. Both processes were insensitive to the presence of cadmium, a potent blocker of toxin-formed transmembrane pores, indicating that alpha-latrotoxin-induced disturbance of the plasma membrane permeability was not responsible to these effects. A gradual dissipation of the synaptic vesicle proton gradient closely coupled with lowering the vesicular GABA transporter activity results in a leakage of the neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles to cytoplasm. As a consequence, there is an essential increase in GABA concentration in a soluble cytosolic pool that appears to be critical parameter for altering the mode of the plasma membrane GABA transporter operation from inward to outward. Thus, our data allow clarifying what cell processes underlain a recruitment of the plasma membrane transporter-mediated pathway in alpha-LTX-stimulated secretion.

  8. Beef-heart submitochondrial particles: a mixture of mitochondrial inner and outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Albracht, S P; Heidrich, H G

    1975-02-17

    1. EPR spectra at 9 GHz and 83 degrees K of NADH-reduced anaerobic beef-heart submitochondrial particles, prepared from mitochondria by sonication and centrifugation, contain a signal (gz equals to 2.01, gy equals to 1.94, gx equals to 1.89) due to an iron-sulphur center of the mitochondrial outer membrane. 2. The ratio of inner and outer membranes in submitochondrial particles is not greatly different from that in beef-heart mitochondria. 3. Beef-heart submitochondrial particles free from outer-membrane contamination have been prepared by free-flow electrophoresis. EPR spectra at 83 degrees K of such particles are presented.

  9. Radiation inactivation method provides evidence that membrane-bound mitochondrial creatine kinase is an oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Quemeneur, E.; Eichenberger, D.; Goldschmidt, D.; Vial, C.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

    1988-06-30

    Lyophilized suspensions of rabbit heart mitochondria have been irradiated with varying doses of gamma rays. Mitochondrial creatine kinase activity was inactivated exponentially with a radiation inactivation size of 352 or 377 kDa depending upon the initial medium. These values are in good agreement with the molecular mass previously deduced from by permeation experiments: 357 kDa. This is the first direct evidence showing that the native form of mitochondrial creatine kinase is associated to the inner membrane as an oligomer, very likely an octamer.

  10. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-β: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, Jose; Melnikov, Valery G.; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Munoz, Ruben; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-β (Aβ) generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ). The purpose was to determine how Aβ may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aβ in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid β was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:22666620

  11. THE EFFECT OF NITRIC OXIDE ON SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTON GRADIENT AND MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL OF BRAIN NERVE TERMINALS.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of nitric oxide on synaptic vesicle proton gradient and membrane potential of rat brain nerve terminals was studied. It has been shown that nitric oxide in the form of S-nitrosothiols at nanomolar concentrations had no effect on the studied parameters, but caused a rapid dissipation of synaptic vesicle proton gradient and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane in the presence of a SH-reducing compound such as dithiothreitol. Both processes were reversible and the rate of H(+)-gradient restoration depended on the redox potential of nerve terminals, namely the molar ratio of reductant/oxidant. This facts, as well as insensitivity of the studied processes to the inhibitor of NO-sensitive guanylate cyclase such as ODQ, allow suggesting that post-translational modification of thiol residues of the mitochondrial and synaptic vesicle proteins underlies the effect of nitric oxide on the key functional parameters ofpresynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:27025060

  12. Correlation between Changes in Mitochondrial Membranes of Artichoke Tubers and Their Hardening and Dormancy.

    PubMed

    Wright, L C; Raison, J K

    1981-10-01

    Spin labeling studies using mitochondrial membranes of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) showed that the decrease during winter in the temperatures of the upper and lower lipid transitions correlated with the development of freezing hardiness of the tubers. The killing temperature for tuber tissue reached a minimum of -12 C, about 5 C degrees lower than the lower transition. Freeze-hardiness decreased when the lower transition increased at the time of sprouting.Low temperature storage was not required to induce freeze-hardiness or to lower the transitions. These changes occurred in tubers under field conditions and at a constant growth temperature of 25 +/- 1 C. In both conditions, tuber dormancy preceded the mitochondrial membrane changes.In young nondormant tubers, cessation of growth by storage at 0 or 4 C and the induction of dormancy with abscisic acid led to decreased temperatures of the upper and lower transitions.Changes in Arrhenius activation energy of succinate oxidase were correlated with the seasonal changes in the upper and lower transitions confirming that these were indeed a reflection of altered thermal responses of mitochondrial membranes, which might be part of a general mechanism in this plant of insuring membrane integrity during the freeze-thaw process. In contrast with chilling injury, there is no precise correlation between the temperature of the lower transition and the temperature below which freezing injury occurs. PMID:16662026

  13. A mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein stabilizes model membranes in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Hincha, Dirk K; Macherel, David

    2010-10-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a highly diverse group of polypeptides expected to play important roles in desiccation tolerance of plant seeds. They are also found in other plant tissues and in some anhydrobotic invertebrates, fungi, protists and prokaryotes. The LEA protein LEAM accumulates in the matrix space of pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondria during late seed maturation. LEAM is an intrinsically disordered protein folding into amphipathic alpha-helix upon desiccation. This suggests that it could interact with the inner mitochondrial membrane, providing structural protection in dry seeds. Here, we have used Fourier-transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy to gain insight into the molecular details of interactions of LEAM with phospholipid bilayers in the dry state and their effects on liposome stability. LEAM interacted specifically with negatively charged phosphate groups in dry phospholipids, increasing fatty acyl chain mobility. This led to an enhanced stability of liposomes during drying and rehydration, but also upon freezing. Protection depended on phospholipid composition and was strongly enhanced in membranes containing the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin. Collectively, the results provide strong evidence for a function of LEAM as a mitochondrial membrane protectant during desiccation and highlight the role of lipid composition in the interactions between LEA proteins and membranes.

  14. Membrane potential of mitochondria in intact lymphocytes during early mitogenic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, M D; Felber, S M

    1984-01-01

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) in intact lymphocytes was calculated by measuring the distribution of radiolabelled methyltriphenylphosphonium cation. The value obtained was 120 mV. The pH gradient across the mitochondrial membrane in situ (delta pH m) was estimated to be 73 mV (1.2 pH units). Thus the electrochemical gradient of protons was about 190 mV. Addition of the mitogen concanavalin A did not alter delta psi m, showing that, if movement of Ca2+ across the inner membrane of lymphocyte mitochondria occurs when concanavalin A is added, it is accompanied by charge-compensating ion movements. PMID:6696741

  15. Mitochondrial respiratory pathways inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae potentiates activity of posaconazole and itraconazole via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  16. Mitochondrial Respiratory Pathways Inhibition in Rhizopus oryzae Potentiates Activity of Posaconazole and Itraconazole via Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has increased drastically in immunocompromised patients. Also the array of targets whose inhibition results in Mucorales death is limited. Recently, researchers identified mitochondria as important regulators of detoxification and virulence mechanisms in fungi. In this context, targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain may provide a new platform for antifungal development. We hypothesized that targeting respiratory pathways potentiates triazoles activity via apoptosis. We found that simultaneous administration of antimycin A (AA) and benzohydroxamate (BHAM), inhibitors of classical and alternative mitochondrial pathways respectively, resulted in potent activity of posaconazole (PCZ) and itraconazole (ICZ) against Rhizopus oryzae. We observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in R. oryzae cells treated with PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM. The fungicidal activity of this combination against R. oryzae was correlated with intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and increased caspase like activity. DNA fragmentation and condensation assays also revealed apoptosis of R. oryzae cells. These apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine. Taken together, these findings suggest that the use of PCZ or ICZ in combination with AA and BHAM makes R. oryzae exquisitely sensitive to treatment with triazoles via apoptosis. This strategy may serve as a new model for the development of improved or novel antifungal agents. PMID:23696824

  17. 4-Hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of membrane lipid peroxidation, impairs glutamate transport and mitochondrial function in synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Keller, J N; Mark, R J; Bruce, A J; Blanc, E; Rothstein, J D; Uchida, K; Waeg, G; Mattson, M P

    1997-10-01

    Removal of extracellular glutamate at synapses, by specific high-affinity glutamate transporters, is critical to prevent excitotoxic injury to neurons. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of an array of prominent neurodegenerative conditions that involve degeneration of synapses and neurons in glutamatergic pathways including stroke, and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Although cell culture data indicate that oxidative insults can impair key membrane regulatory systems including ion-motive ATPases and amino acid transport systems, the effects of oxidative stress on synapses, and the mechanisms that mediate such effects, are largely unknown. This study provides evidence that 4-hydroxynonenal, an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation, mediates oxidation-induced impairment of glutamate transport and mitochondrial function in synapses. Exposure of rat cortical synaptosomes to 4-hydroxynonenal resulted in concentration- and time-dependent decreases in [3H]glutamate uptake, and mitochondrial function [assessed with the dye 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT)]. Other related aldehydes including malondialdehyde and hexanal had little or no effect on glutamate uptake or mitochondrial function. Exposure of synaptosomes to insults known to induce lipid peroxidation (FeSO4 and amyloid beta-peptide) also impaired glutamate uptake and mitochondrial function. The antioxidants propyl gallate and glutathione prevented impairment of glutamate uptake and MTT reduction induced by FeSO4 and amyloid beta-peptide, but not that induced by 4-hydroxynonenal. Western blot analyses using an antibody to 4-hydroxynonenal-conjugated proteins showed that 4-hydroxynonenal bound to multiple cell proteins including GLT-1, a glial glutamate transporter present at high levels in synaptosomes. 4-Hydroxynonenal itself induced lipid peroxidation suggesting that, in addition to binding directly to membrane regulatory proteins, 4

  18. Mature DIABLO/Smac Is Produced by the IMP Protease Complex on the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Burri, Lena; Strahm, Yvan; Hawkins, Christine J.; Gentle, Ian E.; Puryer, Michelle A.; Verhagen, Anne; Callus, Bernard; Vaux, David; Lithgow, Trevor

    2005-01-01

    DIABLO/Smac is a mitochondrial protein that can promote apoptosis by promoting the release and activation of caspases. To do so, DIABLO/Smac must first be processed by a mitochondrial protease and then released into the cytosol, and we show this in an intact cellular system. We propose that the precursor form of DIABLO/Smac enters the mitochondria through a stop-transfer pathway and is processed to its active form by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) complex. Catalytic subunits of the mammalian IMP complex were identified based on sequence conservation and functional complementation, and the novel sequence motif RX5P in Imp1 and NX5S in Imp2 distinguish the two catalytic subunits. DIABLO/Smac is one of only a few specific proteins identified as substrates for the IMP complex in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. PMID:15814844

  19. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  20. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  1. Evidence for several cysteine transport mechanisms in the mitochondrial membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun Pong; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is essential for many mitochondrial processes in plants, including translation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and cyanide detoxification. Its biosynthesis is carried out by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL) which can be found in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria. Mutants lacking one compartment-specific OAS-TL isoform show viable phenotypes, leading to the hypothesis that the organellar membranes are permeable to substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. In this report, we show that exogenouslly supplied [(35)S]cysteine accumulates in the mitochondrial fraction and is taken up into isolated mitochondria for in organello protein synthesis. Analysis of cysteine uptake by isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts indicates that cysteine is transported by multiple facilitated mechanisms that operate in a concentration gradient-dependent manner. In addition, cysteine uptake is dependent mainly on the ΔpH across the inner membrane. The rates of mitochondrial cysteine transport can be mildly altered by specific metabolites in the cyanide detoxification-linked sulfide oxidation, but not by most substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the transport of cysteine plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular cysteine biosynthesis as well as modulating the availability of sulfur for mitochondrial metabolism.

  2. Correlation between fluidising effects on phospholipid membranes and mitochondrial respiration of propofol and p-nitrosophenol homologues.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Wisniewska, Anna; Fiore, Cristina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2003-03-25

    Nitrosopropofol (2-6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol) has dramatic consequences for respiration, ATP synthesis and the transmembrane potential of isolated rat liver mitochondria at concentrations at which propofol (2-6-diisopropylphenol) does not cause any apparent effects. These results correlate well with the observation that nitrosopropofol is also a stronger perturbing agent of phospholipid membranes. In this paper we verify the possible biological activity of different phenols and nitrosophenols on mitochondrial respiration. We then discuss their interactions with phospholipid liposomes, studied with differential scanning calorimetry, spin labelling techniques and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, in order to obtain information on drug distribution and the modifications they impose on lipid bilayer. The results of the experiments performed on mitochondria and model membranes prove an interesting correlation between the effects of the molecules on both systems.

  3. Stability of membrane potential in heart mitochondria: Single mitochondrion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Yukiko; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Morikawa, Daisuke; Ohta, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohta@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2006-06-16

    Mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi} {sub m}) plays an important role in cellular activity. Although {delta}{psi} {sub m} of intracellular mitochondria are relatively stable, the recent experiments with isolated mitochondria demonstrate that individual mitochondria show frequent fluctuations of {delta}{psi} {sub m}. The current study is performed to investigate the factors that stabilize {delta}{psi} {sub m} in cells by observing {delta}{psi} {sub m} of individual isolated mitochondria with fluorescence microscopy. Here, we report that (1) the transient depolarizations are also induced for mitochondria in plasma membrane permeabilized cells, (2) almost all mitochondria isolated from porcine hearts show the transient depolarizations that is enhanced with the net efflux of protons from the matrix to the intermembrane space, and (3) ATP and ADP significantly inhibit the transient depolarizations by plural mechanisms. These results suggest that the suppression of acute alkalinization of the matrix together with the presence of ATP and ADP contributes to the stabilization of {delta}{psi} {sub m} in cells.

  4. Hypertonicity-induced Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability in Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells: Protective Role of Osmolytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Dong; Chen, Zhonghai; Moeckel, Gilbert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperosmotic stress causes cell death through activation of apoptotic pathways if the protective osmolyte response is impaired. In this study we attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of hypertonicity-induced apoptosis and the effect of major organic osmolytes upon those. Methods Hypertonicity-induced changes in Bcl2-family protein abundance and the presence of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in the cytoplasm, were measured using western blot and immunofluorescence labeling. To determine dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) though the permeability transition pore (PTP), the lipophilic cationic carbocyanine fluorescence probe JC-1 and TMRM fluorescence probes were used. Results Hypertonic culture conditions increase the abundance of proapoptotic Bax and the concentration of cytochrome c and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in the cytoplasm. These changes are associated with a dissipation of Δψ and increased permeability of the PTP. We further show that organic osmolytes stabilize the Δψ and decrease the concentration of cytochrome c and AIF in the cytoplasm. Conclusion Our study shows that organic osmolytes prevent hypertonicity-induced apoptosis by preventing dissipation of Δψ through stabilization of the PTP. These findings further support the important role of organic osmolytes in preventing hypertonicity-mediated cell death in medullary kidney cells. PMID:20511721

  5. An ABC transporter in the mitochondrial inner membrane is required for normal growth of yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, J; Schatz, G

    1995-01-01

    In an attempt to identify a mitochondrial ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, we have used the polymerase chain reaction to amplify 10 DNA fragments homologous to members of the ABC family from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We disrupted five of the corresponding genes and found that one of the resulting null mutants barely grew on rich medium and failed to grow on minimal medium. This gene, termed ATM1, encodes a putative 'half-transporter' of 694 amino acids. Atm1p is synthesized with an N-terminal mitochondrial matrix-targeting signal and is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, with its C-terminal ATPase domain exposed to the matrix. Cells lacking a functional ATM1 gene have an unstable mitochondrial genome and have white mitochondria that completely lack cytochromes. Atm1p is the first mitochondrial member of the ABC family to be identified and the only eukaryotic ABC transporter that has been shown to be necessary for normal cellular growth. Images PMID:7828591

  6. The RNA binding of protein A from Wuhan nodavirus is mediated by mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Miao, Meng; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiao-Feng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-08-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the lipids present in intracellular membranes, the sites of which viral replicases associate with. However, the direct effects of membrane lipids on viral replicases are still poorly understood. Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) protein A, which associates with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for RNA replication. Here, we report that WhNV protein A binds to RNA1 in a cooperative manner. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) stimulated the RNA binding activity and cooperativity of protein A, and such stimulations exhibited strong selectivity for distinct phospholipids. Interestingly, MMLs stimulated the RNA-binding cooperativity only at higher protein A concentrations. Further investigation showed that MMLs stimulate the RNA binding of protein A by promoting its self-interaction. Finally, manipulating MML metabolism affected the protein A-induced RNA1 recruitment in cells. Together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on the RNA binding activity of a nodaviral replicase. PMID:25092456

  7. Compartmented coupling of chicken heart mitochondrial creatine kinase to the nucleotide translocase requires the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S P; Suelter, C H

    1987-08-15

    The kinetic coupling of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MiMi-CK) to ADP/ATP translocase in chicken heart mitochondrial preparations is demonstrated. Measuring the MiMi-CK apparent Km value for MgATP2- (at saturating creatine) gives a value of 36 microM when MiMi-CK is coupled to oxidative phosphorylation. This Km value is threefold lower than the Km for enzyme bound to mitoplasts or free in solution. The nucleotide translocase Km value for ADP decreases from 20 to 10 microM in the presence of 50 mM creatine only with intact mitochondria. Similar experiments with mitoplasts do not give decreased Km values. The observed Km differences can be used to calculate the concentration of ATP and ADP under steady-state conditions showing that the observed differences in the kinetic constants accurately reflect the enzyme activities of MiMi-CK under the different conditions. The behavior of the Km values provides evidence for what we term compartmented coupling. Therefore, like the rabbit heart system (S. Erickson-Viitanen, P. Viitanen, P. J. Geiger, W. C. T. Yang, and S. P. Bessman (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 14395-14404) compartmented coupling requires an intact outer mitochondrial membrane. The apparent Km values for normal or compartmentally coupled systems can be used to calculate steady-state values of ATP and ADP by coupling enzyme theory. Hence, the overall kinetic parameters accurately reflect the behavior of the enzymes whether free in solution or in the intermembrane space.

  8. Covalent binding and anchoring of cytochrome c to mitochondrial mimetic membranes promoted by cholesterol carboxyaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Appolinário, Patricia P; Mugnol, Katia C U; Bloch, Carlos; Nantes, Iseli L; Di Mascio, Paolo; Miyamoto, Sayuri

    2013-10-21

    Mitochondrial cholesterol has been reported to be increased under specific pathological conditions associated with enhanced oxidative stress parameters. In this scenario, cholesterol oxidation would be increased, leading to the production of reactive aldehydes, including cholesterol carboxyaldehyde (ChAld). By using SDS micelles as a mitochondrial mimetic model, we have demonstrated that ChAld covalently modifies cytochrome c (cytc), a protein known to participate in electron transport and apoptosis signaling. This mimetic model induces changes in cytc structure in the same way as mitochondrial membranes do. Tryptic digestion of the cytc-ChAld adduct followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses revealed that modifications occur at Lys residues (K22) localized at cytc site L, a site involved in protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. Interestingly, ChAld ligation prevented cytc detachment from liposomes even under high ionic strength conditions. Overall, it can be concluded that ChAld ligation to Lys residues at site L creates a hydrophobic tail at cytc, which promotes cytc anchoring to the membrane. Although not investigated in detail in this study, cytc adduction to cholesterol derived aldehydes could have implications in cytc release from mitochondria under apoptotic stimuli. PMID:24059586

  9. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  10. Qualitative Determination of Superoxide Release at Both Sides of the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane by Capillary Electrophoretic Analysis of the Oxidation Products of Triphenylphosphonium Hydroethidine*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide is released asymmetrically to both sides of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Since this membrane is impermeable to superoxide, two separate pools are formed at either side of the membrane, each with its own characteristics and potential biological effects. Here, we report an attomole-sensitive fast capillary electrophoretic method that can analyze superoxide in a single pool, either the matrix pool or that outside the mitochondria. The method uses triphenylphosphonium hydroethidine (TPP-HE) that reacts with the superoxide in both pools. Centrifugation is used to separate the mitochondria (i.e. matrix contents) from the supernatant (i.e. products released outside the mitochondria). Each fraction is then analyzed by a capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) method that separates and detects hydroxytriphenylphosphonium ethidium (OH-TPP-E+), the fluorescent superoxide specific product. The separation takes < 3 min and the detection level is down to 3 attomole OH-TPP-E+. The method has proved to be effective detecting qualitatively superoxide release in the mitochondria of 143B cells, mouse liver, and rat skeletal muscle, both in the presence and absence of inhibitors. In addition, this study confirmed that Complex I releases superoxide only toward the matrix while Complex III releases superoxide toward both sides of the mitochondrial inner membrane. Furthermore, treatment with menadione induces superoxide release toward both sides of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:19168125

  11. High fat diet-induced modifications in membrane lipid and mitochondrial-membrane protein signatures precede the development of hepatic insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, M.; Schäfer, A.; Seelig, A.; Schultheiß, J.; Wu, M.; Aichler, M.; Leonhardt, J.; Rathkolb, B.; Rozman, J.; Sarioglu, H.; Hauck, S.M.; Ueffing, M.; Wolf, E.; Kastenmueller, G.; Adamski, J.; Walch, A.; Hrabé de Angelis, M.; Neschen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Excess lipid intake has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatosteatosis and hepatic insulin resistance. Lipids constitute approximately 50% of the cell membrane mass, define membrane properties, and create microenvironments for membrane-proteins. In this study we aimed to resolve temporal alterations in membrane metabolite and protein signatures during high-fat diet (HF)-mediated development of hepatic insulin resistance. Methods We induced hepatosteatosis by feeding C3HeB/FeJ male mice an HF enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 fatty acids for 7, 14, or 21 days. Longitudinal changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity were assessed via the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, in membrane lipids via t-metabolomics- and membrane proteins via quantitative proteomics-analyses, and in hepatocyte morphology via electron microscopy. Data were compared to those of age- and litter-matched controls maintained on a low-fat diet. Results Excess long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 intake for 7 days did not compromise hepatic insulin sensitivity, however, induced hepatosteatosis and modified major membrane lipid constituent signatures in liver, e.g. increased total unsaturated, long-chain fatty acid-containing acyl-carnitine or membrane-associated diacylglycerol moieties and decreased total short-chain acyl-carnitines, glycerophosphocholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, or sphingolipids. Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease within 14 days HF-exposure. Overt hepatic insulin resistance developed until day 21 of HF-intervention and was accompanied by morphological mitochondrial abnormalities and indications for oxidative stress in liver. HF-feeding progressively decreased the abundance of protein-components of all mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, inner and outer mitochondrial membrane substrate transporters independent from the hepatocellular mitochondrial volume in liver. Conclusions We assume HF-induced modifications in membrane lipid

  12. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease. PMID:26137589

  13. ANT2-defective fibroblasts exhibit normal mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Dolly; Goldstein, Amy C.; El-Khoury, Riyad; Rak, Malgorzata; Edmunds, Lia; Rustin, Pierre; Vockley, Jerry; Schiff, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) transports glycolytic ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Patients with ANT2 deletion were recently reported. We aimed at characterizing mitochondrial functions in ANT2-defective fibroblasts. In spite of ANT2 expression in fibroblasts, we observed no difference between ANT2-defective and control fibroblasts for mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels. This indicates that ANT2 insufficiency does not alter fibroblast basal mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:26000237

  14. Investigating membrane and mitochondrial cryobiological responses of HUVEC using interrupted cooling protocols.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Anthony J F; Elliott, Janet A W; McGann, Locksley E

    2015-10-01

    The success of cryopreservation protocols is largely based on membrane integrity assessments after thawing, since membrane integrity can be considered to give an upper limit in assessment of cell viability and the plasma membrane is considered to be a primary site of cryoinjury. However, the exposure of cells to conditions associated with low temperatures can induce injury to cellular structure and function that may not be readily identified by membrane integrity alone. Interrupted cooling protocols (including interrupted slow cooling without a hold time (graded freezing), and interrupted rapid cooling with a hold time (two-step freezing)), can yield important information about cryoinjury by separating the damage that occurs upon cooling to (and possibly holding at) a critical intermediate temperature range from the damage that occurs upon plunging to the storage temperature (liquid nitrogen). In this study, we used interrupted cooling protocols in the absence of cryoprotectant to investigate the progression of damage to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), comparing an assessment of membrane integrity with a mitochondrial polarization assay. Additionally, the membrane integrity response of HUVEC to interrupted cooling was investigated as a function of cooling rate (for interrupted slow cooling) and hold time (for interrupted rapid cooling). A key finding of this work was that under slow cooling conditions which resulted in a large number of membrane intact cells immediately post thaw, mitochondria are predominantly in a non-functional depolarized state. This study, the first to look directly at mitochondrial polarization throughout interrupted cooling profiles and a detailed study of HUVEC response, highlights the complexity of the progression of cell damage, as the pattern and extent of cell injury throughout the preservation process differs by injury site. PMID:26254036

  15. The self-interaction of a nodavirus replicase is enhanced by mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Han, Yajuan; Miao, Meng; Qi, Nan; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-01-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the protein-protein interactions among viral replicases and the association of viral replicases with intracellular membranes. Protein A from Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV), which closely associate with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for viral RNA replication. Here, we studied the direct effects of mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) on WhNV protein A activity in vitro. Our investigations revealed the self-interaction of WhNV protein A is accomplished via two different patterns (i.e., homotypic and heterotypic self-interactions via different interfaces). MMLs stimulated the protein A self-interaction, and this stimulation exhibited selectivity for specific phospholipids. Moreover, we found that specific phospholipids differently favor the two self-interaction patterns. Furthermore, manipulating specific phospholipid metabolism affected protein A self-interaction and the activity of protein A to replicate RNA in cells. Taken together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on a nodaviral RNA replicase. PMID:24586921

  16. The Self-Interaction of a Nodavirus Replicase Is Enhanced by Mitochondrial Membrane Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Han, Yajuan; Miao, Meng; Qi, Nan; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-01-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the protein-protein interactions among viral replicases and the association of viral replicases with intracellular membranes. Protein A from Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV), which closely associate with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for viral RNA replication. Here, we studied the direct effects of mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) on WhNV protein A activity in vitro. Our investigations revealed the self-interaction of WhNV protein A is accomplished via two different patterns (i.e., homotypic and heterotypic self-interactions via different interfaces). MMLs stimulated the protein A self-interaction, and this stimulation exhibited selectivity for specific phospholipids. Moreover, we found that specific phospholipids differently favor the two self-interaction patterns. Furthermore, manipulating specific phospholipid metabolism affected protein A self-interaction and the activity of protein A to replicate RNA in cells. Taken together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on a nodaviral RNA replicase. PMID:24586921

  17. The Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Associates with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase in a Stoichiometric Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Mehnert, Carola S.; Rampelt, Heike; Gebert, Michael; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schrempp, Sandra G.; Kochbeck, Lioba; Guiard, Bernard; Warscheid, Bettina; van der Laan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized with amino-terminal signal sequences. The presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex) mediates the import of these preproteins. The essential TIM23 core complex closely cooperates with partner protein complexes like the presequence translocase-associated import motor and the respiratory chain. The inner mitochondrial membrane also contains a large number of metabolite carriers, but their association with preprotein translocases has been controversial. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the TIM23 interactome based on stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture. Subsequent biochemical studies on identified partner proteins showed that the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier associates with the membrane-embedded core of the TIM23 complex in a stoichiometric manner, revealing an unexpected connection of mitochondrial protein biogenesis to metabolite transport. Our data indicate that direct TIM23-AAC coupling may support preprotein import into mitochondria when respiratory activity is low. PMID:25124039

  18. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ran; Rittenhouse, Danielle; Sweeney, Katelyn; Potluri, Prasanth; Wallace, Douglas C

    2015-08-01

    The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs) which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs.

  19. The distribution and apoptotic function of outer membrane proteins depend on mitochondrial fusion

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, David; Eisner, Verónica; Liu, Xingguo; Várnai, Péter; Hunyady, László; Gross, Atan; Hajnóczky, György

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion have been shown to have defects linked to the exchange of innermembrane and matrix components. Because outer-mitochondrial membrane (OMM) constituents insert directly from the cytoplasm, a role for fusion in their inter-mitochondrial transfer was unanticipated. Here we show that fibroblasts lacking the GTPases responsible for OMM fusion, Mitofusins1/2 (MFN1/2), display more heterogeneous distribution of OMM proteins. Proteins with different modes of OMM association display varying degrees of heterogeneity in Mfn1/2−/− cells and different kinetics of transfer during fusion in fusion-competent cells. Pro-apoptotic Bak exhibits marked heterogeneity, which is normalized upon expression of MFN2. Bak is critical for Bid-induced OMM permeabilization and cytochrome c release and Mfn1/2−/− cells show dysregulation of Bid-dependent apoptotic signaling. Bid sensitivity of Bak-deficient mitochondria is regained upon fusion with Bak-containing mitochondria. Thus, OMM protein distribution depends on mitochondrial fusion and is a locus of apoptotic dysfunction in conditions of fusion deficiency. PMID:24813948

  20. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  1. Importing Mitochondrial Proteins: Machineries and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Koehler, Carla M.; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Lithgow, Trevor; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and must be imported across one or both mitochondrial membranes. There is an amazingly versatile set of machineries and mechanisms, and at least four different pathways, for the importing and sorting of mitochondrial precursor proteins. The translocases that catalyze these processes are highly dynamic machines driven by the membrane potential, ATP, or redox reactions, and they cooperate with molecular chaperones and assembly complexes to direct mitochondrial proteins to their correct destinations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the importing and sorting of mitochondrial proteins and their contributions to mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:19703392

  2. Genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Baker, B. J.; Mutoh, H.; Dimitrov, D.; Akemann, W.; Perron, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Jin, L.; Cohen, L. B.; Isacoff, E. Y.; Pieribone, V. A.; Hughes, T.; Knöpfel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging activity of neurons in intact brain tissue was conceived several decades ago and, after many years of development, voltage-sensitive dyes now offer the highest spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal functions in the living brain. Further progress in this field is expected from the emergent development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. These fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors overcome the drawbacks of organic voltage sensitive dyes such as non-specificity of cell staining and the low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. In a transgenic animal, a genetically encoded sensor could in principle be expressed specifically in any cell type and would have the advantage of staining only the cell population determined by the specificity of the promoter used to drive expression. Here we critically review the current status of these developments. PMID:18679801

  3. [CA²⁺ ACCUMULATION IN ISOLATED RAT HEART MITOCHONDRIA UNDER MAINTENANCE OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL].

    PubMed

    Budko, A Yu; Strutynska, N A; Okhay, I Yu; Semenykhina, O M; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    It is known that mitochondria can accumulate calcium, which regulates energy metabolism and cell death. About 90% of energy of cardiomyocytes is synthesized in mitochondria. Heart cells are also affected by the rapid changes in the Ca²⁺ concentration in the cytoplasm. Therefore, mitochondrial Ca²⁺-accumulation ability is crucial. The aim of our work was to study the accumulation of Ca²⁺ in isolated rat heart mitochondria in the presence of mitochondrial potential and different extramitochondrial Ca²⁺ concentrations. Isolated organelles were loaded with fluorescent dye Fluo-4 AM (2.5 μmol/l) at a temperature of 26°C for 30 min. It has been revealed that under these conditions high mitochondrial potential was maintained sufficiently, which is necessary for the functioning of the calcium transporting system in organelles. We established that mitochondria have a limited ability to store ionized calcium, as addition of Ca²⁺ ion in concentrations of 10, 20, 50 µmol/l ensures a certain level of accumulation in organelles with further fluorescent signal growth cessation. Addition of 100 µmol/Ca²⁺ to isolated mitochondria resulted in a significant increase in fluorescence intensity (46% in the fifth minute, compared to the fluorescence when 20 µmol/l Ca²⁺ was added) and likely to activation of cation release. It was shown that ruthenium red (10⁻⁵ mol/l), an inhibitor of Ca²⁺-uniporter, prevented accumulation of calcium ions in organelles by 89%, in the presence of 100 µmol/ Ca²⁺. It was clearly seen that heart mitochondria require Mg²⁺-ATP complex (3 mmol/l) to accumulate Ca²⁺, likely to maintain the inner membrane potential, activity of Ca²⁺ uniporter and energetic processes in organelles. Thus, the process of Ca²⁺ accumulation in rat heart mitochondria requires the maintenance of mitochondrial potential, activity of Ca²⁺-uniporter, depends on extramitochondrial Ca²⁺ concentration and presence of Mg²⁺-ATP complex.

  4. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  5. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1.

  6. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1. PMID:26950402

  7. Consequences of defective vitamin A transportation on mitochondrial membrane integrity during protein depletion.

    PubMed

    Olowookere, J O

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between the structural integrity and functionality of rat liver mitochondrial membranes, and different levels of dietary protein and vitamin A transportation during protein depletion in animals have been investigated. Although the vitamin A content of the protein-depleted diet was 1680 +/- 35 IU/kg diet, and that of the control diet was 1,650 +/- 30 IU/kg diet, the vitamin A content of the liver of depleted rats was reduced to 16.7% of controls. The hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet showed excessive passive swelling (about 3-fold of controls) in isotonic solutions. Whereas a seemingly inverse relationship existed between the vitamin A content of the liver and the osmotic behaviour of hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet, there is a direct relationship between their hepatic mitochondrial vitamin A and the respiratory control ratio. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  8. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  9. Complexes of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein mitoNEET with resveratrol-3-sulfate.

    PubMed

    Arif, Waqar; Xu, Shu; Isailovic, Dragan; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Carroll, Richard T; Funk, Max O

    2011-06-28

    Binding of the thiazolidinedione antidiabetic drug pioglitazone led to the discovery of a novel outer mitochondrial membrane protein of unknown function called mitoNEET. The protein is homodimeric and contains a uniquely ligated two iron-two sulfur cluster in each of its two cytosolic domains. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was employed to characterize solutions of the soluble cytosolic domain (amino acids 32--108) of the protein. Ions characteristic of dimers containing the cofactors were readily detected under native conditions. mitoNEET responded to exposure to solutions at low pH by dissociation to give monomers that retained the cofactor, followed by dissociation of the cofactor in a concerted fashion. mitoNEET formed complexes with resveratrol-3-sulfate, one of the primary metabolites of the natural product resveratrol. Resveratrol itself showed no tendency to interact with mitoNEET. The formation of complexes was evident in both electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements. Up to eight molecules of the compound associated with the dimeric form of the protein in a sequential fashion. Dissociation constants determined by micorcalorimetry were in the range 5-16 μM for the various binding sites. The only other known naturally occurring binding partner for mitoNEET at present is NADPH. It is very interesting that the iron-sulfur cluster containing protein interacts with two potentially redox active substances at the surface of mitochondria. These findings provide a new direction for research into two poorly understood, yet biomedically relevant, species. PMID:21591687

  10. Mammalian plasma membrane proteins as potential biomarkers and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Rucevic, Marijana; Hixson, Douglas; Josic, Djuro

    2011-06-01

    Defining the plasma membrane proteome is crucial to understand the role of plasma membrane in fundamental biological processes. Change in membrane proteins is one of the first events that take place under pathological conditions, making plasma membrane proteins a likely source of potential disease biomarkers with prognostic or diagnostic potential. Membrane proteins are also potential targets for monoclonal antibodies and other drugs that block receptors or inhibit enzymes essential to the disease progress. Despite several advanced methods recently developed for the analysis of hydrophobic proteins and proteins with posttranslational modifications, integral membrane proteins are still under-represented in plasma membrane proteome. Recent advances in proteomic investigation of plasma membrane proteins, defining their roles as diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers and as target molecules in disease treatment, are presented.

  11. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  12. Rotenone-sensitive mitochondrial potential in Phytomonas serpens: electrophoretic Ca(2+) accumulation.

    PubMed

    Moysés, Danuza Nogueira; Barrabin, Hector

    2004-06-01

    Phytomonas sp. are flagellated trypanosomatid plant parasites that cause diseases of economic importance in plantations of coffee, oil palm, cassava and coconuts. Here we investigated Ca(2+) uptake by the vanadate-insensitive compartments using permeabilized Phytomonas serpens promastigotes. This uptake occurs at a rate of 1.13+/-0.23 nmol Ca(2+) mg x protein(-1) min(-1). It is completely abolished by the H(+) ionophore FCCP and by valinomycin and nigericin. It is also inhibited by 2 microM ruthenium red, which, at this low concentration, is known to inhibit the mitochondrial calcium uniport. Furthermore, salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) and propylgallate, specific inhibitors of the alternative oxidase in plant and parasite mitochondria, are also effective as inhibitors of the Ca(2+) transport. These compounds abolish the membrane potential that is monitored with safranine O. Rotenone, an inhibitor of NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase, can also dissipate 100% of the membrane potential. It is suggested that the mitochondria of P. serpens can be energized via oxidation of NADH in a pathway involving the NADH-CoQ oxidoreductase and the alternative oxidase to regenerate the ubiquinone. The electrochemical H(+) gradient can be used to promote Ca(2+) uptake by the mitochondria. PMID:15178471

  13. [Mitochondrial dynamics: a potential new therapeutic target for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuzmicic, Jovan; Del Campo, Andrea; López-Crisosto, Camila; Morales, Pablo E; Pennanen, Christian; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Hechenleitner, Jonathan; Zepeda, Ramiro; Castro, Pablo F; Verdejo, Hugo E; Parra, Valentina; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles able to vary their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and fragmented disconnected arrays, through events of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. These events allow the transmission of signaling messengers and exchange of metabolites within the cell. They have also been implicated in a variety of biological processes including embryonic development, metabolism, apoptosis, and autophagy. Although the majority of these studies have been confined to noncardiac cells, emerging evidence suggests that changes in mitochondrial morphology could participate in cardiac development, the response to ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, and diabetes mellitus. In this article, we review how the mitochondrial dynamics are altered in different cardiac pathologies, with special emphasis on heart failure, and how this knowledge may provide new therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:21820793

  14. Effect of EMP fields on cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    A simple model is presented for cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Using calculated values of internal electric field strength induced during EMP exposure, the model predicts that cell membrane potentials of about 100 mV may be induced for time frames on the order of 10 ns. Possible biological effects of these potentials including electroporation area discussed.

  15. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  16. Prohibitins act as a membrane-bound chaperone for the stabilization of mitochondrial proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nijtmans, Leo G.J.; de Jong, Liesbeth; Artal Sanz, Marta; Coates, Philip J.; Berden, Jan A.; Willem Back, Jaap; Muijsers, Anton O.; van der Spek, Hans; Grivell, Les A.

    2000-01-01

    Prohibitins are ubiquitous, abundant and evolutionarily strongly conserved proteins that play a role in important cellular processes. Using blue native electrophoresis we have demonstrated that human prohibitin and Bap37 together form a large complex in the mitochondrial inner membrane. This complex is similar in size to the yeast complex formed by the homologues Phb1p and Phb2p. In yeast, levels of this complex are increased on co-overexpression of both Phb1p and Phb2p, suggesting that these two proteins are the only components of the complex. Pulse–chase experiments with mitochondria isolated from phb1/phb2-null and PHB1/2 overexpressing cells show that the Phb1/2 complex is able to stabilize newly synthesized mitochondrial translation products. This stabilization probably occurs through a direct interaction because association of mitochondrial translation products with the Phb1/2 complex could be demonstrated. The fact that Phb1/2 is a large multimeric complex, which provides protection of native peptides against proteolysis, suggests a functional homology with protein chaperones with respect to their ability to hold and prevent misfolding of newly synthesized proteins. PMID:10835343

  17. Cobra cardiotoxins: membrane interactions and pharmacological potential.

    PubMed

    Dubovskii, P V; Konshina, A G; Efremov, R G

    2014-01-01

    Natural polycationic membrane-active peptides typically lack disulfide bonds and exhibit fusion, cell-penetrating, antimicrobial activities. They are mostly unordered in solution, but adopt a helical structure, when bound to phospholipid membranes. Structurally different are cardiotoxins (or cytotoxins, CTs) from cobra venom. They are fully β- structured molecules, characterized by the three-finger fold (TFF). Affinity of CTs to lipid bilayer was shown to depend on amino acid sequence in the tips of the three loops. In the present review, CT-membrane interactions are analyzed through the prism of data on binding of the toxins to phospholipid liposomes and detergent micelles, as well as their structural and computational studies in membrane mimicking environments. We assess different hydrophobicity scales to compare membrane partitioning of various CTs and their membrane effects. A comparison of hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of CTs and linear polycationic peptides provides a key to their biological activity and creates a fundamental basis for rational design of new membrane-interacting compounds, including new promising drugs. For instance, from the viewpoint of the data obtained on model lipid membranes, cytotoxic activity of CTs against cancer cells is discussed.

  18. Genetically Encoded Protein Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Organic voltage-sensitive dyes offer very high spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal function. However these dyes suffer from the drawbacks of non-specificity of cell staining and low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. Further progress in imaging activity is expected from the development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. Cell type specificity of expression of these fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors can be obtained via several different mechanisms. One is cell type specificity of infection by individual virus subtypes. A second mechanism is specificity of promoter expression in individual cell types. A third, depends on the offspring of transgenic animals with cell type specific expression of cre recombinase mated with an animal that has the DNA for the FP voltage sensor in all of its cells but its expression is dependent on the recombinase activity. Challenges remain. First, the response time constants of many of the new FP voltage sensors are slower (2-10 ms) than those of organic dyes. This results in a relatively small fractional fluorescence change, ΔF/F, for action potentials. Second, the largest signal presently available is only ~40% for a 100 mV depolarization and many of the new probes have signals that are substantially smaller. Large signals are especially important when attempting to detect fast events because the shorter measurement interval results in a relatively small number of detected photons and therefore a relatively large shot noise (see Chap. 1). Another kind of challenge has occurred when attempts were made to transition from one species to another or from one cell type to another or from cell culture to in vivo measurements.Several laboratories have recently described a number of novel FP voltage sensors. Here we attempt to critically review the current status of these developments in terms of signal size, time course, and in vivo function.

  19. Effects of curcumin on cancer cell mitochondrial function and potential monitoring with ¹⁸F-FDG uptake.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Moon, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Young Seok; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-02-01

    A better understanding of how curcumin influences cancer cell biology could help devise new strategies to enhance its antitumor effect. Many curcumin actions are proposed to occur by targeting mitochondrial function, among which glucose metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production are pivotal. However, little is known of how curcumin influences cancer cell glucose metabolism. We thus evaluated the effect of curcumin on cancer cell glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function, and further investigated whether these responses could be modified to enhance the anticancer potency of the compound. MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with curcumin were measured for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F‑FDG) uptake, lactate production, hexokinase activity, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Activation of signaling pathways was evaluated by western blots, and cell survival was assessed with sulforhodamine B assays. Curcumin stimulated a 3.6-fold increase of 18F-FDG uptake in MCF-7 cells, along with augmented hexokinase activity and lactate efflux. This was accompanied by significantly suppressed cellular OCR, consistent with a metabolic shift to glycolytic flux. Inhibiting this metabolic response with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) blocked curcumin-induced mTOR activation and resulted in a greater anti-proliferative effect. Curcumin-induced MMP depolarization led to reduced ROS production, which may hinder the anticancer effect of the compound. Intracellular ROS was completely restored by adding Cu2+, which can bind and modify the curcumin's physico-chemical property, and this resulted in a marked potentiation of its anti-proliferative effect. Thus, curcumin suppresses cancer cell MMP and ROS generation, and this response is accompanied by stimulated 18F-FDG uptake via shifting of metabolism from mitochondrial respiration to glycolytic flux. These mitochondrial and metabolic responses may provide potential targets that can

  20. Yeast Vps13 promotes mitochondrial function and is localized at membrane contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Sook; Thorsness, Mary K.; Policastro, Robert; McGoldrick, Luke L.; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.; Thorsness, Peter E.; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Mutations in human VPS13 genes result in a variety of diseases, such as chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), but the cellular functions of Vps13 proteins are not well defined. In yeast, there is a single VPS13 orthologue, which is required for at least two different processes: protein sorting to the vacuole and sporulation. This study demonstrates that VPS13 is also important for mitochondrial integrity. In addition to preventing transfer of DNA from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, VPS13 suppresses mitophagy and functions in parallel with the endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondrion encounter structure (ERMES). In different growth conditions, Vps13 localizes to endosome–mitochondrion contacts and to the nuclear–vacuole junctions, indicating that Vps13 may function at membrane contact sites. The ability of VPS13 to compensate for the absence of ERMES correlates with its intracellular distribution. We propose that Vps13 is present at multiple membrane contact sites and that separation-of-function mutants are due to loss of Vps13 at specific junctions. Introduction of VPS13A mutations identified in ChAc patients at cognate sites in yeast VPS13 are specifically defective in compensating for the lack of ERMES, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction might be the basis for ChAc. PMID:27280386

  1. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  2. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  3. Changes in membrane potential and delayed luminescence of Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Ho, M W; Triglia, A; Musumeci, F; Scordino, A

    2000-03-01

    This paper examines the effect of changes in membrane potential on the critical parameters of delayed luminescence of Acetabularia acetabulum. We show that these parameters are altered by changes in membrane potential in ways that may reflect concomitant changes in energy storage and energy coupling.

  4. Lysophosphatidylcholine cell depolarization: increased membrane permeability for use in the determination of cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.L.; Wersto, R.P.; Notter, R.H.; Finkelstein, J.N.

    1984-12-01

    Current techniques for the determination of cellular membrane potentials based on the uptake of a radiolabeled lipophilic cation, (3H)triphenylmethylphosphonium, and the cyanine dye, DiOC5(3), were analyzed in terms of the proportions of these probes which are accumulated due to potential-dependent and potential-independent forces. Measurements were made of probe uptake in two model systems: rabbit type II pneumocytes and human promyelocytic HL60 cells. For both cell types, the membrane potential-independent component of triphenylmethylphosphonium uptake was found to be a function of several variables, including the length of exposure of the cells to the transport facilitator tetraphenylboron, the concentration of tetraphenylboron, and the integrity of the cell membrane. To accurately determine the magnitude of the potential-independent component of probe uptake by type II and HL60 cells, the cell-permeabilizing agent lysophosphatidylcholine was used. The ability of lysophosphatidylcholine to depolarize cell membranes and accurately predict membrane potential-independent accumulation was found to be equal to or superior to several other techniques commonly used to achieve membrane depolarization (e.g. gramicidin, valinomycin plus high external potassium). Lysophosphatidylcholine cell treatment was found to be a simple, rapid, and accurate technique to increase cell membrane permeability and allow equilibration of intra- and extracellular ions. The method is shown to be useful for determining membrane potential-independent accumulation of both radiolabeled and fluorescent probes of membrane potential.

  5. Phosphate Regulation of Lipid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Is Independent of the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane DGS1 Complex1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Moellering, Eric R.; Benning, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Galactoglycerolipids are major constituents of photosynthetic membranes in chloroplasts. At least three parallel sets of enzymes are involved in their biosynthesis that must be coordinated in response to changing growth conditions. A potential candidate for a protein affecting the activity of different galactoglycerolipid pathways is the recently described digalactosyldiacylglycerol1 (dgd1) SUPPRESSOR1 (DGS1) protein of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) localized in the mitochondrial outer membrane. It was discovered based on a specific gain-of-function point mutation allele, dgs1-1, that causes a partial restoration of chloroplast galactoglycerolipid deficiency in the dgd1 mutant, which is defective in the lipid galactosyltransferase, DGD1. The dgs1-1 allele causes the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide that leads to an activation of an alternative, DGD1-independent galactoglycerolipid biosynthesis pathway in chloroplasts. Analysis presented here shows that the DGS1 protein is a component of a large protein complex, which explains the previously observed dominant negative phenotype following the expression of the dgs1-1 allele. The dgs1-1 allele causes the loss of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein that might be related to the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the dgs1-1 mutant background. This effect was posttranscriptional because mRNA levels for the major form of AOX were not affected in dgs1-1 mutant seedlings. Unlike dgs1-1, a loss-of-function allele, dgs1-2, had no effect on plant growth, AOX, and lipid composition to the extent tested, leaving the quest for a possible molecular function of DGS1 open. Apparently, the DGS1 wild-type protein does not directly affect lipid metabolism in mitochondria or chloroplasts. PMID:20181751

  6. Membrane potential mediates the cellular binding of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Edwin H.; Li, Ye; Kumar, Umesh; Sureka, Hursh V.; Zhang, Xianren; Payne, Christine K.

    2013-06-01

    The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the cytosolic face. Using a combination of flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy experiments and dissipative particle dynamics simulations, we have found that a decrease in membrane potential leads to decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles. The decreased cellular binding of anionic nanoparticles is a general phenomenon, independent of depolarization method, nanoparticle composition, and cell type. Increased membrane potential reverses this trend resulting in increased binding of anionic nanoparticles. The cellular binding of cationic nanoparticles is minimally affected by membrane potential due to the interaction of cationic nanoparticles with cell surface proteins. The influence of membrane potential on the cellular binding of nanoparticles is especially important when considering the use of nanoparticles in the treatment or detection of diseases, such as cancer, in which the membrane potential is decreased.The use of nanoparticles for cellular therapeutic or sensing applications requires nanoparticles to bind, or adhere, to the cell surface. While nanoparticle parameters such as size, shape, charge, and composition are important factors in cellular binding, the cell itself must also be considered. All cells have an electrical potential across the plasma membrane driven by an ion gradient. Under standard conditions the ion gradient will result in a -10 to -100 mV potential across the membrane with a net negative charge on the

  7. A transient increase in lipid peroxidation primes preadipocytes for delayed mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and ATP depletion during prolonged exposure to fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Carlyle; Davis, Barbara; Neufer, P. Darrell; Murphy, Michael P.; Anderson, Ethan J; Robidoux, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Preadipocytes are periodically subjected to fatty acid (FA) concentrations that are potentially cytotoxic. We tested the hypothesis that prolonged exposure of preadipocytes of human origin to a physiologically relevant mix of FAs leads to mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) permeabilization and ultimately to mitochondrial crisis. We found that exposure of preadipocytes to FAs led to progressive cyclosporin A-sensitive MIM permeabilization, which in turn caused reduction in MIM potential (ΔΨM), oxygen consumption, ATP synthetic capacity, and ultimately death. Additionally, we showed that FAs induce a transient increase in intramitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxide production lasting roughly 30 and 120 minutes for the ROS and lipid peroxides, respectively. MIM permeabilization and its deleterious consequences including mitochondrial crisis and cell death were prevented by treating the cells with the mitochondrial FA uptake inhibitor, Etomoxir; the mitochondrion selective superoxide and lipid peroxide antioxidants, MitoTempo and MitoQ; or the lipid peroxide and reactive carbonyl scavenger, L-carnosine. FAs also promoted a delayed oxidative stress phase. However, since the beneficial effects of Etomoxir, MitoTempo and L-carnosine were lost by delaying the treatment by 2 hours, it suggested that the initial phase was sufficient to prime the cells for the delayed MIM permeabilization and mitochondrial crisis. It also suggested that the second ROS production phase is a consequence of this loss in mitochondrial health. Altogether, our data suggest that approaches designed to diminish intramitochondrial ROS or lipid peroxide accumulation as well as MIM permeabilization, are valid mechanism-based therapeutic avenues to prevent the loss in preadipocyte metabolic fitness associated with prolonged exposure to elevated FA levels. PMID:24269897

  8. Mitochondrial small conductance SK2 channels prevent glutamate-induced oxytosis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dolga, Amalia M; Netter, Michael F; Perocchi, Fabiana; Doti, Nunzianna; Meissner, Lilja; Tobaben, Svenja; Grohm, Julia; Zischka, Hans; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Decher, Niels; Culmsee, Carsten

    2013-04-12

    Small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK2/K(Ca)2.2) channels are known to be located in the neuronal plasma membrane where they provide feedback control of NMDA receptor activity. Here, we provide evidence that SK2 channels are also located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of neuronal mitochondria. Patch clamp recordings in isolated mitoplasts suggest insertion into the inner mitochondrial membrane with the C and N termini facing the intermembrane space. Activation of SK channels increased mitochondrial K(+) currents, whereas channel inhibition attenuated these currents. In a model of glutamate toxicity, activation of SK2 channels attenuated the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, blocked mitochondrial fission, prevented the release of proapoptotic mitochondrial proteins, and reduced cell death. Neuroprotection was blocked by specific SK2 inhibitory peptides and siRNA targeting SK2 channels. Activation of mitochondrial SK2 channels may therefore represent promising targets for neuroprotective strategies in conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  9. Naja naja oxiana Cobra Venom Cytotoxins CTI and CTII Disrupt Mitochondrial Membrane Integrity: Implications for Basic Three-Fingered Cytotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Gasanov, Sardar E.; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Israilov, Firuz S.; Kim, Aleksandr A.; Rylova, Kamila A.; Zhang, Boris; Dagda, Ruben K.

    2015-01-01

    Cobra venom cytotoxins are basic three-fingered, amphipathic, non-enzymatic proteins that constitute a major fraction of cobra venom. While cytotoxins cause mitochondrial dysfunction in different cell types, the mechanisms by which cytotoxins bind to mitochondria remain unknown. We analyzed the abilities of CTI and CTII, S-type and P-type cytotoxins from Naja naja oxiana respectively, to associate with isolated mitochondrial fractions or with model membranes that simulate the mitochondrial lipid environment by using a myriad of biophysical techniques. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy data suggest that both cytotoxins bind to isolated mitochondrial fractions and promote the formation of aberrant non-bilayer structures. We then hypothesized that CTI and CTII bind to cardiolipin (CL) to disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Collectively, 31P-NMR, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), proton NMR (1H-NMR), deuterium NMR (2H-NMR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and erythrosine phosphorescence assays suggest that CTI and CTII bind to CL to generate non-bilayer structures and promote the permeabilization, dehydration and fusion of large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes enriched with CL. On the other hand, CTII but not CTI caused biophysical alterations of large unilamellar PC liposomes enriched with phosphatidylserine (PS). Mechanistically, single molecule docking simulations identified putative CL, PS and PC binding sites in CTI and CTII. While the predicted binding sites for PS and PC share a high number of interactive amino acid residues in CTI and CTII, the CL biding sites in CTII and CTI are more divergent as it contains additional interactive amino acid residues. Overall, our data suggest that cytotoxins physically associate with mitochondrial membranes by binding to CL to disrupt mitochondrial structural integrity. PMID:26091109

  10. Mild mitochondrial metabolic deficits by α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase inhibition cause prominent changes in intracellular autophagic signaling: Potential role in the pathobiology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kalpita; Munshi, Soumyabrata; Xu, Hui; Frank, David E; Chen, Huan-Lian; Chu, Charleen T; Yang, Jiwon; Cho, Sunghee; Kagan, Valerian E; Denton, Travis T; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Jiang, Jian Fei; Gibson, Gary E

    2016-06-01

    Brain activities of the mitochondrial enzyme α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) are reduced in Alzheimer's disease and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders. The goal of the present study was to test the consequences of mild impairment of KGDHC on the structure, protein signaling and dynamics (mitophagy, fusion, fission, biogenesis) of the mitochondria. Inhibition of KGDHC reduced its in situ activity by 23-53% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, but neither altered the mitochondrial membrane potential nor the ATP levels at any tested time-points. The attenuated KGDHC activity increased translocation of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) and microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) from the cytosol to the mitochondria, and promoted mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Inhibition of KGDHC also increased the negative surface charges (anionic phospholipids as assessed by Annexin V binding) on the mitochondria. Morphological assessments of the mitochondria revealed increased fission and mitophagy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of the regulation of the mitochondrial dynamism including fission and fusion by the mitochondrial KGDHC activity via the involvement of the cytosolic and mitochondrial protein signaling molecules. A better understanding of the link among mild impairment of metabolism, induction of mitophagy/autophagy and altered protein signaling will help to identify new mechanisms of neurodegeneration and reveal potential new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26923918

  11. The effect of dietary lipids on the thermotropic behaviour of rat liver and heart mitochondrial membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    McMurchie, E J; Abeywardena, M Y; Charnock, J S; Gibson, R A

    1983-09-21

    Diets supplemented with relatively high levels of either saturated fatty acids derived from sheep kidney fat (sheep kidney fat diet) or unsaturated fatty acids derived from sunflower seed oil (sunflower seed oil diet) were fed to rats for a period of 16 weeks and changes in the thermotropic behaviour of liver and heart mitochondrial lipids were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The diets induced similar changes in the fatty acid composition in both liver and heart mitochondrial lipids, the major change being the omega 6 to omega 3 unsaturated fatty acid ratio, which was elevated in mitochondria from animals on the sunflower seed oil diet and lowered with the mitochondria from the sheep kidney fat dietary animals. When examined by DSC, aqueous buffer dispersions of liver and heart mitochondrial lipids exhibited two independent, reversible phase transitions and in some instances a third highly unstable transition. The dietary lipid treatments had their major effect of the temperature at which the lower phase transition occurred, there being an inverse relationship between the transition temperature and the omega 6 to omega 3 unsaturated fatty acid ratio. No significant effect was observed for the temperature of the higher phase transition. These results indicate that certain domains of mitochondrial lipids, probably containing some relatively higher melting-point lipids, independently undergo formation of the solidus or gel phase and this phenomenon is not greatly influenced by the lipid composition of the mitochondrial membranes. Conversely, other domains, representing the bulk of the membrane lipids and which probably contain the relatively lower melting point lipids, undergo solidus phase formation at temperatures which reflect changes in the membrane lipid composition which are in turn, a reflection of the nature of the dietary lipid intake. These lipid phase transitions do not appear to correlate directly with those events considered

  12. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  13. "Eye of tiger sign" mimic in an adolescent boy with mitochondrial membrane protein associated neurodegeneration (MPAN).

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Sudhakar, Sniya Valsa; Thomas, Maya; Dutta, Atanu Kumar; Danda, Sumita

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) refers to an inherited heterogeneous group of disorders pathologically characterized by focal brain iron deposition. Clinical phenotype, imaging findings and genotype are variable among the different types of this disorder. In this case report, we describe the imaging finding of an adolescent boy with mitochondrial membrane protein associated neurodegeneration (MPAN), a subentity of NBIA. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed hypointensity of globi pallidi with medial medullary lamina appearing as a hyperintense streak in T2 weighted images. Mild cerebellar atrophy in T2 weighted images and blooming of substantia nigra and globi pallidi in susceptibility weighted images were also observed. Imaging findings in patients with MPAN mimics the eye of tiger appearance in patients with pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration. Classical phenotype and eye of tiger sign mimic in imaging of patients with NBIA should raise the suspect for MPAN. Genetic studies helps in the confirmation of diagnosis of this neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:26602591

  14. Membrane potential genesis in Nitella cells, mitochondria, and thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Hiroshi

    2003-10-01

    The resting membrane potential of Nitella cells shifts in parallel with the change in H+ equilibrium potential, but is not equal to the H+ equilibrium potential. The deviation of the membrane potential from the H+ equilibrium potential depends on the extrusion rate of H+ by the electrogenic H+-pump. The activity of the electrogenic H+-pump was formulated in terms of the change in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The deviation of membrane potential from the H+ equilibrium potential induces a passive H+ flow. The passive inward H+ current may be coupled with Cl- uptake. The coupling rate of H+,Cl- co-transport was discussed. The membrane potential of mitochondria was electrochemically formulated in terms of oxidation-reduction H2/H+ half-cells spontaneously formed at the inner and outer boundaries of each trans-membrane electron-conducting pathway. The membrane potential formed by a pair of H2/H+ redox cells is pH-sensitive in its nature, but deviates from the H+ equilibrium potential to an extent that depends on the logarithm of the ratio of H2 concentrations at the inner and outer boundaries. The membrane potential of thylakoids is considered to be primarily due to the electromotive force of photocells embedded in the thylakoid membrane, as far as the anode and cathode of each photocell are in contact with the inner and outer solutions, respectively. The light-induced electronic current yields oxygen at the inner boundary and causes an increase in the H2 pool at the outer boundary of the electron-conducting pathway, which has no shunting plastoquinone chain between these two boundaries.

  15. The modulation of action potential generation by calcium-induced calcium release is enhanced by mitochondrial inhibitors in mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Barstow, K L; Locknar, S A; Merriam, L A; Parsons, R L

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that outward currents activated by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) opposed depolarization-induced action potential (AP) generation in dissociated mudpuppy parasympathetic neurons [J Neurophysiol 88 (2002) 1119]. In the present study, we tested whether AP generation by depolarizing current ramps could be altered by dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential and thus interrupting mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Exposure to the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP; 2 microM) alone or in combination with the mitochondrial ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin (8 microg/ml), increased the latency to AP generation. Exposure to the electron transport chain inhibitor rotenone (10 microM) alone or in combination with oligomycin (8 microg/ml) similarly increased the latency to AP generation. CCCP and oligomycin or rotenone and oligomycin treatment caused rhodamine 123 loss from mitochondria within a few minutes, confirming that the mitochondrial membrane potential was dissipated during drug exposure. Oligomycin alone had no effect on the latency to AP generation and did not cause loss of rhodamine 123 from mitochondria. The increase in latency induced by CCCP and oligomycin was similar when recordings were made with either the perforated patch or standard whole cell patch recording configuration. Exposure to the endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 microM), decreased the latency to AP generation. In cells pretreated with thapsigargin to eliminate CICR, CCCP and oligomycin had no effect on AP latency. Pretreatment with iberiotoxin (IBX; 100 nM), an inhibitor of large conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium channels, reduced the extent of the CCCP- and oligomycin-induced increase in latency to AP generation. These results indicate that treatment with CCCP or rotenone to dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential, a condition which should minimize sequestration of Ca2+ by

  16. Specific ion effects on membrane potential and the permselectivity of ion exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Geise, Geoffrey M; Cassady, Harrison J; Paul, Donald R; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2014-10-21

    Membrane potential and permselectivity are critical parameters for a variety of electrochemically-driven separation and energy technologies. An electric potential is developed when a membrane separates electrolyte solutions of different concentrations, and a permselective membrane allows specific species to be transported while restricting the passage of other species. Ion exchange membranes are commonly used in applications that require advanced ionic electrolytes and span technologies such as alkaline batteries to ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis, but membranes are often only characterized in sodium chloride solutions. Our goal in this work was to better understand membrane behaviour in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate, which is of interest for closed-loop energy generation processes. Here we characterized the permselectivity of four commercial ion exchange membranes in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, ammonium chloride, sodium bicarbonate, and ammonium bicarbonate. This stepwise approach, using four different ions in aqueous solution, was used to better understand how these specific ions affect ion transport in ion exchange membranes. Characterization of cation and anion exchange membrane permselectivity, using these ions, is discussed from the perspective of the difference in the physical chemistry of the hydrated ions, along with an accompanying re-derivation and examination of the basic equations that describe membrane potential. In general, permselectivity was highest in sodium chloride and lowest in ammonium bicarbonate solutions, and the nature of both the counter- and co-ions appeared to influence measured permselectivity. The counter-ion type influences the binding affinity between counter-ions and polymer fixed charge groups, and higher binding affinity between fixed charge sites and counter-ions within the membrane decreases the effective membrane charge density. As a result permselectivity decreases. The charge density and polarizability

  17. Combining Membrane Potential Imaging with Other Optical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Jaafari, Nadia; Vogt, Kaspar E; Saggau, Peter; Leslie, Loew M; Zecevic, Dejan; Canepari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Membrane potential imaging using voltage-sensitive dyes can be combined with other optical techniques for a variety of applications. Combining voltage imaging with Ca2+ imaging allows correlating membrane potential changes with intracellular Ca2+ signals or with Ca2+ currents. Combining voltage imaging with uncaging techniques allows analyzing electrical signals elicited by photorelease of a particular molecule. This approach is also a useful tool to calibrate the change in fluorescence intensity in terms of membrane potential changes from different sites permitting spatial mapping of electrical activity. Finally, combining voltage imaging with optogenetics, in particular with channelrhodopsin stimulation, opens the gate to novel investigations of brain circuitries by allowing measurements of synaptic signals mediated by specific sets of neurons. Here we describe in detail the methods of membrane potential imaging in combination with other optical techniques and discus some important applications.

  18. Aluminum chloride and membrane potentials of barley root cells

    SciTech Connect

    Etherton, B.; Shane, M.

    1986-04-01

    Aluminum chloride at pH 4 hyperpolarizes the membrane potentials of barley root epidermal cells. The authors tested to see whether this hyperpolarization could be caused by an aluminum induced alteration of the permeability of the membrane to potassium or sodium ions by measuring the effect of .04 mM aluminum ions (the Ca/sup + +/ conc. was 0.1 mM) on the membrane potential changes induced by changing the potassium or sodium concentrations in the medium bathing the roots. Aluminum ions did not change the magnitude of potassium or sodium induced changes in membrane potentials but significantly altered the rates of potassium and sodium induced changes of the potential. The results indicate that aluminum ions did not change sodium or potassium ion permeabilities of barley root cells.

  19. Mitochondrial fission augments capsaicin-induced axonal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hao; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Mahad, Don J; Kikuchi, Shin; Komuro, Hitoshi; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Trapp, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1, induces axonal degeneration of peripheral sensory nerves and is commonly used to treat painful sensory neuropathies. In this study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial dynamics in capsaicin-induced axonal degeneration. In capsaicin-treated rodent sensory axons, axonal swellings, decreased mitochondrial stationary site length and reduced mitochondrial transport preceded axonal degeneration. Increased axoplasmic Ca(2+) mediated the alterations in mitochondrial length and transport. While sustaining mitochondrial transport did not reduce axonal swellings in capsaicin-treated axons, preventing mitochondrial fission by overexpression of mutant dynamin-related protein 1 increased mitochondrial length, retained mitochondrial membrane potentials and reduced axonal loss upon capsaicin treatment. These results establish that mitochondrial stationary site size significantly affects axonal integrity and suggest that inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent mitochondrial fission facilitates mitochondrial function and axonal survival following activation of axonal cationic channels.

  20. Evaluation of gravity-dependent membrane potential shift in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Baba, S A; Mogami, Y; Otsu, T

    1999-01-01

    It is still debated whether or not gravity can stimulate unicellular organisms. This question may be settled by revealing changes in the membrane potential in a manner depending on the gravitational forces imposed on the cell. We estimated the gravity-dependent membrane potential shift to be about 1 mV G-1 for Paramecium showing gravikinesis at 1-5 G, on the basis of measurements of gravity-induced changes in active propulsion and those of propulsive velocity in solutions, in which the membrane potential has been measured electrophysiologically. The shift in membrane potential to this extent may occur from mechanoreceptive changes in K+ or Ca2+ conductance by about 1% and might be at the limit of electrophysiological measurement using membrane potential-sensitive dyes. Our measurements of propulsive velocity vs membrane potential also suggested that the reported propulsive force of Paramecium measured in a solution of graded densities with the aid of a video centrifuge microscope at 350 G was 11 times as large as that for -29 mV, i.e., the resting membrane potential at [K+]o = 1 mM and [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, and, by extrapolation, that Paramecium was hyperpolarized to -60 mV by gravity stimulation of 100-G equivalent, the value corrected by considering the reduction of density difference between the interior and exterior of the cell in the graded density solution. The estimated shift of the membrane potential from -29 mV to -60 mV by 100-G equivalent stimulation, i.e., 0.3 mV G -1, could reach the magnitude entirely feasible to be measured more directly.

  1. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU)-dependent and MCU-independent Ca(2+) channels coexist in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Alexander I; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F

    2014-07-01

    A protein referred to as CCDC109A and then renamed to mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) has recently been shown to accomplish mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in different cell types. In this study, we investigated whole-mitoplast inward cation currents and single Ca(2+) channel activities in mitoplasts prepared from stable MCU knockdown HeLa cells using the patch-clamp technique. In whole-mitoplast configuration, diminution of MCU considerably reduced inward Ca(2+) and Na(+) currents. This was accompanied by a decrease in occurrence of single channel activity of the intermediate conductance mitochondrial Ca(2+) current (i-MCC). However, ablation of MCU yielded a compensatory 2.3-fold elevation in the occurrence of the extra large conductance mitochondrial Ca(2+) current (xl-MCC), while the occurrence of bursting currents (b-MCC) remained unaltered. These data reveal i-MCC as MCU-dependent current while xl-MCC and b-MCC seem to be rather MCU-independent, thus, pointing to the engagement of at least two molecularly distinct mitochondrial Ca(2+) channels.

  2. Low-molecular-mass peptides from the venom of the Amazonian viper Bothrops atrox protect against brain mitochondrial swelling in rat: potential for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Martins, N M; Ferreira, D A S; Carvalho Rodrigues, M A; Cintra, A C O; Santos, N A G; Sampaio, S V; Santos, A C

    2010-08-01

    The neurodegenerative diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in Western countries. Common mechanisms of toxicity involving mitochondrial damage have been suggested; however, a definitive treatment has not yet been found. Therefore, there has been great interest in the development of mitochondria-targeted protective compounds for the treatment of neuropathies. Animal toxins represent a promising source of new molecules with neuroprotective activity and potential to originate new drugs. We present here the effects of a low-molecular-mass peptides fraction (Ba-V) from Bothrops atrox snake venom, on rat brain mitochondrial function. Ba-V did not induce the mitochondrial swelling and moreover, was as effective as cyclosporin A (CsA) to inhibit the calcium/phosphate-induced swelling, which indicates its potential to prevent the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). The membrane electrochemical potential, the oxygen consumption during states-3 and -4 respirations as well as the respiratory control ratio (RCR) were not affected by Ba-V. Additionally, Ba-V did not induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, Ba-V did not protect against the generation of ROS induced by t-BOH, which suggests a protection mechanism other than ROS scavenging. Given the important role of the mitochondrial damage and, more specifically, of MPT, in the development of neuropathies, Ba-V might be useful in the future strategies for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:20338188

  3. The potential role for use of mitochondrial DNA copy number as predictive biomarker in presbycusis

    PubMed Central

    Falah, Masoumeh; Houshmand, Massoud; Najafi, Mohammad; Balali, Maryam; Mahmoudian, Saeid; Asghari, Alimohamad; Emamdjomeh, Hessamaldin; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Age-related hearing impairment, or presbycusis, is the most common communication disorder and neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Its prevalence is expected to increase, due to the trend of growth of the elderly population. The current diagnostic test for detection of presbycusis is implemented after there has been a change in hearing sensitivity. Identification of a pre-diagnostic biomarker would raise the possibility of preserving hearing sensitivity before damage occurs. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including the production of reactive oxygen species and induction of expression of apoptotic genes, participates in the progression of presbycusis. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation has a critical role in presbycusis. However, the nature of the relationship between mitochondrial DNA copy number, an important biomarker in many other diseases, and presbycusis is undetermined. Methods Fifty-four subjects with presbycusis and 29 healthy controls were selected after ear, nose, throat examination and pure-tone audiometry. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. The copy number of mitochondrial DNA relative to the nuclear genome was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Subjects with presbycusis had a lower median mitochondrial DNA copy number than healthy subjects and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.007). Mitochondrial DNA copy number was also significantly associated with degree of hearing impairment (P=0.025) and audiogram configuration (P=0.022). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that lower mitochondrial DNA copy number is responsible for presbycusis through alteration of mitochondrial function. Moreover, the significant association of mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood samples with the degree of hearing impairment and audiogram configuration has potential for use as a standard test for presbycusis, providing the possibility of the development of an easy

  4. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential

    PubMed Central

    Bezanilla, Francisco; Rojas, Eduardo; Taylor, Robert E.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 μsec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential. 2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential. 3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current—voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939). 4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin—Huxley equations. 5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  5. Chemico-osmosis in geologic membranes: Role of membrane potential gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanchu; Jim Hendry, M.

    2014-09-01

    Chemico-osmosis is conventionally regarded to occur in the positive direction, i.e., from low to high concentration reservoirs. However, experiments have shown that chemico-osmosis in clay membranes can occur in the opposite direction, i.e., from high to low concentration reservoirs. Conceptual interpretations of this negative osmosis suggest that the diffused electrolytes exert “drag” on water molecules, thus driving the entire solution toward the low concentration reservoir. This paper proposes a quantitative interpretation of this phenomenon considering the role of the induced membrane potential gradient. To this end, a model, which involves the expansion of pore-scale electrokinetics to continuum-scale chemico-osmosis behaviors, is developed for quantification of this membrane potential gradient. The numerical investigation based on the model shows that the membrane potential gradient (1) is caused by the requirement of electroneutrality in the solutions on either side of the membrane; (2) is directly proportional to the difference in effective diffusivity for cations and anions; and (3) contributes to retarding cation migration, enhancing anion migration, and driving the solution flux from low to high concentration reservoirs. These three observations thus suggest that a likely cause of negative osmosis is a decreasing tendency for the solution flux from low to high concentration reservoirs caused by a decreasing membrane potential gradient. Using these findings, previous experiments are discussed and interpreted with success from the electrodynamic perspective of the membrane potential gradient.

  6. Purinergically induced membrane fluidization in ciliary cells: characterization and control by calcium and membrane potential.

    PubMed Central

    Alfahel, E; Korngreen, A; Parola, A H; Priel, Z

    1996-01-01

    To examine the role of membrane dynamics in transmembrane signal transduction, we studied changes in membrane fluidity in mucociliary tissues from frog palate and esophagus epithelia stimulated by extracellular ATP. Micromolar concentrations of ATP induced strong changes in fluorescence polarization, possibly indicating membrane fluidization. This effect was dosage dependent, reaching a maximum at 10-microM ATP. It was dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ (or Mg2+), though it was insensitive to inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels. It was inhibited by thapsigargin and by ionomycin (at low extracellular Ca2+ concentration), both of which deplete Ca2+ stores. It was inhibited by the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitors quinidine, charybdotoxin, and apamine and was reduced considerably by replacement of extracellular Na+ with K+. Hyperpolarization, or depolarization, of the mucociliary membrane induced membrane fluidization. The degree of membrane fluidization depended on the degree of hyperpolarization or depolarization of the ciliary membrane potential and was considerably lower than the effect induced by extracellular ATP. These results indicate that appreciable membrane fluidization induced by extracellular ATP depends both on an increase in intracellular Ca2+, mainly from its internal stores, and on hyperpolarization of the membrane. Calcium-dependent potassium channels couple the two effects. In light of recent results on the enhancement of ciliary beat frequency, it would appear that extracellular ATP-induced changes both in ciliary beat frequency and in membrane fluidity are triggered by similar signal transduction pathways. PMID:8789123

  7. Overexpression of ErbB2 renders breast cancer cells susceptible to 3-BrPA through the increased dissociation of hexokinase II from mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    GAO, SUJIE; CHEN, XUEBO; JIN, HONGYONG; REN, SHENGNAN; LIU, ZHUO; FANG, XUEDONG; ZHANG, GUIZHEN

    2016-01-01

    ErbB2 is known to upregulate glycolysis in breast cancer, however, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, ErbB2 upregulated Hexokinase II (HK II) activity by increasing the binding of HK II to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Dysregulated glucose metabolism in high ErbB2-expressing breast cancer cells induces susceptibility to glucose starvation and glycolysis inhibition. Additionally, HK II has a tendency to dissociate from the mitochondria outer membrane in ErbB2-overexpressing cells following treatment with the HK II inhibitor, 3-BrPA. Furthermore, 3-BrPA treatment results in decreased mitochondria membrane potential and release of cytochrome c into cytoplasm in ErbB2-overexpressing cells, leading to activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway. In summary, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism for ErbB2-activated glycolysis and reveal that 3-BrPA is effective in reducing ErbB2-positive breast cancer cell viability by targeting HK II in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26893781

  8. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  9. Preprotein transport machineries of yeast mitochondrial outer membrane are not required for Bax-induced release of intermembrane space proteins.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán Szklarz, Luiza K; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Vögtle, F-Nora; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Vogel, Sandra; Dürr, Mark; Westermann, Benedikt; Guiard, Bernard; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Borner, Christoph; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2007-04-20

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains protein import machineries, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) and the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). It has been speculated that TOM or SAM are required for Bax-induced release of intermembrane space (IMS) proteins; however, experimental evidence has been scarce. We used isolated yeast mitochondria as a model system and report that Bax promoted an efficient release of soluble IMS proteins while preproteins were still imported, excluding an unspecific damage of mitochondria. Removal of import receptors by protease treatment did not inhibit the release of IMS proteins by Bax. Yeast mutants of each Tom receptor and the Tom40 channel were not impaired in Bax-induced protein release. We analyzed a large collection of mutants of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins, including SAM, fusion and fission components, but none of these components was required for Bax-induced protein release. The released proteins included complexes up to a size of 230 kDa. We conclude that Bax promotes efficient release of IMS proteins through the outer membrane of yeast mitochondria while the inner membrane remains intact. Inactivation of the known protein import and sorting machineries of the outer membrane does not impair the function of Bax at the mitochondria.

  10. Cardiolipin externalization to the outer mitochondrial membrane acts as an elimination signal for mitophagy in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Charleen T.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Tyurin, Vladimir A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Shrivastava, Indira H.; Mohammadyani, Dariush; Wang, Kent Zhi Qiang; Zhu, Jianhui; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Borisenko, Grigory; Huang, Zhentai; Gusdon, Aaron M.; Cheikhi, Amin; Steer, Erin K.; Wang, Ruth; Baty, Catherine; Watkins, Simon; Bahar, Ivet; Bayir, Hülya; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of injured mitochondria for degradation by macroautophagy is essential for cellular health, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cardiolipin is an inner mitochondrial membrane phospholipid. We found that rotenone, staurosporine, 6-hydroxydopamine and other pro-mitophagy stimuli caused externalization of cardiolipin to the mitochondrial surface in primary cortical neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. RNAi knockdown of cardiolipin synthase or of phospholipid scramblase-3, which transports cardiolipin to the outer mitochondrial membrane, decreased mitochondrial delivery to autophagosomes. Furthermore, we found that the autophagy protein microtubule-associated-protein-1-light chain-3 (LC3), which mediates both autophagosome formation and cargo recognition, contains cardiolipin-binding sites important for the engulfment of mitochondria by the autophagic system. Mutation of LC3 residues predicted as cardiolipin-interaction sites by computational modeling inhibited its participation in mitophagy. These data indicate that redistribution of cardiolipin serves as an “eat-me” signal for the elimination of damaged mitochondria from neuronal cells. PMID:24036476

  11. Toward Better Genetically Encoded Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Sepehri Rad, Masoud; Kang, BokEum; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J

    2016-05-01

    Genetically encoded optical sensors of cell activity are powerful tools that can be targeted to specific cell types. This is especially important in neuroscience because individual brain regions can include a multitude of different cell types. Optical imaging allows for simultaneous recording from numerous neurons or brain regions. Optical signals of membrane potential are useful because membrane potential changes are a direct sign of both synaptic and action potentials. Here we describe recent improvements in the in vitro and in vivo signal size and kinetics of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) and discuss their relationship to alternative sensors of neural activity.

  12. Overexpression of human SOD1 in VDAC1-less yeast restores mitochondrial functionality modulating beta-barrel outer membrane protein genes.

    PubMed

    Magrì, Andrea; Di Rosa, Maria Carmela; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Guarino, Francesca; Reina, Simona; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1), the most important antioxidant defense against ROS in eukaryotic cells, localizes in cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria (IMS). Several evidences show a SOD1 intersection with both fermentative and respiratory metabolism. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) is the main pore-forming protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), and is considered the gatekeeper of mitochondrial metabolism. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking VDAC1 (Δpor1) is a very convenient model system, since it shows an impaired growth rate on non-fermentable carbon source. Transformation of Δpor1 yeast with human SOD1 completely restores the cell growth deficit in non-fermentative conditions and re-establishes the physiological levels of ROS, as well as the mitochondrial membrane potential. No similar result was found upon yeast SOD1 overexpression. A previous report highlighted the action of SOD1 as a transcription factor. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that β-barrel outer-membrane encoding-genes por2, tom40, sam50 are induced by hSOD1, but the same effect was not obtained in Δpor1Δpor2 yeast, indicating a crucial function for yVDAC2. Since the lack of VDAC1 in yeast can be considered a stress factor for the cell, hSOD1 could relieve it stimulating the expression of genes bringing to the recovery of the MOM function. Our results suggest a direct influence of SOD1 on VDAC. PMID:26947057

  13. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lizard, G.; Fournel, S.; Genestier, L.; Dhedin, N.

    1995-11-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is characterized by typical morphological alterations. By transmission electron microscopy, apoptotic cells are identified by condensation of the chromatin in tight apposition to the nuclear envelope, alteration of the nuclear envelope and fragmentation of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display and early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria. In this study we assessed by flow cytometry the sequential alterations of forward angle light scatter, 90{degrees} light scatter, and fluorescence associated with fluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123, and propidium iodide in two human B cell lines undergoing apoptosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by sodium azide. At the same time intervals, cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy and by UV microscopy after staining with Hoechst 33342. We report that sequential changes in light scatters and fluorescein diacetate are similar in cells undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, whereas apoptosis is characterized by a slightly delayed decrease of mitochondrial activity as assessed by rhodamine 123 staining. Surprisingly, a part of cells undergoing apoptosis displayed an early uptake of propidium iodide followed by a condensation and then a fragmentation of their nuclei. It is concluded that uptake of propidium iodide is a very early marker of cell death which does not discriminate between necrosis and apoptosis. Along with biochemical criteria, nuclear morphology revealed by staining with Hoechst 33342 would seem to be of the most simple and most discriminative assay of apoptosis. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The AAA+ ATPase ATAD3A Controls Mitochondrial Dynamics at the Interface of the Inner and Outer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gilquin, Benoît; Taillebourg, Emmanuel; Cherradi, Nadia; Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Gay, Olivia; Merle, Nicolas; Assard, Nicole; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile; Tomohiro, Shiho; Kuge, Osamu; Baudier, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic interactions between components of the outer (OM) and inner (IM) membranes control a number of critical mitochondrial functions such as channeling of metabolites and coordinated fission and fusion. We identify here the mitochondrial AAA+ ATPase protein ATAD3A specific to multicellular eukaryotes as a participant in these interactions. The N-terminal domain interacts with the OM. A central transmembrane segment (TMS) anchors the protein in the IM and positions the C-terminal AAA+ ATPase domain in the matrix. Invalidation studies in Drosophila and in a human steroidogenic cell line showed that ATAD3A is required for normal cell growth and cholesterol channeling at contact sites. Using dominant-negative mutants, including a defective ATP-binding mutant and a truncated 50-amino-acid N-terminus mutant, we showed that ATAD3A regulates dynamic interactions between the mitochondrial OM and IM sensed by the cell fission machinery. The capacity of ATAD3A to impact essential mitochondrial functions and organization suggests that it possesses unique properties in regulating mitochondrial dynamics and cellular functions in multicellular organisms. PMID:20154147

  15. Inhibition of the iron-catalysed formation of hydroxyl radicals by nitrosouracil derivatives: protection of mitochondrial membranes against lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Rabion, A; Verlhac, J B; Fraisse, L; Roche, B; Seris, J L

    1993-01-01

    A new series of metal ligands containing the 1,3-dimethyl-6-amino-5- nitrosouracil moiety has been synthesized and they have been studied as potential inhibitors of iron-dependent lipid peroxidation. For this purpose, these new derivatives have been tested in the Fenton induced deoxyribose degradation assay, which allows a quantitative measurement of their inhibitory effect towards hydroxyl radical generation. When iron(II) is complexed by these ligands, a strong inhibition of deoxyribose degradation is observed, especially in the case of tris-[2-(1,3-dimethyl-5-nitrosouracil-6-yl)aminoethyl] amine (5). This inhibitory effect is clearly related to a specific complexation of iron(II) and is not due to the direct scavenging of hydroxyl radical by the ligand. Inhibition of the iron mediated Fenton reaction presumably results from inactivation of the reactivity of the metal center towards hydrogen peroxide. These derivatives, as well as long alkyl chain substituted nitrosouracils were evaluated in the protection of biological membranes against lipid peroxidation (induced by iron(II)/dihydroxyfumaric acid and determined with the 2-thiobarbituric acid test). Ligand 5 inhibited lipid peroxidation at a rate similar to Desferal (desferrioxamine B) and slightly higher than bathophenanthroline sulphonate (BPS), which are respectively good iron(III) and iron(II) chelators. When covalently bound with a long alkyl chain, the increase of lipophilic character of the ligand allows its location near the mitochondrial membrane, where lipid peroxidation occurs. Lower concentrations (IC50 = 4 microM) are then necessary to inhibit lipid peroxidation. This IC50 concentration should be compared to those obtained for Trolox (IC50 = 3 microM) or the 21-aminosteroid U74500A (IC50 = 1 microM) described previously.

  16. Isolation of a Ca/sup 2 +/ carrier from calf heart inner mitochondrial membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, A.Y.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1980-07-25

    A protein has been isolated from calf heart inner mitochondrial membrane with the aid of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) assay based on the relative binding properties of Ca/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ to the protein. The molecular weight of this protein has been estimated to be about 3000 by urea/sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis and amino acid analysis. The isolated protein has been shown to have high affinity and high specificity for Ca/sup 2 +/. However, the protein was found to be contaminated with a large amount of phospholipids. There are 150 mol of phospholipids associated with each mole of the protein. The protein is delipidated using Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The contaminating phospholipids can be reduced to 0.1 mol of phospholipids/mol of protein. There are no detectable free fatty acids, hexosamines, or sialic acids associated with the delipidated protein. This protein is named calciphorin, meaning calcium ionophore protein.

  17. SOM 1, a small new gene required for mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Esser, K; Pratje, E; Michaelis, G

    1996-09-25

    IMP1 encodes a subunit of the mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase responsible for the proteolytic processing of cytochrome oxidase subunit 2 (Cox2) and cytochrome b2 (Cytb2). The molecular defect in an imp1 mutation and the characterisation of a high-copy-number suppressor is described. A deletion of the suppressor region causes respiration deficiency. The DNA sequence revealed three very small overlapping ORFs. Constructs which carried termination codons within the ORFs or lacked ATG initiation codons still retained complementing activity on a high-copy-number plasmid. Nevertheless, the possibility that the suppressor acts at DNA or RNA level could be excluded. Subcloning of the ORFs, complementation analysis in low-copy-number plasmids and transcript mapping identified the 222 bp ORF as the suppressor gene designated SOM1. The SOM1 gene is transcribed into a 375 bp polyadenylated RNA and the deduced amino acid sequence predicts a small protein of 8.4 kDa with no significant sequence similarity to known proteins. In the som1 deletion mutant, proteolytic processing of the Cox2 precursor is prevented and Cytb2 is strongly reduced. SOM1 represents a new small gene which encodes a novel factor that is essential for the correct function of the Imp1 peptidase and/or the protein sorting machinery. PMID:8879245

  18. Genome-Wide Screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Highlight a Role for Cardiolipin in Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Multispan Proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, Julia; Jores, Tobias; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Chuartzman, Silvia Gabriela; Schuldiner, Maya; Rapaport, Doron

    2015-09-01

    A special group of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins spans the membrane several times via multiple helical segments. Such multispan proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes before their targeting to mitochondria and insertion into the MOM. Previous work recognized the import receptor Tom70 and the mitochondrial import (MIM) complex, both residents of the MOM, as required for optimal biogenesis of these proteins. However, their involvement is not sufficient to explain either the entire import pathway or its regulation. To identify additional factors that are involved in the biogenesis of MOM multispan proteins, we performed complementary high-throughput visual and growth screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cardiolipin (CL) synthase (Crd1) appeared as a candidate in both screens. Our results indeed demonstrate lower steady-state levels of the multispan proteins Ugo1, Scm4, and Om14 in mitochondria from crd1Δ cells. Importantly, MOM single-span proteins were not affected by this mutation. Furthermore, organelles lacking Crd1 had a lower in vitro capacity to import newly synthesized Ugo1 and Scm4 molecules. Crd1, which is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, condenses phosphatidylglycerol together with CDP-diacylglycerol to obtain de novo synthesized CL molecules. Hence, our findings suggest that CL is an important component in the biogenesis of MOM multispan proteins. PMID:26149385

  19. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  20. Surface characterization of hemodialysis membranes based on streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Jacobasch, H J; Reichelt, G

    1995-01-01

    Hemodialysis membranes made from cellulose (CUPROPHAN, HEMOPHAN) and sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) were characterized using the streaming potential technique to determine the zeta potential at their interfaces against well-defined aqueous solutions of varied pH and potassium chloride concentrations. Streaming potential measurements enable distinction between different membrane materials. In addition to parameters of the electrochemical double layer at membrane interfaces, thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption of different solved species were evaluated. For that aim a description of double layer formation as suggested by Börner and Jacobasch (in: Electrokinetic Phenomena, p. 231. Institut für Technologie der Polymere, Dresden (1989)) was applied which is based on the generally accepted model of the electrochemical double layer according to Stern (Z. Elektrochemie 30, 508 (1924)) and Grahame (Chem. Rev. 41, 441 (1947)). The membranes investigated show different surface acidic/basic and polar/nonpolar behavior. Furthermore, alterations of membrane interfaces through adsorption processes of components of biologically relevant solutions were shown to be detectable by streaming potential measurements.

  1. A Potential Role for Bat Tail Membranes in Flight Control

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, James D.; Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Codd, Jonathan R.; Nudds, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests conducted on a model based on the long-eared bat Plecotus auritus indicated that the positioning of the tail membrane (uropatagium) can significantly influence flight control. Adjusting tail position by increasing the angle of the legs ventrally relative to the body has a two-fold effect; increasing leg-induced wing camber (i.e., locally increased camber of the inner wing surface) and increasing the angle of attack of the tail membrane. We also used our model to examine the effects of flying with and without a tail membrane. For the bat model with a tail membrane increasing leg angle increased the lift, drag and pitching moment (nose-down) produced. However, removing the tail membrane significantly reduced the change in pitching moment with increasing leg angle, but it had no significant effect on the level of lift produced. The drag on the model also significantly increased with the removal of the tail membrane. The tail membrane, therefore, is potentially important for controlling the level of pitching moment produced by bats and an aid to flight control, specifically improving agility and manoeuvrability. Although the tail of bats is different from that of birds, in that it is only divided from the wings by the legs, it nonetheless, may, in addition to its prey capturing function, fulfil a similar role in aiding flight control. PMID:21479137

  2. Deregulation of mitochondrial functions provoked by long-chain fatty acid accumulating in long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and mitochondrial permeability transition deficiencies in rat heart--mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening as a potential contributing pathomechanism of cardiac alterations in these disorders.

    PubMed

    Cecatto, Cristiane; Hickmann, Fernanda H; Rodrigues, Marília D N; Amaral, Alexandre U; Wajner, Moacir

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies are fatty acid oxidation disorders biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of long-chain fatty acids and derivatives, including the monocarboxylic long-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acids (LCHFAs) 3-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (3HTA) and 3-hydroxypalmitic acid (3HPA). Patients commonly present severe cardiomyopathy for which the pathogenesis is still poorly established. We investigated the effects of 3HTA and 3HPA, the major metabolites accumulating in these disorders, on important parameters of mitochondrial homeostasis in Ca(2+) -loaded heart mitochondria. 3HTA and 3HPA significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, the matrix NAD(P)H pool and Ca(2+) retention capacity, and also induced mitochondrial swelling. These fatty acids also provoked a marked decrease of ATP production reflecting severe energy dysfunction. Furthermore, 3HTA-induced mitochondrial alterations were completely prevented by the classical mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) inhibitors cyclosporin A and ADP, as well as by ruthenium red, a Ca(2+) uptake blocker, indicating that LCHFAs induced Ca(2+)-dependent mPT pore opening. Milder effects only achieved at higher doses of LCHFAs were observed in brain mitochondria, implying a higher vulnerability of heart to these fatty acids. By contrast, 3HTA and docosanoic acids did not change mitochondrial homeostasis, indicating selective effects for monocarboxylic LCHFAs. The present data indicate that the major LCHFAs accumulating in mitochondrial trifunctional protein and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiencies induce mPT pore opening, compromising Ca(2+) homeostasis and oxidative phosphorylation more intensely in the heart. It is proposed that these pathomechanisms may contribute at least in part to the severe cardiac alterations characteristic of patients affected by these diseases.

  3. Ion separations based on electrical potentials nanoporous and microporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jason

    This dissertation examines several types of ion separations in nanometer to micrometer pores in membranes. Membranes provide an attractive platform for ion separations, primarily because they operate continuously (i.e. not in a batch mode), and small pores offer the potential for ion separation based on charge and electrophoretic mobility differences. Initial studies employed charged, nanoporous membranes to separate monovalent and divalent ions. Adsorption of polyelectrolyte multilayers in nanoporous membranes afforded control over the surface charge and pore radii in track-etched membranes, and electrostatic ion-exclusion, particularly for divalent ions, occurred in these membranes because the electrical double layer filled the entire nanopore. Initial experiments employed adsorption of (PSS/PAH) multilayers in the 50-nm diameter pores of PCTE membranes to give a K+/Mg2+ selectivity of ~10 in pressure-driven dead-end filtration. Adsorption of (PSS/PAH) 1 films in 30-nm pores gave a similar K+/Mg2+ selectivity with a simpler modification procedure. Separations utilizing (PSS/PAH)1 films in 30-nm pores showed the lowest ion rejections with high ion concentrations, consistent with enhanced screening of the electrical double layer at high ionic strength. However, solutions with < 5 mM ionic strength exhibited essentially 100% Mg2+ rejections (the Mg2+ concentration in the permeate was below the method detection limit). Moreover, K+ rejections increased in the presence of Mg2+, which may stem from Mg2+-adsorption within the PEM and increased surface charge. Finally, separation of Br- and SO42- with a PSS1-modified, 30-nm PCTE membrane validated the exclusion mechanism for anions. The average Br-/SO42- selectivity was 3.4 +/- 0.8 for a solution containing 0.5 mM NaBr and 0.5 mM Na2SO4. The low selectivity in this case likely stems from a relatively large pore. The membranes used for the separation of monovalent and divalent ions also facilitated separation of

  4. Relationship between membrane potential and respiration rate in isolated liver mitochondria from rats fed an energy dense diet.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, L; Iossa, S; Brand, M D; Liverini, G

    1996-05-24

    We studied the relationship between membrane potential and respiration rate in isolated liver mitochondria from rats fed an energy dense diet. We conceptually divided the system into blocks of reactions that produced or consumed mitochondrial membrane potential and then measured the kinetic response of these blocks of reactions to this potential using NAD-linked and FAD-linked substrates. We show that decreased respiration rate with an NAD-linked substrate is accounted for by decreased kinetic response of the substrate oxidation pathway to the potential. No variation in the kinetic response of the above blocks of reactions to the potential was found using an FAD-linked substrate. These results indicate that FAD-linked and NAD-linked pathways are differently affected in rats fed an energy dense diet.

  5. The temperature-induced changes in membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Buzatu, Stefanu

    2009-01-01

    Excitability and response properties of a neuron may vary in different environmental conditions of temperature. Increase/decrease of membrane potential has been observed under increase/decrease of temperature in the external side of membrane compared with internal temperature, i.e. the internal cell environment becomes more electronegative/electropositive in relation to the external one. Changes in temperature affected the amplitude of action potentials, measured as the voltage difference between the threshold and the peak, and their duration, measured as the width of the action potential at the threshold. As the temperature is increased, the amplitude of action potential is decreased and its duration is reduced. This parameter may influence the functioning of a neuron through the temperature dependence of ion channel conductance and time constants of channel activation/inactivation factors. Alterations in temperature affect the rates of diffusion through ion channels, the rates of conformational changes that lead to their activation and inactivation, and the rates of the biochemical reactions with which ion channels are modulated and transported into and out of membranes. Measurements of the propagated action potentials at different temperatures show that temperature has a double effect on the action potential: an increase of the Nernst equilibrium potentials when the absolute temperature is decreased and a change of the rate constants by a temperature factor. Temperature induced changes in the equilibrium potentials alone have little effect on the duration and amplitude of any action potentials but, because the cell membranes are permeable to more than one ion, the relation between the membrane potential and the Nernst equilibrium potentials shows different importance of the different ionic species in determining both resting and action potentials. In contrast, the temperature induced scaling of the rate constants can have quite dramatic effects on the duration

  6. Potential impact of human mitochondrial replacement on global policy regarding germline gene modification.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Previous discussions regarding human germline gene modification led to a global consensus that no germline should undergo genetic modification. However, the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, having conducted at the UK Government's request a scientific review and a wide public consultation, provided advice to the Government on the pros and cons of Parliament's lifting a ban on altering mitochondrial DNA content of human oocytes and embryos, so as to permit the prevention of maternal transmission of mitochondrial diseases. In this commentary, relevant ethical and biomedical issues are examined and requirements for proceeding with this novel procedure are suggested. Additionally, potentially significant impacts of the UK legalization on global policy concerning germline gene modification are discussed in the context of recent advances in genome-editing technology. It is concluded that international harmonization is needed, as well as further ethical and practical consideration, prior to the legalization of human mitochondrial replacement.

  7. Potential impact of human mitochondrial replacement on global policy regarding germline gene modification.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    Previous discussions regarding human germline gene modification led to a global consensus that no germline should undergo genetic modification. However, the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, having conducted at the UK Government's request a scientific review and a wide public consultation, provided advice to the Government on the pros and cons of Parliament's lifting a ban on altering mitochondrial DNA content of human oocytes and embryos, so as to permit the prevention of maternal transmission of mitochondrial diseases. In this commentary, relevant ethical and biomedical issues are examined and requirements for proceeding with this novel procedure are suggested. Additionally, potentially significant impacts of the UK legalization on global policy concerning germline gene modification are discussed in the context of recent advances in genome-editing technology. It is concluded that international harmonization is needed, as well as further ethical and practical consideration, prior to the legalization of human mitochondrial replacement. PMID:24832374

  8. Osmotic stress and cryoinjury of koala sperm: an integrative study of the plasma membrane, chromatin stability and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Satake, N; Zee, Y; López-Fernández, C; Holt, W V; Gosálvez, J

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated whether cryopreservation-induced injury to koala spermatozoa could be explained using an experimental model that mimics the structural and physiological effects of osmotic flux. DNA labelling after in situ nick translation of thawed cryopreserved spermatozoa revealed a positive correlation (r=0.573; P<0.001; n=50) between the area of relaxed chromatin in the nucleus and the degree of nucleotide labelling. While the chromatin of some spermatozoa increased more than eight times its normal size, not all sperm nuclei with relaxed chromatin showed evidence of nucleotide incorporation. Preferential staining associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) was typically located in the peri-acrosomal and peripheral regions of the sperm head and at the base of the spermatozoa where it appear to be 'hot spots' of DNA damage following cryopreservation. Results of the comparative effects of anisotonic media and cryopreservation on the integrity of koala spermatozoa revealed that injury induced by exposure to osmotic flux, essentially imitated the results found following cryopreservation. Plasma membrane integrity, chromatin relaxation and SDF appeared particularly susceptible to extreme hypotonic environments. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), while susceptible to extreme hypo- and hypertonic environments, showed an ability to rebound from hypertonic stress when returned to isotonic conditions. Koala spermatozoa exposed to 64 mOsm/kg media showed an equivalent, or more severe, degree of structural and physiological injury to that of frozen-thawed spermatozoa, supporting the hypothesis that cryoinjury is principally associated with a hypo-osmotic effect. A direct comparison of SDF of thawed cryopreserved spermatozoa and those exposed to a 64 mOsm/kg excursion showed a significant correlation (r=0.878; P<0.05; n=5); however, no correlation was found when the percentage of sperm with relaxed chromatin was compared. While a cryo-induced osmotic

  9. Genetic and biochemical characterization of ISP6, a small mitochondrial outer membrane protein associated with the protein translocation complex.

    PubMed Central

    Kassenbrock, C K; Cao, W; Douglas, M G

    1993-01-01

    To search genetically for additional components of the protein translocation apparatus of mitochondria, we have used low fidelity PCR mutagenesis to generate temperature-sensitive mutants in the outer membrane translocation pore component ISP42. A high copy number suppressor of temperature-sensitive isp42 has been isolated and sequenced. This novel gene, denoted ISP6, encodes a 61 amino acid integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which is oriented with its amino-terminus facing the cytosol. Disruption of the ISP6 gene is without apparent effect in wild type yeast cells, but is lethal in temperature-sensitive isp42 mutants. Immunoprecipitation of the gene product, ISP42p, from mitochondria solubilized under mild conditions reveals a multi-protein complex containing ISP6p and ISP42p. Images PMID:8344244

  10. Stability of Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins in Terrestrial Vertebrates Predicts Aerobic Capacity and Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Kitazoe, Yasuhiro; Kishino, Hirohisa; Hasegawa, Masami; Matsui, Atsushi; Lane, Nick; Tanaka, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    The cellular energy produced by mitochondria is a fundamental currency of life. However, the extent to which mitochondrial (mt) performance (power and endurance) is adapted to habitats and life strategies of vertebrates is not well understood. A global analysis of mt genomes revealed that hydrophobicity (HYD) of mt membrane proteins (MMPs) is much lower in terrestrial vertebrates than in fishes and shows a strong negative correlation with serine/threonine composition (STC). Here, we present evidence that this systematic feature of MMPs was crucial for the evolution of large terrestrial vertebrates with high aerobic capacity. An Arrhenius-type equation gave positive correlations between STC and maximum life span (MLS) in terrestrial vertebrates (with a few exceptions relating to the lifestyle of small animals with a high resting metabolic rate [RMR]) and negative correlations in secondary marine vertebrates, such as cetaceans and alligators (which returned from land to water, utilizing buoyancy with increased body size). In particular, marked STC increases in primates (especially hominoids) among placentals were associated with very high MLS values. We connected these STC increases in MMPs with greater stability of respiratory complexes by estimating the degradation of the Arrhenius plot given by accelerating mtRMR up to mt maximum metabolic rate. Both mtRMR and HYD in terrestrial vertebrates decreased with increasing body mass. Decreases in mtRMR raise MMP stability when high mobility is not required, whereas decreased HYD may weaken this stability under the hydrophobic environment of lipid bilayer. High maximal metabolic rates (5–10 RMR), which we postulate require high MMP mobility, presumably render MMPs more unstable. A marked rise in STC may therefore be essential to stabilize MMPs, perhaps as dynamic supercomplexes, via hydrogen bonds associated with serine/threonine motifs. PMID:21824868

  11. Pharmacological doses of melatonin induce alterations in mitochondrial mass and potential, bcl-2 levels and K+ currents in UVB-exposed U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Canonico, Barbara; Luchetti, Francesca; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Arcangeletti, Marcella; Betti, Michele; Cesarini, Erica; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Palma, Fulvio; Cuppini, Riccardo; Papa, Stefano

    2013-03-01

    Apoptosis is observed in 'actively' dying cells after the exposure to cell stressors such as ultraviolet light irradiation. Since melatonin has been proposed to act under stressful conditions as cell protection factor, in this study we examined the potential of this molecule when used at pharmacological concentrations to control mitochondrial damage and apoptotic signalling of UVB irradiated U937 human leukaemic cells. Moreover, the effect of melatonin treatment on electrophysiological properties and membrane K(+) currents of irradiated U937 cells was investigated as functional aspects relevant to the anti-apoptotic role of melatonin. The general effect is associated with the restoration of mass, number and membrane potential of mitochondria, with a lower caspase activation and bcl-2 upregulation. In the presence of the caspase inhibitor ZVAD-Fmk, melatonin seems to drive UVB stressed cells to follow the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway, interfering just at the mitochondrial level. Moreover, treatment with melatonin, as well as ZVAD-Fmk, prevented the K(+) current reduction observed late following the UVB insult application, by sparing cells from death; this result also indicates that the decrease of K(+) leakage currents could represent a functional feature of apoptotic process in UV-exposed U937 cells.

  12. Assembly of the mitochondrial membrane system. XVIII. Genetic loci on mitochondrial DNA involved in cytochrome b biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tzagoloff, A; Foury, F; Akai, A

    1976-11-24

    1. Fourteen cytoplasmic mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a specific deficiency of cytochrome b have been studied. The mutations have been shown to occur in two separate genetic loci, COB 1 and COB 2. These loci can be distinguished by mit- X mit- crosses. Pairwise crosses of cytochrome b mutants belonging to different loci yield 4-6% wild type recombinants corresponding to recombinational frequencies of 8-12%. In intra-locus crosses, the recombinational frequencies range from 1% to less than 0.01%. The two loci can also be distinguished by mit- X rho- crosses. Twenty rho- testers have been isolated of which ten preferentially restore mutations in COB 1 and ten others in COB 2. 2. The COB 1 and COB 2 loci have been localized on mitochondrial DNA between the two antibiotic resistance loci OLI 1 and OLI 2 in the order OLI 2-COB 2-COB 1-OLI 1. The results of mit- X mit- and mit- X rho- crosses have also been used to map the cytochrome b mutations relative to each other. The maps obtained by the two independent methods are in good agreement. 3. Mutations in COB 1 have been found to be linked to the OLI1 locus in some but not in other strains of S. cervisiae. This evidence suggests that there may be a spacer region between the two loci whose length varies from strain to strain. 4. Two mutations in COB 2 have been found to cause a loss of a mitochondrial translation product corresponding to the cytochrome b apoprotein. Instead of the wild type protein the mutants have a new low-molecular weight product which is probably a fragment of cytochrome b. The fact that the mutations revert suggests that they are nonsense mutations in the structural gene of cytochrome b. PMID:796670

  13. Charged membranes.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Jack D

    2013-04-16

    This Teaching Resource provides three animated lessons that describe the storage and utilization of energy across plasma membranes. The "Na,K ATPase" animation explains how these pumps establish the electrochemical gradient that stores energy across plasma membranes. The "ATP synthesizing complexes" animation shows how these complexes transfer energy from the inner mitochondrial membrane to adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The "action potential" lesson explains how charged membranes are used to propagate signals along the axons of neurons. These animations serve as valuable resources for any collegiate-level course that describes these important factors. Courses that might employ them include introductory biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, pharmacology, and physiology.

  14. Zero-current potentials in a large membrane channel: a simple theory accounts for complex behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Zambrowicz, E B; Colombini, M

    1993-01-01

    Flow of ions through large channels is complex because both cations and anions can penetrate and multiple ions can be in the channel at the same time. A modification of the fixed-charge membrane theory of Teorell was reported (Peng, S., E. Blachly-Dyson, M. Forte, and M. Colombini. 1992. Biophys. J. 62:123-135) in which the channel is divided into two compartments: a relatively charged cylindrical shell of solution adjacent to the wall of the pore and a relatively neutral central cylinder of solution. The zero-current (reversal) potential results in current flow in opposite directions in these two compartments. This description accounted rather well for the observed reversal potential changes following site-directed mutations. Here we report the results of systematic tests of this simple theory with the mitochondrial channel, VDAC (isolated from Neurospora crassa), reconstituted into planar phospholipid membranes. The variation of the observed reversal potential with transmembrane activity ratio, ionic strength, ion mobility ratio, and net charge on the wall of the pore are accounted for reasonably well. The Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz theory fails to account for the observations. PMID:7694668

  15. Reduction in mitochondrial potential constitutes an early irreversible step of programmed lymphocyte death in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In a number of experimental systems in which lymphocyte depletion was induced by apoptosis-inducing manipulations, no apoptotic morphology and ladder-type DNA fragmentation were detected among freshly isolated peripheral lymphocytes ex vivo. Here we report that one alteration that can be detected among splenocytes stimulated with lymphocyte-depleting doses of dexamethasone (DEX) in vivo is a reduced uptake of 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DiOC6[3]), a fluorochrome which incorporates into cells dependent upon their mitochondrial transmembrane potential (delta psi m). In contrast, ex vivo isolated splenocytes still lacked established signs of programmed cell death (PCD):DNA degradation into high or low molecular weight fragments, ultrastructural changes of chromatin arrangement and endoplasmatic reticulum, loss in viability, or accumulation of intracellular peroxides. Moreover, no changes in cell membrane potential could be detected. A reduced delta psi m has been observed in response to different agents inducing lymphoid cell depletion in vivo (superantigen and glucocorticoids [GC]), in mature T and B lymphocytes, as well as their precursors. DEX treatment in vivo, followed by cytofluorometric purification of viable delta psi mlow splenic T cells ex vivo, revealed that this fraction of cells is irreversibly committed to undergoing DNA fragmentation. Immediately after purification neither delta psi mlow, nor delta psi mhigh cells, exhibit detectable DNA fragmentation. However, after short-term culture (37 degrees C, 1 h) delta psi mlow cells show endonucleolysis, followed by cytolysis several hours later. Incubation of delta psi mlow cells in the presence of excess amount of the GC receptor antagonist RU38486 (which displaces DEX from the GC receptor), cytokines that inhibit DEX-induced cell death, or cycloheximide fails to prevent cytolysis. The antioxidant, N- acetylcysteine, as well as linomide, an agent that effectively inhibits DEX or superantigen

  16. Changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacities during thermal acclimation of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss: roles of membrane proteins, phospholipids and their fatty acid compositions.

    PubMed

    Kraffe, Edouard; Marty, Yanic; Guderley, Helga

    2007-01-01

    Changes in the properties of mitochondria from oxidative muscle of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were examined during warm (5 degrees C to 15 degrees C) acclimation. Trout were studied shortly after the initial thermal change and after 8 weeks acclimation to 15 degrees C. To identify potential mechanisms by which oxidative capacities change, the modifications of phospholipid composition, membrane proteins and functional capacities of red muscle mitochondria were examined. Marked functional changes of isolated muscle mitochondria during warm acclimation of rainbow trout were reflected by a host of modifications in phospholipid composition, but by few shifts in protein components. Shortly after transfer of trout from 5 degrees C to 15 degrees C, the maximal oxidative capacity of mitochondria measured at 15 degrees C increased slightly, but rates at both assay temperatures (5 degrees C and 15 degrees C) decreased markedly after warm acclimation. The increase in capacity in short-term warm exposed trout was most pronounced when rates at 15 degrees C were expressed relative to cytochrome a and c(1) levels. Non-phosphorylating (State 4) rates of oxygen uptake increased with short-term warm exposure before returning to initial levels after warm acclimation. Cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) activity in the mitochondrial preparations decreased with warm acclimation. The thermal sensitivity of the ADP affinity was markedly modified during short-term warm exposure, when the ADP/O ratio increased, but warm acclimation returned these values to those observed initially. ADP affinity increased after warm acclimation. Changes in the mitochondrial content of cytochromes and adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) could not explain these patterns. On the other hand, changes in the proportions of the lipid classes and in the acyl chain composition of certain phospholipid classes mirror the modifications in functional properties. Short-term exposure to 15 degrees C decreased the ratio of

  17. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazutaka; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  18. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  19. Novel super-resolution capable mitochondrial probe, MitoRed AIE, enables assessment of real-time molecular mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Camden Yeung-Wah; Chen, Sijie; Creed, Sarah Jayne; Kang, Miaomiao; Zhao, Na; Tang, Ben Zhong; Elgass, Kirstin Diana

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial dynamics play vital roles in health and disease. With the intricate nanometer-scale structure and rapid dynamics of mitochondria, super-resolution microscopy techniques possess great un-tapped potential to significantly contribute to understanding mitochondrial biology and kinetics. Here we present a novel mitochondrial probe (MitoRed AIE) suitable for live mitochondrial dynamics imaging and single particle tracking (SPT), together with a multi-dimensional data analysis approach to assess local mitochondrial (membrane) fluidity. The MitoRed AIE probe localizes primarily to mitochondrial membranes, with 95 ms fluorophore on-time delivering 106 photons/ms, characteristics which we exploit to demonstrate live cell 100 fps 3D time-lapse tracking of mitochondria. Combining our experimental and analytical approaches, we uncover mitochondrial dynamics at unprecedented time scales. This approach opens up a new regime into high spatio-temporal resolution dynamics in many areas of mitochondrial biology. PMID:27492961

  20. Malonate induces cell death via mitochondrial potential collapse and delayed swelling through an ROS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Galindo, Maria F; Gómez-Lázaro, Maria; Yuste, Victor J; Comella, Joan X; Aguirre, Norberto; Jordán, Joaquín

    2005-01-01

    Herein we study the effects of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate on its primary target, the mitochondrion. Malonate induces mitochondrial potential collapse, mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c (Cyt c) release and depletes glutathione (GSH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme (NAD(P)H) stores in brain-isolated mitochondria. Although, mitochondrial potential collapse was almost immediate after malonate addition, mitochondrial swelling was not evident before 15 min of drug presence. This latter effect was blocked by cyclosporin A (CSA), Ruthenium Red (RR), magnesium, catalase, GSH and vitamin E. Malonate added to SH-SY5Y cell cultures produced a marked loss of cell viability together with the release of Cyt c and depletion of GSH and NAD(P)H concentrations. All these effects were not apparent in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing Bcl-xL. When GSH concentrations were lowered with buthionine sulphoximine, cytoprotection afforded by Bcl-xL overexpression was not evident anymore. Taken together, all these data suggest that malonate causes a rapid mitochondrial potential collapse and reactive oxygen species production that overwhelms mitochondrial antioxidant capacity and leads to mitochondrial swelling. Further permeability transition pore opening and the subsequent release of proapoptotic factors such as Cyt c could therefore be, at least in part, responsible for malonate-induced toxicity. PMID:15655518

  1. Bioassay-guided Isolation of Constituents of Piper sarmentosum Using a Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential Assay

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Matthew, Susan; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Chai, Heebyung; de Blanco, Esperanza J. Carcache; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Swanson, Steven M.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on a chloroform-soluble extract of the aerial parts of Piper sarmentosum collected in Vietnam, monitored by a mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) assay using HT-29 human colon cancer cells. This led to the isolation of four new C-benzylated dihydroflavones, sarmentosumins A-D (1-4), as well as 14 known compounds. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. Among these compounds, 1-4 as well as five known C-benzylated dihydroflavones (5-9), and pipercallosine, a piperamide (11), were found to induce apoptosis in HT-29 cells by moderately reducing the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), with ED50 values ranging from 1.6 to 13.6 μM. Furthermore, 7-methoxydichamanetin (8) and pinocembrin (10) exhibited proteasome inhibitory activities in a human 20S proteasome bioassay with IC50 values of 3.45 ± 0.18 μM and 2.87 ± 0.26 μM, respectively. This is the first time that C-benzylated dihydroflavones have been reported to demonstrate an apoptotic effect associated with disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. PMID:21973101

  2. Mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index: A potential biomarker to predict progression from indolent to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vayalil, Praveen K.; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is influenced by alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and changes in the microenvironment occurring during tumorigenesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitochondrial function will be stably and dynamically altered at each stage of the prostate tumor development. We tested this hypothesis in RWPE-1 cells and its tumorigenic clones with progressive malignant characteristics (RWPE-1 < WPE-NA22 < WPE-NB14 < WPE-NB11 < WPE-NB26) using high-throughput respirometry. Our studies demonstrate that mitochondrial content do not change with increasing malignancy. In premalignant cells (WPE-NA22 and WPE-NB14), OXPHOS is elevated in presence of glucose or glutamine alone or in combination compared to RWPE-1 cells and decreases with increasing malignancy. Glutamine maintained higher OXPHOS than glucose and suggests that it may be an important substrate for the growth and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells. Glycolysis significantly increases with malignancy and follow a classical Warburg phenomenon. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is significantly lower in tumorigenic clones and invasive WPE-NB26 does not utilize FAO at all. In this paper, we introduce for the first time the mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index (MOBI), a mathematical representation of oncobioenergetic profile of a cancer cell, which increases significantly upon transformation into localized premalignant form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell lines and MOBI appears to be not related to androgen dependence or mitochondrial content, but rather dependent on the stage of the cancer. Altogether, we propose that MOBI could be a potential biomarker to distinguish aggressive cancer from that of indolent disease. PMID:26515588

  3. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent K(m,ADP) for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death.

  4. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent K(m,ADP) for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death. PMID:27085978

  5. Estimation of the membrane potential of cultured macrophages from the fast potential transient upon microelectrode entry.

    PubMed

    Ince, C; Ypey, D L; Van Furth, R; Verveen, A A

    1983-03-01

    Analysis of membrane potential recordings upon microelectrode impalement of four types of macrophages (cell lines P388D1 and PU5-1.8, cultured mouse peritoneal macrophages, and cultured human monocytes) reveals that these cells have membrane potentials at least two times more negative than sustained potential values (E(s)) frequently reported. Upon microelectrode entry into the cell (P388D1), the recorded potential drops to a peak value (E(p)) (mean -37 mV for 50 cells, range -15 to -70 mV) within 2 ms, after which it decays to a depolarized potential (E(n)) (mean -12 mV) in about 20 ms. Thereafter, the membrane develops one or a series of slow hyperpolarizations before a final sustained membrane potential (E(s)) (mean -14 mV, range -5 to -40) is established. The mean value of the peak of the first hyperpolarization (E(h)) is -30 mV (range -10 to -55 mV). The initial fast peak transient, measured upon microelectrode entry, was first described and analyzed by Lassen et al. (Lassen, U.V., A.M. T. Nielson, L. Pape, and L. O. Simonsen, 1971, J. Membr. Biol. 6:269-288 for other change in the membrane potential from its real value before impalement to a sustained depolarized value. This was shown to be true for macrophages by two-electrode impalements of single cells. Values of E(p), E(n), E(h), E(s), and membrane resistance (R(m)) measured for the other macrophages were similar to those of P388D1. From these results we conclude that E(p) is a better estimate of the true membrane potential of macrophages than E(s), and that the slow hyperpolarizations upon impalement should be regarded as transient repolarizations back to the original membrane potentials. Thus, analysis of the initial fast impalement transient can be a valuable aid in the estimation of the membrane potential of various sorts of small isolated cells by microelectrodes.

  6. Mitochondrial delivery of antisense RNA by MITO-Porter results in mitochondrial RNA knockdown, and has a functional impact on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ryo; Yamada, Yuma; Kawamura, Eriko; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial genome-targeting nucleic acids are promising therapeutic candidates for treating mitochondrial diseases. To date, a number of systems for delivering genetic information to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported, and several successful gene therapies involving gene delivery targeted to the cytosol and the nucleus have been reported. However, much less progress has been made concerning mitochondrial gene delivery systems, and mitochondrial gene therapy has never been achieved. Here, we report on the mitochondrial delivery of an antisense RNA oligonucleotide (ASO) to perform mitochondrial RNA knockdown to regulate mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO was achieved using a combination of a MITO-Porter system, which contains mitochondrial fusogenic lipid envelopes for mitochondrial delivery via membrane fusion and D-arm, a mitochondrial import signal of tRNA to the matrix. Mitochondrial delivery of the ASO induces the knockdown of the targeted mitochondria-encoded mRNA and protein, namely cytochrome c oxidase subunit II, a component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential was depolarized by the down regulation of the respiratory chain as the result of the mitochondrial delivery of ASO. This finding constitutes the first report to demonstrate that the nanocarrier-mediated mitochondrial genome targeting of antisense RNA effects mitochondrial function.

  7. A component of the mitochondrial outer membrane proteome of T. brucei probably contains covalent bound fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Albisetti, Anna; Wiese, Sebastian; Schneider, André; Niemann, Moritz

    2015-08-01

    A subclass of eukaryotic proteins is subject to modification with fatty acids, the most common of which are palmitic and myristic acid. Protein acylation allows association with cellular membranes in the absence of transmembrane domains. Here we examine POMP39, a protein previously described to be present in the outer mitochondrial membrane proteome (POMP) of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei. POMP39 lacks canonical transmembrane domains, but is likely both myristoylated and palmitoylated on its N-terminus. Interestingly, the protein is also dually localized on the surface of the mitochondrion as well as in the flagellum of both insect-stage and the bloodstream form of the parasites. Upon abolishing of global protein acylation or mutation of the myristoylation site, POMP39 relocates to the cytosol. RNAi-mediated ablation of the protein neither causes a growth phenotype in insect-stage nor bloodstream form trypanosomes.

  8. Electrochemical sensing of membrane potential and enzyme function using gallium arsenide electrodes functionalized with supported membranes.

    PubMed

    Gassull, Daniel; Ulman, Abraham; Grunze, Michael; Tanaka, Motomu

    2008-05-01

    We deposit phospholipid monolayers on highly doped p-GaAs electrodes that are precoated with methyl-mercaptobiphenyl monolayers and operate such a biofunctional electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) setup as an analogue of a metal-oxide-semiconductor setup. Electrochemical impedance spectra measured over a wide frequency range demonstrate that the presence of a lipid monolayer remarkably slows down the diffusion of ions so that the membrane-functionalized GaAs can be subjected to electrochemical investigations for more than 3 days with no sign of degradation. The biofunctional EIS setup enables us to translate changes in the surface charge density Q and bias potentials Ubias into the change in the interface capacitance Cp. Since Cp is governed by the capacitance of semiconductor space charge region CSC, the linear relationships obtained for 1/Cp2 vs Q and 1/Cp2 vs Ubias suggests that Cp can be used to detect the surface charges with a high sensitivity (1 charge per 18 nm2). Furthermore, the kinetics of phospholipids degradation by phospholipase A2 can also be monitored by a significant decrease in diffusion coefficients through the membrane by a factor of 104. Thus, the operation of GaAs membrane composites established here allows for electrochemical sensing of surface potential and barrier capability of biological membranes in a quantitative manner.

  9. Regulation of the plasma membrane potential in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    VanderHeyden, N; McLaughlin, G L; Docampo, R

    2000-02-15

    Many protists use a H(+) gradient across the plasma membrane, the proton motive force, to drive nutrient uptake. This force is generated in part by the plasma membrane potential (DeltaPsi). We investigated the regulation of the DeltaPsi in Pneumocystis carinii using the potentiometric fluorescent dye bisoxonol. The steady state DeltaPsi in a buffer containing Na(+) and K(+) (standard buffer) was found to be -78+/-8 mV. In the absence of Na(+) and K(+) (NMG buffer) or Cl(-) (gluconate buffer), DeltaPsi was not significantly changed suggesting that cation and anion conductances do not play a significant role in the regulation of DeltaPsi in P. carinii. The DeltaPsi was also not affected by inhibitors of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, ouabain (1 mM), and the K(+)/H(+)-ATPase, omeprazole (1 mM). In contrast, inhibitors of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (100 microM), N-ethylmaleimide (100 microM) and diethylstilbestrol (25 microM), significantly depolarized the DeltaPsi to -43+/-7, -56+/-5 and -40+/-12 mV, respectively. The data support that the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase plays a significant role in the regulation of DeltaPsi in P. carinii.

  10. Contributions of electrogenic pumps to resting membrane potentials: the theory of electrogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Sjodin, R A

    1984-01-01

    Pumped and transported components of ionic flux have been added to passive electrodiffusive components. This permits the derivation of equations for the resting membrane potential that take account of electrogenic mechanisms in which the transport mechanism or pump itself produces a net ionic current. Such equations are general in that they apply to non-steady-state conditions in which intracellular ionic concentrations are changing. The equations developed allow calculation of resting membrane potentials in terms of ionic concentrations, membrane permeability to ions, and kinetic relations for pumped ionic fluxes. When applied to skeletal muscle fibers, the equations predict a buffering effect of the Na/K pump on the membrane potential over a wide range in the values [K]i and [Na]i such that a fairly constant membrane potential occurs under conditions in which the passive ionic fluxes themselves would produce increasing degrees of depolarization. A plot of the membrane potential versus log [K]o with an electrogenic Na pump present gives a curve with slopes both greater than and less than 58 mV per 10-fold concentration change. Over a middle range of [K]o values, the slope is 58 mV. The slope of Em versus log [K]o curves is, therefore, not a very sensitive test for the presence of an electrogenic pump. For the same internal ionic concentrations, less electrogenic increment in membrane potential is observed the higher the value of [K]o, and the more depolarized the membrane. This is due to a rectification present in the pump current-voltage curve, which requires that more pump current be present to produce a given membrane hyperpolarization at depolarized values of the potential than at hyperpolarized values of the potential. A gain in Na and a loss of K by the fibers affects the rectification curve in such a way that less pump current is required to produce the same degree of hyperpolarization. This mechanism ensures that adequate internal negativity will be

  11. New insights into the targeting of a subset of tail-anchored proteins to the outer mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Naomi J.; Teresinski, Howard J.; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Clendening, Eric A.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Sliwinska, Elwira; Zhang, Daiyuan; Miernyk, Ján A.; Brito, Glauber C.; Andrews, David W.; Dyer, John M.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a unique class of functionally diverse membrane proteins defined by their single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and their ability to insert post-translationally into specific organelles with an Ncytoplasm-Corganelle interior orientation. The molecular mechanisms by which TA proteins are sorted to the proper organelles are not well-understood. Herein we present results indicating that a dibasic targeting motif (i.e., -R-R/K/H-X{X≠E}) identified previously in the C terminus of the mitochondrial isoform of the TA protein cytochrome b5, also exists in many other A. thaliana outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM)-TA proteins. This motif is conspicuously absent, however, in all but one of the TA protein subunits of the translocon at the outer membrane of mitochondria (TOM), suggesting that these two groups of proteins utilize distinct biogenetic pathways. Consistent with this premise, we show that the TA sequences of the dibasic-containing proteins are both necessary and sufficient for targeting to mitochondria, and are interchangeable, while the TA regions of TOM proteins lacking a dibasic motif are necessary, but not sufficient for localization, and cannot be functionally exchanged. We also present results from a comprehensive mutational analysis of the dibasic motif and surrounding sequences that not only greatly expands the functional definition and context-dependent properties of this targeting signal, but also led to the identification of other novel putative OMM-TA proteins. Collectively, these results provide important insight to the complexity of the targeting pathways involved in the biogenesis of OMM-TA proteins and help define a consensus targeting motif that is utilized by at least a subset of these proteins. PMID:25237314

  12. Decreased in vitro fertility in male rats exposed to fluoride-induced oxidative stress damage and mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo-Vega, Jeannett A.; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Manuel; Razo, Luz Maria del

    2008-08-01

    Fluorosis, caused by drinking water contamination with inorganic fluoride, is a public health problem in many areas around the world. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of environmentally relevant doses of fluoride on in vitro fertilization (IVF) capacity of spermatozoa, and its relationship to spermatozoa mitochondrial transmembrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}). Male Wistar rats were administered at 5 mg fluoride/kg body mass/24 h, or deionized water orally for 8 weeks. We evaluated several spermatozoa parameters in treated and untreated rats: i) standard quality analysis, ii) superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, iii) the generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -}), iv) lipid peroxidation concentration, v) ultrastructural analyses of spermatozoa using transmission electron microscopy, vi) {delta}{psi}{sub m}, vii) acrosome reaction, and viii) IVF capability. Spermatozoa from fluoride-treated rats exhibited a significant decrease in SOD activity ({approx} 33%), accompanied with a significant increase in the generation of O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}} ({approx} 40%), a significant decrease in {delta}{psi}{sub m} ({approx} 33%), and a significant increase in lipid peroxidation concentration ({approx} 50%), relative to spermatozoa from the control group. Consistent with this finding, spermatozoa from fluoride-treated rats exhibited altered plasmatic membrane. In addition, the percentage of fluoride-treated spermatozoa capable of undergoing the acrosome reaction was decreased relative to control spermatozoa (34 vs. 55%), while the percentage fluoride-treated spermatozoa capable of oocyte fertilization was also significantly lower than the control group (13 vs. 71%). These observations suggest that subchronic exposure to fluoride causes oxidative stress damage and loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, resulting in reduced fertility.

  13. Inner-membrane proteins PMI/TMEM11 regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis independently of the DRP1/MFN fission/fusion pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rival, Thomas; Macchi, Marc; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laetitia; Poidevin, Mickael; Maillet, Frédéric; Richard, Fabrice; Fatmi, Ahmed; Belenguer, Pascale; Royet, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that can change in number and morphology during cell cycle, development or in response to extracellular stimuli. These morphological dynamics are controlled by a tight balance between two antagonistic pathways that promote fusion and fission. Genetic approaches have identified a cohort of conserved proteins that form the core of mitochondrial remodelling machineries. Mitofusins (MFNs) and OPA1 proteins are dynamin-related GTPases that are required for outer- and inner-mitochondrial membrane fusion respectively whereas dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is the master regulator of mitochondrial fission. We demonstrate here that the Drosophila PMI gene and its human orthologue TMEM11 encode mitochondrial inner-membrane proteins that regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis. PMI-mutant cells contain a highly condensed mitochondrial network, suggesting that PMI has either a pro-fission or an anti-fusion function. Surprisingly, however, epistatic experiments indicate that PMI shapes the mitochondria through a mechanism that is independent of drp1 and mfn. This shows that mitochondrial networks can be shaped in higher eukaryotes by at least two separate pathways: one PMI-dependent and one DRP1/MFN-dependent. PMID:21274005

  14. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and pancreatic cancer: a new potential target therapy.

    PubMed

    Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Palmieri, Marta

    2015-03-21

    Overall 5-years survival of pancreatic cancer patients is nearly 5%, making this cancer type one of the most lethal neoplasia. Furthermore, the incidence rate of pancreatic cancer has a growing trend that determines a constant increase in the number of deceases caused by this pathology. The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer is mainly caused by delayed diagnosis, early metastasis of tumor, and resistance to almost all tested cytotoxic drugs. In this respect, the identification of novel potential targets for new and efficient therapies should be strongly encouraged in order to improve the clinical management of pancreatic cancer. Some studies have shown that the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer as compared to adjacent normal tissues. In addition, recent discoveries established a key role of UCP2 in protecting cancer cells from an excessive production of mitochondrial superoxide ions and in the promotion of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, including aerobic glycolysis stimulation, promotion of cancer progression. These observations together with the demonstration that UCP2 repression can synergize with standard chemotherapy to inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth provide the molecular rationale to consider UCP2 as a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. In this editorial, recent advances describing the relationship between cancer development and mitochondrial UCP2 activity are critically provided.

  15. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and pancreatic cancer: A new potential target therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Palmieri, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Overall 5-years survival of pancreatic cancer patients is nearly 5%, making this cancer type one of the most lethal neoplasia. Furthermore, the incidence rate of pancreatic cancer has a growing trend that determines a constant increase in the number of deceases caused by this pathology. The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer is mainly caused by delayed diagnosis, early metastasis of tumor, and resistance to almost all tested cytotoxic drugs. In this respect, the identification of novel potential targets for new and efficient therapies should be strongly encouraged in order to improve the clinical management of pancreatic cancer. Some studies have shown that the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer as compared to adjacent normal tissues. In addition, recent discoveries established a key role of UCP2 in protecting cancer cells from an excessive production of mitochondrial superoxide ions and in the promotion of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, including aerobic glycolysis stimulation, promotion of cancer progression. These observations together with the demonstration that UCP2 repression can synergize with standard chemotherapy to inhibit pancreatic cancer cell growth provide the molecular rationale to consider UCP2 as a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer. In this editorial, recent advances describing the relationship between cancer development and mitochondrial UCP2 activity are critically provided. PMID:25805929

  16. The Amniotic Membrane: Development and Potential Applications - A Review.

    PubMed

    Favaron, P O; Carvalho, R C; Borghesi, J; Anunciação, A R A; Miglino, M A

    2015-12-01

    Foetal membranes are essential tissues for embryonic development, playing important roles related to protection, breathing, nutrition and excretion. The amnion is the innermost extraembryonic membrane, which surrounds the foetus, forming an amniotic sac that contains the amniotic fluid (AF). In recent years, the amniotic membrane has emerged as a potential tool for clinical applications and has been primarily used in medicine in order to stimulate the healing of skin and corneal diseases. It has also been used in vaginal reconstructive surgery, repair of abdominal hernia, prevention of surgical adhesions and pericardium closure. More recently, it has been used in regenerative medicine because the amniotic-derived stem cells as well as AF-derived cells exhibit cellular plasticity, angiogenic, cytoprotective, immunosuppressive properties, antitumoural potential and the ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. These features make them a promising source of stem cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. In this review, we discussed the development of the amnion, AF and amniotic cavity in different species, as well as the applicability of stem cells from the amnion and AF in cellular therapy.

  17. Apaf-1-deficient fog mouse cell apoptosis involves hypo-polarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane, ATP depletion and citrate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Iyoko; Sato, Shingo; Fukunishi, Nahoko; Yoshida, Hiroki; Imai, Takasuke; Kurata, Shun-Ichi

    2008-12-01

    To explore how the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is controlled in the spontaneous fog (forebrain overgrowth) mutant mice with an Apaf1 splicing deficiency, we examined spleen and bone marrow cells from Apaf1(+/+) (+/+) and Apaf1(fog/fog) (fog/fog) mice for initiator caspase-9 activation by cellular stresses. When the mitochondrial inner membrane potential (Deltapsim) was disrupted by staurosporine, +/+ cells but not fog/fog cells activated caspase-9 to cause apoptosis, indicating the lack of apoptosome (apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1)/cytochrome c/(d)ATP/procaspase-9) function in fog/fog cells. However, when a marginal ( approximately 20%) decrease in Deltapsim was caused by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM), peroxynitritedonor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (0.1 mM) and UV-C irradiation (20 J/m(2)), both +/+ and fog/fog cells triggered procaspase-9 auto-processing and its downstream cascade activation. Supporting our previous results, procaspase-9 pre-existing in the mitochondria induced its auto-processing before the cytosolic caspase activation regardless of the genotypes. Cellular ATP concentration significantly decreased under the hypoactive Deltapsim condition. Furthermore, we detected accumulation of citrate, a kosmotrope known to facilitate procaspase-9 dimerization, probably due to a feedback control of the Krebs cycle by the electron transfer system. Thus, mitochondrial in situ caspase-9 activation may be caused by the major metabolic reactions in response to physiological stresses, which may represent a mode of Apaf-1-independent apoptosis hypothesized from recent genetic studies.

  18. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, P.D.; Potter, B.J.; Sorrentino, D.; Zhou, S.L.; Isola, L.M.; Stump, D.; Kiang, C.L.; Thung, S. ); Wada, H.; Horio, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP{sub PM}) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABP{sub PM} have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABP{sub PM} reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of ({sup 3}H)oleate but not that of ({sup 35}S)sulfobromophthalein or ({sup 14}C)taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABP{sub PM} can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABP{sub PM} and mGOT are closely related.

  19. Thermoelectric Potential of Polymer-Scaffolded Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R. S.; Said, S. M.; Sahamir, S. R.; Karim, M. R.; Sabri, M. F. M.; Nakajo, T.; Kubouchi, M.; Hayashi, K.; Miyazaki, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Organic thin films have been viewed as potential thermoelectric (TE) materials, given their ease of fabrication, flexibility, cost effectiveness, and low thermal conductivity. However, their intrinsically low electrical conductivity is a main drawback which results in a relatively lower TE figure of merit for polymer-based TE materials than for inorganic materials. In this paper, a technique to enhance the ion transport properties of polymers through the introduction of ionic liquids is presented. The polymer is in the form of a nanofiber scaffold produced using the electrospinning technique. These fibers were then soaked in different ionic liquids based on substituted imidazolium such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride or 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide. This method was applied to electrospun polyacrylonitrile and a mixture of polyvinyl alcohol and chitosan polymers. The ion transport properties of the membranes have been observed to increase with increasing concentration of ionic liquid, with maximum electrical conductivity of 1.20 × 10-1 S/cm measured at room temperature. Interestingly, the maximum electrical conductivity value surpassed the value of pure ionic liquids. These results indicate that it is possible to significantly improve the electrical conductivity of a polymer membrane through a simple and cost-effective method. This may in turn boost the TE figures of merit of polymer materials, which are well known to be considerably lower than those of inorganic materials. Results in terms of the Seebeck coefficient of the membranes are also presented in this paper to provide an overall representation of the TE potential of the polymer-scaffolded ionic liquid membranes.

  20. Imaging cellular membrane potential through ionization of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Clare E.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J.; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J.; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A.; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Efros, Alexander L.; Huston, Alan L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in quantum dots (QDs) stems from the plethora of potential applications that arises from their tunable absorption and emission profiles, high absorption cross sections, resistance to photobleaching, functionalizable surfaces, and physical robustness. The emergent use of QDs in biological imaging exploits these and other intrinsic properties. For example, quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), which describes changes in the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs driven by the application of an electric field, provides an inherent means of detecting changes in electric fields by monitoring QD emission and thus points to a ready mean of imaging membrane potential (and action potentials) in electrically active cells. Here we examine the changing PL of various QDs subjected to electric fields comparable to those found across a cellular membrane. By pairing static and timeresolved PL measurements, we attempt to understand the mechanism driving electric-field-induced PL quenching and ultimately conclude that ionization plays a substantial role in initiating PL changes in systems where QCSE has traditionally been credited. Expanding on these findings, we explore the rapidity of response of the QD PL to applied electric fields and demonstrate changes amply able to capture the millisecond timescale of cellular action potentials.

  1. Structural transition in Bcl-xL and its potential association with mitochondrial calcium ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Choi, Minjoo; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Ye, Hong; Liu, Wei; Toh, Hui Ting; Kang, CongBao; Kamariah, Neelagandan; Li, Chi; Huang, Huiya; White, Carl; Baek, Kwanghee; Grüber, Gerhard; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2015-01-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are key regulators for cellular homeostasis in response to apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-xL, an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, undergoes conformational transitions, which leads to two conformational states: the cytoplasmic and membrane-bound. Here we present the crystal and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structures of Bcl-xL treated with the mild detergent n-Octyl β-D-Maltoside (OM). The detergent-treated Bcl-xL forms a dimer through three-dimensional domain swapping (3DDS) by swapping helices α6-α8 between two monomers. Unlike Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, Bcl-xL is not converted to 3DDS homodimer upon binding BH3 peptides and ABT-737, a BH3 mimetic drug. We also designed Bcl-xL mutants which cannot dimerize and show that these mutants reduced mitochondrial calcium uptake in MEF cells. This illustrates the structural plasticity in Bcl-xL providing hints toward the probable molecular mechanism for Bcl-xL to play a regulatory role in mitochondrial calcium ion transport. PMID:26023881

  2. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, P D; Wada, H; Horio, Y; Potter, B J; Sorrentino, D; Zhou, S L; Isola, L M; Stump, D; Kiang, C L; Thung, S

    1990-01-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABPPM) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate with a Ka approximately 1.2-1.4 x 10(7) M-1. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABPPM have GOT enzymatic activity; the relative specific activities (units/mg) of the membranes and purified protein suggest that h-FABPPM constitutes 1-2% of plasma membrane protein in the rat hepatocyte. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABPPM reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of [3H]oleate but not that of [35S]sulfobromophthalein or [14C]taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABPPM can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABPPM and mGOT are closely related. Images PMID:2185471

  3. A Splice-Isoform of Vesicle-associated Membrane Protein-1 (VAMP-1) Contains a Mitochondrial Targeting Signal

    PubMed Central

    Isenmann, Sandra; Khew-Goodall, Yeesim; Gamble, Jennifer; Vadas, Mathew; Wattenberg, Binks W.

    1998-01-01

    Screening of a library derived from primary human endothelial cells revealed a novel human isoform of vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1), a protein involved in the targeting and/or fusion of transport vesicles to their target membrane. We have termed this novel isoform VAMP-1B and designated the previously described isoform VAMP-1A. VAMP-1B appears to be an alternatively spliced form of VAMP-1. A similar rat splice variant of VAMP-1 (also termed VAMP-1B) has recently been reported. Five different cultured cell lines, from different lineages, all contained VAMP-1B but little or no detectable VAMP-1A mRNA, as assessed by PCR. In contrast, brain mRNA contained VAMP-1A but no VAMP-1B. The VAMP-1B sequence encodes a protein identical to VAMP-1A except for the carboxy-terminal five amino acids. VAMP-1 is anchored in the vesicle membrane by a carboxy-terminal hydrophobic sequence. In VAMP-1A the hydrophobic anchor is followed by a single threonine, which is the carboxy-terminal amino acid. In VAMP-1B the predicted hydrophobic membrane anchor is shortened by four amino acids, and the hydrophobic sequence is immediately followed by three charged amino acids, arginine-arginine-aspartic acid. Transfection of human endothelial cells with epitope-tagged VAMP-1B demonstrated that VAMP-1B was targeted to mitochondria whereas VAMP-1A was localized to the plasma membrane and endosome-like structures. Analysis of C-terminal mutations of VAMP-1B demonstrated that mitochondrial targeting depends both on the addition of positive charge at the C terminus and a shortened hydrophobic membrane anchor. These data suggest that mitochondria may be integrated, at least at a mechanistic level, to the vesicular trafficking pathways that govern protein movement between other organelles of the cell. PMID:9658161

  4. Identification of potential mitochondrial CLPXP protease interactors and substrates suggests its central role in energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Fabian; Langer, Julian D.; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondria is achieved by several mechanisms, including the regulation of mitochondrial proteostasis. The matrix protease CLPXP, involved in protein quality control, has been implicated in ageing and disease. However, particularly due to the lack of knowledge of CLPXP’s substrate spectrum, only little is known about the pathways and mechanisms controlled by this protease. Here we report the first comprehensive identification of potential mitochondrial CLPXP in vivo interaction partners and substrates using a combination of tandem affinity purification and differential proteomics. This analysis reveals that CLPXP in the fungal ageing model Podospora anserina is mainly associated with metabolic pathways in mitochondria, e.g. components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as subunits of electron transport chain complex I. These data suggest a possible function of mitochondrial CLPXP in the control and/or maintenance of energy metabolism. Since bioenergetic alterations are a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and ageing, our data comprise an important resource for specific studies addressing the role of CLPXP in these adverse processes. PMID:26679294

  5. Transport of ions across bipolar membranes. 1. Theoretical and experimental examination of the membrane potential of KCl solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Higa, Mitsuru; Kira, Akira

    1995-04-06

    A calculation method was derived for ionic transport across a bipolar membrane in dialysis systems of mixed salt solutions containing multivalent ions. The calculation of the total membrane potential in the solutions containing KCl alone by this method shows that the potential-salt concentration curve depends both on the direction of the arrangement of the membrane charged layers to the concentration gradient of the salt solutions and on the ratio of the charge densities of the two charged layers. The simulations based on experimentally determined parameters agree with the potential measurements for bipolar membranes produced so that the transport properties depend mainly on their charges. 40 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism.

  7. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26857402

  8. Induction of necrosis and apoptosis to KB cancer cells by sanguinarine is associated with reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, M.-C.; Chan, C.-P.; Wang, Y.-J.; Lee, P.-H.; Chen, L.-I; Tsai, Y.-L.; Lin, B.-R.; Wang, Y.-L.; Jeng, J.-H. . E-mail: huei@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2007-01-15

    Sanguinarine is a benzopheanthridine alkaloid present in the root of Sanguinaria canadensis L. and Chellidonium majus L. In this study, sanguinarine (2 and 3 {mu}M) exhibited cytotoxicity to KB cancer cells by decreasing MTT reduction to 83% and 52% of control after 24-h of exposure. Sanguinarine also inhibited the colony forming capacity (> 52-58%) and growth of KB cancer cells at concentrations higher than 0.5-1 {mu}M. Short-term exposure to sanguinarine (> 0.5 {mu}M) effectively suppressed the adhesion of KB cells to collagen and fibronectin (FN). Sanguinarine (2 and 3 {mu}M) induced evident apoptosis as indicated by an increase in sub-G0/G1 populations, which was detected after 6-h of exposure. Only a slight increase in cells arresting in S-phase and G2/M was noted. Induction of KB cell apoptosis and necrosis by sanguinarine (2 and 3 {mu}M) was further confirmed by Annexin V-PI dual staining flow cytometry and the presence of DNA fragmentation. The cytotoxicity by sanguinarine was accompanied by an increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential as indicated by single cell flow cytometric analysis of DCF and rhodamine fluorescence. NAC (1 and 3 mM) and catalase (2000 U/ml) prevented the sanguinarine-induced ROS production and cytotoxicity, whereas dimethylthiourea (DMT) showed no marked preventive effect. These results suggest that sanguinarine has anticarcinogenic properties with induction of ROS production and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, which mediate cancer cell death.

  9. Complex oscillatory redox dynamics with signaling potential at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Kembro, Jackelyn M.; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The time-keeping properties bestowed by oscillatory behavior on functional rhythms represent an evolutionarily conserved trait in living systems. Mitochondrial networks function as timekeepers maximizing energetic output while tuning reactive oxygen species (ROS) within physiological levels compatible with signaling. In this work, we explore the potential for timekeeping functions dependent on mitochondrial dynamics with the validated two-compartment mitochondrial energetic-redox (ME-R) computational model, that takes into account (a) four main redox couples [NADH, NADPH, GSH, Trx(SH)2], (b) scavenging systems (glutathione, thioredoxin, SOD, catalase) distributed in matrix and extra-matrix compartments, and (c) transport of ROS species between them. Herein, we describe that the ME-R model can exhibit highly complex oscillatory dynamics in energetic/redox variables and ROS species, consisting of at least five frequencies with modulated amplitudes and period according to power spectral analysis. By stability analysis we describe that the extent of steady state—as against complex oscillatory behavior—was dependent upon the abundance of Mn and Cu, Zn SODs, and their interplay with ROS production in the respiratory chain. Large parametric regions corresponding to oscillatory dynamics of increasingly complex waveforms were obtained at low Cu, Zn SOD concentration as a function of Mn SOD. This oscillatory domain was greatly reduced at higher levels of Cu, Zn SOD. Interestingly, the realm of complex oscillations was located at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial energetic behavior, and was characterized by oxidative stress. We conclude that complex oscillatory dynamics could represent a frequency- and amplitude-modulated H2O2 signaling mechanism that arises under intense oxidative stress. By modulating SOD, cells could have evolved an adaptive compromise between relative constancy and the flexibility required under stressful redox

  10. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu JM; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells. PMID:25470234

  11. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells.

  12. Deficiency in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway reveals the toxic potential of autophagy under ER stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Shane; Saveljeva, Svetlana; Logue, Susan E; Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Gupta, Sanjeev; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bertrand, Mathieu J M; Samali, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cell death is normally associated with activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is characterized by CYCS (cytochrome c, somatic) release, apoptosome formation, and caspase activation, resulting in cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that under conditions of ER stress cells devoid of CASP9/caspase-9 or BAX and BAK1, and therefore defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, still undergo a delayed form of cell death associated with the activation of caspases, therefore revealing the existence of an alternative stress-induced caspase activation pathway. We identified CASP8/caspase-8 as the apical protease in this caspase cascade, and found that knockdown of either of the key autophagic genes, ATG5 or ATG7, impacted on CASP8 activation and cell death induction, highlighting the crucial role of autophagy in the activation of this novel ER stress-induced death pathway. In line with this, we identified a protein complex composed of ATG5, FADD, and pro-CASP8 whose assembly coincides with caspase activation and cell death induction. Together, our results reveal the toxic potential of autophagy in cells undergoing ER stress that are defective in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and suggest a model in which the autophagosome functions as a platform facilitating pro-CASP8 activation. Chemoresistance, a common problem in the treatment of cancer, is frequently caused by the downregulation of key mitochondrial death effector proteins. Alternate stress-induced apoptotic pathways, such as the one described here, may become of particular relevance for tackling the problem of chemoresistance in cancer cells. PMID:25470234

  13. Antihepatocellular Carcinoma Potential of Tetramethylpyrazine Induces Cell Cycle Modulation and Mitochondrial-Dependent Apoptosis: Regulation of p53 Signaling Pathway in HepG2 Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lei; Yan, Xiaojing; Chen, Weiping; Gao, Jing; Qian, Lei; Qiu, Shuang

    2016-06-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) was originally isolated from a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Ligusticum chuanxiong In the present study, TMP exhibits potent antitumor activities in vitro. However, the molecular mechanisms remain to be defined. Hence, this study aims to investigate the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of TMP on HepG2 and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Analyses using Cell Counting Kit-8 and real-time cell analyzer indicated that TMP significantly inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation. We also observed that TMP induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint and apoptosis, using flow cytometry and high-content screening. Furthermore, our results predicted that TMP could directly decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), increase the release of cytochrome c, and increase caspase activation, indicating that mitochondrial pathway apoptosis could be the mechanism for TMP within HepG2 cells. Moreover, TMP altered expression of p53 and the Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio, which revealed that TMP induced cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis in HepG2 cells in vitro. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the antitumor properties of TMP, which may be explored as a potential option for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27179035

  14. Polymeric membrane systems of potential use for battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    Two membrane systems were investigated that may have potential use as alkaline battery separators. One system comprises two miscible polymers: a support polymer (e.g., polyvinyl formal) and an ion conductor such as polyacrylic acid. The other system involves a film composed of two immiscible polymers: a conducting polymer (e.g., calcium polyacrylate) suspended in an inert polymer support matrix, polyphenylene oxide. Resistivities in 45-percent potassium hydroxide and qualitative mechanical properties are presented for films comprising various proportions of conducting and support polymers. In terms of these parameters, the results are encouraging for optimum ratios of conducting to support polymers.

  15. Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for living cell membrane potential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Namuna

    Recently, the existence of multiple micro-domains of extracellular potential around individual cells have been revealed by voltage reporter dye using fluorescence microscopy. One hypothesis is that these long lasting potential patterns play a vital role in regulating important cell activities such as embryonic patterning, regenerative repair and reduction of cancerous disorganization. We used multifunctional Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (SICM) to study these extracellular potential patterns of single cell with higher spatial resolution. To validate this novel technique, we compared the extracellular potential distribution on the fixed HeLa cell surface and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface and found significant difference. We then measured the extracellular potential distributions of living melanocytes and melanoma cells and found both the mean magnitude and spatial variation of extracellular potential of the melanoma cells are bigger than those of melanocytes. As compared to the voltage reporter dye based fluorescence microscope method, SICM can achieve quantitative potential measurements of non-labeled living cell membranes with higher spatial resolution.

  16. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.; Groth, Jesper S.; Helix-Nielsen, Claus

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We have established a vesicle fusion efficacy assay based on the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA). {yields} Maximal fusion obtained was almost 150,000 porin insertions during 20 min. {yields} Incorporation can be either first order or exponential kinetics which has implications for establishing protein delivery to biomimetic membranes. -- Abstract: Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR) = 50 more than 10{sup 5} FomA proteins could be incorporated in a bilayer array with a total membrane area of 2 mm{sup 2} within 20 min. This novel assay for quantifying protein delivery into lipid bilayers may be a useful tool in developing biomimetic membrane applications.

  17. Estimation of time-dependent input from neuronal membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Shinomoto, Shigeru; Lansky, Petr

    2011-12-01

    The set of firing rates of the presynaptic excitatory and inhibitory neurons constitutes the input signal to the postsynaptic neuron. Estimation of the time-varying input rates from intracellularly recorded membrane potential is investigated here. For that purpose, the membrane potential dynamics must be specified. We consider the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process, one of the most common single-neuron models, with time-dependent mean and variance. Assuming the slow variation of these two moments, it is possible to formulate the estimation problem by using a state-space model. We develop an algorithm that estimates the paths of the mean and variance of the input current by using the empirical Bayes approach. Then the input firing rates are directly available from the moments. The proposed method is applied to three simulated data examples: constant signal, sinusoidally modulated signal, and constant signal with a jump. For the constant signal, the estimation performance of the method is comparable to that of the traditionally applied maximum likelihood method. Further, the proposed method accurately estimates both continuous and discontinuous time-variable signals. In the case of the signal with a jump, which does not satisfy the assumption of slow variability, the robustness of the method is verified. It can be concluded that the method provides reliable estimates of the total input firing rates, which are not experimentally measurable. PMID:21919789

  18. High mitochondrial redox potential may promote induction and activation of UCP2 in hepatocytes during hepatothermic therapy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F

    2005-01-01

    Although uncoupling protein-1 is a key mediator of thermogenesis in activated brown fat, the more recently characterized uncoupling proteins-2 and -3 do not appear to influence basal metabolism, but rather may function to diminish excessive mitochondrial superoxide production when mitochondrial redox potential is high. Under these circumstances, superoxide within the mitochondrial matrix directly activates uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), and may also promote induction of this protein. Normal healthy hepatocytes do not express UCP2, but this protein is induced in hepatocytes that are steatotic or that are treated with agents that boost superoxide production. It is proposed that induction and activation of UCP2 may play a role in the thermogenesis evoked by hepatothermic therapy, a strategy designed to decrease body fat by maximizing hepatic fatty acid oxidation. Under these conditions, high mitochondrial redox potential would be expected, and induction of UCP2's uncoupling activity would represent a homeostatically appropriate antioxidant response. PMID:15823721

  19. The relation between membrane potential, membrane currents and activation of contraction in ventricular myocardial fibres

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, G. W.; Reuter, H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Membrane currents and contractile responses have been measured in ventricular myocardial preparations under voltage clamp conditions. 2. In Tyrode solution, steady-state contraction was obtained only after 5-8 depolarizations to a given potential level. The threshold of steady-state tension was identical to the potential where the calcium inward current, ICa, was activated (about -35 mV). Both thresholds were shifted in the same direction along the voltage axis and by the same amount by changing [Ca]o or [Na]o. Maximum tension was obtained at inside positive potentials. 3. The time courses of steady-state tension and of activation of ICa were different by more than one order of magnitude in Tyrode solution. But in order to achieve any appreciable steady-state tension, ICa had to flow during several identical depolarizations. Tension decreased again at potentials above ECa. This suggests that calcium inward current must flow in order to fill intracellular calcium stores from which calcium can be released by an unknown mechanism. 4. The ability of a fibre bundle to contract again after a preceding twitch is greatly dependent on the membrane potential between two equal depolarizations. In Tyrode solutions with 1·8 and 7·2 mM-CaCl2 half restoration of this ability occurred at -45 ± 3 mV (± S.E. of mean) and -23 ± 4 mV, respectively. 5. In sodium-free bathing solutions, steady-state tension was attained upon the first depolarization provided ICa was activated. Furthermore, at different potentials, the time courses of activation of tension and of activation of ICa were identical, i.e. tension reached its maximum when ICa was fully activated. This suggests that in sodium-free solutions the flow of calcium ions into the fibre directly activates contraction. PMID:5503873

  20. Fouling mitigation of anion exchange membrane by zeta potential control.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Soo; Lee, Hong-Joo; Choi, Seok-Ju; Geckeler, Kurt E; Cho, Jaeweon; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2003-03-15

    The feasibility of fouling mitigation of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in the presence of humate was studied by adding three different types of water-soluble polymers, i.e., poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), during electrodialysis (ED) desalination. Measurement of zeta potential of the humate used in this study showed highly negative potential (about -30 mV), implying that the humate had a strong fouling potential on the AEMs in ED. Of the three water-soluble polymers, PEI showed a positive zeta potential (about +14 mV) and is able to form an interpolymer complex with the humate. PAA and PVA hardly formed interpolymer complexes with humate due to electrostatic repulsion. The PEI-humate mixture with a volume ratio of 1:20 (PEI:humate) showed zero zeta potential, and a complexed humate with zero surface charge was formed, resulting in no fouling effects on the AEMs. Accordingly, the desalting ED experiments with PEI showed improved ED performance. Further, black colloids formed in the mixture did not cause the cell resistance to increase. PMID:16256509

  1. Fouling mitigation of anion exchange membrane by zeta potential control.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Soo; Lee, Hong-Joo; Choi, Seok-Ju; Geckeler, Kurt E; Cho, Jaeweon; Moon, Seung-Hyeon

    2003-03-15

    The feasibility of fouling mitigation of anion exchange membranes (AEMs) in the presence of humate was studied by adding three different types of water-soluble polymers, i.e., poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), during electrodialysis (ED) desalination. Measurement of zeta potential of the humate used in this study showed highly negative potential (about -30 mV), implying that the humate had a strong fouling potential on the AEMs in ED. Of the three water-soluble polymers, PEI showed a positive zeta potential (about +14 mV) and is able to form an interpolymer complex with the humate. PAA and PVA hardly formed interpolymer complexes with humate due to electrostatic repulsion. The PEI-humate mixture with a volume ratio of 1:20 (PEI:humate) showed zero zeta potential, and a complexed humate with zero surface charge was formed, resulting in no fouling effects on the AEMs. Accordingly, the desalting ED experiments with PEI showed improved ED performance. Further, black colloids formed in the mixture did not cause the cell resistance to increase.

  2. BDE-154 induces mitochondrial permeability transition and impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lílian Cristina; Miranda, Luiz Felippe Cabral; de Souza, Alecsandra Oliveira; Dorta, Daniel Junqueira

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants are used in various consumer goods to make these materials difficult to burn. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), which are representative of this class of retardants, consist of two benzene rings linked by an oxygen atom, and contain between 1 and 10 bromine atoms in their chemical structure, with the possibility of up to 209 different congeners. Among these congeners, BDE-154 (hexa-BDE) is persistent in the environment and easy to detect in the biota, but no apparent information regarding the mechanism underlying action and toxicity is available. Mitochondria, as the main energy-producing organelles, play an important role in the maintenance of various cellular functions. Therefore, mitochondria were used in the present study as an experimental model to determine the effects of BDE-154 congener at concentrations ranging from 0.1 μM to 50 μM. Our results demonstrated that BDE-154 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane, preferably by inserting into the hydrophobic core of the mitochondrial membrane, which partially inhibits respiration, dissipates Δψ, and permeabilizes the inner mitochondrial membrane to deplete ATP. These effects are more pronounced at concentrations equal to or higher than 10 μM. Results also showed that BDE-154 did not induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation within the mitochondria, indicating the absence of oxidative stress. Therefore, BDE-154 impairs mitochondrial bioenergetics and permeabilizes the mitochondrial membrane, potentially leading to cell death but not via mechanisms involving oxidative stress. PMID:24555644

  3. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Sunakawa, Hajime; Aniya, Yoko

    2008-10-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore.

  4. Effect of staining and sorting on boar sperm membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and in vitro blastocyst development.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, M; De Ambrogi, M; Volpe, S; Galeati, G; Tamanini, C; Seren, E

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of staining with Hoechst 33342 and of the entire sorting procedure on boar sperm membrane integrity (using Annexin-V/PI), mitochondrial activity (using JC-1/SYBR/PI) and blastocyst development in vitro; the effect of storage at 17 degrees C for 24h prior to Hoechst staining and sorting was also investigated. The Hoechst staining and the whole sorting procedure reduced the percent of live spermatozoa in both fresh (day 0) and stored (day 1) semen, as determined by both assays; nevertheless, there was no increase in live sperm cells showing signs of early damage (Annexin-V positive, propidium negative), whose percentages remained nearly zero. The majority of Annexin-V positive cells were propidium positive, therefore dead. JC-1 staining evidenced a correlation between mitochondrial activity and viability. However, a significant difference between viable sperm cells and sperm cells with active mitochondria was detected in control and stained sperm, whereas almost all viable sorted spermatozoa had active mitochondria. No significant differences in the in vitro produced blastocysts both on day 0 and 1 were observed. In conclusion, despite the damages induced by sorting procedures, semen sorted as fresh or after storage at 17 degrees C can be successfully used for in vitro production of pig embryos. PMID:15935852

  5. Megaconial muscular dystrophy caused by mitochondrial membrane homeostasis defect, new insights from skeletal and heart muscle analyses.

    PubMed

    Vanlander, Arnaud V; Muiño Mosquera, Laura; Panzer, Joseph; Deconinck, Tine; Smet, Joél; Seneca, Sara; Van Dorpe, Jo; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; De Jonghe, Peter; Van Coster, Rudy; Baets, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy is a disease caused by pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding choline kinase beta (CHKB). Microscopically, the disease is hallmarked by the presence of enlarged mitochondria at the periphery of skeletal muscle fibres leaving the centre devoid of mitochondria. Clinical characteristics are delayed motor development, intellectual disability and dilated cardiomyopathy in half of reported cases. This study describes a patient presenting with the cardinal clinical features, in whom a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.248_249insT; p.Arg84Profs*209) was identified in CHKB and who was treated by heart transplantation. Microscopic evaluation of skeletal and heart muscles typically showed enlarged mitochondria. Spectrophotometric evaluation in both tissues revealed a mild decrease of all OXPHOS complexes. Using BN-PAGE analysis followed by activity staining subcomplexes of complex V were detected in both tissues, indicating incomplete complex V assembly. Mitochondrial DNA content was not depleted in analysed tissues. This is the first report describing the microscopic and biochemical abnormalities in the heart from an affected patient. A likely hypothesis is that the biochemical findings are caused by an abnormal lipid profile in the inner mitochondrial membrane resulting from a defective choline kinase B activity. PMID:26855408

  6. Megaconial muscular dystrophy caused by mitochondrial membrane homeostasis defect, new insights from skeletal and heart muscle analyses.

    PubMed

    Vanlander, Arnaud V; Muiño Mosquera, Laura; Panzer, Joseph; Deconinck, Tine; Smet, Joél; Seneca, Sara; Van Dorpe, Jo; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; De Jonghe, Peter; Van Coster, Rudy; Baets, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy is a disease caused by pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding choline kinase beta (CHKB). Microscopically, the disease is hallmarked by the presence of enlarged mitochondria at the periphery of skeletal muscle fibres leaving the centre devoid of mitochondria. Clinical characteristics are delayed motor development, intellectual disability and dilated cardiomyopathy in half of reported cases. This study describes a patient presenting with the cardinal clinical features, in whom a homozygous nonsense mutation (c.248_249insT; p.Arg84Profs*209) was identified in CHKB and who was treated by heart transplantation. Microscopic evaluation of skeletal and heart muscles typically showed enlarged mitochondria. Spectrophotometric evaluation in both tissues revealed a mild decrease of all OXPHOS complexes. Using BN-PAGE analysis followed by activity staining subcomplexes of complex V were detected in both tissues, indicating incomplete complex V assembly. Mitochondrial DNA content was not depleted in analysed tissues. This is the first report describing the microscopic and biochemical abnormalities in the heart from an affected patient. A likely hypothesis is that the biochemical findings are caused by an abnormal lipid profile in the inner mitochondrial membrane resulting from a defective choline kinase B activity.

  7. IκΒα inhibits apoptosis at the outer mitochondrial membrane independently of NF-κB retention

    PubMed Central

    Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Mahul-Mellier, Anne-Laure; Datler, Christoph; Chaisaklert, Wanwisa; Hwang, Ming-Shih; Kroon, Jan; Qize, Ding; Osborne, Foy; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah; Al-Ali, Amein; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Aboagye, Eric O; Grimm, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    IκBα resides in the cytosol where it retains the inducible transcription factor NF-κB. We show that IκBα also localises to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) to inhibit apoptosis. This effect is especially pronounced in tumour cells with constitutively active NF-κB that accumulate high amounts of mitochondrial IκBα as a NF-κB target gene. 3T3 IκBα−/− cells also become protected from apoptosis when IκBα is specifically reconstituted at the OMM. Using various IκBα mutants, we demonstrate that apoptosis inhibition and NF-κB inhibition can be functionally and structurally separated. At mitochondria, IκBα stabilises the complex of VDAC1 and hexokinase II (HKII), thereby preventing Bax recruitment to VDAC1 and the release of cytochrome c for apoptosis induction. When IκBα is reduced in tumour cells with constitutively active NF-κB, they show an enhanced response to anticancer treatment in an in vivo xenograft tumour model. Our results reveal the unexpected activity of IκBα in guarding the integrity of the OMM against apoptosis induction and open possibilities for more specific interference in tumours with deregulated NF-κB. PMID:25361605

  8. In vitro synthesis and integration into mitochondria of porin, a major protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mihara, K; Blobel, G; Sato, R

    1982-12-01

    We have isolated an outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) fraction from baker's yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that possesses porin activity and contains a major polypeptide of 29,000 daltons. By analogy to similar data for an OMM fraction from rat liver and mung bean [Zalman, L. S., Nikaido, N. & Kagawa, Y. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 1771-1774], the 29,000-dalton polypeptide of the isolated yeast OMM fraction has been tentatively identified as porin. Evidence to substantiate this identification was provided by the finding that both the porin activity and the 29,000-dalton polypeptide were entirely resistant when the OMM fraction was exposed to trypsin digestion, with the 29,000-dalton polypeptide being virtually the only polypeptide in the OMM fraction to be unaffected by trypsin digestion. There was no protection when trypsin digestion was carried out in the presence of detergent. Using monospecific antibodies, we have shown that yeast porin is apparently not synthesized as a larger precursor in a cell-free translation system. In vitro-synthesized porin could not be integrated into dog pancreas microsomal vesicles or into an isolated OMM fraction from yeast, either co- or posttranslationally. In vitro-synthesized porin, however, could be integrated posttranslationally into whole isolated mitochondria. This membrane specificity suggests that integration does not proceed by unassisted partitioning. The integration of porin into whole mitochondria occurred with fidelity by the criterion of its resistance to trypsin. Moreover, integration was not inhibited in the presence of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl-hydrazone whereas translocation into the mitochondrial matrix of the in vitro-synthesized gamma subunit of F1-ATPase was inhibited.

  9. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease. PMID:27161368

  10. Ornithine and Homocitrulline Impair Mitochondrial Function, Decrease Antioxidant Defenses and Induce Cell Death in Menadione-Stressed Rat Cortical Astrocytes: Potential Mechanisms of Neurological Dysfunction in HHH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Rodrigues, Marília Danyelle Nunes; Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Souza, Débora Guerini; Quincozes-Santos, André; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-09-01

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is caused by deficiency of ornithine translocase leading to predominant tissue accumulation and high urinary excretion of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Although affected patients commonly present neurological dysfunction manifested by cognitive deficit, spastic paraplegia, pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, stroke-like episodes, hypotonia and ataxia, its pathogenesis is still poorly known. Although astrocytes are necessary for neuronal protection. Therefore, in the present study we investigated the effects of Orn and Hcit on cell viability (propidium iodide incorporation), mitochondrial function (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide-MTT-reduction and mitochondrial membrane potential-ΔΨm), antioxidant defenses (GSH) and pro-inflammatory response (NFkB, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in unstimulated and menadione-stressed cortical astrocytes that were previously shown to be susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. We first observed that Orn decreased MTT reduction, whereas both amino acids decreased GSH levels, without altering cell viability and the pro-inflammatory factors in unstimulated astrocytes. Furthermore, Orn and Hcit decreased cell viability and ΔΨm in menadione-treated astrocytes. The present data indicate that the major compounds accumulating in HHH syndrome impair mitochondrial function and reduce cell viability and the antioxidant defenses in cultured astrocytes especially when stressed by menadione. It is presumed that these mechanisms may be involved in the neuropathology of this disease.

  11. Properties of the mitochondrial membrane and carnitine palmitoyltransferase in the periportal and the perivenous zone of the liver. Effects of chronic ethanol feeding.

    PubMed

    Castro, J; Cortés, J P; Guzmán, M

    1991-06-15

    Rats were fed for 35 days a high-fat diet containing either 36% of total calories as ethanol (ethanol group) or an isocaloric amount of carbohydrate (control group). Then, mitochondria were isolated from the periportal and the perivenous zone of the liver in order to study the acinar heterogeneity of the effects of prolonged ethanol administration upon the properties of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) and its membrane environment. Chronic ethanol ingestion selectively decreased CPT-I activity in periportal hepatocytes but equally increased enzyme sensitivity to malonyl-CoA and enzyme energy of activation in the two zones of the liver. In control animals, mitochondrial membrane showed higher fluidity and lower degree of saturation of phospholipid fatty acyl moieties in periportal than in perivenous hepatocytes. Prolonged ethanol feeding (i) decreased mitochondrial membrane fluidity; (ii) increased the proportion of palmitic acid and decreased that of arachidonic acid in mitochondrial phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, whereas it drastically reduced the content of linoleic acid and concomitantly increased that of saturated and monoenoic fatty acids in cardiolipin; (iii) suppressed the disordering effects of the addition of ethanol to mitochondrial suspensions. All these ethanol-induced alterations of membrane fluidity and fatty acyl composition were not significantly different between periportal and perivenous mitochondria. In conclusion, chronic ethanol feeding changes the activity of CPT-I in a zone-selective manner but modifies both the regulatory properties of the enzyme and the properties of its lipid environment in a non-zone-selective manner. Hence factors in addition to the properties of the mitochondrial membrane seem to be involved in the ethanol-induced alterations of the CPT-I enzyme.

  12. Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: altered mitochondria membrane potential and defective respiration in Pank2 knock-out mouse model.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Morbin, Michela; Uggetti, Andrea; Moda, Fabio; D'Amato, Ilaria; Giordano, Carla; d'Amati, Giulia; Cozzi, Anna; Levi, Sonia; Hayflick, Susan; Tiranti, Valeria

    2012-12-15

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by high brain content of iron and presence of axonal spheroids. Mutations in the PANK2 gene, which encodes pantothenate kinase 2, underlie an autosomal recessive inborn error of coenzyme A metabolism, called pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN). PKAN is characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity and pigmentary retinal degeneration. The pathogenesis of this disorder is poorly understood and, although PANK2 is a mitochondrial protein, perturbations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have not been reported. A knock-out (KO) mouse model of PKAN exhibits retinal degeneration and azoospermia, but lacks any neurological phenotype. The absence of a clinical phenotype has partially been explained by the different cellular localization of the human and murine PANK2 proteins. Here we demonstrate that the mouse Pank2 protein localizes to mitochondria, similar to its human orthologue. Moreover, we show that Pank2-defective neurons derived from KO mice have an altered mitochondrial membrane potential, a defect further corroborated by the observations of swollen mitochondria at the ultra-structural level and by the presence of defective respiration.

  13. Mitochondrial protection and anti-aging activity of Astragalus polysaccharides and their potential mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-Tai; Zhang, Ya-Kui; Kuang, Hai-Xue; Jin, Feng-Xin; Liu, De-Wen; Gao, Ming-Bo; Liu, Ze; Xin, Xiao-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The current study was performed to investigate mitochondrial protection and anti-aging activity of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) and the potential underlying mechanism. Lipid peroxidation of liver and brain mitochondria was induced by Fe(2+)-Vit C in vitro. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) colorimetry was used to measure the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Mouse liver mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) was induced by calcium overload in vitro and spectrophotometry was used to measure it. The scavenging activities of APS on superoxide anion (O(2) (•-)) and hydroxyl radical (•OH), which were produced by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-N-Methylphenazonium methyl sulfate (PMS) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-Fe(2+) system respectively, were measured by 4-nitrobluetetrazolium chloride (NBT) reduction and Fenton reaction colorimetry respectively. The Na(2)S(2)O(3) titration method was used to measure the scavenging activities of APS on H(2)O(2). APS could inhibit TBARS production, protect mitochondria from PT, and scavenge O(2) (•-), •OH and H(2)O(2) significantly in a concentration-dependent manner respectively. The back of the neck of mice was injected subcutaneously with D-galactose to induce aging at a dose of 100 mg/kg/d for seven weeks. Moreover, the activities of catalase (CAT), surperoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and anti-hydroxyl radical which were assayed by using commercial monitoring kits were increased significantly in vivo by APS. According to this research, APS protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting mitochondrial PT and increasing the activities of antioxidases. Therefore, APS has the effect of promoting health. PMID:22408421

  14. Mitochondrial Protection and Anti-aging Activity of Astragalus Polysaccharides and Their Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xing-Tai; Zhang, Ya-Kui; Kuang, Hai-Xue; Jin, Feng-Xin; Liu, De-Wen; Gao, Ming-Bo; Liu, Ze; Xin, Xiao-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The current study was performed to investigate mitochondrial protection and anti-aging activity of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) and the potential underlying mechanism. Lipid peroxidation of liver and brain mitochondria was induced by Fe2+–Vit C in vitro. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) colorimetry was used to measure the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Mouse liver mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) was induced by calcium overload in vitro and spectrophotometry was used to measure it. The scavenging activities of APS on superoxide anion (O2•−) and hydroxyl radical (•OH), which were produced by reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)—N-Methylphenazonium methyl sulfate (PMS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)–Fe2+ system respectively, were measured by 4-nitrobluetetrazolium chloride (NBT) reduction and Fenton reaction colorimetry respectively. The Na2S2O3 titration method was used to measure the scavenging activities of APS on H2O2. APS could inhibit TBARS production, protect mitochondria from PT, and scavenge O2•−, •OH and H2O2 significantly in a concentration-dependent manner respectively. The back of the neck of mice was injected subcutaneously with D-galactose to induce aging at a dose of 100 mg/kg/d for seven weeks. Moreover, the activities of catalase (CAT), surperoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and anti-hydroxyl radical which were assayed by using commercial monitoring kits were increased significantly in vivo by APS. According to this research, APS protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting mitochondrial PT and increasing the activities of antioxidases. Therefore, APS has the effect of promoting health. PMID:22408421

  15. Mitochondrial stress: balancing friend and foe.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf; Schulze, Ekkehard

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondria are vital organelles of the aerobic eukaryotic cell. Their dysfunction associates with aging and widespread age-related diseases. To sustain mitochondrial integrity, the cell executes a distinct set of stress-induced protective responses. The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) is a response of the cell to mitochondrial damage. The transcription factor ATFS-1 triggers UPR(mt) effector gene expression in the nucleus. The selective exclusion of ATFS-1 from mitochondrial import by stress-induced alterations of the mitochondrial membrane potential is currently discussed as key activation mechanism. Surprisingly, UPR(mt) activation often coincides with a lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans and the same has recently been reported for mammalian cells. This review summarizes the current model of the UPR(mt), its inducers, and its crosstalk with other cellular stress responses. It focuses on the role of mitochondrial function as a regulator of aging and longevity.

  16. CCN6 regulates mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Patra, Milan; Mahata, Sushil K; Padhan, Deepesh K; Sen, Malini

    2016-07-15

    Despite established links of CCN6, or Wnt induced signaling protein-3 (WISP3), with progressive pseudo rheumatoid dysplasia, functional characterization of CCN6 remains incomplete. In light of the documented negative correlation between accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and CCN6 expression, we investigated whether CCN6 regulates ROS accumulation through its influence on mitochondrial function. We found that CCN6 localizes to mitochondria, and depletion of CCN6 in the chondrocyte cell line C-28/I2 by using siRNA results in altered mitochondrial electron transport and respiration. Enhanced electron transport chain (ETC) activity of CCN6-depleted cells was reflected by increased mitochondrial ROS levels in association with augmented mitochondrial ATP synthesis, mitochondrial membrane potential and Ca(2+) Additionally, CCN6-depleted cells display ROS-dependent PGC1α (also known as PPARGC1A) induction, which correlates with increased mitochondrial mass and volume density, together with altered mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, transcription factor Nrf2 (also known as NFE2L2) repressed CCN6 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that CCN6 acts as a molecular brake, which is appropriately balanced by Nrf2, in regulating mitochondrial function. PMID:27252383

  17. Cytochrome c impaled: investigation of the extended lipid anchorage of a soluble protein to mitochondrial membrane models.

    PubMed

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Wallace, Carmichael J A

    2007-10-15

    Cyt c (cytochrome c) has been traditionally envisioned as rapidly diffusing in two dimensions at the surface of the mitochondrial inner membrane when not engaged in redox reactions with physiological partners. However, the discovery of the extended lipid anchorage (insertion of an acyl chain of a bilayer phospholipid into the protein interior) suggests that this may not be exclusively the case. The physical and structural factors underlying the conformational changes that occur upon interaction of ferrous cyt c with phospholipid membrane models have been investigated by monitoring the extent of the spin state change that result from this interaction. Once transiently linked by electrostatic forces between basic side chains and phosphate groups, the acyl chain entry may occur between two parallel hydrophobic polypeptide stretches that are surrounded by positively charged residues. Alteration of these charges, as in the case of non-trimethylated (TML72K) yeast cyt c and Arg91Nle horse cyt c (where Nle is norleucine), led to a decline in the binding affinity for the phospholipid liposomes. The electrostatic association was sensitive to ionic strength, polyanions and pH, whereas the hydrophobic interactions were enhanced by conformational changes that contributed to the loosening of the tertiary structure of cyt c. In addition to proposing a mechanistic model for the extended lipid anchorage of cyt c, we consider what, if any, might be the physiological relevance of the phenomenon. PMID:17614790

  18. Localization of the Carnation Italian ringspot virus replication protein p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by an internal targeting signal and the TOM complex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeen Ting; McCartney, Andrew W; Gidda, Satinder K; Mullen, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Background Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes massive structural alterations of mitochondria in infected host cells, the most conspicuous being the formation of numerous internal vesicles/spherules that are derived from the mitochondrial outer membrane and serve as the sites for viral RNA replication. While the membrane-bound components of the CIRV replication complex, including a 36-kD RNA-binding protein (p36), are known to be essential for these changes in mitochondrial morphology and are relatively well characterized in terms of their roles in nascent viral RNA synthesis, how these proteins are specifically targeted and inserted into mitochondria is poorly defined. Results Here we report on the molecular signal responsible for sorting p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Using a combination of gain-of-function assays with portions of p36 fused to reporter proteins and domain-swapping assays with p36 and another closely-related viral RNA-binding protein, p33, that sorts specifically to the peroxisomal boundary membrane, we show that the mitochondrial targeting information in p36 resides within its two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and intervening hydrophilic loop sequence. Comprehensive mutational analysis of these regions in p36 revealed that the primary targeting determinants are the moderate hydrophobicity of both TMDs and the positively-charged face of an amphipathic helix within the intervening loop sequence. We show also using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) that p36 interacts with certain components of the translocase complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM), but not with the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). Conclusion Our results provide insight to how viruses, such as CIRV, exploit specific host-cell protein sorting pathways to facilitate their replication. The characterization of the targeting and insertion of p36 into the mitochondrial outer membrane also sheds light on

  19. Antitumor triptycene analogs induce a rapid collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in HL-60 cells and isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Ward, Mary M; Lou, Kaiyan; Zhao, Huiping; Battina, Srinivas K; Wiredu, Bernard; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H

    2006-01-01

    Since synthetic analogs of triptycene (TT code number), such as bisquinones TT2 and TT13, can trigger cytochrome c release without caspase activation and retain their ability to induce apoptosis in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells, fluorescent probes of transmembrane potential have been used to determine whether these antitumor compounds might directly target mitochondria in cell and cell-free systems to cause the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential ( downward arrow Deltapsim) that is linked to permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. Using JC-1 dye, the abilities of various TT analogs to induce the downward arrow Deltapsim in wild-type and MDR HL-60 cells are rapid (within 5-20 min), irreversible after drug removal, concentration dependent in the 0.64-25 microM range, and generally related to their antitumor activities in vitro. The downward arrow Deltapsim caused by TT2 and TT13, which are more potent than mitoxantrone, staurosporine and the reference depolarizing agent, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), in HL-60 cells, are not prevented by caspase-2 or -8 inhibitors, suggesting that activation of these apical caspases upstream of mitochondria is not involved in this process. Antitumor TT analogs (0.64-25 microM) also mimic the abilities of the known depolarizing agents, CCCP, alamethicin, gramicidin A and 100 microM CaCl(2), to directly induce within 20 min the downward arrow Deltapsim in isolated mitochondria prepared from mouse liver and loaded with rhodamine 123 dye. The fact that 20 microM Ca(2+), which is insufficient to trigger depolarization on its own, is required to reveal the depolarizing effect of TT2 in isolated mitochondria suggests that antitumor TT analogs might interact with the PTP to alter its conformation and increase its Ca(2+) sensitivity. Indeed, such Ca(2+)-dependent downward arrowDeltapsim of isolated mitochondria treated with 25 microM TT2 or 100 microM Ca(2+) are blocked by ruthenium red. Daunorubicin

  20. Membrane fouling potentials and cellular properties of bacteria isolated from fouled membranes in a MBR treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, So; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Membrane fouling remains a major challenge for wider application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) to wastewater treatment. Membrane fouling is mainly caused by microorganisms and their excreted microbial products. For development of more effective control strategies, it is important to identify and characterize the microorganisms that are responsible for membrane fouling. In this study, 41 bacterial strains were isolated from fouled microfiltration membranes in a pilot-scale MBR treating real municipal wastewater, and their membrane fouling potentials were directly measured using bench-scale cross-flow membrane filtration systems (CFMFSs) and related to their cellular properties. It was found that the fouling potential was highly strain dependent, suggesting that bacterial identification at the strain level is essential to identify key fouling-causing bacteria (FCB). The FCB showed some common cellular properties. The most prominent feature of FCB was that they formed convex colonies having swollen podgy shape and smooth lustrous surfaces with high water, hydrophilic organic matter and carbohydrate content. However, general and rigid biofilm formation potential as determined by microtiter plates and cell surface properties (i.e., hydrophobicity and surface charge) did not correlate with the fouling potential in this study. These results suggest that the fouling potential should be directly evaluated under filtration conditions, and the colony water content could be a useful indicator to identify the FCB. PMID:27232989

  1. Triiodothyronine facilitates weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation by improved mitochondrial substrate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Files, Matthew D.; Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Des Rosiers, Christine; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-03-20

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a bridge to recovery after myocardial injury in infants and children, yet morbidity and mortality remain high. Weaning from the circuit requires adequate cardiac contractile function, which can be impaired by metabolic disturbances induced either by ischemia-reperfusion and / or by ECMO.

  2. Influence of low-power laser radiation on the activity of some membraneous and mitochondrial enzymes of hepatocytes in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Adamek, Mariusz; Sieron, Aleksander; Kaminski, Marcin

    1995-01-01

    It was observed in some experiments that visible laser radiation activates the enzymatic function of mitochondria, while infrared laser radiation affects the enzymatic activity of cellular membranes. The aim of the study was to estimate the activity of some membranous as well as mitochondrial enzymes of hepatocytes in rats irradiated with infrared laser. Experimental material consisted of 38 Wistar rats divided into 2 groups -- a studied group exposed to infrared laser radiation and a control group, in which no irradiation was made. A semiconductive infrared laser (wavelength -- 904 nm, mean power -- 8.9 mW) was used. The clean-shaven skin of the right infracostal region of animals was irradiated 5 minutes daily for 15 consecutive days. After finishing the experiment in the preparations from obtained segments of the left liver lobe, the enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, EC 1.3.99.1), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27), Mg2+ dependent ATP-ase (ATP-ase Mg2+, EC 3.1.3.2.) and acid phosphatase (AcP, EC 3.6.1.8.) was estimated with the use of histochemical methods. In the case of SDH and LDH the increase of enzymatic activity was observed in all 3 zones of liver cluster, especially in male rats. In the case of ATP-ase Mg2+ and AcP the increase of enzymatic activity in biliary canaliculi of hepatocytes in all zones of the liver cluster was observed. On the basis of the obtained results it was proved that infrared laser radiation activates significantly the enzymatic activity of most of the analyzed enzymes, which means that it affects not only properties of biological membranes but also activates the oxidoreductive processes of organism, as it has been observed for visible laser radiation. On the basis of the spectrum of energetic levels in macromolecules (Jablonski's diagram) the mechanisms of availed results are discussed both for enzymes possessing and not possessing chromatophores.

  3. Lysine residues at positions 234 and 236 in yeast porin are involved in its assembly into the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Smith, M D; Petrak, M; Boucher, P D; Barton, K N; Carter, L; Reddy, G; Blachly-Dyson, E; Forte, M; Price, J; Verner, K

    1995-11-24

    Various point mutations of lysyl residues in yeast mitochondrial porin (283 residues) were tested for their ability to assemble in vitro into the outer membranes of intact yeast mitochondria. Assembly was evaluated by protection from proteinases. The extent of assembly of two of the mutants, K234E and K236E porins, was much less than for wild-type in either post-translational or co-translational assembly assays. Lysine to glutamate mutants at other positions and K234R porin assembled as well as wild-type, but K234Q porin was poorly inserted. When both Lys-234 and Lys-236 were mutated, K234R/K236R porin was inserted better than K234Q/K236Q porin, which was inserted better than K234E/K236E; however, none of these mutants assembled as well as wild-type porin. It was concluded that optimal assembly of yeast porin depended on the presence of positively charged residues at both positions 234 and 236 and a lysine at one of these positions. After undergoing the assembly reaction, mutants that were vulnerable to proteinase K (i.e. K234E, K234Q, and K236E porins) seemed to be incompletely digested and were, to varying degrees, resistant to extraction by Na2CO3 (pH 11.5). These experiments suggested that these mutants were incompletely inserted into the outer membrane. Both Lys-234 and Lys-236 are included in an internal pentapeptide, VKAKV, that is conserved in porins from protists, plants, and animals, and it is possible that, at least, the lysines in this tract are one of the signals for the membrane assembly of these proteins.

  4. Electrogenic and nonelectrogenic ion fluxes across lipid and mitochondrial membranes mediated by monensin and monensin ethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Huczyński, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Monensin is a carrier of cations through lipid membranes capable of exchanging sodium (potassium) cations for protons by an electroneutral mechanism, whereas its ethyl ester derivative ethyl-monensin is supposed to transport sodium (potassium) cations in an electrogenic manner. To elucidate mechanistic details of the ionophoric activity, ion fluxes mediated by monensin and ethyl-monensin were measured on planar bilayer lipid membranes, liposomes, and mitochondria. In particular, generation of membrane potential on liposomes was studied via the measurements of rhodamine 6G uptake by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In mitochondria, swelling experiments were expounded by the additional measurements of respiration, membrane potential, and matrix pH. It can be concluded that both monensin and ethyl-monensin can perform nonelectrogenic exchange of potassium (sodium) ions for protons and serve as electrogenic potassium ion carriers similar to valinomycin. The results obtained are in line with the predictions based on the crystal structures of the monensin complexes with sodium ions and protons (Huczyński et al., Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1818 (2012) pp. 2108-2119). The functional activity observed for artificial membranes and mitochondria can be applied to explain the activity of ionophores in living systems. It can also be important for studying the antitumor activity of monensin.

  5. Quantum squeezed light for probing mitochondrial membranes and study of neuroprotectants.

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K.

    2005-01-01

    We report a new nanolaser technique for measuring characteristics of human mitochondria. Because mitochondria are so small, it has been difficult to study large populations using standard light microscope or flow cytometry techniques. We recently discovered a nano-optical transduction method for high-speed analysis of submicron organelles that is well suited to mitochondrial studies. This ultrasensitive detection technique uses nano-squeezing of light into photon modes imposed by the ultrasmall organelle dimensions in a semiconductor biocavity laser. In this paper, we use the method to study the lasing spectra of normal and diseased mitochondria. We find that the diseased mitochondria exhibit larger physical diameter and standard deviation. This morphological differences are also revealed in the lasing spectra. The diseased specimens have a larger spectral linewidth than the normal, and have more variability in their statistical distributions.

  6. Targeting of Neisserial PorB to the mitochondrial outer membrane: an insight on the evolution of β-barrel protein assembly machines.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Davies, John K; Lithgow, Trevor; Strugnell, Richard A; Gabriel, Kipros

    2011-11-01

    Mitochondria originated from Gram-negative bacteria through endosymbiosis. In modern day mitochondria, the Sorting and Assembly Machinery (SAM) is responsible for eukaryotic β-barrel protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane. The SAM is the functional equivalent of the β-barrel assembly machinery found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. In this study we examined the import pathway of a pathogenic bacterial protein, PorB, which is targeted from pathogenic Neisseria to the host mitochondria. We have developed a new method for measurement of PorB assembly into mitochondria that relies on the mobility shift exhibited by bacterial β-barrel proteins once folded and separated under semi-native electrophoretic conditions. We show that PorB is targeted to the outer mitochondrial membrane with a dependence on the intermembrane space shuttling chaperones and the core component of the SAM, Sam50, which is a functional homologue of BamA that is required for PorB assembly in bacteria. The peripheral subunits of the SAM, Sam35 and Sam37, which are essential for eukaryotic β-barrel protein assembly but do not have distinguishable functional homologues in bacteria, are not required for PorB assembly in eukaryotes. This shows that PorB uses an evolutionary conserved 'bacterial like' mechanism to infiltrate the host mitochondrial outer membrane. PMID:22032638

  7. Sequence homology and structural similarity between cytochrome b of mitochondrial complex III and the chloroplast b6-f complex: position of the cytochrome b hemes in the membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Widger, W R; Cramer, W A; Herrmann, R G; Trebst, A

    1984-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of cytochrome b of complex III from five different mitochondrial sources (human, bovine, mouse, yeast, and Aspergillus nidulans) and the chloroplast cytochrome b6 from spinach show a high degree of homology. Calculation of the distribution of hydrophobic residues with a "hydropathy" function that is conserved in this family of proteins implies that the membrane-folding pattern of the 42-kilodalton (kDa) mitochondrial cytochromes involves 8-9 membrane-spanning domains. The smaller 23-kDa chloroplast cytochrome appears to fold in five spanning domains that are similar to the first five of the mitochondria. Four highly conserved histidines are considered to be the likely ligands for the two hemes. The positions of the histidines along the spanning segments and in a cross section of the membrane-spanning alpha helices implies that two ligand pairs, His-82-His-197/198 and His-96-His-183, bridge the spanning peptides II and V, and the two hemes reside on opposite sides of the hydrophobic membrane core. In addition, the 17-kDa protein of the chloroplast b6-f complex appears to contain one or more of the functions of the COOH-terminal end of the mitochondrial cytochrome b polypeptide. PMID:6322162

  8. Iron-sulfur protein in mitochondrial complexes of Spodoptera litura as potential site for ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangde; Dong, Xiaolin; Shu, Benshui; Wang, Zheng; Hu, Qiongbo; Zhong, Guohua

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, but the exact site of superoxide generation or their relative contribution is not clear. This study aims to determine the function of iron-sulfur clusters (ISCU) in the initiation of ROS generation. ISCU2 and ISCU8 were cloned from Spodoptera litura which shared the conserved amino acid sequence with other insects. The expressions of the two genes were ubiquitous throughout the whole development stages and tissues. Knockdown of ISCU2 and ISCU8 resulted in the decline of the ROS, whereas rotenone and azadirachtin treatment up-regulated ROS levels by increasing mRNA expression. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme activity of SOD and POD were up-regulated by rotenone and azadirachtin treatment and then declined after ISCU was silenced. Our results suggest the possibility that the molecules of ISCU2 and ISCU8 in complex I may serve as potential sites in the initiation of ROS generation.

  9. Nonclinical and pharmacokinetic assessments to evaluate the potential of tedizolid and linezolid to affect mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Shawn; McKee, Edward E; Das, Debaditya; Tulkens, Paul M; Hosako, Hiromi; Fiedler-Kelly, Jill; Passarell, Julie; Radovsky, Ann; Prokocimer, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged treatment with the oxazolidinone linezolid is associated with myelosuppression, lactic acidosis, and neuropathies, toxicities likely caused by impairment of mitochondrial protein synthesis (MPS). To evaluate the potential of the novel oxazolidinone tedizolid to cause similar side effects, nonclinical and pharmacokinetic assessments were conducted. In isolated rat heart mitochondria, tedizolid inhibited MPS more potently than did linezolid (average [± standard error of the mean] 50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] for MPS of 0.31 ± 0.02 μM versus 6.4 ± 1.2 μM). However, a rigorous 9-month rat study comparing placebo and high-dose tedizolid (resulting in steady-state area under the plasma concentration-time curve values about 8-fold greater than those with the standard therapeutic dose in humans) showed no evidence of neuropathy. Additional studies explored why prolonged, high-dose tedizolid did not cause these mitochondriopathic side effects despite potent MPS inhibition by tedizolid. Murine macrophage (J774) cell fractionation studies found no evidence of a stable association of tedizolid with eukaryotic mitochondria. Monte Carlo simulations based on population pharmacokinetic models showed that over the course of a dosing interval using standard therapeutic doses, free plasma concentrations fell below the respective MPS IC50 in 84% of tedizolid-treated patients (for a median duration of 7.94 h) and 38% of linezolid-treated patients (for a median duration of 0 h). Therapeutic doses of tedizolid, but not linezolid, may therefore allow for mitochondrial recovery during antibacterial therapy. The overall results suggest that tedizolid has less potential to cause myelosuppression and neuropathy than that of linezolid during prolonged treatment courses. This, however, remains a hypothesis that must be confirmed in clinical studies. PMID:25331703

  10. TIMMDC1/C3orf1 Functions as a Membrane-Embedded Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly Factor through Association with the MCIA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Guarani, Virginia; Paulo, Joao; Zhai, Bo; Huttlin, Edward L.; Gygi, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Complex I (CI) of the electron transport chain, a large membrane-embedded NADH dehydrogenase, couples electron transfer to the release of protons into the mitochondrial inner membrane space to promote ATP production through ATP synthase. In addition to being a central conduit for ATP production, CI activity has been linked to neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. CI is built in a stepwise fashion through the actions of several assembly factors. We employed interaction proteomics to interrogate the molecular associations of 15 core subunits and assembly factors previously linked to human CI deficiency, resulting in a network of 101 proteins and 335 interactions (edges). TIMMDC1, a predicted 4-pass membrane protein, reciprocally associated with multiple members of the MCIA CI assembly factor complex and core CI subunits and was localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane, and its depletion resulted in reduced CI activity and cellular respiration. Quantitative proteomics demonstrated a role for TIMMDC1 in assembly of membrane-embedded and soluble arms of the complex. This study defines a new membrane-embedded CI assembly factor and provides a resource for further analysis of CI biology. PMID:24344204

  11. Dissipation of the membrane potential in susceptible corn mitochondria by the toxin of Helminthosporium maydis, race T, and toxin analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, M.J.; Sze, H.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have tested directly the effect of Helminthosporium maydis T (Hmt) toxin and various analogs on the membrane potential formed in mitochondria isolated from a Texas (T) cytoplasmic male-sterile and a normal (N) corn. ATP, malate or succinate generated a membrane potential (negative inside) as monitored by the absorbance change of a cationic dye, safranine. The relative membrane potential (..delta.. psi) could also be detected indirectly as /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Hmt toxin added to T mitochondria dissipated the steady state delta psi similar to addition of a protonophore, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP). Toxin analogs (Cpd XIII: C/sub 41/H/sub 68/O/sub 12/ and Cpd IV: C/sub 25/H/sub 44/O/sub 6/), reduced native toxin (RT2C: C/sub 41/H/sub 84/O/sub 13/) and Pm toxin (band A: C/sub 33/H/sub 60/O/sub 8/, produced by the fungus, Phyllosticta maydis) were effective in dissipating ..delta.. psi and decreasing Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake with the following order: Pm (100) >> HmT (23-30) > Cpd XIII (11-25) >> RT2C (0.4-1.8) > Cpd IV (0.2-1.0). In contrast, the toxins and analogs had no effect on delta psi formed in N mitochondria. The striking similarities of the HmT toxin (band 1: C/sub 41/H/sub 68/O/sub 13/) and Cpd XIII on T mitochondrial activities provide strong evidence supporting the correctness of the polyketol structure assigned to the native toxin. Since the ..delta.. psi in energized mitochondria is caused mainly by the electrogenic extrusion of H/sup +/, the results support the idea that HmT toxin increases membrane permeability of T mitochondria to H/sup +/. The host specificity of the toxin suggests that an interaction with unique target site(s) on the inner mitochondrial membrane of T corn causes H/sup +/ leakage.

  12. The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin and myrtucommulone A cause mitochondrial dysfunctions in leukemic cells by direct interference with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Katja; Müller, Hans; Fischer, Dagmar; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin (Hypf) and myrtucommulone A (MC A) induce death of cancer cells by triggering the intrinsic/mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c. However, the upstream targets and mechanisms leading to these mitochondrial events in cancer cells remain elusive. Here we show that Hypf and MC A directly act on mitochondria derived from human leukemic HL-60 cells and thus, disrupt mitochondrial functions. In isolated mitochondria, Hypf and MC A efficiently impaired mitochondrial viability (EC50 = 0.2 and 0.9 µM, respectively), caused loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (at 0.03 and 0.1 µM, respectively), and suppressed mitochondrial ATP synthesis (IC50 = 0.2 and 0.5 µM, respectively). Consequently, the compounds activated the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in HL-60 cells, a cellular energy sensor involved in apoptosis of cancer cells. Side by side comparison with the protonophore CCCP and the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin suggest that Hypf and MC A act as protonophores that primarily dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential by direct interaction with the mitochondrial membrane. Together, Hypf and MC A abolish the mitochondrial proton motive force that on one hand impairs mitochondrial viability and on the other cause activation of AMPK due to lowered ATP levels which may further facilitate the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  13. The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin and myrtucommulone A cause mitochondrial dysfunctions in leukemic cells by direct interference with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Katja; Müller, Hans; Fischer, Dagmar; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin (Hypf) and myrtucommulone A (MC A) induce death of cancer cells by triggering the intrinsic/mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c. However, the upstream targets and mechanisms leading to these mitochondrial events in cancer cells remain elusive. Here we show that Hypf and MC A directly act on mitochondria derived from human leukemic HL-60 cells and thus, disrupt mitochondrial functions. In isolated mitochondria, Hypf and MC A efficiently impaired mitochondrial viability (EC50 = 0.2 and 0.9 µM, respectively), caused loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (at 0.03 and 0.1 µM, respectively), and suppressed mitochondrial ATP synthesis (IC50 = 0.2 and 0.5 µM, respectively). Consequently, the compounds activated the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in HL-60 cells, a cellular energy sensor involved in apoptosis of cancer cells. Side by side comparison with the protonophore CCCP and the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin suggest that Hypf and MC A act as protonophores that primarily dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential by direct interaction with the mitochondrial membrane. Together, Hypf and MC A abolish the mitochondrial proton motive force that on one hand impairs mitochondrial viability and on the other cause activation of AMPK due to lowered ATP levels which may further facilitate the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26386573

  14. [Computer modeling the hydrostatic pressure characteristics of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane, separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions].

    PubMed

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Rogal, Mirosława; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of model equation depending the membrane potential deltapsis, on mechanical pressure difference (deltaP), concentration polarization coefficient (zetas), concentration Rayleigh number (RC) and ratio concentration of solutions separated by membrane (Ch/Cl), the characteristics deltapsis = f(deltaP)zetas,RC,Ch/Cl for steady values of zetas, RC and Ch/Cl in single-membrane system were calculated. In this system neutral and isotropic polymeric membrane oriented in horizontal plane, the non-homogeneous binary electrolytic solutions of various concentrations were separated. Nonhomogeneity of solutions is results from creations of the concentration boundary layers on both sides of the membrane. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, RC and zetas. PMID:17022155

  15. On calculation of the electrostatic potential of a phosphatidylinositol phosphate-containing phosphatidylcholine lipid membrane accounting for membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Jonathan C; Martinez, Michael; Wade, Rebecca C

    2014-01-01

    Many signaling events require the binding of cytoplasmic proteins to cell membranes by recognition of specific charged lipids, such as phosphoinositol-phosphates. As a model for a protein-membrane binding site, we consider one charged phosphoinositol phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) embedded in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer. As the protein-membrane binding is driven by electrostatic interactions, continuum solvent models require an accurate representation of the electrostatic potential of the phosphoinositol phosphate-containing membrane. We computed and analyzed the electrostatic potentials of snapshots taken at regular intervals from molecular dynamics simulations of the bilayer. We observe considerable variation in the electrostatic potential of the bilayer both along a single simulation and between simulations performed with the GAFF or CHARMM c36 force fields. However, we find that the choice of GAFF or CHARMM c36 parameters has little effect on the electrostatic potential of a given configuration of the bilayer with a PtdIns(3)P embedded in it. From our results, we propose a remedian averaging method for calculating the electrostatic potential of a membrane system that is suitable for simulations of protein-membrane binding with a continuum solvent model.

  16. Shifting the Paradigm: The Putative Mitochondrial Protein ABCB6 Resides in the Lysosomes of Cells and in the Plasma Membrane of Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Katalin; Brozik, Anna; Kucsma, Nora; Toth, Alexandra; Gera, Melinda; Berry, Laurence; Vallentin, Alice; Vial, Henri; Vidal, Michel; Szakacs, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    ABCB6, a member of the adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has been proposed to be responsible for the mitochondrial uptake of porphyrins. Here we show that ABCB6 is a glycoprotein present in the membrane of mature erythrocytes and in exosomes released from reticulocytes during the final steps of erythroid maturation. Consistent with its presence in exosomes, endogenous ABCB6 is localized to the endo/lysosomal compartment, and is absent from the mitochondria of cells. Knock-down studies demonstrate that ABCB6 function is not required for de novo heme biosynthesis in differentiating K562 cells, excluding this ABC transporter as a key regulator of porphyrin synthesis. We confirm the mitochondrial localization of ABCB7, ABCB8 and ABCB10, suggesting that only three ABC transporters should be classified as mitochondrial proteins. Taken together, our results challenge the current paradigm linking the expression and function of ABCB6 to mitochondria. PMID:22655043

  17. Experimental investigation into the transmembrane electrical potential of the forward osmosis membrane process in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations. PMID:24957177

  18. Experimental Investigation into the Transmembrane Electrical Potential of the Forward Osmosis Membrane Process in Electrolyte Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Lixia; Fang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane electrical potential (TMEP) in a forward osmosis membrane process with a single electrolyte solution as the draw and feed solutions was investigated by experiments. The effects of membrane orientation, the electrolyte species (KCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2), concentration and concentration ratio of solutions at both sides of membrane on water flux and TMEP were investigated. The results showed that the TMEPs at different membrane orientation cannot completely coincide, which confirmed the effect of membrane asymmetry. The ion diffusion coefficients significantly affected the TMEP across the membrane, with different patterns for different electrolytes and concentrations. PMID:24957177

  19. Overexpression of mitochondrial sirtuins alters glycolysis and mitochondrial function in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Michelle Barbi; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Van Houten, Bennett; Goetzman, Eric S

    2014-01-01

    SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 are mitochondrial deacylases that impact multiple facets of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. SIRT3 activates several mitochondrial enzymes, SIRT4 represses its targets, and SIRT5 has been shown to both activate and repress mitochondrial enzymes. To gain insight into the relative effects of the mitochondrial sirtuins in governing mitochondrial energy metabolism, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 overexpressing HEK293 cells were directly compared. When grown under standard cell culture conditions (25 mM glucose) all three sirtuins induced increases in mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and glucose oxidation, but with no change in growth rate or in steady-state ATP concentration. Increased proton leak, as evidenced by oxygen consumption in the presence of oligomycin, appeared to explain much of the increase in basal oxygen utilization. Growth in 5 mM glucose normalized the elevations in basal oxygen consumption, proton leak, and glycolysis in all sirtuin over-expressing cells. While the above effects were common to all three mitochondrial sirtuins, some differences between the SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 expressing cells were noted. Only SIRT3 overexpression affected fatty acid metabolism, and only SIRT4 overexpression altered superoxide levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that all three mitochondrial sirtuins can promote increased mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism. SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT5 appear to respond to excess glucose by inducing a coordinated increase of glycolysis and respiration, with the excess energy dissipated via proton leak.

  20. [Targeting mitochondria: innovation from mitochondrial drug delivery system (DDS) to mitochondrial medicine].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Effective medical therapies for such diseases will ultimately require the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to mitochondria. This will likely be achieved through innovations in the areas of the nanotechnology of intracellular trafficking. Mitochondrial delivery systems for a variety of cargoes have been repored to date. However, only a limited number of approaches are available for delivering macromolecules directly to mitochondria. We previously reported on the construction of a MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. Using the green fluorescence protein as a model macromolecule in conjunction with analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy, we were able to confirm the mitochondrial delivery of a macromolecule by the MITO-Porter. Moreover, we reported that the Dual Function MITO-Porter (DF-MITO-Porter) could efficiently deliver cargo to mitochondria, through endosomal and mitochondrial membranes via step-wise membrane fusion. Here, We will present our findings on the development of our mitochondrial drug delivery system, and discuss our attempts regarding mitochondrial gene delivery and therapy. Finally, We will discuss the potential use of mitochondrial drug delivery systems in mitochondrial medicine.

  1. Efficient surface reconstruction from noisy data using regularized membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Jalba, Andrei C; Roerdink, Jos B T M

    2009-05-01

    A physically motivated method for surface reconstruction is proposed that can recover smooth surfaces from noisy and sparse data sets. No orientation information is required. By a new technique based on regularized-membrane potentials the input sample points are aggregated, leading to improved noise tolerability and outlier removal, without sacrificing much with respect to detail (feature) recovery. After aggregating the sample points on a volumetric grid, a novel, iterative algorithm is used to classify grid points as exterior or interior to the surface. This algorithm relies on intrinsic properties of the smooth scalar field on the grid which emerges after the aggregation step. Second, a mesh-smoothing paradigm based on a mass-spring system is introduced. By enhancing this system with a bending-energy minimizing term we ensure that the final triangulated surface is smoother than piecewise linear. In terms of speed and flexibility, the method compares favorably with respect to previous approaches. Most parts of the method are implemented on modern graphics processing units (GPUs). Results in a wide variety of settings are presented, ranging from surface reconstruction on noise-free point clouds to grayscale image segmentation.

  2. Adenine nucleotide translocator isoforms 1 and 2 are differently distributed in the mitochondrial inner membrane and have distinct affinities to cyclophilin D.

    PubMed Central

    Vyssokikh, M Y; Katz, A; Rueck, A; Wuensch, C; Dörner, A; Zorov, D B; Brdiczka, D

    2001-01-01

    Different isoforms of the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. It was assumed that ANT-1 and ANT-2 co-exist in every single mitochondrion and might be differently distributed within the membrane structures that constitute the peripheral inner membrane or the crista membrane. To discriminate between ANT originating from peripheral or from cristal inner membranes we made use of the fact that complexes between porin, the outer-membrane pore protein, and the ANT can be generated. Such complexes between porin and the ANT in the peripheral inner membrane were induced in rat heart mitochondria and isolated from rat brain and kidney. Using ANT-isotype-specific antibodies and sequence analysis of the N-terminal end, it was discovered that the peripheral inner membrane contained ANT-1 and ANT-2, whereas the cristal membrane contained exclusively ANT-2. Cyclophilin was co-purified with the porin-ANT complexes, whereas it was absent in the crista-derived ANT. This suggested that ANT-1 might have a higher affinity for cyclophilin. This specific intra-mitochondrial distribution of the two ANT isotypes and cyclophilin D suggests specific functions of the peripheral and crista-forming parts of the inner membrane and the two ANT isotypes therein. PMID:11513733

  3. Regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by the outer membrane does not involve the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (Translocator Protein of 18 kDa (TSPO)).

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Blachly-Dyson, Elizabeth; Sewell, Randall; Carpi, Andrea; Menabò, Roberta; Di Lisa, Fabio; Ricchelli, Fernanda; Bernardi, Paolo; Forte, Michael

    2014-05-16

    Translocator protein of 18 kDa (TSPO) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is thought to play a key role in the mitochondrial transport of cholesterol, a key step in the generation of steroid hormones. However, it was first characterized as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor because it appears to be responsible for high affinity binding of a number of benzodiazepines to non-neuronal tissues. Ensuing studies have employed natural and synthetic ligands to assess the role of TSPO function in a number of natural and pathological circumstances. Largely through the use of these compounds and biochemical associations, TSPO has been proposed to play a role in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which has been associated with cell death in many human pathological conditions. Here, we critically assess the role of TSPO in the function of the PTP through the generation of mice in which the Tspo gene has been conditionally eliminated. Our results show that 1) TSPO plays no role in the regulation or structure of the PTP, 2) endogenous and synthetic ligands of TSPO do not regulate PTP activity through TSPO, 3) outer mitochondrial membrane regulation of PTP activity occurs though a mechanism that does not require TSPO, and 4) hearts lacking TSPO are as sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury as hearts from control mice. These results call into question a wide variety of studies implicating TSPO in a number of pathological processes through its actions on the PTP.

  4. Long-chain fatty acid-promoted swelling of mitochondria: further evidence for the protonophoric effect of fatty acids in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, P; Wieckowski, M R; Wojtczak, L

    2000-04-01

    Swelling of non-respiring rat liver mitochondria suspended in isotonic potassium acetate at pH 6.5-7.4 in the presence of valinomycin was promoted by long-chain fatty acids, such as myristate, indicating a protonophoric mechanism. This swelling was partly inhibited by inhibitors or substrates of mitochondrial anion carriers. The results show that the fatty acid cycling mechanism responsible for uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation can also operate in the direction opposite to that originally proposed [Skulachev, V.P. (1991) FEBS Lett. 294, 158-162], i.e. the inwardly directed transfer of the fatty acid anion accompanied by outwardly directed free passage of undissociated fatty acid. They also extend the list of mitochondrial anion carriers, that are involved in this process, over the mono- and tricarboxylate transporters. At pH 8, myristate, but not the synthetic protonophore, p-trifluoromethoxycarbonyl-cyanide phenylhydrazone, induced mitochondrial swelling in both potassium acetate and KCl media, that did not require the presence of valinomycin. This indicates that, at alkaline pH, myristate facilitates permeation of the inner mitochondrial membrane to monovalent cations and, possibly, activates the inner membrane anion channel.

  5. Roles of the Mdm10, Tom7, Mdm12, and Mmm1 Proteins in the Assembly of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, Jeremy G.; Go, Nancy E.; Klein, Astrid; Redmond, Erin; Lackey, Sebastian W.K.; Tao, Tan; Kalbacher, Hubert; Rapaport, Doron; Neupert, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The Mdm10, Mdm12, and Mmm1 proteins have been implicated in several mitochondrial functions including mitochondrial distribution and morphology, assembly of β-barrel proteins such as Tom40 and porin, association of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and maintaining lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes. Here we show that loss of any of these three proteins in Neurospora crassa results in the formation of large mitochondrial tubules and reduces the assembly of porin and Tom40 into the outer membrane. We have also investigated the relationship of Mdm10 and Tom7 in the biogenesis of β-barrel proteins. Previous work showed that mitochondria lacking Tom7 assemble Tom40 more efficiently, and porin less efficiently, than wild-type mitochondria. Analysis of mdm10 and tom7 single and double mutants, has demonstrated that the effects of the two mutations are additive. Loss of Tom7 partially compensates for the decrease in Tom40 assembly resulting from loss of Mdm10, whereas porin assembly is more severely reduced in the double mutant than in either single mutant. The additive effects observed in the double mutant suggest that different steps in β-barrel assembly are affected in the individual mutants. Many aspects of Tom7 and Mdm10 function in N. crassa are different from those of their homologues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:20335503

  6. Potential Indexing of the Invasiveness of Breast Cancer Cells by Mitochondrial Redox Ratios.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nannan; Xu, He N; Luo, Qingming; Li, Lin Z

    2016-01-01

    The invasive/metastatic potential of cancer cells is an important factor in tumor progression. The redox ratios obtained from ratios of the endogenous fluorescent signals of NADH and FAD, can effectively respond to the alteration of cancer cells in its mitochondrial energy metabolism. It has been shown previously that the redox ratios may predict the metastatic potential of cancer mouse xenografts. In this report, we aimed to investigate the metabolic state represented by the redox ratios of cancer cells in vitro. Fluorescence microscopic imaging technology was used to observe the changes of the endogenous fluorescence signals of NADH and FAD in the energy metabolism pathways. We measured the redox ratios (FAD/NADH) of breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MCF-7, and SKBR3. We found that the more invasive cancer cells have higher FAD/NADH ratios, largely consistent with previous studies on breast cancer xenografts. Furthermore, by comparing the fluorescence signals of the breast cancer cells under different nutritional environments including starvation and addition of glutamine, pyruvate and lactate, we found that the redox ratios still effectively distinguished the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells from less invasive MCF-7 cells. These preliminary data suggest that the redox ratio may potentially provide a new index to stratefy breast cancer with different degrees of aggressiveness, which could have significance for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27526133

  7. Drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltán V; Ferdinandy, Peter; Liaudet, Lucas; Pacher, Pál

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria has an essential role in myocardial tissue homeostasis; thus deterioration in mitochondrial function eventually leads to cardiomyocyte and endothelial cell death and consequent cardiovascular dysfunction. Several chemical compounds and drugs have been known to directly or indirectly modulate cardiac mitochondrial function, which can account both for the toxicological and pharmacological properties of these substances. In many cases, toxicity problems appear only in the presence of additional cardiovascular disease conditions or develop months/years following the exposure, making the diagnosis difficult. Cardiotoxic agents affecting mitochondria include several widely used anticancer drugs [anthracyclines (Doxorubicin/Adriamycin), cisplatin, trastuzumab (Herceptin), arsenic trioxide (Trisenox), mitoxantrone (Novantrone), imatinib (Gleevec), bevacizumab (Avastin), sunitinib (Sutent), and sorafenib (Nevaxar)], antiviral compound azidothymidine (AZT, Zidovudine) and several oral antidiabetics [e.g., rosiglitazone (Avandia)]. Illicit drugs such as alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, ecstasy, and synthetic cannabinoids (spice, K2) may also induce mitochondria-related cardiotoxicity. Mitochondrial toxicity develops due to various mechanisms involving interference with the mitochondrial respiratory chain (e.g., uncoupling) or inhibition of the important mitochondrial enzymes (oxidative phosphorylation, Szent-Györgyi-Krebs cycle, mitochondrial DNA replication, ADP/ATP translocator). The final phase of mitochondrial dysfunction induces loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in mitochondrial oxidative/nitrative stress, eventually culminating into cell death. This review aims to discuss the mechanisms of mitochondrion-mediated cardiotoxicity of commonly used drugs and some potential cardioprotective strategies to prevent these toxicities. PMID:26386112

  8. Anacardic acid-mediated changes in membrane potential and pH gradient across liposomal membranes.

    PubMed

    Toyomizu, Masaaki; Okamoto, Katsuyuki; Akiba, Yukio; Nakatsu, Tetsuo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that anacardic acid has an uncoupling effect on oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria using succinate as a substrate (Life Sci. 66 (2000) 229-234). In the present study, for clarification of the physicochemical characteristics of anacardic acid, we used a cyanine dye (DiS-C3(5)) and 9-aminoacridine (9-AA) to determine changes of membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and pH difference (DeltapH), respectively, in a liposome suspension in response to the addition of anacardic acid to the suspension. The anacardic acid quenched DiS-C3(5) fluorescence at concentrations higher than 300 nM, with the degree of quenching being dependent on the log concentration of the acid. Furthermore, the K(+) diffusion potential generated by the addition of valinomycin to the suspension decreased for each increase in anacardic acid concentration used over 300 nM, but the sum of the anacardic acid- and valinomycin-mediated quenching was additively increasing. This indicates that the anacardic acid-mediated quenching was not due simply to increments in the K(+) permeability of the membrane. Addition of anacardic acid in the micromolar range to the liposomes with DeltaPsi formed by valinomycin-K(+) did not significantly alter 9-AA fluorescence, but unexpectedly dissipated DeltaPsi. The DeltaPsi preformed by valinomycin-K(+) decreased gradually following the addition of increasing concentrations of anacardic acid. The DeltaPsi dissipation rate was dependent on the pre-existing magnitude of DeltaPsi, and was correlated with the logarithmic concentration of anacardic acid. Furthermore, the initial rate of DeltapH dissipation increased with logarithmic increases in anacardic acid concentration. These results provide the evidence for a unique function of anacardic acid, dissimilar to carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone or valinomycin, in that anacardic acid behaves as both an electrogenic (negative) charge carrier driven by DeltaPsi, and a 'proton

  9. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on mitochondrial function of tomato seedling roots under salinity-alkalinity stress].

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiong-bo; Xiang, Li-xia; Hu, Xiao-hui; Ren, Wen-qi; Zhang, Li; Ni, Xin-xin

    2016-02-01

    Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, cvs. 'Jinpengchaoguan' and 'Zhongza No. 9', with the former being more tolerant to saline-alkaline stress) seedlings grown hydroponically were subjected to salinity-alkalinity stress condition (NaCl: Na2SO4:NaHCO3:Na2CO3 = 1:9:9:1) without or with foliar application of 0.25 mmol . L-1 spermidine (Spd), and the root morphology and physiological characteristics of mitochondrial membrane were analyzed 8 days after treatment, to explore the protective effects of exogenous Spd on mitochondrial function in tomato roots under salinity-alkalinity stress. The results showed that the salinity-alkalinity stress increased the concentrations of both mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA as well as the mitochondrial membrane permeability in the roots of the two cultivars, while it decreased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity, which impaired the mitochondria and therefore inhibited the root growth; and these effects were more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengechaoguan'. Under the salinity-alkalinity stress, foliar application Spd could effectively decrease the concentrations of mitochondrial H2O2 and MDA and mitochondrial membrane permeability, while increased the mitochondrial membrane fluidity, membrane potential, Cyt c/a and H+-ATPase activity. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could effectively mitigate the damage on mitochondria induced by salinity-alkalinity stress, and the alleviation effect was more obvious in 'Zhongza No. 9' than in 'Jinpengchaoguan'.

  10. Altered mitochondrial function in fibroblasts containing MELAS or MERRF mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    James, A M; Wei, Y H; Pang, C Y; Murphy, M P

    1996-01-01

    A number of human diseases are caused by inherited mitochondrial DNA mutations. Two of these diseases, MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) and MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibres), are commonly caused by point mutations to tRNA genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Here we report on how these mutations affect mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast cultures established from a MELAS patient containing an A to G mutation at nucleotide 3243 in the tRNA(Leu(UUR) gene and a MERRF patient containing an A to G mutation at nucleotide 8344 in the tRNA(Lys) gene. Both mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration rate were significantly decreased in digitonin-permeabilized MELAS and MERRF fibroblasts respiring on glutamate/malate. A similar decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential was found in intact MELAS and MERRF fibroblasts. The mitochondrial content of these cells, estimated by stereological analysis of electron micrographs and from measurement of mitochondrial marker enzymes, was similar in control, MELAS and MERRF cells. Therefore, in cultured fibroblasts, mutation of mitochondrial tRNA genes leads to assembly of bioenergetically incompetent mitochondria, not to an alteration in their amount. However, the cell volume occupied by secondary lysosomes and residual bodies in the MELAS and MERRF cells was greater than in control cells, suggesting increased mitochondrial degradation in these cells. In addition, fibroblasts containing mitochondrial DNA mutations were 3-4-fold larger than control fibroblasts. The implications of these findings for the pathology of mitochondrial diseases are discussed. PMID:8809026

  11. Role of anion translocation across the mitochondrial membrane in the regulation of urea synthesis from ammonia by isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A J; Gimpel, J A; Deleeuw, G A; Tager, J M; Williamson, J R

    1975-10-10

    The regulation of urea synthesis from ammonia was investigated using isolated hepatocytes from fasted rats. Addition of ammonia alone produced only a small increase of urea formation, which was stimulated 2-fold by ornithine in conjunction with a fall of ATP levels and an accumulation of citrulline. Further addition of oleate or beta-hydroxybutyrate produced an additional 2-fold stimulation of urea formation to approximately 200 mumol/g dry weight/hour. The presence of oleate also protected against the inhibitory effect of 2,4-dinitrophenol on urea synthesis and the cellular ATP content. The data suggest that both the rate of of energy production and the rate of generation of reducing equivalents from endogensou substrates are insufficient to meet the requirements for optimal rates of urea synthesis. Urea formation from NH3 in the presence of ornithine and oleate, but iin the absence of gluconeogenic precursors, was inhibited by butylmalonate, a known inhibitor of malate-phosphate exchange across the mitochondrial membrane, and stimulated by theaddition of malate and other dicarboxylic acids and amino acids to the cell suspension... PMID:1182028

  12. MitoNEET Is a Uniquely Folded 2Fe-2S Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized By Pioglitazone

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, M.L.; Wiley, S.E.; Axelrod, H.L.; Cohen, A.E.; Roy, M.; Abresch, E.C.; Capraro, D.; Murphy, A.N.; Nechushtai, R.; Dixon, J.E.; Jennings, P.A.; /UC, San Diego /SLAC, SSRL /Hebrew U.

    2007-10-19

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins are key players in vital processes involving energy homeostasis and metabolism from the simplest to most complex organisms. We report a 1.5 Angstrom x-ray crystal structure of the first identified outer mitochondrial membrane Fe-S protein, mitoNEET. Two protomers intertwine to form a unique dimeric structure that constitutes a new fold to not only the {approx}650 reported Fe-S protein structures but also to all known proteins. We name this motif the NEET fold. The protomers form a two-domain structure: a {beta}-cap domain and a cluster-binding domain that coordinates two acid-labile 2Fe-2S clusters. Binding of pioglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing thiazolidinedione used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, stabilizes the protein against 2Fe-2S cluster release. The biophysical properties of mitoNEET suggest that it may participate in a redox-sensitive signaling and/or in Fe-S cluster transfer.

  13. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), Vtmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P < 0.0001), Vsucc (−65%; P < 0.0001), and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  14. Biogenesis of the protein import channel Tom40 of the mitochondrial outer membrane: intermembrane space components are involved in an early stage of the assembly pathway.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Truscott, Kaye N; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2004-04-30

    Tom40 forms the central channel of the preprotein translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM complex). The precursor of Tom40 is encoded in the nucleus, synthesized in the cytosol, and imported into mitochondria via a multi-step assembly pathway that involves the mature TOM complex and the sorting and assembly machinery of the outer membrane (SAM complex). We report that opening of the mitochondrial intermembrane space by swelling blocks the assembly pathway of the beta-barrel protein Tom40. Mitochondria with defects in small Tim proteins of the intermembrane space are impaired in the Tom40 assembly pathway. Swelling as well as defects in the small Tim proteins inhibit an early stage of the Tom40 import pathway that is needed for formation of a Tom40-SAM intermediate. We propose that the biogenesis pathway of beta-barrel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane not only requires TOM and SAM components, but also involves components of the intermembrane space.

  15. Differential Effect of Cholesterol and Its Biosynthetic Precursors on Membrane Dipole Potential

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Sourav; Kanaparthi, Ravi Kumar; Samanta, Anunay; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2012-01-01

    Dipole potential is the potential difference within the membrane bilayer, which originates due to the nonrandom arrangement of lipid dipoles and water molecules at the membrane interface. Cholesterol, a representative sterol in higher eukaryotic membranes, is known to increase membrane dipole potential. In this work, we explored the effects of immediate (7-DHC and desmosterol) and evolutionary (ergosterol) precursors of cholesterol on membrane dipole potential, monitored by the dual wavelength ratiometric approach utilizing the probe di-8-ANEPPS. Our results show that the effect of these precursors on membrane dipole potential is very different from that observed with cholesterol, although the structural differences among them are subtle. These results assume relevance, since accumulation of cholesterol precursors due to defective cholesterol biosynthesis has been reported to result in several inherited metabolic disorders such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Interestingly, cholesterol (and its precursors) has a negligible effect on dipole potential in polyunsaturated membranes. We interpret these results in terms of noncanonical orientation of cholesterol in these membranes. Our results constitute the first report on the effect of biosynthetic and evolutionary precursors of cholesterol on dipole potential, and imply that a subtle change in sterol structure can significantly alter the dipolar field at the membrane interface. PMID:22500756

  16. K+ transport and membrane potentials in isolated rat parotid acini

    SciTech Connect

    Nauntofte, B.; Dissing, S.

    1988-10-01

    42K+ transport properties of isolated rat parotid acini were characterized concomitant with measurements of membrane potentials (Em) by means of the fluorescent dye diSC3-(5). In unstimulated acini suspended in a 5 mM K+ buffer, Em was governed by the K+ and Cl- gradients and amounted to about -59 mV, a value that remained unaffected on cholinergic stimulation. In unstimulated acini, 42K+ influx was largely mediated by the Na+-K+ pump, and the residual influxes were mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component (cotransport system) and by K+ channels. Efflux of 42K+ was largely mediated by a bumetanide-sensitive component and by K+ channels. In the unstimulated state, the cotransport system was mediating K+-K+ exchange without contributing to the net uptake of K+. Within 10 s after stimulation, a approximately 10-fold increase in the acinar K+ conductance (gK) occurred, resulting in a rapid net efflux of K+ that amounted to approximately 3.8 mmol.l cells-1.s-1. Measurements of 42K+ fluxes as a function of the external K+ concentration revealed that in the stimulated state gK increases when external K+ is raised from 0.7 to 10 mM, consistent with an activation of acinar gK by the binding of external K+ to the channel. 42K+ flux ratios as well as the effect of the K+ channel inhibitor from scorpion venom (LQV) suggest that approximately 90% of K+ transport in the stimulated state is mediated by ''maxi'' K+ channels.

  17. Cell membrane penetration and mitochondrial targeting by platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrano, Adriano A.; Herrmann, Rudolf; Strobel, Claudia; Rennhak, Markus; Engelke, Hanna; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid; Wixforth, Achim; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and focus on their fast uptake and association with mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we clearly show that 46 nm platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles can rapidly penetrate cell membranes and reach the cytosol. Moreover, if suitably targeted, these particles are able to selectively attach to mitochondria. These results are complemented by cytotoxicity assays, thus providing insights into the biological effects of these particles on cells. Interestingly, no permanent membrane disruption or any other significant adverse effects on cells were observed. The unusual uptake behavior observed for 46 nm nanoparticles was not observed for equivalent but larger 143 nm and 285 nm platinum-decorated particles. Our results demonstrate a remarkable particle size effect in which particles smaller than ~50-100 nm escape the usual endocytic pathway and translocate directly into the cytosol, while particles larger than ~150 nm are internalized by conventional endocytosis. Since the small particles are able to bypass endocytosis they could be explored as drug and gene delivery vehicles. Platinum-decorated nanoparticles are therefore highly interesting in the fields of nanotoxicology and nanomedicine.In this work we investigate the interaction between endothelial cells and nanoparticles emitted by catalytic converters. Although catalyst-derived particles are recognized as growing burden added to environmental pollution, very little is known about their health impact. We use platinum-decorated ceria nanoparticles as model compounds for the actual emitted particles and

  18. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  19. Rapid novel test for the determination of biofouling potential on reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Cervinia V; Ohno, Masaki; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to determine biofouling potential by direct analysis of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane through fluorescence intensity analysis of biofilm formed on the membrane surface, thereby incorporating fouling tendencies of both feedwater and membrane. Evaluation of the biofouling potential on the RO membrane was done by accelerated biofilm formation through soaking of membranes in high biofouling potential waters obtained by adding microorganisms and glucose in test waters. The biofilm formed on the soaked membrane was quantified by fluorescence intensity microplate analysis. The soaking method's capability in detecting biofilm formation was confirmed when percentage coverage obtained through fluorescence microscopy and intensity values exhibited a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.96). Continuous cross-flow experiments confirmed the ability and reliability of the soaking method in giving biofouling potential on RO membranes when a good correlation (R(2) = 0.87) between intensity values of biofilms formed on the membrane during soaking and filtration conditions was obtained. Applicability of the test developed was shown when three commercially available polyamide (PA) RO membranes were assessed for biofouling potential. This new method can also be applied for the determination of biofouling potential in water with more than 3.6 mg L(-1) easily degradable organic carbon. PMID:27332844

  20. Rapid novel test for the determination of biofouling potential on reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Cervinia V; Ohno, Masaki; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Nishijima, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    A novel method was proposed to determine biofouling potential by direct analysis of a reverse osmosis (RO) membrane through fluorescence intensity analysis of biofilm formed on the membrane surface, thereby incorporating fouling tendencies of both feedwater and membrane. Evaluation of the biofouling potential on the RO membrane was done by accelerated biofilm formation through soaking of membranes in high biofouling potential waters obtained by adding microorganisms and glucose in test waters. The biofilm formed on the soaked membrane was quantified by fluorescence intensity microplate analysis. The soaking method's capability in detecting biofilm formation was confirmed when percentage coverage obtained through fluorescence microscopy and intensity values exhibited a linear correlation (R(2) = 0.96). Continuous cross-flow experiments confirmed the ability and reliability of the soaking method in giving biofouling potential on RO membranes when a good correlation (R(2) = 0.87) between intensity values of biofilms formed on the membrane during soaking and filtration conditions was obtained. Applicability of the test developed was shown when three commercially available polyamide (PA) RO membranes were assessed for biofouling potential. This new method can also be applied for the determination of biofouling potential in water with more than 3.6 mg L(-1) easily degradable organic carbon.

  1. 2-Anilinonicotinyl linked 2-aminobenzothiazoles and [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-b] [1,2,4]benzothiadiazine conjugates as potential mitochondrial apoptotic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Srikanth, Y V V; Naseer Ahmed Khan, M; Ashraf, Md; Kashi Reddy, M; Sultana, Farheen; Kaur, Tandeep; Chashoo, Gousia; Suri, Nitasha; Sehar, Irum; Wani, Zahoor A; Saxena, Arpita; Sharma, Parduman R; Bhushan, Shashi; Mondhe, Dilip M; Saxena, Ajit K

    2011-12-01

    A series of N-(2-anilino-pyridyl) linked 2-amino benzothiazoles (4a-n) and [1,2,4]triazolo [1,5-b]benzothiadiazine conjugates (5a-j) have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity. Some of these compounds (4h-k, 4n, and 5e) have exhibited potent cytotoxicity specifically against human leukemia HL-60 cell lines with IC(50) values in the range of 0.08-0.70 μM. All these compounds were tested for their effects on the cell cycle perturbations and induction of apoptosis. Morphological evidences of apoptosis, including fragmentation of nuclei and inter nucleosomal DNA laddering formation were clearly observed after 24h exposure to compound 4i. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that compound 4i showed drastic cell cycle perturbations due to concentration dependant increase in the sub-G0 region which comprises of both the apoptotic and debris fraction, thus implying the extent of cell death. These compounds trigger the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway that results in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential through activation of multiple caspases followed by activation of caspase-3, and finally cleavage of PARP. Further the mechanism of cell death was analysed by fluorescent microscopic analysis and also by scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity of 4i correlated with induction of apoptosis, caspases activation and DNA damage and thus indicating the apoptotic pathway of anticancer effect of these compounds. PMID:22047801

  2. Sequential reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and generation of reactive oxygen species in early programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a physiological process commonly defined by alterations in nuclear morphology (apoptosis) and/or characteristic stepwise degradation of chromosomal DNA occurring before cytolysis. However, determined characteristics of PCD such as loss in mitochondrial reductase activity or cytolysis can be induced in enucleated cells, indicating cytoplasmic PCD control. Here we report a sequential disregulation of mitochondrial function that precedes cell shrinkage and nuclear fragmentation. A first cyclosporin A-inhibitable step of ongoing PCD is characterized by a reduction of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, as determined by specific fluorochromes (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine++ + iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide). Cytofluorometrically purified cells with reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential are initially incapable of oxidizing hydroethidine (HE) into ethidium. Upon short-term in vitro culture, such cells acquire the capacity of HE oxidation, thus revealing a second step of PCD marked by mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This step can be selectively inhibited by rotenone and ruthenium red yet is not affected by cyclosporin A. Finally, cells reduce their volume, a step that is delayed by radical scavengers, indicating the implication of ROS in the apoptotic process. This sequence of alterations accompanying early PCD is found in very different models of apoptosis induction: glucocorticoid-induced death of lymphocytes, activation-induced PCD of T cell hybridomas, and tumor necrosis factor-induced death of U937 cells. Transfection with the antiapoptotic protooncogene Bcl-2 simultaneously inhibits mitochondrial alterations and apoptotic cell death triggered by steroids or ceramide. In vivo injection of fluorochromes such as 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide; 3,3'dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide; or HE allows for the detection of

  3. [Computer modeling the concentration characteristics of the membrane potential for polymeric membrane, separated non-homogeneous electrolyte solutions].

    PubMed

    Slezak, Izabella H; Jasik-Slezak, Jolanta; Rogal, Mirosława; Slezak, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the concentration boundary layers on membrane potential (deltapsis) in a single-membrane system on basis of the Kedem-Katchalsky equations was described in cases of horizontally mounted neutral polymeric membrane separates non-homogeneous (mechanically unstirred) binary electrolytic solutions at different concentrations. Results of calculations of deltapsis as a function of ratio solution concentrations (Ch/Cl) at constant values of: concentration Rayleigh number (Rc), concentration polarization coefficient (zetas) and hydrostatic pressure (deltaP) were presented. Calculations were made for the case where on a one side of the membrane aqueous solution of NaCl at steady concentration 10(-3) mol x l(-1) (Cl) was placed and on the other aqueous solutions of NaCl at concentrations from 10(-3) mol x l(-1) to 2 x 10(-2) mol x l(-1) (Ch). Their densities were greater than NaCl solution's at 10(-3) mol x l(-1). It was shown that membrane potential depends on hydrodynamic state of a complex concentration boundary layer-membrane-concentration boundary layer, what is controlled by deltaP, Ch/Cl, Rc and zetas. PMID:17022154

  4. Recruitment of an interferon molecular signaling complex to the mitochondrial membrane: disruption by hepatitis C virus NS3-4A protease.

    PubMed

    Hiscott, John; Lacoste, Judith; Lin, Rongtuan

    2006-11-30

    Recent advances in the understanding of the signaling pathways leading to the host antiviral response to hepatitis C virus (HCV), the mechanisms used by HCV to evade the immune response, and the development of small molecule inhibitors of HCV have generated optimism that novel therapeutic approaches to control HCV disease may soon be available. HCV infection is detected by the cytoplasmic, RNA helicase RIG-I that plays an essential role in signaling to the host antiviral response. Recently the adapter molecule that links RIG-I sensing of incoming viral RNA to downstream signaling and gene activation events was characterized by four different groups: MAVS/IPS-1-1/VISA/Cardif contains an amino-terminal CARD domain and carboxyl-terminal mitochondrial transmembrane sequence that localizes to the mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, the hepatitis C virus NS3-4A protease complex specifically targets MAVS/IPS-1/VISA/Cardif for cleavage as part of its immune evasion strategy. Using a combination of biochemical analysis, subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that: (1) NS3-4A cleavage of MAVS/IPS-1/VISA/Cardif causes relocation from the mitochondrial membrane to the cytosolic fraction, resulting in disruption of signaling to the antiviral immune response; (2) disruption requires a function NS3-4A protease; (3) a point mutant of MAVS/IPS-1/VISA/Cardif (Cys508Ala) is not cleaved from the mitochondria by active protease; and (4) the virus-induced IKK epsilon kinase, but not TBK1, co-localizes strongly with MAVS at the mitochondrial membrane and the localization of both molecules is disrupted by NS3-4A expression. These observations provide an outline of the mechanism by which HCV evades the IFN antiviral response. PMID:16876765

  5. Development of pharmacological strategies for mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, M; Heales, S J; Rahman, S

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an unusually genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders, which are extremely challenging to treat. Currently, apart from supportive therapy, there are no effective treatments for the vast majority of mitochondrial diseases. Huge scientific effort, however, is being put into understanding the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial disease pathology and developing potential treatments. To date, a variety of treatments have been evaluated by randomized clinical trials, but unfortunately, none of these has delivered breakthrough results. Increased understanding of mitochondrial pathways and the development of many animal models, some of which are accurate phenocopies of human diseases, are facilitating the discovery and evaluation of novel prospective treatments. Targeting reactive oxygen species has been a treatment of interest for many years; however, only in recent years has it been possible to direct antioxidant delivery specifically into the mitochondria. Increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, whether by pharmacological approaches, dietary manipulation or exercise therapy, is also currently an active area of research. Modulating mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy and the mitochondrial membrane lipid milieu have also emerged as possible treatment strategies. Recent technological advances in gene therapy, including allotopic and transkingdom gene expression and mitochondrially targeted transcription activator-like nucleases, have led to promising results in cell and animal models of mitochondrial diseases, but most of these techniques are still far from clinical application.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Oliver; Turnbull, Doug

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA diseases are common neurological conditions caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes responsible for its maintenance. Current treatments for these disorders are focussed on the management of the symptoms, rather than the correction of biochemical defects caused by the mutation. This review focuses on the molecular effects of mutations, the symptoms they cause and current work focusing on the development of targeted treatments for mitochondrial DNA disease. - Highlights: • We discuss several common disease causing mtDNA mutations. • We highlight recent work linking pathogenicity to deletion size and heteroplasmy. • We discuss recent advances in the development of targeted mtDNA disease treatments.

  7. Bax-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), distinct from the mitochondrial permeability transition, is a key mechanism in diclofenac-induced hepatocyte injury: Multiple protective roles of cyclosporin A

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, W.P.; Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2008-03-15

    Diclofenac, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been associated with rare but severe cases of clinical hepatotoxicity. Diclofenac causes concentration-dependent cell death in human hepatocytes (after 24-48 h) by mitochondrial permeabilization via poorly defined mechanisms. To explore whether the cyclophilin D (CyD)-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and/or the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) was primarily involved in mediating cell death, we exposed immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to apoptogenic concentrations of diclofenac (> 500 {mu}M) in the presence or absence of inhibitors of upstream mediators. The CyD inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, 2 {mu}M) fully inhibited diclofenac-induced cell injury, suggesting that mPT was involved. However, CyD gene silencing using siRNA left the cells susceptible to diclofenac toxicity, and CsA still protected the CyD-negative cells from lethal injury. Diclofenac induced early (9 h) activation of Bax and Bak and caused mitochondrial translocation of Bax, indicating that MOMP was involved in cell death. Inhibition of Bax protein expression by using siRNA significantly protected HC-04 from diclofenac-induced cell injury. Diclofenac also induced early Bid activation (tBid formation, 6 h), which is an upstream mechanism that initiates Bax activation and mitochondrial translocation. Bid activation was sensitive to the Ca{sup 2+} chelator, BAPTA. In conclusion, we found that Bax/Bak-mediated MOMP is a key mechanism of diclofenac-induced lethal cell injury in human hepatocytes, and that CsA can prevent MOMP through inhibition of Bax activation. These data support our concept that the Ca{sup 2+}-Bid-Bax-MOMP axis is a critical pathway in diclofenac (metabolite)-induced hepatocyte injury.

  8. Dynamic potential and surface morphology study of sertraline membrane sensors

    PubMed Central

    Khater, M.M.; Issa, Y.M.; Hassib, H.B.; Mohammed, S.H.

    2014-01-01

    New rapid, sensitive and simple electrometric method was developed to determine sertraline hydrochloride (Ser-Cl) in its pure raw material and pharmaceutical formulations. Membrane sensors based on heteropolyacids as ion associating material were prepared. Silicomolybdic acid (SMA), silicotungstic acid (STA) and phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) were used. The slope and limit of detection are 50.00, 60.00 and 53.24 mV/decade and 2.51, 5.62 and 4.85 μmol L−1 for Ser-ST, Ser-PM and Ser-SM membrane sensors, respectively. Linear range is 0.01–10.00 for the three sensors. These new sensors were used for the potentiometric titration of Ser-Cl using sodium tetraphenylborate as titrant. The surface morphologies of the prepared membranes with and without the modifier (ion-associate) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopes. PMID:26257944

  9. Dietary fat modifies mitochondrial and plasma membrane apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle of calorie-restricted mice.

    PubMed

    López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Khraiwesh, Husam; González-Reyes, José Antonio; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon Jay; de Cabo, Rafael; Burón, María Isabel; Villalba, José M

    2013-12-01

    Calorie restriction decreases skeletal muscle apoptosis, and this phenomenon has been mechanistically linked to its protective action against sarcopenia of aging. Alterations in lipid composition of membranes have been related with the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. However, no study has been designed to date to elucidate if different dietary fat sources with calorie restriction modify apoptotic signaling in skeletal muscle. We show that a 6-month calorie restriction decreased the activity of the plasma membrane neutral sphingomyelinase, although caspase-8/10 activity was not altered, in young adult mice. Lipid hydroperoxides, Bax levels, and cytochrome c and AIF release/accumulation into the cytosol were also decreased, although caspase-9 activity was unchanged. No alterations in caspase-3 and apoptotic index (DNA fragmentation) were observed, but calorie restriction improved structural features of gastrocnemius fibers by increasing cross-sectional area and decreasing circularity of fibers in cross sections. Changing dietary fat with calorie restriction produced substantial alterations of apoptotic signaling. Fish oil augmented the protective effect of calorie restriction decreasing plasma membrane neutral sphingomyelinase, Bax levels, caspase-8/10, and -9 activities, while increasing levels of the antioxidant coenzyme Q at the plasma membrane, and potentiating the increase of cross-sectional area and the decrease of fiber circularity in cross sections. Many of these changes were not found when we used lard. Our data support that dietary fish oil with calorie restriction produces a cellular anti-apoptotic environment in skeletal muscle with a downregulation of components involved in the initial stages of apoptosis engagement, both at the plasma membrane and the mitochondria.

  10. Iron-sulfur protein in mitochondrial complexes of Spodoptera litura as potential site for ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangde; Dong, Xiaolin; Shu, Benshui; Wang, Zheng; Hu, Qiongbo; Zhong, Guohua

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial complex I is the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, but the exact site of superoxide generation or their relative contribution is not clear. This study aims to determine the function of iron-sulfur clusters (ISCU) in the initiation of ROS generation. ISCU2 and ISCU8 were cloned from Spodoptera litura which shared the conserved amino acid sequence with other insects. The expressions of the two genes were ubiquitous throughout the whole development stages and tissues. Knockdown of ISCU2 and ISCU8 resulted in the decline of the ROS, whereas rotenone and azadirachtin treatment up-regulated ROS levels by increasing mRNA expression. Furthermore, antioxidant enzyme activity of SOD and POD were up-regulated by rotenone and azadirachtin treatment and then declined after ISCU was silenced. Our results suggest the possibility that the molecules of ISCU2 and ISCU8 in complex I may serve as potential sites in the initiation of ROS generation. PMID:25257538

  11. Triiodothyronine Facilitates Weaning From Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation by Improved Mitochondrial Substrate Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Files, Matthew D.; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Des Rosiers, Christine; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a bridge to recovery after myocardial injury in infants and children, yet morbidity and mortality remain high. Weaning from the circuit requires adequate cardiac contractile function, which can be impaired by metabolic disturbances induced either by ischemia‐reperfusion and/or by ECMO. We tested the hypothesis that although ECMO partially ameliorates metabolic abnormalities induced by ischemia‐reperfusion, these abnormalities persist or recur with weaning. We also determined if thyroid hormone supplementation (triiodothyronine) during ECMO improves oxidative metabolism and cardiac function. Methods and Results Neonatal piglets underwent transient coronary ischemia to induce cardiac injury then were separated into 4 groups based on loading status. Piglets without coronary ischemia served as controls. We infused into the left coronary artery [2‐13C]pyruvate and [13C6, 15N]l‐leucine to evaluate oxidative metabolism by gas chromatography‐mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance methods. ECMO improved survival, increased oxidative substrate contribution through pyruvate dehydrogenase, reduced succinate and fumarate accumulation, and ameliorated ATP depletion induced by ischemia. The functional and metabolic benefit of ECMO was lost with weaning, yet triiodothyronine supplementation during ECMO restored function, increased relative pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, reduced succinate and fumarate, and preserved ATP stores. Conclusions Although ECMO provides metabolic rest by decreasing energy demand, metabolic impairments persist, and are exacerbated with weaning. Treating ECMO‐induced thyroid depression with triiodothyronine improves substrate flux, myocardial oxidative capacity and cardiac contractile function. This translational model suggests that metabolic targeting can improve weaning. PMID:24650924

  12. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers

    PubMed Central

    Clark Nicholas, Jonathan; Wildschutte Julia, Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-01-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci in gorillas and other apes are completely unknown. Furthermore, little work to date has assessed the utility of numts as candidate population genetic markers. In the present study, we screened Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries in the chimpanzee and gorilla to compare patterns of mitochondrial-wide insertion in both taxa. We conducted an intensive BLAST search for numts in the gorilla genome and compared the prevalence of numt loci originating from the MCR with other great ape taxa. Additional gorilla-specific MCR numts were retrieved either through BAC library screens or using an anchored-PCR (A-PCR) amplification using genomic DNA from five unrelated gorillas. Locus-specific primers were designed to identify numt insertional polymorphisms and evaluate their potential as population genetic markers. Mitochondrial-wide surveys of chimpanzee and gorilla BACs showed that the number of numts does not differ between these two taxa. However, MCR numts are more abundant in chimpanzees than in other great apes. We identified and mapped 67 putative gorilla-specific numts, including two that contain the entire HV1 domain, cluster with sequences from two numt classes (I, IIb) and will likely co-amplify with mitochondrial sequences using most published HV1 primers. However, phylogenetic analysis coupled with post-hoc analysis of mitochondrial variation can successfully differentiate nuclear sequences. Insertional polymorphisms were evident in three out of five numts

  13. Identification of species-specific nuclear insertions of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas and their potential as population genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Soto-Calderón, Iván Darío; Clark, Nicholas Jonathan; Wildschutte, Julia Vera Halo; DiMattio, Kelly; Jensen-Seaman, Michael Ignatius; Anthony, Nicola Mary

    2014-12-01

    The first hyper-variable region (HV1) of the mitochondrial control region (MCR) has been widely used as a molecular tool in population genetics, but inadvertent amplification of nuclear translocated copies of mitochondrial DNA (numts) in gorillas has compromised the use of mitochondrial DNA in population genetic studies. At least three putative classes (I, II, III) of gorilla-specific HV1 MCR numts have been uncovered over the past decade. However, the number, size and location of numt loci in gorillas and other apes are completely unknown. Furthermore, little work to date has assessed the utility of numts as candidate population genetic markers. In the present study, we screened Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic libraries in the chimpanzee and gorilla to compare patterns of mitochondrial-wide insertion in both taxa. We conducted an intensive BLAST search for numts in the gorilla genome and compared the prevalence of numt loci originating from the MCR with other great ape taxa. Additional gorilla-specific MCR numts were retrieved either through BAC library screens or using an anchored-PCR (A-PCR) amplification using genomic DNA from five unrelated gorillas. Locus-specific primers were designed to identify numt insertional polymorphisms and evaluate their potential as population genetic markers. Mitochondrial-wide surveys of chimpanzee and gorilla BACs showed that the number of numts does not differ between these two taxa. However, MCR numts are more abundant in chimpanzees than in other great apes. We identified and mapped 67 putative gorilla-specific numts, including two that contain the entire HV1 domain, cluster with sequences from two numt classes (I, IIb) and will likely co-amplify with mitochondrial sequences using most published HV1 primers. However, phylogenetic analysis coupled with post-hoc analysis of mitochondrial variation can successfully differentiate nuclear sequences. Insertional polymorphisms were evident in three out of five numts

  14. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications.

  15. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications. PMID:26797529

  16. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim interacts with components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM).

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel O; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated.

  17. The Cell-Free Integration of a Polytopic Mitochondrial Membrane Protein into Liposomes Occurs Cotranslationally and in a Lipid-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ashley R.; O'Brien, Catherine C.; Alder, Nathan N.

    2012-01-01

    The ADP/ATP Carrier (AAC) is the most abundant transporter of the mitochondrial inner membrane. The central role that this transporter plays in cellular energy production highlights the importance of understanding its structure, function, and the basis of its pathologies. As a means of preparing proteoliposomes for the study of membrane proteins, several groups have explored the use of cell-free translation systems to facilitate membrane protein integration directly into preformed unilamellar vesicles without the use of surfactants. Using AAC as a model, we report for the first time the detergent-free reconstitution of a mitochondrial inner membrane protein into liposomes using a wheat germ-based in vitro translation system. Using a host of independent approaches, we demonstrate the efficient integration of AAC into vesicles with an inner membrane-mimetic lipid composition and, more importantly, that the integrated AAC is functionally active in transport. By adding liposomes at different stages of the translation reaction, we show that this direct integration is obligatorily cotranslational, and by synthesizing stable ribosome-bound nascent chain intermediates, we show that the nascent AAC polypeptide interacts with lipid vesicles while ribosome-bound. Finally, we show that the presence of the phospholipid cardiolipin in the liposomes specifically enhances AAC translation rate as well as the efficiency of vesicle association and integration. In light of these results, the possible mechanisms of liposome-assisted membrane protein integration during cell-free translation are discussed with respect to the mode of integration and the role of specific lipids. PMID:23050015

  18. Plasma membrane potential of the alga dunaliella, and its relation to osmoregulation.

    PubMed

    Oren-Shamir, M; Pick, U; Avron, M

    1990-06-01

    A fluorescent dye sensitive to membrane potential was used to follow the plasma-membrane potential in the unicellular halo-tolerant alga Dunaliella salina. The signal observed during dissipation of the plasma membrane potential by the addition of excess K(+) and valinomycin, or a protonophore, was taken as a measure of the preexisting potential. A resting potential of -85 to -100 millivolts (negative inside) was calculated. Following a hypertonic shock, the plasma membrane was rapidly hyperpolarized. This hyperpolarization was transient, and the algae resumed their resting potential about 30 minutes after the shock. The resting plasma membrane potential was decreased by vanadate and is concluded to be generated mostly by the plasma membrane ATPase of Dunaliella. The transient hyperpolarization following a hypertonic shock indicates, therefore, a transient activation of the ATPase. This is further corroborated by a rapid transient decrease in the intracellular ATP following a hypertonic shock and its inhibition by vanadate. It is suggested that activation of the plasma membrane ATPase may be the trigger for osmoregulation in Dunaliella. PMID:16667480

  19. THE NON-STEADY STATE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL OF ION EXCHANGERS WITH FIXED SITES.

    PubMed

    CONTI, F; EISENMAN, G

    1965-03-01

    A system of equations, based upon the assumption that the only force acting on each ionic species is due to the gradient of its electrochemical potential, is used to deduce, in the non-steady state for zero net current, the expression of the difference of electric potential between two solutions separated by an ion exchange membrane with fixed monovalent sites. The membrane is assumed to be solely permeable to cations or anions, depending on whether the charge of the sites is -1 or +1, and not to permit any flow of solvent. Under the assumptions that the difference of standard chemical potentials of any pair of permeant monovalent species and the ratio of their mobilities are constant throughout the membrane, even when the spacing of sites is variable, explicit expressions are derived for the diffusion potential and total membrane potential as functions of time and of solution activities. The expressions are valid for any number of permeant monovalent species having ideal behavior and for two permeant monovalent species having "n-type" non-ideal behavior. The results show that for a step change in solution composition the observable potential across a membrane having fixed, but not necessarily uniformly spaced, sites becomes independent of time once equilibria are established at the boundaries of the membrane and attains its steady-state value even while the ionic concentration profiles and the electric potential profile within the membrane are changing with time.

  20. The Spatial Variation of Membrane Potential Near a Small Source of Current in a Spherical Cell

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R. S.; Engel, E.

    1970-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the change in membrane potential produced by current supplied by a microelectrode inserted just under the membrane of a spherical cell. The results of the analysis are presented in tabular and graphic form for three wave forms of current: steady, step function, and sinusoidal. As expected from physical reasoning, we find that the membrane potential is nonuniform, that there is a steep rise in membrane potential near the current microelectrode, and that this rise is of particular importance when the membrane resistance is low, or the membrane potential is changing rapidly. The effect of this steep rise in potential on the interpretation of voltage measurements from spherical cells is discussed and practical suggestions for minimizing these effects are made: in particular, it is pointed out that if the current and voltage electrodes are separated by 60°, the change in membrane potential produced by application of current is close to that which would occur if there were no spatial variation of potential. We thus suggest that investigations of the electrical properties of spherical cells using two microelectrodes can best be made when the electrodes are separated by 60°. PMID:5424376

  1. Multiphoton Process and Anomalous Potential of Cell Membrane by Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhar, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, by the use of quantum biology and quantum optics, the laser induced potential variation of cell membrane has been studied. Theoretically, we have found a method of calculating the monophoton and multiphoton processes in the formation of the anomalous potential of cell membrane. In contrast with the experimental results, our numerical result is in the same order. Therefore, we have found the possibility of cancer caused by the laser induced anomalous cell potential.

  2. Acid gradient across plasma membrane can drive phosphate bond synthesis in cancer cells: acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target.

  3. Mitochondrial aquaporin-8 knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization and loss of viability.

    PubMed

    Marchissio, Maria Julia; Francés, Daniel Eleazar Antonio; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Marinelli, Raúl Alberto

    2012-10-15

    Human aquaporin-8 (AQP8) channels facilitate the diffusional transport of H(2)O(2) across membranes. Since AQP8 is expressed in hepatic inner mitochondrial membranes, we studied whether mitochondrial AQP8 (mtAQP8) knockdown in human hepatoma HepG2 cells impairs mitochondrial H(2)O(2) release, which may lead to organelle dysfunction and cell death. We confirmed AQP8 expression in HepG2 inner mitochondrial membranes and found that 72h after cell transfection with siRNAs targeting two different regions of the human AQP8 molecule, mtAQP8 protein specifically decreased by around 60% (p<0.05). Studies in isolated mtAQP8-knockdown mitochondria showed that H(2)O(2) release, assessed by Amplex Red, was reduced by about 45% (p<0.05), an effect not observed in digitonin-permeabilized mitochondria. mtAQP8-knockdown cells showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS, assessed by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (+120%, p<0.05) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (-80%, p<0.05), assessed by tetramethylrhodamine-coupled quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoTempol prevented ROS accumulation and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cyclosporin A, a mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker, also abolished the mtAQP8 knockdown-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Besides, the loss of viability in mtAQP8 knockdown cells verified by MTT assay, LDH leakage, and trypan blue exclusion test could be prevented by cyclosporin A. Our data on human hepatoma HepG2 cells suggest that mtAQP8 facilitates mitochondrial H(2)O(2) release and that its defective expression causes ROS-induced mitochondrial depolarization via the mitochondrial permeability transition mechanism, and cell death. PMID:22910329

  4. Mitochondrial control of nuclear apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Anucleate cells can be induced to undergo programmed cell death (PCD), indicating the existence of a cytoplasmic PCD pathway that functions independently from the nucleus. Cytoplasmic structures including mitochondria have been shown to participate in the control of apoptotic nuclear disintegration. Before cells exhibit common signs of nuclear apoptosis (chromatin condensation and endonuclease-mediated DNA fragmentation), they undergo a reduction of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (delta psi m) that may be due to the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT) pores. Here, we present direct evidence indicating that mitochondrial PT constitutes a critical early event of the apoptotic process. In a cell-free system combining purified mitochondria and nuclei, mitochondria undergoing PT suffice to induce chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Induction of PT by pharmacological agents augments the apoptosis-inducing potential of mitochondria. In contrast, prevention of PT by pharmacological agents impedes nuclear apoptosis, both in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondria from hepatocytes or lymphoid cells undergoing apoptosis, but not those from normal cells, induce disintegration of isolated Hela nuclei. A specific ligand of the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), bongkreik acid, inhibits PT and reduces apoptosis induction by mitochondria in a cell-free system. Moreover, it inhibits the induction of apoptosis in intact cells. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the proto-oncogene product Bcl-2 inhibits apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial PT. First, to inhibit nuclear apoptosis, Bcl-2 must be localized in mitochondrial but not nuclear membranes. Second, transfection-enforced hyperexpression of Bcl-2 directly abolishes the induction of mitochondrial PT in response to a protonophore, a pro- oxidant, as well as to the ANT ligand atractyloside, correlating with its apoptosis-inhibitory effect. In conclusion, mitochondrial PT appears

  5. The membrane potential of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells microelectrode measurements and their critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lassen, U V; Nielsen, A M; Pape, L; Simonsen, L O

    1971-12-01

    Intracellular potentials were measured, using a piezoelectric electromechanical transducer to impale Ehrlich ascites tumor cells with capillary microelectrodes. In sodium Ringer's, the potential immediately after the penetration was -24±7 mV, and decayed to a stable value of about -8 mV within a few msec. The peak potentials disappeared in potassium Ringer's and reappeared immediately after resuspension in sodium. Ringer's, whereas the stable potentials were only slightly influenced by the change of medium. The peak potential is in good agreement with the Nernst potential for chloride. This is also the case when cell sodium and potassium have been changed by addition of ouabain. It is concluded that the peak potentials represent the membrane potential of the unperturbed cell, and that chloride is in electrochemical equilibrium across the cell membrane.The membrane potential of about -11 mV previously reported corresponds to the stable potential in this study, and is considered as a junction potential between damaged cells and their environment. Similar potential differences were recorded between a homogenate of cells and Ringer's.The apparent membrane resistance of Ehrlich cells was about 70 Ωcm(2). This is two orders of magnitude less than the value calculated from(36)Cl fluxes, and may, in part, represent a leak in the cell membrane.For comparison, the influence of an eventual leak on measurements in red cells and mitochondria is discussed.

  6. Aldosterone secretion, measurements of membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity in the isolated adrenal zone glomerulosa.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, M; Hampel, J; Belkien, L; Oelkers, W

    1984-09-01

    Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity (microelectrodes filled with ion-sensitive liquid ion exchanger) were measured in the zona glomerulosa of superfused hemi-adrenals of rats kept on different diets. Simultaneously, samples of the superfusate were collected and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for aldosterone content. Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity were not influenced by high sodium, low sodium or high potassium diet. However, aldosterone secretion significantly changed. These results suggest that membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity per se may not be linked to changes in aldosterone secretion.

  7. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  8. Lipid, detergent, and Coomassie Blue G-250 affect the migration of small membrane proteins in blue native gels: mitochondrial carriers migrate as monomers not dimers.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Paul G; Harding, Marilyn; Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Lee, Yang; Kunji, Edmund R S

    2013-07-26

    Blue native gel electrophoresis is a popular method for the determination of the oligomeric state of membrane proteins. Studies using this technique have reported that mitochondrial carriers are dimeric (composed of two ∼32-kDa monomers) and, in some cases, can form physiologically relevant associations with other proteins. Here, we have scrutinized the behavior of the yeast mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier AAC3 in blue native gels. We find that the apparent mass of AAC3 varies in a detergent- and lipid-dependent manner (from ∼60 to ∼130 kDa) that is not related to changes in the oligomeric state of the protein, but reflects differences in the associated detergent-lipid micelle and Coomassie Blue G-250 used in this technique. Higher oligomeric state species are only observed under less favorable solubilization conditions, consistent with aggregation of the protein. Calibration with an artificial covalent AAC3 dimer indicates that the mass observed for solubilized AAC3 and other mitochondrial carriers corresponds to a monomer. Size exclusion chromatography of purified AAC3 in dodecyl maltoside under blue native gel-like conditions shows that the mass of the monomer is ∼120 kDa, but appears smaller on gels (∼60 kDa) due to the unusually high amount of bound negatively charged dye, which increases the electrophoretic mobility of the protein-detergent-dye micelle complex. Our results show that bound lipid, detergent, and Coomassie stain alter the behavior of mitochondrial carriers on gels, which is likely to be true for other small membrane proteins where the associated lipid-detergent micelle is large when compared with the mass of the protein.

  9. Rat Liver Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by an Organic Arsenical Compound 4-(2-Nitrobenzaliminyl) Phenyl Arsenoxide.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuan-Hong; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Ling-Li; Chen, Xin-You; Lei, Ke-Lin; Zhao, Jie; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is successfully used in cancer chemotherapy and several cancer treatments on account of its apoptogenic effects. However, it is environmentally hazardous with potential for toxicity when distributed in the soil, water, and food, and long exposure to water contaminated with Arsenic may induce cancers. Some research studies have reported that liver is the storage site and an important target organ for Arsenic toxicity. In the present work, a new kind of organic arsenic compound, 4-(2-nitrobenzaliminyl) phenyl arsenoxide (NPA), was synthesized, and its potential involvement of mitochondria was explored. The results presented that the toxicology of NPA, at least in part, mediated mitochondrial function and may thoroughly destroy mitochondrial membrane physiological functions. NPA induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) opening that induces mitochondrial biochemical abnormalities as evidenced by mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential breakdown, membrane fluidity alterations, and the strikingly remarkable protection of CsA. Meanwhile, both the decreased respiration rate of state 4 and the increased inner membrane H(+) permeabilization revealed that the inner membrane function regarding important energy production chain was destroyed. The toxicity of NPA is due to its interaction with mitochondrial membrane thiol protein. This conclusion is based on the protective effects of RR, DTT, and MBM(+). PMID:26087905

  10. Single cell wound generates electric current circuit and cell membrane potential variations that requires calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2014-07-24

    Breaching of the cell membrane is one of the earliest and most common causes of cell injury, tissue damage, and disease. If the compromise in cell membrane is not repaired quickly, irreversible cell damage, cell death and defective organ functions will result. It is therefore fundamentally important to efficiently repair damage to the cell membrane. While the molecular aspects of single cell wound healing are starting to be deciphered, its bio-physical counterpart has been poorly investigated. Using Xenopus laevis oocytes as a model for single cell wound healing, we describe the temporal and spatial dynamics of the wound electric current circuitry and the temporal dynamics of cell membrane potential variation. In addition, we show the role of calcium influx in controlling electric current circuitry and cell membrane potential variations. (i) Upon wounding a single cell: an inward electric current appears at the wound center while an outward electric current is observed at its sides, illustrating the wound electric current circuitry; the cell membrane is depolarized; calcium flows into the cell. (ii) During cell membrane re-sealing: the wound center current density is maintained for a few minutes before decreasing; the cell membrane gradually re-polarizes; calcium flow into the cell drops. (iii) In conclusion, calcium influx is required for the formation and maintenance of the wound electric current circuitry, for cell membrane re-polarization and for wound healing.

  11. Thioredoxin Reductase Deficiency Potentiates Oxidative Stress, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Dopaminergic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopert, Pamela; Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx) system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H2O2 levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR) inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells) resulted in a synergistic increase in H2O2 levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2) in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H2O2, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H2O2 the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H2O2 and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD. PMID:23226354

  12. Methyl glycol, methanol and DMSO effects on post-thaw motility, velocities, membrane integrity and mitochondrial function of Brycon orbignyanus and Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes) sperm.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Ana T M; Nascimento, Ariane F; Leal, Marcelo C; Gonçalves, Antônio C S; Orfão, Laura H; Cosson, Jacky

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use more accurate techniques to investigate the effects of cryoprotectants (CPAs) and extenders on post-thaw sperm quality of Brycon orbignyanus and Prochilodus lineatus. Six freezing media comprising the combination of three CPAs (DMSO, methanol and methyl glycol) and two extenders (BTS and glucose) were used. Sperm was diluted in each medium, loaded into 0.5-mL straws, frozen in a nitrogen vapor vessel (dry-shipper), and stored in liquid nitrogen at -196 °C. Post-thaw sperm motility rate and velocities (curvilinear = VCL; straight line = VSL; average path = VAP) were evaluated using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. Membrane integrity and mitochondrial function were determined using fluorochromes. Post-thaw quality was considered high when samples presented the following minimum values: 60 % motile sperm, 140 µm/s of VCL, 50 % intact sperm membrane and 50 % mitochondrial function integrity. High post-thaw quality was observed in B. orbignyanus sperm frozen in BTS-methyl glycol and in P. lineatus sperm frozen in BTS-methyl glycol, glucose-methyl glycol and glucose-methanol. All samples frozen in DMSO yielded low quality. The presence of ions in the BTS extender affected post-thaw sperm quality positively in B. orbignyanus and negatively in P. lineatus. Methyl glycol was the most suitable CPA for both fish species, leading to a good protection of cell membrane, mitochondrial function and motility apparatus during the cryopreservation process. For an improved protection, B. orbignyanus sperm should be frozen in an ionic freezing medium. PMID:25433690

  13. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  14. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium: evidence and potential clinical use.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Elizabeth R; Shelling, Andrew N; Cree, Lynsey M

    2016-08-01

    The ability to screen embryos for aneuploidy or inherited disorders in a minimally invasive manner may represent a major advancement for the future of embryo viability assessment. Recent studies have demonstrated that both blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium contain genetic material, which can be isolated and subjected to downstream genetic analysis. The blastocoele fluid may represent an alternative source of nuclear DNA for aneuploidy testing, although the degree to which the isolated genetic material is solely representative of the developing embryo is currently unclear. In addition to nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be detected in the embryo culture medium. Currently, the origin of this nuclear and mtDNA has not been fully evaluated and there are several potential sources of contamination that may contribute to the genetic material detected in the culture medium. There is however evidence that the mtDNA content of the culture medium is related to embryo fragmentation levels and its presence is predictive of blastulation, indicating that embryo development may influence the levels of genetic material detected. If the levels of genetic material are strongly related to aspects of embryo quality, then this may be a novel biomarker of embryo viability. If the genetic material does have an embryo origin, the mechanisms by which DNA may be released into the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium are unknown, although apoptosis may play a role. While the presence of this genetic material is an exciting discovery, the DNA in the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium appears to be of low yield and integrity, which makes it challenging to study. Further research aimed at assessing the methodologies used for both isolating and analysing this genetic material, as well as tracing its origin, are needed in order to evaluate its potential for clinical use. Should such methodologies prove to be routinely successful and the DNA recovered

  15. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium: evidence and potential clinical use.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Elizabeth R; Shelling, Andrew N; Cree, Lynsey M

    2016-08-01

    The ability to screen embryos for aneuploidy or inherited disorders in a minimally invasive manner may represent a major advancement for the future of embryo viability assessment. Recent studies have demonstrated that both blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium contain genetic material, which can be isolated and subjected to downstream genetic analysis. The blastocoele fluid may represent an alternative source of nuclear DNA for aneuploidy testing, although the degree to which the isolated genetic material is solely representative of the developing embryo is currently unclear. In addition to nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be detected in the embryo culture medium. Currently, the origin of this nuclear and mtDNA has not been fully evaluated and there are several potential sources of contamination that may contribute to the genetic material detected in the culture medium. There is however evidence that the mtDNA content of the culture medium is related to embryo fragmentation levels and its presence is predictive of blastulation, indicating that embryo development may influence the levels of genetic material detected. If the levels of genetic material are strongly related to aspects of embryo quality, then this may be a novel biomarker of embryo viability. If the genetic material does have an embryo origin, the mechanisms by which DNA may be released into the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium are unknown, although apoptosis may play a role. While the presence of this genetic material is an exciting discovery, the DNA in the blastocoele fluid and embryo culture medium appears to be of low yield and integrity, which makes it challenging to study. Further research aimed at assessing the methodologies used for both isolating and analysing this genetic material, as well as tracing its origin, are needed in order to evaluate its potential for clinical use. Should such methodologies prove to be routinely successful and the DNA recovered

  16. Effects of hypothermic storage on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and plasma membrane integrity in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Theisen, D D; Woods, L C

    2011-03-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage on striped bass sperm cell plasma membrane integrity, free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cytometry; motion activation and ATP concentration as determined by Luciferin-Luciferase bioluminescence assay. Semen was stored for 1 or 24 h at 4 °C in an O(2) atmosphere undiluted or diluted (one volume semen with 3 volumes diluent) with T350 (20 mM TRIS base-NaCl, 350 mOsm/mL, pH 8) or with seminal plasma in the presence of various treatments. Viability (% cells excluding propidium iodide) approached 100% after 1 h storage in undiluted or diluted semen. After 1 h of storage the [Ca(2+)](i) marker, Fluo-3, was detected in only 3% of sperm cells in undiluted or diluted semen. In contrast to storage for 1 h, after 24 h the incidence Fluo-3 fluorescence intensity was increased (P < 0.05) in > 50% of the viable cells in undiluted and diluted semen along with increased cell death; the presence of 1 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) blocked CaCl(2)-induced Fluo-3 fluorescence and cell death. Activation of sperm motility was 82% after 1 h in T350 and decreased (P < 0.05) to 30% after 24 h. However, motility activation failed in the presence of EGTA at 1 or 24 h. During storage ΔΨ(m) was not affected by storage time or treatment. In contrast, sperm ATP was greater (P < 0.05) at 1 h than at 24 h and was greater in sperm stored in diluted than undiluted form. While ROS formation was induced by menadione treatment, there was no evidence of storage-induced ROS formation in the absence of menadione. The increased [Ca(2+)](i) found after 24 h indicates a storage induced defect in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis which may be detrimental to sperm activation. PMID:21247623

  17. Effects of hypothermic storage on intracellular calcium, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial function, motility, and plasma membrane integrity in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) sperm.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R; Theisen, D D; Woods, L C

    2011-03-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effect of hypothermic 24 h storage on striped bass sperm cell plasma membrane integrity, free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidation of hydroethidine to ethidium) as determined by flow cytometry; motion activation and ATP concentration as determined by Luciferin-Luciferase bioluminescence assay. Semen was stored for 1 or 24 h at 4 °C in an O(2) atmosphere undiluted or diluted (one volume semen with 3 volumes diluent) with T350 (20 mM TRIS base-NaCl, 350 mOsm/mL, pH 8) or with seminal plasma in the presence of various treatments. Viability (% cells excluding propidium iodide) approached 100% after 1 h storage in undiluted or diluted semen. After 1 h of storage the [Ca(2+)](i) marker, Fluo-3, was detected in only 3% of sperm cells in undiluted or diluted semen. In contrast to storage for 1 h, after 24 h the incidence Fluo-3 fluorescence intensity was increased (P < 0.05) in > 50% of the viable cells in undiluted and diluted semen along with increased cell death; the presence of 1 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) blocked CaCl(2)-induced Fluo-3 fluorescence and cell death. Activation of sperm motility was 82% after 1 h in T350 and decreased (P < 0.05) to 30% after 24 h. However, motility activation failed in the presence of EGTA at 1 or 24 h. During storage ΔΨ(m) was not affected by storage time or treatment. In contrast, sperm ATP was greater (P < 0.05) at 1 h than at 24 h and was greater in sperm stored in diluted than undiluted form. While ROS formation was induced by menadione treatment, there was no evidence of storage-induced ROS formation in the absence of menadione. The increased [Ca(2+)](i) found after 24 h indicates a storage induced defect in the maintenance of cellular calcium homeostasis which may be detrimental to sperm activation.

  18. Cholate extracts of mitochondrial outer membranes increase inhibition by malonyl-CoA of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I by a mechanism involving phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Mynatt, R L; Greenhaw, J J; Cook, G A

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that sodium cholate can separate the catalytic component of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I (CPT-I) from a putative malonyl-CoA-binding regulatory protein capable of conferring sensitivity to malonyl-CoA on CPT-II. We found that cholate preferentially extracted a contaminating malonyl-CoA-sensitive CPT from mitochondrial inner membranes. When cholate extracts of outer membranes were incubated either with cholate extracts of inner membranes or with osmotically swollen mitochondria, inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA was increased. Treatment of intact mitochondria with subtilisin abolished the increased inhibition by malonyl-CoA, suggesting that the outer-membrane CPT-I was responsible for the increased inhibition. Incubation of cholate extracts with proteinase K did not prevent the increased inhibition. Fractionation of the cholate extract indicated the presence of phospholipids. Addition of cardiolipin or phosphatidylglycerol to osmotically swollen mitochondria increased sensitivity of CPT to malonyl-CoA, but several other phospholipids did not. When cardiolipin was added to intact mitochondria from either starved or fed rats, there were large increases in inhibition by malonyl-CoA; sensitivity in mitochondria from starved rats increased to that normally observed with mitochondria from fed rats. These results suggest that phospholipids are responsible for the increased inhibition of CPT by malonyl-CoA with added cholate extracts and that changes in membrane composition may be involved in the physiological regulation of CPT-I. PMID:8192665

  19. Effect of cholesterol on the interaction of the HIV GP41 fusion peptide with model membranes. Importance of the membrane dipole potential.

    PubMed

    Buzón, Víctor; Cladera, Josep

    2006-12-26

    Fusion of viral and cell membranes is a key event in the process by which the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enters the target cell. Membrane fusion is facilitated by the interaction of the viral gp41 fusion peptide with the cell membrane. Using synthetic peptides and model membrane systems, it has been established that the sequence of events implies the binding of the peptide to the membrane, followed by a conformational change (transformation of unordered and helical structures into beta-aggregates) which precedes lipid mixing. It is known that this process can be influenced by the membrane lipid composition. In the present work we have undertaken a systematic study in order to determine the influence of cholesterol (abundant in the viral membrane) in the sequence of events leading to lipid mixing. Besides its effect on membrane fluidity, cholesterol can affect a less known physical parameter, the membrane dipole potential. Using the dipole potential fluorescent sensor di-8-ANEPPS together with other biophysical techniques, we show that cholesterol increases the affinity of the fusion peptide for the model membranes, and although it lowers the extent of lipid mixing, it increases the mixing rate. The influence of cholesterol on the peptide affinity and the lipid mixing rate are shown to be mainly due to its influence of the membrane dipole potential, whereas the lipid mixing extent and peptide conformational changes seem to be more dependent on other membrane parameters such as membrane fluidity and hydration.

  20. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.