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Sample records for mitochondrial membrane potential

  1. Tau accumulation impairs mitophagy via increasing mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing mitochondrial Parkin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-hao; Luo, Yu; Zhang, Xiangnan; Liu, Xiu-Ping; Feng, Qiong; Wang, Qun; Yue, Zhenyu; Chen, Zhong; Ye, Keqiang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular accumulation of wild type tau is a hallmark of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tau toxicity is not fully understood. Here, we detected mitophagy deficits evidenced by the increased levels of mitophagy markers, including COX IV, TOMM20, and the ratio of mtDNA to genomic DNA indexed as mt-Atp6/Rpl13, in the AD brains and in the human wild type full-length tau (htau) transgenic mice. More interestingly, the mitophagy deficit was only shown in the AD patients who had an increased total tau level. Further studies demonstrated that overexpression of htau induced mitophagy deficits in HEK293 cells, the primary hippocampal neurons and in the brains of C57 mice. Upon overexpression of htau, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and the levels of PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and Parkin decreased in the mitochondrial fraction, while upregulation of Parkin attenuated the htau-induced mitophagy deficits. Finally, we detected a dose-dependent allocation of tau proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane fraction along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. These data suggest that intracellular accumulation of htau induces mitophagy deficits by direct inserting into the mitochondrial membrane and thus increasing the membrane potential, which impairs the mitochondrial residence of PINK1/Parkin. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism underlying the htau-induced neuronal toxicities in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:26943044

  2. A new model for mitochondrial membrane potential production and storage.

    PubMed

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2014-08-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) is the most reliable indicator of mitochondrial function. The MMP value range of -136 to -140mV has been considered optimal for maximum ATP production for all living organisms. Even small changes from the above range result in a large fall in ATP production and a large increase in ROS production. The resulting bioenergetic deregulation is considered as the causative agent for numerous major human diseases. Normalization of MMP value improves mitochondrial function and gives excellent therapeutic results. In order for a systematic effective treatment of these diseases to be developed, a detailed knowledge of the mechanism of MMP production is absolutely necessary. However, despite the long-standing research efforts, a concrete mechanism for MMP production has not been found yet. The present paper proposes a novel mechanism of MMP production based on new considerations underlying the function of the two basic players of MMP production, the electron transport chain (ETC) and the F1F0 ATP synthase. Under normal conditions, MMP is almost exclusively produced by the electron flow through ETC complexes I-IV, creating a direct electric current that stops in subunit II of complex IV and gradually charges MMP. However, upon ETC dysfunction F1F0 ATP synthase reverses its action and starts to hydrolyze ATP. ATP hydrolysis further produces electric energy which is transferred, in the form of a direct electric current, from F1 to F0 where is used to charge MMP. This new model is expected to redirect current experimental research on mitochondrial bioenergetics and indicate new therapeutic schemes for mitochondrial disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a trait involved in organelle inheritance?

    PubMed

    Milani, Liliana

    2015-10-01

    Which mitochondria are inherited across generations? Are transmitted mitochondria functionally silenced to preserve the integrity of their genetic information, or rather are those mitochondria with the highest levels of function (as indicated by membrane potential Δψm) preferentially transmitted? Based on observations of the unusual system of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria and of the common strictly maternal inheritance mode, I formulate a general hypothesis to explain which mitochondria reach the primordial germ cells (PGCs), and how this happens. Several studies indicate that mitochondrial movements are driven by microtubules and that mitochondria with high Δψm are preferentially transported. This can be applied also to the mitochondria that eventually populate embryonic PGCs, so I propose that Δψm may be a trait that allows for the preferential transmission of the most active (and healthy) mitochondria. The topics discussed here are fundamental in cell biology and genetics but remain controversial and a subject of heated debate; I propose an explanation for how a Δψm-dependent mechanism can cause the observed differences in mitochondrial transmission.

  4. Mitochondrial membrane potential: a novel biomarker of oxidative environmental stress.

    PubMed Central

    Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Kreps, Sarah E; Adrie, Christophe; Dall'Ava, Josette; Christiani, David; Polla, Barbara S

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic analyses, traditionally based on long-term cohort or case-control studies, provide retrospective causal associations between exposure to a particular environmental stressor and an exposure-related disease end point. Recent research initiatives have propelled a shift toward exploring molecular epidemiology and molecular biological markers (biomarkers) as a means of providing more immediate, quantitative risk assessment of potentially deleterious environmental exposures. We compared, in normal human monocytes isolated from the blood of healthy donors, variations in Hsp70 expression and mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) in response to exposure to either tobacco smoke or gamma-irradiation, two models for environmentally mediated oxidant exposure. On the basis of its mechanistic specificity for oxidants and little baseline variation in cells from distinct individuals, we propose that delta psi m represents a selective in vitro and in vivo biomarker for oxidant exposure. delta psi m may be used to gauge risks associated with oxidant-mediated air pollution and radiation. PMID:11882482

  5. Photodynamic action of chlorin e6 on thymocyte plasmatic and mitochondrial membrane potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulkhandanyan, Grigor V.

    2005-08-01

    Transmembrane potentials appear to be cell state sensitive characteristics and can give information about cell damage initial stage. Photodynamic action of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 on plasmatic and mitochondrial membrane potentials of the rat thymus lymphocytes was studied using voltage-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G. It has been revealed that mitochondrial membrane potential is more sensitive characteristic of membrane disfunction than plasmatic one at the cell photodamage.

  6. Development of a no-wash assay for mitochondrial membrane potential using the styryl dye DASPEI.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristian H R; Rekling, Jens C

    2010-10-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of several diseases and may also result from drugs with unwanted side effects on mitochondrial biochemistry. The mitochondrial membrane potential is a good indicator of mitochondrial function. Here, the authors have developed a no-wash mitochondrial membrane potential assay using 2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide (DASPEI), a rarely used mitochondrial potentiometric probe, in a 96-well format using a fluorescent plate reader. The assay was validated using 2 protonophores (CCCP, DNP), which are known uncouplers, and the neuroleptic thioridazine, which is a suspected mitochondrial toxicant. CCCP and DNP have short-term depolarizing effects, and thioridazine has long-term hyperpolarizing effects on the mitochondrial membrane potential of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The assay also detected changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential in CHO cells exposed to cobalt (mimicking hypoxia) and in PC12 cells exposed to amyloid β, demonstrating that the assay can be used in cellular models of hypoxia and Alzheimer's disease. The assay needs no washing steps, has a Z' value >0.5, can be used on standard fluorometers, has good post liquid-handling stability, and thus is suitable for large-scale screening efforts. In summary, the DASPEI assay is simple and rapid and may be of use in toxicological testing, drug target discovery, and mechanistic models of diseases involving mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Monitoring of relative mitochondrial membrane potential in living cells by fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Permeant cationic fluorescent probes are shown to be selectively accumulated by the mitochondria of living cells. Mitochondria-specific interaction of such molecules is apparently dependent on the high trans- membrane potential (inside negative) maintained by functional mitochondria. Dissipation of the mitochondrial trans-membrane and potential by ionophores or inhibitors of electron transport eliminates the selective mitochondrial association of these compounds. The application of such potential-dependent probes in conjunction with fluorescence microscopy allows the monitoring of mitochondrial membrane potential in individual living cells. Marked elevations in mitochondria- associated probe fluorescence have been observed in cells engaged in active movement. This approach to the analysis of mitochondrial membrane potential should be of value in future investigations of the control of energy metabolism and energy requirements of specific biological functions at the cellular level. PMID:6783667

  8. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes and the proton gradient: a practical usage guide.

    PubMed

    Perry, Seth W; Norman, John P; Barbieri, Justin; Brown, Edward B; Gelbard, Harris A

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescent probes for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential are frequently used for assessing mitochondrial function, particularly in the context of cell fate determination in biological and biomedical research. However, valid interpretation of results obtained with such probes requires careful consideration of numerous controls, as well as possible effects of non-protonic charges on dye behavior. In this context, we provide an overview of some of the important technical considerations, controls, and parallel complementary assays that can be employed to help ensure appropriate interpretation of results, thus providing a practical usage guide for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potentials with cationic probes. In total, this review will help illustrate both the strengths and potential pitfalls of common mitochondrial membrane potential dyes, and highlight best-usage approaches for their efficacious application in life sciences research.

  9. Toward high-content screening of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells.

    PubMed

    Iannetti, Eligio F; Willems, Peter H G M; Pellegrini, Mina; Beyrath, Julien; Smeitink, Jan A M; Blanchet, Lionel; Koopman, Werner J H

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are double membrane organelles involved in various key cellular processes. Governed by dedicated protein machinery, mitochondria move and continuously fuse and divide. These "mitochondrial dynamics" are bi-directionally linked to mitochondrial and cell functional state in space and time. Due to the action of the electron transport chain (ETC), the mitochondrial inner membrane displays a inside-negative membrane potential (Δψ). The latter is considered a functional readout of mitochondrial "health" and required to sustain normal mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial fusion. During the last decade, live-cell microscopy strategies were developed for simultaneous quantification of Δψ and mitochondrial morphology. This revealed that ETC dysfunction, changes in Δψ and aberrations in mitochondrial structure often occur in parallel, suggesting they are linked potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss how combining high-content and high-throughput strategies can be used for analysis of genetic and/or drug-induced effects at the level of individual organelles, cells and cell populations. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  10. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously.

  11. Expression of a Mitochondrial Progesterone Receptor (PR-M) in Leiomyomata and Association With Increased Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Quanling; Crochet, John R.; Dai, Qunsheng; Leppert, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical evidence supports a role for progestins in the growth of leiomyomata (fibroids). The mechanism(s) for this is thought to involve gene regulation via the nuclear progesterone receptors. Recently a mitochondrial progesterone receptor (PR-M) has been identified with evidence of a progesterone/progestin-dependent increase in cellular respiration. This observation raises a possible new mechanism whereby progesterone/progestin may affect the growth of fibroids. Objective: The goals of this research were to determine differential expression of PR-M in normal myometrium compared with the edge of a fibroid within the same uterus, to demonstrate a progestin-dependent increase in mitochondria membrane potential using an immortalized human myometrial cell line and to examine mitochondrial membrane potential in transfected cells expressing the complete coding sequence of PR-M. Design: Protein levels of PR-M, PR-B, PR-A, mitochondrial porin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in the myometrium and adjacent edge of a fibroid in 10 subjects undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by fluorescent emission of 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′-tetraethylbenzimidazolecarbocyanide iodine in hTERT-HM cells treated with R5020 and in transfected hTERT-HM cells determined by the fluorescent emission of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester. Results: Higher levels of PR-M and mitochondrial porin were found in the fibroid edge compared with adjacent myometrium. Progestin increased mitochondrial membrane potential in hTERT-HM cells, which was not affected by a translation inhibitor. This effect was exaggerated in hTERT-HM cells expressing PR-M after transient transfection. Conclusion: These studies suggest a mechanism whereby progesterone/progestin may affect the growth of fibroids by altering mitochondrial activity. PMID:24423317

  12. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart

    SciTech Connect

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 muM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt{sub max} of 105 +- 8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49 +- 7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0 +- 0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2 +- 0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24 +- 1 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14 +- 3 muM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; *p < 0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity.

  13. Stabilization of mitochondrial membrane potential prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Baccouch, Riadh; Modine, Thomas; Preau, Sebastien; Zannis, Konstantinos; Marchetti, Philippe; Lancel, Steve; Neviere, Remi

    2010-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of doxorubicin on left ventricular function and cellular energy state in intact isolated hearts, and, to test whether inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation would prevent doxorubicin-induced mitochondrial and myocardial dysfunction. Myocardial contractile performance and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated by left ventricular tension and its first derivatives and cardiac fiber respirometry, respectively. NADH levels, mitochondrial membrane potential and glucose uptake were monitored non-invasively via epicardial imaging of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Heart performance was reduced in a time-dependent manner in isolated rat hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 1 microM doxorubicin. Compared with controls, doxorubicin induced acute myocardial dysfunction (dF/dt(max) of 105+/-8 mN/s in control hearts vs. 49+/-7 mN/s in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05). In cardiac fibers prepared from perfused hearts, doxorubicin induced depression of mitochondrial respiration (respiratory control ratio of 4.0+/-0.2 in control hearts vs. 2.2+/-0.2 in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05) and cytochrome c oxidase kinetic activity (24+/-1 microM cytochrome c/min/mg in control hearts vs. 14+/-3 microM cytochrome c/min/mg in doxorubicin-treated hearts; p<0.05). Acute cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin was accompanied by NADH redox state, mitochondrial membrane potential, and glucose uptake reduction. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by cyclosporine A largely prevented mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, cardiac energy state and dysfunction. These results suggest that in intact hearts an impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is involved in the development of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  15. Biophysical significance of the inner mitochondrial membrane structure on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Maurer, Laura L.; Lu, Wei; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie

    2013-12-01

    The available literature supports the hypothesis that the morphology of the inner mitochondrial membrane is regulated by different energy states, that the three-dimensional morphology of cristae is dynamic, and that both are related to biochemical function. Examination of the correlation between the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) structure and mitochondrial energetic function is critical to an understanding of the links between mesoscale morphology and function in progressive mitochondrial dysfunction such as aging, neurodegeneration, and disease. To investigate this relationship, we develop a model to examine the effects of three-dimensional IMM morphology on the electrochemical potential of mitochondria. The two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method is used to simulate mitochondrial electric potential and proton concentration distribution. This simulation model demonstrates that the proton motive force (Δp) produced on the membranes of cristae can be higher than that on the inner boundary membrane. The model also shows that high proton concentration in cristae can be induced by the morphology-dependent electric potential gradient along the outer side of the IMM. Furthermore, simulation results show that a high Δp is induced by the large surface-to-volume ratio of an individual crista, whereas a high capacity for ATP synthesis can primarily be achieved by increasing the surface area of an individual crista. The mathematical model presented here provides compelling support for the idea that morphology at the mesoscale is a significant driver of mitochondrial function.

  16. Air Bubble Contact with Endothelial Cells Causes a Calcium-Independent Loss in Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Eckmann, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. Methods and Results Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4) and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1) or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM). Contact with 50–150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα), with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. Conclusions Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:23091614

  17. Air bubble contact with endothelial cells causes a calcium-independent loss in mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Peter; Kandel, Judith; Eckmann, David M

    2012-01-01

    Gas microembolism remains a serious risk associated with surgical procedures and decompression. Despite this, the signaling consequences of air bubbles in the vasculature are poorly understood and there is a lack of pharmacological therapies available. Here, we investigate the mitochondrial consequences of air bubble contact with endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were loaded with an intracellular calcium indicator (Fluo-4) and either a mitochondrial calcium indicator (X-Rhod-1) or mitochondrial membrane potential indicator (TMRM). Contact with 50-150 µm air bubbles induced concurrent rises in intracellular and mitochondrial calcium, followed by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pre-treating cells with 1 µmol/L ruthenium red, a TRPV family calcium channel blocker, did not protect cells from the mitochondrial depolarization, despite blocking the intracellular calcium response. Mitigating the interactions between the air-liquid interface and the endothelial surface layer with 5% BSA or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, inhibiting protein kinase C-α (PKCα), with 5 µmol/L Gö6976, protected cells from mitochondrial depolarization, but did not affect the intracellular calcium response. Our results indicate that air bubble contact with endothelial cells activates a novel, calcium-independent, PKCα-dependent signaling pathway, which results in mitochondrial depolarization. As a result, mitochondrial dysfunction is likely to be a key contributor to the pathophysiology of gas embolism injury. Further, this connection between the endothelial surface layer and endothelial mitochondria may also play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease.

  18. [HOMOCYSTEINE-INDUCED MEMBRANE CURRENTS, CALCIUM RESPONSES AND CHANGES OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL IN RAT CORTICAL NEURONS].

    PubMed

    Abushik, P A; Karelina, T V; Sibarov, D A; Stepanenko, J D; Giniatullin, R; Antonov, S M

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, exhibits neurotoxic effects and is involved in the pathogenesis of several major neurodegenerative disorders. In contrast to well studied excitoxicity of glutamate, the mechanism of homocysteine neurotoxicity is not clearly understood. By using whole-cell patch-clamp, calcium imaging (fluo-3) and measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123) we studied transmembrane currents, calcium signals and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential induced by homocysteine versus responses induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured rat cortical neurons. L-homocysteine (50 µM) induced inward currents that could be completely blocked by the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors - AP-5. In contrast to NMDA-induced currents, homocysteine-induced currents had a smaller steady-state amplitude. Comparison of calcium responses to homocysteine, NMDA or glutamate demonstrated that in all cortical neurons homocysteine elicited short, oscillatory-type calcium responses, whereas NMDA or glutamate induced sustained increase of intracellular calcium. Analysis of mitochondrial changes demonstrated that in contrast to NMDA homocysteine did not cause a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential at the early stages of action. However, after its long-term action, as in the case of NMDA and glutamate, the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were comparable with the full drop of respiratory chain induced by protonophore FCCP. Our data suggest that in cultured rat cortical neuron homocysteine at the first stages of action induces neurotoxic effects through activation of NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors with strong calcium influx through the channels of these receptors. The long-term action of homocysteine may lead to mitochondrial disfuction and appears as a drop of mitochondrial membrane potential.

  19. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes in osteoblasts treated with parathyroid hormone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Troyan, M B; Gilman, V R; Gay, C V

    1997-06-15

    This study assessed mitochondrial membrane potential changes in cultured osteoblasts treated with hormones known to regulate osteoblasts. A fluorescent carbocyanine dye, 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolocarbocyanine++ + iodide, also called JC-1, was used as a probe. JC-1 emits photons at 585 nm (orange-red) when the membrane potential in mitochondria is highly negative, but when the potential becomes reduced emission occurs at 527 nm (green). Osteoblasts were rinsed in serum-free medium for 5 min, then loaded with 1 x 10(-6) M JC-1 for 10 min. The distribution and intensity of JC-1 fluorescence were evaluated with a laser-scanning confocal microscope system. Hormone treatments included parathyroid hormone (PTH; 10(-8) M), 17beta-estradiol (10(-8) M), and thyroxine (T4; 10(-8) M). The potassium ionophore valinomycin (10(-6) M) was used as a control since it is known to disrupt the electrochemical gradient of mitochondria without interfering with the pH gradient. Valinomycin caused a profound, rapid increase (22.5% above untreated values) in the green/red ratio, which indicated a lowering of the mitochondrial membrane potential in all samples evaluated. PTH caused a less pronounced, but significant (7-14%), reduction in membrane potential in all cells examined. PTH is known to affect osteoblasts in a number of ways and is inhibitory to mitochondrial respiration; the results confirm this effect. For estradiol, half of the cells responded at a significant level, with a membrane potential reduction of 6 to 13% being recorded; the other half did not respond. Thyroxine did not alter mitochondrial membrane potential. Responses were detectable within 20 s for valinomycin, but occurred at a slower rate, over 200 to 300 s, following PTH and estradiol treatment. Responses to PTH and estradiol could be due to mitochondrial uptake of cytosolic Ca2+.

  20. Assessment of mitochondrial membrane potential using an on-chip microelectrode in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Sun; Dávila, Antonio; Wallace, Douglas C; Burke, Peter

    2010-07-07

    The mitochondrial membrane potential is used to generate and regulate energy in living systems, driving the conversion of ADP to ATP, regulating ion homeostasis, and controlling apoptosis, all central to human health and disease. Therefore, there is a need for tools to study its regulation in a controlled environment for potential clinical and scientific applications. For this aim, an on-chip tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP(+)) selective microelectrode sensor was constructed in a microfluidic environment. The concentration of isolated mitochondria (Heb7A) used in a membrane potential measurement was 0.3 ng microL(-1), four orders of magnitude smaller than the concentration used in conventional assays (3 microg microL(-1)). In addition, the volume of the chamber (85 microL) is 2 orders of magnitude smaller than traditional experiments. As a demonstration, changes in the membrane potential are clearly measured in response to a barrage of well-known substrates and inhibitors of the electron transport chain. This general approach, which to date has not been demonstrated for study of mitochondrial function and bio-energetics in generally, can be instrumental in advancing the field of mitochondrial research and clinical applications by allowing high throughput studies of the regulation, dynamics, and statistical properties of the mitochondrial membrane potential in response to inhibitors and inducers of apoptosis in a controlled (microfluidic) chemical environment.

  1. Mitochondrial metabolic states and membrane potential modulate mtNOS activity.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Laura B; Zaobornyj, Tamara; Boveris, Alberto

    2006-03-01

    The mitochondrial metabolic state regulates the rate of NO release from coupled mitochondria: NO release by heart, liver and kidney mitochondria was about 40-45% lower in state 3 (1.2, 0.7 and 0.4 nmol/min mg protein) than in state 4 (2.2, 1.3 and 0.7 nmol/min mg protein). The activity of mtNOS, responsible for NO release, appears driven by the membrane potential component and not by intramitochondrial pH of the proton motive force. The intramitochondrial concentrations of the NOS substrates, L-arginine (about 310 microM) and NADPH (1.04-1.78 mM) are 60-1000 times higher than their KM values. Moreover, the changes in their concentrations in the state 4-state 3 transition are not enough to explain the changes in NO release. Nitric oxide release was exponentially dependent on membrane potential as reported for mitochondrial H2O2 production [S.S. Korshunov, V.P. Skulachev, A.A. Satarkov, High protonic potential actuates a mechanism of production of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria. FEBS Lett. 416 (1997) 15-18.]. Agents that decrease or abolish membrane potential minimize NO release while the addition of oligomycin that produces mitochondrial hyperpolarization generates the maximal NO release. The regulation of mtNOS activity, an apparently voltage-dependent enzyme, by membrane potential is marked at the physiological range of membrane potentials.

  2. Variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production by natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains.

    PubMed

    Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kichise, Yuki; Izumoto, Eiji; Nakayama, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Research on the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and fermentation profile is being intensely pursued because of the potential for developing advanced fermentation technologies. In the present study, we isolated naturally occurring strains of yeast from sake mash that produce high levels of malic acid and demonstrate that variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production. To define the underlying biochemical mechanism, we determined the activities of enzymes required for malic acid synthesis and found that pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase activities in strains that produce high levels of malic acid were elevated compared with the standard sake strain K901. These results inspired us to hypothesize that decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was responsible for increased malic acid synthesis, and we present data supporting this hypothesis. Thus, the mitochondrial membrane potential of high malic acid producers was lower compared with standard strains. We conclude that mitochondrial membrane potential correlates with malic acid production.

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Regulates Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Myocardial Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Carl M; Lu, Yao; Stary, Creed M; Piplani, Honit; Small, Bryce A; Urban, Travis J; Qvit, Nir; Gross, Garrett J; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Gross, Eric R

    2016-09-26

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) mediates cellular responses to pain, heat, or noxious stimuli by calcium influx; however, the cellular localization and function of TRPV1 in the cardiomyocyte is largely unknown. We studied whether myocardial injury is regulated by TRPV1 and whether we could mitigate reperfusion injury by limiting the calcineurin interaction with TRPV1. In primary cardiomyocytes, confocal and electron microscopy demonstrates that TRPV1 is localized to the mitochondria. Capsaicin, the specific TRPV1 agonist, dose-dependently reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine or the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine. Using in silico analysis, we discovered an interaction site for TRPV1 with calcineurin. We synthesized a peptide, V1-cal, to inhibit the interaction between TRPV1 and calcineurin. In an in vivo rat myocardial infarction model, V1-cal given just prior to reperfusion substantially mitigated myocardial infarct size compared with vehicle, capsaicin, or cyclosporine (24±3% versus 61±2%, 45±1%, and 49±2%, respectively; n=6 per group; P<0.01 versus all groups). Infarct size reduction by V1-cal was also not seen in TRPV1 knockout rats. TRPV1 is localized at the mitochondria in cardiomyocytes and regulates mitochondrial membrane potential through an interaction with calcineurin. We developed a novel therapeutic, V1-cal, that substantially reduces reperfusion injury by inhibiting the interaction of calcineurin with TRPV1. These data suggest that TRPV1 is an end-effector of cardioprotection and that modulating the TRPV1 protein interaction with calcineurin limits reperfusion injury. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  4. Mitochondrial uncouplers act synergistically with the fumigant phosphine to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential and cause cell death.

    PubMed

    Valmas, Nicholas; Zuryn, Steven; Ebert, Paul R

    2008-10-30

    Phosphine is the most widely used fumigant for the protection of stored commodities against insect pests, especially food products such as grain. However, pest insects are developing resistance to phosphine and thereby threatening its future use. As phosphine inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and reduces the strength of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), we reasoned that mitochondrial uncouplers should act synergistically with phosphine. The mitochondrial uncouplers FCCP and PCP caused complete mortality in populations of both wild-type and phosphine-resistant lines of Caenorhabditis elegans simultaneously exposed to uncoupler and phosphine at concentrations that were individually nonlethal. Strong synergism was also observed with a third uncoupler DNP. We have also tested an alternative complex IV inhibitor, azide, with FCCP and found that this also caused a synergistic enhancement of toxicity in C. elegans. To investigate potential causes of the synergism, we measured DeltaPsi(m), ATP content, and oxidative damage (lipid hydroperoxides) in nematodes subjected to phosphine-FCCP treatment and found that neither an observed 50% depletion in ATP nor oxidative stress accounted for the synergistic effect. Instead, a synergistic reduction in DeltaPsi(m) was observed upon phosphine-FCCP co-treatment suggesting that this is directly responsible for the subsequent mortality. These results support the hypothesis that phosphine-induced mortality results from the in vivo disruption of normal mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel pathway that can be targeted to overcome genetic resistance to phosphine.

  5. Toxicity and Loss of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Induced by Alkyl Gallates in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andréo, Rogério; Regasini, Luís Octávio; Petrônio, Maicon Segalla; Chiari-Andréo, Bruna Galdorfini; Tansini, Aline; Silva, Dulce Helena Siqueira; Cicarelli, Regina Maria Barretto

    2015-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease is a debilitating disease representing an important social problem that affects, approximately, 10 million people in the world. The main aggravating factor of this situation is the lack of an effective drug to treat the different stages of this disease. In this context, the search for trypanocidal substances isolated from plants, synthetic or semi synthetic molecules, is an important strategy. Here, the trypanocidal potential of gallates was assayed in epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi and also, the interference of these substances on the mitochondrial membrane potential of the parasites was assessed, allowing the study of the mechanism of action of the gallates in the T. cruzi organisms. Regarding the preliminary structure-activity relationships, the side chain length of gallates plays crucial role for activity. Nonyl, decyl, undecyl, and dodecyl gallates showed potent antitrypanosomal effect (IC50 from 1.46 to 2.90 μM) in contrast with benznidazole (IC50 = 34.0 μM). Heptyl gallate showed a strong synergistic activity with benznidazole, reducing by 105-fold the IC50 of benznidazole. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by these esters was revealed. Tetradecyl gallate induced a loss of 53% of the mitochondrial membrane potential, at IC50 value. PMID:27347554

  6. Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential after low-flow ischemia are not affected by ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Dodoni, Giuliano; Konietzka, Ina; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd; Schulz, Rainer

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial function following prolonged ischemia and subsequent reperfusion is better preserved by ischemic preconditioning (IP). In the present study, we analyzed whether or not IP has an impact on mitochondrial function at the end of a sustained ischemic period. Göttinger minipigs were subjected to 90-min low-flow ischemia without (n=5) and with (n=5) a preconditioning cycle of 10-min ischemia and 15-min reperfusion. Mitochondria were isolated from the ischemic or preconditioned anterior wall (AW) and the control posterior wall (PW) at the end of ischemia. Basal mitochondrial respiration was not different between AW and PW. The ADP-stimulated (state 3) respiration in AW mitochondria compared to PW mitochondria was equally decreased in non-preconditioned and preconditioned pigs. The uncoupled respiration as well as the membrane potential (rhodamine 123 fluorescence) were not significantly different between groups. However, the recovery of the membrane potential (Delta rhodamine 123 fluorescence/s) after the addition of ADP was delayed in mitochondria obtained from AW compared to PW, both in non-preconditioned and in preconditioned pig hearts. Neither the amount of marker proteins for complexes of the electron transport chain nor the level of reactive oxygen species were affected by ischemia without or with IP. State 3 respiration and recovery of membrane potential were impaired in pig mitochondria after 90 min of low-flow ischemia. IP did not improve mitochondrial function during ischemia. Therefore, the preservation of mitochondrial function by IP may occur during reperfusion rather than during the sustained ischemic period.

  7. Ischemic preconditioning preserves mitochondrial membrane potential and limits reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, Ricardo; Lee, Daniel S; Steinbaugh, Gregory; Cramer, Brandon; Erdahl, Warren; Pfeiffer, Douglas R; Zweier, Jay L; Crestanello, Juan A

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial superoxide radical (O(2)(•¯)) production increases after cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) preserves mitochondrial function and attenuates O(2)(•¯) production, but the mechanism is unknown. Mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔΨ) is known to affect O(2)(•¯) production; mitochondrial depolarization decreases O(2)(•¯) formation. We examined the relationship between O(2)(•¯) production and mΔΨ during IR and IPC. Rat hearts were subjected to Control or IPC. Mitochondria were isolated at end equilibration (End EQ), end ischemia (End I), and end reperfusion (End RP). mΔΨ was measured using a tetraphenylphosphonium electrode. Mitochondrial O(2)(•¯) production was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance using DMPO spin trap. Cytochrome c levels were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography. IPC preserved mΔΨ at End I (-156 ± 5 versus -131 ± 6 mV, P < 0.001) and End RP (-168 ± 2 versus -155 ± 2 mV, P < 0.05). At End RP, IPC attenuated O(2)(•¯) production (2527 ± 221 versus 3523 ± 250 AU/mg protein, P < 0.05). IPC preserved cytochrome c levels (351 ± 14 versus 269 ± 16 picomoles/mg protein, P < 0.05) at End RP, and decreased mitochondrial cristae disruption (10% ± 4% versus 33% ± 7%, P < 0.05) and amorphous density formation (18% ± 4% versus 28% ± 1%, P < 0.05). We conclude that IPC preserves mΔΨ, possibly by limiting disruption of mitochondrial inner membrane. IPC also decreases mitochondrial O(2)(•¯) production and preserves mitochondrial ultrastructure after IR. While it was previously held that slight decreases in mΔΨ decrease O(2)(•¯) production, our results indicate that preservation of mΔΨ is associated with decreased O(2)(•¯) and preservation of cardiac function in IPC. These findings indicate that the mechanism of IPC may not involve mΔΨ depolarization, but rather preservation of mitochondrial electrochemical potential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc

  8. Application of a homogenous membrane potential assay to assess mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuru, Srilatha; Li, Xiao; Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Lu, Jianming; Shou, Louie; Shen, Min; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Decreases in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction that could lead to cell death. The MMP is generated by an electrochemical gradient via the mitochondrial electron transport chain coupled to a series of redox reactions. Measuring the MMP in living cells is commonly used to assess the effect of chemicals on mitochondrial function; decreases in MMP can be detected using lipophilic cationic fluorescent dyes. To identify an optimal dye for use in a high-throughput screening (HTS) format, we compared the ability of mitochondrial membrane potential sensor (Mito-MPS), 5,5′,6,6′-tetrachloro-1,1′,3,3′ tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide, rhodamine 123, and tetramethylrhodamine to quantify a decrease in MMP in chemically exposed HepG2 cells cultured in 1,536-well plates. Under the conditions used, the optimal dye for this purpose is Mito-MPS. Next, we developed and optimized a homogenous cell-based Mito-MPS assay for use in 1,536-well plate format and demonstrated the utility of this assay by screening 1,280 compounds in the library of pharmacologically active compounds in HepG2 cells using a quantitative high-throughput screening platform. From the screening, we identified 14 compounds that disrupted the MMP, with half-maximal potencies ranging from 0.15 to 18 μM; among these, compound clusters that contained tyrphostin and 3′-substituted indolone analogs exhibited a structure-activity relationship. Our results demonstrate that this homogenous cell-based Mito-MPS assay can be used to evaluate the ability of large numbers of chemicals to decrease mitochondrial function. PMID:22433785

  9. MitoQ regulates autophagy by inducing a pseudo-mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Xiongxiong; Di, Cuixia; Wang, Zhenhua; Mi, Xiangquan; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Qiuyue; Mao, Aihong; Chen, Weiqiang; Gan, Lu; Zhang, Hong

    2017-04-03

    During the process of oxidative phosphorylation, protons are pumped into the mitochondrial intermembrane space to establish a mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). The electrochemical gradient generated allows protons to return to the matrix through the ATP synthase complex and generates ATP in the process. MitoQ is a lipophilic cationic drug that is adsorbed to the inner mitochondrial membrane; however, the cationic moiety of MitoQ remains in the intermembrane space. We found that the positive charges in MitoQ inhibited the activity of respiratory chain complexes I, III, and IV, reduced proton production, and decreased oxygen consumption. Therefore, a pseudo-MMP (PMMP) was formed via maintenance of exogenous positive charges. Proton backflow was severely impaired, leading to a decrease in ATP production and an increase in AMP production. Excess AMP activates AMP kinase, which inhibits the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and induces macroautophagy/autophagy. Therefore, we conclude that MitoQ increases PMMP via proton displacement with exogenous positive charges. In addition, PMMP triggered autophagy in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells via modification of mitochondrial bioenergetics pathways.

  10. Two distinct membrane potential-dependent steps drive mitochondrial matrix protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Alexander Benjamin; Schulz, Christian; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Clancy, Anne; Guiard, Bernard; Ieva, Raffaele; van der Laan, Martin; Rehling, Peter

    2017-01-02

    Two driving forces energize precursor translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Although the membrane potential (Δψ) is considered to drive translocation of positively charged presequences through the TIM23 complex (presequence translocase), the activity of the Hsp70-powered import motor is crucial for the translocation of the mature protein portion into the matrix. In this study, we show that mitochondrial matrix proteins display surprisingly different dependencies on the Δψ. However, a precursor's hypersensitivity to a reduction of the Δψ is not linked to the respective presequence, but rather to the mature portion of the polypeptide chain. The presequence translocase constituent Pam17 is specifically recruited by the receptor Tim50 to promote the transport of hypersensitive precursors into the matrix. Our analyses show that two distinct Δψ-driven translocation steps energize precursor passage across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Δψ- and Pam17-dependent import step identified in this study is positioned between the two known energy-dependent steps: Δψ-driven presequence translocation and adenosine triphosphate-driven import motor activity.

  11. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  12. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  13. Stimulation of mitochondrial proton conductance by hydroxynonenal requires a high membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Parker, Nadeene; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Brand, Martin D

    2008-04-01

    Mild uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, caused by a leak of protons back into the matrix, limits mitochondrial production of ROS (reactive oxygen species). This proton leak can be induced by the lipid peroxidation products of ROS, such as HNE (4-hydroxynonenal). HNE activates uncoupling proteins (UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3) and ANT (adenine nucleotide translocase), thereby providing a negative feedback loop. The mechanism of activation and the conditions necessary to induce uncoupling by HNE are unclear. We have found that activation of proton leak by HNE in rat and mouse skeletal muscle mitochondria is dependent on incubation with respiratory substrate. In the presence of HNE, mitochondria energized with succinate became progressively more leaky to protons over time compared with mitochondria in the absence of either HNE or succinate. Energized mitochondria must attain a high membrane potential to allow HNE to activate uncoupling: a drop of 10-20 mV from the resting value is sufficient to blunt induction of proton leak by HNE. Uncoupling occurs through UCP3 (11%), ANT (64%) and other pathways (25%). Our findings have shown that exogenous HNE only activates uncoupling at high membrane potential. These results suggest that both endogenous HNE production and high membrane potential are required before mild uncoupling will be triggered to attenuate mitochondrial ROS production.

  14. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p < 0.05]. More than 11% of the structural clusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. Conclusions: Our multiplexed qHTS approach allowed us to generate a robust and reliable data set to evaluate the ability of thousands of drugs and environmental compounds to decrease MMP. The use of structure-based clustering analysis allowed us to identify molecular features that are likely responsible for the observed activity. Citation: Attene-Ramos MS, Huang R, Michael S, Witt KL, Richard A, Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox

  15. Mitochondrial membrane potential is reduced in copper-deficient C2C12 cells in the absence of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulian; Medeiros, Denis M; Jennings, Dianne

    2005-07-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential is reduced in copper-deficient rat hearts, but it is uncertain if this will lead to the onset of apoptosis. To determine if copper deficiency per se leads to apoptosis, C2C12 cells were made copper deficient by treatment with the copper chelator tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). In TEPA-treated cells, the activity of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase and cytochrome-c oxidase decreased dramatically. The protein levels of nuclear-encoded subunits of the cytochromie-c oxidase decreased, but the mitochondrial-encoded subunits remained unchanged. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was indicated in TEPA-treated cells, but further investigation of the potential induction of apoptosis by measuring caspase-3 activity, protein concentrations of Bcl-2 and Bax, and DNA fragmentation suggested that apoptosis is not induced in TEPA-treated C2C12 cells. Cells with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were not destined to apoptosis as a result of copper deficiency.

  16. Crystal and microparticle effects on MDCK cell superoxide production: oxalate-specific mitochondrial membrane potential changes.

    PubMed

    Meimaridou, Eirini; Jacobson, Jake; Seddon, Alan M; Noronha-Dutra, Alberto A; Robertson, William G; Hothersall, John S

    2005-06-15

    We have previously shown that crystals of calcium oxalate (COM) elicit a superoxide (O2-) response from mitochondria. We have now investigated: (i) if other microparticles can elicit the same response, (ii) if processing of crystals is involved, and (iii) at what level of mitochondrial function oxalate acts. O2- was measured in digitonin-permeabilized MDCK cells by lucigenin (10 microM) chemiluminescence. [(14)C]-COM dissociation was examined with or without EDTA and employing alternative chelators. Whereas mitochondrial O2- in COM-treated cells was three- to fourfold enhanced compared to controls, other particulates (uric acid, zymosan, and latex beads) either did not increase O2- or were much less effective (hydroxyapatite +50%, p < 0.01), with all at 28 microg/cm(2). Free oxalate (750 microM), at the level released from COM with EDTA (1 mM), increased O2- (+50%, p < 0.01). Omitting EDTA abrogated this signal, which was restored completely by EGTA and partially by ascorbate, but not by desferrioxamine or citrate. Omission of phosphate abrogated O2-, implicating phosphate-dependent mitochondrial dicarboxylate transport. COM caused a time-related increase in the mitochondrial membrane potential (deltapsi(m)) measured using TMRM fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Application of COM to Fura 2-loaded cells induced rapid, large-amplitude cytosolic Ca(2+) transients, which were inhibited by thapsigargin, indicating that COM induces release of Ca(2+) from internal stores. Thus, COM-induced mitochondrial O2- requires the release of free oxalate and contributes to a synergistic response. Intracellular dissociation of COM and the mitochondrial dicarboxylate transporter are important in O2- production, which is probably regulated by deltapsi(m).

  17. Heat shock induces production of reactive oxygen species and increases inner mitochondrial membrane potential in winter wheat cells.

    PubMed

    Fedyaeva, A V; Stepanov, A V; Lyubushkina, I V; Pobezhimova, T P; Rikhvanov, E G

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock leads to oxidative stress. Excessive ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation could be responsible for expression of genes of heat-shock proteins or for cell death. It is known that in isolated mammalian mitochondria high protonic potential on the inner membrane actuates the production of ROS. Changes in viability, ROS content, and mitochondrial membrane potential value have been studied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultured cells under heat treatment. Elevation of temperature to 37-50°C was found to induce elevated ROS generation and increased mitochondrial membrane potential, but it did not affect viability immediately after treatment. More severe heat exposure (55-60°C) was not accompanied by mitochondrial potential elevation and increased ROS production, but it led to instant cell death. A positive correlation between mitochondrial potential and ROS production was observed. Depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane by the protonophore CCCP inhibited ROS generation under the heating conditions. These data suggest that temperature elevation leads to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in winter wheat cultured cells, which in turn causes the increased ROS production.

  18. A new method for evaluating stallion sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential in fixed semen samples.

    PubMed

    Peña, F J; Ball, B A; Squires, E L

    2016-12-29

    Multiparametric assessment of stallion sperm quality using flow cytometry can be a useful adjunct in semen evaluation; however, the availability of flow cytometers in veterinary practice is limited. The ability to preserve and transport sperm samples for later flow cytometric analysis using fixable probes would potentially facilitate this process. In the current study, we validated the combination of live/dead Zombie Green(®) (a fixable dye used to assess live and dead sperm) and MitoTracker Deep Red(®) (used to assess mitochondrial membrane potential). The assay was validated against classic, non-fixable, membrane assays (SYBR-14/PI). Our results demonstrated the feasibility of the assay. In conclusion, stained and fixed semen samples stored for 72 h obtained equivalent results to the exam on the same day; this new protocol shall facilitate the wider use of flow cytometry in stallion andrology in the future. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  19. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  20. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  1. Dimethyl sulfoxide damages mitochondrial integrity and membrane potential in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chan; Gao, Junying; Guo, Jichao; Bai, Lei; Marshall, Charles; Cai, Zhiyou; Wang, Linmei; Xiao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a polar organic solvent that is used to dissolve neuroprotective or neurotoxic agents in neuroscience research. However, DMSO itself also has pharmacological and pathological effects on the nervous system. Astrocytes play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis, but the effect and mechanism of DMSO on astrocytes has not been studied. The present study showed that exposure of astrocyte cultures to 1% DMSO for 24 h did not significantly affect cell survival, but decreased cell viability and glial glutamate transporter expression, and caused mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential impairment and reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. DMSO at concentrations of 5% significantly inhibited cell variability and promoted apoptosis of astrocytes, accompanied with more severe mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that mitochondrial impairment is a primary event in DMSO-induced astrocyte toxicity. The potential cytotoxic effects on astrocytes need to be carefully considered during investigating neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of hydrophobic agents dissolved by DMSO.

  2. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Damages Mitochondrial Integrity and Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chan; Gao, Junying; Guo, Jichao; Bai, Lei; Marshall, Charles; Cai, Zhiyou; Wang, Linmei; Xiao, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a polar organic solvent that is used to dissolve neuroprotective or neurotoxic agents in neuroscience research. However, DMSO itself also has pharmacological and pathological effects on the nervous system. Astrocytes play a central role in maintaining brain homeostasis, but the effect and mechanism of DMSO on astrocytes has not been studied. The present study showed that exposure of astrocyte cultures to 1% DMSO for 24 h did not significantly affect cell survival, but decreased cell viability and glial glutamate transporter expression, and caused mitochondrial swelling, membrane potential impairment and reactive oxygen species production, and subsequent cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. DMSO at concentrations of 5% significantly inhibited cell variability and promoted apoptosis of astrocytes, accompanied with more severe mitochondrial damage. These results suggest that mitochondrial impairment is a primary event in DMSO-induced astrocyte toxicity. The potential cytotoxic effects on astrocytes need to be carefully considered during investigating neuroprotective or neurotoxic effects of hydrophobic agents dissolved by DMSO. PMID:25238609

  3. Inorganic nanoparticles kill Toxoplasma gondii via changes in redox status and mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemi, Oluyomi Stephen; Murata, Yuho; Sugi, Tatsuki; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Toxoplasma gondii potential of gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles (NPs). Inorganic NPs (0.01–1,000 µg/mL) were screened for antiparasitic activity. The NPs caused >90% inhibition of T. gondii growth with EC50 values of ≤7, ≤1, and ≤100 µg/mL for gold, silver, and platinum NPs, respectively. The NPs showed no host cell cytotoxicity at the effective anti-T. gondii concentrations; the estimated selectivity index revealed a ≥20-fold activity toward the parasite versus the host cell. The anti-T. gondii activity of the NPs, which may be linked to redox signaling, affected the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential and parasite invasion, replication, recovery, and infectivity potential. Our results demonstrated the antiparasitic potential of NPs. The findings support the further exploration of NPs as a possible source of alternative and effective anti-T. gondii agents. PMID:28280332

  4. Inorganic nanoparticles kill Toxoplasma gondii via changes in redox status and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Oluyomi Stephen; Murata, Yuho; Sugi, Tatsuki; Kato, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the anti-Toxoplasma gondii potential of gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles (NPs). Inorganic NPs (0.01-1,000 µg/mL) were screened for antiparasitic activity. The NPs caused >90% inhibition of T. gondii growth with EC50 values of ≤7, ≤1, and ≤100 µg/mL for gold, silver, and platinum NPs, respectively. The NPs showed no host cell cytotoxicity at the effective anti-T. gondii concentrations; the estimated selectivity index revealed a ≥20-fold activity toward the parasite versus the host cell. The anti-T. gondii activity of the NPs, which may be linked to redox signaling, affected the parasite mitochondrial membrane potential and parasite invasion, replication, recovery, and infectivity potential. Our results demonstrated the antiparasitic potential of NPs. The findings support the further exploration of NPs as a possible source of alternative and effective anti-T. gondii agents.

  5. Mitochondrial calcium ion and membrane potential transients follow the pattern of epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Richard; Kardos, Julianna; Heinemann, Uwe; Kann, Oliver

    2005-04-27

    Emerging evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Recurrent mitochondrial Ca2+ ion load during seizures might act on mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) and proton motive force. By using electrophysiology and confocal laser-scanning microscopy, we investigated the effects of epileptiform activity, as induced by low-Mg2+ ion perfusion in hippocampal slice cultures, on changes in DeltaPsim and in mitochondrial Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]m). The mitochondrial compartment was identified by monitoring DeltaPsim in the soma and dendrites of patched CA3 pyramidal cells using the mitochondria-specific voltage-sensitive dye rhodamine-123 (Rh-123). Interictal activity was accompanied by localized mitochondrial depolarization that was restricted to a few mitochondria in small dendrites. In contrast, robust Rh-123 release into the cytosol was observed during seizure-like events (SLEs), indicating simultaneous depolarization of mitochondria. This was critically dependent on Ca2+ ion uptake and extrusion, because inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ ion uniporter by Ru360 and the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ ion exchanger by 7-chloro-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,5-dihydro-4,1-benzothiazepin-2(3H)-one but not the inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, cyclosporin A, decreased the SLE-associated mitochondrial depolarization. The Ca2+ ion dependence of simultaneous mitochondrial depolarization suggested enhanced Ca2+ ion cycling across mitochondrial membranes during epileptiform activity. Indeed, [Ca2+]m fluctuated during interictal activity in single dendrites, and these fluctuations spread over the entire mitochondrial compartment during SLEs, as revealed using mitochondria-specific dyes (rhod-2 and rhod-ff) and spatial frequency-based image analysis. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that epileptic activity results in Ca2+ ion-dependent changes in mitochondrial function that might contribute to the

  6. Ocean acidification impacts on sperm mitochondrial membrane potential bring sperm swimming behaviour near its tipping point.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, Peter; Binet, Monique T; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Doyle, Christopher J; Williamson, Jane E

    2015-04-01

    Broadcast spawning marine invertebrates are susceptible to environmental stressors such as climate change, as their reproduction depends on the successful meeting and fertilization of gametes in the water column. Under near-future scenarios of ocean acidification, the swimming behaviour of marine invertebrate sperm is altered. We tested whether this was due to changes in sperm mitochondrial activity by investigating the effects of ocean acidification on sperm metabolism and swimming behaviour in the sea urchin Centrostephanus rodgersii. We used a fluorescent molecular probe (JC-1) and flow cytometry to visualize mitochondrial activity (measured as change in mitochondrial membrane potential, MMP). Sperm MMP was significantly reduced in ΔpH -0.3 (35% reduction) and ΔpH -0.5 (48% reduction) treatments, whereas sperm swimming behaviour was less sensitive with only slight changes (up to 11% decrease) observed overall. There was significant inter-individual variability in responses of sperm swimming behaviour and MMP to acidified seawater. We suggest it is likely that sperm exposed to these changes in pH are close to their tipping point in terms of physiological tolerance to acidity. Importantly, substantial inter-individual variation in responses of sperm swimming to ocean acidification may increase the scope for selection of resilient phenotypes, which, if heritable, could provide a basis for adaptation to future ocean acidification. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-02-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  8. The Force Exerted by the Membrane Potential During Protein Import into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The electrostatic force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated and found to vary from 1.4 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 12 to 6.5 Angstroms, its measured range. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a nonaqueous pore gives a force of 3.1 pN per unit charge, which represents an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein harness, these results imply that a force of 11 plus or minus 4 pN is sufficient to catalyze the unfolding of harness during import. Comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy suggests that the two are not inconsistent.

  9. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  10. High membrane potential promotes alkenal-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and influences adenine nucleotide translocase conformation.

    PubMed

    Azzu, Vian; Parker, Nadeene; Brand, Martin D

    2008-07-15

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species, whose downstream lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, induce uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by increasing proton leak through mitochondrial inner membrane proteins such as the uncoupling proteins and adenine nucleotide translocase. Using mitochondria from rat liver, which lack uncoupling proteins, in the present study we show that energization (specifically, high membrane potential) is required for 4-hydroxynonenal to activate proton conductance mediated by adenine nucleotide translocase. Prolonging the time at high membrane potential promotes greater uncoupling. 4-Hydroxynonenal-induced uncoupling via adenine nucleotide translocase is prevented but not readily reversed by addition of carboxyatractylate, suggesting a permanent change (such as adduct formation) that renders the translocase leaky to protons. In contrast with the irreversibility of proton conductance, carboxyatractylate added after 4-hydroxynonenal still inhibits nucleotide translocation, implying that the proton conductance and nucleotide translocation pathways are different. We propose a model to relate adenine nucleotide translocase conformation to proton conductance in the presence or absence of 4-hydroxynonenal and/or carboxyatractylate.

  11. Dietary Tocotrienol/γ-Cyclodextrin Complex Increases Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and ATP Concentrations in the Brains of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, Anke; Esatbeyoglu, Tuba; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Dose, Janina; Ikuta, Naoko; Okamoto, Hinako; Ishida, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Keiji; Matsugo, Seiichi; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial function. In vitro studies suggest that tocotrienols, including γ- and δ-tocotrienol (T3), may exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, little is known about the effect of dietary T3 on mitochondrial function in vivo. In this study, we monitored the effect of a dietary T3/γ-cyclodextrin complex (T3CD) on mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels in the brain of 21-month-old mice. Mice were fed either a control diet or a diet enriched with T3CD providing 100 mg T3 per kg diet for 6 months. Dietary T3CD significantly increased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared to those of controls. The increase in MMP and ATP due to dietary T3CD was accompanied by an increase in the protein levels of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). Furthermore, dietary T3CD slightly increased the mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase, γ-glutamyl cysteinyl synthetase, and heme oxygenase 1 in the brain. Overall, the present data suggest that T3CD increases TFAM, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP synthesis in the brains of aged mice. PMID:26301044

  12. Cerium oxide nanoparticles prevent apoptosis in primary cortical culture by stabilizing mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Arya, A; Sethy, N K; Das, M; Singh, S K; Das, A; Ujjain, S K; Sharma, R K; Sharma, M; Bhargava, K

    2014-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) of spherical shape have unique antioxidant capacity primarily due to alternating + 3 and + 4 oxidation states and crystal defects. Several studies revealed the protective efficacies of CNPs in cells and tissues against the oxidative damage. However, its effect on mitochondrial functioning, downstream effectors of radical burst and apoptosis remains unknown. In this study, we investigated whether CNPs treatment could protect the primary cortical cells from loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and Δψm-dependent cell death. CNPs with spherical morphology and size range 7-10 nm were synthesized and utilized at a concentration of 25 nM on primary neuronal culture challenged with 50 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We showed that optimal dose of CNPs minimized ROS content of the cells and also curbed related surge in cellular calcium flux. Importantly, CNPs treatment prevented apoptotic loss of cell viability. Reduction in the apoptosis could be successfully attributed to the maintenance of Δψm and restoration of major redox equivalents NADH/NAD(+) ratio and cellular ATP. These findings, therefore, suggest possible route of CNPs protective efficacies in primary cortical culture.

  13. Glutaminolysis and glycolysis regulation by troglitazone in breast cancer cells: Relationship to mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Friday, Ellen; Oliver, Robert; Welbourne, Tomas; Turturro, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    We studied the roles of glycolysis and glutaminolysis following an acute reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψ(m)) induced by the thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRO) and compared the responses with CCCP-induced depolarization in breast cancer derived MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells as well as in the MCF-10A normal breast cell line. TRO and CCCP both acutely reduced Ψ(m) but after 24 h TRO-treated cells had restored Ψ(m) associated with both increased glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In contrast, CCCP-treated cells exhibited only a partial restoration of Ψ(m) associated with increased glycolysis but decreased glutaminolysis. TRO-induced glutaminolysis was coupled to increased ammonium (GDH flux) and decreased alanine production (ALT flux) in all three cell lines. Both cancer cell lines exhibited a higher spontaneous GDH/ALT flux than the normal breast cell line associated with a reduced keto-acid pool. TRO's effect on GDH/ALT fluxes and mitochondrial keto-acid pool homeostasis was additive with glucose withdrawal suggesting limited intramitochondrial pyruvate availability. The TRO-induced acceleration in GDH flux supplies substrate for Complex I contributing to the restoration of Ψ(m) as well as Krebs cycle intermediates for biosynthesis. Inhibiting mitochondrial proton ATPase with oligomycin or nullifying the proton gradient with CCCP prevented both the TRO-induced recovery of Ψ(m) and accelerated GDH flux but restored ALT flux consonant with important roles for proton pumping in regulating GDH flux and Ψ(m) recovery. Blocking enhanced GDH flux reduced DNA synthesis consistent with glutaminolysis via GDH playing an important biosynthetic role in tumorigenesis. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization with nanosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Vernier, P Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-short, high-field electric pulses permeabilize plasma and intracellular membranes. We report here nanosecond pulse-induced permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes in living cells. Using four independent methods based on fluorescent dyes--JC-1, rhodamine 123, tetramethyl rhodamine ethyl ester, and cobalt-quenched calcein--we show that as few as five, 4 ns, 10 MV/m pulses delivered at 1 kHz cause an increase of the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability and an associated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The most likely interpretation of these results is a pulse-induced permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  15. MitoLoc: A method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial network morphology and membrane potential in single cells.

    PubMed

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Hartl, Johannes; Butler, Richard; Ralser, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria assemble into flexible networks. Here we present a simple method for the simultaneous quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential and network morphology that is based on computational co-localisation analysis of differentially imported fluorescent marker proteins. Established in, but not restricted to, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MitoLoc reproducibly measures changes in membrane potential induced by the uncoupling agent CCCP, by oxidative stress, in respiratory deficient cells, and in ∆fzo1, ∆ref2, and ∆dnm1 mutants that possess fission and fusion defects. In combination with super-resolution images, MitoLoc uses 3D reconstruction to calculate six geometrical classifiers which differentiate network morphologies in ∆fzo1, ∆ref2, and ∆dnm1 mutants, under oxidative stress and in cells lacking mtDNA, even when the network is fragmented to a similar extent. We find that mitochondrial fission and a decline in membrane potential do regularly, but not necessarily, co-occur. MitoLoc hence simplifies the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in parallel to detect morphological changes in mitochondrial networks. Marker plasmid open-source software as well as the mathematical procedures are made openly available.

  16. Bovine adenovirus 3 core protein precursor pVII localizes to mitochondria, and modulates ATP synthesis, mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjeev K; Gaba, Amit; Singh, Jaswant; Tikoo, Suresh K

    2014-02-01

    Viruses modulate the functions of mitochondria by translocating viral proteins to the mitochondria. Subcellular fractionation and sensitivity to proteinase K/Triton X-100 treatment of mitochondrial fractions of bovine adenovirus (BAdV)-3-infected/transfected cells suggested that core protein pVII localizes to the mitochondria and contains a functional mitochondrial localization signal. Moreover, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII appears to help in the retention of mitochondrial Ca(2+), inducing a significant increase in the levels of ATP and maintaining the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in transfected cells. In contrast, mitochondrial localization of BAdV-3 pVII has no significant effect on the levels of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production in the transfected cells. Consistent with these results, expression of pVII in transfected cells treated with staurosporine decreased significantly the activation of caspase-3. Our results suggested that BAdV-3 pVII localizes to mitochondria, and interferes with apoptosis by inhibiting loss of the MMP and by increasing mitochondrial Ca(2+) and ATP production.

  17. Intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential and associated tumor phenotype are independent of MUC1 over-expression.

    PubMed

    Houston, Michele A; Augenlicht, Leonard H; Heerdt, Barbara G

    2011-01-01

    We have established previously that minor subpopulations of cells with stable differences in their intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) exist within populations of mammary and colonic carcinoma cells and that these differences in Δψm are linked to tumorigenic phenotypes consistent with increased probability of participating in tumor progression. However, the mechanism(s) involved in generating and maintaining stable differences in intrinsic Δψm and how they are linked to phenotype are unclear. Because the mucin 1 (MUC1) oncoprotein is over-expressed in many cancers, with the cytoplasmic C-terminal fragment (MUC1 C-ter) and its integration into the outer mitochondrial membrane linked to tumorigenic phenotypes similar to those of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm, we investigated whether endogenous differences in MUC1 levels were linked to stable differences in intrinsic Δψm and/or to the tumor phenotypes associated with the intrinsic Δψm. We report that levels of MUC1 are significantly higher in subpopulations of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm derived from both mammary and colonic carcinoma cell lines. However, using siRNA we found that down-regulation of MUC1 failed to significantly affect either the intrinsic Δψm or the tumor phenotypes associated with increased intrinsic Δψm. Moreover, whereas pharmacologically mediated disruption of the Δψm was accompanied by attenuation of tumor phenotype, it had no impact on MUC1 levels. Therefore, while MUC1 over-expression is associated with subpopulations of cells with elevated intrinsic Δψm, it is not directly linked to the generation or maintenance of stable alterations in intrinsic Δψm, or to intrinsic Δψm associated tumor phenotypes. Since the Δψm is the focus of chemotherapeutic strategies, these data have important clinical implications in regard to effectively targeting those cells within a tumor cell population that exhibit stable elevations in intrinsic Δψm and are most

  18. Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Identifies Cells with Enhanced Stemness for Cellular Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Liu, Jie; Mehta, Gautam U; Patel, Shashank J; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Crompton, Joseph G; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Ji, Yun; Li, Peng; Yu, Zhiya; Whitehill, Greg D; Clever, David; Eil, Robert L; Palmer, Douglas C; Mitra, Suman; Rao, Mahadev; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Schrump, David S; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Gattinoni, Luca; Leonard, Warren J; Muranski, Pawel; Finkel, Toren; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2016-01-12

    Long-term survival and antitumor immunity of adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells is dependent on their metabolic fitness, but approaches to isolate therapeutic T cells based on metabolic features are not well established. Here we utilized a lipophilic cationic dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) to identify and isolate metabolically robust T cells based on their mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Comprehensive metabolomic and gene expression profiling demonstrated global features of improved metabolic fitness in low-ΔΨm-sorted CD8(+) T cells. Transfer of these low-ΔΨm T cells was associated with superior long-term in vivo persistence and an enhanced capacity to eradicate established tumors compared with high-ΔΨm cells. Use of ΔΨm-based sorting to enrich for cells with superior metabolic features was observed in CD8(+), CD4(+) T cell subsets, and long-term hematopoietic stem cells. This metabolism-based approach to cell selection may be broadly applicable to therapies involving the transfer of HSC or lymphocytes for the treatment of viral-associated illnesses and cancer.

  19. Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Dispersyn, G; Nuydens, R; Connors, R; Borgers, M; Geerts, H

    1999-08-05

    This report addresses the relation between Bcl-2 and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) in apoptotic cell death. Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are differentiated into neuron-like cells with nerve growth factor (NGF). It is known that Bcl-2 can attenuate apoptosis induced by deprivation of neurotrophic factor. The protective effect of Bcl-2 has been correlated with preservation of DeltaPsi(m). Protonophores, such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), collapse the proton gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane, resulting in a complete abolition of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Based on the analysis of morphology, of phosphatidylserine exposure and of nuclear fragmentation we conclude that FCCP induces apoptosis in PC12 cells, which can be prevented by overexpression of Bcl-2. To determine whether the cytoprotective effect of Bcl-2 is due to stabilization of DeltaPsi(m), we investigated the effect of Bcl-2 on changes in DeltaPsi(m), induced by FCCP in PC12 cells. We showed that treatment with FCCP induced a reduction in DeltaPsi(m), as assessed with the lipophilic cationic membrane potential-sensitive dye JC-1, and that Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced changes in NGF differentiated PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Bcl-2 protects against FCCP-induced cell death by stabilizing DeltaPsi(m).

  20. Mitochondrial membrane lipidome defines yeast longevity

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Michelle T.; Bourque, Simon D.; Koupaki, Olivia; Juneau, Mylène; Feldman, Rachel; Iouk, Tatiana; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2013-01-01

    Our studies revealed that lithocholic acid (LCA), a bile acid, is a potent anti-aging natural compound that in yeast cultured under longevity-extending caloric restriction (CR) conditions acts in synergy with CR to enable a significant further increase in chronological lifespan. Here, we investigate a mechanism underlying this robust longevity-extending effect of LCA under CR. We found that exogenously added LCA enters yeast cells, is sorted to mitochondria, resides mainly in the inner mitochondrial membrane, and also associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane. LCA elicits an age-related remodeling of glycerophospholipid synthesis and movement within both mitochondrial membranes, thereby causing substantial changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome and triggering major changes in mitochondrial size, number and morphology. In synergy, these changes in the membrane lipidome and morphology of mitochondria alter the age-related chronology of mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential, ATP synthesis and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. The LCA-driven alterations in the age-related dynamics of these vital mitochondrial processes extend yeast longevity. In sum, our findings suggest a mechanism underlying the ability of LCA to delay chronological aging in yeast by accumulating in both mitochondrial membranes and altering their glycerophospholipid compositions. We concluded that mitochondrial membrane lipidome plays an essential role in defining yeast longevity. PMID:23924582

  1. Protective effect of silymarin on viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm treated with sodium arsenite

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Farzaneh; Momeni, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sodium arsenite can impair male reproductive function by inducing oxidative stress. Silymarin is known as a potent antioxidant. Objective: This study was performed to investigate if silymarin can prevent the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on ram sperm viability, motility and mitochondrial membrane potential. Materials and Methods: Epidydimal spermatozoa obtained from ram were divided into five groups: 1) Spermatozoa at 0 hr, 2) spermatozoa at 180 min (control), 3) spermatozoa treated with sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min, 4) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) + sodium arsenite (10 μM) for 180 min and 5) spermatozoa treated with silymarin (20 μM) for 180 min. MTT assay and Rhodamine 123 staining were used to assess sperm viability and mitochondrial membrane potential respectively. Sperm motility was performed according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Results: Viability (p<0.01), nonprogressive motility (p<0.001) and intact mitochondrial membrane potential (p<0.001) of the spermatozoa were significantly decreased in sodium arsenite treated group compared to control group. In silymarin + sodium arsenite group, silymarin could significantly reverse the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on these sperm parameters compared to sodium arsenite group (p<0.001). In addition, the application of silymarin alone for 180 minutes could significantly increase progressively motile sperm (p<0.001) and decrease non motile sperm (p<0.01) compared to the control. Conclusion: Silymarin could compensate the adverse effect of sodium arsenite on viability, nonprogressive motility and mitochondrial membrane potential of ram sperm. PMID:27525323

  2. Opposing effects on mitochondrial membrane potential by malonate and levamisole, whose effect on cell-mediated mineralization is antagonistic.

    PubMed

    Klein, B Y; Gal, I; Libergal, M; Ben-Bassat, H

    1996-01-01

    The act of chondrocyte preparation for primary, enchondral, mineralization is associated with a decline in mitochondrial respiration toward the end of the proliferative zone and the hypertrophic zone in the growth plate. Dexamethasone (Dex)-stimulated cultures of rat marrow stroma constitute a differentiation model simulating, in its energy metabolism, chondrocyte mineralization. In this model, early inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) enriches the culture with mineralizing cells, whereas levamisole inhibits mineralization. Dex also increases mitochondrial membrane potential in stromal cells, especially on days 7-8 of stimulation. In the present study, suicide inhibition of SDH, by nitropropionic acid (NPA), in Dex-stimulated cells showed a dose-dependent increase in day 21 mineralization; the maximal effect was induced on days 2-4 of stimulation. Mineralization under 2-day-long exposure to NPA showed a similar trend to the previously studied effect of continuous exposure to malonate applied between days 3-11. Unlike malonate, the effect of NPA required its presence in the cultures for only 2 days and resulted in higher mineralization than that seen under 8 days of malonate. NPA delineated a period, days 2/4 to 7/9, in which inhibition of succinate oxidation is necessary to augment mineralization. During this period, NPA also exhibited OPC selection capacity. Early application of levamisole, under conditions previously shown to decrease day 21 mineralization, maintained mitochondrial membrane potential at the beginning of Dex stimulation but decreased or had little effect on it during days 5-10. By contrast, malonate previously found to increase day 21 mineralization decreased the membrane potential at the beginning of Dex stimulation but increased it later on day 7, or during days 5-10. These results indicate that during osteoprogenitor differentiation, before the mineralization stage, a surge in mitochondrial inner membrane potential during late matrix

  3. The effect of aminoguanidine on sperm motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in varicocelized rats

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Rafieh; Navid, Shadan; Abbasi, Niloofar; Yari, Abazar; Mazaheri, Zohreh; Daneshi, Erfan; Agarwal, Ashok; Abbasi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Increased levels of nitric oxide (NO) in the testicular veins of people suffering from varicocele have already been reported. However, the role of NO-synthase (NOS) isozymes and their inhibitors have not been extensively studied. We aimed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of aminoguanidine (AG), on sperm motility, vitality, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in varicocelized rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty fore male Wister rats were divided into control, sham, varicocele, and treatment groups. Varicocele and treatment groups underwent partial ligation of left renal vein. Rats in the sham group underwent the same procedures as the varicocele group with the exception of vein ligation. 10 weeks after varicocele induction, sperm parameters were evaluated in all groups. The treatment group received 50 mg/kg AG injection daily for 10 weeks after which they were sacrificed prior to assessment of the parameters. Sperm viability and MMP were assessed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and rhodamine 123 (Rh123), respectively. Results: The results of this study show a decrease in sperm viability, motility and MMP in the varicocele group compared with the other groups. After AG injection, we observed that all the parameters were significantly enhanced in the treatment group compared with the other groups. Rh123 staining revealed a positive relation between MMP and sperm motility, whereas PI staining showed a positive relation between sperm motility and viability. Conclusion: The findings of our study show that AG improves sperm motility and MMP, and thus, might be useful in the management of varicocele-related infertility. PMID:28096959

  4. Cyclosporin A does not protect the disruption of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by potassium ionophores in intact K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Marques-Santos, Luis F; Coqueiro, Vivian M; Rumjanek, Vivian M

    2006-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been widely associated with programmed cell death. Studies of intact cells are important for the understanding of the process of cell death and its relation to mitochondrial physiology. Using cytofluorometric approaches we studied the mitochondrial behavior in an erythroleukemic cell line. The effects of protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), potassium exchanger (nigericin), potassium ionophore (valinomycin), Na+K+-ATPase inhibitor (ouabain) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor (cyclosporin A) were evaluated. Cyclosporin A (CSA) was very effective in attenuating the disruption of inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by CCCP. However, CSA failed to protect the loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential induced by potassium intracellular flux manipulation. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial cyclophilin is not involved in the cell events mediated by deregulation of potassium flux, underlining the need for further studies in intact tumor cells for a better understanding of the involvement of mitochondria physiology in cell death events.

  5. The effects of the ergosteroid 7-oxo-dehydroepiandrosterone on mitochondrial membrane potential: possible relationship to thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bobyleva, V; Bellei, M; Kneer, N; Lardy, H

    1997-05-01

    Administered 3 beta-hydroxyandrost-5-ene-7,17-dione (7-oxo-DHEA) is more effective than 3 beta-hydroxyandrost-5-en-7-one (DHEA) as an inducer of liver mitochondrial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and cytosolic malic enzyme in rats. Like DHEA, the 7-oxo metabolite enhances liver catalase, fatty acylCoA oxidase, cytosolic sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, mitochondrial substrate oxidation rate, and the reconstructed sn-glycerol 3-phosphate shuttle. The mitochondrial adenine nucleotide carrier is diminished by thyroidectomy and is restored to normal activity by administering 7-oxo-DHEA. The relationship between respiratory rate and proton motive force across the mitochondrial membrane was measured in the nonphosphorylating state. When treated with increasing concentrations of respiratory inhibitors liver mitochondria from rats treated with 7-oxo-DHEA or thyroid hormones show a more rapid decline of membrane potential than do normal liver mitochondria. Thus 7-oxo-DHEA induces an increased proton leak or slip as has been reported for the thyroid hormone by M.D. Brand [(1990) Biochem. Biophys. Acta 1018, 128-133]. This process may contribute to the enhanced thermogenesis caused by ergosteroids as well as by thyroid hormones.

  6. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  7. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  8. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R.; Shaffer, Karl J.; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J.; Robb, Ellen L.; Prime, Tracy A.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M.; Porteous, Carolyn M.; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by “click” chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. PMID:26712463

  9. Assessing the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cells and In Vivo using Targeted Click Chemistry and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Logan, Angela; Pell, Victoria R; Shaffer, Karl J; Evans, Cameron; Stanley, Nathan J; Robb, Ellen L; Prime, Tracy A; Chouchani, Edward T; Cochemé, Helena M; Fearnley, Ian M; Vidoni, Sara; James, Andrew M; Porteous, Carolyn M; Partridge, Linda; Krieg, Thomas; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P

    2016-02-09

    The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) is a major determinant and indicator of cell fate, but it is not possible to assess small changes in Δψm within cells or in vivo. To overcome this, we developed an approach that utilizes two mitochondria-targeted probes each containing a triphenylphosphonium (TPP) lipophilic cation that drives their accumulation in response to Δψm and the plasma membrane potential (Δψp). One probe contains an azido moiety and the other a cyclooctyne, which react together in a concentration-dependent manner by "click" chemistry to form MitoClick. As the mitochondrial accumulation of both probes depends exponentially on Δψm and Δψp, the rate of MitoClick formation is exquisitely sensitive to small changes in these potentials. MitoClick accumulation can then be quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This approach enables assessment of subtle changes in membrane potentials within cells and in the mouse heart in vivo. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30–35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances. PMID:26647379

  11. Simultaneous evaluation of substrate-dependent oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM and safranin in cortical mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Subir Roy; Djordjevic, Jelena; Albensi, Benedict C; Fernyhough, Paul

    2015-12-08

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (mtMP) is critical for maintaining the physiological function of the respiratory chain to generate ATP. The present study characterized the inter-relationship between mtMP, using safranin and tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester (TMRM), and mitochondrial respiratory activity and established a protocol for functional analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetics in a multi-sensor system. Coupled respiration was decreased by 27 and 30-35% in the presence of TMRM and safranin respectively. Maximal respiration was higher than coupled with Complex I- and II-linked substrates in the presence of both dyes. Safranin showed decreased maximal respiration at a higher concentration of carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) compared with TMRM. FCCP titration revealed that maximal respiration in the presence of glutamate and malate was not sustainable at higher FCCP concentrations as compared with pyruvate and malate. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and mtMP in response to mitochondrial substrates were higher in isolated mitochondria compared with tissue homogenates. Safranin exhibited higher sensitivity to changes in mtMP than TMRM. This multi-sensor system measured mitochondrial parameters in the brain of transgenic mice that model Alzheimer's disease (AD), because mitochondrial dysfunction is believed to be a primary event in the pathogenesis of AD. The coupled and maximal respiration of electron transport chain were decreased in the cortex of AD mice along with the mtMP compared with age-matched controls. Overall, these data demonstrate that safranin and TMRM are suitable for the simultaneous evaluation of mtMP and respiratory chain activity using isolated mitochondria and tissue homogenate. However, certain care should be taken concerning the selection of appropriate substrates and dyes for specific experimental circumstances.

  12. Modulation of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and ROS Generation by Nicotinamide in a Manner Independent of SIRT1 and Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Seon Beom; Jang, So-Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Wei, Bie; Jeoun, Un-woo; Yoon, Gye Soon; Hwang, Eun Seong

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NAM) plays essential roles in physiology through facilitating NAD+ redox homeostasis. Importantly, at high doses, it protects cells under oxidative stresses, and has shown therapeutic effectiveness in a variety of disease conditions. In our previous studies, NAM lowered reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and extended cellular life span in primary human cells. In the treated cells, levels of NAD+/NADH and SIRT1 activity increased, while mitochondrial content decreased through autophagy activation. The remaining mitochondria were marked with low superoxide levels and high membrane potentials (Δψm); we posited that the treatment of NAM induced an activation of mitophagy that is selective for depolarized mitochondria, which produce high levels of ROS. However, evidence for the selective mitophagy that is mediated by SIRT1 has never been provided. This study sought to explain the mechanisms by which NAM lowers ROS levels and increases Δψm. Our results showed that NAM and SIRT1 activation exert quite different effects on mitochondrial physiology. Furthermore, the changes in ROS and Δψm were not found to be mediated through autophagy or SIRT activation. Rather, NAM suppressed superoxide generation via a direct reduction of electron transport, and increased Δψm via suppression of mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation. Our results dissected the effects of cellular NAD+ redox modulation, and emphasized the importance of the NAD+/NADH ratio in the mitochondria as well as the cytosol in maintaining mitochondrial quality. PMID:28736426

  13. Phellinus linteus polysaccharide extracts increase the mitochondrial membrane potential and cause apoptotic death of THP-1 monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The differentiation resp. death of human monocytic THP-1 cells induced by polysaccharide extracts of the medicinal mushrooms Phellinus linteus, Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus brasiliensis have been studied. This study aims to identify leads for the causal effects of these mushroom components on cell differentiation and death. Methods THP-1 cells were treated with different polysaccharide extracts of mushrooms and controls. Morphological effects were observed by light microscopy. Flow cytometry was applied to follow the cell differentiation by cell cycle shifts after staining with propidium iodide, changes of mitochondrial membrane potential after incubation with JC-1, and occurrence of intracellular reactive oxygen species after incubation with hydroethidine. Principal component analysis of the data was performed to evaluate the cellular effects of the different treatments. Results P. linteus polysaccharide extracts induced dose-dependent apoptosis of THP-1 cells within 24 h, while A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts caused differentiation into macrophages. A pure P. linteus polysaccharide had no effect. Apoptosis was inhibited by preincubating THP-1 cells with human serum. The principal component analysis revealed that P. linteus, A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts increased reactive oxygen species production. Both A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, while this was increased by P. linteus polysaccharide extracts. Conclusions P. linteus polysaccharide extracts caused apoptosis of THP-1 monocytes while A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts caused these cells to differentiate into macrophages. The protective effects of human serum suggested that P. linteus polysaccharide extract induced apoptosis by extrinsic pathway, i.e. by binding to the TRAIL receptor. The mitochondrial membrane potential together with reactive oxygen species

  14. Phellinus linteus polysaccharide extracts increase the mitochondrial membrane potential and cause apoptotic death of THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    van Griensven, Leo Jld; Verhoeven, Harrie A

    2013-12-18

    The differentiation resp. death of human monocytic THP-1 cells induced by polysaccharide extracts of the medicinal mushrooms Phellinus linteus, Agaricus bisporus and Agaricus brasiliensis have been studied. This study aims to identify leads for the causal effects of these mushroom components on cell differentiation and death. THP-1 cells were treated with different polysaccharide extracts of mushrooms and controls. Morphological effects were observed by light microscopy. Flow cytometry was applied to follow the cell differentiation by cell cycle shifts after staining with propidium iodide, changes of mitochondrial membrane potential after incubation with JC-1, and occurrence of intracellular reactive oxygen species after incubation with hydroethidine. Principal component analysis of the data was performed to evaluate the cellular effects of the different treatments. P. linteus polysaccharide extracts induced dose-dependent apoptosis of THP-1 cells within 24 h, while A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts caused differentiation into macrophages. A pure P. linteus polysaccharide had no effect. Apoptosis was inhibited by preincubating THP-1 cells with human serum. The principal component analysis revealed that P. linteus, A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts increased reactive oxygen species production. Both A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, while this was increased by P. linteus polysaccharide extracts. P. linteus polysaccharide extracts caused apoptosis of THP-1 monocytes while A. bisporus and A. brasiliensis polysaccharide extracts caused these cells to differentiate into macrophages. The protective effects of human serum suggested that P. linteus polysaccharide extract induced apoptosis by extrinsic pathway, i.e. by binding to the TRAIL receptor. The mitochondrial membrane potential together with reactive oxygen species seems to play an important role in cell

  15. Valproic acid II: effects on oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytotoxicity in glutathione-depleted rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Vincent; Teng, Xiao Wei; Chang, Thomas K H; Abbott, Frank S

    2005-08-01

    Oxidative stress has been associated with valproic acid (VPA) treatment, and mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of VPA-idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. The present study investigated the effect of VPA and the role of GSH on oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential, and toxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats, and total levels of glutathione (GSH) reduced by pretreatment with a combination of L-buthionine sulfoximine (2 mM) and diethylmaleate (0.5 mM) prior to VPA (0-1000 microg/ml) treatment. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring the levels of 15-F(2t)-isoprostane (15-F(2t)-IsoP) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). Mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) was determined by using the dual-fluorescent dye JC-1, and cell viability was evaluated by the water-soluble tetrazolium salt WST-1 assay. Exposure of rat hepatocytes to VPA (0-1000 mug/ml) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in 15-F(2t)-IsoP and DCF fluorescence, and these levels were further elevated in GSH-reduced hepatocytes. In control hepatocytes, VPA had no effect on cell viability; however, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the glutathione-depleted hepatocytes treated with 1000 mug/ml VPA. The Deltapsi(m) was only reduced in glutathione-reduced hepatocytes at 500 and 1000 microg/ml VPA. Our novel findings indicate that acute treatment of freshly isolated rat hepatocytes with VPA resulted in oxidative stress, which occurred in the absence of cytotoxicity, and that glutathione confers protection to hepatocytes against mitochondrial damage by VPA.

  16. Relative mitochondrial membrane potential and [Ca2+]i in type I cells isolated from the rabbit carotid body.

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, M R; Biscoe, T J

    1992-01-01

    1. In the accompanying paper (Duchen & Biscoe, 1992) we have described graded changes in autofluorescence derived from mitochondrial NAD(P)H in type I cells of the carotid body in response to changes of PO2 over a physiologically significant range. These observations suggest that mitochondrial function in these cells is unusually sensitive to oxygen and could play a role in oxygen sensing. We have now explored further the relationships between hypoxia, mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) and [Ca2+]i. 2. The fluorescence of Rhodamine 123 (Rh 123) accumulated within mitochondria is quenched by delta psi m. Mitochondrial depolarization thus increases the fluorescence signal. Blockade of electron transport (CN-, anoxia, rotenone) and uncoupling agents (e.g. carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone; FCCP) increased fluorescence by up to 80-120%, while fluorescence was reduced by blockade of the F0 proton channel of the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex (oligomycin). 3. delta psi m depolarized rapidly with anoxia, and was usually completely dissipated within 1-2 min. The depolarization of delta psi m with anoxia (or CN-) and repolarization on reoxygenation both followed a time course well characterized as the sum of two exponential processes. Oligomycin (0.2-2 micrograms/ml) hyperpolarized delta psi m and abolished the slower components of both the depolarization with anoxia and of the subsequent repolarization. These data (i) illustrate the role of the F1-F0 ATP synthetase in slowing the rate of dissipation of delta psi m on cessation of electron transport, (ii) confirm blockade of the ATP synthetase by oligomycin at these concentrations, and (iii) indicate significant accumulation of intramitochondrial ADP during 1-2 min of anoxia. 4. Depolarization of delta psi m was graded with graded changes in PO2 below about 60 mmHg. The stimulus-response curves thus constructed strongly resemble those for [Ca2+]i and NAD(P)H with PO2. The change in delta

  17. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester triggers apoptosis through induction of loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in CCRF-CEM cells.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Cığır Biray; Gündüz, Cumhur; Baran, Yusuf; Sahin, Fahri; Yılmaz, Sunde; Dogan, Zeynep Ozlem; Saydam, Güray

    2011-01-01

    CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester) is one of the most valuable and investigated component of propolis which is composed by honeybees. In the current study, we aimed at examining apoptotic effects of CAPE on CCRF-CEM leukemic cells and at determining the roles of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in cell death. Trypan blue and XTT methods were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. Apoptosis was examined by ELISA-based oligonucleotide and acridine orange/ethidium bromide dye techniques. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using JC-1 dye by flow cytometric analysis and under fluorescent microscope. We detected the time- and dose-dependent increases in cytotoxic effect of CAPE on CCRF-CEM cells. ELISA and acridine orange/ethidium bromide results showed that apoptotic cell population increased significantly in CCRF-CEM cells exposed to increasing concentrations of CAPE. On the other hand, there was significant loss of MMP determined in response to CAPE in CCRF-CEM cells. This in vitro data by being supported with clinical data may open the way of the potential use of CAPE for the treatment of leukemia.

  18. Tualang honey induces apoptosis and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential of human breast and cervical cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Fauzi, Agustine Nengsih; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2011-04-01

    Honey is reported to contain various compounds such as phenols, vitamins and antioxidants. The present study investigates the anticancer potential of Tualang honey (Agromas) (TH) in human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines; as well as in the normal breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. The cells were treated with increasing doses of TH (1-10%) for up to 72 h. Increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage from the cell membranes indicates that TH is cytotoxic to all three cancer cells with effective concentrations (EC(50)) of 2.4-2.8%. TH is however, not cytotoxic to the MCF-10A cells. Reactivity with annexin V fluorescence antibody and propidium iodide as analysed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy shows that apoptosis occurred in these cancer cells. TH also reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in the cancer cell lines after 24h of treatment. The activation of caspase-3/7 and -9 was observed in all TH-treated cancer cells indicating the involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This study shows that TH has significant anticancer activity against human breast and cervical cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Changes in mitochondrial membrane potentials and its exponential relation with phosphatidylserine translocation in the plasma membrane as markers in the initial events of apoptosis: evaluation in different spermatic fractions].

    PubMed

    Barroso Villa, Gerardo; Karchmer Krivitzky, Samuel; Castelazo Morales, Ernesto; Carballo Mondragón, Esperanza; Kably Ambe, Alberto

    2002-04-01

    To determine the integrity of the plasmatic membrane through phosphatidylserine (PS) translocation in two spermatic fractions and their correlation with the spermatic mitochondrial membrane potential. The analysis of both spermatic fractions was carried out through a discontinuous gradient separation with Percoli, in order to obtain two samples with high and low mobility (90-40%). Twelve patients were recruited for the initial evaluation of seminal parameters. Mitochondrial membrane integrity was determined using a second antibody (Mitosensor), and was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, evaluating an average of 200 cells. A 450-490 nm excitation filter was used for this analysis. Cytoplasmatic assessment was carried out by anexine V bonding to PS, in order to determine the initial events of cellular death. Non parameter tests were used in order to determine the differences between mitochondrial potentials and plasmatic membrane processes. Linear correlation tests were used for the anexine V and Mitosensor ratios. Due to the study's design, some differences were observed regarding the displacement parameters and the presence of apoptosis, both, in the plasmatic membrane and in mitochondrial membrane potentials. A positive correlation between both, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic membrane functions was also found. This is the first study performing a comparative analysis between mitochondrial membrane function and cytoplasmatic PS expression as early cellular death markers. The male infertility population is probably associated with an increase in this kind of apoptosis processes.

  20. Effect of manganese supplementation on the membrane integrity and the mitochondrial potential of the sperm of grazing Nelore bulls.

    PubMed

    Reis, L S L S; Ramos, A A; Camargos, A S; Oba, E

    2014-11-10

    The effect of dietary manganese (Mn(2+)) supplementation on the reproductive performance of Nelore bulls was evaluated by assessment of sperm membrane integrity. Sixty Nelore bulls (Bos taurus indicus) aged 18-20 mo were randomly divided into four groups (n=15) receiving dietary Mn(2+) supplementation at 540, 1300, 3800 and 6300mg/kg (treatments TC, T1300, T3800 and T6300, respectively). The diets were changed for the groups every 70d. Semen samples were obtained 15 and 56d after the diet change, which corresponded to the period of adjustment to the new diet and the time required for a complete spermatogenesis cycle, respectively. Sperm integrity was assessed by detection of: intact (IMe) or damaged (DMe) membranes, intact (IA) or damaged (DA) acrosomes, and high (HM) or low (LM) mitochondrial membrane potentials. Only bulls from the TC treatment showed a significant increase in the production of intact sperm [IMe/IA/LM] and decrease in the production of sperm with damaged acrosome [IMe/DA/LM] or completely damaged sperm [DMe/DA/LM] (P<0.05). The Mn(2+) concentrations in the semen were positively correlated with the incidence of sperm with IMe, DA, and LM and negatively correlated with number of sperm with DMe, IA, and LM. Therefore, dietary Mn(2+) supplementation for Nelore bulls must be limited to 540mg of Mn(2+)/kg given that higher doses are detrimental to the integrity of the plasma and acrosomal sperm membranes.

  1. Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in living cells using high-content imaging, machine learning, and morphological binning.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Anthony P; Cameron, Robert B; Speiser, Jaime L; Wolf, Bethany J; Peterson, Yuri K; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beeson, Craig C; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the processes of mitochondrial dynamics (fission, fusion, biogenesis, and mitophagy) has been hampered by the lack of automated, deterministic methods to measure mitochondrial morphology from microscopic images. A method to quantify mitochondrial morphology and function is presented here using a commercially available automated high-content wide-field fluorescent microscopy platform and R programming-language-based semi-automated data analysis to achieve high throughput morphological categorization (puncta, rod, network, and large & round) and quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential. In conjunction with cellular respirometry to measure mitochondrial respiratory capacity, this method detected that increasing concentrations of toxicants known to directly or indirectly affect mitochondria (t-butyl hydroperoxide [TBHP], rotenone, antimycin A, oligomycin, ouabain, and carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone [FCCP]), decreased mitochondrial networked areas in cultured 661w cells to 0.60-0.80 at concentrations that inhibited respiratory capacity to 0.20-0.70 (fold change compared to vehicle). Concomitantly, mitochondrial swelling was increased from 1.4- to 2.3-fold of vehicle as indicated by changes in large & round areas in response to TBHP, oligomycin, or ouabain. Finally, the automated identification of mitochondrial location enabled accurate quantification of mitochondrial membrane potential by measuring intramitochondrial tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) fluorescence intensity. Administration of FCCP depolarized and administration of oligomycin hyperpolarized mitochondria, as evidenced by changes in intramitochondrial TMRM fluorescence intensities to 0.33- or 5.25-fold of vehicle control values, respectively. In summary, this high-content imaging method accurately quantified mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in hundreds of thousands of cells on a per-cell basis, with sufficient throughput for pharmacological

  2. Platelets of type 2 diabetic patients are characterized by high ATP content and low mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinmin; Wu, Jiajia; Du, Junjun; Ran, Jianmin; Xu, Jie

    2009-12-01

    Platelet dysfunction plays a critical role in vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). But the relationship between platelet hyperactivity and its energy metabolic process remains unclear. This study was designed to explore alterations of platelet mitochondrial ATP production and the possible mechanism. A total of 39 T2DM patients without macrovascular and microvascular complications and 32 normal controls were fasting sampled. Platelet ATP content was measured by a high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC). The flow cytometry technique was adopted to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim), the stored force for platelet ATP production. Consequently, T2DM patients exhibited obvious hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hypertension, but normal platelet morphology. Platelet ATP content was significantly higher in T2DM (0.032 +/- 0.010 micromol/10(9) platelets versus 0.017 +/- 0.006 micromol/10(9) platelets, p < 0.001) than in the control group. Interestingly, DeltaPsim was markedly decreased in T2DM patients (0.79 +/- 0.18 versus 2.70 +/- 1.03, p < 0.001) compared with normal controls. For whole subjects, a stepwise regression showed that plasma glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level positively correlated to platelet ATP content (beta = 0.552, 95% CI = 0.072-1.451), and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level was negatively correlated to DeltaPsim (beta = -0.372, 95% CI = -0.471 to -0.089). These data support that hyperglycemia of T2DM promotes platelet mitochondria to generate more ATP, but decreases platelet mitochondrial potential. The discordance between them requires further researches to elucidate.

  3. Mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and Ca(2+)-induced differentiation in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Savignan, F; Ballion, B; Odessa, M F; Charveron, M; Bordat, P; Dufy, B

    2004-01-01

    We have used the human calcium- and temperature-dependent (HaCaT) keratinocyte cell line to elucidate mechanisms of switching from a proliferating to a differentiating state. When grown in low calcium medium (<0.1 mM) HaCaT cells proliferate. However, an increase in the calcium concentration of the culture medium, [Ca(2+)](0), induces growth arrest and the cells start to differentiate. Numerous studies have already shown that the increase in [Ca(2+)](0) results in acute and sustained increases in intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca(2+)](i). We find that the Ca(2+)-induced cell differentiation of HaCaT cells is also accompanied by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, DeltaPsi. By combining patch-clamp electrophysiological recordings and microspectrofluorimetric measurements of DeltaPsi on single cells, we show that the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) led to DeltaPsi depolarization. In addition, we report that tetraethylammonium (TEA), a blocker of plasma membrane K(+) channels, which is known to inhibit cell proliferation, and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), a blocker of plasma membrane Cl(-) channels, also affect DeltaPsi. Both these agents stimulate HaCaT cell differentiation. These data therefore strongly suggest a direct causal relationship between depolarization of DeltaPsi and the inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation in HaCaT keratinocytes.

  4. Benzo[a]pyrene-induced nitric oxide production acts as a survival signal targeting mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hardonnière, Kévin; Huc, Laurence; Podechard, Normand; Fernier, Morgane; Tekpli, Xavier; Gallais, Isabelle; Sergent, Odile; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), the prototype molecule of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, exhibits genotoxic and carcinogenic effects, which has led the International Agency for Research on Cancer to recognize it as a human carcinogen. Besides the well-known apoptotic signals triggered by B[a]P, survival signals have also been suggested to occur, both signals likely involved in cancer promotion. Our previous work showed that B[a]P induced an hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in rat hepatic epithelial F258 cells. Elevated ΔΨm plays a role in tumor development and progression, and nitric oxide (NO) has been suggested to be responsible for increases in ΔΨm. The present study therefore aimed at evaluating the impact of B[a]P on NO level in F258 cells, and at testing the putative role for NO as a survival signal, notably in link with ΔΨm. Our data demonstrated that B[a]P exposure resulted in an NO production which was dependent upon the activation of the inducible NO synthase. This enzyme activation involved AhR and possibly p53 activation. Preventing NO production not only increased B[a]P-induced cell death but also blocked mitochondrial hyperpolarization. This therefore points to a role for NO as a survival signal upon B[a]P exposure, possibly targeting ΔΨm.

  5. SB203580 enhances the RV-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis in A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-yang; Zhuang, Cai-ping; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    Resveratrol (RV), a naturally occurring phytoalexin, is known to possess a wide spectrum of chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects in various stages of human tumors. p38, a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily, is always activated by some extracellular stimulus to regulate many cellular signal transduction pathways, such as apoptosis, proliferation, and inflammation and so on. In this report, we assessed the effect of SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK signaling pathway, on the RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. CCK-8 assay showed that pretreatment with SB203580 significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of RV, which was further verified by analyzing the phosphatidylserine externalization using flow cytometry. In order to further confirm whether SB203580 accelerated apoptosis via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, we analyzed the dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) of cells stained with rhodamine 123 by using flow cytometry after treatment with RV in the absence and presence of SB203580. Our data for the first time reported that p38 inhibitor SB203580 enhanced the RV-induced apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway.

  6. Membrane-potential-dependent changes in the stoichiometry of charge translocation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M P; Brand, M D

    1988-05-02

    The charge/oxygen (q+/O) stoichiometry of mitochondria respiring on succinate was measured under conditions of high membrane potential (delta psi). The technique used was a variation of the steady-state method of Al-Shawi and Brand [(1981) Biochem. J. 200, 539-546]. We show that q+/O was about 2.7 at high values of delta psi (170 mV). As delta psi was lowered from 170 mV to 85 mV with the respiratory inhibitor malonate the q+/O stoichiometry increased to 6.0. A number of artefacts which could have led to an underestimation of the q+/O stoichiometry were eliminated. These included effects of any rapid change in mitochondrial volume, internal pH, activity of the endogenous K+/H+ exchanger or in H+ conductance due to changes in delta psi after the addition of inhibitor. The experiments presented here are the first direct demonstration that the stoichiometry of proton pumping by the mitochondrial respiratory chain changes as delta psi is varied.

  7. Chloroquine-induced glioma cells death is associated with mitochondrial membrane potential loss, but not oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Quinet, Annabel; de Andrade-Lima, Leonardo Carmo; Martins, Davi Jardim; Garcia, Camila Carrião Machado; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro Reily; Vieira, Debora Braga; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins

    2016-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), a quinolone derivative widely used to treat and prevent malaria, has been shown to exert a potent adjuvant effect when combined with conventional glioblastoma therapy. Despite inducing lysosome destabilization and activating p53 in human glioma cells, the mechanisms underlying cell death induced by this drug are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed in a time- and dose-dependent manner, the effects of CQ upon mitochondria integrity, autophagy regulation and redox processes in four human glioma cell lines that differ in their resistance to this drug. NAC-containing media protected cells against CQ-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), autophagic vacuoles (LC3II) accumulation and loss of cell viability induced by CQ. However, we noticed that part of this protection was due to media acidification in NAC preparations, alerting for problems in experimental procedures using NAC. The results indicate that although CQ induces accumulation of LC3II, mitochondria, and oxidative stress, neither of these events is clearly correlated to cell death induced by this drug. The only event elicited in all cell lines at equitoxic doses of CQ was the loss of MMP, indicating that mitochondrial stability is important for cells resistance to this drug. Finally, the data indicate that higher steady-state MMP values can predict cell resistance to CQ treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of brain mitochondrial H2O2 production by membrane potential and NAD(P)H redox state.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary

    2003-09-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at Complex I of the electron transport chain is implicated in the etiology of neural cell death in acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. However, little is known regarding the regulation of mitochondrial ROS production by NADH-linked respiratory substrates under physiologically realistic conditions in the absence of respiratory chain inhibitors. This study used Amplex Red fluorescence measurements of H2O2 to test the hypothesis that ROS production by isolated brain mitochondria is regulated by membrane potential (DeltaPsi) and NAD(P)H redox state. DeltaPsi was monitored by following the medium concentration of the lipophilic cation tetraphenylphosphonium with a selective electrode. NAD(P)H autofluorescence was used to monitor NAD(P)H redox state. While the rate of H2O2 production was closely related to DeltaPsi and the level of NAD(P)H reduction at high values of DeltaPsi, 30% of the maximal rate of H2O2 formation was still observed in the presence of uncoupler (p-trifluoromethoxycarbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone) concentrations that provided for maximum depolarization of DeltaPsi and oxidation of NAD(P)H. Our findings indicate that ROS production by mitochondria oxidizing physiological NADH-dependent substrates is regulated by DeltaPsi and by the NAD(P)H redox state over ranges consistent with those that exist at different levels of cellular energy demand.

  9. Reconstitution of CKMT1 expression fails to rescue cells from mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation: implications for controlling RNAi experiments.

    PubMed

    Datler, Christoph; Grimm, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an essential method in molecular biology to reduce the expression of target genes and thereby determine their function. Since this tool is known to also have unspecific effects, control experiments are needed, chiefly among them the exclusion of off-target effects and the reconstitution of the genes' expression for the rescue of the cellular RNAi effects. We show here that the knock-down of the mitochondrial creatine kinase-1 (CKMT1) by RNA interference causes the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential ΔΨm. This was accomplished with 11 different RNAi constructs designed to target 7 distinct exons as well as exon/intron junctions making unspecific off-target effects unlikely. However, all our attempts failed to rescue human cells from ΔΨm dissipation by the expression of CKMT1 alleles not targeted by RNAi. This included the transient and stable expression of the murine CKMT1 homologue, the expression of human codon usage-modified alleles, the transfection of a novel splice-isoform of CKMT1, and even the introduction of a human genomic clone for CKMT1 with codon usage changes. Our results indicate that while off-target effects of RNA interference can easily be addressed, the rescue of the knock-down phenotype is not necessarily achievable. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  11. Quantitative measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential in cultured cells: calcium-induced de- and hyperpolarization of neuronal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, Akos A; Chinopoulos, Christos; Birket, Matthew J; Jastroch, Martin; Vitelli, Cathy; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨM) is a central intermediate in oxidative energy metabolism. Although ΔΨM is routinely measured qualitatively or semi-quantitatively using fluorescent probes, its quantitative assay in intact cells has been limited mostly to slow, bulk-scale radioisotope distribution methods. Here we derive and verify a biophysical model of fluorescent potentiometric probe compartmentation and dynamics using a bis-oxonol-type indicator of plasma membrane potential (ΔΨP) and the ΔΨM probe tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) using fluorescence imaging and voltage clamp. Using this model we introduce a purely fluorescence-based quantitative assay to measure absolute values of ΔΨM in millivolts as they vary in time in individual cells in monolayer culture. The ΔΨP-dependent distribution of the probes is modelled by Eyring rate theory. Solutions of the model are used to deconvolute ΔΨP and ΔΨM in time from the probe fluorescence intensities, taking into account their slow, ΔΨP-dependent redistribution and Nernstian behaviour. The calibration accounts for matrix:cell volume ratio, high- and low-affinity binding, activity coefficients, background fluorescence and optical dilution, allowing comparisons of potentials in cells or cell types differing in these properties. In cultured rat cortical neurons, ΔΨM is −139 mV at rest, and is regulated between −108 mV and −158 mV by concerted increases in ATP demand and Ca2+-dependent metabolic activation. Sensitivity analysis showed that the standard error of the mean in the absolute calibrated values of resting ΔΨM including all biological and systematic measurement errors introduced by the calibration parameters is less than 11 mV. Between samples treated in different ways, the typical equivalent error is ∼5 mV. PMID:22495585

  12. Involvement of seminal leukocytes, reactive oxygen species, and sperm mitochondrial membrane potential in the DNA damage of the human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lobascio, A M; De Felici, M; Anibaldi, M; Greco, P; Minasi, M G; Greco, E

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing leukocytes in semen has been a standard component of the semen analysis, but its true significance remains still unknown. In this study, we have correlated the number of seminal leukocytes to various semen parameters. We found a negative correlation between the leukocyte number and sperm concentration (rs  = -0.22; p = 0.01) and motility (rs  = -0.20; p = 0.02). In contrast, a positive correlation between the number of leukocytes and both seminal ROS (rs  = 0.70, p < 0.001; n = 125) and the number of spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation (rs  = 0.43, p = 0.032; n = 25) was found. However, only a trend of positive correlation between ROS and the number of spermatozoa with TUNEL-detected DNA fragmentation was observed. Moreover, this latter was not correlated with loss of sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) (10% vs 35%, rs  = 0.25, p = 0.08; n = 50). Overall these results indicate that the presence of high number of leukocytes in the ejaculate negatively affects key semen parameters, as sperm concentration and motility, associated with infertility conditions. Moreover, they suggest that leukocytes are the major source of the seminal ROS and cause of sperm DNA fragmentation. However, the absence of a clear correlation between ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation, and spermatozoa with damaged DNA and MMP loss, suggest that ROS produced by leukocytes might be not the only cause of DNA damage in spermatozoa and that intrinsic mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathways might not have a major impact on sperm DNA fragmentation.

  13. Intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential change and associated events mediate apoptosis in chemopreventive effect of diclofenac in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Sanyal, S N

    2010-01-01

    The present study explored the role of intrinsic mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi M) in NSAID-induced apoptosis in the early stages of colon cancer. 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) was used to induce colon cancer and its chemoprevention was studied by diclofenac in a rat model. After 6 weeks of treatment with DMH (early stage), morphological analysis revealed a marked occurrence of preneoplastic features [i.e., mucosal plaque lesions (MPLs) in the colonic tissue]. Coadministration of diclofenac with DMH resulted in a significant reduction of these lesions, thereby proving the chemopreventive efficacy of diclofenac at the chosen anti-inflammatory dose. DMH treatment also led to a significant increase in delta psi M in the isolated colonocytes as assessed by JC-1 fluorescent staining, measured both by fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometerically. Further, there was seen a reduction in the number of cells showing low delta psi M, and hence monomer intensity of JC-1 by DMH treatment. To study the mechanism of these alterations in delta psi M in the present work, we studied the protein expression of important proapoptotic proteins, cytochrome c and Bax, by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. DMH treatment reduced the mitochondrial translocation of Bax whereas cytochrome c was found to be located prominently in the mitochondria. Protein expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 was also studied in the colonic mucosa, which was expectedly found to be overexpressed after DMH treatment. Diclofenac treatment ameliorated the elevated delta psi M and its associated events to exert its chemopreventive action against early stages of colon cancer.

  14. Simultaneous Single Neuron Recording of O2 Consumption, [Ca2+]i and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Glutamate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gleichmann, Marc; Collis, Leon P.; Smith, Peter J.S.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    To order the cellular processes in glutamate toxicity, we simultaneously recorded O2 consumption, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) in single cortical neurons. O2 consumption was measured using an amperometric self-referencing platinum electrode adjacent to neurons in which [Ca2+]i and mΔψ were monitored with Fluo-4 and TMRE+, respectively using a spinning disk laser confocal microscope. Excitotoxic doses of glutamate caused an elevation of [Ca2+]i followed seconds afterwards by an increase in O2 consumption which reached a maximum level within 1 to 5 min. A modest increase in mΔψ occurred during this time period, and then, shortly before maximal O2 consumption was reached, the mΔψ, as indicated by TMRE+ fluorescence, dissipated. Maximal O2 consumption lasted up to 5 min and then declined together with mΔψ and ATP levels, while [Ca2+]i further increased. mΔψ and [Ca2+]i returned to baseline levels when neurons were treated with an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist shortly after the [Ca2+]i increased. Our unprecedented spatial and time resolution revealed that this sequence of events is identical in all neurons, albeit with considerable variability in magnitude and kinetics of changes in O2 consumption, [Ca2+]i and mΔψ. The data obtained using this new method are consistent with a model where Ca2+ influx causes ATP depletion, despite maximal mitochondrial respiration, minutes after glutamate receptor activation. PMID:19226367

  15. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H.; Bongard, Robert D.; Gauthier, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψm and Δψp) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([Re]) were measured over time. R123 [Re] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [Re] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K+ concentration ([K+]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [Re], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [Re]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [Re] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψm (−130 ± 7 and −133 ± 4 mV), Δψp (−36 ± 4 and −49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (KPgp, 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψm (−124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψm and Δψp. Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O2 for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψm, hyperoxic cell Δψm was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21239539

  16. Relation between cell death progression, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential in fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells under heat-shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyatrikas, Darya V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Stepanov, Alexei V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Borovskii, Gennadii B; Rikhvanov, Eugene G

    2015-06-01

    Moderate heat shock increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that led to cell death in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Conditions that disturb mitochondrial functions such as treatment by uncouplers and petite mutation were shown to inhibit ROS production and protects cell from thermal death. Hence, mitochondria are responsible for ROS production and play an active role in cell death. An increase in ROS production was accompanied by hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane. All agents suppressing hyperpolarization also suppressed heat-induced ROS production. It was supposed that generation of ROS under moderate heat shock in glucose-grown S. cerevisiae cells is driven by the mitochondrial membrane potential. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A potential role of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and its implication in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Tariq A.; O'Malley, Jordan; Kumar, Sandeep; Chandra, Dhyan

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) has an important regulatory role in programmed cell death by inhibiting the caspase cascade. Activation of XIAP-dependent signaling culminates into regulation of multiple cellular processes including apoptosis, innate immunity, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell migration, invasion, metastasis and differentiation. Although XIAP localizes to the cytosolic compartment, XIAP-mediated cellular signaling encompasses mitochondrial and post-mitochondrial levels. Recent findings demonstrate that XIAP also localizes to mitochondria and regulates mitochondria functions. XIAP acts upstream of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and modulates caspase-dependent apoptosis. The new function of XIAP has potential to enhance mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and other cellular functions controlling cytochrome c release. These findings could exploit the overexpression of XIAP in human tumors for therapeutic benefits. PMID:26232549

  18. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions.

  19. Influence of mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa on in vitro fertilisation outcome.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, P; Ballot, C; Jouy, N; Thomas, P; Marchetti, C

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether the outcome of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) is influenced by the percentage of spermatozoa with functional mitochondria, a total of 91 random couples undergoing IVF were included. Mitochondrial function was determined by flow cytometry and expressed as percentage of spermatozoa. Conventional sperm parameters were studied by light microscopy. Reproductive outcome parameters were fertilisation rate, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy. It was found that the fertilisation rate was correlated with the percentage of spermatozoa (r = 0.24, P = 0.01) as well as with the percentage of highly motile spermatozoa. However, we did not find any relationship between the percentage of spermatozoa and embryo quality. Nevertheless, no patient who exhibited less than 64% of spermatozoa achieved pregnancy. It is concluded that determination of Δψ(m) provides accurate information to guide physicians to identify male patients for whom IVF will be unlikely to result in pregnancy. Therefore, we suggest that the percentage of spermatozoa may contribute to identify the most appropriate treatment for an individual patient.

  20. Effects of Medical Diagnostic Low-dose X Rays on Human Lymphocytes: Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, Apoptosis and Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Tungjai, Montree; Phathakanon, Nutnicha; Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy

    2017-05-01

    Low-dose radiation is widely used across the world for the diagnosis of many diseases by means of a variety of imaging technologies. However, the harmful effects of exposure to low-dose radiation during medical examination remain controversial. The authors studied the effects of medical diagnostic low-dose x rays (i.e., 0.03, 0.05, or 0.1 mGy) after an in vitro exposure of human lymphocytes. Cells with no irradiation served as the non-irradiated control group. Three biological indicators were used to determine the effects of medical diagnostic low-dose x rays at 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 h post-irradiation. These biological endpoints were mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cell cycle, and apoptosis. Results indicated no changes in the ΔΨm, number of apoptotic cells, and cell cycle in lymphocytes exposed to these low doses of radiation, as compared to the corresponding non-irradiated lymphocytes at all harvest time-points. These results suggested that there were no harmful effects of the diagnostic low-dose x rays when human lymphocytes were exposed in an in vitro condition.

  1. Sodium Fluoride Induces Apoptosis in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes by Altering Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Intracellular ROS Level.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaoyan; Yang, Xia; Hao, Xianhui; Ren, Qiurong; Gao, Jiping; Wang, Yu; Chang, Na; Qiu, Yulan; Song, Guohua

    2015-08-01

    Chronic excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic, and effects of long-term fluorosis on different organ systems have been examined. However, there are few studies about the effects of fluorosis on cardiovascular systems. Here, we studied the fluoride-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells and determined the underlying molecular mechanisms including the cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, the changes of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and the cell apoptosis. Sodium fluoride (NaF) at concentrations of 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/L was administered to cultured H9c2 cells for up to 48 h. After the treatment, H9c2 cells were collected and the associated parameters were measured by flow cytometry. Our study found that fluoride not only inhibited H9c2 cell proliferation but also induced cell apoptosis. With the increment of NaF concentration, the apoptotic rates and ROS generation were increased, while the ΔΨm was decreased. In summary, these data suggested that NaF-induced H9c2 cell apoptosis is mediated by direct increased intracellular ROS and downregulated ΔΨm.

  2. Mulberry leaf phenolics ameliorate hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and stabilize mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu-Xiao; Shen, Wei-Zhi; Liao, Sen-Tai; Liu, Fan; Zheng, Shan-Qing; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Chen, C-Y Oliver

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effect of phenolics in mulberry leaves (mulberry leaf phenolics; MLP) on hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in HepG2 cells; we treated HepG2 with glucose [5.5 (N-Glc) or 50 mmol/L (Hi-Glc)] with or without MLP at 10 or 100 µmol/L gallic acid equivalents and assessed level of reactive oxidant species (ROS), ΔΨm, malondialdehyde (MDA) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation. Hi-Glc-induced oxidative damage was demonstrated by a series of increase in superoxides (560%, 0.5 h), MDA (400%, 24 h), NF-κB activation (474%, 4 h) and a wild fluctuation of ΔΨm relative to the control cells (p ≤ 0.05). MLP treatments ameliorate Hi-Glc-induced negative effects by a 40% reduction in ROS production, 34-44% reduction in MDA production, over 35% inhibition of NF-κB activation, as well as exert protective effect on HepG2 cells from change in ΔΨm. Our data show that MLP in vitro can protect hepatoctyes from hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damages.

  3. Ethanol Influences on Bax Translocation, Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation are Modulated by Vitamin E and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Paiva, Michael; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra

    2011-01-01

    Background This study investigated ethanol influences on intracellular events which predispose developing neurons toward apoptosis, and the capacity of the antioxidant α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to modulate these effects. Assessments were made of the following: (1) ethanol-induced translocation of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein to the mitochondrial membrane, a key upstream event in the initiation of apoptotic cell death; (2) disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) as a result of ethanol exposure, an important process in triggering the apoptotic cascade; and (3) generation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a function of ethanol exposure. Methods These interactions were investigated in cultured postnatal day 8 neonatal rat cerebellar granule cells, a population vulnerable to developmental ethanol exposure in vivo and in vitro. Bax mitochondrial translocation was analyzed via subcellular fractionation followed by Western blot, and mitochondrial membrane integrity was determined using the lipophilic dye, JC-1, which exhibits potential-dependent accumulation in the mitochondrial membrane as a function of the MMP. Results Brief ethanol exposure in these preparations precipitated Bax translocation, but both vitamin E and BDNF reduced this effect to control levels. Ethanol treatment also resulted in a disturbance of the MMP, and this effect was blunted by the antioxidant and the neurotrophin. ROS generation was enhanced by a short ethanol exposure in these cells, but the production of these harmful free radicals was diminished to control levels by co-treatment with either vitamin E or BDNF. Conclusions These results indicate that both antioxidants and neurotrophic factors have the potential to ameliorate ethanol neurotoxicity, and suggest possible interventions which could be implemented in preventing or lessening the severity of the damaging effects of ethanol in the developing central

  4. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of the ethanolic herbal extract of Achillea falcata in human cervical cancer cells are mediated via cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial membrane potential loss.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qing; Zang, Yong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the second most common malignancy in females and most of the cases are found in developing countries. The objectives of the present study were (a): to demonstrate the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of Achillea falcata (A.falcata) extract in human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), and (b): to study the effect of the extract on cellular morphology, cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential. MTT assay was used to evaluate the anticancer effect of the extract on HeLa cells. Phase contrast, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the morphological changes in these cancer cells after extract treatment. Flow cytometry was used to evaluate the effects of the extract on cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential. The results revealed that A. falcata extract led to a significant antiproliferative effect in HeLa cancer cells. The extract induced cellular shrinkage, chromatin condensation and appearance of apoptotic bodies which are the hallmarks of cellular apoptosis. TEM results showed that extract-treated cells had nuclear membrane which was hemispherical and the nuclear chromatin was concentrated and bundled on the inner border of karyotheca. The endoplasmic reticulum also became enlarged in the inner segment. The extract also induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest along with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Achillea falcata extract induced potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effects in HeLa cells. This was accompanied by cellular shrinkage, chromatin condensation, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in these cancer cells.

  5. In vitro cytotoxicity of Mokko lactone in human leukemia HL-60 cells: induction of apoptotic cell death by mitochondrial membrane potential collapse.

    PubMed

    Yun, Y G; Oh, H; Oh, G S; Pae, H O; Choi, B M; Kwon, J W; Kwon, T O; Jang, S I; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2004-08-01

    We studied the effect of mokko lactone (ML) isolated from the roots of Saussurea lappa (Compositae), a plant that is used for medicinal purposes in Korea, on the induction of apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells. ML was cytotoxic to HL-60 cells, and this cytotoxic effect of ML appears to be attributable to its induction of apoptotic cell death, as ML induced nuclear morphologic changes and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and increased the proportion of Annexin V-positive cells and the activity of caspase-3. Further studies revealed that the induction of apoptosis by ML was associated with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Collectively, our results suggest that apoptosis induced by ML in HL-60 cells was executed by a collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential followed by the activation of caspase-3. This is the first report on the mechanism of apoptosis-inducing effect of ML.

  6. Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-induced reactive oxidative species protects human hepatic stellate cells from apoptosis by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins and mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Li, Shu-Jie; Xin, Yong-Ning; Ji, Shu-Sheng; Xie, Rui-Jin; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS)-induced apoptosis of human hepatic stellate (HSC) is one of the treatments for liver fibrosis. However, how ROS (reactive oxygen species) affect HSC apoptosis and liver fibrosis is still unknown. In our study, ROS in human HSC cell line LX-2 was induced by ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) and assessed by superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level. We found that in LX2 cells Fe-NTA induced notable ROS, which played a protective role in HSCs cells apoptosis by inhibiting Caspase-3 activation. Fe-NTA-induced ROS increased mRNA and protein level of anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 and decreased mRNA protein level of pro-apoptosis gene Bax, As a result, maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential of HSCs. Fe-NTA-induced ROS play a protective role in human HSCs by regulating Bcl-2 family proteins and mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:26770403

  7. Regulation of mitochondrial morphology by membrane potential, and DRP1-dependent division and FZO1-dependent fusion reaction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Naotada; Jofuku, Akihiro; Eura, Yuka; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2003-02-21

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo frequent fission and fusion or branching. To analyze the mitochondrial fusion reaction, mitochondria were separately labeled with green or red fluorescent protein (GFP and RFP, respectively) in HeLa cells, and the cells were fused using hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ). The resulting mixing of the fluorescent reporters was then followed using fluorescence microscopy. This system revealed that mitochondria fuse frequently in mammalian cells, and the fusion depends on the membrane potential across the inner membrane. The protonophore, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), led to fragmentation of the mitochondria and inhibited the fusion reaction. Removal of CCCP recovered the fusion activity to reform filamentous mitochondrial networks. Analysis of the effects of GTP-binding proteins, DRP1 and two FZO1 isoforms, and the GTPase-domain mutants on the CCCP-induced mitochondrial morphologic changes revealed that DRP1 and FZO1 are involved in membrane budding and fusion, respectively. Furthermore, a HVJ-dependent cell fusion assay combined with RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that both FZO1 isoforms are essential and must be acting in cis for the mitochondrial fusion reaction to occur.

  8. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, Akos A.; Mookerjee, Shona A.; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions. PMID:27404273

  9. Positive Feedback Amplifies the Response of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Glucose Concentration in Clonal Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-10-20

    Analysis of the cellular mechanisms of metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, is complicated by the large number of reactions and interactions in metabolic networks. Metabolic control analysis with appropriate modularization is a powerful method for simplifying and analyzing these networks. To analyze control of cellular energy metabolism in adherent cell cultures of the INS-1 832/13 pancreatic β-cell model we adapted our microscopy assay of absolute mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) to a fluorescence microplate reader format, and applied it in conjunction with cell respirometry. In these cells the sensitive response of ΔψM to extracellular glucose concentration drives glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Using metabolic control analysis we identified the control properties that generate this sensitive response. Force-flux relationships between ΔψM and respiration were used to calculate kinetic responses to ΔψM of processes both upstream (glucose oxidation) and downstream (proton leak and ATP turnover) of ΔψM. The analysis revealed that glucose-evoked ΔψM hyperpolarization is amplified by increased glucose oxidation activity caused by factors downstream of ΔψM. At high glucose, the hyperpolarized ΔψM is stabilized almost completely by the action of glucose oxidation, whereas proton leak also contributes to the homeostatic control of ΔψM at low glucose. These findings suggest a strong positive feedback loop in the regulation of β-cell energetics, and a possible regulatory role of proton leak in the fasting state. Analysis of islet bioenergetics from published cases of type 2 diabetes suggests that disruption of this feedback can explain the damaged bioenergetic response of β-cells to glucose.

  10. Effects of eprosartan on mitochondrial membrane potential and H2O2 levels in leucocytes in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Labiós, M; Martínez, M; Gabriel, F; Guiral, V; Ruiz-Aja, S; Beltrán, B; Muñoz, A

    2008-07-01

    We investigated whether circulating leucocytes from hypertensive patients exhibit more spontaneous, stimulated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and greater mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi) than those from normotensive individuals. We also investigated the effects of oral treatment with the angiotensin II (AT II) type 1 receptor blocker eprosartan (600 mg day(-1)) on these markers of oxidative stress. In 25 hypertensive patients and 28 healthy volunteers, spontaneous H2O2 formation was measured by flow cytometry after preincubation of buffy coat-leucocytes from fresh peripheral venous blood at 37 degrees C with 2',7' dichlorofluorescein. Stimulation of H2O2 formation by circulating leucocytes was elicited by the addition of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP). Deltapsi was determined by flow cytometry after the addition of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM). Compared with healthy individuals, lymphocytes from hypertensive patients exhibited higher Deltapsi (12.28+/-3.20 vs 16.25+/-2.88 arbitrary fluorescence units (AFU), respectively; P<0.001) and greater spontaneous H2O2 production (4.75+/-5.15 vs 8.98+/-9.97 AFU, respectively; P<0.05). tBHP stimulation was associated with higher H2O2 levels in circulating leucocytes in patients with uncorrected hypertension than in normotensive individuals. H2O2 overproduction was corrected by eprosartan treatment. These results suggest that oxidative stress could be important in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Furthermore, measurement of leucocyte oxidant activities may be useful for the evaluation of oxidative stress, which may be reduced with the use of antihypertensive drugs. Our results demonstrate that treatment of hypertension with eprosartan normalizes blood pressure and corrects oxidative disturbances, suggesting that leucocytes could be a target for this drug.

  11. PINK1 is activated by mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization and stimulates Parkin E3 ligase activity by phosphorylating Serine 65

    PubMed Central

    Kondapalli, Chandana; Kazlauskaite, Agne; Zhang, Ning; Woodroof, Helen I.; Campbell, David G.; Gourlay, Robert; Burchell, Lynn; Walden, Helen; Macartney, Thomas J.; Deak, Maria; Knebel, Axel; Alessi, Dario R.; Muqit, Miratul M. K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Missense mutations in PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) cause autosomal-recessive inherited Parkinson's disease (PD). We have exploited our recent discovery that recombinant insect PINK1 is catalytically active to test whether PINK1 directly phosphorylates 15 proteins encoded by PD-associated genes as well as proteins reported to bind PINK1. We have discovered that insect PINK1 efficiently phosphorylates only one of these proteins, namely the E3 ligase Parkin. We have mapped the phosphorylation site to a highly conserved residue within the Ubl domain of Parkin at Ser65. We show that human PINK1 is specifically activated by mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) depolarization, enabling it to phosphorylate Parkin at Ser65. We further show that phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65 leads to marked activation of its E3 ligase activity that is prevented by mutation of Ser65 or inactivation of PINK1. We provide evidence that once activated, PINK1 autophosphorylates at several residues, including Thr257, which is accompanied by an electrophoretic mobility band-shift. These results provide the first evidence that PINK1 is activated following Δψm depolarization and suggest that PINK1 directly phosphorylates and activates Parkin. Our findings indicate that monitoring phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65 and/or PINK1 at Thr257 represent the first biomarkers for examining activity of the PINK1-Parkin signalling pathway in vivo. Our findings also suggest that small molecule activators of Parkin that mimic the effect of PINK1 phosphorylation may confer therapeutic benefit for PD. PMID:22724072

  12. Sperm DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial membrane potential combined are better for predicting natural conception than standard sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Malić Vončina, Slađana; Golob, Barbara; Ihan, Alojz; Kopitar, Andreja Nataša; Kolbezen, Mojca; Zorn, Branko

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate whether DNA fragmentation and/or mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) predict natural conception better than standard sperm parameters. Prospective cross-sectional study. University medical center. Eighty-five infertile and 51 fertile men. Assessment of sperm DNA fragmentation, MMP, and standard semen parameters over a 6- to 12-month observation period. Comparison between the results of DNA fragmentation, MMP, and standard sperm parameters alone or combined and achievement of natural conception. Twenty-six of the 85 (31%) men from infertile couples conceived naturally. The median values of DNA fragmentation and MMP in the men who conceived within the observation period were similar to those in the fertile controls. Optimal threshold values of DNA fragmentation and MMP were 25% as determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve [AUC], 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.82) and 62.5% (AUC, 0.68, 95% CI 0.56-0.80), respectively. The men in the infertile group with values of DNA fragmentation ≤25% and with MMP values ≥62.5% had significantly higher odds for conception (odds ratio [OR], 5.22; 95% CI 1.82-14.93] and OR, 4.67; 95% CI 1.74-12.5, respectively). Normal semen analysis alone had no predictive value for natural conception (OR, 1.84; 95% CI 0.67-5.07]). Both sperm function tests combined had significant odds for natural conception (OR, 8.24; 95% CI 2.91-23.33]), with a probability of 0.607 (60.7%) for both normal values and 0.158 (15.8%) for abnormal values. Sperm DNA fragmentation and MMP combined may be superior to standard semen parameters for the prediction of natural conception. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential are not required for apoptosis and anti-apoptotic action of Bcl-2 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shchepina, L A; Popova, E N; Pletjushkina, O Yu; Chernyak, B V

    2002-02-01

    The release of cytochrome c from intermembrane space of mitochondria into cytosol is one of the critical events in apoptotic cell death. The important anti-apoptotic oncoprotein Bcl-2 inhibits this process. In the present study it was shown that apoptosis and release of cytochrome c induced by staurosporine or by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in HeLa cells were not affected by inhibitors of respiration (rotenone, myxothiazol, antimycin A) or by uncouplers (CCCP, DNP) that decrease the membrane potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane. The inhibitors of respiration and the uncouplers did not affect also the anti-apoptotic activity of Bcl-2.

  14. Cryopreservation of bull semen shipped overnight and its effect on post-thaw sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential and normal acrosomes.

    PubMed

    Anzar, M; Kroetsch, T; Boswall, L

    2011-06-01

    In the Canadian Animal Genetic Resource Program, bull semen is donated in frozen or fresh (diluted) states. This study was designed to assess the cryopreservation of diluted bull semen shipped at 4°C overnight, and to determine the post-thaw quality of shipped semen using different straw volumes and freezing rates. Semen was collected from four breeding bulls (three ejaculates per bull). Semen was diluted in Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol (TEYG) extender, cooled to 4°C and frozen as per routine (control semen). After cooling to 4°C, a part of semen was removed and shipped overnight to the research laboratory via express courier (shipped semen). Semen was packaged in 0.25 or 0.5 ml straws and frozen in a programmable freezer using three freezing rates, i.e., -10, -25 or -40°C/min. Control semen was also shipped to the research laboratory. Post-thaw sperm motility characteristics were assessed using CASA, and post-thaw sperm plasma membrane, mitochondrial membrane potential and normal acrosomes were assessed using flow cytometry. Post-thaw sperm quality was greater in shipped semen as compared to control (P<0.001). The shipped semen packaged in 0.25 ml straws had better post-thaw sperm quality than in 0.5 ml straws (P<0.001). Freezing rate had no effect on post-thaw sperm quality. In conclusion, bull semen can be shipped overnight for subsequent cryopreservation and gene banking. Overnight shipping of semen was found advantageous for bull semen cryopreservation. Semen packaging in 0.25 ml straws yielded better post-thaw quality than 0.5 ml straws.

  15. In vitro effects of triterpenic acids from olive leaf extracts on the mitochondrial membrane potential of promastigote stage of Leishmania spp.

    PubMed

    Sifaoui, Ines; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Martín-Navarro, Carmen Maria; Ticona, Juan Carlos; Reyes-Batlle, María; Mejri, Mondher; Jiménez, Antonio Ignacio; Lopez-Bazzocchi, Isabel; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Abderabba, Manef; Piñero, José E

    2014-10-15

    Protozoan diseases, such as leishmaniasis, are a cause of considerable morbidity throughout the world, affecting millions every year. In this study, two triterpenic acids (maslinic and oleanolic acids) were isolated from Tunisian olive leaf extracts and their in vitro activity against the promastigotes stage of Leishmania (L.) infantum and Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was investigated. Maslinic acid showed the highest activity with an IC50 of 9.32 ± 1.654 and 12.460 ± 1.25 μg/ml against L. infantum and L. amazonensis, respectively. The mechanism of action of these drugs was investigated by detecting changes in the phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, the plasma membrane permeability, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the ATP level production in the treated parasites. By using the fluorescent probe SYTOX® Green, both triterpenic acids showed that they produce a time-dependent plasma membrane permeabilization in the treated Leishmania species. In addition, spectrofluorimeteric data revealed the surface exposure of PS in promastigotes. Both molecules reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased the ATP levels to 15% in parasites treated with IC90 for 24h. We conclude that the triterpenic acids tested in this study, show potential as future therapeutic alternative against leishmaniasis. Further studies are needed to confirm this.

  16. HBCDD-induced sustained reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP and steroidogenesis in peripubertal rat Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fa, Svetlana; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Samardzija, Dragana; Hrubik, Jelena; Glisic, Branka; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), a brominated flame retardant added to various consumer products, is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. We have previously shown that 6-hour exposure to HBCDD disturbs basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced steroidogenesis in rat Leydig cells. Reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cAMP production was also observed. Here, we further expanded research on the effect of HBCDD on Leydig cells by using a prolonged exposure scenario. Cells were incubated in the presence of HBCDD during 24 h and then treated with HBCDD + hCG for additional 2 h. Results showed that HBCDD caused a sustained reduction in ATP level after 24 h of exposure, which persisted after additional 2-hour treatment with HBCDD + hCG. cAMP and androgen accumulations measured after 2 h of HBCDD + hCG treatment were also inhibited. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant inhibition in the expression of genes for steroidogenic enzymes, luteinizing hormone receptor, regulatory and transport proteins, and several transcription factors under both treatment conditions. Western blot analysis revealed a decreased level of 30 kDa steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) after HBCDD + hCG treatment. In addition, HBCDD decreased the conversion of 22-OH cholesterol to pregnenolone and androstenedione to testosterone, indicating loss of the activity of cytochrome P450C11A1 (CYP11A1) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17β). Cell survival was not affected, as confirmed by cytotoxicity and trypan blue tests or DNA fragmentation analysis. In summary, our data showed that HBCDD inhibits ATP supply, most likely through a decrease in ΔΨm, and targets multiple sites in the steroidogenic pathway in Leydig cells. - Highlights: • HBCDD causes a sustained reduction in ΔΨm and ATP level in Leydig cells. • Prolonged HBCDD exposure decreases hCG-supported steroidogenesis in Leydig cells. • HBCDD targets StAR, HSD17β and CYP11A1 in Leydig

  17. High-molecular-weight polyphenols from oolong tea and black tea: purification, some properties, and role in increasing mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Takashi; Nakagawa-Izumi, Akiko; Ozawa, Tetsuo; Numata, Osamu

    2007-03-01

    High-molecular-weight polyphenols from oolong and black teas increased mitochondrial membrane potential, as measured by a method using ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena and rhodamine 123. These polyphenols, referred to as mitochondrial activation factors (MAFs), were purified from oolong and black teas by solvent extraction and Toyopearl column chromatography. The number-average molecular weights of the MAFs were 9,000 to 18,000, and the weight-average molecular weights were 15,000 to 25,000. The MAFs increased the mitochondrial membrane potential more than catechins did. Treatment of the MAFs with tannase indicated that they contained galloyl residues. When the MAFs were hydrolyzed with HCl-n-BuOH, cyanidin and delphinidin were detected. The partial structure of the MAFs was analyzed by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and nine compounds were identified. These results suggest that MAFs are heterogeneous polymers of flavan-3-ols and flavan-3-ol gallates with intermonomeric linkages of B-ring to B-ring and C-ring to A-ring.

  18. Study on the mitochondrial activity and membrane potential after exposing later stage oocytes of two gorgonian corals (Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis) to cryoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S; Spikings, E; Huang, I-C; Lin, C

    2011-01-01

    Coral reefs provide a valuable habitat for many economically valuable fish and invertebrates. However, they are in serious jeopardy, threatened by increasing over-exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, disease and global climate change. Here, we examined the effect of cryoprotectant exposure on mitochondrial activity and membrane potential in coral oocytes in order to find suitable cryoprotectants towards their successful cryopreservation. According to the No Observed Effect Concentrations (NOECs), methanol was found to be the least toxic cryoprotectant whilst DMSO was the most toxic cryoprotectant. The results also demonstrated that there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in ATP concentrations between Junceella juncea and Junceella fragilis after exposure to all concentrations of all cryoprotectants for 30 min. Using confocal microscopy, JC-1 (5,50,6,60-tetrachloro-1,10,3,30-tetraethyl-imidacarbocyanine iodide) staining indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential of Junceella fragilis oocytes reduced after 1 M and 2 M methanol treatment and a loss of the mitochondrial distribution pattern and poor green fluorescence after 3M methanol treatment. Therefore, even oocytes that show no adverse effect of cryoprotectants on survival might suffer some more subtle impacts. The results obtained from this study will provide a basis for development of protocols to cryopreserve the oocytes of gorgonian corals.

  19. Apoptosis of leukemia K562 and Molt-4 cells induced by emamectin benzoate involving mitochondrial membrane potential loss and intracellular Ca(2+) modulation.

    PubMed

    Yun, Xinming; Rao, Wenbing; Xiao, Ciying; Huang, Qingchun

    2017-06-01

    Leukemia threatens millions of people's health and lives, and the pesticide-induced leukemia has been increasingly concerned because of the etiologic exposure. In this paper, cytotoxic effect of emamectin benzoate (EMB), an excellent natural-product insecticide, was evaluated through monitoring cell viability, cell apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in leukemia K562 and Molt-4 cells. Following the exposure to EMB, cell viability was decreased and positive apoptosis of K562 and Molt-4 cells was increased in a concentration- and time- dependent fashion. In the treatment of 10μM EMB, apoptotic cells accounted for 93.0% to K562 cells and 98.9% to Molt-4 cells based on the control, meanwhile, 63.47% of K562 cells and 81.15% of Molt-4 cells exhibited late apoptotic and necrotic features with damaged cytoplasmic membrane. 48h exposure to 10μM EMB increased significantly the great number of cells with mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, and the elevation of [Ca(2+)]i level was peaked and persisted within 70s in K562 cells whilst 50s in Molt-4 cells. Moreover, a stronger cytotoxicity of EMB was further observed than that of imatinib. The results authenticate the efficacious effect of EMB as a potential anti-leukemia agent and an inconsistency with regard to insecticide-induced leukemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Copper effects on key metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial membrane potential in gills of the estuarine crab Neohelice granulata at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mariana Machado; de Oliveira, Camila Bento; Yano, Natalia Lie Inocencio; Bianchini, Adalto

    2012-11-01

    The estuarine crab Neohelice granulata was exposed (96 h) to a sublethal copper concentration under two different physiological conditions (hyperosmoregulating crabs: 2 ppt salinity, 1 mg Cu/L; isosmotic crabs: 30 ppt salinity, 5 mg Cu/L). After exposure, gills (anterior and posterior) were dissected and activities of enzymes involved in glycolysis (hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase), Krebs cycle (citrate synthase), and mitochondrial electron transport chain (cytochrome c oxidase) were analyzed. Membrane potential of mitochondria isolated from anterior and posterior gill cells was also evaluated. In anterior gills of crabs acclimated to 2 ppt salinity, copper exposure inhibited hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and citrate synthase activity, increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. In posterior gills, copper inhibited hexokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, and increased citrate synthase activity. In anterior gills of crabs acclimated to 30 ppt salinity, copper exposure inhibited phosphofructokinase and citrate synthase activity, and increased hexokinase activity. In posterior gills, copper inhibited phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase activity, and increased hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity. Copper did not affect cytochrome c oxidase activity in either anterior or posterior gills of crabs acclimated to 2 and 30 ppt salinity. These findings indicate that exposure to a sublethal copper concentration affects the activity of enzymes involved in glycolysis and Krebs cycle, especially in anterior (respiratory) gills of hyperosmoregulating crabs. Changes observed indicate a switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, characterizing a situation of functional hypoxia. In this case, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential would suggest a decrease in ATP production. Although gills of isosmotic crabs were also affected by copper exposure, changes

  1. Salvianolic acid B inhibits intermittent high glucose-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis through regulation of Bcl-2 proteins and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Tao, Shanjun; Ren, Younan; Zheng, Haowen; Zhao, Mengqiu; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Yuanmei; Yang, Jieren; Zheng, Shuguo

    2017-08-08

    Blood glucose fluctuations, also referred to as intermittent high glucose, have been validated to be more harmful than sustained high glucose in exacerbating pancreatic dysfunction by inducing β cell apoptosis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), an aqueous component of Salvia miltiorrhiza, has been proved beneficial to pancreatic islet function in diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated the protective effect of Sal B on INS-1 cells exposed to intermittent high glucose and the possible mechanisms implicated. The results indicated that Sal B was able to restore cell viability and suppress INS-1 cell apoptosis induced by intermittent high glucose. Preincubation with Sal B led to a significant decrease of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activity and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Exposure to intermittent high glucose induced significant up-regulation of proapoptotic proteins, down-regulation of antiapoptotic protein and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in INS-1 cells, while these changes were reversed effectively in Sal B treated groups. In addition, Sal B markedly attenuated intermittent high glucose-induced oxidative stress as manifested by notably decreased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde (MDA). Taken together, these results indicate that Sal B is able to suppress intermittent high glucose-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis, which might be ascribed to regulation of Bcl-2 family protein expression and preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. An analysis of membrane fusion between mitochondrial double membranes and MITO-Porter, mitochondrial fusogenic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2015-09-01

    To achieve mitochondrial gene therapy, therapeutic molecules need to be transported through the outer and inner membranes of mitochondria into the innermost space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the construction of a MITO-Porter with a high fusogenic activity for the mitochondrial outer membrane for delivering molecules to the mitochondria of human cells. Here, we report on an investigation of a fusogenic lipid composition for the inner membrane, and an analysis of the fusogenic compositions for the outer and inner membranes. A significant relationship was found between fusion activity and the mitochondrial delivery of nucleic acids.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Provoke Dominant Inhibition of Mitochondrial Inner Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  4. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  5. Anticancer and apoptotic activities of oleanolic acid are mediated through cell cycle arrest and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, YUE-YONG; HUANG, HONG-YAN; WU, YIN-LIAN

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive form of cancer, with high rates of morbidity and mortality, a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the anticancer activity of oleanolic acid in HepG2 human HCC cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay, following administration of various doses of oleanolic acid. The effect of oleanolic acid on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using flow cytometry with propidium iodide and rhodamine-123 DNA-binding cationic fluorescent dyes. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to detect morphological changes in HepG2 cells following oleanolic acid treatment. The results revealed that oleanolic acid induced a dose-dependent, as well as time-dependent inhibition in the growth of HepG2 cancer cells. Following acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, treatment with various doses (0, 5, 25 and 50 µM) of oleanolic acid induced typical morphological changes associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that oleanolic acid induced cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells at the sub-G1 (apoptotic) phase of the cell cycle, in a dose-dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide revealed that apoptosis occurred early in these cells. Oleanolic acid treatment also resulted in fragmentation of nuclear DNA in a dose-dependent manner, producing the typical features of DNA laddering on an agarose gel. The results also demonstrated that oleanolic acid treatment resulted in a potent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which also occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, oleanolic acid may be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of human HCC. PMID:26151733

  6. Anticancer and apoptotic activities of oleanolic acid are mediated through cell cycle arrest and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yue-Yong; Huang, Hong-Yan; Wu, Yin-Lian

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive form of cancer, with high rates of morbidity and mortality, a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the anticancer activity of oleanolic acid in HepG2 human HCC cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay, following administration of various doses of oleanolic acid. The effect of oleanolic acid on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using flow cytometry with propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123 DNA‑binding cationic fluorescent dyes. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to detect morphological changes in HepG2 cells following oleanolic acid treatment. The results revealed that oleanolic acid induced a dose‑dependent, as well as time‑dependent inhibition in the growth of HepG2 cancer cells. Following acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, treatment with various doses (0, 5, 25 and 50 µM) of oleanolic acid induced typical morphological changes associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that oleanolic acid induced cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells at the sub‑G1 (apoptotic) phase of the cell cycle, in a dose‑dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide revealed that apoptosis occurred early in these cells. Oleanolic acid treatment also resulted in fragmentation of nuclear DNA in a dose‑dependent manner, producing the typical features of DNA laddering on an agarose gel. The results also demonstrated that oleanolic acid treatment resulted in a potent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which also occurred in a dose‑dependent manner. Therefore, oleanolic acid may be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of human HCC.

  7. Decreased Autophagy in Rat Heart Induced by Anti-β1-Adrenergic Receptor Autoantibodies Contributes to the Decline in Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Haihu; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ke; Wang, Jin; Yan, Zi; Zhang, Suli; Du, Yunhui; Liu, Huirong

    2013-01-01

    It has been recognized that changes in mitochondrial structure plays a key role in development of cardiac dysfunction, and autophagy has been shown to exert maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis effects. Our previous study found that anti-β1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies (β1-AABs) could lead to cardiac dysfunction along with abnormalities in mitochondrial structure. The present study tested the hypothesis that β1-AABs may induce the decline in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) by suppression of cardiac autophagy, which contributed to cardiac dysfunction. Male adult rats were randomized to receive a vehicle or peptide corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the β1 adrenergic receptor (β1-AAB group, 0.4 μg/g every two weeks for 12 weeks) and treated with rapamycin (RAPA, an autophagy agonist) at 5 mg/kg/day for two days before detection. At the 4th week, 8th week and 12th week of active immunization, the rats were sacrificed and cardiac function and the levels of cardiac LC3 and Beclin-1 were detected. ΔΨm in cardiac myocytes was determined by myocardial radionuclide imaging technology and JC-1 staining. In the present study, β1-AABs caused cardiac dysfunction, reduced ΔΨm and decreased cardiac autophagy. Treatment with RAPA markedly attenuated β1-AABs-induced cardiac injury evidenced by recovered ΔΨm. Taken together, these results suggested that β1-AABs exerted significant decreased ΔΨm, which may contribute to cardiac dysfunction, most likely by decreasing cardiac autophagy in vivo. Moreover, myocardial radionuclide imaging technology may be needed to assess the risk in developing cardiac dysfunction for the people who have β1-AABs in their blood. PMID:24278413

  8. Radiosensitization by fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene on human malignant melanoma through lipid peroxidation and enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    We examined fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene (C60/Sqe) for the ability to potentiate the radiosensitization under X-ray irradiation on human malignant melanoma HMV-II cells, which were treated with C60/Sqe and thereafter irradiated with X-ray. The cell proliferation for C60/Sqe was inhibited more markedly than for Sqe alone. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was almost unaltered for C60/squalane (Sqa) or Sqa, a hydrogenated form of Sqe, as compared to no-additive control. Thus radiosensitization of C60/Sqe is attributed to peroxidation of unsaturated bonds of squalene by X-ray-excited C60 in contrast to squalane. The fluorescence images of HMV-II cells stained with Rhodamine123, an indicator for mitochondrial membrane potential, were monitored for 6 h after X-ray irradiation. C60/Sqe obviously exhibited more augmented fluorescence intensity on perinuclear region of HMV-II cells than Sqe alone. TBARS assay showed that the lipid peroxidation level as malondialdehyde-equivalent increased by combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray dose-dependently on X-ray doses. C60/Sqe exhibited lipid peroxidation more markedly by 1.2-fold than Sqe alone. Thus the level of lipid peroxidation of squalene was sufficiently higher in C60/Sqe than in Sqe in the absence of C60 under X-ray irradiation, suggesting the combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray irradiation induced radiosensitization on HMV-II cells by peroxidation of absorbed Sqe in mitochondrial membrane via oxidative stress mediated by fullerene-C60.

  9. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Eze, Anthonius A; Gould, Matthew K; Munday, Jane C; Tagoe, Daniel N A; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim; De Koning, Harry P

    2016-08-01

    Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial mutation is in the F1 ATPase γ subunit, which allows loss of k

  10. Mucuna pruriens and Its Major Constituent L-DOPA Recover Spermatogenic Loss by Combating ROS, Loss of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akhand Pratap; Sarkar, Saumya; Tripathi, Muktanand; Rajender, Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background The Ayurvedic medicinal system claims Mucuna pruriens (MP) to possess pro-male fertility, aphrodisiac and adaptogenic properties. Some scientific evidence also supports its pro-male fertility properties; however, the mechanism of its action is not yet clear. The present study aimed at demonstrating spermatogenic restorative efficacy of MP and its major constituent L-DOPA (LD), and finding the possible mechanism of action thereof in a rat model. Methodology/Findings Ethinyl estradiol (EE) was administered at a rate of 3 mg/kg body weight (BW)/day for a period of 14 days to generate a rat model with compromised spermatogenesis. MP and LD were administered in two separate groups of these animals starting 15th day for a period of 56 days, and the results were compared with an auto-recovery (AR) group. Sperm count and motility, testis histo-architecture, level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), apoptosis, peripheral hormone levels and testicular germ cell populations were analysed, in all experimental groups. We observed efficient and quick recovery of spermatogenesis in MP and LD groups in comparison to the auto-recovery group. The treatment regulated ROS level, apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), recovered the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the number of testicular germ cells, ultimately leading to increased sperm count and motility. Conclusion/Significance M. pruriens efficiently recovers the spermatogenic loss induced due to EE administration. The recovery is mediated by reduction in ROS level, restoration of MMP, regulation of apoptosis and eventual increase in the number of germ cells and regulation of apoptosis. The present study simplified the complexity of mechanism involved and provided meaningful insights into MP/LD mediated correction of spermatogenic impairment caused by estrogens exposure. This is the first study demonstrating that L-DOPA largely accounts for pro

  11. Ruthenium(II) complexes: DNA-binding, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cellular localization, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Wang, Ji; Han, Bing-Jie; Xie, Yang-Yin; Lin, Gan-Jian; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-11-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate DNA-binding and cytotoxic activity of the four new Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (1), [Ru(bpy)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (2), [Ru(phen)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (3) and [Ru(dmp)₂(HMHPIP)](ClO₄)₂ (4). The complexes interact with DNA through intercalative mode and show relatively high cytotoxic activity against A549 cells, no cytotoxicity toward MG-63 cells. Complexes 1-4 can enhance the levels of ROS in A549 cells and induce the decrease of the mitochondrial membrane potential. These complexes inhibit the cell growth in A549 cells at G0/G1 or S phase. Complex 3 activated caspase 7, and down-regulated the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Complexes 1-4 induce apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dihydromethysticin kavalactone induces apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells through modulation of PI3K/Akt pathway, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and inducing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun-Qi; Huang, Yi-Gang; He, Ai-Na

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the tumor and apoptotic effects of dihydromethysticin kavalactone against human osteosarcoma (MG-63) cells. Antiproliferative activity was measured with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis induction by dihydromethysticin was demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy, quantitative videomicroscopy and Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit. Mitochondrial membrane potential disruption was demonstrated by rhodamine-123 dye using flow cytometry. We also evaluated the effect of dihydromethysticin on PI3K/Akt pathway with an immunoblotting analysis. The results showed that the compound induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent antiproliferative effects against MG-63 cell growth. Cell death and apoptotic body formation was noticed followed dihydromethysticin treatment at various doses. The percentage of apoptotic cells (early apoptosis+late apoptosis) increased from 6.63% in untreated control to 23.92%, 23.81% and 93.9% in 25 µM, 75 µM and 100 µ Mdihydromethysticin-treated cells respectively. Flow cytometric analysis showed dihydromethysticin induced an increase in G0/G1 cells (apoptotic cells). Furthermore, we observed mitochondrial transmembrane depolarization along with decreased phosphorylation levels for PI3K, AKT (Ser 473), AKT (Thr 308), GSK-3β, and BAD. These reductions were associated with down regulation of AKT and upregulation of both GSK-3β and BAD.

  13. Cryotolerance of stallion spermatozoa is related to ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential rather than to the integrity of sperm nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yeste, M; Estrada, E; Rocha, L G; Marín, H; Rodríguez-Gil, J E; Miró, J

    2015-03-01

    Although cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa allows long-term preservation of spermatozoa from particular stallions and facilitates international trade, it is understood to inflict damages on sperm cells that may finally reduce their fertilizing ability. In addition, individual differences are known to exist in the sperm ability to withstand freeze-thawing protocols. To date, these differences have mainly been reported on the basis of sperm motility and membrane integrity. For this reason, the present work sought to determine differences between good (good freezability ejaculates: GFE) and poor (poor freezability ejaculates: PFE) freezability stallion ejaculates in other sperm parameters, including peroxide and superoxide levels, potential of mitochondrial membrane and nuclear integrity. With this purpose, a total of 24 stallion ejaculates were cryopreserved and classified into two groups (GFE vs. PFE), depending on their sperm membrane integrity and motility after freeze-thawing. From the total of 24 ejaculates, 13 were classified as GFE and the other 11 were classified as PFE. Apart from differences in sperm membrane permeability and lipid disorder after freeze-thawing, GFE presented significantly (p < 0.05) higher percentages of viable spermatozoa with high content of peroxides and of superoxides than PFE. In contrast, and despite cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa increasing DNA fragmentation and disrupting disulphide bonds in sperm head proteins, no significant differences between GFE and PFE were seen. We can thus conclude that good and poor freezability stallion ejaculates differ in their reactive oxygen species levels after cryopreservation, but not in the damage extent on sperm nucleus.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of steroidal alkaloids on glutamate-induced toxicity by preserving mitochondrial membrane potential and reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Taveira, Marcos; Sousa, Carla; Valentão, Patrícia; Ferreres, Federico; Teixeira, João P; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-03-01

    Several evidences suggest that enhanced oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis and/or progression of several neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate for the first time whether both extracts from tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) leaves and their isolated steroidal alkaloids (tomatine and tomatidine) afford neuroprotective effect against glutamate-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and to elucidate the mechanisms underlying this protection. Steroidal alkaloids from tomato are well known for their cholinesterases' inhibitory capacity and the results showed that both purified extracts and isolated compounds, at non-toxic concentrations for gastric (AGS), intestinal (Caco-2) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells, have the capacity to preserve mitochondria membrane potential and to decrease reactive oxygen species levels of SH-SY5Y glutamate-insulted cells. Moreover, the use of specific antagonists of cholinergic receptors allowed observing that tomatine and tomatidine can interact with nicotinic receptors, specifically with the α7 type. No effect on muscarinic receptors was noticed. In addition to the selective cholinesterases' inhibition revealed by the compounds/extracts, these results provide novel and important insights into their neuroprotective mechanism. This work also demystifies the applicability of these compounds in therapeutics, by demonstrating that their toxicity was overestimated for long time.

  15. Novel channels of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Zoratti, Mario; De Marchi, Umberto; Gulbins, Erich; Szabò, Ildikò

    2009-05-01

    Along with a large number of carriers, exchangers and "pumps", the inner mitochondrial membrane contains ion-conducting channels which endow it with controlled permeability to small ions. Some have been shown to be the mitochondrial counterpart of channels present also in other cellular membranes. The manuscript summarizes the current state of knowledge on the major inner mitochondrial membrane channels, properties, identity and proposed functions. Considerable attention is currently being devoted to two K(+)-selective channels, mtK(ATP) and mtBK(Ca). Their activation in "preconditioning" is considered by many to underlie the protection of myocytes and other cells against subsequent ischemic damage. We have recently shown that in apoptotic lymphocytes inner membrane mtK(V)1.3 interacts with the pro-apoptotic protein Bax after the latter has inserted into the outer mitochondrial membrane. Whether the just-discovered mtIK(Ca) has similar cellular role(s) remains to be seen. The Ca(2+) "uniporter" has been characterized electrophysiologically, but still awaits a molecular identity. Chloride-selective channels are represented by the 107 pS channel, the first mitochondrial channel to be observed by patch-clamp, and by a approximately 400 pS pore we have recently been able to fully characterize in the inner membrane of mitochondria isolated from a colon tumour cell line. This we propose to represent a component of the Permeability Transition Pore. The available data exclude the previous tentative identification with porin, and indicate that it coincides instead with the still molecularly unidentified "maxi" chloride channel.

  16. Monitoring mitochondrial membranes permeability in live neurons and mitochondrial swelling through electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity is essential for mitochondrial function and neuronal viability. Apoptotic stimulus or calcium overload leads to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP ) opening and induces mitochondrial swelling, a common feature of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. The first phenomenon can be evaluated in cells loaded with the dye calcein -AM quenched by cobalt, and mitochondrial swelling can be detected by electron microscopy through the analysis of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Here, we describe a live cell imaging assay to detect mitochondrial permeability transition and the development of a detailed analysis of morphological and ultrastructural changes that mitochondria undergo during this process.

  17. 2,3,5-tris(Glutathion-S-yl)hydroquinone (TGHQ)-mediated apoptosis of human promyelocytic leukemia cells is preceded by mitochondrial cytochrome c release in the absence of a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mi Young; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J

    2005-07-01

    2,3,5-tris(Glutathion-S-yl)hydroquinone (TGHQ), a metabolite of benzene, induces apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. However, the mechanisms by which TGHQ induces apoptosis are unclear, and they were the focus of the present investigation. TGHQ stimulated the rapid formation (30 min) of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HL-60 cells, and co-treatment with catalase or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely blocked TGHQ-induced apoptosis, implicating a causative role for ROS in HL-60 cell death. Western blot analysis revealed the complete disappearance of pro-caspase 9 between 1 and 2 hours after exposure of HL-60 cells to TGHQ, concomitant with the appearance of cleaved caspase 9 and increases in caspase 9 activity. The appearance of two cleaved forms of caspase 3 occurred subsequent to increases in caspase 9 activity. Levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein remained constant during TGHQ-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells, but Bcl-2 S70 phosphorylation decreased. In contrast, changes in the subcellular localization of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bax were observed, with a rapid (15-60 min) increase in the ratio of cytosolic to mitochondrial Bax. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol occurred after Bax translocation and the dephosphorylation of pS70 Bcl-2. However the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) was maintained, even after cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria. Cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (PTP), did not completely rescue HL-60 cells from apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that TGHQ facilitates ROS production, alters the post-translational modification of Bcl-2 and subcellular localization of Bax, culminating in the release of cytochrome c and caspase activation.

  18. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of insulinoma INS-1E cells is associated with elevation of both respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Tomás; Santorová, Jitka; Zacharovová, Klára; Berková, Zuzana; Hlavatá, Lydie; Saudek, Frantisek; Jezek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Increased ATP/ADP ratio resulting from enhanced glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation represents a plausible mechanism controlling the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Although specific bioenergetics might be involved, parallel studies of cell respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) during GSIS are lacking. Using high resolution respirometry and parallel DeltaPsi(m) monitoring by two distinct fluorescence probes we have quantified bioenergetics in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells representing a suitable model to study in vitro insulin secretion. Upon glucose addition to glucose-depleted cells we demonstrated a simultaneous increase in respiration and DeltaPsi(m) during GSIS and showed that the endogenous state 3/state 4 respiratory ratio hyperbolically increased with glucose, approaching the maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate at maximum GSIS. Attempting to assess the basis of the "toxic" effect of fatty acids on insulin secretion, GSIS was studied after linoleic acid addition, which diminished respiration increase, DeltaPsi(m) jump, and magnitude of insulin release, and reduced state 3/state 4 dependencies on glucose. Its effects were due to protonophoric function, i.e. uncoupling, since without glucose, linoleic acid accelerated both state 3 and state 4 respiration by similar extent. In turn, state 3 respiration increased marginally with linoleic acid at 10-20mM glucose. We conclude that upon glucose addition in physiological range, the INS-1E cells are able to regulate the oxidative phosphorylation rate from nearly zero to maximum and that the impairment of GSIS by linoleic acid is caused by mitochondrial uncoupling. These findings may be relevant to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Reduced Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Is a Late Adaptation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to Isometamidium Preceded by Mutations in the γ Subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Stelmanis, Valters; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background Isometamidium is the main prophylactic drug used to prevent the infection of livestock with trypanosomes that cause Animal African Trypanosomiasis. As well as the animal infective trypanosome species, livestock can also harbor the closely related human infective subspecies T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense. Resistance to isometamidium is a growing concern, as is cross-resistance to the diamidine drugs diminazene and pentamidine. Methodology/Principal Findings Two isometamidium resistant Trypanosoma brucei clones were generated (ISMR1 and ISMR15), being 7270- and 16,000-fold resistant to isometamidium, respectively, which retained their ability to grow in vitro and establish an infection in mice. Considerable cross-resistance was shown to ethidium bromide and diminazene, with minor cross-resistance to pentamidine. The mitochondrial membrane potentials of both resistant cell lines were significantly reduced compared to the wild type. The net uptake rate of isometamidium was reduced 2-3-fold but isometamidium efflux was similar in wild-type and resistant lines. Fluorescence microscopy and PCR analysis revealed that ISMR1 and ISMR15 had completely lost their kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) and both lines carried a mutation in the nuclearly encoded γ subunit gene of F1 ATPase, truncating the protein by 22 amino acids. The mutation compensated for the loss of the kinetoplast in bloodstream forms, allowing near-normal growth, and conferred considerable resistance to isometamidium and ethidium as well as significant resistance to diminazene and pentamidine, when expressed in wild type trypanosomes. Subsequent exposure to either isometamidium or ethidium led to rapid loss of kDNA and a further increase in isometamidium resistance. Conclusions/Significance Sub-lethal exposure to isometamidium gives rise to viable but highly resistant trypanosomes that, depending on sub-species, are infective to humans and cross-resistant to at least some diamidine drugs. The crucial

  20. BAD induces apoptosis in cells over-expressing Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL without loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, A D; Hedley, D W; Pham, N A; Chow, S; Minden, M D

    2001-07-01

    Inhibitors of Bcl-2 may be useful therapeutic agents for the treatment of a wide variety of malignancies including leukemia. A potential prototype of such a compound is the endogenous Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL binding protein BAD. Previous reports indicate that BAD can overcome the anti-apoptotic effect of Bcl-xL but not Bcl-2. If BAD cannot induce apoptosis in cells over-expressing Bcl-2, it would limit the application of molecules like BAD as novel anti-tumor agents. We report that transient transfection of BAD induced cell death in cells with and without over-expression of Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL. Forty-eight hours after transfection, BAD increased cell death in COS, COS Bcl-2, and COS Bcl-xL cells as demonstrated by decreased GFP expression, and an increase in the number of number of floating cells. In addition, BAD induced cell death in leukemic cell lines over-expressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL as determined by changes in luciferase activity. BAD-induced apoptosis was not accompanied by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Therefore, we conclude that transient transfection of BAD directly induces apoptosis in cells over-expressing Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL and validates the pursuit of molecules like BAD as novel therapeutic agents.

  1. Real-time detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential in THP-1 macrophages during ultrasonic irradiation for optimal sonodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Xu, Haobo; Shen, Jing; Guo, Shuyuan; Shi, Sa; Dan, Juhua; Tian, Fang; Tian, Yanfeng; Tian, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss have been proven recently to be involved in sonodynamic therapy (SDT)-induced macrophage apoptosis and necrosis. This study aims to develop an experimental system to monitor intracellular ROS and MMP in real-time during ultrasonic irradiation in order to achieve optimal effect in SDT. Cultured THP-1 derived macrophages were incubated with 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), and then sonicated at different intensities. Intracellular ROS elevation and MMP loss were detected in real-time by fluorospectrophotometer using fluorescence probe DCFH-DA and jc-1, respectively. Ultrasound at low intensities (less than 0.48W/cm(2)) had no influence on ROS and MMP in macrophages, whereas at an intensity of 0.48W/cm(2), ROS elevation and MMP loss were observed during ultrasonic irradiation. These effects were strongly enhanced in the presence of ALA. Quantitative analysis showed that ROS elevation and MMP loss monotonically increased with the rise of ultrasonic intensity between 0.48 and 1.16W/cm(2). SDT at 0.48 and 0.84W/cm(2) induced mainly apoptosis in THP-1 macrophages while SDT at 1.16W/cm(2) mainly cell necrosis. This study supports the validity and potential utility of real-time ROS and MMP detection as a dosimetric tool for the determination of optimal SDT.

  2. Determination of high mitochondrial membrane potential in spermatozoa loaded with the mitochondrial probe 5,5',6,6'tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolyl-carbocyanine iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A flow cytometric method was developed to identify viable, energized sperm cells with high mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (''m), > 80-100 mV using the mitochondrial probe 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1, 1', 3, 3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) and the impermeant nuclear ...

  3. Paraquat Induces Cell Death Through Impairing Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuen-Lin; Chao, Chih-Chang; Lee, Yi-Chao; Lu, Mei-Kuang; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Yang, Ying-Chen; Wang, Vin-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Huang, Nai-Kuei

    2016-05-01

    Paraquat (PQ) as a Parkinsonian mimetic has been demonstrated to impair dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons and is highly correlated with the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) where the death of DAergic neurons has been mainly attributed to impaired mitochondrial functioning. In this study, PQ-induced cytotoxicity focusing on mitochondrial membrane permeability (MMP), which has been implicated to play a part in neurodegeneration, was investigated. Primarily, PQ-induced cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were inhibited by an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (NOX), indicating the toxic effect of PQ redox cycling. Further, dibucaine and cyclosporin A which respectively inhibit mitochondrial apoptosis-induced channels (MAC) and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (mPTP) were used and found to prevent PQ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, such as decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased MMP, mitochondrial ROS, and pro-apoptotic factor release. Knockdown of bax and/or bak blocked PQ-induced mitochondrial clusterization of Bax and/or Bak and cytotoxicity, demonstrating the significance of MAC which is composed of Bax and/or Bak. This clusterization coincided with the release of mitochondrial apoptotic factors before there was an increase in inner MMP, indicating that MAC may precede mPTP formation. Besides, NOX inhibitor but not dibucaine attenuated the earlier PQ-induced cytosolic ROS formation or Bax and/or Bak clusterization indicating PQ redox cycling may account for MAC formation. In this model, we have resolved for the first that PQ cytotoxicity through redox cycling may sequentially result in increased outer (MAC) and inner (mPTP) MMP and suggested MMP could be implicated as a therapeutic target in treating neurodegenerative diseases like PD.

  4. Involvement of intracellular Ca2+ and K+ in dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death induced by extracellular ATP in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zoeteweij, J P; van de Water, B; de Bont, H J; Mulder, G J; Nagelkerke, J F

    1992-01-01

    Isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated with extracellular ATP to induce a prolonged increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and a loss of viability within 2 h. By using video-intensified fluorescence microscopy, the effects of exposure to extracellular ATP on [Ca2+]i, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and cell viability were determined simultaneously in individual living hepatocytes. The increase in [Ca2+]i on exposure to ATP was followed by a decreasing MMP; there were big differences between individual cells. Complete loss of the MMP occurred before cell death was observed. Omission of K+ from the incubation medium decreased the cytotoxicity of ATP; under these conditions, intracellular K+ was decreased by more than 80%. Treatment with nigericin also depleted intracellular K+ and decreased ATP-induced toxicity. Protection against loss of viability by means of a decrease in intracellular [K+] was reflected by maintenance of the MMP. These observations suggest that ATP-induced cell death may be caused by a mechanism that has been described for isolated mitochondria: after an increase in Ca2+ levels, a K+ influx into mitochondria is induced, which finally disrupts the MMP and leads to cell death. PMID:1445265

  5. Selenium (sodium selenite) causes cytotoxicity and apoptotic mediated cell death in PLHC-1 fish cell line through DNA and mitochondrial membrane potential damage.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Tomblin, Justin; Yeager Armistead, Mindy; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Elevated concentration of selenium poses a toxic threat to organisms inhabiting aquatic ecosystems influenced by excessive inputs from anthropogenic sources. Selenium is also an essential micronutrient in living things, particularly in fish, and provides antioxidant properties to tissues. Whole fish and hepatocytes in primary culture show selenite toxicity above threshold levels. The present study was designed to investigate the process by which selenite exposure causes cellular toxicity and apoptotic and necrotic cell death in fish hepatoma cell line PLHC-1. PLHC-1 cells were exposed to various selenite concentrations (1, 10, 50 and 100 μM) for 10, 20 and 40 h intervals. The 24h inhibitory concentration 50 (IC₅₀) of selenite in PLHC-1 cell line was found to be 237 μM. Flow cytometery data showed that selenite exposed cells promote apoptotic and necrotic mediated cell death when selenite concentrations were ≥10 μM compared to control. Selenite exposure was associated with a significant increase of caspase-3 activities suggesting the induction of apoptosis. Selenite exposure at high levels (≥10 μM) and longer exposure times (≥20 h) induces mitochondrial membrane potential damage (ΔΨ(m)), DNA damage and elevated production of ROS which could be associated with cell death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The production of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondrial membrane potential are modulated during onion oil-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-jiang; Stahl, Thorsten; Hu, Ying; Kassie, Fekadu; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2006-03-01

    Protective effects of Allium vegetables against cancers have been shown extensively in experimental animals and epidemiologic studies. We investigated cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis by onion oil extracted from Allium cepa, a widely consumed Allium vegetable, in human lung cancer A549 cells. GC/MS analysis suggested that propyl sulfides but not allyl sulfides are major sulfur-containing constituents of onion oil. Onion oil at 12.5 mg/L significantly induced apoptosis (13% increase of apoptotic cells) as indicated by sub-G1 DNA content. It also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase; 25 mg/L onion oil increased the percentage of G2/M cells almost 6-fold compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide control. The action of onion oil may occur via a reactive oxygen species-dependent pathway because cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were blocked by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and exogenous glutathione. Marked collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that dysfunction of the mitochondria may be involved in the oxidative burst and apoptosis induced by onion oil. Expression of phospho-cdc2 and phospho-cyclin B1 were downregulated by onion oil, perhaps accounting for the G2/M arrest. Overall, these results suggest that onion oil may exert chemopreventive action by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells.

  7. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway.

  8. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase. PMID:25954808

  9. A Metabotropic-Like Flux-Independent NMDA Receptor Regulates Ca2+ Exit from Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cultured Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca Balderas, Pavel; Aguilera, Penélope

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes were long thought to be only structural cells in the CNS; however, their functional properties support their role in information processing and cognition. The ionotropic glutamate N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) is critical for CNS functions, but its expression and function in astrocytes is still a matter of research and debate. Here, we report immunofluorescence (IF) labeling in rat cultured cortical astrocytes (rCCA) of all NMDAR subunits, with phenotypes suggesting their intracellular transport, and their mRNA were detected by qRT-PCR. IF and Western Blot revealed GluN1 full-length synthesis, subunit critical for NMDAR assembly and transport, and its plasma membrane localization. Functionally, we found an iCa2+ rise after NMDA treatment in Fluo-4-AM labeled rCCA, an effect blocked by the NMDAR competitive inhibitors D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) and Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and dependent upon GluN1 expression as evidenced by siRNA knock down. Surprisingly, the iCa2+ rise was not blocked by MK-801, an NMDAR channel blocker, or by extracellular Ca2+ depletion, indicating flux-independent NMDAR function. In contrast, the IP3 receptor (IP3R) inhibitor XestosponginC did block this response, whereas a Ryanodine Receptor inhibitor did so only partially. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase inhibition with genistein enhanced the NMDA elicited iCa2+ rise to levels comparable to those reached by the gliotransmitter ATP, but with different population dynamics. Finally, NMDA depleted the rCCA mitochondrial membrane potential (mΔψ) measured with JC-1. Our results demonstrate that rCCA express NMDAR subunits which assemble into functional receptors that mediate a metabotropic-like, non-canonical, flux-independent iCa2+ increase.

  10. Effect of mitochondrial apoptotic activation through the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore on yak meat tenderness during postmortem aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Han, Ling; Ma, Xiu-Li; Yu, Qun-Li; Zhao, Suo-Nan

    2017-11-01

    The effect of membrane permeability transition pore dependent mitochondrial apoptotic activation on yak meat tenderness was investigated. Results indicate that MPTP opening increased significantly and the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased markedly in the early aging process (P<0.05). Cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm via the MPTP in the early period. Meanwhile, the activation of procaspase-9 occurred earlier than that of procaspase-3. Cyclosporin A suppressed the MPTP opening, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, apoptosis rate, myofibril fragmentation index, reactive oxygen species generation, and Ca(2+) levels. These results demonstrated that MPTP mediated the release of cytochrome c in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, yak meat tenderness was improved by mitochondrial apoptotic pathway during aging. MPTP opening may be influenced by the ROS generation and Ca(2+) overloading in yak meat during postmortem aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metalloproteases of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Levytskyy, Roman M; Bohovych, Iryna; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2017-09-12

    The inner mitochondrial membrane (IM) is among the most protein-rich cellular compartments. The metastable IM subproteome where the concentration of proteins is approaching oversaturation creates a challenging protein folding environment with a high probability of protein malfunction or aggregation. Failure to maintain protein homeostasis in such a setting can impair the functional integrity of the mitochondria and drive clinical manifestations. The IM is equipped with a series of highly conserved, proteolytic complexes dedicated to the maintenance of normal protein homeostasis within this mitochondrial subcompartment. Particularly important is a group of membrane-anchored metallopeptidases commonly known as m-AAA and i-AAA proteases, and the ATP-independent Oma1 protease. Herein, we will summarize the current biochemical knowledge of these proteolytic machines and discuss recent advances in our understanding of mechanistic aspects of their functioning.

  12. Measuring Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential by TMRE Staining.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Lisa C; Christensen, Melinda E; Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2016-12-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the main source of energy for metabolism. Mitochondria provide the majority of this ATP by a process known as oxidative phosphorylation. This process involves active transfer of positively charged protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane resulting in a net internal negative charge, known as the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). The proton gradient is then used by ATP synthase to produce ATP by fusing adenosine diphosphate and free phosphate. The net negative charge across a healthy mitochondrion is maintained at approximately -180 mV, which can be detected by staining cells with positively charged dyes such as tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE). TMRE emits a red fluorescence that can be detected by flow cytometry or fluorescence microscopy and the level of TMRE fluorescence in stained cells can be used to determine whether mitochondria in a cell have high or low ΔΨm. Cytochrome c is essential for producing ΔΨm because it promotes the pumping the protons into the mitochondrial intermembrane space as it shuttles electrons from Complex III to Complex IV along the electron transport chain. Cytochrome c is released from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol during apoptosis. This impairs its ability to shuttle electrons between Complex III and Complex IV and results in rapid dissipation of ΔΨm. Loss of ΔΨm is therefore closely associated with cytochrome c release during apoptosis and is often used as a surrogate marker for cytochrome c release in cells.

  13. Topological Transitions in Mitochondrial Membranes controlled by Apoptotic Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Sanders, Lori K.; Mishra, Abhijit; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Ivashyna, Olena; Schlesinger, Paul H.

    2010-03-01

    The Bcl-2 family comprises pro-apoptotic proteins, capable of permeabilizing the mitochondrial membrane, and anti-apoptotic members interacting in an antagonistic fashion to regulate programmed cell death (apoptosis). They offer potential therapeutic targets to re-engage cellular suicide in tumor cells but the extensive network of implicated protein-protein interactions has impeded full understanding of the decision pathway. We show, using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, that pro-apoptotic proteins interact with mitochondrial-like model membranes to generate saddle-splay (negative Gaussian) curvature topologically required for pore formation, while anti-apoptotic proteins can deactivate curvature generation by molecules drastically different from Bcl-2 family members and offer evidence for membrane-curvature mediated interactions general enough to affect very disparate systems.

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans ATPase inhibitor factor 1 (IF1) MAI-2 preserves the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and is important to induce germ cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cárdenas, L P; Villanueva-Chimal, E; Salinas, L S; José-Nuñez, C; Tuena de Gómez Puyou, M; Navarro, R E

    2017-01-01

    When the electrochemical proton gradient is disrupted in the mitochondria, IF1 (Inhibitor Factor-1) inhibits the reverse hydrolytic activity of the F1Fo-ATP synthase, thereby allowing cells to conserve ATP at the expense of losing the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The function of IF1 has been studied mainly in different cell lines, but these studies have generated contrasting results, which have not been helpful to understand the real role of this protein in a whole organism. In this work, we studied IF1 function in Caenorhabditis elegans to understand IF1´s role in vivo. C. elegans has two inhibitor proteins of the F1Fo-ATPase, MAI-1 and MAI-2. To determine their protein localization in C. elegans, we generated translational reporters and found that MAI-2 is expressed ubiquitously in the mitochondria; conversely, MAI-1 was found in the cytoplasm and nuclei of certain tissues. By CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing, we generated mai-2 mutant alleles. Here, we showed that mai-2 mutant animals have normal progeny, embryonic development and lifespan. Contrasting with the results previously obtained in cell lines, we found no evident defects in the mitochondrial network, dimer/monomer ATP synthase ratio, ATP concentration or respiration. Our results suggest that some of the roles previously attributed to IF1 in cell lines could not reflect the function of this protein in a whole organism and could be attributed to specific cell lines or methods used to silence, knockout or overexpress this protein. However, we did observe that animals lacking IF1 had an enhanced Δψm and lower physiological germ cell apoptosis. Importantly, we found that mai-2 mutant animals must be under stress to observe the role of IF1. Accordingly, we observed that mai-2 mutant animals were more sensitive to heat shock, oxidative stress and electron transport chain blockade. Furthermore, we observed that IF1 is important to induce germ cell apoptosis under certain types of stress. Here, we

  15. Grape seed extract induces apoptotic death of human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells via caspases activation accompanied by dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Chapla; Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2002-11-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE), rich in the bioflavonoids commonly known as procyanidins, is one of the most commonly consumed dietary supplements in the United States because of its several health benefits. Epidemiological studies show that many prostate cancer (PCA) patients use herbal extracts as dietary supplements in addition to their prescription drugs. Accordingly, in recent years, we have focused our attention on assessing the efficacy of GSE against PCA. Our studies showed that GSE inhibits growth and induces apoptotic death of human PCA cells in culture and in nude mice. Here, we performed detailed studies to define the molecular mechanism of GSE-induced apoptosis in advanced human PCA DU145 cells. GSE treatment of cells at various doses (50-200 micro g/ml) for 12-72 h resulted in a moderate to strong apoptotic death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the studies assessing the apoptotic-signaling pathway induced by GSE, we observed an increase in cleaved fragments of caspases 3, 7 and 9 as well as PARP in GSE-treated cells after 48 and 72 h of treatment. Pre-treatment of cells with general caspases inhibitor, z-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-FMK or caspase 3-like proteases inhibitor [z-Asp(OMe)-Glu(OMe)-Val-Asp(OMe)-FMK], almost completely (approximately 90%) inhibited the GSE-induced apoptotic cell death. In a later case, GSE-induced caspase-3 activity was completely inhibited. Selective caspase 9 inhibitor [z-Leu-Glu(OMe)-His-Asp(OMe)-FMK] showed only partial inhibition of GSE-induced apoptosis whereas GSE-induced protease activity of caspase 9 was completely inhibited. Upstream of caspase cascade, GSE showed disappearance of mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in cytochrome c release in cytosol. Together, these results suggest that GSE possibly causes mitochondrial damage leading to cytochrome c release in cytosol and activation of caspases resulting in PARP cleavage and execution of apoptotic death of human PCA DU145 cells. Furthermore, GSE

  16. Influenza Virus Protein PB1-F2 Inhibits the Induction of Type I Interferon by Binding to MAVS and Decreasing Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Zsuzsanna T.; Grant, Alesha; Manicassamy, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    PB1-F2 is a small, 87- to 90-amino-acid-long protein encoded by the +1 alternate open reading frame of the PB1 gene of most influenza A virus strains. It has been shown to contribute to viral pathogenicity in a host- and strain-dependent manner, and we have previously discovered that a serine at position 66 (66S) in the PB1-F2 protein increases virulence of the 1918 and H5N1 pandemic viruses. Recently, we have shown that PB1-F2 inhibits the induction of type I interferon (IFN) at the level of the MAVS adaptor protein. However, the molecular mechanism for the IFN antagonist function of PB1-F2 has remained unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C-terminal portion of the PB1-F2 protein binds to MAVS in a region that contains the transmembrane domain. Strikingly, PB1-F2 66S was observed to bind to MAVS more efficiently than PB1-F2 66N. We also tested the effect of PB1-F2 on the IFN antagonist functions of the polymerase proteins PB1, PB2, and PA and observed enhanced IFN inhibition by the PB1 and PB2 proteins in combination with PB1-F2 but not by the PA protein. Using a flow cytometry-based assay, we demonstrate that the PB1-F2 protein inhibits MAVS-mediated IFN synthesis by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Interestingly, PB1-F2 66S affected the MMP more efficiently than wild-type PB1-F2. In summary, the results of our study identify the molecular mechanism by which the influenza virus PB1-F2 N66S protein increases virulence. PMID:22674996

  17. Lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA integrity of spermatozoa in relation to intracellular reactive oxygen species in liquid and frozen-thawed buffalo semen.

    PubMed

    Kadirvel, G; Kumar, Satish; Kumaresan, A

    2009-08-01

    Several factors affect sperm motility and functional integrity during preservation; the damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) being an important factor. The present study investigated intracellular ROS generation and its relationship with sperm motility, lipid peroxidation (LPO), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and DNA integrity during preservation (liquid preservation at 4 degrees C and cryopreservation) of buffalo semen. Fifty-six ejaculates, eight each from seven buffalo bulls (Bubalus bubalis) were utilized for the study. Intracellular ROS level was detected using 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and propodium iodide (PI) by flow cytometry. 3,3'-Dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide [DiOC(6) (3)]/PI and acridine orange were used for detection of MMP and DNA integrity of spermatozoa, respectively. Results revealed that ROS and LPO level in sperm increased linearly between 0 h and 72 h of liquid preservation at 4 degrees C, with significantly (P<0.01) higher levels at 48 h and 72 h of storage compared to fresh semen. The ROS level in viable sperm in frozen-thawed semen did not differ significantly from fresh semen, but the LPO was significantly (P<0.05) higher in frozen-thawed sperm compared to fresh sperm. There was a linear reduction in the sperm with high MMP and DNA integrity in liquid semen, which was significantly (P<0.01) higher at 48 h and 72 h of storage compared to fresh semen. The intracellular ROS was strongly associated to sperm motility, LPO, MMP and DNA integrity during liquid preservation, while this association did not exist in frozen-thawed sperm. The study concluded that ROS generation and its associated effects are likely to be an important contributor to the reduced sperm motility and functional integrity during liquid preservation of buffalo semen at 4 degrees C, but ROS generation and its damage had only minor effects during freezing and thawing process.

  18. Sclareol, a plant diterpene, exhibits potent antiproliferative effects via the induction of apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss in osteosarcoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; He, Hong-Sheng; Yu, Hua-Long; Zeng, Yun; Han, Heng; He, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Shou-Jia; Xiong, Min

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of sclareol against MG63 osteosarcoma cells. A 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the cell viability of cells following treatment with sclareol. The extent of cell death induced by sclareol was evaluated using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The effect of sclareol on cell cycle progression and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) was evaluated with flow cytometry using the DNA‑binding fluorescent dyes propidium iodide and rhodamine‑123, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy was used to detect the morphological changes in the MG63 osteosarcoma cancer cells and the appearance of apoptotic bodies following sclareol treatment. The results revealed that sclareol induced dose‑ and time‑dependent growth inhibition of MG63 cancer cells with an IC50 value of 65.2 µM following a 12‑h incubation. Furthermore, sclareol induced a significant increase in the release of LDH from MG63 cell cultures, which was much more pronounced at higher doses. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sclareol induced characteristic morphological features of apoptosis and the appearance of apoptotic bodies. Flow cytometry revealed that sclareol induced G1‑phase cell cycle arrest, which showed significant dose‑dependence. Additionally, sclareol induced a progressive and dose‑dependent reduction in the ΛΨm. In summary, sclareol inhibits the growth of osteosarcoma cancer cells via the induction of apoptosis, which is accompanied by G1‑phase cell cycle arrest and loss of ΛΨm.

  19. Curcumin hampers the antitumor effect of vinblastine via the inhibition of microtubule dynamics and mitochondrial membrane potential in HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Park, Sojin; Kim, Sun Yeou; Um, Sung Hee; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2016-06-15

    Curcumin, a major component of curry powder, which is a natural polyphenol product extracted from rhizoma curcumae longae, interacts with a specific binding site on microtubules. Vinblastine is an antitumor drug that induces microtubule depolymerization. We investigated whether curcumin influences the antitumor effect of vinblastine in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. Changes in microtubule filaments were visualized by immuno-staining. Cell death was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT) or water-soluble tetrazolium(WST) assay. Apoptotic cell formation was assessed by flow cytometry after staining cells with propidium iodide(PI) and/or Annexin V or with 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole(DAPI). Reactive oxygen species(ROS) were also measured by flow cytometry using dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate(DCF-DA). JC-1 was used to determine mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). When cells were pretreated with curcumin, microtubule filaments were disordered. Vinblastine-induced microtubule depolymerization and cell death were reduced in HeLa human cervical cancer cells pretreated with curcumin compared to the control. The decrease in cell death was much greater in cells pretreated with curcumin compared to cotreatment or post-treatment. DNA condensation by vinblastine was also decreased in curcumin-pretreated cells. Curcumin reduced ROS production by vinblastine. However, no changes in vinblastine-mediated microtubule depolymerization were detected upon N-acetylcysteine(NAC) treatment. In contrast, vinblastine-induced MMP collapse was inhibited by pretreatment with curcumin or NAC. These findings suggest that vinblastine-induced tumor cell death might be inhibited by curcumin via ROS-independent microtubule dynamics and ROS-dependent MMP collapse. It also suggests that microtubule dynamics could be necessary for the optimal antitumor activity of vinblastine. Our results suggest that patients treated with vinblastine should not

  20. Sulforaphene-Carboplatin Combination Synergistically Enhances Apoptosis by Disruption of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saswata; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-09-01

    Worldwide non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) causes substantial morbidity and mortality among human populations. Due to the severe side effects and low survival rate of patients with the conventional drugs, implementation of new combination therapies is much needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a combination therapy with a conventional drug and a natural medicine. We compared the combination of chemotherapy drug carboplatin and the radish-derived isothiocyanate compound sulforaphene, which synergistically induces higher apoptosis and growth inhibition in A549, to the drug alone in human NSCLC cells. We found that this combination group significantly induced higher depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation than the single drug dose, followed by cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase after 24 h of incubation. In addition to that, the Western blot assays showed that combination treatment inhibited the expression of Bcl-2 and successively upregulated the expression of Bax, cytochrome C, apoptosis-inducing factor, caspase-9 and -3, and cleaved poly ADP ribose polymerase. It also modulated the expression of PI3K, p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (1/2), and p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase indicating the involvement of antiproliferative properties. Further pretreatment with pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk was carried out to confirm the effect of caspases in the combination therapy-induced apoptosis. To summarize, this is the first report that sulforaphene-carboplatin combination treatment synergistically promotes enhanced apoptosis and antiproliferative effect over single drug treatment against A549, human NSCLC cells through caspase activation, MMP disruption, and cell cycle arrest. This study demonstrates that the duel character of this combination therapy may be an effective replacement for conventional therapy alone against NSCLC.

  1. Bcl-2 apoptosis proteins, mitochondrial membrane curvature, and cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Sanders, Lori; Mishra, Abhijit; Wong, Gerard; Ivashyna, Olena; Christenson, Eric; Schlesinger, Paul; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Santangelo, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Critical interactions between Bcl-2 family proteins permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane, a common decision point early in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway that irreversibly commits the cell to death. However, a unified picture integrating the essential non-passive role of lipid membranes with the contested dynamics of Bcl-2 regulation remains unresolved. Correlating results between synchrotron x-ray diffraction and microscopy in cell-free assays, we report activation of pro-apoptotic Bax induces strong pure negative Gaussian membrane curvature topologically necessary for pore formation and membrane remodeling events. Strikingly, Bcl-xL suppresses not only Bax-induced pore formation, but also membrane remodeling by disparate systems including cell penetrating, antimicrobial or viral fusion peptides, and bacterial toxin, none of which have BH3 allosteric domains to mediate direct binding. We propose a parallel mode of Bcl-2 pore regulation in which Bax and Bcl-xL induce antagonistic and mutually interacting Gaussian membrane curvatures. The universal nature of curvature-mediated interactions allows synergy with direct binding mechanisms, and potentially accounts for the Bcl-2 family modulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics.

  2. THC (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol) Exerts Neuroprotective Effect in Glutamate-affected Murine Primary Mesencephalic Cultures Through Restoring Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Anti-apoptosis Involving CB1 Receptor-dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi Huu; Krewenka, Christopher; Radad, Khaled; Kranner, Barbara; Huber, Alexandra; Duvigneau, Johanna Catharina; Miller, Ingrid; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD) or related disorders, are an increasing societal and economic burden worldwide. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is discussed as a neuroprotective agent in several in vitro and in vivo models of brain injury. However, the mechanisms by which THC exhibits neuroprotective properties are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated neuroprotective mechanisms of THC in glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary murine mesencephalic cultures, as a culture model for PD. Glutamate was administered for 48 h with or without concomitant THC treatment. Immunocytochemistry staining and resazurin assay were used to evaluate cell viability. Furthermore, superoxide levels, caspase-3 activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined to explore the mode of action of this compound. THC protected dopaminergic neurons and other cell types of primary dissociated cultures from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, THC significantly counteracted the glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and apoptosis. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, concentration-dependently blocked the protective effect of THC in primary mesencephalic cultures. In conclusion, THC exerts anti-apoptotic and restores mitochondrial membrane potential via a mechanism dependent on CB1 receptor. It strengthens the fact that THC has a benefit on degenerative cellular processes occurring, among others, in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases by slowing down the progression of neuronal cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The outer mitochondrial membrane in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Owen; van der Merwe, Margaretha J; Daley, Daniel O; Whelan, James

    2013-04-01

    The acquisition and integration of intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria and plastids, were important steps in the emergence of complex multicellular life. Although the outer membranes of these organelles have lost many of the functions of their free-living bacterial ancestor, others were acquired during organellogenesis. To date, the biological roles of these proteins have not been systematically characterized. In this review, we discuss the evolutionary origins and functions of outer membrane mitochondrial (OMM) proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our analysis, using phylogenetic inference, indicates that several OMM proteins either acquired novel functional roles or were recruited from other subcellular localizations during evolution in Arabidopsis. These observations suggest the existence of novel communication routes and functions between organelles within plant cells.

  4. Kinetic activity, membrane mitochondrial potential, lipid peroxidation, intracellular pH and calcium of frozen/thawed bovine spermatozoa treated with metabolic enhancers.

    PubMed

    Boni, R; Gallo, A; Cecchini, S

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the progressive decline of sperm motility during storage there is a need to find substances capable of enhancing sperm energy metabolism and motility and/or preserving it from oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate in frozen/thawed bovine spermatozoa the effect of several compounds, such as myo-inositol, pentoxifylline, penicillamine + hypotaurine + epinephrine mixture (PHE), caffeine and coenzyme Q10+ zinc + d-aspartate mixture (CZA), on either kinetic or metabolic parameters. Sperm kinetics was evaluated by Sperm Class Analyser whereas specific fluorochromes were used to evaluated mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular pH, intracellular calcium concentration and lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation was also evaluated by TBARS analysis. Treatments significantly affected total and progressive motility with different dynamics in relation to the incubation time. After the first hour of incubation, CZA treatment produced the best performance in total and progressive sperm motility as well as in curvilinear velocity, average path velocity and amplitude of head displacement, whereas pentoxifylline stimulated the highest straight-line velocity. MMP showed higher values (p < 0.01) after treatment with pentoxifylline and PHE. Intracytoplasmic calcium concentration and lipid peroxidation were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the incubation time rather than the treatments. Intracellular pH varied significantly (p < 0.01) in relation to either the incubation time or treatments. In particular, it showed a progressive increase throughout incubation with values in control group significantly higher than in myo-inositol, PHE, caffeine, pentoxifylline and CZA groups (7.37 ± 0.03 vs. 7.29 ± 0.03, 7.28 ± 0.03, 7.26 ± 0.03, 7.22 ± 0.03 and 7.00 ± 0.03, respectively; p < 0.01).; however, among treatments, CZA displayed the lowest values. Significant correlations were found between sperm kinetic and metabolic

  5. Destabilization of the Outer and Inner Mitochondrial Membranes by Core and Linker Histones

    PubMed Central

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Background Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. Methodology/Principal Findings We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. Conclusions We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage. PMID:22523586

  6. Destabilization of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes by core and linker histones.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Annunziata; Bruelle, Celine; Lindholm, Dan; Bernardi, Paolo; Eriksson, Ove

    2012-01-01

    Extensive DNA damage leads to apoptosis. Histones play a central role in DNA damage sensing and may mediate signals of genotoxic damage to cytosolic effectors including mitochondria. We have investigated the effects of histones on mitochondrial function and membrane integrity. We demonstrate that both linker histone H1 and core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 bind strongly to isolated mitochondria. All histones caused a rapid and massive release of the pro-apoptotic intermembrane space proteins cytochrome c and Smac/Diablo, indicating that they permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane. In addition, linker histone H1, but not core histones, permeabilized the inner membrane with a collapse of the membrane potential, release of pyridine nucleotides, and mitochondrial fragmentation. We conclude that histones destabilize the mitochondrial membranes, a mechanism that may convey genotoxic signals to mitochondria and promote apoptosis following DNA damage.

  7. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors modulate the metal-induced inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the protective action of stigmatellin (an inhibitor of complex III of mitochondrial electron transport chain, mtETC) against the heavy metal-induced cytotoxicity, we tested its effectiveness against mitochondrial membrane permeabilization produced by heavy metal ions Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Cu²(+) and Zn²(+), as well as by Ca²(+) (in the presence of P(i)) or Se (in form of Na₂SeO₃) using isolated rat liver mitochondria. It was shown that stigmatellin modulated mitochondrial swelling produced by these metals/metalloids in the isotonic sucrose medium in the presence of ascorbate plus tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (complex IV substrates added for energization of the mitochondria). It was found that stigmatellin and other mtETC inhibitors enhanced the mitochondrial swelling induced by selenite. However, in the same medium, all the mtETC inhibitors tested as well as cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid did not significantly affect Cu²(+)-induced swelling. In contrast, the high-amplitude swelling produced by Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Zn²(+), or Ca²(+) plus P(i) was significantly depressed by these inhibitors. Significant differences in the action of these metals/metalloids on the redox status of pyridine nucleotides, transmembrane potential and mitochondrial respiration were also observed. In the light of these results as well as the data from the recent literature, our hypothesis on a possible involvement of the respiratory supercomplex, formed by complex I (P-site) and complex III (S-site) in the mitochondrial permeabilization mediated by the mitochondrial transition pore, is updated.

  8. Higher mitochondrial potential and elevated mitochondrial respiration are associated with excessive activation of blood platelets in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Siewiera, Karolina; Kassassir, Hassan; Talar, Marcin; Wieteska, Lukasz; Watala, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    The high glucose concentration observed in diabetic patients is a recognized factor of mitochondrial damage in various cell types. Its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetics in blood platelets remains largely vague. The aim of the study was to determine how the metabolism of carbohydrates, which has been impaired by streptozotocin-induced diabetes may affect the functioning of platelet mitochondria. Diabetes was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Platelet mitochondrial respiratory capacity was monitored as oxygen consumption (high-resolution respirometry). Mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed using a fluorescent probe, JC-1. Activation of circulating platelets was monitored by flow cytometry measuring of the expressions of CD61 and CD62P on a blood platelet surface. To determine mitochondrial protein density in platelets, Western Blot technique was used. The results indicate significantly elevated mitochondria mass, increased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and enhanced respiration in STZ-diabetic animals, although the respiration control ratios appear to remain unchanged. Higher ΔΨm and elevated mitochondrial respiration were closely related to the excessive activation of circulating platelets in diabetic animals. Long-term diabetes can result in increased mitochondrial mass and may lead to hyperpolarization of blood platelet mitochondrial membrane. These alterations may be a potential underlying cause of abnormal platelet functioning in diabetes mellitus and hence, a potential target for antiplatelet therapies in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

  10. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E.; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1K38A, partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology. PMID:26813789

  11. Isolation and quantification of major chlorogenic acids in three major instant coffee brands and their potential effects on H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and apoptosis in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae B

    2013-11-01

    Coffee is a most consumed drink worldwide, with potential health effects on several chronic diseases including neuronal degenerative diseases. Chlorogenic acids (CHAs) are phenolic compounds found in coffee and they are reported to have strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the amounts of CHAs often vary in coffee drinks and their potential effects on ROS-induced neuronal cell death still require more investigation. Therefore, in this paper, major CHAs were isolated from three major instant coffee brands, confirmed and quantified using HPLC and NMR spectroscopic methods. Then, their antioxidant activities and protective effects on H2O2-induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells were investigated using radical scavenging, mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase assays. In the coffee samples, three major CHAs (3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid) and some minor CHAs (3-O-feruloylquinic acid, 4-O-feruloylquinic acid, 5-O-feruloylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,4-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid) were detected. The three major CHAs were further isolated and their chemical structures were confirmed using NMR spectroscopic techniques. Also, the amounts of the three major CHAs were individually quantified using a HPLC method. At the concentration of 10 μM, all three major CHAs quenched DPPH and/or xanthine oxidase-generated radical species by 21-51% (P < 0.014). They also inhibited H2O2-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-9 activation by 27% (P < 0.034) and 50% (P < 0.05), respectively. This study suggests that the major CHAs found in coffee are likely to be potent antioxidant compounds able to quench radical species as well as inhibit H2O2-induced apoptosis via suppressing mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-9 activation in the cells.

  12. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L.; Lu, Baisong; Andy Li, P.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove or Immp2l−/−) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (•O2−) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of lmmp2l (Immp2l+/−) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l+/− and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l+/− mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l+/− mice was associated with early increase in •O2− production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l+/− mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that lmmp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing •O2− production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. PMID:21824519

  13. Deficiency in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp21) gene increases ischemic brain damage and impairs mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Mehta, Suresh L; Lu, Baisong; Li, P Andy

    2011-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in mediating ischemic brain damage. Immp2l is an inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase that processes mitochondrial protein cytochrome c1 (Cyc1). Homozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2l(Tg(Tyr)979Ove) or Immp2l(-/-)) elevates mitochondrial membrane potential, increases superoxide (O(2)(-)) production in the brain and impairs fertility. The objectives of this study are to explore the effects of heterozygous mutation of Immp2l (Immp2l(+/-)) on ischemic outcome and to determine the influence of Immp2l deficiency on brain mitochondria after stroke. Male Immp2l(+/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to 1-h focal cerebral ischemia. Their brains were harvested after 5 and 24-h of reperfusion. The results showed that infarct volume and DNA oxidative damage significantly increased in the Immp2l(+/-) mice. There were no obvious cerebral vasculature abnormalities between the two types of mice viewed by Indian ink perfusion. The increased damage in Immp2l(+/-) mice was associated with early increase in O(2)(-) production. Mitochondrial respiratory rate, total mitochondrial respiratory capacity and mitochondrial respiratory complex activities were decreased at 5-h of recirculation in Immp2l(+/-) mice compared to WT mice. Our results suggest that Immp2l deficiency increases ischemic brain damage by enhancing O(2)(-) production and damaging mitochondrial functional performance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial membrane damage caused by disulfiram.

    PubMed

    Pavón, Natalia; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Correa, Francisco; Yoval-Sánchez, Belem; Belmont, Javier; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Chávez, Edmundo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we studied the protective effects of tamoxifen (TAM) on disulfiram (Dis)-induced mitochondrial membrane insult. The results indicate that TAM circumvents the inner membrane leakiness manifested as Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and collapse of the transmembrane electric gradient. Furthermore, it was found that TAM prevents inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and detachment of cytochrome c from the inner membrane. Interestingly, TAM also inhibited Dis-promoted generation of hydrogen peroxide. Given that TAM is an antioxidant molecule, it is plausible that its protection may be due to the inhibition of Dis-induced oxidative stress.

  15. MINOS is plus: a Mitofilin complex for mitochondrial membrane contacts.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Johannes M

    2011-10-18

    Cristae junctions mark the boundaries of respiratory compartments in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In this issue of Developmental Cell, von der Malsburg et al. (2011) identify a complex, MINOS, that organizes cristae junctions. Mitofilin/Fcj1, the central component of the MINOS complex, also connects the inner membrane to outer membrane protein import machinery.

  16. Mitochondrial Membrane Studies Using Impedance Spectroscopy with Parallel pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Padmaraj, Divya; Pande, Rohit; Miller, John H.; Wosik, Jarek; Zagozdzon-Wosik, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    A biological microelectromechanical system (BioMEMS) device was designed to study complementary mitochondrial parameters important in mitochondrial dysfunction studies. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to many diseases, including diabetes, obesity, heart failure and aging, as these organelles play a critical role in energy generation, cell signaling and apoptosis. The synthesis of ATP is driven by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. We have developed a tool to study the ionic activity of the mitochondria in parallel with dielectric measurements (impedance spectroscopy) to gain a better understanding of the properties of the mitochondrial membrane. This BioMEMS chip includes: 1) electrodes for impedance studies of mitochondria designed as two- and four-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range and 2) ion-sensitive field effect transistors for proton studies of the electron transport chain and for possible monitoring other ions such as sodium, potassium and calcium. We have used uncouplers to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane and disrupt the ionic balance. Dielectric spectroscopy responded with a corresponding increase in impedance values pointing at changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. An electrical model was used to describe mitochondrial sample’s complex impedance frequency dependencies and the contribution of the membrane to overall impedance changes. The results prove that dielectric spectroscopy can be used as a tool for membrane potential studies. It can be concluded that studies of the electrochemical parameters associated with mitochondrial bioenergetics may render significant information on various abnormalities attributable to these organelles. PMID:25010497

  17. Paclitaxel resistance development is associated with biphasic changes in reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane potential and autophagy with elevated energy production capacity in lung cancer cells: A chronological study.

    PubMed

    Datta, Satabdi; Choudhury, Diptiman; Das, Amlan; Das Mukherjee, Dipanwita; Das, Nabanita; Roy, Sib Sankar; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2017-02-01

    Paclitaxel (Tx) is one of the first-line chemotherapeutic drugs used against lung cancer, but acquired resistance to this drug is a major challenge against successful chemotherapy. In this work, we have focused on the chronological changes of various cellular parameters and associated effect on Tx (10 nM) resistance development in A549 cell line. It was observed, at initial stage, the cell death percentage due to drug treatment had increased up to 20 days, and thereafter, it started declining and became completely resistant by 40 days. Expressions of βIII tubulin and drug efflux pumps also increased over the period of resistance development. Changes in cellular autophagy and reactive oxygen species generation showed a biphasic pattern and increased gradually over the course of upto 20 days, thereafter declined gradually; however, their levels remained higher than untreated cells when resistance was acquired. Increase in extracellular acidification rates and oxygen consumption rates was found to be directly correlated with acquisition of resistance. The depolarisation of mitochondrial membrane potential was also biphasic; first, it increased with increase of cell death up to 20 days, thereafter, it gradually decreased to normal level along with resistance development. Increase in activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione content over these periods may attribute in bringing down the reactive oxygen species levels and normalisation of mitochondrial membrane potential in spite of comparatively higher reactive oxygen species production by the Tx-resistant cells.

  18. Detergent-resistant membrane subfractions containing proteins of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, and internal membrane origins.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    HEK293 cell detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) isolated by the standard homogenization protocol employing a Teflon pestle homogenizer yielded a prominent opaque band at approximately 16% sucrose upon density gradient ultracentrifugation. In contrast, cell disruption using a ground glass tissue homogenizer generated three distinct DRM populations migrating at approximately 10%, 14%, and 20% sucrose, named DRM subfractions A, B, and C, respectively. Separation of the DRM subfractions by mechanical disruption suggested that they are physically associated within the cellular environment, but can be dissociated by shear forces generated during vigorous homogenization. All three DRM subfractions possessed cholesterol and ganglioside GM1, but differed in protein composition. Subfraction A was enriched in flotillin-1 and contained little caveolin-1. In contrast, subfractions B and C were enriched in caveolin-1. Subfraction C contained several mitochondrial membrane proteins, including mitofilin and porins. Only subfraction B appeared to contain significant amounts of plasma membrane-associated proteins, as revealed by cell surface labeling studies. A similar distribution of DRM subfractions, as assessed by separation of flotillin-1 and caveolin-1 immunoreactivities, was observed in CHO cells, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and in HEK293 cells lysed in detergent-free carbonate. Teflon pestle homogenization of HEK293 cells in the presence of the actin-disrupting agent latrunculin B generated DRM subfractions A-C. The microtubule-disrupting agent vinblastine did not facilitate DRM subfraction separation, and DRMs prepared from fibroblasts of vimentin-null mice were present as a single major band on sucrose gradients, unless pre-treated with latrunculin B. These results suggest that the DRM subfractions are interconnected by the actin cytoskeleton, and not by microtubes or vimentin intermediate filaments. The subfractions described may prove useful in studying discrete protein

  19. Reoxygenation-induced mitochondrial damage is caused by the Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial inner membrane permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Hakoda, S; Takeyama, N

    1998-07-01

    Anoxia/reoxygenation injury of isolated rat liver mitochondria was investigated. During anoxia of up to 60 min, the membrane potential was largely preserved and mitochondrial swelling was not observed. Reoxygenation of anoxic mitochondria rapidly caused swelling, cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux, [14C]sucrose trapping, and loss of the membrane potential along with increased generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Although pretreatment with catalase and superoxide dismutase completely abolished reoxygenation-induced generation of ROI, mitochondrial damage was not prevented, as indicated by swelling, loss of the membrane potential, a decrease of the ATP content, and cyclosporin A-sensitive Ca2+ efflux. However, addition of the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A or addition of ADP completely prevented the mitochondrial damage induced by reoxygenation. The same protective effect was noted when Ca2+ cycling was prevented, either by chelating Ca2+ with EGTA or by inhibiting Ca2+ reuptake with ruthenium red. These findings indicate that mitochondrial anoxia/reoxygenation injury is caused by the cyclosporin A-sensitive and Ca2+-dependent membrane permeability transition. In contrast, reoxygenation injury does not appear to be triggered by the enhanced production of ROI.

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) activators, bezafibrate and Wy-14,643, increase uncoupling protein-3 mRNA levels without modifying the mitochondrial membrane potential in primary culture of rat preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, A; Alegret, M; Sánchez, R; Adzet, T; Laguna, J C; Vázquez, M

    2000-08-15

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are inner mitochondrial membrane transporters which act as pores for H(+) ions, dissipating the electrochemical gradient that develops during mitochondrial respiration at the expense of ATP synthesis. We have studied the effects of two fibrates, bezafibrate and Wy-14,643, on UCP-3 and UCP-2 mRNA levels in primary monolayer cultures of rat adipocytes and undifferentiated preadipocytes. Treatment with both PPARalpha activators for 24 h up-regulated UCP-3 mRNA levels. Thus, bezafibrate treatment resulted in an 8-fold induction in UCP-3 mRNA levels in preadipocytes compared with the 3.5-fold induction observed in adipocytes. Differences in the induction of UCP-3 between these cells correlated well with the higher expression of PPARalpha and RXRalpha mRNA values in preadipocytes compared to adipocytes. Wy-14,643 caused similar effects on UCP-3 mRNA expression. In contrast to UCP-3, UCP-2 mRNA levels were only slightly modified by bezafibrate in adipocytes. The induction in UCP-3 expression was not accompanied by changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential of rat primary preadipocytes after bezafibrate or Wy-14,643 treatment. Since it has been proposed that UCP-3 could be involved in the regulation of the use of fatty acids as fuel substrates, the UCP-3 induction achieved after bezafibrate and Wy-14, 643 treatment may indicate a higher oxidation of fatty acids, limiting their availability to be stored as triglycerides. This change may result in a reduced rate of conversion of preadipocytes to adipocytes, which directly affects fat depots.

  1. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serasinghe, Madhavika N.; Yoon, Yisang

    2008-11-15

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six {alpha}-helices ({alpha}1-{alpha}6) out of which {alpha}2-{alpha}5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the {alpha}1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that {alpha}1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the {alpha}5 helix and the linker between {alpha}3 and {alpha}4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by {alpha}1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment.

  2. Metaxin deficiency alters mitochondrial membrane permeability and leads to resistance to TNF-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Ono, Koh; Wang, Xiaofei; Kim, Sung Ouk; Armstrong, Lucas C; Bornstein, Paul; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-02-01

    Metaxin, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, is critical for TNF-induced cell death in L929 cells. Its deficiency, caused by retroviral insertion-mediated mutagenesis, renders L929 cells resistance to TNF killing. In this study, we further characterized metaxin deficiency-caused TNF resistance in parallel with Bcl-X(L) overexpression-mediated death resistance. We did not find obvious change in mitochondria membrane potential in metaxin-deficient (Met(mut)) and Bcl-X(L)-overexpressing cells, but we did find an increase in the release rate of the mitochondrial membrane potential probe rhodamine 123 (Rh123) that was preloaded into mitochondria. In addition, overexpression of a function-interfering mutant of metaxin (MetaΔTM/C) or Bcl-X(L) in MCF-7.3.28 cells also resulted in an acquired resistance to TNF killing and a faster rate of Rh123 release, indicating a close correlation between TNF resistance and higher rates of the dye release from the mitochondria. The release of Rh123 can be controlled by the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (PT) pore, as targeting an inner membrane component of the PT pore by cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited Rh123 release. However, metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression apparently affect Rh123 release from a site(s) different from that of CsA, as CsA can overcome their effect. Though both metaxin and Bcl-X(L) appear to function on the outer mitochondrial membrane, they do not interact with each other. They may use different mechanisms to increase the permeability of Rh123, since previous studies have suggested that metaxin may influence certain outer membrane porins while Bcl-X(L) may form pores on the outer membrane. The alteration of the mitochondrial outer membrane properties by metaxin deficiency and Bcl-X(L) overexpression, as indicated by a quicker Rh123 release, may be helpful in maintaining mitochondrial integrity.

  3. Ca2+ acting at the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane can stimulate mitochondrial permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide.

    PubMed

    Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F

    1997-12-15

    Mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) induced by the thiol cross-linker phenylarsine oxide (PhAsO) in Ca(2+)-depleted mitochondria incubated in the presence of ruthenium red, an inhibitor of the Ca2+ uniporter, is stimulated by the addition of extramitochondrial Ca2+. The presence of extramitochondrial Ca2+ stimulates the reaction of mitochondrial membrane protein thiol groups with PhAsO. Both Ca(2+)-induced increase in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and protein thiol group reaction with PhAsO are dependent on time (5-10 min to be complete) and the concentration of Ca2+ (1-25 microM). Mitochondrial permeabilization induced by PhAsO (15 microM) and extramitochondrial Ca2+ is inhibited by ADP, cyclosporin A, dibucaine and Mg2+, while mitochondrial permeabilization induced by high concentrations of PhAsO (60 microM) in the absence of Ca2+ is inhibited only by ADP and cyclosporin A. These results suggest that dibucaine and Mg2+ can inhibit mitochondrial permeabilization by antagonizing the effect of Ca2+ on the mitochondrial membrane. Once mitochondrial permeabilization induced by 15 microM PhAsO and extramitochondrial Ca2+ has already occurred, the addition of the Ca2+ chelator EGTA restores mitochondrial membrane potential (MPT pore closure), suggesting that the presence of Ca2+ is essential for the maintenance of the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane to protons (MPT pore opening). In conclusion, the results presented indicate that low Ca2+ concentrations acting at the external side of the inner mitochondrial membrane can stimulate mitochondrial permeability transition induced by PhAsO, due to increased accessibility of protein thiol groups to the reaction with PhAsO and increased probability of MPT pore opening.

  4. [Effect of macrocyclic esters on mitochondrial and phosphatidylcholine membranes].

    PubMed

    Bogatskiĭ, A V; Luk'ianenko, N G; Nazarov, E I; Nazarova, N Iu; Konup, I P

    1982-01-01

    It has been found that some macrocyclic esters have no ionophoric properties, but can block valinomycin-induced potassium transport in mitochondrial membranes and lessen the potassium current induced by valinomycin in phosphatidylcholine bilayers. It has been also discovered that 36-member cyclic esters of succinic acid and propylene glycoles decrease fluorescence of puridine nucleotides in mitochondria and produce a modifying effect on bimolecular phosphatidylcholine membranes in the medium of litium, calcium and magnesium chlorides at unilateral injection. The results obtained suggest that cyclopolyesters under investigation form mixed complexes with the macromolecules in the composition of mitochondrial and phosphatidylcholine membranes with the participation of the integrated ion.

  5. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G₂ /M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Harish C; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-07-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), one of the most common neoplasms, cause serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and antiproliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fisetin (5-80 μm) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G₂ /M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2; Bcl-xL and Mcl-1); (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad); (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential; (iv) release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria; (v) activation of caspases; and (vi) cleavage of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fisetin inhibits growth, induces G2/M arrest and apoptosis of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells: Role of mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and consequent caspases activation

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Harish C.; Sharma, Samriti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2013-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) one of the most common neoplasms causes serious morbidity and mortality. Therefore, identification of non-toxic phytochemicals for prevention/treatment of NMSCs is highly desirable. Fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a dietary flavonoid, present in fruits and vegetables possesses anti-oxidant and anti-proliferative properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemotherapeutic potential of fisetin in cultured human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Treatment of A431 cells with fistein (5-80 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Employing clonogenic assay, we found that fisetin treatment significantly reduced colony formation in A431 cells. Fisetin treatment of A431 cells resulted in G2/M arrest and induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of A431 cells with fisetin resulted in (i) decreased expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1), (ii) increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, Bak and Bad), (iii) disruption of mitochondrial potential, (iv) release of cytchrome c and Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria, (v) activation of caspases, and (vi) cleavage of PARP protein. Pretreatment of A431 cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK) blocked fisetin-induced cleavage of caspases and PARP. Taken together, these data provide evidence that fisetin possesses chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Overall, these results suggest that fisetin could be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of NMSCs. PMID:23800058

  7. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity.

  8. Agmatine effects on mitochondrial membrane potential and NF-κB activation protect against rotenone-induced cell damage in human neuronal-like SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Condello, Salvatore; Currò, Monica; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Caccamo, Daniela; Satriano, Joseph; Ientile, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Agmatine, an endogenous arginine metabolite, has been proposed as a novel neuromodulator that plays protective roles in the CNS in several models of cellular damage. However, the mechanisms involved in these protective effects in neurodegenerative diseases are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of agmatine on cell injury induced by rotenone, commonly used in establishing in vivo and in vitro models of Parkinson's disease, in human-derived dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). We report that agmatine dose-dependently suppressed rotenone-induced cellular injury through a reduction of oxidative stress. Similar effects were obtained by spermine, suggesting a scavenging effect for these compounds. However, unlike spermine, agmatine also prevented rotenone-induced nuclear factor-κB nuclear translocation and mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation. Furthermore, rotenone-induced increase in apoptotic markers, such as caspase 3 activity, Bax expression and cytochrome c release, was significantly attenuated with agmatine treatment. These findings demonstrate mitochondrial preservation with agmatine in a rotenone model of apoptotic cell death, and that the neuroprotective action of agmatine appears because of suppressing apoptotic signalling mechanisms. Thus, agmatine may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of Parkinson's disease by protecting dopaminergic neurons.

  9. Proteomic analysis of the mouse liver mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz, Sandrine; Xenarios, Ioannis; Langridge, James; Vilbois, Francis; Parone, Phillipe A; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2003-10-17

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in cellular homeostasis, which justifies the increasing interest in mapping the different components of these organelles. Here we have focused our study on the identification of proteins of the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM). This membrane is of particular interest because, besides the well known components of the respiratory chain complexes, it contains several ion channels and many carrier proteins that certainly play a key role in mitochondrial function and, therefore, deserve to be identified at the molecular level. To achieve this goal we have used a novel approach combining the use of highly purified mouse liver mitochondrial inner membranes, extraction of membrane proteins with organic acid, and two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. This procedure allowed us to identify 182 proteins that are involved in several biochemical processes, such as the electron transport machinery, the protein import machinery, protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and ion or substrate transport. The full range of isoelectric point (3.9-12.5), molecular mass (6-527 kDa), and hydrophobicity values (up to 16 transmembrane predicted domains) were represented. In addition, of the 182 proteins found, 20 were unknown or had never previously been associated with the MIM. Overexpression of some of these proteins in mammalian cells confirmed their mitochondrial localization and resulted in severe remodeling of the mitochondrial network. This study provides the first proteome of the MIM and provides a basis for a more detailed study of the newly characterized proteins of this membrane.

  10. The development of mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Habicht, K-L.; Singh, N.S.; Indig, F.E.; Wainer, I.W.; Moaddel, R.; Shimmo, R.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane fragments from U-87 MG (U87MG) and HEK-293 cells were successfully immobilized on to Immobilized Artificial Membrane (IAM) chromatographic support and surface of activated open tubular (OT) silica capillary resulting in mitochondrial membrane affinity chromatography (MMAC) columns. Translocator protein (TSPO), located in mitochondrial outer membrane as well as sulfonylurea and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) receptors, localized to the inner membrane, were characterized. Frontal displacement experiments with multiple concentrations of dipyridamole (DIPY) and PK-11195 were run on MMAC-(U87MG) column and the binding affinities (Kd) determined were 1.08 ± 1.49 and 0.0086 ± 0.0006 μM respectively, which was consistent with previously reported values. Further, binding affinities (Ki) for DIPY binding site were determined for TSPO ligands, PK-11195, mesoporphyrin IX, protoporphyrin IX and rotenone. Additionally, the relative ranking of these TSPO ligands based on single displacement studies using DIPY as marker on MMAC-(U87MG) was consistent with the obtained Ki values. The immobilization of mitochondrial membrane fragments was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. PMID:26049098

  11. Palmitoleic acid induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Eri; Uchida, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Yamaguchi, Hidetaka; Nagami, Kuniatsu; Utsumi, Kozo; Yano, Hiromi

    Although palmitoleic acid (C16:1) is associated with arrhythmias, and increases in an age-dependent matter, the effects of L-carnitine, which is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, are unclear. It has been postulated that L-carnitine may attenuate palmitate (C16:0)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the activity of L-carnitine in the prevention of the palmitoleic acid-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and cytochrome c release using isolated cardiac mitochondria from rats. Palmitoleoyl-CoA-induced mitochondrial respiration was not accelerated by L-carnitine treatment, and this respiration was slightly inhibited by oligomycin, which is an inhibitor of ATP synthase. Despite pretreatment with L-carnitine, the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased and mitochondrial swelling was induced by palmitoleoyl-CoA. In the presence of a combination of L-carnitine and tiron, a free radical scavenger, there was attenuated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release following palmitoleoyl-CoA treatment. We concluded that palmitoleic acid, but not palmitate, induces the cardiac mitochondrial membrane permeability transition despite the presence of L-carnitine.

  12. The fusogenic lipid phosphatidic acid promotes the biogenesis of mitochondrial outer membrane protein Ugo1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Michael; Taskin, Asli A.; Horvath, Susanne E.; Guan, Xue Li; Prinz, Claudia; Opalińska, Magdalena; Zorzin, Carina; van der Laan, Martin; Wenk, Markus R.; Schubert, Rolf; Wiedemann, Nils; Holzer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Import and assembly of mitochondrial proteins depend on a complex interplay of proteinaceous translocation machineries. The role of lipids in this process has been studied only marginally and so far no direct role for a specific lipid in mitochondrial protein biogenesis has been shown. Here we analyzed a potential role of phosphatidic acid (PA) in biogenesis of mitochondrial proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo remodeling of the mitochondrial lipid composition by lithocholic acid treatment or by ablation of the lipid transport protein Ups1, both leading to an increase of mitochondrial PA levels, specifically stimulated the biogenesis of the outer membrane protein Ugo1, a component of the mitochondrial fusion machinery. We reconstituted the import and assembly pathway of Ugo1 in protein-free liposomes, mimicking the outer membrane phospholipid composition, and found a direct dependency of Ugo1 biogenesis on PA. Thus, PA represents the first lipid that is directly involved in the biogenesis pathway of a mitochondrial membrane protein. PMID:26347140

  13. Alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential by Spirulina platensis C-phycocyanin induces apoptosis in the doxorubicinresistant human hepatocellular-carcinoma cell line HepG2.

    PubMed

    Roy, Karnati R; Arunasree, Kalle M; Reddy, Nishant P; Dheeraj, Bhavanasi; Reddy, Gorla Venkateswara; Reddanna, Pallu

    2007-07-01

    C-PC (C-phycocyanin) is a water-soluble biliprotein from the filamentous cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis with potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancerous properties. In the present study, the effect of C-PC was tested on the proliferation of doxorubicin-sensitive (S-HepG2) and -resistant (R-HepG2) HCC (hepatocellular carcinoma) cell lines. These studies indicate a 50% decrease in the proliferation of S- and R-HepG2 cells treated with 40 and 50 microM C-PC for 24 h respectively. C-PC also enhanced the sensitivity of R-HepG2 cells to doxorubicin. R-HepG2 cells treated with C-PC showed typical apoptotic features such as membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation. Flow-cytometric analysis of R-HepG2 cells treated with 10, 25 and 50 microM C-PC for 24 h showed 18.8, 39.72 and 65.64% cells in sub-G(0)/G(1)-phase respectively. Cytochrome c release, decrease in membrane potential, caspase 3 activation and PARP [poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase] cleavage were observed in C-PC-treated R-HepG2 cells. These studies also showed down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic Bax (Bcl2-associated X-protein) protein in the R-HepG2 cells treated with C-PC. The present study thus demonstrates that C-PC induces apoptosis in R-HepG2 cells and its potential as an anti-HCC agent.

  14. Sensitization of U937 leukemia cells to doxorubicin by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor induces an increase in apoptosis by suppressing NF-kappa B and mitochondrial membrane potential loss

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The resistance of cancerous cells to chemotherapy remains the main limitation for cancer treatment at present. Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent antitumor drug that activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system, but unfortunately it also activates the Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-кB) pathway leading to the promotion of tumor cell survival. MG132 is a drug that inhibits I kappa B degradation by the proteasome-avoiding activation of NF-кB. In this work, we studied the sensitizing effect of the MG132 proteasome inhibitor on the antitumor activity of DOX. Methods U937 human leukemia cells were treated with MG132, DOX, or both drugs. We evaluated proliferation, viability, apoptosis, caspase-3, -8, and −9 activity and cleavage, cytochrome c release, mitochondrial membrane potential, the Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL antiapoptotic proteins, senescence, p65 phosphorylation, and pro- and antiapoptotic genes. Results The greatest apoptosis percentage in U937 cells was obtained with a combination of MG132 + DOX. Likewise, employing both drugs, we observed a decrease in tumor cell proliferation and important caspase-3 activation, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential loss. Therefore, MG132 decreases senescence, p65 phosphorylation, and the DOX-induced Bcl-2 antiapoptotic protein. The MG132 + DOX treatment induced upregulation of proapoptotic genes BAX, DIABLO, NOXA, DR4, and FAS. It also induced downregulation of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-XL and SURVIVIN. Conclusion MG132 sensitizes U937 leukemia cells to DOX-induced apoptosis, increasing its anti-leukemic effectiveness. PMID:24495648

  15. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L.; Tudella, Valeria G.

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions

  16. Characterization of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein translocator Tim17 from Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Ujjal K.; Peprah, Emmanuel; Williams, Shuntae; Walker, Robert; Saha, Lipi; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translocation machinery in the kinetoplastid parasites, like Trypanosoma brucei, has been characterized poorly. In T. brucei genome data base, one homolog for a protein translocator of mitochondrial inner membrane (Tim) has been found, which is closely related to Tim17 from other species. The T. brucei Tim17 (TbTim17) has a molecular mass 16.2 kDa and it possesses four characteristic transmembrane domains. The protein is localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. The level of TbTim17 protein is 6–7 fold higher in the procyclic form that has a fully active mitochondrion, than in the mammalian bloodstream form of T. brucei, where many of the mitochondrial activities are suppressed. Knockdown of TbTim17 expression by RNAi caused a cessation of cell growth in the procyclic form and reduced growth rate in the bloodstream form. Depletion of TbTim17 decreased mitochondrial membrane potential more in the procyclic than bloodstream form. However, TbTim17 knockdown reduced the expression level of several nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in both the forms. Furthermore, import of presequence containing nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins was significantly reduced in TbTim17 depleted mitochondria of the procyclic as well as the bloodstream form, confirming that TbTim17 is critical for mitochondrial protein import in both developmental forms. Together, these show that TbTim17 is the translocator of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins and its expression is regulated according to mitochondrial activities in T. brucei. PMID:18325611

  17. The Short Isoform of DNAJB6 Protects against 1-Methyl-4-phenylpridinium Ion-Induced Apoptosis in LN18 Cells via Inhibiting Both ROS Formation and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yeon-Mi; Hong, Yohan; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Jin, Soo Hee; Sung, Backil; Lee, Sook-Hyun; Jung, Hyejin

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that the short isoform of DNAJB6 (DNAJB6(S)) had been decreased in the striatum of a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). DNAJB6, one of the heat shock proteins, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. In this study, we explored the cytoprotective effect of DNAJB6(S) against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion- (MPP+-) induced apoptosis and the underlying molecular mechanisms in cultured LN18 cells from astrocytic tumors. We observed that MPP+ significantly reduced the cell viability and induced apoptosis in LN18 glioblastoma cells. DNAJB6(S) protected LN18 cells against MPP+-induced apoptosis not only by suppressing Bax cleavage but also by inhibiting a series of apoptotic events including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species, and activation of caspase-9. These observations suggest that the cytoprotective effects of DNAJB6(S) may be mediated, at least in part, by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:28280525

  18. Mitofusins and the mitochondrial permeability transition: the potential downside of mitochondrial fusion

    PubMed Central

    Papanicolaou, Kyriakos N.; Phillippo, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitofusins (Mfn-1 and Mfn-2) are transmembrane proteins that bind and hydrolyze guanosine 5′-triphosphate to bring about the merging of adjacent mitochondrial membranes. This event is necessary for mitochondrial fusion, a biological process that is critical for organelle function. The broad effects of mitochondrial fusion on cell bioenergetics have been extensively studied, whereas the local effects of mitofusin activity on the structure and integrity of the fusing mitochondrial membranes have received relatively little attention. From the study of fusogenic proteins, theoretical models, and simulations, it has been noted that the fusion of biological membranes is associated with local perturbations on the integrity of the membrane that present in the form of lipidic holes which open on the opposing bilayers. These lipidic holes represent obligate intermediates that make the fusion process thermodynamically more favorable and at the same time induce leakage to the fusing membranes. In this perspectives article we present the relevant evidence selected from a spectrum of membrane fusion/leakage models and attempt to couple this information with observations conducted with cardiac myocytes or mitochondria deficient in Mfn-1 and Mfn-2. More specifically, we argue in favor of a situation whereby mitochondrial fusion in cardiac myocytes is coupled with outer mitochondrial membrane destabilization that is opportunistically employed during the process of mitochondrial permeability transition. We hope that these insights will initiate research on this new hypothesis of mitochondrial permeability transition regulation, a poorly understood mitochondrial function with significant consequences on myocyte survival. PMID:22636681

  19. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteome of Trypanosoma brucei Reveals Novel Factors Required to Maintain Mitochondrial Morphology*

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei. PMID:23221899

  20. Mitochondrial outer membrane proteome of Trypanosoma brucei reveals novel factors required to maintain mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Moritz; Wiese, Sebastian; Mani, Jan; Chanfon, Astrid; Jackson, Christopher; Meisinger, Chris; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2013-02-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a unicellular parasite that causes devastating diseases in humans and animals. It diverged from most other eukaryotes very early in evolution and, as a consequence, has an unusual mitochondrial biology. Moreover, mitochondrial functions and morphology are highly regulated throughout the life cycle of the parasite. The outer mitochondrial membrane defines the boundary of the organelle. Its properties are therefore key for understanding how the cytosol and mitochondria communicate and how the organelle is integrated into the metabolism of the whole cell. We have purified the mitochondrial outer membrane of T. brucei and characterized its proteome using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for protein abundance profiling in combination with statistical analysis. Our results show that the trypanosomal outer membrane proteome consists of 82 proteins, two-thirds of which have never been associated with mitochondria before. 40 proteins share homology with proteins of known functions. The function of 42 proteins, 33 of which are specific to trypanosomatids, remains unknown. 11 proteins are essential for the disease-causing bloodstream form of T. brucei and therefore may be exploited as novel drug targets. A comparison with the outer membrane proteome of yeast defines a set of 17 common proteins that are likely present in the mitochondrial outer membrane of all eukaryotes. Known factors involved in the regulation of mitochondrial morphology are virtually absent in T. brucei. Interestingly, RNAi-mediated ablation of three outer membrane proteins of unknown function resulted in a collapse of the network-like mitochondrion of procyclic cells and for the first time identified factors that control mitochondrial shape in T. brucei.

  1. Cytosolic BNIP3 Dimer Interacts with Mitochondrial BAX Forming Heterodimers in the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane under Basal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Esfeld, Sonja; Rudi, Katharina; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Klare, Johann P; Rassaf, Tienush

    2017-03-23

    The primary function of mitochondria is energy production, a task of particular importance especially for cells with a high energy demand like cardiomyocytes. The B-cell lymphoma (BCL-2) family member BCL-2 adenovirus E1B 19 kDa-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3) is linked to mitochondrial targeting after homodimerization, where it functions in inner membrane depolarization and permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) mediating cell death. We investigated the basal distribution of cardiac BNIP3 in vivo and its physical interaction with the pro-death protein BCL2 associated X, apoptosis regulator (BAX) and with mitochondria using immunoblot analysis, co-immunoprecipitation, and continuous wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques. We found that BNIP3 is present as a dimer in the cytosol and in the outer membrane of cardiac mitochondria under basal conditions. It forms disulfide-bridged, but mainly non-covalent dimers in the cytosol. Heterodimers with BAX are formed exclusively in the MOM. Furthermore, our results suggest that BNIP3 interacts with the MOM directly via mitochondrial BAX. However, the physical interactions with BAX and the MOM did not affect the membrane potential and cell viability. These findings suggest that another stimulus other than the mere existence of the BNIP3/BAX dimer in the MOM is required to promote BNIP3 cell-death activity; this could be a potential disturbance of the BNIP3 distribution homeostasis, namely in the direction of the mitochondria.

  2. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission

    PubMed Central

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T.; Eckert, Debra M.; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity. PMID:23530241

  3. Interchangeable adaptors regulate mitochondrial dynamin assembly for membrane scission.

    PubMed

    Koirala, Sajjan; Guo, Qian; Kalia, Raghav; Bui, Huyen T; Eckert, Debra M; Frost, Adam; Shaw, Janet M

    2013-04-09

    Mitochondrial fission is mediated by the dynamin-related GTPases Dnm1/Drp1 (yeast/mammals), which form spirals around constricted sites on mitochondria. Additional membrane-associated adaptor proteins (Fis1, Mdv1, Mff, and MiDs) are required to recruit these GTPases from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface. Whether these adaptors participate in both GTPase recruitment and membrane scission is not known. Here we use a yeast strain lacking all fission proteins to identify the minimal combinations of GTPases and adaptors sufficient for mitochondrial fission. Although Fis1 is dispensable for fission, membrane-anchored Mdv1, Mff, or MiDs paired individually with their respective GTPases are sufficient to divide mitochondria. In addition to their role in Drp1 membrane recruitment, MiDs coassemble with Drp1 in vitro. The resulting heteropolymer adopts a dramatically different structure with a narrower diameter than Drp1 homopolymers assembled in isolation. This result demonstrates that an adaptor protein alters the architecture of a mitochondrial dynamin GTPase polymer in a manner that could facilitate membrane constriction and severing activity.

  4. Rat liver mitochondrial membrane characteristics and mitochondrial functions are more profoundly altered by dietary lipid quantity than by dietary lipid quality: effect of different nutritional lipid patterns.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Manar; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Chabi, Béatrice; Crouzier, David; Ferreri, Carla; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Cristol, Jean Paul; Carbonneau, Marie-Annette; Coudray, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Dietary lipids are known to affect the composition of the biological membrane and functions that are involved in cell death and survival. The mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes are membrane protein complexes whose function depends on the composition and fluidity of the mitochondrial membrane lipid. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of different nutritional patterns of dietary lipids on liver mitochondrial functions. A total of forty-eight Wistar male rats were divided into six groups and fed for 12 weeks with a basal diet, lard diet or fish oil diet, containing either 50 or 300 g lipid/kg. The 30 % lipid intake increased liver NEFA, TAG and cholesterol levels, increased mitochondrial NEFA and TAG, and decreased phospholipid (PL) levels. SFA, PUFA and unsaturation index (UI) increased, whereas MUFA and trans-fatty acids (FA) decreased in the mitochondrial membrane PL in 30 % fat diet-fed rats compared with 5 % lipid diet-fed rats. PL UI increased with fish oil diet v. basal and lard-rich diets, and PL trans-FA increased with lard diet v. basal and fish oil diets. The 30 % lipid diet intake increased mitochondrial membrane potential, membrane fluidity, mitochondrial respiration and complex V activity, and decreased complex III and IV activities. With regard to lipid quality effects, β-oxidation decreased with the intake of basal or fish oil diets compared with that of the lard diet. The intake of a fish oil diet decreased complex III and IV activities compared with both the basal and lard diets. In conclusion, the characteristics and mitochondrial functions of the rat liver mitochondrial membrane are more profoundly altered by the quantity of dietary lipid than by its quality, which may have profound impacts on the pathogenesis and development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  5. Bax assembles into large ring-like structures remodeling the mitochondrial outer membrane in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Große, Lena; Wurm, Christian A; Brüser, Christian; Neumann, Daniel; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-02-15

    The Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak are essential for the execution of many apoptotic programs. During apoptosis, Bax translocates to the mitochondria and mediates the permeabilization of the outer membrane, thereby facilitating the release of pro-apoptotic proteins. Yet the mechanistic details of the Bax-induced membrane permeabilization have so far remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that activated Bax molecules, besides forming large and compact clusters, also assemble, potentially with other proteins including Bak, into ring-like structures in the mitochondrial outer membrane. STED nanoscopy indicates that the area enclosed by a Bax ring is devoid of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom22, and Sam50. This strongly supports the view that the Bax rings surround an opening required for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Even though these Bax assemblies may be necessary for MOMP, we demonstrate that at least in Drp1 knockdown cells, these assemblies are not sufficient for full cytochrome c release. Together, our super-resolution data provide direct evidence in support of large Bax-delineated pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane as being crucial for Bax-mediated MOMP in cells. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  6. Proteome analysis of mitochondrial outer membrane from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Simone; Prokisch, Holger; Schlunk, Tilman; Camp, David G.; Ahting, Uwe; Waizenegger, Thomas; Scharfe, Curt M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Imhof, Axel; Neupert, Walter; Oefner, Peter J.; Rapaport, Doron

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane mediates numerous interactions between the metabolic and genetic systems of mitochondria and the rest of the eukaryotic cell. We performed a proteomic study to discover novel functions of components of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Proteins of highly pure outer membrane vesicles (OMV) from Neurospora crassa were identified by a combination of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptide digests and gel electrophoresis of solubilized OMV proteins, followed by their identification using MALDI-MS peptide fingerprinting. Among the 30 proteins found in at least three of four separate analyses were 23 proteins with known functions in the outer membrane. These included components of the import machinery (the TOM and TOB complexes), a pore-forming component (Porin), and proteins that control fusion and fission of the organelle. In addition, proteins playing a role in various biosynthetic pathways, whose intracellular location had not been established previously, could be localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Thus, the proteome of the outer membrane can help in identifying new mitochondria-related functions.

  7. [Development of the MITO-porter, a nano device for mitochondrial drug delivery via membrane fusion].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma

    2014-01-01

    Many human diseases have been reported to be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Therefore, mitochondrial therapy would be expected to be useful and productive in the treatment of various diseases. To achieve such an innovative therapy, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents into mitochondria. However, only a limited number of methods are available for accomplishing this. We previously developed the MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that permits macromolecular cargos to be transported into mitochondria via membrane fusion. Intracellular observations using the green fluorescence protein as a model macromolecule confirmed the mitochondrial delivery of a macromolecule by the MITO-Porter. Moreover, when we attempted the mitochondrial delivery of bongkrekic acid (BKA), an antiapoptosis agent, the MITO-Porter enhanced the antiapoptosis effect compared with naked BKA. To construct a device with enhanced performance, the MITO-Porter was coated with cell membrane-fusogenic outer envelopes to produce the dual function (DF)-MITO-Porter. Intracellular observations indicated that the DF-MITO-Porter was more effective in delivering exogenous macromolecules into mitochondria than the conventional MITO-Porter. Furthermore, when biomacromolecules were delivered using the DF-MITO-Porter to estimate the mitochondrial gene targeting of the carrier, the results confirmed that the MITO-Porter system has the potential for use in therapies aimed at mitochondrial DNA. This paper sumarizes our findings on mitochondrial drug delivery systems that are directed toward mitochondrial medicine development and mitochondrial gene therapy. It is expected that the MITO-Porter system will open new research areas in mitochondrial drug delivery systems and have a significant impact on the medical and life sciences.

  8. Barbiturates induce mitochondrial depolarization and potentiate excitotoxic neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher M; Norquist, Becky A; Vesce, Sabino; Nicholls, David G; Soine, William H; Duan, Shumin; Swanson, Raymond A

    2002-11-01

    Barbiturates are widely used as anesthetics, anticonvulsants, and neuroprotective agents. However, barbiturates may also inhibit mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial inhibitors are known to potentiate NMDA receptor-mediated neurotoxicity. Here we used rat cortical cultures to examine the effect of barbiturates on neuronal mitochondria and responses to NMDA receptor stimulation. The barbiturates tested, secobarbital, amobarbital, and thiamylal, each potentiated NMDA-induced neuron death at barbiturate concentrations relevant to clinical and experimental use (100-300 microm). By using rhodamine-123 under quenching conditions, barbiturates in this concentration range were shown to depolarize neuronal mitochondria and greatly amplify NMDA-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Barbiturate-induced mitochondrial depolarization was increased by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin, indicating that barbiturates act by inhibiting electron transport sufficiently to cause ATP synthase reversal. Barbiturates similarly amplified the effects of NMDA on cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations. The cell-impermeant barbiturate N-glucoside amobarbital did not influence mitochondrial potential or potentiate NMDA neurotoxicity or calcium responses. However, all of the barbiturates attenuated NMDA-induced calcium elevations and cell death when present at millimolar concentrations. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that these effects may be attributable to actions at the cell membrane, resulting in a block of NMDA-induced current flux at millimolar barbiturate concentrations. Together, these findings reconcile previous reports of opposing effects on barbiturates on NMDA neurotoxicity and show that barbiturate effects on neuronal mitochondria can be functionally significant. Effects of barbiturates on neuronal mitochondria should be considered in experimental and clinical application of these drugs.

  9. The sigma-1 receptor agonist 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects against newborn excitotoxic brain injury by stabilizing the mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro and inhibiting microglial activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wegleiter, Karina; Hermann, Martin; Posod, Anna; Wechselberger, Karina; Stanika, Ruslan I; Obermair, Gerald J; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Urbanek, Martina; Griesmaier, Elke

    2014-11-01

    Premature birth represents a clinical situation of risk for brain injury. The diversity of pathophysiological processes complicates efforts to find effective therapeutic strategies. Excitotoxicity is one important factor in the pathogenesis of preterm brain injury. The observation that sigma-1 receptor agonists possess neuroprotective potential, at least partly mediated by a variety of anti-excitotoxic mechanisms, has generated great interest in targeting those receptors to counteract brain injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the highly specific sigma-1 receptor agonist, 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) to protect against excitotoxic developmental brain injury in vivo and in vitro. Primary hippocampal neurons were pre-treated with PPBP before glutamate was applied and subsequently analyzed for cell death (PI/calcein AM), mitochondrial activity (TMRM) and morphology of the neuronal network (WGA) using confocal microscopy. Using an established neonatal mouse model we also determined whether systemic injection of PPBP significantly attenuates excitotoxic brain injury. PPBP significantly reduced neuronal cell death in primary hippocampal neurons exposed to glutamate. Neurons treated with PPBP showed a less pronounced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and fewer morphological changes after glutamate exposure. A single intraperitoneal injection of PPBP given one hour after the excitotoxic insult significantly reduced microglial cell activation and lesion size in cortical gray and white matter. The present study provides strong support for the consideration of sigma-1 receptor agonists as a candidate therapy for the reduction of neonatal excitotoxic brain lesions and might offer a novel target to counteract developmental brain injury.

  10. Mitochondrial Sirtuin Network Reveals Dynamic SIRT3-Dependent Deacetylation in Response to Membrane Depolarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Nagasawa, Koji; Münch, Christian; Xu, Yingjie; Satterstrom, Kyle; Jeong, Seungmin; Hayes, Sebastian D; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Vyas, F Sejal; Zaganjor, Elma; Guarani, Virginia; Ringel, Alison E; Gygi, Steven P; Harper, J Wade; Haigis, Marcia C

    2016-11-03

    Mitochondrial sirtuins, SIRT3-5, are NAD(+)-dependent deacylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that are critical for stress responses. However, a comprehensive understanding of sirtuin targets, regulation of sirtuin activity, and the relationships between sirtuins remains a key challenge in mitochondrial physiology. Here, we employ systematic interaction proteomics to elucidate the mitochondrial sirtuin protein interaction landscape. This work reveals sirtuin interactions with numerous functional modules within mitochondria, identifies candidate sirtuin substrates, and uncovers a fundamental role for sequestration of SIRT3 by ATP synthase in mitochondrial homeostasis. In healthy mitochondria, a pool of SIRT3 binds ATP synthase, but upon matrix pH reduction with concomitant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, SIRT3 dissociates. This release correlates with rapid deacetylation of matrix proteins, and SIRT3 is required for recovery of membrane potential. In vitro reconstitution experiments, as well as analysis of CRISPR/Cas9-engineered cells, indicate that pH-dependent SIRT3 release requires H135 in the ATP5O subunit of ATP synthase. Our SIRT3-5 interaction network provides a framework for discovering novel biological functions regulated by mitochondrial sirtuins.

  11. J protein cochaperone of the mitochondrial inner membrane required for protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    PubMed Central

    D'Silva, Patrick D.; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Andrew, Amy; Craig, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    The major Hsp70 of the mitochondrial matrix (Ssc1 in yeast) is critically important for the translocation of proteins from the cytosol, across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and into the matrix. Tim44, a peripheral inner membrane protein with limited sequence similarity to the J domain of J-type cochaperones, tethers Ssc1 to the import channel. Here we report that, unlike a J protein, Tim44 does not stimulate the ATPase activity of Ssc1, nor does it affect the stimulation by either a known mitochondrial J protein or a peptide substrate. Thus, we conclude that Tim44 does not function as a J protein cochaperone of Ssc1; rather, it tethers Ssc1 to the import channel through interactions independent of those critical for J protein function. However, a previously unstudied essential gene, PAM18, encodes an 18-kDa protein that contains a J domain and is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Pam18 stimulates the ATPase activity of Ssc1; depletion of Pam18 in vivo disrupts import of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix. We propose that Pam18 is the J protein partner for Ssc1 at the import channel and is critical for Ssc1's function in protein import. PMID:14605210

  12. J protein cochaperone of the mitochondrial inner membrane required for protein import into the mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    D'Silva, Patrick D; Schilke, Brenda; Walter, William; Andrew, Amy; Craig, Elizabeth A

    2003-11-25

    The major Hsp70 of the mitochondrial matrix (Ssc1 in yeast) is critically important for the translocation of proteins from the cytosol, across the mitochondrial inner membrane, and into the matrix. Tim44, a peripheral inner membrane protein with limited sequence similarity to the J domain of J-type cochaperones, tethers Ssc1 to the import channel. Here we report that, unlike a J protein, Tim44 does not stimulate the ATPase activity of Ssc1, nor does it affect the stimulation by either a known mitochondrial J protein or a peptide substrate. Thus, we conclude that Tim44 does not function as a J protein cochaperone of Ssc1; rather, it tethers Ssc1 to the import channel through interactions independent of those critical for J protein function. However, a previously unstudied essential gene, PAM18, encodes an 18-kDa protein that contains a J domain and is localized to the mitochondrial inner membrane. Pam18 stimulates the ATPase activity of Ssc1; depletion of Pam18 in vivo disrupts import of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix. We propose that Pam18 is the J protein partner for Ssc1 at the import channel and is critical for Ssc1's function in protein import.

  13. Non-toxic fluorescent phosphonium probes to detect mitochondrial potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šarić, Ana; Crnolatac, Ivo; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Sobočanec, Sandra; Mikecin, Ana-Matea; Mačak Šafranko, Željka; Delgeorgiev, Todor; Piantanida, Ivo; Balog, Tihomir; Petit, Patrice X.

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated our phosphonium-based fluorescent probes for selective staining of mitochondria. Currently used probes for monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential show varying degrees of interference with cell metabolism, photo-induced damage and probe binding. Here presented probes are characterised by highly efficient cellular uptake and specific accumulation in mitochondria. Fluorescent detection of the probes was accomplished using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy imaging of yeast and mammalian cells. Toxicity analysis (impedimetry—xCELLigence for the cellular proliferation and Seahorse technology for respiratory properties) confirms that these dyes exhibit no-toxicity on mitochondrial or cellular functioning even for long time incubation. The excellent chemical and photophysical stability of the dyes makes them promising leads toward improved fluorescent probes. Therefore, the probes described here offer to circumvent the problems associated with existing-probe’s limitations.

  14. The Association of Mitochondrial Potential and Copy Number with Pig Oocyte Maturation and Developmental Potential

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Seul-Ki; ZHAO, Ming-Hui; KWON, Jung-Woo; LI, Ying-Hua; LIN, Zi-Li; JIN, Yong-Xun; KIM, Nam-Hyung; CUI, Xiang-Shun

    2014-01-01

    ATP is critical for oocyte maturation, fertilization, and subsequent embryo development. Both mitochondrial membrane potential and copy number expand during oocyte maturation. In order to differentiate the roles of mitochondrial metabolic activity and mtDNA copy number during oocyte maturation, we used two inhibitors, FCCP (carbonyl cyanide p-(tri-fluromethoxy)phenyl-hydrazone) and ddC (2’3-dideoxycytidine), to deplete the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δφm) and mitochondrial copy number, respectively. FCCP (2000 nM) reduced ATP production by affecting mitochondrial Δφm, decreased the mRNA expression of Bmp15 (bone morphogenetic protein 15), and shortened the poly(A) tails of Bmp15, Gdf9 (growth differentiation factor 9), and Cyclin B1 transcripts. FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) also affected p34cdc2 kinase activity. By contrast, ddC did not alter ATP production. Instead, ddC significantly decreased mtDNA copy number (P < 0.05). FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) also decreased extrusion of the first polar body, whereas ddC at all concentrations did not affect the ability of immature oocytes to reach metaphase II. Both FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) and ddC (200 and 2000 µM) reduced parthenogenetic blastocyst formation compared with untreated oocytes. However, these inhibitors did not affect total cell number and apoptosis. These findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic activity is critical for oocyte maturation and that both mitochondrial metabolic activity and replication contribute to the developmental competence of porcine oocytes. PMID:24492657

  15. Defective kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase and alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential in fibroblasts and cytoplasmic hybrid cells with the mutation for myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres ('MERRF') at position 8344 nt.

    PubMed Central

    Antonická, H; Floryk, D; Klement, P; Stratilová, L; Hermanská, J; Houstková, H; Kalous, M; Drahota, Z; Zeman, J; Houstek, J

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated pathogenic effects of the tRNA(Lys) A8344G mutation associated with the syndrome myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF) by using fibroblasts and fibroblast-derived cytoplasmic hybrid cells harbouring different percentages of mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in patient fibroblasts with 89% mutated mtDNA was decreased to 20% of the control levels. COX exhibited altered kinetics, with a decreased V(max) for both the low-affinity and high-affinity phases; however, the K(m) values were not significantly changed. The substrate-dependent synthesis of ATP was decreased to 50% of the control. Analysis of the mitochondrial membrane potential, DeltaPsi, in digitonin-treated cells with tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) with the use of flow cytometry showed a 80% decrease in DeltaPsi at state 4 and an increased sensitivity of DeltaPsi to an uncoupler in fibroblasts from the patient. The investigation of transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid clones derived from the patient's fibroblasts enabled us to characterize the relationship between heteroplasmy of the MERRF mutation, COX activity and DeltaPsi. Within the range of 87-73% mutated mtDNA, COX activity was decreased to 5-35% and DeltaPsi was decreased to 6-78%. These results demonstrate that the MERRF mutation affects COX activity and DeltaPsi in different proportions with regard to mutation heteroplasmy and indicate that the biochemical manifestation of the MERRF mutation exerts a very steep threshold of DeltaPsi inhibition. PMID:10477264

  16. Tiam1/Rac1 signaling pathway mediates palmitate-induced, ceramide-sensitive generation of superoxides and lipid peroxides and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Syed, Ismail; Jayaram, Bhavaani; Subasinghe, Wasanthi; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2010-09-15

    The phagocytic NADPH oxidase [NOX] has been implicated in the generation of superoxides in the pancreatic beta-cell. Herein, using normal rat islets and clonal INS 832/13 cells, we tested the hypothesis that activation of the small G-protein Rac1, which is a member of the NOX holoenzyme, is necessary for palmitate [PA]-induced generation of superoxides in pancreatic beta-cells. Incubation of isolated beta-cells with PA potently increased the NOX activity culminating in a significant increase in the generation of superoxides and lipid peroxides in these cells; such effects of PA were attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium [DPI], a known inhibitor of NOX. In addition, PA caused a transient, but significant activation [i.e., GTP-bound form] of Rac1 in these cells. NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac1, but not Cdc42 or Rho activation, inhibited Rac1 activation and the generation of superoxides and lipid peroxides induced by PA. Fumonisin B-1 [FB-1], which inhibits de novo synthesis of ceramide [CER] from PA, also attenuated PA-induced superoxide and lipid peroxide generation and NOX activity implicating intracellularly generated CER in the metabolic effects of PA; such effects were also demonstrable in the presence of the cell-permeable C2-CER. Further, NSC23766 prevented C2-CER-induced Rac1 activation and production of superoxides and lipid peroxides. Lastly, C2-CER, but not its inactive analogue, significantly reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was prevented to a large degree by NSC23766. Together, our findings suggest that Tiam1/Rac1 signaling pathway regulates PA-induced, CER-dependent superoxide generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in pancreatic beta-cells.

  17. Bergamottin isolated from Citrus bergamia exerts in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in lung adenocarcinoma through the induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential loss and inhibition of cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Juan; Wu, Hong-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Qiu; Chen, Li-Juan; Zou, Hong-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer properties of bergamottin, a natural furanocoumarin, against human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) A549 cells. We also studied its effect on cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest, cell invasion, cell migration as well as cell apoptosis. Antiproliferative activity of bergamottin was estimated by the MTT assay. Phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC assay were used to study induction of apoptosis by bergamottin in these cells. The effects of bergamottin on cell cycle phase distribution as well as on mitochondrial membrane potential were also demonstrated using flow cytometry. In vitro wound healing assay was used to study the effect of bergamottin on cell migration. The effects of bergamottin on tumor progression were also observed using a nude mouse model. The mice were divided into 4 groups and treated with bergamottin injected intraperitoneally. Bergamottin induced dose-dependent as well as time-dependent cytotoxic effects as well as inhibition of colony formation in the A549 cancer cells. Bergamottin also suppressed cancer cell invasion as well as cancer cell migration. Phase contrast microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that bergamottin induced cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and the cells became rounded and detached from each other. Bergamottin also induced a potent cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Experiments in mice showed that 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg bergamottin injection reduced the tumor weight from 1.61 g in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group (control) to 1.21, 0.42 and 0.15 g in the bergamottin-treated groups, respectively. The results of the present study revealed that bergamottin was able to inhibit lung cancer cell growth both in a cell model and a xenograft mouse model by inducing apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, G2/M cell cycle

  18. MICOS coordinates with respiratory complexes and lipids to establish mitochondrial inner membrane architecture

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jonathan R; Mourier, Arnaud; Yamada, Justin; McCaffery, J Michael; Nunnari, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    The conserved MICOS complex functions as a primary determinant of mitochondrial inner membrane structure. We address the organization and functional roles of MICOS and identify two independent MICOS subcomplexes: Mic27/Mic10/Mic12, whose assembly is dependent on respiratory complexes and the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and Mic60/Mic19, which assembles independent of these factors. Our data suggest that MICOS subcomplexes independently localize to cristae junctions and are connected via Mic19, which functions to regulate subcomplex distribution, and thus, potentially also cristae junction copy number. MICOS subunits have non-redundant functions as the absence of both MICOS subcomplexes results in more severe morphological and respiratory growth defects than deletion of single MICOS subunits or subcomplexes. Mitochondrial defects resulting from MICOS loss are caused by misdistribution of respiratory complexes in the inner membrane. Together, our data are consistent with a model where MICOS, mitochondrial lipids and respiratory complexes coordinately build a functional and correctly shaped mitochondrial inner membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07739.001 PMID:25918844

  19. Suppression of human arthritis synovial fibroblasts inflammation using dexamethasone-carbon nanotubes via increasing caveolin-dependent endocytosis and recovering mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Sang-Woo; Park, Jun-Young; Kang, Woong Chol; Kang, Youn Joo; Khang, Dongwoo

    2017-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX), a non-particulate glucocorticoid (GC) to inhibit anti-inflammatory response, has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases such as arthritis, cancer, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebral edema, and multiple sclerosis. However, prolonged and/or high-dose GC therapy can cause various serious adverse effects (adrenal insufficiency, hyperglycemia, Cushing's syndrome, osteoporosis, Charcot arthropathy, etc). In this study, developed DEX-carbon nanotube (CNT) conjugates improved intracellular drug delivery via increased caveolin-dependent endocytosis and ultimately suppressed the expression of major pro-inflammatory cytokines in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) at low drug concentrations. Specifically, DEX on polyethylene-glycol (PEG)-coated CNTs induced caveolin uptake, recovered mitochondrial disruption, and inhibited reactive oxygen species production by targeting mitochondria that was released from the early endosome in TNF-α-stimulated FLS. The obtained results clearly demonstrated that DEX-PEG-coated CNTs significantly inhibited the inflammation by FLS in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by achieving greater drug uptake and efficient intracellular drug release from the endosome, thus suggesting a mechanism of effective low-dose GC therapy to treat inflammatory diseases, including RA and osteoarthritis.

  20. Typha capensis (Rohrb.)N.E.Br. (bulrush) extract scavenges free radicals, inhibits collagenase activity and affects human sperm motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Henkel, R; Fransman, W; Hipler, U-C; Wiegand, C; Schreiber, G; Menkveld, R; Weitz, F; Fisher, D

    2012-05-01

    The biodiversity in South Africa provides more than 30,000 higher plants, of which more than 3000 are used by traditional healers to treat diseases. Typha capensis (bulrush) is one of the medicinal plants used in South Africa to treat male fertility problems. Considering that South African traditional healers have been recognised by Law and the health benefits of T. capensis have not been scientifically investigated yet, this study aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of aqueous extracts from this plant on male reproductive functions. Both leaves and rhizomes of T. capensis were dried, infused with distilled water and freeze-dried. Motile sperm from 50 men were isolated by swim-up and incubated with 1 μg ml(-1) aqueous extract of Typha rhizome for 1 h at 37 °C. Vitality, motility, sperm production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential were analysed in the test sample, a control and in the pellet from the swim-up. Results showed that the rhizome extract had significant (P < 0.0001) negative effects on all parameters. The extracts from the leaves and rhizomes revealed dose-dependent inhibitory activity for collagenase and free radical formation. No inhibitory activity for elastase was found. The inhibitory activity for collagenase might indicate possible anti-cancer effects.

  1. Separate fusion of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Florence; Guillery, Olwenn; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Belenguer, Pascale; Lombès, Anne; Rojo, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are enveloped by two closely apposed boundary membranes with different properties and functions. It is known that they undergo fusion and fission, but it has remained unclear whether outer and inner membranes fuse simultaneously, coordinately or separately. We set up assays for the study of inner and outer membrane fusion in living human cells. Inner membrane fusion was more sensitive than outer membrane fusion to inhibition of glycolysis. Fusion of the inner membrane, but not of the outer membrane, was abolished by dissipation of the inner membrane potential with K+ (valinomycin) or H+ ionophores (cccp). In addition, outer and inner membrane fusion proceeded separately in the absence of any drug. The separate fusion of outer and inner membranes and the different requirements of these fusion reactions point to the existence of fusion machineries that can function separately. PMID:16113651

  2. Synchronism in mitochondrial ROS flashes, membrane depolarization and calcium sparks in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Javadov, Sabzali; Saks, Valdur; Margreiter, Raimund; Grimm, Michael

    2017-03-06

    Mitochondria are major producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in many cells including cancer cells. However, complex interrelationships between mitochondrial ROS (mitoROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and Ca(2+) are not completely understood. Using human carcinoma cells, we further highlight biphasic ROS dynamics: - gradual mitoROS increase followed by mitoROS flash. Also, we demonstrate heterogeneity in rates of mitoROS generation and flash initiation time. Comparing mitochondrial and near-extra-mitochondrial signals, we show that mechanisms of mitoROS flashes in single mitochondria, linked to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening (ΔΨm collapse) and calcium sparks, may involve flash triggering by certain levels of external ROS released from the same mitochondria. In addition, mitochondria-mitochondria interactions can produce wave propagations of mitoROS flashes and ΔΨm collapses in cancer cells similar to phenomena of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR). Our data suggest that in cancer cells RIRR, activation of mitoROS flashes and mitochondrial depolarization may involve participation of extramitochondrial-ROS produced either by individual mitochondria and/or by neighboring mitochondria. This could represent general mechanisms in ROS-ROS signaling with suggested role in both mitochondrial and cellular physiology and signaling.

  3. Condurango (Gonolobus condurango) Extract Activates Fas Receptor and Depolarizes Mitochondrial Membrane Potential to Induce ROS-dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, Kausik; Mondal, Jesmin; Sikdar, Sourav; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Condurango (Gonolobus condurango) extract is used by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners as a traditional medicine, including homeopathy, mainly for the treatment of syphilis. Condurango bark extract is also known to reduce tumor volume, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Methods: Using a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) as our model, the molecular events behind condurango extract’s (CE’s) anticancer effect were investigated by using flow cytometry, immunoblotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other included cell types were prostate cancer cells (PC3), transformed liver cells (WRL-68), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results: Condurango extract (CE) was found to be cytotoxic against target cells, and this was significantly deactivated in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS), suggesting that its action could be mediated through ROS generation. CE caused an increase in the HeLa cell population containing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage at the G zero/Growth 1 (G0/G1) stage. Further, CE increased the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and the fas receptor (FasR) levels both at the ribonucleic acid (RNA) and the protein levels, indicating that CE might have a cytotoxic mechanism of action. CE also triggered a sharp decrease in the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB ) both at the RNA and the protein levels, a possible route to attenuation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and caused an opening of the mitochondrial membrane’s permeability transition (MPT) pores, thus enhancing caspase activities. Conclusion: Overall, our results suggest possible pathways for CE mediated cytotoxicity in model cancer cells. PMID:26389000

  4. Localized translation near the mitochondrial outer membrane: An update.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, Chen; Golani-Armon, Adi; Arava, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    Local synthesis of proteins near their activity site has been demonstrated in many biological systems, and has diverse contributions to cellular functions. Studies in recent years have revealed that hundreds of mitochondria-destined proteins are synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes near the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that localized translation also occurs at this cellular locus. Furthermore, in the last year central factors that are involved in this process were identified in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. Herein we review the experimental evidence for localized translation on the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane; in addition, we describe the factors that are involved in this process and discuss the conservation of this mechanism among various species. We also describe the relationship between localized translation and import into the mitochondria and suggest avenues of study that look beyond cotranslational import. Finally we discuss future challenges in characterizing the mechanisms for localized translation and its physiological significance.

  5. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Tudella, Valeria G; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Rodrigues, Fernando P; Pestana, Cezar R; Uyemura, Sérgio A; Leopoldino, Andreia M; Alberici, Luciane C; Curti, Carlos

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 μM) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca²⁺ efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP+ transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Quazi Sohel; Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang; Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Aniya, Yoko

    2009-02-15

    We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

  7. Grape seed proanthocyanidins promote apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells through alterations in Cdki-Cdk-cyclin cascade, and caspase-3 activation via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Meeran, Syed M; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-05-01

    Dietary grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) prevent photocarcinogenesis in mice. Here, we report that in vitro treatment of human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells with GSPs inhibited cellular proliferation (13-89%) and induced cell death (1-48%) in a dose (5-100 mug/ml)- and time (24, 48 and 72 h)-dependent manner. GSP-induced inhibition of cell proliferation was associated with an increase in G1-phase arrest at 24 h, which was mediated through the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 and cyclins D1, D2 and E and simultaneous increase in protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (Cdki), Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27, and enhanced binding of Cdki-Cdk. The treatment of A431 cells with GSPs (20-80 mug/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in apoptotic cell death (26-58%), which was associated with an increased protein expression of proapoptotic Bax, decreased expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP. Pretreatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) blocked the GSP-induced apoptosis in A431 cells suggesting that GSP-induced apoptosis is associated primarily with the caspase-3-dependent pathway. Together, our study suggests that GSPs possess chemotherapeutic potential against human epidermoid carcinoma cells in vitro, further in vivo mechanistic studies are required to verify the chemotherapeutic effect of GSPs in skin cancers.

  8. The Structure of the Mitochondrial Membrane: Inferences from Permeability Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, Henry

    1959-01-01

    Mitochondria possess a semipermeable membrane with properties similar to the cell membrane. Despite the presence of a limiting membrane, mitochondria swell approximately 4 to 5 times their original volume without lysis or loss of internal solute. For this reason, it has been argued that the membrane might be convoluted. The present kinetic study of the permeability of isolated mitochondria was undertaken to clarify this question. A photometric method described previously was used. In the case of highly lipid soluble penetrants, the results suggest that neither the permeability nor the surface area available for penetration varies significantly during considerable swelling. These results may be interpreted to mean that the mitochondrial membrane is convoluted. For highly polar compounds, the permeability of the membrane also remains unchanged during swelling, but the surface area available to penetration increases. These results may be interpreted to mean that in this latter case, the surface of the convolutions becomes available only after they are unfolded by swelling. The simplest model that can explain the permeability properties of this membrane consists of a bimolecular lipid layer where the inner monomolecular layer is convoluted. PMID:13837259

  9. Ubiquilins Chaperone and Triage Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins for Degradation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Zavodszky, Eszter; Shao, Sichen; Wohlever, Matthew L; Keenan, Robert J; Hegde, Ramanujan S

    2016-07-07

    We investigated how mitochondrial membrane proteins remain soluble in the cytosol until their delivery to mitochondria or degradation at the proteasome. We show that Ubiquilin family proteins bind transmembrane domains in the cytosol to prevent aggregation and temporarily allow opportunities for membrane targeting. Over time, Ubiquilins recruit an E3 ligase to ubiquitinate bound clients. The attached ubiquitin engages Ubiquilin's UBA domain, normally bound to an intramolecular UBL domain, and stabilizes the Ubiquilin-client complex. This conformational change precludes additional chances at membrane targeting for the client, while simultaneously freeing Ubiquilin's UBL domain for targeting to the proteasome. Loss of Ubiquilins by genetic ablation or sequestration in polyglutamine aggregates leads to accumulation of non-inserted mitochondrial membrane protein precursors. These findings define Ubiquilins as a family of chaperones for cytosolically exposed transmembrane domains and explain how they use ubiquitin to triage clients for degradation via coordinated intra- and intermolecular interactions. Copyright © 2016 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analytical study of microsomes and isolated subcellular membranes from rat liver VIII. Subfractionation of preparations enriched with plasma membranes, outer mitochondrial membranes, or Golgi complex membranes

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Preparations enriched with plasmalemmal, outer mitochondrial, or Golgi complex membranes from rat liver were subfractionated by isopycnic centrifugation, without or after treatment with digitonin, to establish the subcellular distribution of a variety of enzymes. The typical plasmalemmal enzymes 5'-nucleotidase, alkaline phosphodiesterase I, and alkaline phosphatase were markedly shifted by digitonin toward higher densities in all three preparations. Three glycosyltransferases, highly purified in the Golgi fraction, were moderately shifted by digitonin in both this Golgi complex preparation and the microsomal fraction. The outer mitochondrial membrane marker, monoamine oxidase, was not affected by digitonin in the outer mitochondrial membrane marker, monoamine oxidase, was not affected by digitonin in the out mitochondrial membrane preparation, in agreement wit its behavior in microsomes. With the exception of NADH cytochrome c reductase (which was concentrated in the outer mitochondrial membrane preparation), typical microsomal enzymes (glucose-6-phosphatase, esterase, and NADPH cytochrome c reductase) displayed low specific activities in the three preparations; except for part of the glucose-6-phosphatase activity in the plasma membrane preparation, their density distributions were insensitive to digitonin, as they were in microsomes. The influence of digitonin on equilibrium densities was correlated with its morphological effects. Digitonin induced pseudofenestrations in plasma membranes. In Golgi and outer mitochondrial membrane preparations, a few similarly altered membranes were detected in subfractions enriched with 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphodiesterase I. The alterations of Golgi membranes were less obvious and seemingly restricted to some elements in the Golgi preparation. No morphological modification was detected in digitonin-treated outer mitochondrial membranes. These results indicate that each enzyme is associated with the same membrane

  11. Function of the mitochondrial outer membrane as a diffusion barrier in health and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gellerich, F N; Trumbeckaite, S; Opalka, J R; Seppet, E; Rasmussen, H N; Neuhoff, C; Zierz, S

    2000-02-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane separates the intermembrane space from the cytosol. The whole exchange of metabolites, cations and information between mitochondria and the cell occurs through the outer membrane. Experimental evidence is reviewed supporting the hypothesis of dynamic ADP compartmentation within the intermembrane space. The outer membrane creates a diffusion barrier for small molecules (adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, creatine etc.) causing rate-dependent concentration gradients as a prerequisite for the action of ADP shuttles via creatine kinases or adenylate kinases. If the outer membrane becomes leaky, cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor can be released, leading to apoptosis, and as a bioenergetic consequence the cytosolic phosphorylation potential decreases. Leaky outer membranes can be detected in saponin-skinned fibres with spectrophotometric and oxygraphic methods. This is of special interest in respect to acute impairment of mitochondria during ischaemia/reperfusion.

  12. A novel motif in the yeast mitochondrial dynamin Dnm1 is essential for adaptor binding and membrane recruitment.

    PubMed

    Bui, Huyen T; Karren, Mary A; Bhar, Debjani; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-11-12

    To initiate mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) must bind specific adaptors on the outer mitochondrial membrane. The structural features underlying this interaction are poorly understood. Using yeast as a model, we show that the Insert B domain of the Dnm1 guanosine triphosphatase (a DRP) contains a novel motif required for association with the mitochondrial adaptor Mdv1. Mutation of this conserved motif specifically disrupted Dnm1-Mdv1 interactions, blocking Dnm1 recruitment and mitochondrial fission. Suppressor mutations in Mdv1 that restored Dnm1-Mdv1 interactions and fission identified potential protein-binding interfaces on the Mdv1 β-propeller domain. These results define the first known function for Insert B in DRP-adaptor interactions. Based on the variability of Insert B sequences and adaptor proteins, we propose that Insert B domains and mitochondrial adaptors have coevolved to meet the unique requirements for mitochondrial fission of different organisms.

  13. A novel motif in the yeast mitochondrial dynamin Dnm1 is essential for adaptor binding and membrane recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huyen T.; Karren, Mary A.; Bhar, Debjani

    2012-01-01

    To initiate mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) must bind specific adaptors on the outer mitochondrial membrane. The structural features underlying this interaction are poorly understood. Using yeast as a model, we show that the Insert B domain of the Dnm1 guanosine triphosphatase (a DRP) contains a novel motif required for association with the mitochondrial adaptor Mdv1. Mutation of this conserved motif specifically disrupted Dnm1–Mdv1 interactions, blocking Dnm1 recruitment and mitochondrial fission. Suppressor mutations in Mdv1 that restored Dnm1–Mdv1 interactions and fission identified potential protein-binding interfaces on the Mdv1 β-propeller domain. These results define the first known function for Insert B in DRP–adaptor interactions. Based on the variability of Insert B sequences and adaptor proteins, we propose that Insert B domains and mitochondrial adaptors have coevolved to meet the unique requirements for mitochondrial fission of different organisms. PMID:23148233

  14. Mitochondrial calcium homeostasis as potential target for mitochondrial medicine.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Carlotta; Agnoletto, Chiara; Bononi, Angela; Bonora, Massimo; De Marchi, Elena; Marchi, Saverio; Missiroli, Sonia; Patergnani, Simone; Poletti, Federica; Rimessi, Alessandro; Suski, Jan M; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pinton, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are crucial in different intracellular pathways of signal transduction. Mitochondria are capable of decoding a variety of extracellular stimuli into markedly different intracellular actions, ranging from energy production to cell death. The fine modulation of mitochondrial calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis plays a fundamental role in many of the processes involving this organelle. When mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis is compromised, different pathological conditions can occur, depending on the cell type involved. Recent data have shed light on the molecular identity of the main proteins involved in the handling of mitochondrial Ca(2+) traffic, opening fascinating and ambitious new avenues for mitochondria-based pharmacological strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Protective action of methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) on the mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Toninello, A; Siliprandi, D; Castagnini, P; Novello, M C; Siliprandi, N

    1988-09-15

    At low concentrations (0.5-1.0 mM) methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) exhibited a clearcut protection of rat liver mitochondria against the deenergizing action of either Ca2+, or oxidizing agents (butylhydroperoxide and oxaloacetate). Such a protection resulted from the prevention of transmembrane potential decay, discharge of accumulated Ca2+, release of mitochondrial Mg2+, adenine nucleotides and pyridine nucleotides and mitochondrial swelling. At high concentrations (5-10 mM) MGBG induced functional alterations of mitochondria (decrease of transmembrane potential, lower capability to accumulate and to retain Ca2+) which can be reversed by resuspension of mitochondria in a MGBG free medium. These reversible mitochondrial alterations by high MGBG concentrations are interpreted as a consequence of an aggregation and coprecipitation of suspended mitochondria.

  16. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players.

    PubMed

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca(2+) transients which are further transduced by Ca(2+) sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca(2+) signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca(2+) across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca(2+) signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca(2+) signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca(2+) concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca(2+) across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle.

  17. Calcium Flux across Plant Mitochondrial Membranes: Possible Molecular Players

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Checchetto, Vanessa; De Bortoli, Sara; Formentin, Elide; Costa, Alex; Szabó, Ildikó; Teardo, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, have evolved the ability to integrate external stimuli into metabolic and developmental signals. A wide variety of signals, including abiotic, biotic, and developmental stimuli, were observed to evoke specific spatio-temporal Ca2+ transients which are further transduced by Ca2+ sensor proteins into a transcriptional and metabolic response. Most of the research on Ca2+ signaling in plants has been focused on the transport mechanisms for Ca2+ across the plasma- and the vacuolar membranes as well as on the components involved in decoding of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, but how intracellular organelles such as mitochondria are involved in the process of Ca2+ signaling is just emerging. The combination of the molecular players and the elicitors of Ca2+ signaling in mitochondria together with newly generated detection systems for measuring organellar Ca2+ concentrations in plants has started to provide fruitful grounds for further discoveries. In the present review we give an updated overview of the currently identified/hypothesized pathways, such as voltage-dependent anion channels, homologs of the mammalian mitochondrial uniporter (MCU), LETM1, a plant glutamate receptor family member, adenine nucleotide/phosphate carriers and the permeability transition pore (PTP), that may contribute to the transport of Ca2+ across the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes in plants. We briefly discuss the relevance of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis for ensuring optimal bioenergetic performance of this organelle. PMID:27065186

  18. Photoaffinity labeling of uncoupler binding sites on mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kurup, C K; Sanadi, D R

    1977-02-01

    3H 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, a photoactive uncoupler, has been synthesized, and its uncoupling action on oxidative phosphorylation and its binding to the mitochondrial membrane have been studied. The uncoupler bound covalently to the mitochondrial membrane on photoirradiation was 3-4 times that bound reversibly in the absence of light. When irradiation was carried out in the presence of serum albumin, covalent binding was significantly depressed. The pattern of loss of ATP-Pi exchange activity with increasing amounts of the uncoupler suggests that serum albumin prevents the binding of the uncoupler to the functional sites as well. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity labeled submitochondrial particles in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate revealed that a 9000 dalton peptide bound high levels of uncoupler. Other proteins in the molecular weight range of 20,000-40,000 and 55,000 were also labeled. Photolysis in the presence of serum albumin or ATP decreased the covalent binding of the uncoupler to all the proteins, but particularly to the 20,000 dalton component. Soluble ATPase and the mitochondrial proteolipid purified from labeled mitochondria showed the presence of label.

  19. The hydrophobic proteome of mitochondrial membranes from Arabidopsis cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Brugière, Sabine; Kowalski, Solène; Ferro, Myriam; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné; Miras, Stéphane; Salvi, Daniel; Ravanel, Stéphane; d'Hérin, Pierre; Garin, Jérôme; Bourguignon, Jacques; Joyard, Jacques; Rolland, Norbert

    2004-06-01

    The development of mitochondria and the integration of their function within a plant cell rely on the presence of a complex biochemical machinery located within their limiting membranes. The aim of the present work was: (1) to enhance our understanding of the biochemical machinery of mitochondrial membranes and (2) to test the versatility of the procedure developed for the identification of the hydrophobic proteome of the chloroplast envelope [Molecular and Cellular Proteomics 2 (2003) 325-345]. A proteomic analysis was performed, to provide the most exhaustive view of the protein repertoire of these membranes. For this purpose, highly purified mitochondria were prepared from Arabidopsis cultured cells and membrane proteins were extracted. To get a more exhaustive array of membrane proteins from Arabidopsis mitochondria, from the most to the less hydrophobic ones, various extraction procedures (chloroform/methanol extraction, alkaline or saline treatments) were applied. LC-MS/MS analyses were then performed on each membrane subfraction, leading to the identification of more than 110 proteins. The identification of these proteins is discussed with respect to their mitochondrial localization, their physicochemical properties and their implications in the metabolism of mitochondria. In order to provide a new overview of the biochemical machinery of the plant mitochondria, proteins identified during this work were compared to the lists of proteins identified during previous proteomic analyses performed on plant and algae mitochondria (Arabidopsis, pea, Chlamydomonas, rice, etc.). A total of 502 proteins are listed. About 40% of the 114 proteins identified during this work were not identified during previous proteomic studies performed on mitochondria.

  20. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) induces apoptosis and necrosis mediated cell death through mitochondrial membrane potential damage and elevated production of reactive oxygen species in PLHC-1 fish cell line

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Cohenford, Menashi; Armistead, Mindy Yeager; Murray, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Several environmental pollutants, including metals can induce toxicological effect on aquatic animal species. Most studies to understand the toxicity of arsenic compounds were performed in mammalian cells; however, the study of the arsenic toxicity to the aquatic animals’ species, including fish, is limited. So the objective of this study was first to investigate the effects of As2O3 induced toxicity particularly on apoptosis and necrosis mediated cell death in fish cell PLHC-1 as compared to the mechanism of toxicity from known mammalian cell lines, secondly to relate in vitro effects in fish to those demonstrated by in vivo systems. To conduct this study, PLHC-1 cells were exposed to various concentrations of As2O3 (0–100μM) for 10, 20 and 40 h. The results indicate that As2O3 exposure promoted apoptotic and necrotic mediated cell death in a concentration and time dependent manner. Cell death (apoptotic and necrotic) induced by As2O3 was further confirmed by changes in various phases of cell cycle, DNA fragmentation (necro- comet and apo-comet) in the comet assay, alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Apoptotic mediated cell death was confirmed further by observing the increased caspase-3 activity and elevated expression of p53, cytochrome c and Bax proteins levels in the same experimental conditions. PLHC-1 cells were shown to be a good model for evaluating biochemical/cytotoxic effects following exposure to various reference chemicals and environmental contaminants. In vitro data obtained from this study provides a comprehensive approach for the elucidating the actual molecular mechanism for As2O3 induced toxicity particularly apoptosis and necrosis mediated cell death in PLHC-1 cell line. PMID:23121984

  1. Rows of ATP Synthase Dimers in Native Mitochondrial Inner Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Prima, Valerie; Sturgis, James N.; Scheuring, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The ATP synthase is a nanometric rotary machine that uses a transmembrane electrochemical gradient to form ATP. The structures of most components of the ATP synthase are known, and their organization has been elucidated. However, the supramolecular assembly of ATP synthases in biological membranes remains unknown. Here we show with submolecular resolution the organization of ATP synthases in the yeast mitochondrial inner membranes. The atomic force microscopy images we have obtained show how these molecules form dimers with characteristic 15 nm distance between the axes of their rotors through stereospecific interactions of the membrane embedded portions of their stators. A different interaction surface is responsible for the formation of rows of dimers. Such an organization elucidates the role of the ATP synthase in mitochondrial morphology. Some dimers have a different morphology with 10 nm stalk-to-stalk distance, in line with ATP synthases that are accessible to IF1 inhibition. Rotation torque compensation within ATP synthase dimers stabilizes the ATP synthase structure, in particular the stator-rotor interaction. PMID:17557793

  2. Astrocytic mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization following extended oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Korenić, Andrej; Boltze, Johannes; Deten, Alexander; Peters, Myriam; Andjus, Pavle; Radenović, Lidija

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m)) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extended OGD exposure. Here, we subjected primary mouse astrocytes to glucose deprivation (GD), OGD and combinations of both conditions varying in duration and sequence. Changes in Δψ(m), visualized by change in the fluorescence of JC-1, were investigated within one hour after reconstitution of oxygen and glucose supply, intended to model in vivo reperfusion. In all experiments, astrocytes showed resilience to extended periods of OGD, which had little effect on Δψ(m) during reperfusion, whereas GD caused a robust Δψ(m) negativation. In case no Δψ(m) negativation was observed after OGD, subsequent chemical oxygen deprivation (OD) induced by sodium azide caused depolarization, which, however, was significantly delayed as compared to normoxic group. When GD preceded OD for 12 h, Δψ(m) hyperpolarization was induced by both GD and subsequent OD, but significant interaction between these conditions was not detected. However, when GD was extended to 48 h preceding OGD, hyperpolarization enhanced during reperfusion. This implicates synergistic effects of both conditions in that sequence. These findings provide novel information regarding the role of the two main substrates of electron transport chain (glucose and oxygen) and their hyperpolarizing effect on Δψ(m) during substrate deprivation, thus shedding new light on mechanisms of astrocyte resilience to prolonged ischemic injury.

  3. A dimeric equilibrium intermediate nucleates Drp1 reassembly on mitochondrial membranes for fission.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Patrick J; Stepanyants, Natalia; Mehrotra, Niharika; Mears, Jason A; Qi, Xin; Sesaki, Hiromi; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2014-06-15

    The GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) catalyzes mitochondrial division, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Much of what is attributed to Drp1's mechanism of action in mitochondrial membrane fission parallels that of prototypical dynamin in endocytic vesicle scission. Unlike the case for dynamin, however, no lipid target for Drp1 activation at the mitochondria has been identified. In addition, the oligomerization properties of Drp1 have not been well established. We show that the mitochondria-specific lipid cardiolipin is a potent stimulator of Drp1 GTPase activity, as well as of membrane tubulation. We establish further that under physiological conditions, Drp1 coexists as two morphologically distinct polymeric species, one nucleotide bound in solution and the other membrane associated, which equilibrate via a dimeric assembly intermediate. With two mutations, C300A and C505A, that shift Drp1 polymerization equilibria in opposite directions, we demonstrate that dimers, and not multimers, potentiate the reassembly and reorganization of Drp1 for mitochondrial membrane remodeling both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Role of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system in membrane architecture and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rampelt, Heike; Zerbes, Ralf M; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    The elaborate membrane architecture of mitochondria is a prerequisite for efficient respiration and ATP generation. The cristae membranes, invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane, represent a specialized compartment that harbors the complexes of the respiratory chain and the F1Fo-ATP synthase. Crista junctions form narrow openings that connect the cristae membranes to the inner boundary membrane. The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is located at crista junctions where it stabilizes membrane curvature and forms contact sites between the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes. MICOS is a large machinery, consisting of two dynamic subcomplexes that are anchored in the inner membrane and expose domains to the intermembrane space. The functions of MICOS in mitochondrial membrane architecture and biogenesis are influenced by numerous interaction partners and the phospholipid environment.

  5. Phylogenetic Analysis of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane β-Barrel Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Jąkalski, Marcin; Pieńkowska, Joanna R.; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Weiner, January; Kmita, Hanna; Makałowski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Transport of molecules across mitochondrial outer membrane is pivotal for a proper function of mitochondria. The transport pathways across the membrane are formed by ion channels that participate in metabolite exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm (voltage-dependent anion-selective channel, VDAC) as well as in import of proteins encoded by nuclear genes (Tom40 and Sam50/Tob55). VDAC, Tom40, and Sam50/Tob55 are present in all eukaryotic organisms, encoded in the nuclear genome, and have β-barrel topology. We have compiled data sets of these protein sequences and studied their phylogenetic relationships with a special focus on the position of Amoebozoa. Additionally, we identified these protein-coding genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii and Dictyostelium discoideum to complement our data set and verify the phylogenetic position of these model organisms. Our analysis show that mitochondrial β-barrel channels from Archaeplastida (plants) and Opisthokonta (animals and fungi) experienced many duplication events that resulted in multiple paralogous isoforms and form well-defined monophyletic clades that match the current model of eukaryotic evolution. However, in representatives of Amoebozoa, Chromalveolata, and Excavata (former Protista), they do not form clearly distinguishable clades, although they locate basally to the plant and algae branches. In most cases, they do not posses paralogs and their sequences appear to have evolved quickly or degenerated. Consequently, the obtained phylogenies of mitochondrial outer membrane β-channels do not entirely reflect the recent eukaryotic classification system involving the six supergroups: Chromalveolata, Excavata, Archaeplastida, Rhizaria, Amoebozoa, and Opisthokonta. PMID:22155732

  6. Mitochondrial glycerol-3-P acyltransferase 1 is most active in outer mitochondrial membrane but not in mitochondrial associated vesicles (MAV).

    PubMed

    Pellon-Maison, Magalí; Montanaro, Mauro A; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gonzalez-Baró, María R

    2007-07-01

    Glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase-1 (GPAT1), catalyzes the committed step in phospholipid and triacylglycerol synthesis. Because both GPAT1 and carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 are located on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) it has been suggested that their reciprocal regulation controls acyl-CoA metabolism at the OMM. To determine whether GPAT1, like carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1, is enriched in both mitochondrial contact sites and OMM, and to correlate protein location and enzymatic function, we used Percoll and sucrose gradient fractionation of rat liver to obtain submitochondrial fractions. Most GPAT1 protein was present in a vesicular membrane fraction associated with mitochondria (MAV) but GPAT specific activity in this fraction was low. In contrast, highest GPAT1 specific activity was present in purified mitochondria. Contact sites from crude mitochondria, which contained markers for both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, also showed high expression of GPAT1 protein but low specific activity, whereas contact sites isolated from purified mitochondria lacked ER markers and expressed highly active GPAT1. To determine how GPAT1 is targeted to mitochondria, recombinant protein was synthesized in vitro and its incorporation into crude and purified mitochondria was assayed. GPAT1 was rapidly incorporated into mitochondria, but not into microsomes. Incorporation was ATP-driven, and lack of GPAT1 removal by alkali and a chaotropic agent showed that GPAT1 had become an integral membrane protein after incorporation. These results demonstrate that two pools of GPAT1 are present in rat liver mitochondria: an active one, located in OMM and a less active one, located in membranes (ER-contact sites and mitochondrial associated vesicles) associated with both mitochondria and ER.

  7. Role of the Transmembrane Potential in the Membrane Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Anne; Sokolenko, Elena A.; Beck, Valeri; Ninnemann, Olaf; Jaburek, Martin; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Klishin, Sergey S.; Jezek, Petr; Skulachev, Vladimir P.; Pohl, Elena E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The molecular mechanism responsible for the regulation of the mitochondrial membrane proton conductance (G) is not clearly understood. This study investigates the role of the transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) using planar membranes, reconstituted with purified uncoupling proteins (UCP1 and UCP2) and/or unsaturated FA. We show that high ΔΨm (similar to ΔΨm in mitochondrial State IV) significantly activates the protonophoric function of UCPs in the presence of FA. The proton conductance increases nonlinearly with ΔΨm. The application of ΔΨm up to 220 mV leads to the overriding of the protein inhibition at a constant ATP concentration. Both, the exposure of FA-containing bilayers to high ΔΨm and the increase of FA membrane concentration bring about the significant exponential Gm increase, implying the contribution of FA in proton leak. Quantitative analysis of the energy barrier for the transport of FA anions in the presence and absence of protein suggests that FA− remain exposed to membrane lipids while crossing the UCP-containing membrane. We believe this study shows that UCPs and FA decrease ΔΨm more effectively if it is sufficiently high. Thus, the tight regulation of proton conductance and/or FA concentration by ΔΨm may be key in mitochondrial respiration and metabolism. PMID:20409469

  8. Apricot Melanoidins Prevent Oxidative Endothelial Cell Death by Counteracting Mitochondrial Oxidation and Membrane Depolarization

    PubMed Central

    Giordo, Roberta; Emanueli, Costanza; Sanguinetti, Anna Maria; Piscopo, Amalia; Poiana, Marco; Capobianco, Giampiero; Piga, Antonio; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular benefits associated with diets rich in fruit and vegetables are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. However, whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed apricots were isolated and their presence confirmed by colorimetric analysis and browning index. Oxidative injury of endothelial cells (ECs) is the key step for the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), therefore the potential protective effect of apricot melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative mitochondrial damage and cell death was explored in human ECs. The redox state of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments was detected by using the redox-sensitive, fluorescent protein (roGFP), while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was assessed with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. ECs exposure to hydrogen peroxide, dose-dependently induced mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation. Additionally detected hydrogen peroxide-induced phenomena were MMP dissipation and ECs death. Pretreatment of ECs with apricot melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide-induced intracellular oxidation, mitochondrial depolarization and cell death. In this regard, our current results clearly indicate that melanoidins derived from heat-processed apricots, protect human ECs against oxidative stress. PMID:23144984

  9. Chemical synthesis of yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase membranous subunit 8.

    PubMed

    Goetz, M; Schmitter, J M; Geoffre, S; Dufourc, E J

    1999-06-01

    Chemical synthesis of highly hydrophobic peptides and proteins remains a challenging problem. Strong interchain associations within the peptide-resin matrix have to be overcome. A synthetic strategy for solid phase peptide synthesis is proposed, mainly based on prolonged coupling time using aprotic polar solvent mixtures. A tailored chromatographic purification was required to obtain a sample sufficiently pure for structural analysis. In this work, the total chemical synthesis of the membrane-embedded yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit 8 is described. The quality of the synthetic protein was checked by electrospray mass spectrometry, its tendency to adopt alpha-helical secondary structure is evidenced by circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  10. Neuroprotective and neurorestorative potential of propargylamine derivatives in ageing: focus on mitochondrial targets.

    PubMed

    Bar-Am, Orit; Amit, Tamar; Youdim, Moussa B; Weinreb, Orly

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial theory of ageing proposes that accumulation of damage to mitochondrial function and DNA mutation lead to ageing of humans and animals. It has been suggested that mitochondria play dynamic roles in regulating synaptogenesis and morphological/functional responses of synaptic activity, and thus, deteriorating of mitochondrial function (e.g., deficits of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, reduced calcium influx, increased accumulation of mitochondrial DNA defects/apoptotic proteins and impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential) can lead to severe neuronal energy deficit, and in the long run, to modifications in neuronal synapses and neurodegeneration in the ageing brain. Hence, considering the mechanisms by which mitochondrial impairment can lead to neuronal death, the development of neuroprotective molecules that target various mitochondrial pathogenic processes can be effective in the treatment of ageing and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. This review addresses several aspects of the neuroprotective effects of propargylamine derivatives (e.g., the monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors, selegiline and rasagiline and the multifunctional drugs, ladostigil, M30 and VAR10303) in ageing with a special focus on mitochondrial molecular protective mechanisms.

  11. The yeast dynamin-like protein, Mgm1p, functions on the mitochondrial outer membrane to mediate mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Shepard, K A; Yaffe, M P

    1999-02-22

    The mdm17 mutation causes temperature-dependent defects in mitochondrial inheritance, mitochondrial morphology, and the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Defects in mitochondrial transmission to daughter buds and changes in mitochondrial morphology were apparent within 30 min after shifting cells to 37 degrees C, while loss of the mitochondrial genome occurred after 4-24 h at the elevated temperature. The mdm17 lesion mapped to MGM1, a gene encoding a dynamin-like GTPase previously implicated in mitochondrial genome maintenance, and the cloned MGM1 gene complements all of the mdm17 mutant phenotypes. Cells with an mgm1-null mutation displayed aberrant mitochondrial inheritance and morphology. A version of mgm1 mutated in a conserved residue in the putative GTP-binding site was unable to complement any of the mutant defects. It also caused aberrant mitochondrial distribution and morphology when expressed at high levels in cells that also contained a wild-type copy of the gene. Mgm1p was localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane and fractionated as a component of a high molecular weight complex. These results indicate that Mgm1p is a mitochondrial inheritance and morphology component that functions on the mitochondrial surface.

  12. Association of active caspase 8 with the mitochondrial membrane during apoptosis: potential roles in cleaving BAP31 and caspase 3 and mediating mitochondrion-endoplasmic reticulum cross talk in etoposide-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Dhyan; Choy, Grace; Deng, Xiaodi; Bhatia, Bobby; Daniel, Peter; Tang, Dean G

    2004-08-01

    It was recently demonstrated that during apoptosis, active caspase 9 and caspase 3 rapidly accumulate in the mitochondrion-enriched membrane fraction (D. Chandra and D. G. Tang, J. Biol. Chem.278:17408-17420, 2003). We now show that active caspase 8 also becomes associated with the membranes in apoptosis caused by multiple stimuli. In MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells treated with etoposide (VP16), active caspase 8 is detected only in the membrane fraction, which contains both mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as revealed by fractionation studies. Immunofluorescence microscopy, however, shows that procaspase 8 and active caspase 8 predominantly colocalize with the mitochondria. Biochemical analysis demonstrates that both procaspase 8 and active caspase 8 are localized mainly on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) as integral proteins. Functional analyses with dominant-negative mutants, small interfering RNAs, peptide inhibitors, and Fas-associated death domain (FADD)- and caspase 8-deficient Jurkat T cells establish that the mitochondrion-localized active caspase 8 results mainly from the FADD-dependent and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated death domain-dependent mechanisms and that caspase 8 activation plays a causal role in VP16-induced caspase 3 activation and cell death. Finally, we present evidence that the OMM-localized active caspase 8 can activate cytosolic caspase 3 and ER-localized BAP31. Cleavage of BAP31 leads to the generation of ER- localized, proapoptotic BAP20, which may mediate mitochondrion-ER cross talk through a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism.

  13. Polyphenol-rich extract of Salvia chinensis exhibits anticancer activity in different cancer cell lines, and induces cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1-phase, apoptosis and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, QUAN; HUO, XUE-CHEN; SUN, FU-DONG; DONG, RUI-QIAN

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most aggressive types of human malignancy, which has an overall 5-year survival rate of <2%. PC is the fourth most common cause of cancer-associated mortality in the western world. At present, there is almost no effective treatment available for the treatment of PC. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer potential of a polyphenol enriched extract obtained from Salvia chinensis, a Chinese medicinal plant. An MTT assay was used to evaluate the cell viability of five cancer cell lines and one normal cell line. In addition, the effects of the extract on apoptotic induction, cell cycle phase distribution, DNA damage and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΛΨm) were evaluated in MiapaCa-2 human PC cells. The effects of the extract on cell cycle phase distribution and ΛΨm were assessed by flow cytometry, using propidium iodide and rhodamine-123 DNA-binding fluorescent dyes, respectively. Fluorescence microscopy, using 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole as a staining agent, was performed in order to detect the morphological changes of the MiapaCa-2 cancer cells and the presence of apoptotic bodies following treatment with the extract. The results of the present study demonstrated that the polyphenol-rich extract from S. chinensis induced potent cytotoxicity in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, A549 human lung cancer cells, HCT-116 and COLO 205 human colon cancer cells, and MiapaCa-2 human PC cells. The COLO 205 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines were the most susceptible to treatment with the extract, which exhibited increased rate of growth inhibition. Fluorescence microscopy revealed characteristic morphological features of apoptosis and detected the appearance of apoptotic bodies following treatment with the extract in the PC cells. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that the extract induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with the extract induced a significant and

  14. Bacterial tail anchors can target to the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Lutfullahoğlu-Bal, Güleycan; Keskin, Abdurrahman; Seferoğlu, Ayşe Bengisu; Dunn, Cory D

    2017-07-24

    During the generation and evolution of the eukaryotic cell, a proteobacterial endosymbiont was re-fashioned into the mitochondrion, an organelle that appears to have been present in the ancestor of all present-day eukaryotes. Mitochondria harbor proteomes derived from coding information located both inside and outside the organelle, and the rate-limiting step toward the formation of eukaryotic cells may have been development of an import apparatus allowing protein entry to mitochondria. Currently, a widely conserved translocon allows proteins to pass from the cytosol into mitochondria, but how proteins encoded outside of mitochondria were first directed to these organelles at the dawn of eukaryogenesis is not clear. Because several proteins targeted by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) appear to have the ability to insert spontaneously into the mitochondrial outer membrane (OM), it is possible that self-inserting, tail-anchored polypeptides obtained from bacteria might have formed the first gate allowing proteins to access mitochondria from the cytosol. Here, we tested whether bacterial TAs are capable of targeting to mitochondria. In a survey of proteins encoded by the proteobacterium Escherichia coli, predicted TA sequences were directed to specific subcellular locations within the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Importantly, TAs obtained from DUF883 family members ElaB and YqjD were abundantly localized to and inserted at the mitochondrial OM. Our results support the notion that eukaryotic cells are able to utilize membrane-targeting signals present in bacterial proteins obtained by lateral gene transfer, and our findings make plausible a model in which mitochondrial protein translocation was first driven by tail-anchored proteins. This article was reviewed by Michael Ryan and Thomas Simmen.

  15. Human MIEF1 recruits Drp1 to mitochondrial outer membranes and promotes mitochondrial fusion rather than fission.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Liu, Tong; Jin, Shaobo; Wang, Xinming; Qu, Mingqi; Uhlén, Per; Tomilin, Nikolay; Shupliakov, Oleg; Lendahl, Urban; Nistér, Monica

    2011-06-24

    Mitochondrial morphology is controlled by two opposing processes: fusion and fission. Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1) and hFis1 are two key players of mitochondrial fission, but how Drp1 is recruited to mitochondria and how Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission is regulated in mammals is poorly understood. Here, we identify the vertebrate-specific protein MIEF1 (mitochondrial elongation factor 1; independently identified as MiD51), which is anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Elevated MIEF1 levels induce extensive mitochondrial fusion, whereas depletion of MIEF1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation. MIEF1 interacts with and recruits Drp1 to mitochondria in a manner independent of hFis1, Mff (mitochondrial fission factor) and Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), but inhibits Drp1 activity, thus executing a negative effect on mitochondrial fission. MIEF1 also interacts with hFis1 and elevated hFis1 levels partially reverse the MIEF1-induced fusion phenotype. In addition to inhibiting Drp1, MIEF1 also actively promotes fusion, but in a manner distinct from mitofusins. In conclusion, our findings uncover a novel mechanism which controls the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery in vertebrates. As MIEF1 is vertebrate-specific, these data also reveal important differences between yeast and vertebrates in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics.

  16. Ion conductance pathways in potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Matkovic, Karolina; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2011-03-01

    Single-ion channel activities were measured after reconstitution of potato tuber mitochondrial inner membranes into planar lipid bilayers. In addition to the recently described large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel activity (Koszela-Piotrowska et al., 2009), the following mitochondrial ion conductance pathways were recorded: (i) an ATP-regulated potassium channel (mitoK(ATP) channel) activity with a conductance of 164+/-8pS, (ii) a large-conductance Ca(2+)-insensitive iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channel activity with a conductance of 312 pS+/-23, and (iii) a chloride 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-inhibited channel activity with a conductance of 117 pS+/-4. In isolated non-phosphorylating potato tuber mitochondria, individual and combined potassium channel activities caused significant (up to 14mV) but not collapsing K(+)-influx-induced membrane potential depolarisation. Under phosphorylating conditions, the coupling parameters were unchanged in the presence of high K(+) level, indicating that plant K(+) channels function as energy-dissipating systems that are not able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation. A potato tuber K(+) channel that is ATP-, 5-hydroxydecanonic acid-, glybenclamide-inhibited and diazoxide-stimulated caused low cation flux, modestly decreasing membrane potential (up to a few mV) and increasing respiration in non-phosphorylating mitochondria. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against the mammalian plasma membrane ATP-regulated K(+) channel identified a pore-forming subunit of the Kir-like family in potato tuber mitochondrial inner membrane. These results suggest that a mitoK(ATP) channel similar to that of mammalian mitochondria is present in potato tuber mitochondria. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lipidomics reveals mitochondrial membrane remodeling associated with acute thermoregulation in a rodent with a wide thermoneutral zone.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qian; Li, Min; Shi, Yao-Long; Liu, Huwei; Speakman, John R; Wang, De-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) have high physiological flexibility in response to acute temperature changes, and have the widest thermoneutral zone (TNZ, 26.5-38.9 °C) reported among small mammals. At the upper critical temperature (T(uc), 38.9 °C), body temperatures of gerbils were significantly increased (39-41 °C) while metabolic rates were maintained at the basal level. In contrast, below the lower critical temperature (T(lc), 26.5 °C), metabolism was elevated and body temperature stable. Rapid changes in mitochondrial membrane lipidome were hypothesized to play an important role during acute thermoregulation of gerbils. Taking advantage of a recent lipidomic technique, we examined changes in the membrane phospholipids environment and free fatty acids (FFA) production in mitochondria between 38 and 27 °C (in the TNZ), and between 27 and 16 °C (below the TNZ). At 38 °C, acute heat stress elicited distinct remodeling in mitochondrial membrane lipidome which related to a potential decrease in mitochondrial respiration and membrane fluidity compared to 27 °C. At 16 °C, a sharply decreased unsaturation index and increased chain lengths were detected in mitochondrial FFA production both in muscle and brown adipose tissue. Our results suggest that mitochondrial membrane lipid remodeling may stabilize membrane function and activity of respiration related membrane protein to maintain a stable metabolic rate at T(uc), and improve heat production by decomposing less fluid fatty acid conjugates of membrane lipids under acute cold exposure. These data therefore imply an important role of membrane remodeling during acute thermoregulation in a non-hibernating endotherm.

  18. Nox2 as a potential target of mitochondrial superoxide and its role in endothelial oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Nazarewicz, Rafal R.; Bikineyeva, Alfiya; Dikalov, Sergey I.

    2013-01-01

    Superoxide (O2·−) production by the NADPH oxidases is implicated in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. We have previously shown that activation of NADPH oxidases increases mitochondrial O2·− which is inhibited by the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (mitoKATP) inhibitor 5-hydroxydecanoic acid and that scavenging of mitochondrial or cytoplasmic O2·− inhibits hypertension. We hypothesized that mitoKATP-mediated mitochondrial O2·− potentiates cytoplasmic O2·− by stimulation of NADPH oxidases. In this work we studied Nox isoforms as a potential target of mitochondrial O2·−. We tested contribution of reverse electron transfer (RET) from complex II to complex I in mitochondrial O2·− production and NADPH oxidase activation in human aortic endothelial cells. Activation of mitoKATP with low dose of diazoxide (100 nM) decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester probe) and increased production of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic O2·− measured by site-specific probes and mitoSOX. Inhibition of RET with complex II inhibitor (malonate) or complex I inhibitor (rotenone) attenuated the production of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic O2·−. Supplementation with a mitochondria-targeted SOD mimetic (mitoTEMPO) or a mitochondria-targeted glutathione peroxidase mimetic (mitoEbselen) inhibited production of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic O2·−. Inhibition of Nox2 (gp91ds) or Nox2 depletion with small interfering RNA but not Nox1, Nox4, or Nox5 abolished diazoxide-induced O2·− production in the cytoplasm. Treatment of angiotensin II-infused mice with RET inhibitor dihydroethidium (malate) significantly reduced blood pressure. Our study suggests that mitoKATP-mediated mitochondrial O2·− stimulates cytoplasmic Nox2, contributing to the development of endothelial oxidative stress and hypertension. PMID:23955717

  19. Phosphorylated tau potentiates Aβ-induced mitochondrial damage in mature neurons.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; von Bernhardi, Rommy; Godoy, Juan A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Johnson, Gail V W

    2014-11-01

    Tau phosphorylated at the PHF-1 epitope (S396/S404) is likely involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms by which tau phosphorylated at these sites negatively impacts neuronal functions are still under scrutiny. Previously, we showed that expression of tau truncated at D421 enhances mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Aβ in cortical neurons. To extend these findings, we expressed tau pseudo-phosphorylated at S396/404 (T42EC) in mature and young cortical neurons and evaluated different aspects of mitochondrial function in response to Aβ. Expression of T42EC did not induce significant changes in mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial length, or mitochondrial transport, compared to GFP and full-length tau. However, T42EC expression enhanced Aβ-induced mitochondrial membrane potential loss and increased superoxide levels compared to what was observed in mature neurons expressing full-length tau. The same effect was observed in mature neurons that expressed both pseudo-phosphorylated and truncated tau when they were treated with Aβ. Interestingly, the mitochondrial failure induced by Aβ in mature neurons that expressed T42EC, was not observed in young neurons expressing T42EC. These novel findings suggest that phosphorylated tau (PHF-1 epitope) enhances Aβ-induced mitochondrial injury, which contributes to neuronal dysfunction and to the pathogenesis of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of charge screening and delocalization for lipophilic cation permeability of model and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Sukhanova, Evgenia I; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Seveina, Inna I; Ilyasova, Tatiana M; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2013-09-01

    The effects of the mitochondria-targeted lipophilic cation dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP, the charge is delocalized and screened by bulky hydrophobic residues) and those of lipophilic cations decyltriethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TEA and C16TMA, the charges are localized and screened by less bulky residues) on bilayer planar phospholipid membranes and tightly-coupled mitochondria from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica have been compared. In planar membranes, C12TPP was found to generate a diffusion potential as if it easily penetrates these membranes. In the presence of palmitate, C12TPP induced H(+) permeability like plastoquinonyl decyltriphenilphosphonium that facilitates transfer of fatty acid anions (Severin et al., PNAS, 2010, 107, 663-668). C12TPP was shown to stimulate State 4 respiration of mitochondria and caused a mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a half-maximal effect at 6μM. Besides, C12TPP profoundly potentiated the uncoupling effect of endogenous or added fatty acids. C10TEA and C16TMA inhibited State 4 respiration and decreased the membrane potential, though at much higher concentrations than C12TPP, and they did not promote the uncoupling action of fatty acids. These relationships were modeled by molecular dynamics. They can be explained by different membrane permeabilities for studied cations, which in turn are due to different availabilities of the positive charge in these cations to water dipoles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mitochondrial preconditioning: a potential neuroprotective strategy.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sónia C; Carvalho, Cristina; Cardoso, Susana; Santos, Renato X; Santos, Maria S; Oliveira, Catarina R; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A; Moreira, Paula I

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria have long been known as the powerhouse of the cell. However, these organelles are also pivotal players in neuronal cell death. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of chronic brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), and cerebral ischemic stroke. Data derived from morphologic, biochemical, and molecular genetic studies indicate that mitochondria constitute a convergence point for neurodegeneration. Conversely, mitochondria have also been implicated in the neuroprotective signaling processes of preconditioning. Despite the precise molecular mechanisms underlying preconditioning-induced brain tolerance are still unclear, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels activation have been shown to be involved in the preconditioning phenomenon. This review intends to discuss how mitochondrial malfunction contributes to the onset and progression of cerebral ischemic stroke and AD and PD, two major neurodegenerative disorders. The role of mitochondrial mechanisms involved in the preconditioning-mediated neuroprotective events will be also discussed. Mitochondrial targeted preconditioning may represent a promising therapeutic weapon to fight neurodegeneration.

  3. Bax oligomerization in mitochondrial membranes requires tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) and a mitochondrial protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roucou, Xavier; Montessuit, Sylvie; Antonsson, Bruno; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2002-01-01

    In response to various apoptotic stimuli, Bax, a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, is oligomerized and permeabilizes the mitochondrial outer membrane to apoptogenic factors, including cytochrome c. Bax oligomerization can also be induced by incubating isolated mitochondria containing endogenous Bax with recombinant tBid (caspase-8-cleaved Bid) in vitro. The mechanism by which Bax oligomerizes under these conditions is still unknown. To address this question, recombinant human full-length Bax was purified as a monomeric protein. Bax failed to oligomerize spontaneously in isolated mitochondria or in liposomes composed of either cardiolipin or lipids extracted from mitochondria. However, in the presence of tBid, the protein formed large complexes in mitochondrial membranes and induced the release of cytochrome c. tBid also induced Bax oligomerization in isolated mitochondrial outer membranes, but not in other membranes, such as plasma membranes or microsomes. Moreover, tBid-induced Bax oligomerization was inhibited when mitochondria were pretreated with protease K. The presence of the voltage-dependent anion channel was not required either for Bax oligomerization or for Bax-induced cytochrome c release. Finally, Bax oligomerization was reconstituted in proteoliposomes made from mitochondrial membrane proteins. These findings imply that tBid is necessary but not sufficient for Bax oligomerization; a mitochondrial protein is also required. PMID:12193163

  4. Cristae remodeling causes acidification detected by integrated graphene sensor during mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ted D.; Pham, Phi Q.; Li, Jinfeng; Letai, Anthony G.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic apoptotic pathway and the resultant mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) via BAK and BAX oligomerization, cytochrome c (cytc) release, and caspase activation are well studied, but their effect on cytosolic pH is poorly understood. Using isolated mitochondria, we show that MOMP results in acidification of the surrounding medium. BAK conformational changes associated with MOMP activate the OMA1 protease to cleave OPA1 resulting in remodeling of the cristae and release of the highly concentrated protons within the cristae invaginations. This was revealed by utilizing a nanomaterial graphene as an optically clear and ultrasensitive pH sensor that can measure ionic changes induced by tethered mitochondria. With this platform, we have found that activation of mitochondrial apoptosis is accompanied by a gradual drop in extra-mitochondrial pH and a decline in membrane potential, both of which can be rescued by adding exogenous cytc. These findings have importance for potential pharmacological manipulation of apoptosis, in the treatment of cancer. PMID:27786282

  5. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    activate the apoptotic machinery in neural cells. Toxicity occurs through a mitochondrial-dependent pathway, which in part involves opening of the permeability transition pore. Furthermore, membrane permeabilization is required for cytochrome c release from mitochondria and can be prevented by UDC or TUDC. These data suggest that the mitochondria is a pharmacological target for cytoprotection during unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and neurodegenerative disorders, and that UDC or TUDC may be potential therapeutic agents. PMID:11147571

  6. Interaction of fullerene nanoparticles with biomembranes: from the partition in lipid membranes to effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra M; Dinis, Augusto M; Peixoto, Francisco; Ferreira, Lino; Jurado, Amália S; Videira, Romeu A

    2014-03-01

    Partition and localization of C60 and its derivative C60(OH)18-22 in lipid membranes and their impact on mitochondrial activity were studied, attempting to correlate those events with fullerene characteristics (size, surface chemistry, and surface charge). Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that C60(OH)18-22 preferentially populated the outer regions of the bilayer, whereas C60 preferred to localize in deeper regions of the bilayer. Partition coefficient values indicated that C60 exhibited higher affinity for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and mitochondrial membranes than C60(OH)18-22. Both fullerenes affected the mitochondrial function, but the inhibitory effects promoted by C60 were more pronounced than those induced by C60(OH)18-22 (up to 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein). State 3 and p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-uncoupled respirations are inhibited by both fullerenes when glutamate/malate or succinate was used as substrate. Phosphorylation system and electron transport chain of mitochondria are affected by both fullerenes, but only C60 increased the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability to protons, suggesting perturbations in the structure and dynamics of that membrane. At concentrations of C60(OH)18-22 above 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, the activity of FoF1-ATP synthase was also decreased. The evaluation of transmembrane potential showed that the mitochondria phosphorylation cycle decreased upon adenosine diphosphate addition with increasing fullerenes concentration and the time of the repolarization phase increased as a function of C60(OH)18-22 concentration. Our results suggest that the balance between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity resulting from the surface chemistry of fullerene nanoparticles, rather than the cluster size or the surface charge acquired by fullerenes in water, influences their membrane interactions and consequently their effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  7. Mitoguardin-1 and -2 promote maturation and the developmental potential of mouse oocytes by maintaining mitochondrial dynamics and functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Man; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Ji, Shu-Yan; Li, Bo-Tai; Tian, Xuejun; Li, Dali; Tong, Chao; Fan, Heng-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics change mitochondrial morphological features and numbers as a part of adaptive cellular metabolism, which is vital for most eukaryotic cells and organisms. A disease or even death of an animal can occur if these dynamics are disrupted. Using large-scale genetic screening in fruit flies, we previously found the gene mitoguardin (Miga), which encodes a mitochondrial outer-membrane protein and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Knockout mouse strains were generated for the mammalian Miga homologs Miga1 and Miga2. Miga1/2−/− females show greatly reduced quality of oocytes and early embryos and are subfertile. Mitochondria became clustered in the cytoplasm of oocytes from the germinal-vesicle stage to meiosis II; production of reactive oxygen species increased in mitochondria and caused damage to mitochondrial ultrastructures. Additionally, reduced ATP production, a decreased mitochondrial-DNA copy number, and lower mitochondrial membrane potential were detected in Miga1/2−/− oocytes during meiotic maturation. These changes resulted in low rates of polar-body extrusion during oocyte maturation, reduced developmental potential of the resulting early embryos, and consequently female subfertility. We provide direct evidence that MIGA1/2-regulated mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for mitochondrial functions, ensure oocyte maturation, and maintain the developmental potential. PMID:26716412

  8. Fluorescent probe environment and the structural and charge changes in energy coupling of mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Chance, B

    1970-10-01

    The use of fluorescent probes to give continuous readouts of the structural states of mitochondrial membranes during energy coupling seems a logical extension of their use in the study of protein structural changes. A clear correlation of the probes' fluorescence characteristics with the acquisition of energy coupling can be demonstrated in fragmented and natural membrane using 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) and ethidium bromide respectively. The present contribution attempts to bring together contemporary viewpoints of this and other laboratories and the recent experimental data and give some detailed information on probe environment and on the structural or charge changes occurring upon energization. The energy-dependent region of the membrane is located at an aqueous interface between an outer layer of proteins (presumably cytochromes) and the membrane permeability barrier; the aromatic portion of ANS appears to be located in the lipid phase and the sulfonic acid group in the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is probably a structured water region near paramagnetic membrane components such as cytochrome. Membrane energization arising from altered redox potential changes of cytochromes (b(T)) is communicated to the water structure through altered structural states of the hemoproteins, causing a decreased volume of the structured water region and increased interaction with the paramagnetic components in the energized state. Attendant alterations of protonic equilibria of membrane components induce both local and transmembrane changes in charge distribution, with consequent movements of ions, including the probe molecules themselves.

  9. Polyphenols protect mitochondrial membrane against permeabilization induced by HEWL oligomers: Possible mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Roqanian, Shaqayeq; Meratan, Ali Akbar; Ahmadian, Shahin; Shafizadeh, Mahshid; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Karami, Leila

    2017-10-01

    Increasing body of evidence suggests that polyphenols frequently interacting with amyloid aggregates and/or interfering with aggregate species to bind biomembranes may serve as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of amyloid-related diseases. Hence, in the present study, the possible effects of three naturally occurring polyphenols including Curcumin, Quercetin, and Resveratrol on mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) oligomers were investigated. Our results indicated that pre-incubation of mitochondrial homogenate with polyphenols considerably inhibit membrane permeabilization in a concentration dependent manner. In parallel, HEWL oligomers, which were co-incubated with the polyphenols, showed less effectiveness on membrane permeabilization, suggesting that toxicity of oligomers was hindered. Using a range of techniques including fluorescence quenching, Nile red binding assay, zeta potential and size measurements, CD (far- and near-UV) spectroscopy, and molecular docking, we found that the polyphenols, structure-dependently, interact with and induce conformational changes in HEWL oligomers, thereby inhibit their toxicity. We proposed a mechanism by which selected polyphenols induce their protective effects through binding to mitochondria and interfering with HEWL oligomer-membrane interactions and/or by direct interaction with HEWL oligomers, induction of conformational changes, and generating far less toxic species. However, additional studies are needed to elucidate the detailed mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethanol reduces mitochondrial membrane integrity and thereby impacts carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Na-Rae; Woo, Ji-Min; Choi, Wonja; Zimmermann, Martin; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    2012-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent ethanol producer, but is rather sensitive to high concentration of ethanol. Here, influences of ethanol on cellular membrane integrity and carbon metabolism of S. cerevisiae were investigated to rationalize mechanism involved in ethanol toxicity. Addition of 5% (v/v) ethanol did neither significantly change the permeability of the cytoplasmic membrane of the reference strain S. cerevisiae BY4741 nor of the ethanol-tolerant strain iETS3. However, the addition of ethanol resulted in a marked decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential and in increased concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The carbon flux was redistributed under these conditions from mainly ethanol production to the TCA cycle. This redistribution was possibly a result of increased energy demand for cell maintenance that increased from about zero to 20-40 mmol ATP (g(CDW)  h)(-1) . This increase in maintenance energy might be explained by the ethanol-induced reduction of the proton motive force and the required removal of ROS. Thus, the stability of the mitochondrial membrane and subsequently the capacity to keep ROS levels low could be important factors to improve tolerance of S. cerevisiae against ethanol. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ceramide forms channels in mitochondrial outer membranes at physiologically relevant concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Siskind, Leah J.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Colombini, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the ability of ceramides to induce apoptosis is due to a direct action on mitochondria. Mitochondria are known to contain enzymes responsible for ceramide synthesis and hydrolysis and mitochondrial ceramide levels have been shown to be elevated prior to the mitochondrial phase of apoptosis. Ceramides have been reported to induce the release of intermembrane space proteins from mitochondria, which has been linked to their ability to form large channels in membranes. The aim of this study was to determine if the membrane concentration of ceramide required for the formation of protein permeable channels is within the range that is present in mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. Only a very small percentage of the ceramide actually inserts into the mitochondrial membranes. The permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane correlates directly with the level of ceramide in the membrane. Importantly, the concentration of ceramide at which significant channel formation occurs is consistent with the level of mitochondrial ceramide that occurs during the induction phase of apoptosis (4 pmol ceramide/nanomole phospholipid). Similar results were obtained with short- and long-chain ceramide. Ceramide channel formation is specific to mitochondrial membranes in that no channel formation occurs in the plasma membranes of erythrocytes even at concentrations 20 times higher than those required for channel formation in mitochondrial outer membranes. Thus, ceramide channels are good candidates for the pathway by which proapoptotic proteins are released from mitochondria during the induction phase of apoptosis. PMID:16713754

  12. Sodium/proton antiporters in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Garlid, K D

    1988-01-01

    The two mitochondrial Na+/H+ antiporters differ in several important respects, and the most physiologically significant of these may be their differences in regulation. The Mg2+-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter controls mitochondrial volume in a dangerous, high-K+ environment. To play this vital role, this porter must always lie poised far from K+/H+ equilibrium; i.e., it must be under dynamic regulation, as proposed in the Mg2+ carrier-brake hypothesis (7). Being regulated, it is not necessary for this antiporter to be cation-selective, since all electroneutral cation movements will be followed by redistributions of anions and water. On the other hand, there is no indication at present that the Mg2+-independent Na+/H+ antiporter is regulated. This transporter is therefore required to exhibit high discrimination against K+ in order to prevent the collapse of matrix volume dueto uncontrolled loss of K+ salts and water (4). Do the properties of the mitochondrial Na+/H+ antiporters help us in any way to understand the plasmalemmal Na+/H+ antiporters? I believe they do, if we allow that there are a limited number of ways in which nature constructs such porters. The difference in cation selectivities very likely reflects a fundamental structural difference between the two mitochondrial antiporters, and this difference appears to be mirrored in two types of plasmalemmal Na+/H+ antiporters. Thus, the Mg2+-independent Na+/H+ antiporter resembles the renal tubular Na+/H+ antiporter in its discrimination against K+ and its competitive inhibition by Li+. On the other hand, the Mg2+-dependent Na+/H+ antiporter resembles a cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ antiporter which transports all alkali cations, including Na+ and K+, and which is inhibited by DCCD and amphiphilic amines (S. Kakar, A. Askari and K. Garlid, in preparation). The existence of the latter class of antiporter in plasmalemma may seem unlikely at first glance, since it would tend to catalyze Na+/K+ exchange and dissipate

  13. Deoxycholic acid modulates cell death signaling through changes in mitochondrial membrane properties[S

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tânia; Castro, Rui E.; Pinto, Sandra N.; Coutinho, Ana; Lucas, Susana D.; Moreira, Rui; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA), are responsible for hepatocyte cell death during intrahepatic cholestasis. The mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear, and recent studies conflict, pointing to either a modulation of plasma membrane structure or mitochondrial-mediated toxicity through perturbation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) properties. We conducted a comprehensive comparative study of the impact of cytotoxic and cytoprotective bile acids on the membrane structure of different cellular compartments. We show that DCA increases the plasma membrane fluidity of hepatocytes to a minor extent, and that this effect is not correlated with the incidence of apoptosis. Additionally, plasma membrane fluidity recovers to normal values over time suggesting the presence of cellular compensatory mechanisms for this perturbation. Colocalization experiments in living cells confirmed the presence of bile acids within mitochondrial membranes. Experiments with active isolated mitochondria revealed that physiologically active concentrations of DCA change MOM order in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and that these changes preceded the mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, these effects are not observed on liposomes mimicking MOM lipid composition, suggesting that DCA apoptotic activity depends on features of mitochondrial membranes that are absent in protein-free mimetic liposomes, such as the double-membrane structure, lipid asymmetry, or mitochondrial protein environment. In contrast, the mechanism of action of cytoprotective bile acids is likely not associated with changes in cellular membrane structure. PMID:26351365

  14. Critical roles of Rho-associated kinase in membrane blebbing and mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis caused by 1-butanol.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Nara, Akina; Kato, Chizuru; Uemura, Koichi

    2012-09-01

    Alcohols are widely used as industrial solvents and chemical intermediates but can cause serious damage to human health. Nevertheless, few studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity of industrial alcohols, with the notable exception of ethanol. The goal of our current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytotoxicity caused by primary alcohols containing longer carbon chains than ethanol. We find that 1-butanol induces morphological changes in H9c2 cardiomyoblastoma including nuclear condensation and membrane blebbing, both of which are features of apoptotic response. Moreover, a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, the cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase 9 and 3 was observed, thus revealing the activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by 1-butanol. The addition of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), suppressed the membrane blebbing and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In comparison z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, did not inhibit membrane blebbing but did prevent cell death following exposure to 1-butanol. These results indicate that mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis and membrane blebbing are parallel phenomena that occur downstream of ROCK. This kinase thus plays an essential role in 1-butanol cytotoxicity and subsequent cell death in H9c2 cells.

  15. Human Mitochondrial DNA-Protein Complexes Attach to a Cholesterol-Rich Membrane Structure

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Joachim M.; Cansiz-Arda, Şirin; Lõhmus, Madis; Engberg, Oskar; Reyes, Aurelio; van Rennes, Helga; Sanz, Alberto; Holt, Ian J.; Cooper, Helen M.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    The helicase Twinkle is indispensable for mtDNA replication in nucleoids. Previously, we showed that Twinkle is tightly membrane-associated even in the absence of mtDNA, which suggests that Twinkle is part of a membrane-attached replication platform. Here we show that this platform is a cholesterol-rich membrane structure. We fractionated mitochondrial membrane preparations on flotation gradients and show that membrane-associated nucleoids accumulate at the top of the gradient. This fraction was shown to be highly enriched in cholesterol, a lipid that is otherwise low abundant in mitochondria. In contrast, more common mitochondrial lipids, and abundant inner-membrane associated proteins concentrated in the bottom-half of these gradients. Gene silencing of ATAD3, a protein with proposed functions related to nucleoid and mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis, modified the distribution of cholesterol and nucleoids in the gradient in an identical fashion. Both cholesterol and ATAD3 were previously shown to be enriched in ER-mitochondrial junctions, and we detect nucleoid components in biochemical isolates of these structures. Our data suggest an uncommon membrane composition that accommodates platforms for replicating mtDNA, and reconcile apparently disparate functions of ATAD3. We suggest that mtDNA replication platforms are organized in connection with ER-mitochondrial junctions, facilitated by a specialized membrane architecture involving mitochondrial cholesterol. PMID:26478270

  16. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    PubMed

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, <0.9). For the first time, we have demonstrated that mitochondrial MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

  17. Direct Membrane Association Drives Mitochondrial Fission by the Parkinson Disease-associated Protein α-Synuclein*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ken; Nemani, Venu M.; Azarbal, Farnaz; Skibinski, Gaia; Levy, Jon M.; Egami, Kiyoshi; Munishkina, Larissa; Zhang, Jue; Gardner, Brooke; Wakabayashi, Junko; Sesaki, Hiromi; Cheng, Yifan; Finkbeiner, Steven; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Masliah, Eliezer; Edwards, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The protein α-synuclein has a central role in Parkinson disease, but the mechanism by which it contributes to neural degeneration remains unknown. We now show that the expression of α-synuclein in mammalian cells, including neurons in vitro and in vivo, causes the fragmentation of mitochondria. The effect is specific for synuclein, with more fragmentation by α- than β- or γ-isoforms, and it is not accompanied by changes in the morphology of other organelles or in mitochondrial membrane potential. However, mitochondrial fragmentation is eventually followed by a decline in respiration and neuronal death. The fragmentation does not require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and involves a direct interaction of synuclein with mitochondrial membranes. In vitro, synuclein fragments artificial membranes containing the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin, and this effect is specific for the small oligomeric forms of synuclein. α-Synuclein thus exerts a primary and direct effect on the morphology of an organelle long implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:21489994

  18. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  19. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  20. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13943.001 PMID:27097106

  1. VDAC electronics: 2. A new, anaerobic mechanism of generation of the membrane potentials in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial hexokinase (HK) and creatine kinase (CK) known to form complexes with a voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) have been reported to increase cell death resistance under hypoxia/anoxia. In this work we propose a new, non-Mitchell mechanism of generation of the inner and outer membrane potentials at anaerobic conditions. The driving force is provided by the Gibbs free energy of the HK and CK reactions associated with the VDAC-HK and the ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator)-CK-VDAC complexes, respectively, both functioning as voltage generators. In the absence of oxygen, the cytosolic creatine phosphate can be directly used by the ANT-CK-VDAC contact sites to produce ATP from ADP in the mitochondrial matrix. After that, ATP released through the fraction of unbound ANTs in exchange for ADP is used in the mitochondrial intermembrane space by the outer membrane VDAC-HK electrogenic complexes to convert cytosolic glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. A simple computational model based on the application of Ohm's law to an equivalent electrical circuit showed a possibility of generation of the inner membrane potential up to -160mV, under certain conditions, and of relatively high outer membrane potential without wasting of ATP that normally leads to cell death. The calculated membrane potentials depended on the restriction of ATP/ADP diffusion in narrow cristae and through the cristae junctions. We suggest that high inner membrane potential and calcium extrusion from the mitochondrial intermembrane space by generated positive outer membrane potential prevent mitochondrial permeability transition, thus allowing the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and cell survival in the absence of oxygen.

  2. Yeast mitochondrial fission proteins induce antagonistic Gaussian membrane curvatures to regulate apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Michelle; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Schmidt, Nathan; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondria form a dynamic and interconnected network, which disintegrates during apoptosis to generate numerous smaller mitochondrial fragments. This process is at present not well understood. Yeast mitochondrial fission machinery proteins, Dnm1 and Fis1, are believed to regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Yeast Dnm1 has been previously shown to promote mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation characteristic of apoptotic cells, while yeast Fis1 inhibits cell death by limiting the mitochondrial fission induced by Dnm1 [Fannjiang et al, Genes & Dev. 2004. 18: 2785-2797]. To better understand the mechanisms of these antagonistic fission proteins, we use synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate their interaction with model cell membranes. The relationship between each protein, Dnm1 and Fis1, and protein-induced changes in membrane curvature and topology is examined. Through the comparison of the membrane rearrangement and phase behavior induced by each protein, we will discuss their respective roles in the regulation of mitochondrial fission.

  3. Targeting Membrane Lipid a Potential Cancer Cure?

    PubMed

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Wai-Leng; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer mortality and morbidity is projected to increase significantly over the next few decades. Current chemotherapeutic strategies have significant limitations, and there is great interest in seeking novel therapies which are capable of specifically targeting cancer cells. Given that fundamental differences exist between the cellular membranes of healthy cells and tumor cells, novel therapies based on targeting membrane lipids in cancer cells is a promising approach that deserves attention in the field of anticancer drug development. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a lipid membrane component which exists only in the inner leaflet of cell membrane under normal circumstances, has increased surface representation on the outer membrane of tumor cells with disrupted membrane asymmetry. PE thus represents a potential chemotherapeutic target as the higher exposure of PE on the membrane surface of cancer cells. This feature as well as a high degree of expression of PE on endothelial cells in tumor vasculature, makes PE an attractive molecular target for future cancer interventions. There have already been several small molecules and membrane-active peptides identified which bind specifically to the PE molecules on the cancer cell membrane, subsequently inducing membrane disruption leading to cell lysis. This approach opens up a new front in the battle against cancer, and is of particular interest as it may be a strategy that may be prove effective against tumors that respond poorly to current chemotherapeutic agents. We aim to highlight the evidence suggesting that PE is a strong candidate to be explored as a potential molecular target for membrane targeted novel anticancer therapy.

  4. Prooxidants open both the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and a low-conductance channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Kushnareva, Y E; Sokolove, P M

    2000-04-15

    Mitochondria can be induced by a variety of agents/conditions to undergo a permeability transition (MPT), which nonselectively increases the permeability of the inner membrane (i.m.) to small (<1500 Da) solutes. Prooxidants are generally considered to trigger the MPT, but some investigators suggest instead that prooxidants open a Ca(2+)-selective channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane and that the opening of this channel, when coupled with Ca(2+) cycling mediated by the Ca(2+) uniporter, leads ultimately to the observed increase in mitochondrial permeability [see, e.g., Schlegel et al. (1992) Biochem. J. 285, 65]. S. A. Novgorodov and T. I. Gudz [J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. (1996) 28, 139] propose that the i.m. contains a pore that, upon exposure to prooxidants, can open to two states, one of which conducts only H(+) and one of which is the classic MPT pore. Given the current interest in increased mitochondrial permeability as a factor in apoptotic cell death, it is important to determine whether i.m. permeability is regulated in one or multiple ways and, in the latter event, to characterize each regulatory mechanism in detail. This study examined the effects of the prooxidants diamide and t-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) on the permeability of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Under the experimental conditions used, t-BuOOH induced mitochondrial swelling only in the presence of exogenous Ca(2+) (>2 microM), whereas diamide was effective in its absence. In the absence of exogenous inorganic phosphate (P(i)), (1) both prooxidants caused a collapse of the membrane potential (DeltaPsi) that preceded the onset of mitochondrial swelling; (2) cyclosporin A eliminated the swelling induced by diamide and dramatically slowed that elicited by t-BuOOH, without altering prooxidant-induced depolarization; (3) collapse of DeltaPsi was associated with Ca(2+) efflux but not with efflux of glutathione; (4) neither Ca(2+) efflux nor DeltaPsi collapse was sensitive to ruthenium red; (5

  5. Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent protein degradation and rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kishi, Chieko; Ishihara, Naotada; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-06-03

    Upon mitochondrial depolarization, Parkin, a Parkinson disease-related E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates from the cytosol to mitochondria and promotes their degradation by mitophagy, a selective type of autophagy. Here, we report that in addition to mitophagy, Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom40, Tom70, and Omp25 of depolarized mitochondria. By contrast, degradation of the inner membrane and matrix proteins largely depends on mitophagy. Furthermore, Parkin induces rupture of the outer membrane of depolarized mitochondria, which also depends on proteasomal activity. Upon induction of mitochondrial depolarization, proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria in the perinuclear region. Neither proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins nor outer membrane rupture is required for mitophagy. These results suggest that Parkin regulates degradation of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane proteins differently through proteasome- and mitophagy-dependent pathways.

  6. Cytochrome c oxidase is regulated by modulations in protein expression and mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition in estivating African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Frick, N T; Bystriansky, J S; Ip, Y K; Chew, S F; Ballantyne, J S

    2010-03-01

    We examined some of the potential mechanisms lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) use to regulate cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), during metabolic depression. CCO activity was reduced by 67% in isolated liver mitochondria of estivating fish. This was likely accomplished, in part, by the 46% reduction in CCO subunit I protein expression in the liver. No change in the mRNA expression levels of CCO subunits I, II, III, and IV were found in the liver, suggesting CCO is under translational regulation; however, in the kidney, messenger limitation may be a factor as the expression of subunits I and II were depressed ( approximately 10-fold) during estivation, suggesting tissue-specific mechanisms of regulation. CCO is influenced by mitochondrial membrane phospholipids, particularly cardiolipin (CL). In P. dolloi, the phospholipid composition of the liver mitochondrial membrane changed during estivation, with a approximately 2.3-fold reduction in the amount of CL. Significant positive correlations were found between CCO activity and the amount of CL and phosphatidylethanolamine within the mitochondrial membrane. It appears CCO activity is regulated through multiple mechanisms in P. dolloi, and individual subunits of CCO are regulated independently, and in a tissue-specific manner. It is proposed that altering the amount of CL within the mitochondrial membrane may be a means of regulating CCO activity during metabolical depression in the African lungfish, P. dolloi.

  7. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  8. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  9. Identification of a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that does not depolarize the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kenwood, Brandon M; Weaver, Janelle L; Bajwa, Amandeep; Poon, Ivan K; Byrne, Frances L; Murrow, Beverley A; Calderone, Joseph A; Huang, Liping; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Tomsig, Jose L; Okabe, Kohki; Lo, Ryan H; Cameron Coleman, G; Columbus, Linda; Yan, Zhen; Saucerman, Jeffrey J; Smith, Jeffrey S; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Lynch, Kevin R; Ravichandran, Kodi S; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Santos, Webster L; Rogers, George W; Okusa, Mark D; Bayliss, Douglas A; Hoehn, Kyle L

    2014-04-01

    Dysregulation of oxidative phosphorylation is associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and some of the most prevalent human diseases including obesity, cancer, diabetes, neurodegeneration, and heart disease. Chemical 'mitochondrial uncouplers' are lipophilic weak acids that transport protons into the mitochondrial matrix via a pathway that is independent of ATP synthase, thereby uncoupling nutrient oxidation from ATP production. Mitochondrial uncouplers also lessen the proton motive force across the mitochondrial inner membrane and thereby increase the rate of mitochondrial respiration while decreasing production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mitochondrial uncouplers are valuable chemical tools that enable the measurement of maximal mitochondrial respiration and they have been used therapeutically to decrease mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. However, the most widely used protonophore uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and 2,4-dinitrophenol have off-target activity at other membranes that lead to a range of undesired effects including plasma membrane depolarization, mitochondrial inhibition, and cytotoxicity. These unwanted properties interfere with the measurement of mitochondrial function and result in a narrow therapeutic index that limits their usefulness in the clinic. To identify new mitochondrial uncouplers that lack off-target activity at the plasma membrane we screened a small molecule chemical library. Herein we report the identification and validation of a novel mitochondrial protonophore uncoupler (2-fluorophenyl){6-[(2-fluorophenyl)amino](1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-e]pyrazin-5-yl)}amine, named BAM15, that does not depolarize the plasma membrane. Compared to FCCP, an uncoupler of equal potency, BAM15 treatment of cultured cells stimulates a higher maximum rate of mitochondrial respiration and is less cytotoxic. Furthermore, BAM15 is bioactive in vivo and dose

  10. Modeling the membrane potential generation of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Oppawsky, Christoph; Tittor, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The archaeon Halobacterium salinarum can grow phototrophically with only light as its energy source. It uses the retinal containing and light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin to enhance the membrane potential which drives the ATP synthase. Therefore, a model of the membrane potential generation of bacteriorhodopsin is of central importance to the development of a mathematical model of the bioenergetics of H. salinarum. To measure the current produced by bacteriorhodopsin at different light intensities and clamped voltages, we expressed the gene in Xenopus laevis oocytes. We present current-voltage measurements and a mathematical model of the current-voltage relationship of bacteriorhodopsin and its generation of the membrane potential. The model consists of three intermediate states, the BR, L, and M states, and comparisons between model predictions and experimental data show that the L to M reaction must be inhibited by the membrane potential. The model is not able to fit the current-voltage measurements when only the M to BR phase is membrane potential dependent, while it is able to do so when either only the L to M reaction or both reactions (L to M and M to BR) are membrane potential dependent. We also show that a decay term is necessary for modeling the rate of change of the membrane potential. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CO2 and HCO3- Permeability of the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Arias-Hidalgo, Mariela; Hegermann, Jan; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Across the mitochondrial membrane an exceptionally intense exchange of O2 and CO2 occurs. We have asked, 1) whether the CO2 permeability, PM,CO2, of this membrane is also exceptionally high, and 2) whether the mitochondrial membrane is sufficiently permeable to HCO3- to make passage of this ion an alternative pathway for exit of metabolically produced CO2. The two permeabilities were measured using the previously published mass spectrometric 18O exchange technique to study suspensions of mitochondria freshly isolated from rat livers. The mitochondria were functionally and morphologically in excellent condition. The intramitochondrial CA activity was exclusively localized in the matrix. PM,CO2 of the inner mitochondrial membrane was 0.33 (SD ± 0.03) cm/s, which is the highest value reported for any biological membrane, even two times higher than PM,CO2 of the red cell membrane. PM,HCO3- was 2· 10-6 (SD ± 2· 10-6) cm/s and thus extremely low, almost 3 orders of magnitude lower than PM,HCO3- of the red cell membrane. The inner mitochondrial membrane is almost impermeable to HCO3- but extremely permeable to CO2. Since gas channels are absent, this membrane constitutes a unique example of a membrane of very high gas permeability due to its extremely low content of cholesterol. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Mitochondrial metals as a potential therapeutic target in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Grubman, A; White, A R; Liddell, J R

    2014-01-01

    Transition metals are critical for enzyme function and protein folding, but in excess can mediate neurotoxic oxidative processes. As mitochondria are particularly vulnerable to oxidative damage due to radicals generated during ATP production, mitochondrial biometal homeostasis must therefore be tightly controlled to safely harness the redox potential of metal enzyme cofactors. Dysregulation of metal functions is evident in numerous neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease, stroke, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Friedrich's ataxia. This review describes the mitochondrial metal defects in these disorders and highlights novel metal-based therapeutic approaches that target mitochondrial metal homeostasis in neurological disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24206195

  13. Biochemical and molecular characterization of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase in Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Suman; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2016-05-01

    The two predominant forms of arginase, cytosolic Arginase-I and mitochondrial Arginase-II, catalyze hydrolysis of arginine into ornithine and urea. Based on presence of arginase activity in extracts using potassium chloride (KCl), mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been suggested. However, the activity of arginase in fractions obtained after KCl-treatment may be either due to leakage of mitochondrial arginase or release of adhered cytosolic arginase to cell organelles having altered net charge. Therefore, it has been intended to analyse impact of KCl on ultra-structural properties of mitochondria, and biochemical analysis of mitochondrial membrane-bound proteins and arginase of Heteropneustes fossilis. Liver of H. fossilis was used for isolating mitochondria for analysis of ultrastructural properties, preparing cytosolic, mitochondrial, and mitochondrial-membrane bound extracts after treatment of KCl. Extracts were analysed for arginase activity assay, protein profiling through SDS-PAGE and MALDI MS/MS. The KCl-mediated modulation in polypeptides and arginase were also evaluated by PANTHER, MitoProt and IPSORT servers. The effects of KCl on ultra-structural integrity of mitochondria, activity of arginase, modulation on mitochondrial proteins and enzymes including arginase were observed. The 48 kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial fraction, that showed KCl-dependent alteration matched with Myb binding protein and 30 kDa bands resembles to arginase after MALDI MS/MS analysis. Results indicate KCl-dependent ultrastructural changes in mitochondria and release of mitochondrial arginase. The proposed membrane bound mitochondrial arginase could be mitochondrial arginase-II or altered form of cytosolic arginase-I contributing to KCl-induced arginase activity in H. fossilis.

  14. A Simple Simulator of Membrane Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, C. Leon

    1977-01-01

    This article describes a simulation designed to illustrate the electrical behavior of excitable membranes. The simulator, based on the Hodgkin-Huxley Model of the Membrane, is a simple devie that allows the student to see the consequences of changing equilibrium potentials and conductances. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  15. A Simple Simulator of Membrane Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, C. Leon

    1977-01-01

    This article describes a simulation designed to illustrate the electrical behavior of excitable membranes. The simulator, based on the Hodgkin-Huxley Model of the Membrane, is a simple devie that allows the student to see the consequences of changing equilibrium potentials and conductances. Numerous illustrations are included. (Author/MA)

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction and potential anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lleonart, Matilde E; Grodzicki, Robert; Graifer, Dmitri M; Lyakhovich, Alex

    2017-07-06

    Mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) has been identified as an important factor in various diseases ranging from neurological disorders, to diseases of the cardiovascular system and metabolic syndromes. MDF was also found in cancer as well as in cancer predisposition syndromes with defective DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. Moreover, a recent highlight arises from the detection of MDF in eukaryotic cells upon treatment with antibiotics. In this review, we focus on recent studies of MDF in pathological conditions with a particular emphasis on the effects of various classes of antibiotics on mitochondria. Special attention is given to the role of autophagy/mitophagy in MDF and repurposing antibiotics as anticancer drugs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. ChChd3, an Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Protein, Is Essential for Maintaining Crista Integrity and Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Darshi, Manjula; Mendiola, Vincent L.; Mackey, Mason R.; Murphy, Anne N.; Koller, Antonius; Perkins, Guy A.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane (IM) serves as the site for ATP production by hosting the oxidative phosphorylation complex machinery most notably on the crista membranes. Disruption of the crista structure has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we characterize ChChd3, a previously identified PKA substrate of unknown function (Schauble, S., King, C. C., Darshi, M., Koller, A., Shah, K., and Taylor, S. S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 14952–14959), and show that it is essential for maintaining crista integrity and mitochondrial function. In the mitochondria, ChChd3 is a peripheral protein of the IM facing the intermembrane space. RNAi knockdown of ChChd3 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondria, reduced OPA1 protein levels and impaired fusion, and clustering of the mitochondria around the nucleus along with reduced growth rate. Both the oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates were severely restricted. Ultrastructural analysis of these cells revealed aberrant mitochondrial IM structures with fragmented and tubular cristae or loss of cristae, and reduced crista membrane. Additionally, the crista junction opening diameter was reduced to 50% suggesting remodeling of cristae in the absence of ChChd3. Analysis of the ChChd3-binding proteins revealed that ChChd3 interacts with the IM proteins mitofilin and OPA1, which regulate crista morphology, and the outer membrane protein Sam50, which regulates import and assembly of β-barrel proteins on the outer membrane. Knockdown of ChChd3 led to almost complete loss of both mitofilin and Sam50 proteins and alterations in several mitochondrial proteins, suggesting that ChChd3 is a scaffolding protein that stabilizes protein complexes involved in maintaining crista architecture and protein import and is thus essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and function. PMID:21081504

  18. [Changes in polarization of myometrial cells plasma and internal mitochondrial membranes under calixarenes action as inhibitors of plasma membrane Na+, K+-ATPase].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, H V; Danylovych, Iu V; Kolomiiets', O V; Kosterin, S O; Rodik, R V; Cherenok, S O; Kal'chenko, V I; Chunikhin, O Iu; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O

    2012-01-01

    The influence of supramolecular macrocyclic compounds--calix[4]arenes C-97, C-99, C-107, which are ouabainomymetic high affinity inhibitors of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, on the polarization level of plasmic and mitochondrial membranes of rat uterine smooth muscle cells was investigated. The influence of these compounds on the myocytes characteristic size was studied. By using a confocal microscopy and specific for mitochondrial MitoTracker Orange CM-H2TMRos dye it was proved that the potential-sensitive fluorescent probe DiOC6(3) interacts with mitochondria. Artificial potential collapse of plasmic membrane in this case was modeled by myocytes preincubation with ouabain (1 mM). Further experiments performed using the method of flow cytometry with DiOC6(3) have shown that the compounds C-97, C-99 and C-107 at concentration 50-100 nM caused depolarization of the plasma membrane (at the level of 30% relative to control values) in conditions of artificial collapse of mitochondrial potential by myocytes preincubation in the presence of 5 mM of sodium azide. Under artificial sarcolemma depolarization by ouabain, calixarenes C-97, C-99 and C-107 at 100 nM concentrations caused a transient increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, that is 40% of the control level and lasted about 5 minutes. Calixarenes C-99 and C-107 caused a significant increase in fluorescence of myocytes in these conditions, which was confirmed by confocal microscopy too. It was proved by photon correlation spectroscopy method that the C-99 and C-107 caused an increase of characteristic size of myocytes.

  19. Proteomic mapping of cytosol-facing outer mitochondrial and ER membranes in living human cells by proximity biotinylation

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Victoria; Lam, Stephanie S; Udeshi, Namrata D; Svinkina, Tanya; Guzman, Gaelen; Mootha, Vamsi K; Carr, Steven A; Ting, Alice Y

    2017-01-01

    The cytosol-facing membranes of cellular organelles contain proteins that enable signal transduction, regulation of morphology and trafficking, protein import and export, and other specialized processes. Discovery of these proteins by traditional biochemical fractionation can be plagued with contaminants and loss of key components. Using peroxidase-mediated proximity biotinylation, we captured and identified endogenous proteins on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and endoplasmic reticulum membrane (ERM) of living human fibroblasts. The proteomes of 137 and 634 proteins, respectively, are highly specific and highlight 94 potentially novel mitochondrial or ER proteins. Dataset intersection identified protein candidates potentially localized to mitochondria-ER contact sites. We found that one candidate, the tail-anchored, PDZ-domain-containing OMM protein SYNJ2BP, dramatically increases mitochondrial contacts with rough ER when overexpressed. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry identified ribosome-binding protein 1 (RRBP1) as SYNJ2BP’s ERM binding partner. Our results highlight the power of proximity biotinylation to yield insights into the molecular composition and function of intracellular membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24463.001 PMID:28441135

  20. Glutathionylation of Adenine Nucleotide Translocase Induced by Carbon Monoxide Prevents Mitochondrial Membrane Permeabilization and Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Cláudia S. F.; Almeida, Ana S.; Martel, Cécile; Brenner, Catherine; Alves, Paula M.; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work demonstrates the ability of CO to prevent apoptosis in a primary culture of astrocytes. For the first time, the antiapoptotic behavior can be clearly attributed to the inhibition of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP), a key event in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In isolated non-synaptic mitochondria, CO partially inhibits (i) loss of potential, (ii) the opening of a nonspecific pore through the inner membrane, (iii) swelling, and (iv) cytochrome c release, which are induced by calcium, diamide, or atractyloside (a ligand of ANT). CO directly modulates ANT function by enhancing ADP/ATP exchange and prevents its pore-forming activity. Additionally, CO induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and its prevention by β-carotene decreases CO cytoprotection in intact cells as well as in isolated mitochondria, revealing the key role of ROS. On the other hand, CO induces a slight increase in mitochondrial oxidized glutathione, which is essential for apoptosis modulation by (i) delaying astrocytic apoptosis, (ii) decreasing MMP, and (iii) enhancing ADP/ATP translocation activity of ANT. Moreover, CO and GSSG trigger ANT glutathionylation, a post-translational process regulating protein function in response to redox cellular changes. In conclusion, CO protects astrocytes from apoptosis by preventing MMP, acting on ANT (glutathionylation and inhibition of its pore activity) via a preconditioning-like process mediated by ROS and GSSG. PMID:20348099

  1. A mechanism of virulence: virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv, but not attenuated H37Ra, causes significant mitochondrial inner membrane disruption in macrophages leading to necrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjian; Gan, Huixian; Remold, Heinz G

    2006-03-15

    Infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages with Mycobacterium tuberculosis at low multiplicities of infection leads 48-72 h after the infection to cell death with the characteristics of apoptosis or necrosis. Predominant induction of one or the other cell death modality depends on differences in mitochondrial membrane perturbation induced by attenuated and virulent strains. Infection of macrophages with the attenuated H37Ra or the virulent H37Rv causes mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization characterized by cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial intermembrane space and apoptosis. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization is transient, peaks 6 h after infection, and requires Ca(2+) flux and B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma 2-associated protein X translocation into mitochondria. In contrast, only the virulent H37Rv induces significant mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) loss caused by mitochondrial permeability transition. Dissipation of Deltapsi(m) also peaks at 6 h after infection, is transient, is inhibited by the classical mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporine A, has a requirement for mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading, and is independent of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma translocation into the mitochondria. Transient dissipation of Deltapsi(m) 6 h after infection is essential for the induction of macrophage necrosis by Mtb, a mechanism that allows further dissemination of the pathogen and development of the disease.

  2. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    SciTech Connect

    Josyula, Ratnakar; Jin, Zhongmin; McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence; Sha, Bingdong

    2006-02-01

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  3. Effect of the triaminopyridine flupirtine on calcium uptake, membrane potential and ATP synthesis in rat heart mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Guido; Balakirev, Maxim; Zwicker, Klaus; Hofmann, Michael; Woodcock, Barry G; Pergande, Gabriela

    1998-01-01

    Flupirtine is an analgesic agent which exhibits neuronal cytoprotective activity and may have value in the treatment of conditions involving cell injury and apoptosis. Since flupirtine has no action on known receptor sites we have investigated the effect of this drug on mitochondrial membrane potential, and the changes in intramitochondrial calcium concentration in particular.The findings show that flupirtine increases Ca2+ uptake in mitochondria in vitro. At clinically relevant flupirtine concentrations, corresponding to flupirtine levels in vitro of 0.2 to 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein, there was a 2 to 3 fold increase in mitochondrial calcium levels (P<0.01). At supra-physiological flupirtine concentrations of 20 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein and above, the mitochondrial calcium concentrations were indistinguishable from those in untreated mitochondria.Mitochondrial membrane potential closely paralleled the changes in mitochondrial calcium levels showing a 20% (P<0.01) increase when the flupirtine concentration was raised from 0.2 nmol to 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein and a return to control values at 20 nmol mg−1 protein.The increase in mitochondrial calcium uptake and membrane potential were accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial ATP synthesis (30%; P<0.05) and a similar percentage reduction in mitochondrial volume.Calcium at 80 and 160 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein decreased ATP synthesis by 20–25% (P<0.001). This decrease was prevented or diminished if flupirtine at 10 nmol mg−1 protein was added before the addition of calcium.Since intracellular levels of flupirtine in intact cells never exceeded 10 nmol mg−1 mitochondrial protein, these findings are supportive evidence for an in vivo cytoprotective action of flupirtine at the mitochondrial level. PMID:9559899

  4. Delivery of bioactive molecules to the mitochondrial genome using a membrane-fusing, liposome-based carrier, DF-MITO-Porter.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2012-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in a variety of human diseases. It is now well accepted that mutations and defects in the mitochondrial genome form the basis of these diseases. Therefore, mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve such a strategy, it will be necessary to deliver therapeutic agents into mitochondria in living cells. We report here on an approach to accomplish this via the use of a Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter, aimed at the mitochondrial genome, so-called mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The DF-MITO-Porter, a nano carrier for mitochondrial delivery, has the ability to penetrate the endosomal and mitochondrial membranes via step-wise membrane fusion. We first constructed a DF-MITO-Porter encapsulating DNase I protein as a bioactive cargo. It was expected that mtDNA would be digested, when the DNase I was delivered to the mitochondria. We observed the intracellular trafficking of the carriers, and then measured mitochondrial activity and mtDNA-levels after the delivery of DNase I by the DF-MITO-Porter. The findings confirm that the DF-MITO-Porter effectively delivered the DNase I into the mitochondria, and provides a demonstration of its potential use in therapies that are selective for the mitochondrial genome.

  5. Targeting Membrane Lipid a Potential Cancer Cure?

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Lee, Wai-Leng; Chuah, Lay-Hong; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer mortality and morbidity is projected to increase significantly over the next few decades. Current chemotherapeutic strategies have significant limitations, and there is great interest in seeking novel therapies which are capable of specifically targeting cancer cells. Given that fundamental differences exist between the cellular membranes of healthy cells and tumor cells, novel therapies based on targeting membrane lipids in cancer cells is a promising approach that deserves attention in the field of anticancer drug development. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), a lipid membrane component which exists only in the inner leaflet of cell membrane under normal circumstances, has increased surface representation on the outer membrane of tumor cells with disrupted membrane asymmetry. PE thus represents a potential chemotherapeutic target as the higher exposure of PE on the membrane surface of cancer cells. This feature as well as a high degree of expression of PE on endothelial cells in tumor vasculature, makes PE an attractive molecular target for future cancer interventions. There have already been several small molecules and membrane-active peptides identified which bind specifically to the PE molecules on the cancer cell membrane, subsequently inducing membrane disruption leading to cell lysis. This approach opens up a new front in the battle against cancer, and is of particular interest as it may be a strategy that may be prove effective against tumors that respond poorly to current chemotherapeutic agents. We aim to highlight the evidence suggesting that PE is a strong candidate to be explored as a potential molecular target for membrane targeted novel anticancer therapy. PMID:28167913

  6. Decavanadate induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization and inhibits oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Soares, S S; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-05-01

    Decavanadate induced rat liver mitochondrial depolarization at very low concentrations, half-depolarization with 39 nM decavanadate, while it was needed a 130-fold higher concentration of monomeric vanadate (5 microM) to induce the same effect. Decavanadate also inhibits mitochondrial repolarization induced by reduced glutathione in vitro, with an inhibition constant of 1 microM, whereas no effect was observed up to 100 microM of monomeric vanadate. The oxygen consumption by mitochondria is also inhibited by lower decavanadate than monomeric vanadate concentrations, i.e. 50% inhibition is attained with 99 M decavanadate and 10 microM monomeric vanadate. Thus, decavanadate is stronger as mitochondrial depolarization agent than as inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Up to 5 microM, decavanadate does not alter mitochondrial NADH levels nor inhibit neither F(O)F(1)-ATPase nor cytochrome c oxidase activity, but it induces changes in the redox steady-state of mitochondrial b-type cytochromes (complex III). NMR spectra showed that decameric vanadate is the predominant vanadate species in decavanadate solutions. It is concluded that decavanadate is much more potent mitochondrial depolarization agent and a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption than monomeric vanadate, pointing out the importance to take into account the contribution of higher oligomeric species of vanadium for the biological effects of vanadate solutions.

  7. Mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system: A central player in membrane shaping and crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Wollweber, Florian; von der Malsburg, Karina; van der Laan, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional metabolic factories and integrative signaling organelles of eukaryotic cells. The structural basis for their numerous functions is a complex and dynamic double-membrane architecture. The outer membrane connects mitochondria to the cytosol and other organelles. The inner membrane is composed of a boundary region and highly folded cristae membranes. The evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) connects the two inner membrane domains via formation and stabilization of crista junction structures. Moreover, MICOS establishes contact sites between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes by interacting with outer membrane protein complexes. MICOS deficiency leads to a grossly altered inner membrane architecture resulting in far-reaching functional perturbations in mitochondria. Consequently, mutations affecting the function of MICOS are responsible for a diverse spectrum of human diseases. In this article, we summarize recent insights and concepts on the role of MICOS in the organization of mitochondrial membranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Contact Sites edited by Christian Ungermann and Benoit Kornmann. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. The presequence pathway is involved in protein sorting to the mitochondrial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wenz, Lena-Sophie; Opaliński, Łukasz; Schuler, Max-Hinderk; Ellenrieder, Lars; Ieva, Raffaele; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; van der Laan, Martin; Wiedemann, Nils; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane contains integral α-helical and β-barrel proteins that are imported from the cytosol. The machineries importing β-barrel proteins have been identified, however, different views exist on the import of α-helical proteins. It has been reported that the biogenesis of Om45, the most abundant signal-anchored protein, does not depend on proteinaceous components, but involves direct insertion into the outer membrane. We show that import of Om45 occurs via the translocase of the outer membrane and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane. Assembly of Om45 in the outer membrane involves the MIM machinery. Om45 thus follows a new mitochondrial biogenesis pathway that uses elements of the presequence import pathway to direct a protein to the outer membrane. PMID:24781695

  10. Loss of Prohibitin Membrane Scaffolds Impairs Mitochondrial Architecture and Leads to Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Merkwirth, Carsten; Morbin, Michela; Brönneke, Hella S.; Jordan, Sabine D.; Rugarli, Elena I.; Langer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fusion and fission of mitochondria maintain the functional integrity of mitochondria and protect against neurodegeneration, but how mitochondrial dysfunctions trigger neuronal loss remains ill-defined. Prohibitins form large ring complexes in the inner membrane that are composed of PHB1 and PHB2 subunits and are thought to function as membrane scaffolds. In Caenorhabditis elegans, prohibitin genes affect aging by moderating fat metabolism and energy production. Knockdown experiments in mammalian cells link the function of prohibitins to membrane fusion, as they were found to stabilize the dynamin-like GTPase OPA1 (optic atrophy 1), which mediates mitochondrial inner membrane fusion and cristae morphogenesis. Mutations in OPA1 are associated with dominant optic atrophy characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, highlighting the importance of OPA1 function in neurons. Here, we show that neuron-specific inactivation of Phb2 in the mouse forebrain causes extensive neurodegeneration associated with behavioral impairments and cognitive deficiencies. We observe early onset tau hyperphosphorylation and filament formation in the hippocampus, demonstrating a direct link between mitochondrial defects and tau pathology. Loss of PHB2 impairs the stability of OPA1, affects mitochondrial ultrastructure, and induces the perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in hippocampal neurons. A destabilization of the mitochondrial genome and respiratory deficiencies manifest in aged neurons only, while the appearance of mitochondrial morphology defects correlates with tau hyperphosphorylation in the absence of PHB2. These results establish an essential role of prohibitin complexes for neuronal survival in vivo and demonstrate that OPA1 stability, mitochondrial fusion, and the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome in neurons depend on these scaffolding proteins. Moreover, our findings establish prohibitin-deficient mice as a novel genetic model for tau pathologies

  11. Statistical Analysis of Membrane Potential Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, H.; Segundo, J. P.; Moore, G. P.; Perkel, D. H.

    1968-01-01

    In a study of integration at the single neuron level, the relationships between the postsynaptic membrane potential and the presynaptic spike train were analyzed. Fluctuations in membrane potential of neurons in the visceral ganglion of Aplysia were measured and described by histograms. The histogram estimates the probability density function of the membrane potential. Comparisons were made among histograms when there was no synaptic input, and when there was a single input in which variations were made in the PSP (postsynaptic potential) sign, i.e. excitatory or inhibitory, and arrival statistics, e.g. slow or fast, regular, Poisson-like, or patterned. This was examined in cells where the membrane potential was constant and in cells in which there was spontaneous pacemaker activity. The form of the histogram depended on whether the neuron was spontaneously quiescent or a pacemaker, or whether it received presynaptic input and, if it did, on the sign and temporal characteristics of such input. From such histograms the mean firing rate of output spike trains can be predicted; additional information of a temporal nature is required, however, to predict features of the interval structure of the output train. Suggestions are made concerning the way the nervous system might utilize the information summarized in the membrane potential histogram. PMID:4301347

  12. Effects of mitochondrial poisons on glutathione redox potential and carotid body chemoreceptor activity.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Niño, A; Agapito, M T; Obeso, A; Gonzalez, C

    2009-01-01

    Low oxygen sensing in chemoreceptor cells involves the inhibition of specific plasma membrane K(+) channels, suggesting that mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) link hypoxia to K(+) channel inhibition, subsequent cell depolarization and activation of neurotransmitter release. We have used several mitochondrial poisons, alone and in combination with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), and quantify their capacity to alter GSH/GSSG levels and glutathione redox potential (E(GSH)) in rat diaphragm. Selected concentrations of mitochondrial poisons with or without NAC were tested for their capacity to activate neurotransmitter release in chemoreceptor cells and to alter ATP levels in intact rat carotid body (CB). We found that rotenone (1 microM), antimycin A (0.2 microg/ml) and sodium azide (5mM) decreased E(GSH); NAC restored E(GSH) to control values. At those concentrations mitochondrial poisons activated neurotransmitter release from CB chemoreceptor cells and decreased CB ATP levels, NAC being ineffective to modify these responses. Additional experiments with 3-nitroprionate (5mM), lower concentrations of rotenone and dinitrophenol revealed variable relationships between E(GSH) and chemoreceptor cell neurotransmitter release responses and ATP levels. These findings indicate a lack of correlation between mitochondrial-generated modifications of E(GSH) and chemoreceptor cells activity. This lack of correlation renders unlikely that alteration of mitochondrial production of ROS is the physiological pathway chemoreceptor cells use to signal hypoxia.

  13. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor–Couette–Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. PMID:25742953

  14. Bcl-x(L) blocks a mitochondrial inner membrane channel and prevents Ca2+ overload-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Tornero, Daniel; Posadas, Inmaculada; Ceña, Valentín

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an active process that plays a key role in many physiological and pathological conditions. One of the most important organelles involved in apoptosis regulation is the mitochondrion. An increase in intracellular Ca(2+) is a general mechanism of toxicity in neurons which occurs in response to different noxious stimuli like excitotoxicity and ischemia producing apoptotic and necrotic cell death through mitochondria-dependent mechanisms. The Bcl-2 family of proteins modulate the release of pro-apoptotic factors from the mitochondrial intermembrane space during cell death induction by different stimuli. In this work, we have studied, using single-cell imaging and patch-clamp single channel recording, the mitochondrial mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effect of Bcl-x(L) on Ca(2+) overload-mediated cell death in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We have found that Bcl-x(L) neuroprotective actions take place at mitochondria where this antiapoptotic protein delays both mitochondrial potential collapse and opening of the permeability transition pore by preventing Ca(2+)-mediated mitochondrial multiple conductance channel opening. Bcl-x(L) neuroprotective actions were antagonized by the Bcl-x(L) inhibitor ABT-737 and potentiated by the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM. As a consequence, this would prevent free radical production, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, release from mitochondria of pro-apoptotic molecules, caspase activation and cellular death.

  15. The Drosophila inner-membrane protein PMI controls crista biogenesis and mitochondrial diameter.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Marc; El Fissi, Najla; Tufi, Roberta; Bentobji, Mélanie; Liévens, Jean-Charles; Martins, L Miguel; Royet, Julien; Rival, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Cristae are mitochondrial inner-membrane structures that concentrate respiratory chain complexes and hence regulate ATP production. Mechanisms controlling crista morphogenesis are poorly understood and few crista determinants have been identified. Among them are the Mitofilins that are required to establish crista junctions and ATP-synthase subunits that bend the membrane at the tips of the cristae. We report here the phenotypic consequences associated with the in vivo inactivation of the inner-membrane protein Pantagruelian Mitochondrion I (PMI) both at the scale of the whole organism, and at the level of mitochondrial ultrastructure and function. We show that flies in which PMI is genetically inactivated experience synaptic defects and have a reduced life span. Electron microscopy analysis of the inner-membrane morphology demonstrates that loss of PMI function increases the average length of mitochondrial cristae in embryonic cells. This phenotype is exacerbated in adult neurons in which cristae form a dense tangle of elongated membranes. Conversely, we show that PMI overexpression is sufficient to reduce crista length in vivo. Finally, these crista defects are associated with impaired respiratory chain activity and increases in the level of reactive oxygen species. Since PMI and its human orthologue TMEM11 are regulators of mitochondrial morphology, our data suggest that, by controlling crista length, PMI influences mitochondrial diameter and tubular shape.

  16. 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 located on the mitochondrial membrane and functionally regulated mitochondrial functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingyi; Zhang, Huiyuan; Xu, Hao; Guo, Dongqing; Shi, Hui; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Weiwei; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    5-HT has been reported to possess significant effects on cardiac activities, but activation of 5-HTR on the cell membrane failed to illustrate the controversial cardiac reaction. Because 5-HT constantly comes across the cell membrane via 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) into the cytoplasm, whether 5-HTR is functional present on the cellular organelles is unknown. Here we show 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 were located in cardiac mitochondria, and regulated mitochondrial activities and cellular functions. Knock down 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 in neonatal cardiomyocytes resulted in significant increase of cell damage in response to hypoxia, and also led to alternation in heart beating. Activation of 5-HTR4 attenuated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake under the both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, whereas 5-HTR3 augmented Ca2+ uptake only under hypoxia. 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 exerted the opposite effects on the mitochondrial respiration: 5-HTR3 increased RCR (respiration control ratio), but 5-HTR4 reduced RCR. Moreover, activation of 5-HTR3 and 5-HTR4 both significantly inhibited the opening of mPTP. Our results provided the first evidence that 5-HTR as a GPCR and an ion channel, functionally expressed in mitochondria and participated in the mitochondria function and regulation to maintain homeostasis of mitochondrial [Ca2+], ROS, and ATP generation efficiency in cardiomyocytes in response to stress and O2 tension. PMID:27874067

  17. Comparative kinetics of damage to the plasma and mitochondrial membranes by intra-cellularly synthesized and externally-provided photosensitizers using multi-color FACS.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Sara; Malik, Zvi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer involves inflicting lethal damage to the cells of malignant tumors, primarily by singlet oxygen that is generated following light-absorption in a photosensitizer molecule. Dysfunction of cells is manifested in many ways, including peroxidation of cellular components, membrane rupture, depolarization of electric potentials, termination of mitochondrial activity, onset of apoptosis and necrosis and eventually cell lysis. These events do not necessarily occur in linear fashion and different types of damage to cell components occur, most probably, in parallel. In this report we measured the relative rates of damage to two cellular membranes: the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. We employed photosensitizers of diverse hydrophobicities and used different incubation procedures, which lead to their different intra-cellular localizations. We monitored the damage that was inflicted on these membranes, by employing optical probes of membrane integrity, in a multi-color FACS experiment. The potentiometric indicator JC-1 monitored the electric cross-membrane potential of the mitochondria and the fluorometric indicator Draq7 monitored the rupture of the plasma membrane. We show that the electric depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and the damage to the enveloping plasma membrane proceed with different kinetics that reflect the molecular character and intracellular location of the sensitizer: PpIX that is synthesized in the cells from ALA causes rapid mitochondrial damage and very slow damage to the plasma membrane, while externally added PpIX has an opposite effect. The hydrophilic sensitizer HypS4 can be taken up by the cells by different incubation conditions, and these affect its intracellular location, and as a consequence either the plasma membrane or the mitochondria is damaged first. A similar correlation was found for additional extracellularly-provided photosensitizers HP and PpIX.

  18. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P < 0.01) and aspect ratio (1.97 ± 0.83 vs. 3.63 ± 2.13, P < 0.01) and circularity (0.75 ± 0.16 vs. 0.45 ± 0.22, P < 0.01) but not size (0.28 ± 0.31 vs. 0.27 ± 0.20 μm2). Frequency distributions for mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23104694

  19. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2013-01-15

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P < 0.01) and aspect ratio (1.97 ± 0.83 vs. 3.63 ± 2.13, P < 0.01) and circularity (0.75 ± 0.16 vs. 0.45 ± 0.22, P < 0.01) but not size (0.28 ± 0.31 vs. 0.27 ± 0.20 μm(2)). Frequency distributions for mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology.

  20. Hypothermia-induced neuroprotection is associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane permeability in a swine model of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Hua, Rong; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Hong; Tang, Ziren; Mei, Xue; Zhang, Mingyue; Cui, Juan; Li, Chunsheng

    2013-06-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that mild hypothermia is neuroprotective for comatose patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, but the mechanism of this protection is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether prolonged whole-body mild hypothermia inhibits mitochondrial membrane permeability (MMP) in the cerebral cortex after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Thirty-seven inbred Chinese Wuzhishan minipigs were successfully resuscitated after 8 minutes of untreated ventricular fibrillation (VF) and underwent recovery under normothermic (NT) or prolonged whole-body mild hypothermic (HT; 33°C) conditions for 24 or 72 hours. Cerebral samples from the frontal cortex were collected at 24 and 72 hours after ROSC. Mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation. At 24 hours, relative to NT, HT was associated with reductions in opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, release of pro-apoptotic substances from mitochondria, caspase 3 cleavage, apoptosis, and neurologic deficit scores, as well as increases in mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial respiration. Together, these findings suggest that mild hypothermia inhibits ischemia-induced increases in MMP, which may provide neuroprotection against cerebral injury after cardiac arrest.

  1. Alcohol-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress alters brain mitochondrial membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaddi Damodara; Padmavathi, Pannuru; Kavitha, Godugu; Saradamma, Bulle; Varadacharyulu, Nallanchakravarthula

    2013-03-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption causes numerous biochemical and biophysical changes in the central nervous system, in which mitochondria is the primary organelle affected. In the present study, we hypothesized that alcohol alters the mitochondrial membrane properties and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Alcohol-induced hypoxia further enhances these effects. Administration of alcohol to rats significantly increased the mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation with decreased SOD2 mRNA and protein expression was decreased, while nitric oxide (NO) levels and expression of iNOS and nNOS in brain cortex were increased. In addition, alcohol augmented HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression in the brain cortex. Results from this study showed that alcohol administration to rats decreased mitochondrial complex I, III, IV activities, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and cardiolipin content with increased anisotropic value. Cardiolipin regulates numerous enzyme activities, especially those related to oxidative phosphorylation and coupled respiration. In the present study, decreased cardiolipin could be ascribed to ROS/RNS-induced damage. In conclusion, alcohol-induced ROS/RNS is responsible for the altered mitochondrial membrane properties, and alcohol-induced hypoxia further enhance these alterations, which ultimately leads to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  2. Mitochondrial SSBP1 protects cells from proteotoxic stresses by potentiating stress-induced HSF1 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ke; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Takii, Ryosuke; Takaki, Eiichi; Hayashida, Naoki; Nakai, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Heat-shock response is an adaptive response to proteotoxic stresses including heat shock, and is regulated by heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mammals. Proteotoxic stresses challenge all subcellular compartments including the mitochondria. Therefore, there must be close connections between mitochondrial signals and the activity of HSF1. Here, we show that heat shock triggers nuclear translocation of mitochondrial SSBP1, which is involved in replication of mitochondrial DNA, in a manner dependent on the mitochondrial permeability transition pore ANT–VDAC1 complex and direct interaction with HSF1. HSF1 recruits SSBP1 to the promoters of genes encoding cytoplasmic/nuclear and mitochondrial chaperones. HSF1–SSBP1 complex then enhances their induction by facilitating the recruitment of a chromatin-remodelling factor BRG1, and supports cell survival and the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential against proteotoxic stresses. These results suggest that the nuclear translocation of mitochondrial SSBP1 is required for the regulation of cytoplasmic/nuclear and mitochondrial proteostasis against proteotoxic stresses. PMID:25762445

  3. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    PubMed

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2A (PP-PP2A) pathway, induced mitochondria fission, and impaired respiration. Blocking MAM reduction counteracted glucose-induced mitochondrial alterations. Furthermore, disruption of MAM integrity mimicked effects of glucose on mitochondria dynamics and function. This glucose-sensing system is deficient in the liver of insulin-resistant ob/ob and cyclophilin D-KO mice, both characterized by chronic disruption of MAM integrity, mitochondrial fission, and altered mitochondrial respiration. These data indicate that MAM contribute to the hepatic glucose-sensing system, allowing regulation of mitochondria dynamics and function during nutritional transition. Chronic disruption of MAM may participate in hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with insulin resistance. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions of mitochondrial presequence peptides with the mitochondrial outer membrane preprotein translocase TOM.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ruiz, Mercedes; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Eckert, Reiner; Winterhalter, Mathias; Nussberger, Stephan

    2010-08-04

    TOM protein-conducting channels serve as the main entry sites into mitochondria for virtually all mitochondrial proteins. When incorporated into lipid bilayers, they form large, relatively nonspecific ion channels that are blocked by peptides derived from mitochondrial precursor proteins. Using single-channel electrical recordings, we analyzed the interactions of mitochondrial presequence peptides with single TOM pores. The largest conductance state of the translocon represents the likely protein-conducting conformation of the channel. The frequency (but not the duration) of the polypeptide-induced blockage is strongly modulated by the substrate concentration. Structural differences between substrates are reflected in characteristic blockage frequencies and duration of blockage. To our knowledge, this study provides first quantitative data regarding the kinetics of polypeptide interaction with the mitochondrial TOM machinery. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Mitochondrial Membrane Permeability Waves during Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhola, Patrick D.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Change in the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane to proteins (cytochrome c and Smac) and protons is a critical step in apoptosis. Although the time from the induction of apoptosis to the change of mitochondrial permeability is variable over a period of hours, the release of proteins is an “all or none” phenomenon that is completed in an individual cell within minutes. Here, using single-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that the release of cytochrome c from a single mitochondrion occurs in a single step. However, this increased permeability of the outer membrane to cytochrome c propagates throughout the cell as a slower, spatially coordinated wave. The permeability of the outer membrane to Smac propagates with the same spatial pattern but lagging in time. This is followed by a wave of increased permeability of the inner membrane to protons. Only afterward do the mitochondria fission. The spatial dependence of the permeability wave was inhibited by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps, but buffering cytosolic calcium had no effect. These results show that the trigger for apoptosis is spatially localized, initiating at one or only a few mitochondria preceding the loss of mitochondrial energetics, and the subsequent temporal propagation of mitochondrial membrane permeability is calcium-dependent. PMID:19843454

  6. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  7. Increasing levels of cardiolipin differentially influence packing of phospholipids found in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Zeczycki, Tonya N; Whelan, Jarrett; Hayden, William Tyler; Brown, David A; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2014-07-18

    It is essential to understand the role of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondrial membrane organization given that changes in CL levels contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in type II diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion injury, heart failure, breast cancer, and aging. Specifically, there are contradictory data on how CL influences the molecular packing of membrane phospholipids. Therefore, we determined how increasing levels of heart CL impacted molecular packing in large unilamellar vesicles, modeling heterogeneous lipid mixtures found within the mitochondrial inner membrane, using merocyanine (MC540) fluorescence. We broadly categorized lipid vesicles of equal mass as loosely packed, intermediate, and highly packed based on peak MC540 fluorescence intensity. CL had opposite effects on loosely versus highly packed vesicles. Exposure of loosely packed vesicles to increasing levels of CL dose-dependently increased membrane packing. In contrast, increasing amounts of CL in highly packed vesicles decreased the packing in a dose-dependent manner. In vesicles that were categorized as intermediate packing, CL had either no effect or decreased packing at select doses in a dose-independent manner. Altogether, the results aid in resolving some of the discrepant data by demonstrating that CL displays differential effects on membrane packing depending on the composition of the lipid environment. This has implications for mitochondrial protein activity in response to changing CL levels in microdomains of varying composition.

  8. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Fujimoto, Masaru; Katayama, Kenta; Yamaoka, Shohei; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Arimura, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs), while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles). Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN). The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence. PMID:26752045

  9. Cholinergic-receptor-independent dysfunction of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential and ATP depletion underlie necrotic cell death induced by the organophosphate poison mevinphos.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y H; Chan, S H H; Dai, K Y; Cheng, H L; Chou, J L J; Chang, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    Our current understanding of the nature of cell death that is associated with fatal organophosphate poisoning and the underlying cellular mechanisms is surprisingly limited. Taking advantage of the absence in an in vitro system of acetylcholinesterase, the pharmacological target of organophosphate compounds, the present study evaluated the hypothesis that the repertoire of cholinergic receptor-independent cellular events that underlie fatal organophosphate poisoning entails induction of mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by bioenergetic failure that leads to necrotic cell death because of ATP depletion. Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells incubated with the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (0.4 or 4mumol) for 1 or 3h underwent a dose-related and time-dependent loss of cell viability that was not reversed by muscarinic (atropine) or nicotinic (mecamylamine) blockade. This was accompanied by depressed NADH cytochrome c reductase, succinate cytochrome c reductase or cytochrome c oxidase activity in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, reduced mitochondrial transmembrane potential, decreased ATP concentration, elevated ADP/ATP ratio, increased lactate dehydrogenase release and necrotic cell death. We conclude that Mev induces cholinergic receptor-independent necrotic cell death by depressing the activity of Complexes I to IV in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, eliciting reduction in mitochondrial transmembrane potential, depleting intracellular ATP contents and damaging cell membrane integrity.

  10. MEMBRANE POTENTIALS IN THE DONNAN EQUILIBRIUM. II

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, David I.

    1954-01-01

    Measurements were made of electromotive force in the Donnan equilibrium of systems containing dilute solutions of protein and acid. Removal of the membrane produced a decrease of no more than 2 to 4 mv. in electromotive force, while the membrane potentials, as estimated by the usual arbitrary assumption, were of the order of 12 to 34 mv. Ion ratios, as calculated from analyses for total chloride, were definitely greater than those calculated from the electromotive force of cells with salt bridges, as if there had been combination of some of the chloride ion with protein. PMID:13174778

  11. IGF-1 potentiates sensory innervation signalling by modulating the mitochondrial fission/fusion balance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Hao; Li, Zhenzhong

    2017-01-01

    Restoring the contractile function of long-term denervated skeletal muscle (SKM) cells is difficult due to the long period of denervation, which causes a loss of contractility. Although sensory innervation is considered a promising protective approach, its effect is still restricted. In this study, we introduced insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) as an efficient protective agent and observed that IGF-1 potentiated the effects of sensory protection by preventing denervated muscle atrophy and improving the condition of denervated muscle cells in vivo and in vitro. IGF-1-induced Akt phosphorylation suppressed the mitochondrial outer-membrane protein Mul1 expression, which is a key step on preserving contractile property of sensory innervated SKM cells. Mul1 overexpression interfered with the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission and was a key node for blocking the effects of IGF-1 that preserved the contractility of sensory-innervated SKM cells. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα), a mitochondrial downstream target, could block the effects of IGF-1. These data provide novel evidence that might be applied when searching for new approaches to improve the functional condition of long-term denervated SKM cells by increasing sensory protection using the IGF-1 signalling system to modulate the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission. PMID:28276453

  12. Polypeptide and phospholipid composition of the membrane of rat liver peroxisomes: comparison with endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Membranes were isolated from highly purified peroxisomes, mitochondria, and rough and smooth microsomes of rat liver by the one-step Na2CO3 procedure described in the accompanying paper (1982, J. Cell Biol. 93:97-102). The polypeptide compositions of these membranes were determined by SDS PAGE and found to be greatly dissimilar. The peroxisomal membrane contains 12% of the peroxisomal protein and consists of three major polypeptides (21,700, 67,700 and 69,700 daltons) as well as some minor polypeptides. The major peroxisomal membrane proteins as well as most of the minor ones are absent from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Conversely, most ER proteins are absent from peroxisomes. By electron microscopy, purified peroxisomal membranes are approximately 6.8 nm thick and have a typical trilaminar appearance. The phospholipid/protein ratio of peroxisomal membranes is approximately 200 nmol/mg; the principal phospholipids are phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine as in ER and mitochondrial membranes. In contrast to the mitochondria, peroxisomal membranes contain no cardiolipin. All the membranes investigated contain a polypeptide band with a molecular mass of approximately 15,000 daltons. Whether this represents an exceptional common membrane protein or a coincidence is unknown. The implications of these results for the biogenesis of peroxisomes are discussed. PMID:7068748

  13. KCl-Dependent Release of Mitochondrial Membrane-Bound Arginase Appears to Be a Novel Variant of Arginase-II

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Mishra; Rajnikant, Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Arginase regulates arginine metabolism, ornithine-urea cycle, and immunological surveillance. Arginase-I is predominant in cytosol, and arginase-II is localised in the mitochondria. A mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase has also been proposed to be adsorbed with outer membrane of mitochondria which gets released by 150 mM potassium chloride (KCl). It is presumed that inclusion of 150 mM KCl in the homogenization medium would not only facilitate release of arginase bound with outer membrane of mitochondria but also affect functional anatomy of mitochondria, mitochondrial enzymes, and proteins. Therefore, it has been intended to characterize KCl-dependent release of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase from liver of mice. Results provide advancement in the area of arginase biology and suggest that fraction of mitochondrial membrane-bound arginase contains mitochondrial arginase-II and a variant of arginase-II. PMID:27293971

  14. Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death during myocardial infarction: roles of calcium and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    Excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytosolic calcium accumulation play major roles in the initiation of programmed cell death during acute myocardial infarction. Cell death may include necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy, and combinations thereof. During ischemia, calcium handling between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofilament is disrupted and calcium is diverted to the mitochondria causing swelling. Reperfusion, while essential for survival, reactivates energy transduction and contractility and causes the release of ROS and additional ionic imbalance. During acute ischemia–reperfusion, the principal death pathways are programmed necrosis and apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway, initiated by the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, respectively. Despite intense investigation, the mechanisms of action and modes of regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization are incompletely understood. Extrinsic apoptosis, necroptosis and autophagy may also contribute to ischemia–reperfusion injury. In this review, the roles of dysregulated calcium and ROS and the contributions of Bcl-2 proteins, as well as mitochondrial morphology in promoting mitochondrial membrane permeability change and the ensuing cell death during myocardial infarction are discussed. PMID:23176689

  15. Mitochondrial Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death: Potential Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2017-01-06

    Mitochondria lie at the crossroads of neuronal survival and cell death. They play important roles in cellular bioenergetics, control intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, and participate in key metabolic pathways. Mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial quality control cause a myriad of neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria have evolved strategies to kill cells when they are not able to continue their vital functions. This review provides an overview of the role of mitochondria in neurologic disease and the cell death pathways that are mediated through mitochondria, including their role in accidental cell death, the regulated cell death pathways of apoptosis and parthanatos, and programmed cell death. It details the current state of parthanatic cell death and discusses potential therapeutic strategies targeting initiators and effectors of mitochondrial-mediated cell death in neurologic disorders.

  16. Mitochondrial targeting functional peptides as potential devices for the mitochondrial delivery of a DF-MITO-Porter.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Eriko; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2013-11-01

    To achieve mitochondrial therapy, we previously reported on the use of an octaarginine (R8) modified Dual Function (DF)-MITO-Porter for delivering molecules to mitochondria in living cells. In this study, using isolated mitochondria, homogenates and living cells, we evaluated the utility of mitochondrial targeting functional peptides as a ligand for delivering carriers. The S2 peptide modified carrier showed a high mitochondrial targeting activity in homogenates and living cells. In addition, the S2 peptide had a lower cell toxicity compared to R8 modified liposomes. The S2 peptide represents a potentially useful moiety for constructing an efficient and safe mitochondrial delivery system.

  17. Redox-active nanoceria depolarize mitochondrial membrane of human colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat Kumar; Banerjee, Priyanka; Das, Soumen; Seal, Sudipta; Chaudhury, Koel

    2014-06-01

    Nanotherapeutics is emerging as a promising option to the various limitations and side effects associated with conventional chemotherapy. The present study investigates the cytotoxic effect of redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) on human colorectal adenocarcinoma-derived cell line (HCT 15). Exposure of these cells to nanoceria for 24 h with concentration ranging between 10 and 100 μM resulted in a significant reduction of cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Further, at a concentration of 10 µM, nanoceria exhibited time-dependent cytotoxic effect when exposed to the cells for 24, 48, and 72 h. Upon treatment of the cells with nanoceria, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation which are indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity increased significantly, in a dose-dependent manner. Nanoceria was also found to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane, thereby collapsing the membrane potential and leading to initiation of apoptosis. Scanning electron microscopic study of nanoceria-treated HCT 15 cells showed morphological changes and loss of filopodia and lamellipodia, indicating arrest of metastatic spread. Summarizing, when cultured HCT 15 cells are exposed to nanoceria, a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect mediated by ROS generation is observed.

  18. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  19. Cytochrome c is rapidly reduced in the cytosol after mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Ripple, Maureen O.; Abajian, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Visible spectroscopy was used to measure real-time changes in the oxidation state of cytochrome c (cyt c) and the a-cytochromes (cyt aa3) of cytochrome oxidase during mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) initiated by anisomycin in HL-60 cells. The oxidation state of mitochondrial cyt c was found to be ≈62% oxidized before MOMP and became ≈70% oxidized after MOMP. In contrast, the cytosolic pool of cyt c was found to be almost fully reduced. This oxidation change allows cyt c release to be continuously and quantitatively monitored in real time. Anoxia and antimycin were used to fully reduce and fully oxidize, respectively, the mitochondrial pool of cyt c and it was found that the release of cyt c was independent of it oxidation state consistent with a simple model of cyt c passively diffusing down a concentration gradient through a pore or tear in the outer membrane. After MOMP was complete, the flux of cyt c diffusing back into the mitochondria was measured from the residual mitochondrial oxygen consumption after complete inhibition of the bc1 with antimycin and myxothiazol. The outer membrane was found to be highly permeable after MOMP implying that the reduction of cyt c in the cytosol must be very rapid. The permeability of the outer membrane measured in this study would result in the release of cyt c with a time constant of less than 1 s. PMID:20094799

  20. Resolution of cellular compartments involved in membrane potential changes accompanying IgE-mediated degranulation of rat basophilic leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sagi-Eisenberg, R; Pecht, I

    1984-01-01

    The overall membrane potential of rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBL-2H3) calculated from the transmembrane distribution of the lipophilic, tritium-labelled cation tetraphenyl-phosphonium [( 3H]TPP+) was resolved into its mitochondrial and plasma membrane potential components. Using the mitochondrial uncoupler carbonylcyanide-p-trifluormethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP) which collapses the mitochondrial potential, it was shown that about one third of the overall potential resulted from the mitochondrial contribution. Degranulation of the RBL cells induced by two different IgE-cross-linking agents (specific antigen and anti-IgE antibodies), was accompanied by, and well correlated with, a decrease in the overall potential. However, evaluation of the source of these observed potential changes revealed that the FCCP-insensitive fraction of the overall potential, delta psi P, (representing the plasma membrane potential), was not affected. In contrast, the FCCP-sensitive component due to the mitochondrial potential decreased when receptor cross-linking increased. Thus, the observed decrease in the overall potential is most probably a secondary event in the sequence leading from stimulus to secretion. Indeed, exposure of the RBL cells either to a high external concentration of K+ ions or to a high amount of external TPP+, both causing depolarization, failed to trigger degranulation. It is suggested that the apparent decrease in the measured overall potential is a reflection of the mitochondrial membrane depolarization. The latter is most probably caused by mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake initiated by the increase in the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ which follows cells activation. PMID:6232134

  1. Second Harmonic Imaging of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Loew, Leslie M; Lewis, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The non-linear optical effect known as second harmonic generation (SHG) has been recognized since the earliest days of the laser. But it has only been in the last 20 years that it has begun to emerge as a viable microscope imaging contrast mechanism for visualization of cell and tissue structure and function. This is because only small modifications are required to equip a standard laser scanning 2-photon microscope for second harmonic imaging microscopy (SHIM). SHG signals from certain membrane-bound dyes are highly sensitive to membrane potential, indicating that SHIM may become a valuable probe of cell physiology. However, for the current generation of dyes and microscopes, the small signal size limits the number of photons that can be collected during the course of a fast action potential. Better dyes and optimized microscope optics could ultimately lead to the ability to image neuronal electrical activity with SHIM.

  2. Photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis in epidermoid carcinoma cells. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Lam, M; Oleinick, N L; Nieminen, A L

    2001-12-14

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a novel and promising cancer treatment that employs a combination of a photosensitizing chemical and visible light, induces apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. However, the precise mechanism of PDT-induced apoptosis is not well characterized. To dissect the pathways of PDT-induced apoptosis, we investigated the involvement of mitochondrial damage by examining a second generation photosensitizer, the silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4). By using laser-scanning confocal microscopy, we found that Pc 4 localized to cytosolic membranes primarily, but not exclusively, in mitochondria. Formation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected within minutes when cells were exposed to Pc 4 and 670-675 nm light. This was followed by mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization, depolarization and swelling, cytochrome c release, and apoptotic death. Desferrioxamine prevented mitochondrial ROS production and the events thereafter. Cyclosporin A plus trifluoperazine, blockers of the mitochondrial permeability transition, inhibited mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization and depolarization without affecting mitochondrial ROS generation. These data indicate that the mitochondrial ROS are critical in initiating mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization, which leads to mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release to the cytosol, and apoptotic death during PDT with Pc 4.

  3. Definition of the mitochondrial proteome by measurement of molecular masses of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Joe; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2006-10-31

    The covalent structure of a protein is incompletely defined by its gene sequence, and mass spectrometric analysis of the intact protein is needed to detect the presence of any posttranslational modifications. Because most membrane proteins are purified in detergents that are incompatible with mass spectrometric ionization techniques, this essential measurement has not been made on many hydrophobic proteins, and so proteomic data are incomplete. We have extracted membrane proteins from bovine mitochondria and detergent-purified NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) with organic solvents, fractionated the mixtures by hydrophilic interaction chromatography, and measured the molecular masses of the intact membrane proteins, including those of six subunits of complex I that are encoded in mitochondrial DNA. These measurements resolve long-standing uncertainties about the interpretation of the mitochondrial genome, and they contribute significantly to the definition of the covalent composition of complex I.

  4. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in atherosclerosis: mitochondria-targeted antioxidants as potential therapy.

    PubMed

    Victor, V M; Apostolova, N; Herance, R; Hernandez-Mijares, A; Rocha, M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic and acute overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under pathophysiologic conditions forms an integral part of the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and in particular atherosclerosis. These ROS are released from different sources, such as xanthine oxidase, lipoxygenase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, the uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase and, in particular, mitochondria. Endothelial dysfunction, characterized by a loss of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity, occurs early on in the development of atherosclerosis, and determines future vascular complications. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for mitochondria-mediated disease processes are not clear, oxidative stress seems to play an important role. In general, ROS are essential to cell function, but adequate levels of antioxidant defenses are required in order to avoid the harmful effects of excessive ROS production. Mitochondrial oxidative stress damage and dysfunction contribute to a number of cell pathologies that manifest themselves through a range of conditions. This review considers the process of atherosclerosis from a mitochondrial perspective, and assesses strategies for the targeted delivery of antioxidants to mitochondria that are currently under development. We will provide a summary of the following areas: the cellular metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its role in pathophysiological processes such as atherosclerosis; currently available antioxidants and possible reasons for their efficacy and inefficacy in ameliorating oxidative stress-mediated diseases; and recent developments in mitochondrially-targeted antioxidants that concentrate on the matrix-facing surface of the inner mitochondrial membrane in order to protect against mitochondrial oxidative damage, and their therapeutic potential as a treatment for atherosclerosis.

  5. Transaldolase is essential for maintenance of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and fertility of spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras; Qian, Yueming; Chohan, Kazim R.; Shirley, Cynthia R.; Amidon, Wendy; Banerjee, Sanjay; Middleton, Frank A.; Conkrite, Karina L.; Barcza, Maureen; Gonchoroff, Nick; Suarez, Susan S.; Banki, Katalin

    2006-01-01

    Fertility of spermatozoa depends on maintenance of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm), which is generated by the electron-transport chain and regulated by an oxidation–reduction equilibrium of reactive oxygen intermediates, pyridine nucleotides, and glutathione (GSH). Here, we report that male mice lacking transaldolase (TAL)−/− are sterile because of defective forward motility. TAL−/− spermatozoa show loss of Δψm and mitochondrial membrane integrity because of diminished NADPH, NADH, and GSH. Mitochondria constitute major Ca2+ stores; thus, diminished mitochondrial mass accounts for reduced Ca2+ fluxing, defective forward motility, and infertility. Reduced forward progression of TAL-deficient spermatozoa is associated with diminished mitochondrial reactive oxygen intermediate production and Ca2+ levels, intracellular acidosis, and compensatory down-regulation of carbonic anhydrase IV and overexpression of CD38 and γ-glutamyl transferase. Microarray analyses of gene expression in the testis, caput, and cauda epididymidis of TAL+/+, TAL+/−, and TAL−/− littermates confirmed a dominant impact of TAL deficiency on late stages of sperm-cell development, affecting the electron-transport chain and GSH metabolism. Stimulation of de novo GSH synthesis by oral N-acetyl-cysteine normalized the low fertility rate of TAL+/− males without affecting the sterility of TAL−/− males. Whereas TAL−/− sperm failed to fertilize TAL+/+ oocytes in vitro, sterility of TAL−/− sperm was circumvented by intracytoplasmic sperm injection, indicating that TAL deficiency influenced the structure and function of mitochondria without compromising the nucleus and DNA integrity. Collectively, these data reveal an essential role of TAL in sperm-cell mitochondrial function and, thus, male fertility. PMID:17003133

  6. Modulation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Permeabilization and Apoptosis by Ceramide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rego, António; Costa, Margarida; Chaves, Susana Rodrigues; Matmati, Nabil; Pereira, Helena; Sousa, Maria João; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Costa, Vítor; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a mitochondrial-dependent programmed cell death in response to different stimuli, such as acetic acid, with features similar to those of mammalian apoptosis. However, the upstream signaling events in this process, including those leading to mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, are still poorly characterized. Changes in sphingolipid metabolism have been linked to modulation of apoptosis in both yeast and mammalian cells, and ceramides have been detected in mitochondria upon apoptotic stimuli. In this study, we aimed to characterize the contribution of enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism to apoptotic cell death induced by acetic acid. We show that isc1Δ and lag1Δ mutants, lacking inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C and ceramide synthase, respectively, exhibited a higher resistance to acetic acid that was associated with lower levels of some phytoceramide species. Consistently, these mutant cells displayed lower levels of ROS production and reduced mitochondrial alterations, such as mitochondrial fragmentation and degradation, and decreased translocation of cytochrome c into the cytosol in response to acetic acid. These results suggest that ceramide production contributes to cell death induced by acetic acid, especially through hydrolysis of complex sphingolipids catalyzed by Isc1p and de novo synthesis catalyzed by Lag1p, and provide the first in vivo indication of its involvement in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization in yeast. PMID:23226203

  7. RNS60, a charge-stabilized nanostructure saline alters Xenopus Laevis oocyte biophysical membrane properties by enhancing mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Kim, Duk-Soo; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the effects of RNS60, a 0.9% saline containing charge-stabilized oxygen nanobubble-based structures. RNS60 is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. This study, implemented in Xenopus laevis oocytes, addresses both the electrophysiological membrane properties and parallel biological processes in the cytoplasm. Intracellular recordings from defolliculated X. laevis oocytes were implemented in: (1) air oxygenated standard Ringer's solution, (2) RNS60-based Ringer's solution, (3) RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen)-based Ringer's, and (4) ONS60 (saline containing high pressure oxygen without TCP modification)-based Ringer's. RNS60-based Ringer's solution induced membrane hyperpolarization from the resting membrane potential. This effect was prevented by: (1) ouabain (a blocker of the sodium/potassium ATPase), (2) rotenone (a mitochondrial electron transfer chain inhibitor preventing usable ATP synthesis), and (3) oligomycin A (an inhibitor of ATP synthase) indicating that RNS60 effects intracellular ATP levels. Increased intracellular ATP levels following RNS60 treatment were directly demonstrated using luciferin/luciferase photon emission. These results indicate that RNS60 alters intrinsic the electrophysiological properties of the X. laevis oocyte membrane by increasing mitochondrial-based ATP synthesis. Ultrastructural analysis of the oocyte cytoplasm demonstrated increased mitochondrial length in the presence of RNS60-based Ringer's solution. It is concluded that the biological properties of RNS60 relate to its ability to optimize ATP synthesis. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. Making heads or tails of mitochondrial membranes in longevity and aging: a role for comparative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play vital roles in metabolic energy transduction, intermediate molecule metabolism, metal ion homeostasis, programmed cell death and regulation of the production of reactive oxygen species. As a result of their broad range of functions, mitochondria have been strongly implicated in aging and longevity. Numerous studies show that aging and decreased lifespan are also associated with high reactive oxygen species production by mitochondria, increased mitochondrial DNA and protein damage, and with changes in the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. It is possible that the extent of fatty acid unsaturation of the mitochondrial membrane determines susceptibility to lipid oxidative damage and downstream protein and genome toxicity, thereby acting as a determinant of aging and lifespan. Reviewing the vast number of comparative studies on mitochondrial membrane composition, metabolism and lifespan reveals some evidence that lipid unsaturation ratios may correlate with lifespan. However, we caution against simply relating these two traits. They may be correlative but have no functional relation. We discuss an important methodology for body mass and phylogenetic correction in comparative studies. PMID:24588808

  9. Control of the ornithine cycle in Neurospora crassa by the mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R H; Ristow, J L

    1983-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the mitochondrial membrane separates ornithine used in arginine biosynthesis from ornithine used in the arginine degradative pathway in the cytosol. Ornithine easily exchanges across the mitochondrial membrane under conditions appropriate for synthesis of the immediate biosynthetic product, citrulline. Neither of the two mitochondrial enzymes required for the ornithine-to-citrulline conversion is feedback inhibitable in vitro. Nevertheless, when arginine is added to cells and cytosolic ornithine increases as arginine degradation begins, the rate of citrulline synthesis drops immediately to about 20% of normal (B. J. Bowman and R. H. Davis, Bacteriol. 130:285-291, 1977). We have studied this phenomenon in citrulline-accumulating strains carrying the arg-1 mutation. Citrulline accumulation is blocked when arginine is added to an arg-1 strain but not to an arg-1 strain carrying a mutation conferring insensitivity of intramitochondrial ornithine synthesis to arginine. Thus, ornithine is evidently unable to enter mitochondria in normal (feedback-sensitive) cells. Other experiments show that cytosolic ornithine enters mitochondria readily except when arginine or other basic amino acids are present at high levels in the cells. We conclude that in N. crassa, the mitochondrial membrane has evolved as a secondary site of feedback inhibition in arginine synthesis and that this prevents a wasteful cycling of catabolic ornithine back through the anabolic pathway. This is compared to the quite different mechanism by which the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents a futile ornithine cycle. PMID:6222031

  10. Mitochondrial fission and fusion in Dictyostelium discoideum: a search for proteins involved in membrane dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial morphology is maintained by two distinct membrane events -fission and fusion. Altering these conserved processes can disrupt mitochondrial morphology and distribution, thereby disrupting the organelle’s functionality and impeding cellular function. In higher eukaryotes, these processes are mediated by a family of dynamin-related proteins (DRP’s). In the lower eukaryotes, for instance Dictyostelium discoideum, mitochondrial fission and fusion have been implicated but not yet established. To understand the overall mechanism of these dynamics across organisms, we developed an assay to identify fission and fusion events in Dictyostelium and to assess the involvement of the mitochondrial proteins, MidA, CluA, and two DRP’s, DymA and DymB. Findings Using laser scanning confocal microscopy we show, for the first time, that lower eukaryotes mediate mitochondrial fission and fusion. In Dictyostelium, these processes are balanced, occurring approximately 1 event/minute. Quantification of the rates in midA-, cluA-, dymA-, or dymB- strains established that MidA appears to play an indirect role in the regulation of fission and fusion, while the DRP’s are not essential for these processes. Rates of fission and fusion were significantly reduced in cluA-cells, indicating that CluA is necessary for maintaining both fission and fusion. Conclusions We have successfully demonstrated that Dictyostelium mitochondria undergo the dynamic processes of fission and fusion. The classical mediators of membrane dynamics - the DRP’s – are not necessary for these dynamics, whereas CluA is necessary for both processes. This work contributes to our overall understanding of mitochondrial dynamics and ultimately will provide additional insight into mitochondrial disease. PMID:22980139

  11. Loss of Drp1 function alters OPA1 processing and changes mitochondrial membrane organization

    SciTech Connect

    Moepert, Kristin; Hajek, Petr; Frank, Stephan; Chen, Christiane; Kaufmann, Joerg; Santel, Ansgar

    2009-08-01

    RNAi mediated loss of Drp1 function changes mitochondrial morphology in cultured HeLa and HUVEC cells by shifting the balance of mitochondrial fission and fusion towards unopposed fusion. Over time, inhibition of Drp1 expression results in the formation of a highly branched mitochondrial network along with 'bulge'-like structures. These changes in mitochondrial morphology are accompanied by a reduction in levels of Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and 2 (Mfn2) and a modified proteolytic processing of OPA1 isoforms, resulting in the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, our data imply that bulge formation is driven by Mfn1 action along with particular proteolytic short-OPA1 (s-OPA1) variants: Loss of Mfn2 in the absence of Drp1 results in an increase of Mfn1 levels along with processed s-OPA1-isoforms, thereby enhancing continuous 'fusion' and bulge formation. Moreover, bulge formation might reflect s-OPA1 mitochondrial membrane remodeling activity, resulting in the compartmentalization of cytochrome c deposits. The proteins Yme1L and PHB2 appeared not associated with the observed enhanced OPA1 proteolysis upon RNAi of Drp1, suggesting the existence of other OPA1 processing controlling proteins. Taken together, Drp1 appears to affect the activity of the mitochondrial fusion machinery by unbalancing the protein levels of mitofusins and OPA1.

  12. Radiation inactivation method provides evidence that membrane-bound mitochondrial creatine kinase is an oligomer

    SciTech Connect

    Quemeneur, E.; Eichenberger, D.; Goldschmidt, D.; Vial, C.; Beauregard, G.; Potier, M.

    1988-06-30

    Lyophilized suspensions of rabbit heart mitochondria have been irradiated with varying doses of gamma rays. Mitochondrial creatine kinase activity was inactivated exponentially with a radiation inactivation size of 352 or 377 kDa depending upon the initial medium. These values are in good agreement with the molecular mass previously deduced from by permeation experiments: 357 kDa. This is the first direct evidence showing that the native form of mitochondrial creatine kinase is associated to the inner membrane as an oligomer, very likely an octamer.

  13. Glucagon effects on the membrane potential and calcium uptake rate of rat liver mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Wingrove, D.E.; Amatruda, J.M.; Gunter, T.E.

    1984-08-10

    It has been widely reported that the in vivo administration of glucagon to rats results in the stimulation of calcium influx in subsequently isolated liver mitochondria. The mechanism of this effect is investigated through simultaneous measurements of calcium uptake rate and mitochondrial membrane potential. This allows the measurement of the calcium uniporter conductance independent of hormonal effects on electron transport or respiration. Two experimental approaches are used. The first involves measuring the uptake of 40-50 nmol of Ca/sup 2 +//mg of mitochondrial protein with the calcium dye antipyrylazo III; the second uses /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ to follow uptake in the presence of 0.5 to 1.5 ..mu..M free calcium, buffered with HEDTA. In both cases a tetraphenyl phosphonium electrode is used to follow membrane potential, and membrane potential is varied using either malonate or butylmalonate in the presence of rotenone. The relative merits of these two approaches are discussed. The conductance of the calcium uniporter is found not to be stimulated by glucagon pretreatment. Also, the relative glucagon stimulation of both calcium influx and membrane potential is found to increase with increasing malonate concentration. These results imply that there is no direct stimulation of calcium uptake into liver mitochondria following glucagon treatment. The results are consistent with a glucagon stimulation of substrate transport, substrate oxidation, or a stimulation of electron transport resulting in an increased membrane potential and secondary stimulation of calcium uptake.

  14. Alterations in Lipid Levels of Mitochondrial Membranes Induced by Amyloid-β: A Protective Role of Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Lopez-Armas, Gabriela; Cruz-Ramos, Jose; Melnikov, Valery G.; Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Munoz, Ruben; Reiter, Russel J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer pathogenesis involves mitochondrial dysfunction, which is closely related to amyloid-β (Aβ) generation, abnormal tau phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Alterations in membranal components, including cholesterol and fatty acids, their characteristics, disposition, and distribution along the membranes, have been studied as evidence of cell membrane alterations in AD brain. The majority of these studies have been focused on the cytoplasmic membrane; meanwhile the mitochondrial membranes have been less explored. In this work, we studied lipids and mitochondrial membranes in vivo, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ). The purpose was to determine how Aβ may be responsible for beginning of a vicious cycle where oxidative stress and alterations in cholesterol, lipids and fatty acids, feed back on each other to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. We observed changes in mitochondrial membrane lipids, and fatty acids, following intracerebral injection of fibrillar Aβ in aged Wistar rats. Melatonin, a well-known antioxidant and neuroimmunomodulator indoleamine, reversed some of these alterations and protected mitochondrial membranes from obvious damage. Additionally, melatonin increased the levels of linolenic and n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid, in the same site where amyloid β was injected, favoring an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:22666620

  15. An essential novel component of the noncanonical mitochondrial outer membrane protein import system of trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Pusnik, Mascha; Mani, Jan; Schmidt, Oliver; Niemann, Moritz; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schnarwiler, Felix; Warscheid, Bettina; Lithgow, Trevor; Meisinger, Chris; Schneider, André

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial outer membrane protein Tom40 is the general entry gate for imported proteins in essentially all eukaryotes. Trypanosomatids lack Tom40, however, and use instead a protein termed the archaic translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (ATOM). Here we report the discovery of pATOM36, a novel essential component of the trypanosomal outer membrane protein import system that interacts with ATOM. pATOM36 is not related to known Tom proteins from other organisms and mediates the import of matrix proteins. However, there is a group of precursor proteins whose import is independent of pATOM36. Domain-swapping experiments indicate that the N-terminal presequence-containing domain of the substrate proteins at least in part determines the dependence on pATOM36. Secondary structure profiling suggests that pATOM36 is composed largely of α-helices and its assembly into the outer membrane is independent of the sorting and assembly machinery complex. Taken together, these results show that pATOM36 is a novel component associated with the ATOM complex that promotes the import of a subpopulation of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix. PMID:22787278

  16. Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondrial Nucleoids Reveals Their Spatial Range, Limits, and Membrane Interaction ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Timothy A.; Tkachuk, Ariana N.; Shtengel, Gleb; Kopek, Benjamin G.; Bogenhagen, Daniel F.; Hess, Harald F.; Clayton, David A.

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental objective in molecular biology is to understand how DNA is organized in concert with various proteins, RNA, and biological membranes. Mitochondria maintain and express their own DNA (mtDNA), which is arranged within structures called nucleoids. Their functions, dimensions, composition, and precise locations relative to other mitochondrial structures are poorly defined. Superresolution fluorescence microscopy techniques that exceed the previous limits of imaging within the small and highly compartmentalized mitochondria have been recently developed. We have improved and employed both two- and three-dimensional applications of photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM and iPALM, respectively) to visualize the core dimensions and relative locations of mitochondrial nucleoids at an unprecedented resolution. PALM reveals that nucleoids differ greatly in size and shape. Three-dimensional volumetric analysis indicates that, on average, the mtDNA within ellipsoidal nucleoids is extraordinarily condensed. Two-color PALM shows that the freely diffusible mitochondrial matrix protein is largely excluded from the nucleoid. In contrast, nucleoids are closely associated with the inner membrane and often appear to be wrapped around cristae or crista-like inner membrane invaginations. Determinations revealing high packing density, separation from the matrix, and tight association with the inner membrane underscore the role of mechanisms that regulate access to mtDNA and that remain largely unknown. PMID:22006021

  17. THE EFFECT OF NITRIC OXIDE ON SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTON GRADIENT AND MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL OF BRAIN NERVE TERMINALS.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, A S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of nitric oxide on synaptic vesicle proton gradient and membrane potential of rat brain nerve terminals was studied. It has been shown that nitric oxide in the form of S-nitrosothiols at nanomolar concentrations had no effect on the studied parameters, but caused a rapid dissipation of synaptic vesicle proton gradient and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane in the presence of a SH-reducing compound such as dithiothreitol. Both processes were reversible and the rate of H(+)-gradient restoration depended on the redox potential of nerve terminals, namely the molar ratio of reductant/oxidant. This facts, as well as insensitivity of the studied processes to the inhibitor of NO-sensitive guanylate cyclase such as ODQ, allow suggesting that post-translational modification of thiol residues of the mitochondrial and synaptic vesicle proteins underlies the effect of nitric oxide on the key functional parameters ofpresynaptic nerve terminals.

  18. Demonstration of an intramitochondrial invertase activity and the corresponding sugar transporters of the inner mitochondrial membrane in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Horemans, Nele; Passarella, Salvatore; Tarcsay, Akos; Orsi, Ferenc; Salgó, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2008-10-01

    Genetic evidences indicate that alkaline/neutral invertases are present in plant cell organelles, and they might have a novel physiological function in mitochondria. The present study demonstrates an invertase activity in the mitochondrial matrix of Helianthus tuberosus tubers. The pH optimum, the kinetic parameters and the inhibitor profile of the invertase activity indicated that it belongs to the neutral invertases. In accordance with this topology, transport activities responsible for the mediation of influx/efflux of substrate/products were studied in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The transport of sucrose, glucose and fructose was shown to be bidirectional, saturable and independent of the mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential. Sucrose transport was insensitive to the inhibitors of the proton-sucrose symporters. The different kinetic parameters and inhibitors as well as the absence of cross-inhibition suggest that sucrose, glucose and fructose transport are mediated by separate transporters in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mitochondrial invertase system composed by an enzyme activity in the matrix and the corresponding sugar transporters might have a role in both osmoregulation and intermediary metabolism.

  19. Stability of membrane potential in heart mitochondria: Single mitochondrion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Uechi, Yukiko; Yoshioka, Hisashi; Morikawa, Daisuke; Ohta, Yoshihiro . E-mail: ohta@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2006-06-16

    Mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi} {sub m}) plays an important role in cellular activity. Although {delta}{psi} {sub m} of intracellular mitochondria are relatively stable, the recent experiments with isolated mitochondria demonstrate that individual mitochondria show frequent fluctuations of {delta}{psi} {sub m}. The current study is performed to investigate the factors that stabilize {delta}{psi} {sub m} in cells by observing {delta}{psi} {sub m} of individual isolated mitochondria with fluorescence microscopy. Here, we report that (1) the transient depolarizations are also induced for mitochondria in plasma membrane permeabilized cells, (2) almost all mitochondria isolated from porcine hearts show the transient depolarizations that is enhanced with the net efflux of protons from the matrix to the intermembrane space, and (3) ATP and ADP significantly inhibit the transient depolarizations by plural mechanisms. These results suggest that the suppression of acute alkalinization of the matrix together with the presence of ATP and ADP contributes to the stabilization of {delta}{psi} {sub m} in cells.

  20. Ergosterol content specifies targeting of tail-anchored proteins to mitochondrial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Katrin; Frumkin, Idan; Herzig, Yonatan; Rimon, Nitzan; Özbalci, Cagakan; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Schuldiner, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins have a single C-terminal transmembrane domain, making their biogenesis dependent on posttranslational translocation. Despite their importance, no dedicated insertion machinery has been uncovered for mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) TA proteins. To decipher the molecular mechanisms guiding MOM TA protein insertion, we performed two independent systematic microscopic screens in which we visualized the localization of model MOM TA proteins on the background of mutants in all yeast genes. We could find no mutant in which insertion was completely blocked. However, both screens demonstrated that MOM TA proteins were partially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in ∆spf1 cells. Spf1, an ER ATPase with unknown function, is the first protein shown to affect MOM TA protein insertion. We found that ER membranes in ∆spf1 cells become similar in their ergosterol content to mitochondrial membranes. Indeed, when we visualized MOM TA protein distribution in yeast strains with reduced ergosterol content, they phenocopied the loss of Spf1. We therefore suggest that the inherent differences in membrane composition between organelle membranes are sufficient to determine membrane integration specificity in a eukaryotic cell. PMID:22918956

  1. Polyhydroxybutyrate targets mammalian mitochondria and increases permeability of plasmalemmal and mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Elustondo, Pia A; Angelova, Plamena R; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y; Pavlov, Evgeny V

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle.

  2. Polyhydroxybutyrate Targets Mammalian Mitochondria and Increases Permeability of Plasmalemmal and Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Elustondo, Pia A.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Kawalec, Michał; Michalak, Michał; Kurcok, Piotr; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Pavlov, Evgeny V.

    2013-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a polyester of 3-hydroxybutyric acid (HB) that is ubiquitously present in all organisms. In higher eukaryotes PHB is found in the length of 10 to 100 HB units and can be present in free form as well as in association with proteins and inorganic polyphosphate. It has been proposed that PHB can mediate ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes. We investigated the ability of PHB to interact with living cells and isolated mitochondria and the effects of these interactions on membrane ion transport. We performed experiments using a fluorescein derivative of PHB (fluo-PHB). We found that fluo-PHB preferentially accumulated inside the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Accumulation of fluo-PHB induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization. This membrane depolarization was significantly delayed by the inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore - Cyclosporin A. Further experiments using intact cells as well as isolated mitochondria confirmed that the effects of PHB directly linked to its ability to facilitate ion transport, including calcium, across the membranes. We conclude that PHB demonstrates ionophoretic properties in biological membranes and this effect is most profound in mitochondria due to the selective accumulation of the polymer in this organelle. PMID:24086638

  3. A model for understanding membrane potential using springs.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, David L

    2005-12-01

    In this report, I present a simple model using springs to conceptualize the relationship between ionic conductances across a cellular membrane and their effect on membrane potential. The equation describing the relationships linking membrane potential, ionic equilibrium potential, and ionic conductance is of similar form to that describing the force generated by a spring as a function of its displacement. The spring analogy is especially useful in helping students to conceptualize the effects of multiple conductances on membrane potential.

  4. Evaluations of membrane fouling potential in water treatment applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, S.C.; Ravindran, V.; Pirbazari, M.

    1999-07-01

    Membrane processes such as ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis are becoming increasingly popular in water treatment utilities because of their ability to produce high finished water quality. A major problem affecting the economics of these processes is permeate flux decline due to membrane fouling. The types of membrane fouling can be broadly categorized as follows: organic fouling, biofouling, colloidal fouling, inorganic fouling, and precipitation scaling. The membrane performance with respect to resistance to fouling as well as rejection characteristics is an important consideration. Selection of appropriate membranes for performance improvement in water treatment applications mandates the evaluation of the fouling potential, an aspect related to the membrane material, membrane type, nature of feed solution, and interactions between membranes and solutes. In the present study, the membrane fouling potential is evaluated by membrane performance tests with respect to permeate flux and solute rejections, and by membrane surface characterization techniques including measurements of membrane sorption, zeta potential, contact angles, and membrane surface morphology. These surface characterization techniques are intended to evaluate membrane sorption characteristics (with respect to foulants), membrane surface hydrophobicity, membrane surface charge under different solution conditions, and changes on membrane surface topography on the clean and fouled membranes.

  5. Structural and functional alterations in mitochondrial membrane in picrotoxin-induced epileptic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Katyare, Surendra S

    2005-03-01

    Mitochondrial function is a key determinant of both excitability and viability of neurons. Present studies were carried out to decipher cerebral mitochondrial oxidative energy metabolism and membrane function in the chronic condition of generalized seizures induced by picrotoxin (PTX) in rats. PTX-induced convulsions resulted in decreased respiration rates (14-41%) with glutamate, pyruvate + malate, and succinate as substrate. The ADP phosphorylation rates were drastically reduced by 44-65%. An opposite trend was observed with ascorbate + N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine [corrected] (TMPD) as substrate. In general, uncoupling of the mitochondrial electron transport was observed after PTX treatment. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities were decreased by 20-80%; also, there was significant reduction in cytochrome b content after PTX treatment, while the F(o)F(1) ATPase (complex V) activity increased in basal and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-stimulated condition, indicating increased membrane fragility. The substrate kinetics analysis had shown that K(m) and V(max) of the higher affinity kinetic component of ATPase increased significantly by 1.2- to 1.4-fold in epileptic condition. Temperature kinetic analysis revealed 1.2-fold increase in energies of activation with decreased transition temperature. The total phospholipid (TPL) and cholesterol (CHL) contents decreased significantly with lowering of diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), and phosphatidylserine (PS), while lysophospholipid (lyso), sphingomyelin (SPM), and phosphatidylcholine components were found to be elevated. Brain mitochondrial membrane was somewhat more fluidized in epileptic animals. Possible consequences of mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) dysfunction are discussed. In conclusion, impairment of MRC function along with structural alterations suggests novel pathophysiological mechanisms important for

  6. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  7. Correlation between fluidising effects on phospholipid membranes and mitochondrial respiration of propofol and p-nitrosophenol homologues.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Wisniewska, Anna; Fiore, Cristina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2003-03-25

    Nitrosopropofol (2-6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol) has dramatic consequences for respiration, ATP synthesis and the transmembrane potential of isolated rat liver mitochondria at concentrations at which propofol (2-6-diisopropylphenol) does not cause any apparent effects. These results correlate well with the observation that nitrosopropofol is also a stronger perturbing agent of phospholipid membranes. In this paper we verify the possible biological activity of different phenols and nitrosophenols on mitochondrial respiration. We then discuss their interactions with phospholipid liposomes, studied with differential scanning calorimetry, spin labelling techniques and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, in order to obtain information on drug distribution and the modifications they impose on lipid bilayer. The results of the experiments performed on mitochondria and model membranes prove an interesting correlation between the effects of the molecules on both systems.

  8. Ca(2+) and mitochondrial ROS: Both hero and villain in membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sandra T

    2017-09-05

    Membrane repair is a symphony of signaling, conducted principally by the steep influx of Ca(2+) through an injured membrane. In this issue of Science Signaling, Horn et al reveal unique interplay between Ca(2+) influx and mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species (mtROS) to enhance actin-mediated wound closure for survival of injured mammalian muscle and nonmuscle cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  9. A collection of yeast mutants selectively resistant to ionophores acting on mitochondrial inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Lalakova, Jana; Abelovska, Lenka; Klobucnikova, Vlasta; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2008-03-01

    Valinomycin and nigericin are potassium ionophores acting selectively on the mitochondrial inner membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Kovac, L., Bohmerova, E., Butko, P., 1982a. Ionophores and intact cells. I. Valinomycin and nigericin act preferentially on mitochondria and not on the plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 721, 341-348]. However, the molecular mechanism of their action is not understood. Here we show that their selective effect on mitochondrial membranes is not caused by the pleiotropic drug resistance system. To identify the molecular components mediating the action of ionophores we isolated several mutants specifically resistant to valinomycin and/or nigericin. In contrast to the parental strain, these mutants do not form respiratory-deficient cells in the presence of ionophores. Moreover, all mutants harbor extensively fragmented mitochondria and these morphological defects can be alleviated by the ionophores. Interestingly, we observed that these mitochondrial defects may be accompanied by changes in vacuolar dynamics. Our results demonstrate that the classical genetic approach can provide a starting point for the analysis of components involved in the action of ionophores on mitochondria-related processes in eukaryotic cell.

  10. Fluctuations of the proton-electromotive force across the inner mitochondrial membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, Joaquim; Fornés, José A.

    1997-05-01

    The intermembrane mitochondrial space (IMMS) is delimited by the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes and defines a region of molecular dimension where fluctuations of the number of free protons and of transmembrane voltage can give rise to fluctuations in the proton-electromotive force EPMF across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). We have applied the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistor Rm in parallel with a capacitor Cm representing the passive electrical properties of the IMM, in series with another capacitor Cb representing the proton-buffering power of the IMMS fluid. An access resistance Ra was defined as a link between the capacitor Cb and the membrane. Average EPMF fluctuations across the IMM were calculated for different assumptions concerning the intermembrane space dimensions. The calculated average EPMF fluctuations were in the vicinity of 100 mV for relaxation times in the few-microseconds range. The corresponding fluctuational protonic free energy is about 10 kJ/mole, which is comparable to the binding energy for protons in different transporters. This suggests that fluctuations in EPMF can be of relevance in the universe of forces influencing the molecular machinery embedded in the IMM.

  11. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins Assist Bid in Bax-mediated Lipidic Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Blanca; Quispe, Joel; Choudhary, Vineet; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Ajero, Teddy G.; Du, Han; Schneiter, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is a critical step in apoptosis and is regulated by Bcl-2 family proteins. In vitro systems using cardiolipin-containing liposomes have demonstrated the key features of MOMP induced by Bax and cleaved Bid; however, the nature of the “pores” and how they are formed remain obscure. We found that mitochondrial outer membranes contained very little cardiolipin, far less than that required for liposome permeabilization, despite their responsiveness to Bcl-2 family proteins. Strikingly, the incorporation of isolated mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins into liposomes lacking cardiolipin conferred responsiveness to cleaved Bid and Bax. Cardiolipin dependence was observed only when permeabilization was induced with cleaved Bid but not with Bid or Bim BH3 peptide or oligomerized Bax. Therefore, we conclude that MOM proteins specifically assist cleaved Bid in Bax-mediated permeabilization. Cryoelectron microscopy of cardiolipin-liposomes revealed that cleaved Bid and Bax produced large round holes with diameters of 25–100 nm, suggestive of lipidic pores. In sum, we propose that activated Bax induces lipidic pore formation and that MOM proteins assist cleaved Bid in this process in the absence of cardiolipin. PMID:19244344

  12. The mechanisms of fatty acid-induced proton permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, L; Wieckowski, M R

    1999-10-01

    Nonesterified long-chain fatty acids have long been known as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. They are efficient protonophores in the inner mitochondrial membrane but not so in artificial phospholipid membranes. In the un-ionized form, they undergo a rapid spontaneous transbilayer movement (flip-flop). However, the transbilayer passage of the dissociated (anionic) form is hindered by the negatively charged hydrophilic carboxylic group. In the inner mitochondrial membrane, the transfer of fatty acid anions is mediated by the adenine nucleotide translocase, the dicarboxylate carrier, and the glutamate/aspartate carrier. As a result, the passage of protons and electric charges is a concerted effect of the spontaneous flip-flop of the undissociated (protonated) form in one direction and carrier-facilitated transfer of the ionized (deprotonated) form in the other direction. In addition, fatty acids also promote opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, presumably due to their interaction with one of its constituents, the adenine nucleotide translocase, thus forming an additional route for dissipation of the proton gradient. Structural prerequisites for these proton-conducting mechanisms are (1) a weakly ionized carboxylic group and (2) a hydrocarbon chain of appropriate length without substituents limiting its mobility and hydrophobicity.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of the Yeast Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Reveals Accumulation of a Subclass of PreproteinsD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zahedi, Rene P.; Sickmann, Albert; Boehm, Andreas M.; Winkler, Christiane; Zufall, Nicole; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondria consist of four compartments–outer membrane, intermembrane space, inner membrane, and matrix—with crucial but distinct functions for numerous cellular processes. A comprehensive characterization of the proteome of an individual mitochondrial compartment has not been reported so far. We used a eukaryotic model organism, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to determine the proteome of highly purified mitochondrial outer membranes. We obtained a coverage of ∼85% based on the known outer membrane proteins. The proteome represents a rich source for the analysis of new functions of the outer membrane, including the yeast homologue (Hfd1/Ymr110c) of the human protein causing Sjögren–Larsson syndrome. Surprisingly, a subclass of proteins known to reside in internal mitochondrial compartments were found in the outer membrane proteome. These seemingly mislocalized proteins included most top scorers of a recent genome-wide analysis for mRNAs that were targeted to mitochondria and coded for proteins of prokaryotic origin. Together with the enrichment of the precursor form of a matrix protein in the outer membrane, we conclude that the mitochondrial outer membrane not only contains resident proteins but also accumulates a conserved subclass of preproteins destined for internal mitochondrial compartments. PMID:16407407

  14. Isolation of hepatic mitochondrial contact sites: previously unrecognized inner membrane components.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Charles; Kerner, Janos; Turkaly, Peter; Minkler, Paul; Tandler, Bernard

    2002-03-01

    An improved, fast, and relatively simple procedure for isolation of hepatic mitochondrial contact sites is described. These contact sites include conventional outer membrane, but the inner membrane component (which we term fusion patches) has a unique biochemical composition characterized by a clustering of three specific inner membrane proteins of 54, 52, and 31 kDa identified by proteomics, respectively, as the alpha and beta subunits of ATP synthase and the liver isoform of adenine nucleotide transferase. The contact site fraction was prepared using a discontinuous sucrose gradient from crude outer membranes derived from swollen/shrunk rat liver mitochondria. The resultant contact sites were analyzed using a continuous sucrose density gradient, revealing an apparent heterogeneity due to varying amounts of retained fusion patches in relation to the unvarying outer membrane component. By electron microscopy, contact sites consist of small vacuoles that contain one or several tiny vesicles, many of which are composed of multiple, closely packed lamellae. The contact site subfraction morphology is consistent with the biochemical variation. Thus, contact sites are not haphazard fusions of outer and inner membrane, but consist in part of regions of inner membrane of novel composition (fusion patches) and of conventional outer membrane.

  15. MPV17 encodes an inner mitochondrial membrane protein and is mutated in infantile hepatic mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Spinazzola, Antonella; Viscomi, Carlo; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Carrara, Franco; D'Adamo, Pio; Calvo, Sarah; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Donnini, Claudia; Weiher, Hans; Strisciuglio, Pietro; Parini, Rossella; Sarzi, Emmanuelle; Chan, Alicia; DiMauro, Salvatore; Rötig, Agnes; Gasparini, Paolo; Ferrero, Iliana; Mootha, Vamsi K; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) DNA depletion syndromes (MDDS) are genetic disorders characterized by a severe, tissue-specific decrease of mtDNA copy number, leading to organ failure. There are two main clinical presentations: myopathic (OMIM 609560) and hepatocerebral (OMIM 251880). Known mutant genes, including TK2, SUCLA2, DGUOK and POLG, account for only a fraction of MDDS cases. We found a new locus for hepatocerebral MDDS on chromosome 2p21-23 and prioritized the genes on this locus using a new integrative genomics strategy. One of the top-scoring candidates was the human ortholog of the mouse kidney disease gene Mpv17. We found disease-segregating mutations in three families with hepatocerebral MDDS and demonstrated that, contrary to the alleged peroxisomal localization of the MPV17 gene product, MPV17 is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, and its absence or malfunction causes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) failure and mtDNA depletion, not only in affected individuals but also in Mpv17-/- mice.

  16. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  17. A mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like gene (Immp2l) affects mitochondrial function and impairs fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baisong; Poirier, Christophe; Gaspar, Tamas; Gratzke, Christian; Harrison, Wilbur; Busija, David; Matzuk, Martin M; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Overbeek, Paul A; Bishop, Colin E

    2008-04-01

    The mitochondrion is involved in energy generation, apoptosis regulation, and calcium homeostasis. Mutations in genes involved in mitochondrial processes often result in a severe phenotype or embryonic lethality, making the study of mitochondrial involvement in aging, neurodegeneration, or reproduction challenging. Using a transgenic insertional mutagenesis strategy, we generated a mouse mutant, Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove, with a mutation in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene. The mutation affected the signal peptide sequence processing of mitochondrial proteins cytochrome c1 and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase 2. The inefficient processing of mitochondrial membrane proteins perturbed mitochondrial function so that mitochondria from mutant mice manifested hyperpolarization, higher than normal superoxide ion generation, and higher levels of ATP. Homozygous Immp2lTg(Tyr)979Ove females were infertile due to defects in folliculogenesis and ovulation, whereas mutant males were severely subfertile due to erectile dysfunction. The data suggest that the high superoxide ion levels lead to a decrease in the bioavailability of nitric oxide and an increase in reactive oxygen species stress, which underlies these reproductive defects. The results provide a novel link between mitochondrial dysfunction and infertility and suggest that superoxide ion targeting agents may prove useful for treating infertility in a subpopulation of infertile patients.

  18. Midpoint potentials of the mitochondrial cytochromes of Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Kusel, J P; Storey, B T

    1976-01-01

    The midpoint potentials of the mitochondrial respiratory chain cytochromes of the protozoan Crithidia fasciculata at pH 7.2, Em7.2, show great similarity to those measured in higher organisms. Values of Em7.2 for cytochromes a and a3 are +165 and +340 mV. Both c cytochromes have Em7.2 = +230 mV. There are two b cytochromes with the same spectral characteristics with Em7.2 = -20 and -135 mV. These values are compatible with two sites of energy conservation for oxidative phosphorylation in these mitochondria. All cytochrome components show potentiometric titrations with n = 1. There is a fluorescent flavoprotein in these mitochondria with Em7.2 = -40 mV and n =2, whose function is not known. PMID:986389

  19. High fat diet-induced modifications in membrane lipid and mitochondrial-membrane protein signatures precede the development of hepatic insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, M.; Schäfer, A.; Seelig, A.; Schultheiß, J.; Wu, M.; Aichler, M.; Leonhardt, J.; Rathkolb, B.; Rozman, J.; Sarioglu, H.; Hauck, S.M.; Ueffing, M.; Wolf, E.; Kastenmueller, G.; Adamski, J.; Walch, A.; Hrabé de Angelis, M.; Neschen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Excess lipid intake has been implicated in the pathophysiology of hepatosteatosis and hepatic insulin resistance. Lipids constitute approximately 50% of the cell membrane mass, define membrane properties, and create microenvironments for membrane-proteins. In this study we aimed to resolve temporal alterations in membrane metabolite and protein signatures during high-fat diet (HF)-mediated development of hepatic insulin resistance. Methods We induced hepatosteatosis by feeding C3HeB/FeJ male mice an HF enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 fatty acids for 7, 14, or 21 days. Longitudinal changes in hepatic insulin sensitivity were assessed via the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, in membrane lipids via t-metabolomics- and membrane proteins via quantitative proteomics-analyses, and in hepatocyte morphology via electron microscopy. Data were compared to those of age- and litter-matched controls maintained on a low-fat diet. Results Excess long-chain polyunsaturated C18:2n6 intake for 7 days did not compromise hepatic insulin sensitivity, however, induced hepatosteatosis and modified major membrane lipid constituent signatures in liver, e.g. increased total unsaturated, long-chain fatty acid-containing acyl-carnitine or membrane-associated diacylglycerol moieties and decreased total short-chain acyl-carnitines, glycerophosphocholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, or sphingolipids. Hepatic insulin sensitivity tended to decrease within 14 days HF-exposure. Overt hepatic insulin resistance developed until day 21 of HF-intervention and was accompanied by morphological mitochondrial abnormalities and indications for oxidative stress in liver. HF-feeding progressively decreased the abundance of protein-components of all mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, inner and outer mitochondrial membrane substrate transporters independent from the hepatocellular mitochondrial volume in liver. Conclusions We assume HF-induced modifications in membrane lipid

  20. Effects of (-) mammea A/BB isolated from Calophyllum brasiliense leaves and derivatives on mitochondrial membrane of Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Brenzan, M A; Santos, A O; Nakamura, C V; Filho, B P Dias; Ueda-Nakamura, T; Young, M C M; Côrrea, A G; Júnior, J Alvim; Morgado-Díaz, J A; Cortez, D A G

    2012-02-15

    We have previously demonstrated antileishmanial activity on Leishmania amazonensis of the natural (1-2), synthetic (7) and derivatives of coumarin (-) mammea A/BB (3-6) isolated from the dichloromethane extract of Calophyllum brasiliense leaves. The aim of the present study was to evaluate morphological and ultrastructural alterations in Leishmania amazonensis induced by these compounds. In promastigote forms, all seven compounds produced significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations, as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The compound 5,7-dihydroxy-8-(2-methylbutanoyl)-6-(3-methylbutyl)-4-phenyl-chroman-2-one (3), the most active antileishmanial with LD₅₀ of 0.9 μM), induced cell shrinkage and a rounded appearance of the cells. Parasites incubated in the presence of compound (3) showed ultrastructural changes, such as the appearance of mitochondrial swelling with a reduction in the density of the mitochondrial matrix and the presence of vesicles inside the mitochondrion, indicating damage and significant change in this organelle; abnormal chromatin condensation, alterations in the nuclear envelope, intense atypical cytoplasmic vacuolization, and the appearance of autophagic vacuoles were also observed. In addition, the compound (3) may be acting to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane potential of the cells, leading to death of the parasite.

  1. Ultrastructural Transformations in Bean Inner Mitochondrial Membranes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R. H.; Thurston, E. L.; Mitchell, R.

    1973-01-01

    The ultrastructure of inner membrane-matrix mitochondria isolated from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) shoots was examined in different metabolic states. Gross ultrastructural transformations analogous to the condensed-to-orthodox configurational changes reported in mammalian mitochondria are observed on transistion from nonrespiring to respiring metabolism. With the induction of oxidative phosphorylation, the particles remain in the orthodox configurational state. The reverse orthodox-to-condensed configurational changes observed in mammalian preparations does not occur. Optically monitored absorbancy studies with bean particles show a substrate-supported Pi-induced swelling under the same conditions that induce the condensed-to-orthodox ultrastructural transformation. The swelling is associated with the net uptake of K+ and Pi as well as a small Pi-induced respiratory stimulation. When phosphorylation is initiated with these swollen particles, the optically monitored volume remains unchanged. Thus a positive correlation exists between the ultrastructural configuration and the osmotic volume changes, which supports the conclusion that configurational changes reflect internal osmotic adjustments. Images PMID:16658291

  2. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease.

    PubMed

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-05-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease.

  3. Mitochondrial-dependent Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy of IgG4-related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buelli, Simona; Perico, Luca; Galbusera, Miriam; Abbate, Mauro; Morigi, Marina; Novelli, Rubina; Gagliardini, Elena; Tentori, Chiara; Rottoli, Daniela; Sabadini, Ettore; Saito, Takao; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Saeki, Takako; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of glomerular lesions of membranous nephropathy (MN), including seldom-reported IgG4-related disease, is still elusive. Unlike in idiopathic MN where IgG4 prevails, in this patient IgG3 was predominant in glomerular deposits in the absence of circulating anti-phospholipase A2 receptor antibodies, suggesting a distinct pathologic process. Here we documented that IgG4 retrieved from the serum of our propositus reacted against carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) at the podocyte surface. In patient's biopsy, glomerular CAII staining increased and co-localized with subepithelial IgG4 deposits along the capillary walls. Patient's IgG4 caused a drop in cell pH followed by mitochondrial dysfunction, excessive ROS production and cytoskeletal reorganization in cultured podocytes. These events promoted mitochondrial superoxide-dismutase-2 (SOD2) externalization on the plasma membrane, becoming recognizable by complement-binding IgG3 anti-SOD2. Among patients with IgG4-related disease only sera of those with IgG4 anti-CAII antibodies caused low intracellular pH and mitochondrial alterations underlying SOD2 externalization. Circulating IgG4 anti-CAII can cause podocyte injury through processes of intracellular acidification, mitochondrial oxidative stress and neoantigen induction in patients with IgG4 related disease. The onset of MN in a subset of patients could be due to IgG4 antibodies recognizing CAII with consequent exposure of mitochondrial neoantigen in the context of multifactorial pathogenesis of disease. PMID:26137589

  4. Studies of membrane topology of mitochondrial cholesterol hydroxylases CYPs 27A1 and 11A1

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Natalia; Liao, Wei-Li; Turko, Illarion V.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP or P450, EC 1.14.13.15) play an important role in metabolism of cholesterol. CYP27A1 hydroxylates cholesterol at position 27 and, thus, initiates cholesterol removal from many extrahepatic tissues. CYP11A1 is a steroidogenic P450 that converts cholesterol to pregnenolone, the first step in the biosynthesis of all steroid hormones. We utilized a new approach to study membrane topology of CYPs 27A1 and 11A1. This approach involves heterologous expression of membrane-bound P450 in E. coli, isolation of the P450-containing E. coli membranes, treatment of the membranes with protease, removal of the digested soluble portion and extraction of the membrane-associated peptides, which are then identified by mass spectrometry. By using this approach, we found four membrane-interacting peptides in CYP27A1, and two peptides in CYP11A1. Peptides in CYP27A1 represent a contiguous portion of the polypeptide chain (residues 210-251) corresponding to the putative F-G loop and adjacent portions of the F and G helices. Peptides in CYP11A1 are from the putative F-G loop (residues 218-225) and the C-terminal portion of the G helix (residues 238-250). This data is consistent with those obtained previously by us and others and provide new information about membrane topology of CYPs 27A1 and 11A1. PMID:18791760

  5. Examination of bioenergetic function in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Manish S.; Zhou, Yu; Molina, Anthony J.; Criswell, Tracy; Lu, Baisong

    2014-01-01

    Inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) protein is a mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase that cleaves the signal peptide sequences of cytochrome c1 (CYC1) and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2). Immp2l mutant mice show infertility and early signs of aging. It is unclear whether mitochondrial respiratory deficiency underlies this phenotype. Here we show that the intermediate forms of GPD2 and CYC1 have normal expression levels and enzymatic function in Immp2l mutants. Mitochondrial respiration is not diminished in isolated mitochondria and cells from mutant mice. Our data suggest that respiratory deficiency is not the cause of the observed Immp2l mutant phenotypes. PMID:25460737

  6. Examination of bioenergetic function in the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Manish S; Zhou, Yu; Molina, Anthony J; Criswell, Tracy; Lu, Baisong

    2014-01-01

    Inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2-like (IMMP2L) protein is a mitochondrial inner membrane peptidase that cleaves the signal peptide sequences of cytochrome c1 (CYC1) and mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD2). Immp2l mutant mice show infertility and early signs of aging. It is unclear whether mitochondrial respiratory deficiency underlies this phenotype. Here we show that the intermediate forms of GPD2 and CYC1 have normal expression levels and enzymatic function in Immp2l mutants. Mitochondrial respiration is not diminished in isolated mitochondria and cells from mutant mice. Our data suggest that respiratory deficiency is not the cause of the observed Immp2l mutant phenotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial membrane protein thiol reactivity with N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl is modified by Ca2+: correlation with mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Kowaltowski, A J; Vercesi, A E; Castilho, R F

    1997-02-15

    The content of mitochondrial membrane protein thiol groups accessible to react with the monofunctional thiol reagents mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was determined using Ellman's reagent. Deenergized mitochondria incubated in the presence of Ca2+ (0-500 microM) undergo a very significant decrease in the content of membrane protein thiols accessible to NEM, and an increase in the content of thiols accessible to mersalyl. This process is time-dependent and inhibited by Mg2+, ruthenium red and ADP, but not by cyclosporin A. This suggests that Ca2+ binding to the inner mitochondrial membrane promotes extensive alterations in the conformation of membrane proteins that result in location changes of thiol groups. The relationship between these alterations and mitochondrial membrane permeability transition was studied through the effect of NEM and mersalyl on mitochondrial swelling induced by Ca2+ plus t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bOOH) or Ca2+ plus the thiol cross-linkers 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) or phenylarsine oxide (PhAsO). We observed that the hydrophobic thiol reagent NEM inhibits the effects of t-bOOH, DIDS and PhAsO, while the hydrophilic thiol reagent mersalyl inhibits only the effect of DIDS. Permeability transition in all the situations studied is accompanied by a significant decrease in the total membrane protein thiol content. In addition, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization induced by PhAsO is inhibited by EGTA, but not by ruthenium red. This result suggests that PhAsO leads to permeability transition through a mechanism independent of intramitochondrial Ca2(+)-induced alterations of thiol group reactivity, but dependent on Ca2+ binding to an extramitochondrial site. This site is sensitive to extramitochondrial Ca2+ concentrations in range of 1-50 microM.

  8. Topogenesis of Mammalian Oxa1, a Component of the Mitochondrial Inner Membrane Protein Export Machinery*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takashi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Oxa1 is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein with a predicted five-transmembrane segment (TM1∼5) topology in which the N terminus and a hydrophilic loop, L2, are exposed to the intermembrane space and the C-terminal region and two loops, L1 and L3, are exposed to the matrix. Oxa1 mediates the insertion of mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits of respiratory complexes and several nuclear DNA-encoded proteins into the inner membrane from the matrix. Compared with yeast Oxa1, little is known about the import and function of mammalian Oxa1. Here, we investigated the topogenesis of Oxa1 in HeLa cells using systematic deletion or mutation constructs and found that (i) the N-terminal 64-residue segment formed a presequence, and its deletion directed the mature protein to the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating that the presequence arrests cotranslational activation of the potential endoplasmic reticulum-targeting signal within mature Oxa1, (ii) systematic deletion of Oxa1 TM segments revealed that the presence of all five TMs is essential for efficient membrane integration, (iii) the species-conserved hexapeptide (GLPWWG) located near the N terminus of TM1 was essential for export of the N-terminal segment and L2 into the intermembrane space from the matrix, i.e. for correct topogenesis of Oxa1, and (iv) GLPWWG placed near the N terminus of TM2 or TM3 in the reporter construct also supported its membrane integration in the Nout-Cin orientation. Together, these results demonstrated that topogenesis of Oxa1 is a cooperative event of all five TMs, and GLPWWG followed immediately by TM1 is essential for correct Oxa1 topogenesis. PMID:19349278

  9. Novel ligands that target the mitochondrial membrane protein mitoNEET.

    PubMed

    Bieganski, Robert M; Yarmush, Martin L

    2011-06-01

    Ligands of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of compounds, pioglitazone (Actos™) and rosiglitazone (Avandia™) are currently approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are known to bind to the PPAR-γ nuclear receptor subtype. Recent evidence suggesting PPAR-γ independent action of the TZDs led to the discovery of a novel integral outer mitochondrial membrane protein, mitoNEET. In spite of the several reported X-ray crystal structures of the unbound form of mitoNEET, the location and nature of the mitoNEET ligand binding sites (LBS) remain unknown. In this study, a molecular blind docking (BD) method was used to discover potential mitoNEET LBS and novel ligands, utilizing the program AutoDock Vina (v 1.0.2). Validation of BD was performed on the PPAR-γ receptor (PDB ID: 1ZGY) with the test compound rosiglitazone, demonstrating that the binding conformation of rosiglitazone determined by AutoDock Vina matches well with that of the cocrystallized ligand (root mean square deviation of the heavy atoms 1.45Å). The locations and a general ligand binding interaction model for the LBS were determined, leading to the discovery of novel mitoNEET ligands. An in vitro fluorescence binding assay utilizing purified recombinant mitoNEET protein was used to determine the binding affinity of a predicted mitoNEET ligand, and the data obtained is in good agreement with AutoDock Vina results. The discovery of potential mitoNEET ligand binding sites and novel ligands, opens up the possibility for detailed structural studies of mitoNEET-ligand complexes, as well as rational design of novel ligands specifically targeted for mitoNEET.

  10. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R.; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; DeVay, Rachel M.; Lackner, Laura L.; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya

    2011-01-01

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane–associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria. PMID:21987634

  11. ANT2-defective fibroblasts exhibit normal mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Dolly; Goldstein, Amy C.; El-Khoury, Riyad; Rak, Malgorzata; Edmunds, Lia; Rustin, Pierre; Vockley, Jerry; Schiff, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) transports glycolytic ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Patients with ANT2 deletion were recently reported. We aimed at characterizing mitochondrial functions in ANT2-defective fibroblasts. In spite of ANT2 expression in fibroblasts, we observed no difference between ANT2-defective and control fibroblasts for mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels. This indicates that ANT2 insufficiency does not alter fibroblast basal mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:26000237

  12. The oxidized phospholipid PazePC promotes permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes by Bax.

    PubMed

    Lidman, Martin; Pokorná, Šárka; Dingeldein, Artur P G; Sparrman, Tobias; Wallgren, Marcus; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in programmed cell death via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is tightly regulated by the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family. Intracellular oxidative stress causes the translocation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic family member, to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it induces membrane permeabilization. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPls) generated in the MOM during oxidative stress directly affect the onset and progression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Here we use MOM-mimicking lipid vesicles doped with varying concentrations of 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), an OxPl species known to significantly enhance Bax-membrane association, to investigate three key aspects of Bax's action at the MOM: 1) induction of Bax pores in membranes without additional mediator proteins, 2) existence of a threshold OxPl concentration required for Bax-membrane action and 3) mechanism by which PazePC disturbs membrane organization to facilitate Bax penetration. Fluorescence leakage studies revealed that Bax-induced leakage, especially its rate, increased with the vesicles' PazePC content without any detectable threshold neither for OxPl nor Bax. Moreover, the leakage rate correlated with the Bax to lipid ratio and the PazePC content. Solid state NMR studies and calorimetric experiments on the lipid vesicles confirmed that OxPl incorporation disrupted the membrane's organization, enabling Bax to penetrate into the membrane. In addition, 15N cross polarization (CP) and insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) MAS NMR experiments using uniformly (15)N-labeled Bax revealed dynamically restricted helical segments of Bax embedded in the membrane, while highly flexible protein segments were located outside or at the membrane surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chronic Ethanol Consumption Increases Myocardial Mitochondrial DNA Mutations: A Potential Contribution by Mitochondrial Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, D.; Mathew, J.E.; Mitry, M.; Taft, M.; Force, A.; Edwards, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) presents as decreased myocardial contractility, arrhythmias and secondary non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy leading to heart failure. Mitochondrial dysfunction is known to have a significant role in the development and complications of ACM. This study investigated if chronic ethanol feeding promoted myocardial mitochondrial topoisomerase dysfunction as one underlying cause of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in ACM. Methods: The impact of chronic ethanol exposure on the myocardial mitochondria was examined in both neonatal cardiomyocytes using 50 mM ethanol for 6 days and in rats assigned to control or ethanol feeding groups for 4 months. Results: Chronic ethanol feeding led to significant (P < 0.05) decreases in M-mode Fractional Shortening, ejection fraction, and the cardiac output index as well as increases in Tau. Ethanol feeding promoted mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by significantly decreased left ventricle cytochrome oxidase activity and decreases in mitochondrial protein content. Both in rats and in cultured cardiomyocytes, chronic ethanol presentation significantly increased mtDNA damage. Using isolated myocardial mitochondria, both mitochondrial topoisomerase-dependent DNA cleavage and DNA relaxation were significantly altered by ethanol feeding. Conclusion: Chronic ethanol feeding compromised cardiovascular and mitochondrial function as a result of a decline in mtDNA integrity that was in part the consequence of mitochondrial topoisomerase dysfunction. Understanding the regulation of the mitochondrial topoisomerases is critical for protection of mtDNA, not only for the management of alcoholic cardiomyopathy, but also for the many other clinical treatments that targets the topoisomerases in the alcoholic patient. PMID:24852753

  14. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ran; Rittenhouse, Danielle; Sweeney, Katelyn; Potluri, Prasanth; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs) which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs. PMID:26241038

  15. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  16. Synthesis and anticancer potential of benzothiazole linked phenylpyridopyrimidinones and their diones as mitochondrial apoptotic inducers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Ashraf, Md; Vishnu Vardhan, M V P S; Faazil, Shaikh; Nayak, V Lakshma

    2014-01-01

    A series of benzothiazole linked phenylpyridopyrimidinones (8a-g) and their diones (9a-g) have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anticancer activity. Among the series one of the conjugate 8b showed significant cytotoxicity against human cervical cancer cell line ME-180 with IC50 value of 4.01μM. This compound was tested on the cell cycle perturbations and DNA damage. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the compound 8b showed drastic cell cycle perturbations due to concentration dependent increase in the sub-G0 phase in ME-180 cell line. DNA fragmentation and Hoechst staining reveals that this compound induced cell death by apoptosis. Further caspase-3 and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that the compound induces cell death by apoptosis.

  17. Mdm31 and Mdm32 are inner membrane proteins required for maintenance of mitochondrial shape and stability of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Dimmer, Kai Stefan; Jakobs, Stefan; Vogel, Frank; Altmann, Katrin; Westermann, Benedikt

    2005-01-03

    The MDM31 and MDM32 genes are required for normal distribution and morphology of mitochondria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They encode two related proteins located in distinct protein complexes in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Cells lacking Mdm31 and Mdm32 harbor giant spherical mitochondria with highly aberrant internal structure. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is instable in the mutants, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized, and their association with Mmm1-containing complexes in the outer membrane is abolished. Mutant mitochondria are largely immotile, resulting in a mitochondrial inheritance defect. Deletion of either one of the MDM31 and MDM32 genes is synthetically lethal with deletion of either one of the MMM1, MMM2, MDM10, and MDM12 genes, which encode outer membrane proteins involved in mitochondrial morphogenesis and mtDNA inheritance. We propose that Mdm31 and Mdm32 cooperate with Mmm1, Mmm2, Mdm10, and Mdm12 in maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and mtDNA.

  18. Cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to EMP fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Internal current densities and electric fields induced in the human body during exposure to EMP fields are reviewed and used to predict resulting cell membrane potentials. Using several different approaches, membrane potentials of about 100 mV are predicted. These values are comparable to the static membrane potentials maintained by cells as a part of normal physiological function, but the EMP-induced potentials persist for only about 10 ns. Possible biological implications of EMP-induced membrane potentials including conformational changes and electroporation are discussed.

  19. [CA²⁺ ACCUMULATION IN ISOLATED RAT HEART MITOCHONDRIA UNDER MAINTENANCE OF MITOCHONDRIAL POTENTIAL].

    PubMed

    Budko, A Yu; Strutynska, N A; Okhay, I Yu; Semenykhina, O M; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    It is known that mitochondria can accumulate calcium, which regulates energy metabolism and cell death. About 90% of energy of cardiomyocytes is synthesized in mitochondria. Heart cells are also affected by the rapid changes in the Ca²⁺ concentration in the cytoplasm. Therefore, mitochondrial Ca²⁺-accumulation ability is crucial. The aim of our work was to study the accumulation of Ca²⁺ in isolated rat heart mitochondria in the presence of mitochondrial potential and different extramitochondrial Ca²⁺ concentrations. Isolated organelles were loaded with fluorescent dye Fluo-4 AM (2.5 μmol/l) at a temperature of 26°C for 30 min. It has been revealed that under these conditions high mitochondrial potential was maintained sufficiently, which is necessary for the functioning of the calcium transporting system in organelles. We established that mitochondria have a limited ability to store ionized calcium, as addition of Ca²⁺ ion in concentrations of 10, 20, 50 µmol/l ensures a certain level of accumulation in organelles with further fluorescent signal growth cessation. Addition of 100 µmol/Ca²⁺ to isolated mitochondria resulted in a significant increase in fluorescence intensity (46% in the fifth minute, compared to the fluorescence when 20 µmol/l Ca²⁺ was added) and likely to activation of cation release. It was shown that ruthenium red (10⁻⁵ mol/l), an inhibitor of Ca²⁺-uniporter, prevented accumulation of calcium ions in organelles by 89%, in the presence of 100 µmol/ Ca²⁺. It was clearly seen that heart mitochondria require Mg²⁺-ATP complex (3 mmol/l) to accumulate Ca²⁺, likely to maintain the inner membrane potential, activity of Ca²⁺ uniporter and energetic processes in organelles. Thus, the process of Ca²⁺ accumulation in rat heart mitochondria requires the maintenance of mitochondrial potential, activity of Ca²⁺-uniporter, depends on extramitochondrial Ca²⁺ concentration and presence of Mg²⁺-ATP complex.

  20. Early loss of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential in khat-induced cell death of primary normal human oral cells.

    PubMed

    Lukandu, Ochiba M; Bredholt, Therese; Neppelberg, Evelyn; Gjertsen, Bjørn T; Johannessen, Anne C; Vintermyr, Olav K; Costea, Daniela Elena

    2009-09-19

    Previous studies suggest the use of khat, a psychostimulant plant used by millions of people in Middle East and Africa, as risk factor for oral cancer. We previously reported that khat is able to induce adverse affects, as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, in normal human oral cells cultured in vitro. This study further investigates the more specific role played by mitochondria in khat-induced cell death and the kinetics of the events involved in this process. Exposure of primary normal human oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts to khat extract resulted in a swift and sustained decrease of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential occurring within 0.5-1h. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential preceded all other biochemical and morphologic changes, and was associated with a significant decrease in cell survival. Subsequently, apoptosis-inducing factor was released from mitochondria into cytosol and relocated to nucleus. Cyclosporine A and bongkrekic acid delayed both the loss of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential and the onset of cell death. This study describes a novel mechanism of khat-induced cell death in primary normal oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts involving an early pivotal effect on mitochondrial function and integrity.

  1. Calcium-mediated fusion to produce ultra large osmotically active mitochondrial inner membranes of controlled protein density.

    PubMed

    Chazotte, B; Wu, E S; Höchli, M; Hackenbrock, C R

    1985-08-08

    We have developed a new membrane fusion method which produces ultra large, spherical mitochondrial inner membranes attached to microscope slides. The fused inner membranes measured up to 200 microns in diameter. The technique fuses native inner membranes as well as inner membranes in which the protein density has been varied by enriching with exogenous phospholipid. The fusion process is accomplished through the use of calcium, low pH and elevated temperature. Characterization of the fused membranes was carried out using phase, fluorescence, and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. These ultra large, fused inner membranes were found to model the inner membranes from which they were formed. The fused inner membranes were found to be osmotically active and are large enough for measuring the lateral diffusion of membrane components by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and are large enough for microelectrode impalement.

  2. Evaluation of mitochondrial function and membrane integrity by dual fluorescent staining for assessment of sperm status in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masashi; Makino, Sachiko; Kimura, Hitoshi; Ota, Takao; Furuhashi, Tadakazu; Nagamura, Yoichi

    2002-02-01

    Dual fluorescent staining (DFS) with calcein acetoxy methyl ester (CAM), which labels the cellular esterase activity that is a major component of energy metabolism in cellular mitochondria, and with ethidium homodimer-1 (EthD-1) was used to evaluate mitochondrial function and membrane integrity in rat spermatozoa. The spermatozoa stained by DFS could be classified into three different populations microscopically when excited at 490 nm after 60 min incubation. 1) Spermatozoa, which were stained with CAM alone and had maintained either mitochondrial function or membrane integrity, were identified as live during incubation. 2) Spermatozoa, which were stained with EthD-1 alone and had lost either mitochondrial function or membrane integrity, were identified as already dead at the beginning of incubation. 3) Spermatozoa, which were stained with both CAM and EthD-1 and had maintained mitochondrial function with membrane breached, were identified as having died during incubation. Two toxicological tests, an in vitro triton X-100 experiment and an in vivo nitrobenzene experiment, were done. All spermatozoa were immobilized and lost either mitochondrial function or membrane integrity by 1.0% triton X-100 treatment. Almost no motile sperm were found at 0.1% in the triton X-100 group and in the groups treated with 60 and 40 mg/kg/day of nitrobenzene, and these spermatozoa maintained their mitochondrial function but had their membrane breached. In conclusion, the DFS procedure, which uses CAM and EthD-1, can clearly and visually identify the population of viable and dead spermatozoa simultaneously by fluorescence microscopy in rats. This is a useful technique to characterize sperm status, which is determined by the mitochondrial function assessed by CAM and membrane integrity evaluated by EthD-1.

  3. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  4. Bioenergetics and mitochondrial transmembrane potential during differentiation of cultured osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komarova, S. V.; Ataullakhanov, F. I.; Globus, R. K.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between osteoblast differentiation and bioenergetics, cultured primary osteoblasts from fetal rat calvaria were grown in medium supplemented with ascorbate to induce differentiation. Before ascorbate treatment, the rate of glucose consumption was 320 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), respiration was 40 nmol. h(-1). 10(6) cells(-1), and the ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption was approximately 2, indicating that glycolysis was the main energy source for immature osteoblasts. Ascorbate treatment for 14 days led to a fourfold increase in respiration, a threefold increase in ATP production, and a fivefold increase in ATP content compared with that shown in immature cells. Confocal imaging of mitochondria stained with a transmembrane potential-sensitive vital dye showed that mature cells possessed abundant amounts of high-transmembrane-potential mitochondria, which were concentrated near the culture medium-facing surface. Acute treatment of mature osteoblasts with metabolic inhibitors showed that the rate of glycolysis rose to maintain the cellular energy supply constant. Thus progressive differentiation coincided with changes in cellular metabolism and mitochondrial activity, which are likely to play key roles in osteoblast function.

  5. Consequences of defective vitamin A transportation on mitochondrial membrane integrity during protein depletion.

    PubMed

    Olowookere, J O

    1986-01-01

    The relationships between the structural integrity and functionality of rat liver mitochondrial membranes, and different levels of dietary protein and vitamin A transportation during protein depletion in animals have been investigated. Although the vitamin A content of the protein-depleted diet was 1680 +/- 35 IU/kg diet, and that of the control diet was 1,650 +/- 30 IU/kg diet, the vitamin A content of the liver of depleted rats was reduced to 16.7% of controls. The hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet showed excessive passive swelling (about 3-fold of controls) in isotonic solutions. Whereas a seemingly inverse relationship existed between the vitamin A content of the liver and the osmotic behaviour of hepatic mitochondria of rats fed a protein-depleted diet, there is a direct relationship between their hepatic mitochondrial vitamin A and the respiratory control ratio. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  6. Probing the Lipid Membrane Dipole Potential by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mayer, Kathryn M.; Wickremasinghe, Nissanka S.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2008-01-01

    The electrostatic properties of biological membranes can be described by three parameters: the transmembrane potential, the membrane surface potential, and the membrane dipole potential. The first two are well characterized in terms of their magnitudes and biological effects. The dipole potential, however, is not well characterized. Various methods to measure the membrane dipole potential indirectly yield different values, and there is not even agreement on the source of the membrane dipole moment. This ambiguity impedes investigations into the biological effects of the membrane dipole moment, which should be substantial considering the large interfacial fields with which it is associated. Electrostatic analysis of phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes with the atomic force microscope reveals a repulsive force between the negatively charged probe tips and the zwitterionic lipids. This unexpected interaction has been analyzed quantitatively to reveal that the repulsion is due to a weak external field created by the internal membrane dipole potential. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported phosphatidylcholine membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole moment in a noninvasive manner with nanometer scale spatial resolution will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. PMID:18805919

  7. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes.

  8. Effect of EMP fields on cell membrane potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gailey, P.C.; Easterly, C.E.

    1993-06-01

    A simple model is presented for cell membrane potentials induced during exposure to electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Using calculated values of internal electric field strength induced during EMP exposure, the model predicts that cell membrane potentials of about 100 mV may be induced for time frames on the order of 10 ns. Possible biological effects of these potentials including electroporation area discussed.

  9. Genetically Encoded Protein Sensors of Membrane Potential.

    PubMed

    Storace, Douglas; Rad, Masoud Sepehri; Han, Zhou; Jin, Lei; Cohen, Lawrence B; Hughes, Thom; Baker, Bradley J; Sung, Uhna

    2015-01-01

    Organic voltage-sensitive dyes offer very high spatial and temporal resolution for imaging neuronal function. However these dyes suffer from the drawbacks of non-specificity of cell staining and low accessibility of the dye to some cell types. Further progress in imaging activity is expected from the development of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of membrane potential. Cell type specificity of expression of these fluorescent protein (FP) voltage sensors can be obtained via several different mechanisms. One is cell type specificity of infection by individual virus subtypes. A second mechanism is specificity of promoter expression in individual cell types. A third, depends on the offspring of transgenic animals with cell type specific expression of cre recombinase mated with an animal that has the DNA for the FP voltage sensor in all of its cells but its expression is dependent on the recombinase activity. Challenges remain. First, the response time constants of many of the new FP voltage sensors are slower (2-10 ms) than those of organic dyes. This results in a relatively small fractional fluorescence change, ΔF/F, for action potentials. Second, the largest signal presently available is only ~40% for a 100 mV depolarization and many of the new probes have signals that are substantially smaller. Large signals are especially important when attempting to detect fast events because the shorter measurement interval results in a relatively small number of detected photons and therefore a relatively large shot noise (see Chap. 1). Another kind of challenge has occurred when attempts were made to transition from one species to another or from one cell type to another or from cell culture to in vivo measurements.Several laboratories have recently described a number of novel FP voltage sensors. Here we attempt to critically review the current status of these developments in terms of signal size, time course, and in vivo function.

  10. Lipid-Loving ANTs: Molecular Simulations of Cardiolipin Interactions and the Organization of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocase in Model Mitochondrial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The exchange of ADP and ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane is a fundamental cellular process. This exchange is facilitated by the adenine nucleotide translocase, the structure and function of which are critically dependent on the signature phospholipid of mitochondria, cardiolipin (CL). Here we employ multiscale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate CL interactions within a membrane environment. Using simulations at both coarse-grained and atomistic resolutions, we identify three CL binding sites on the translocase, in agreement with those seen in crystal structures and inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. Characterization of the free energy landscape for lateral lipid interaction via potential of mean force calculations demonstrates the strength of interaction compared to those of binding sites on other mitochondrial membrane proteins, as well as their selectivity for CL over other phospholipids. Extending the analysis to other members of the family, yeast Aac2p and mouse uncoupling protein 2, suggests a degree of conservation. Simulation of large patches of a model mitochondrial membrane containing multiple copies of the translocase shows that CL interactions persist in the presence of protein–protein interactions and suggests CL may mediate interactions between translocases. This study provides a key example of how computational microscopy may be used to shed light on regulatory lipid–protein interactions. PMID:27786441

  11. A novel algorithm identifies stress-induced alterations in mitochondrial connectivity and inner membrane structure from confocal images.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Mathieu; Guillebaud, Gérald; Gervais, Valerie; Lupien St-Pierre, David; Germain, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria exist as a highly interconnected network that is exquisitely sensitive to variations in nutrient availability, as well as a large array of cellular stresses. Changes in length and connectivity of this network, as well as alterations in the mitochondrial inner membrane (cristae), regulate cell fate by controlling metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. Given the key roles of mitochondrial dynamics, the process by which mitochondria constantly fuse and fragment, the measure of mitochondrial length and connectivity provides crucial information on the health and activity of various cell populations. However, despite the importance of accurately measuring mitochondrial networks, the tools required to rapidly and accurately provide this information are lacking. Here, we developed a novel probabilistic approach to automatically measure mitochondrial length distribution and connectivity from confocal images. This method accurately identified mitochondrial changes caused by starvation or the inhibition of mitochondrial function. In addition, we successfully used the algorithm to measure changes in mitochondrial inner membrane/matrix occurring in response to Complex III inhibitors. As cristae rearrangements play a critical role in metabolic regulation and cell survival, this provides a rapid method to screen for proteins or compounds affecting this process. The algorithm will thus provide a robust tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the key roles of mitochondria in the regulation of cell fate.

  12. Measurement of ADP-ATP exchange in relation to mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Kiss, Gergely; Kawamata, Hibiki; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described a fluorometric method to measure ADP-ATP exchange rates in mitochondria of permeabilized cells, in which several enzymes that consume substantial amounts of ATP and other competing reactions interconverting adenine nucleotides are present. This method relies on recording changes in free extramitochondrial Mg(2+) with the Mg(2+)-sensitive fluorescent indicator Magnesium Green (MgGr)™, exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP for Mg(2+). In particular, cells are permeabilized with digitonin in the presence of BeF3(-) and Na3VO4, inhibiting all ATP- and ADP-utilizing reactions but mitochondrial exchange of ATP with ADP catalyzed by the adenine nucleotide translocase. The rate of ATP appearing in the medium upon the addition of ADP to energized mitochondria is then calculated from the rate of change in free extramitochondrial Mg(2+) using standard binding equations. Here, we describe a variant of this method involving an improved calibration step. This step minimizes errors that may be introduced during the conversion of the MgGr™ signal into free extramitochondrial [Mg(2+)] and ATP. Furthermore, we describe an approach for combining this methodology with the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential and oxygen consumption in the same sample. The method described herein is useful for the study of malignant cells, which are known to thrive in hypoxic environments and to harbor mitochondria with profound functional alterations.

  13. Measurement of ADP–ATP Exchange in Relation to Mitochondrial Transmembrane Potential and Oxygen Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Kiss, Gergely; Kawamata, Hibiki; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described a fluorometric method to measure ADP–ATP exchange rates in mitochondria of permeabilized cells, in which several enzymes that consume substantial amounts of ATP and other competing reactions interconverting adenine nucleotides are present. This method relies on recording changes in free extramitochondrial Mg2+ with the Mg2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator Magnesium Green (MgGr)™, exploiting the differential affinity of ADP and ATP for Mg2+. In particular, cells are permeabilized with digitonin in the presence of BeF3− and Na3VO4, inhibiting all ATP- and ADP-utilizing reactions but mitochondrial exchange of ATP with ADP catalyzed by the adenine nucleotide translocase. The rate of ATP appearing in the medium upon the addition of ADP to energized mitochondria is then calculated from the rate of change in free extramitochondrial Mg2+ using standard binding equations. Here, we describe a variant of this method involving an improved calibration step. This step minimizes errors that may be introduced during the conversion of the MgGr™ signal into free extramitochondrial [Mg2+] and ATP. Furthermore, we describe an approach for combining this methodology with the measurement of mitochondrial membrane potential and oxygen consumption in the same sample. The method described herein is useful for the study of malignant cells, which are known to thrive in hypoxic environments and to harbor mitochondria with profound functional alterations. PMID:24862274

  14. Elevated mRNA-levels of distinct mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual hypoglossal motor neurons of endstage SOD1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mühling, Tobias; Duda, Johanna; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Liss, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction have emerged as major pathogenic features in familial and sporadic forms of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal degenerative motor neuron disease. However, the distinct molecular ALS-pathology remains unclear. Recently, an activity-dependent Ca2+ homeostasis deficit, selectively in highly vulnerable cholinergic motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (hMNs) from a common ALS mouse model, the endstage superoxide dismutase SOD1G93A transgenic mouse, was described. This functional deficit was defined by a reduced hMN mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake capacity and elevated Ca2+ extrusion across the plasma membrane. To address the underlying molecular mechanisms, here we quantified mRNA-levels of respective potential mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual, choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) positive hMNs from wildtype (WT) and endstage SOD1G93A mice, by combining UV laser microdissection with RT-qPCR techniques, and specific data normalization. As ChAT cDNA levels as well as cDNA and genomic DNA levels of the mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase ND1 were not different between hMNs from WT and endstage SOD1G93A mice, these genes were used to normalize hMN-specific mRNA-levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters, respectively. We detected about 2-fold higher levels of the mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters MCU/MICU1, Letm1, and UCP2 in remaining hMNs from endstage SOD1G93A mice. These higher expression-levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters in individual hMNs were not associated with a respective increase in number of mitochondrial genomes, as evident from hMN specific ND1 DNA quantification. Normalized mRNA-levels for the plasma membrane Na+/Ca2+ exchanger NCX1 were also about 2-fold higher in hMNs from SOD1G93A mice. Thus, pharmacological stimulation of Ca2+ transporters in highly vulnerable hMNs might offer a neuroprotective strategy for ALS. PMID:25452714

  15. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-06

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an interm