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Sample records for mitochondrial respiration underlies

  1. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  2. Cell respiration under hypoxia: facts and artefacts in mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Francesca M; Gnaiger, Erich

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen supply to tissues is limiting, mitochondrial respiration and ATP production are compromised. To assess the bioenergetic consequences under normoxia and hypoxia, quantitative evaluation of mitochondrial oxygen kinetics is required. Using high-resolution respirometry, the "apparent K (m)" for oxygen or p (50) of respiration in 32D cells was determined at 0.05 +/- 0.01 kPa (0.4 mmHg, 0.5 microM, 0.25% air saturation). Close agreement with p (50) of isolated mitochondria indicates that intracellular gradients are small in small cells at routine activity. At intracellular p (O2) <2 kPa (15 mmHg, 10% air saturation) in various tissues under normoxia, respiration is limited by >2% with a p (50) of 0.05 kPa. Over-estimation of p (50) at 0.4 kPa (3 mmHg) would imply significant (>17%) oxygen limitation of respiration under intracellular normoxia. Based on a critical review, we conclude that p (50) ranges from 0.01 to 0.10 kPa in mitochondria and small cells in the absence of inhibitors of cytochrome c oxidase, whereas experimental artefacts explain the controversial >200-fold range of p (50) in the literature on mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

  3. Stem CO2 release under illumination: corticular photosynthesis, photorespiration or inhibition of mitochondrial respiration?

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Christiane; Pfanz, Hardy; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro; Pietrini, Fabrizio; Alessio, Giorgio

    2006-06-01

    In illuminated stems and branches, CO2 release is often reduced. Many light-triggered processes are thought to contribute to this reduction, namely photorespiration, corticular photosynthesis or even an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In this study, we investigated these processes with the objective to discriminate their influence to the overall reduction of branch CO2 release in the light. CO2 gas-exchange measurements of young birch (Betula pendula Roth.) branches (< 1.5 cm) performed under photorespiratory (20% O2) and non-photorespiratory (< 2%) conditions revealed that photorespiration does not play a pre-dominant role in carbon exchange. This suppression of photorespiration was attributed to the high CO2 concentrations (C(i)) within the bark tissues (1544 +/- 227 and 618 +/- 43 micromol CO2 mol(-1) in the dark and in the light, respectively). Changes in xylem CO2 were not likely to explain the observed decrease in stem CO2 release as gas-exchange measurements before and after cutting of the branches did not effect CO2 efflux to the atmosphere. Combined fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements provided evidence that the light-dependent reduction in CO2 release can pre-dominantly be attributed to corticular refixation, whereas an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in the light is unlikely to occur. Corticular photosynthesis was able to refix up to 97% of the CO2 produced by branch respiration, although it rarely led to a positive net photosynthetic rate.

  4. Lactate kinetics and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of healthy humans under influence of adrenaline.

    PubMed

    Grip, Jonathan; Jakobsson, Towe; Hebert, Christina; Klaude, Maria; Sandström, Gustaf; Wernerman, Jan; Rooyackers, Olav

    2015-08-01

    Plasma lactate is widely used as a biomarker in critical illness. The aims of the present study were to elucidate the usefulness of a three-compartment model for muscle lactate kinetics in humans and to characterize the response to an exogenous adrenaline challenge. Repeated blood samples from artery and femoral vein together with blood flow measurements and muscle biopsies were obtained from healthy male volunteers (n=8) at baseline and during an adrenaline infusion. Concentrations of lactate and enrichment of [13C]lactate were measured and kinetics calculated. Mitochondrial activity, glycogen concentration, oxygen uptake and CO2 release were assessed. The adrenaline challenge increased plasma lactate 4-fold as a result of a greater increase in the rate of appearance (R(a)) than the increase in the rate of disappearance (R(d)). Leg muscle net release of lactate increased 3.5-fold, whereas intramuscular production had a high variation but did not change. Mitochondrial state 3 respiration increased by 30%. Glycogen concentration, oxygen uptake and CO2 production remained unchanged. In conclusion a three-compartment model gives additional information to the two-compartment model but, due to its larger variation and invasive muscle biopsy, it is less likely to become a regularly used tool in clinical research. Hyperlactataemia in response to adrenergic stimuli was driven by an elevated lactate release from skeletal muscle most probably due to a redirection of a high intramuscular turnover rather than an increased production.

  5. F1-catalysed ATP hydrolysis is required for mitochondrial biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing under conditions where it cannot respire.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre-Legendre, Linnka; Balguerie, Axelle; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-France; Slonimski, Piotr P; Di Rago, Jean-Paul

    2003-03-01

    Mutant strains of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking a functional F1-ATPase were found to grow very poorly under anaerobic conditions. A single amino acid replacement (K222 > E222) that locally disrupts the adenine nucleotide catalytic site in the beta-F1 subunit was sufficient to compromise anaerobic growth. This mutation also affected growth in aerated conditions when ethidium bromide (an intercalating agent impairing mtDNA propagation) or antimycin (an inhibitor of respiration) was included in the medium. F1-deficient cells forced to grow in oxygen-limited conditions were shown to lose their mtDNA completely and to accumulate Hsp60p mainly under its precursor form. Fluorescence microscopy analyses with a modified GFP containing a mitochondrial targeting presequence revealed that aerobically growing F1-deficient cells stopped importing the GFP when antimycin was added to the medium. Finally, after total inactivation of the catalytic alpha3beta3 subcomplex of F1, mitochondria could no longer be energized by externally added ATP because of either a block in assembly or local disruption of the adenine nucleotide processing site. Altogether these data strengthen the notion that in the absence of respiration, and whether the proton translocating domain (F0) of complex V is present or not, F1-catalysed hydrolysis of ATP is essential for the occurrence of vital cellular processes depending on the maintenance of an electrochemical potential across the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  6. Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Angelin, Alessia A; Wallace, Douglas C; Eckmann, David M

    2016-11-07

    An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration. We found that although they did not reduce mitochondrial inner membrane potential, cytoskeletal toxins induced significant decreases in basal mitochondrial respiration. In some cases, basal respiration was only affected after cells were pretreated with the calcium ionophore A23187 in order to stress mitochondrial function. In most cases, mitochondrial morphology remained unaffected, but extreme microfilament depolymerization or combined intermediate doses of microtubule and microfilament toxins resulted in decreased mitochondrial lengths. Interestingly, these two particular exposures did not affect mitochondrial respiration in cells not sensitized with A23187, indicating an interplay between mitochondrial morphology and respiration. In all cases, inducing maximal respiration diminished differences between control and experimental groups, suggesting that reduced basal respiration originates as a largely elective rather than pathological symptom of cytoskeletal impairment. However, viability experiments suggest that even this type of respiration decrease may be associated with cell death.

  7. Uncoupling Mitochondrial Respiration for Diabesity.

    PubMed

    Larrick, James W; Larrick, Jasmine W; Mendelsohn, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, the mechanism of adaptive thermogenesis was ascribed to the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown and beige adipocytes. UCP1 is known to catalyze a proton leak of the inner mitochondrial membrane, resulting in uncoupled oxidative metabolism with no production of adenosine triphosphate and increased energy expenditure. Thus increasing brown and beige adipose tissue with augmented UCP1 expression is a viable target for obesity-related disorders. Recent work demonstrates an UCP1-independent pathway to uncouple mitochondrial respiration. A secreted enzyme, PM20D1, enriched in UCP1+ adipocytes, exhibits catalytic and hydrolytic activity to reversibly form N-acyl amino acids. N-acyl amino acids act as endogenous uncouplers of mitochondrial respiration at physiological concentrations. Administration of PM20D1 or its products, N-acyl amino acids, to diet-induced obese mice improves glucose tolerance by increasing energy expenditure. In short-term studies, treated animals exhibit no toxicity while experiencing 10% weight loss primarily of adipose tissue. Further study of this metabolic pathway may identify novel therapies for diabesity, the disease state associated with diabetes and obesity.

  8. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  9. [Continuous adaptation of rats to hypobaric hypoxia prevents stressor hyperglycemia and optimizes mitochondrial respiration under acute hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Portnichenko, V I; Nosar, V I; Sydorenko, A M; Portnichenko, A H; Man'kovs'ka, I M

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen consumption, glucose blood level and liver mitochondrial respiration were investigated in male Wistar rats permanently living in middle altitude (2100 m, Elbrus region). The animals were characterized by reduced body oxygen consumption and blood glucose level, as well as by intensified utilization of NAD-dependent substrates in mitochondrial respiratory chain with increasing indices of ADP-stimulated respiration in comparison with plains rats. As a result of adaptive rebuilding of oxidative metabolism in rats--inhabitants of midlands, the nature and severity of metabolic responses to acute hypoxia were also changed. After lifting in barochamber to a "height" of 5600 m during 3 hours, plains rats transiently demonstrated hypometabolic and hyperglycemic reactions. A rapid adaptation of mitochondrial function occurred due to increase in the rate of FAD-dependent substrate oxidation accompanied by a decrease in the effectiveness of phosphorylation. In midland rats, by contrast, hypoglycemic reaction was developed, and further reduction of aerobic metabolism was limited. Rapid adaptation of mitochondrial function to acute hypoxia in those rats was more intense than in the plains animals. This was achieved by a significant increase in the rate of NAD-dependent substrate oxidation, especially lipids, and an improved efficiency of mitochondrial respiration and an increased economy of oxygen utilization.

  10. Bistability of mitochondrial respiration underlies paradoxical reactive oxygen species generation induced by anoxia.

    PubMed

    Selivanov, Vitaly A; Votyakova, Tatyana V; Zeak, Jennifer A; Trucco, Massimo; Roca, Josep; Cascante, Marta

    2009-12-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria underlies major systemic diseases, and this clinical problem stimulates a great scientific interest in the mechanism of ROS generation. However, the mechanism of hypoxia-induced change in ROS production is not fully understood. To mathematically analyze this mechanism in details, taking into consideration all the possible redox states formed in the process of electron transport, even for respiratory complex III, a system of hundreds of differential equations must be constructed. Aimed to facilitate such tasks, we developed a new methodology of modeling, which resides in the automated construction of large sets of differential equations. The detailed modeling of electron transport in mitochondria allowed for the identification of two steady state modes of operation (bistability) of respiratory complex III at the same microenvironmental conditions. Various perturbations could induce the transition of respiratory chain from one steady state to another. While normally complex III is in a low ROS producing mode, temporal anoxia could switch it to a high ROS producing state, which persists after the return to normal oxygen supply. This prediction, which we qualitatively validated experimentally, explains the mechanism of anoxia-induced cell damage. Recognition of bistability of complex III operation may enable novel therapeutic strategies for oxidative stress and our method of modeling could be widely used in systems biology studies.

  11. Mitochondrial flash as a novel biomarker of mitochondrial respiration in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Guohua; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Huiliang; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration through electron transport chain (ETC) activity generates ATP and reactive oxygen species in eukaryotic cells. The modulation of mitochondrial respiration in vivo or under physiological conditions remains elusive largely due to the lack of appropriate approach to monitor ETC activity in a real-time manner. Here, we show that ETC-coupled mitochondrial flash is a novel biomarker for monitoring mitochondrial respiration under pathophysiological conditions in cultured adult cardiac myocyte and perfused beating heart. Through real-time confocal imaging, we follow the frequency of a transient bursting fluorescent signal, named mitochondrial flash, from individual mitochondria within intact cells expressing a mitochondrial matrix-targeted probe, mt-cpYFP (mitochondrial-circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein). This mt-cpYFP recorded mitochondrial flash has been shown to be composed of a major superoxide signal with a minor alkalization signal within the mitochondrial matrix. Through manipulating physiological substrates for mitochondrial respiration, we find a close coupling between flash frequency and the ETC electron flow, as measured by oxygen consumption rate in cardiac myocyte. Stimulating electron flow under physiological conditions increases flash frequency. On the other hand, partially block or slowdown electron flow by inhibiting the F0F1 ATPase, which represents a pathological condition, transiently increases then decreases flash frequency. Limiting electron entrance at complex I by knocking out Ndufs4, an assembling subunit of complex I, suppresses mitochondrial flash activity. These results suggest that mitochondrial electron flow can be monitored by real-time imaging of mitochondrial flash. The mitochondrial flash frequency could be used as a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiration under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26276820

  12. Mitochondrial flash as a novel biomarker of mitochondrial respiration in the heart.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guohua; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Huiliang; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Wang, Wang

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial respiration through electron transport chain (ETC) activity generates ATP and reactive oxygen species in eukaryotic cells. The modulation of mitochondrial respiration in vivo or under physiological conditions remains elusive largely due to the lack of appropriate approach to monitor ETC activity in a real-time manner. Here, we show that ETC-coupled mitochondrial flash is a novel biomarker for monitoring mitochondrial respiration under pathophysiological conditions in cultured adult cardiac myocyte and perfused beating heart. Through real-time confocal imaging, we follow the frequency of a transient bursting fluorescent signal, named mitochondrial flash, from individual mitochondria within intact cells expressing a mitochondrial matrix-targeted probe, mt-cpYFP (mitochondrial-circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein). This mt-cpYFP recorded mitochondrial flash has been shown to be composed of a major superoxide signal with a minor alkalization signal within the mitochondrial matrix. Through manipulating physiological substrates for mitochondrial respiration, we find a close coupling between flash frequency and the ETC electron flow, as measured by oxygen consumption rate in cardiac myocyte. Stimulating electron flow under physiological conditions increases flash frequency. On the other hand, partially block or slowdown electron flow by inhibiting the F0F1 ATPase, which represents a pathological condition, transiently increases then decreases flash frequency. Limiting electron entrance at complex I by knocking out Ndufs4, an assembling subunit of complex I, suppresses mitochondrial flash activity. These results suggest that mitochondrial electron flow can be monitored by real-time imaging of mitochondrial flash. The mitochondrial flash frequency could be used as a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiration under physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Effects of cadmium on heart mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kisling, G.M.; Kopp, S.J.; Paulson, D.J.; Tow, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effect of cadmium on isolated heart mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were rapidly prepared by polytroning hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats in a 0.25 M Sucrose, 4 mM Tris, 1 mM EGTA, 0.2% BSA buffer (pH 7.4), followed by a two-part differential centrifugation. Mitochondria were resuspended in this same Tris-sucrose-BSA buffer minus EGTA and mitochondrial respiration was assayed using a Clark oxygen electrode system at a concentration of 0.5 mg total mitochondrial protein/ml assay buffer. At 5 x 10/sup -6/ M cadmium, mitochondrial state 3 respiration (pyruvate plus malate) was reduced to a level 74.8% of the control value. A 50% reduction in state 3 respiratory rate was achieved at a cadmium concentration of 8.75 x 10/sup -6/ M. The respiratory control ratio did not change significantly but at higher cadmium concentrations (< greater than or equal to 1.25 x 10/sup -5/ M) the ADP/O ratio was increased. None of the cadmium concentrations tested, from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ M, demonstrated an uncoupling response. These data suggest that cadmium acts strictly as an inhibitor of heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These results contrast those of earlier work involving liver mitochondria in which cadmium was reported to uncouple mitochondrial respiration.

  14. Hypertriglyceridemia increases mitochondrial resting respiration and susceptibility to permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Alberici, Luciane C; Oliveira, Helena C F; Bighetti, Eliete J B; de Faria, Eliana C; Degaspari, Giovana R; Souza, Claudio T; Vercesi, Anibal E

    2003-10-01

    High plasma level of triglycerides (TGs) is a common feature in atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, alcoholism, stress, and infection. Since mitochondria have been implicated in cell death under a variety of metabolic disorders, we examined liver mitochondrial functions in hypertriglyceridemic transgenic mice. Hypertriglyceridemia increased resting respiration and predisposed to mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Ciprofibrate therapy reduced plasma TG levels, normalized respiration, and prevented MPT. The higher resting respiration in transgenic mitochondria remained in the presence of the adenine nucleotide carrier inhibitor, carboxyatractyloside, bovine serum albumin, and the uncoupling proteins (UCPs) inhibitor, GDP. UCP2 content was similar in both control and transgenic mitochondria. We propose that faster resting respiration represents a regulated adaptation to oxidize excess free fatty acid in the transgenic mice.

  15. Effect of muramyl peptides on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    El-Jamal, N; Bahr, G M; Echtay, K S

    2009-01-01

    Muramyl peptides have been shown to exert several biological activities including potentiation of humoral and cell-mediated immunity and stimulation of natural resistance. The mode of action of muramyl peptides has not been elucidated fully and the immunological activities of some derivatives have been associated with toxic effects, including pyrogenicity and inflammatory reactions. Nevertheless, the impact of muramyl peptides on mitochondrial respiration has never been addressed. In this study, the in vitro effects of muramyl peptides on rat liver mitochondria were examined. Toxic muramyl peptides induced a significant decrease in respiratory control ratio versus non-toxic analogues. These results were confirmed by in vivo studies in mice and were extended to mitochondria isolated from spleens. Our data address, for the first time, the effect of muramyl peptides on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity in relation to the damaging effects of toxic muramyl peptides.

  16. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V.; Busija, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I–V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury. PMID:26276815

  18. Warming does not stimulate mitochondrial respiration and it responds to leaf carbohydrates availability in soybean plants grown under elevated CO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Vera, U. M.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.; Ort, D. R.; Siebers, M.

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of understanding on the mechanism underlying the response of mitochondrial respiration (Rs) to the single and combined effects of increasing CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and warming. We investigated the response of Rs to the single and combined effects of elevated [CO2] and warming in soybean plants over a complete growing season using Temperature by Free Air CO2 enrichment technology under field conditions. The treatments were: control, elevated [CO2] (eC), high temperature (eT), and elevated [CO2]+high temperature (eT+eC). Given that photosynthetic rates in eT+eC grown plants were not higher than in plants grown under eC, we hypothesized that Rs would increase only slightly in plants grown under eT+eC compared to eC plants, due to the increase of temperature. Contrary to our prediction, our preliminary results showed that plants grown under the warming treatments had low Rs, thus eT+eC had lower Rs than eC. The response of Rs to these factors was consistent at two different plant high levels (canopy and five nodes down the canopy). Changes in Rs were explained by variations in the carbohydrate content. Our results indicate that the response of Rs to changes in [CO2] and temperature will depend on the carbohydrate availability of plant tissues and thus on how photosynthesis is affected by this environmental factors.

  19. The role of mitochondrial respiration in physiological and evolutionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayatri

    2006-09-01

    Aerobic mitochondria serve as the power sources of eukaryotes by producing ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The enzymes involved in OXPHOS are multisubunit complexes encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Thus, regulation of respiration is necessarily a highly coordinated process that must organize production, assembly and function of mitochondria to meet an organism's energetic needs. Here I review the role of OXPHOS in metabolic adaptation and diversification of higher animals. On a physiological timescale, endocrine-initiated signaling pathways allow organisms to modulate respiratory enzyme concentration and function under changing environmental conditions. On an evolutionary timescale, mitochondrial enzymes are targets of natural selection, balancing cytonuclear coevolutionary constraints against physiological innovation. By synthesizing our knowledge of biochemistry, physiology and evolution of respiratory regulation, I propose that we can now explore questions at the interface of these fields, from molecular translation of environmental cues to selection on mitochondrial haplotype variation.

  20. The role of p38 in mitochondrial respiration in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiaohua; Wen, Yi; Metzger, Daniel; Jung, Marianna

    2013-06-07

    p38 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase and mediates cell growth, cell differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. The aim of this study is to determine the extent to which p38 plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial respiration in male and female mice under a normal condition. To achieve this aim, we have generated transgenic mice that lack p38 in cerebellar Purkinje neurons by crossing Pcp2 (Purkinje cell protein 2)-Cre mice with p38(loxP/loxP) mice. Mitochondria from cerebellum were then isolated from the transgenic and wild-type mice to measure mitochondrial respiration using XF24 respirometer. The mRNA and protein expression of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in cerebellum were also measured using RT-PCR and immunoblot methods. Separately, HT22 cells were used to determine the involvement of 17β-estradiol (E2) and COX in mitochondrial respiration. The genetic knockout of p38 in Purkinje neurons suppressed the mitochondrial respiration only in male mice and increased COX expression only in female mice. The inhibition of COX by sodium azide (SA) sharply suppressed mitochondrial respiration of HT22 cells in a manner that was protected by E2. These data suggest that p38 is required for the mitochondrial respiration of male mice. When p38 is below a normal level, females may maintain mitochondrial respiration through COX up-regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Evaluation of brain ischemia by mitochondrial respiration: experimental model].

    PubMed

    Carlotti, C G; Colli, B O; Kazuo, J Y

    2001-06-01

    Brain ischemia occurs in several diseases. One of the critical factors for recovery of patients is the duration of the ischemic process. Brain activity depends on the energetic supply, it suggests that the study of mitochondrial function can be useful for evaluation of neuronal damage. The purpose of the present research was to study the mitochondrial respiration by occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery by intraluminal suture technique. Adults Wistar rats were subdivided in 4 groups: control, 15, 30 and 60 minutes of occlusion. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the group of 15 minutes and the control group. The group of 30 minutes had significant decrease of state III of mitochondrial respiration compared with control group. The group of 60 minutes had significant decrease in state III and IV of mitochondrial respiration compared with control group. Mitochondrial respiration allowed an early and effective evaluation of focal ischemic process of the rat brain.

  2. Tissue-specific control of mitochondrial respiration in obesity-related insulin resistance and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Maria H; Iglesias-Gutierrez, Eduardo; Zierath, Juleen R; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M

    2012-03-15

    The tissue-specific role of mitochondrial respiratory capacity in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is unclear. We determined mitochondrial function in glycolytic and oxidative skeletal muscle and liver from lean (+/?) and obese diabetic (db/db) mice. In lean mice, the mitochondrial respiration pattern differed between tissues. Tissue-specific mitochondrial profiles were then compared between lean and db/db mice. In liver, mitochondrial respiratory capacity and protein expression, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), was decreased in db/db mice, consistent with increased mitochondrial fission. In glycolytic muscle, mitochondrial respiration, as well as protein and mRNA expression of mitochondrial markers, was increased in db/db mice, suggesting increased mitochondrial content and fatty acid oxidation capacity. In oxidative muscle, mitochondrial complex I function and PGC-1α and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) protein levels were decreased in db/db mice, along with increased level of proteins related to mitochondrial dynamics. In conclusion, mitochondrial respiratory performance is under the control of tissue-specific mechanisms and is not uniformly altered in response to obesity. Furthermore, insulin resistance in glycolytic skeletal muscle can be maintained by a mechanism independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. Conversely, insulin resistance in liver and oxidative skeletal muscle from db/db mice is coincident with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Higher mitochondrial potential and elevated mitochondrial respiration are associated with excessive activation of blood platelets in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Siewiera, Karolina; Kassassir, Hassan; Talar, Marcin; Wieteska, Lukasz; Watala, Cezary

    2016-03-01

    The high glucose concentration observed in diabetic patients is a recognized factor of mitochondrial damage in various cell types. Its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetics in blood platelets remains largely vague. The aim of the study was to determine how the metabolism of carbohydrates, which has been impaired by streptozotocin-induced diabetes may affect the functioning of platelet mitochondria. Diabetes was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Platelet mitochondrial respiratory capacity was monitored as oxygen consumption (high-resolution respirometry). Mitochondrial membrane potential was assessed using a fluorescent probe, JC-1. Activation of circulating platelets was monitored by flow cytometry measuring of the expressions of CD61 and CD62P on a blood platelet surface. To determine mitochondrial protein density in platelets, Western Blot technique was used. The results indicate significantly elevated mitochondria mass, increased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and enhanced respiration in STZ-diabetic animals, although the respiration control ratios appear to remain unchanged. Higher ΔΨm and elevated mitochondrial respiration were closely related to the excessive activation of circulating platelets in diabetic animals. Long-term diabetes can result in increased mitochondrial mass and may lead to hyperpolarization of blood platelet mitochondrial membrane. These alterations may be a potential underlying cause of abnormal platelet functioning in diabetes mellitus and hence, a potential target for antiplatelet therapies in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bariatric surgery rapidly improves mitochondrial respiration in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, Sheetal; Richards, William; O'Hea, Martha F; Audia, Jonathon P; Alvarez, Diego F

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its attendant comorbidities are an emerging epidemic. Chronic metabolic inflammation (metainflammation) is thought to precipitate obesity-associated morbidities; however, its mechanistic progression is poorly understood. Moreover, although interventions such as diet, exercise, and bariatric surgery can control body weight, their effects on metainflammation are also poorly understood. Recently, metainflammation and the pathobiology of obesity have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein we examined the effects of bariatric surgery on mitochondrial respiration as an index of resolving metainflammation in morbidly obese patients. This institutional review board-approved study involved morbidly obese patients (body mass index > 35 kg/m(2)) undergoing sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in peripheral blood monocytes and in skeletal muscle samples before surgery and at 12 weeks after surgery. Patient biometrics, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile were analyzed. Twenty patients were enrolled and showed an average percent excess body weight loss of 30.3% weight loss at 12 weeks after surgery. Average HOMA-IR score decreased from 3.0 to 1.2 in insulin-resistant patients. C-reactive protein, an index of metainflammation, showed a modest decrease. Lipid profile remained stable. Intriguingly, mitochondrial basal and maximal respiration rates in peripheral blood monocytes increased after surgery. Basal rates of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration were unchanged, but the maximal respiration rate trended toward an increase after surgery. Cellular and tissue mitochondrial respiration increased in a morbidly obese patient cohort after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. These changes were consistent in patients with postsurgical weight loss. Importantly, no significant changes or improvements occurred in canonical indices used to

  5. Effect of Simvastatin, Coenzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Acetylcysteine and Acetylcarnitine on Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Kopřivová, A; Macečková, D

    2016-01-01

    Some therapeutic and/or adverse effects of drugs may be related to their effects on mitochondrial function. The effects of simvastatin, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, acetylcysteine, and acetylcarnitine on Complex I-, Complex II-, or Complex IV-linked respiratory rate were determined in isolated brain mitochondria. The protective effects of these biologically active compounds on the calcium-induced decrease of the respiratory rate were also studied. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration (IC50 = 24.0 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 31.3 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 42.9 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration); the inhibitory effect of resveratrol was found at very high concentrations (IC50 = 162 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 564 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 1454 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration). Concentrations required for effective simvastatin- or resveratrol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration were found much higher than concentrations achieved under standard dosing of these drugs. Acetylcysteine and acetylcarnitine did not affect the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria. Coenzyme Q10 induced an increase of Complex I-linked respiration. The increase of free calcium ions induced partial inhibition of the Complex I+II-linked mitochondrial respiration, and all tested drugs counteracted this inhibition. None of the tested drugs showed mitochondrial toxicity (characterized by respiratory rate inhibition) at drug concentrations achieved at therapeutic drug intake. Resveratrol, simvastatin, and acetylcarnitine had the greatest neuroprotective potential (characterized by protective effects against calcium-induced reduction of the respiratory rate).

  6. The stimulation of the mitochondrial respiration by citrulline synthesis.

    PubMed

    Letko, G; Markefski, M; Bohnensack, R

    1979-01-01

    1. The influence of ammonia and ornithine on the oxygen uptake and the formation of citrulline was investigated with isolated rat liver mitochondria. The experiments were performed in a cytosol-like saline medium at 38 degrees C. 2. Under these conditions an increase of the respiration rate by ammonia and ornithine was observed, but a small response to external ADP, only. The missing stimulation by ADP was due to a partial inhibition of the respiratory chain by traces of zinc (approximately 1 microM) present in the medium. This inhibition was only detected at low concentrations of mitochondria. 3. For activation of respiration by ammonia plus ornithine two different processes were responsible: (i) chelation of the inhibiting zinc by ornithine, which could be prevented by EDTA; (ii) ADP production in the matrix space during formation of carbamoyl phosphate, which could be prevented by oligomycin but not by carboxyatractyloside. 4. This stimulus of the carbamoyl phosphate formation and of the equivalent citrulline synthesis on the mitochondrial respiration ran to 12% of that increase caused by phosphorylation of external ADP. The maximum rate of citrulline formation was limited by the activity of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. 5. Added ADP suppresses the production of citrulline probably by the exchange of extramitochondrial ADP versus intramitochondrial ATP. The data suggest a common adenine nucleotide pool delivering ATP to the adenine nucleotide translocase as well as to the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

  7. Impaired Mitochondrial Respiration in Large Cerebral Arteries of Rats with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Merdzo, Ivan; Rutkai, Ibolya; Sure, Venkata N L R; McNulty, Catherine A; Katakam, Prasad V G; Busija, David W

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested as a potential underlying cause of pathological conditions associated with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We have previously shown that mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial protein levels were similar in the large cerebral arteries of insulin-resistant Zucker obese rats and their lean controls. In this study, we extend our investigations into the mitochondrial dynamics of the cerebral vasculature of 14-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty obese (ZDFO) rats with early T2DM. Body weight and blood glucose levels were significantly higher in the ZDFO group, and basal mitochondrial respiration and proton leak were significantly decreased in the large cerebral arteries of the ZDFO rats compared with the lean controls (ZDFL). The expression of the mitochondrial proteins total manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) were significantly lower in the cerebral microvessels, and acetylated MnSOD levels were significantly reduced in the large arteries of the ZDFO group. Additionally, superoxide production was significantly increased in the microvessels of the ZDFO group. Despite evidence of increased oxidative stress in ZDFO, exogenous SOD was not able to restore mitochondrial respiration in the ZDFO rats. Our results show, for the first time, that mitochondrial respiration and protein levels are compromised during the early stages of T2DM. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  9. Pyrimidine biosynthesis links mitochondrial respiration to the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khutornenko, Anastasia A.; Roudko, Vladimir V.; Chernyak, Boris V.; Vartapetian, Andrey B.; Chumakov, Peter M.; Evstafieva, Alexandra G.

    2010-01-01

    While many functions of the p53 tumor suppressor affect mitochondrial processes, the role of altered mitochondrial physiology in a modulation of p53 response remains unclear. As mitochondrial respiration is affected in many pathologic conditions such as hypoxia and intoxications, the impaired electron transport chain could emit additional p53-inducing signals and thereby contribute to tissue damage. Here we show that a shutdown of mitochondrial respiration per se does not trigger p53 response, because inhibitors acting in the proximal and distal segments of the respiratory chain do not activate p53. However, strong p53 response is induced specifically after an inhibition of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 (the electron transport chain complex III). The p53 response is triggered by the deficiency in pyrimidines that is developed due to a suppression of the functionally coupled mitochondrial pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). In epithelial carcinoma cells the activation of p53 in response to mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III inhibitors does not require phosphorylation of p53 at Serine 15 or up-regulation of p14ARF. Instead, our data suggest a contribution of NQO1 and NQO2 in stabilization of p53 in the nuclei. The results establish the deficiency in pyrimidine biosynthesis as the cause of p53 response in the cells with impaired mitochondrial respiration. PMID:20566882

  10. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  11. Cigarette smoke increases cardiomyocyte ceramide accumulation and inhibits mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Tippetts, Trevor S; Winden, Duane R; Swensen, Adam C; Nelson, Michael B; Thatcher, Mikayla O; Saito, Rex R; Condie, Tyler B; Simmons, Kurtis J; Judd, Allan M; Reynolds, Paul R; Bikman, Benjamin T

    2014-11-22

    Cigarette smoking is a common and lethal worldwide habit, with considerable mortality stemming from its deleterious effects on heart function. While current theories posit altered blood lipids and fibrinogen metabolism as likely mediators, none have explored the role of the sphingolipid ceramide in exacerbating heart function with smoke exposure. Ceramide production is a consequence of cigarette smoke in the lung, and considering ceramide's harmful effects on mitochondrial function, we sought to elucidate the role of ceramide in mediating smoke-induced altered heart mitochondrial respiration. Lung cells (A549) were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and heart cells (H9C2) were exposed to the lung-cell conditioned medium. Adult male mice were exposed sidestream cigarette smoke for 8 wk with dietary intervention and ceramide inhibition. Ceramides and heart cell or myocardial mitochondrial respiration were determined. Lung cell cultures revealed a robust response to cigarette smoke extract in both production and secretion of ceramides. Heart cells incubated with lung-cell conditioned medium revealed a pronounced inhibition of myocardial mitochondrial respiration, though this effect was mitigated with ceramide inhibition via myriocin. In vivo, heart ceramides increased roughly 600% in adult mice with long-term sidestream cigarette smoke exposure. This resulted in a significant ceramide-dependent reduction in left myocardial mitochondrial respiration, as heart mitochondria from the mice exposed to both smoke and myriocin injections respired normally. These results suggest ceramide to be an important mediator of altered myocardial mitochondrial function with cigarette smoke exposure. Thus, anti-ceramide therapies might be considered in the future to protect heart mitochondrial function with smoke exposure.

  12. Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis and respiration.

    PubMed

    Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Autio, Kaija J; Schonauer, Melissa S; Kursu, V A Samuli; Dieckmann, Carol L; Kastaniotis, Alexander J

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that mitochondria are able to synthesize fatty acids in a malonyl-CoA/acyl carrier protein (ACP)-dependent manner. This pathway resembles bacterial fatty acid synthesis (FAS) type II, which uses discrete, nuclearly encoded proteins. Experimental evidence, obtained mainly through using yeast as a model system, indicates that this pathway is essential for mitochondrial respiratory function. Curiously, the deficiency in mitochondrial FAS cannot be complemented by inclusion of fatty acids in the culture medium or by products of the cytosolic FAS complex. Defects in mitochondrial FAS in yeast result in the inability to grow on nonfermentable carbon sources, the loss of mitochondrial cytochromes a/a3 and b, mitochondrial RNA processing defects, and loss of cellular lipoic acid. Eukaryotic FAS II generates octanoyl-ACP, a substrate for mitochondrial lipoic acid synthase. Endogenous lipoic acid synthesis challenges the hypothesis that lipoic acid can be provided as an exogenously supplied vitamin. Purified eukaryotic FAS II enzymes are catalytically active in vitro using substrates with an acyl chain length of up to 16 carbon atoms. However, with the exception of 3-hydroxymyristoyl-ACP, a component of respiratory complex I in higher eukaryotes, the fate of long-chain fatty acids synthesized by the mitochondrial FAS pathway remains an enigma. The linkage of FAS II genes to published animal models for human disease supports the hypothesis that mitochondrial FAS dysfunction leads to the development of disorders in mammals.

  13. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  14. Mitochondrial Respiration Controls Lysosomal Function during Inflammatory T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4(+) T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation, and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward proinflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD(+) levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondrial cytochrome redox states and respiration in acute pulmonary oxygen sensing.

    PubMed

    Sommer, N; Pak, O; Schörner, S; Derfuss, T; Krug, A; Gnaiger, E; Ghofrani, H A; Schermuly, R T; Huckstorf, C; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Weissmann, N

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an essential mechanism to optimise lung gas exchange. We aimed to decipher the proposed oxygen sensing mechanism of mitochondria in HPV. Cytochrome redox state was assessed by remission spectrophotometry in intact lungs and isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Mitochondrial respiration was quantified by high-resolution respirometry. Alterations were compared with HPV and hypoxia-induced functional and molecular readouts on the cellular level. Aortic and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC and RASMC, respectively) served as controls. The hypoxia-induced decrease of mitochondrial respiration paralleled HPV in isolated lungs. In PASMC, reduction of respiration and mitochondrial cytochrome c and aa3 (complex IV), but not of cytochrome b (complex III) matched an increase in matrix superoxide levels as well as mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation with subsequent cytosolic calcium increase. In contrast to PASMC, RASMC displayed a lower decrease in respiration and no rise in superoxide, membrane potential or intracellular calcium. Pharmacological inhibition of mitochondria revealed analogous kinetics of cytochrome redox state and strength of HPV. Our data suggest inhibition of complex IV as an essential step in mitochondrial oxygen sensing of HPV. Concomitantly, increased superoxide release from complex III and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation may initiate the cytosolic calcium increase underlying HPV.

  16. Evidence of an alternative oxidase pathway for mitochondrial respiration in the scuticociliate Philasterides dicentrarchi.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; Leiro, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    The presence of an alternative oxidase (AOX) in the mitochondria of the scuticociliate P. dicentrarchi was investigated. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured in the presence of KCN, an inhibitor of cytochrome pathway (CP) respiration and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), a specific inhibitor of alternative pathway (AP) respiration. AOX expression was monitored by western blotting with an AOX polyclonal antibody. The results showed that P. dicentrarchi possesses a branched mitochondrial electron transport chain with both cyanide-sensitive and -insensitive oxygen consumption. Mitochondrial respiration was partially inhibited by cyanide and completely inhibited by the combination of cyanide and SHAM, which is direct evidence for the existence of an AP in this ciliate. SHAM significantly inhibited in vitro growth of trophozoites both under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. AOX is a 42kD monomeric protein inducible by hypoxic conditions in experimental infections and by CP inhibitors such as cyanide and antimycin A, or by AP inhibitors such as SHAM. CP respiration was greatly stimulated during the exponential growth phase, while AP respiration increased during the stationary phase, in which AOX expression is induced. As the host does not possess AOX, and because during infection P. dicentrarchi respires via AP, it may be possible to develop inhibitors targeting the AP as a novel anti-scuticociliate therapy.

  17. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cisplatin cytotoxicity is dependent on mitochondrial respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Inapurapu, Santhi priya; Kudle, Karunakar Rao; Bodiga, Sreedhar; Bodiga, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): To understand the role of mitochondrial respiration in cisplatin sensitivity, we have employed wild-type and mitochondrial DNA depleted Rho0 yeast cells. Materials and Methods: Wild type and Rho0 yeast cultured in fermentable and non-fermentable sugar containing media, were studied for their sensitivity against cisplatin by monitoring growth curves, oxygen consumption, pH changes in cytosol/mitochondrial compartments, reactive oxygen species production and respiratory control ratio. Results: Wild-type yeast grown on glycerol exhibited heightened sensitivity to cisplatin than yeast grown on glucose. Cisplatin (100 μM), although significantly reduced the growth of wild- type cells, only slightly altered the growth rate of Rho0 cells. Cisplatin treatment decreased both pHcyt and pHmit to a similar extent without affecting the pH difference. Cisplatin dose-dependently increased the oxidative stress in wild-type, but not in respiration-deficient Rho0 strain. Cisplatin decreased the respiratory control ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that cisplatin toxicity is influenced by the respiratory capacity of the cells and the intracellular oxidative burden. Although cisplatin per se slightly decreased the respiration of yeast cells grown in glucose, it did not disturb the mitochondrial chemiosmotic gradient. PMID:28133529

  19. Organization and regulation of mitochondrial respiration in plants.

    PubMed

    Millar, A Harvey; Whelan, James; Soole, Kathleen L; Day, David A

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation. We describe recent advances in our understanding of the mitochondrial respiratory machinery of cells, including the presence of a classical oxidative phosphorylation system linked to the cytosol by transporters, discussed alongside nonphosphorylating (and, therefore, non-energy conserving) bypasses that alter the efficiency of ATP synthesis and play a role in oxidative stress responses in plants. We consider respiratory regulation in the context of the contrasting roles mitochondria play in different tissues, from photosynthetic leaves to nutrient-acquiring roots. We focus on the molecular nature of this regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels that allow the respiratory apparatus of plants to help shape organ development and the response of plants to environmental stress. We highlight the challenges for future research considering spatial and temporal changes of respiration in response to changing climatic conditions.

  20. Sodium valproate induces mitochondrial respiration dysfunction in HepG2 in vitro cell model.

    PubMed

    Komulainen, Tuomas; Lodge, Tiffany; Hinttala, Reetta; Bolszak, Maija; Pietilä, Mika; Koivunen, Peppi; Hakkola, Jukka; Poulton, Joanna; Morten, Karl J; Uusimaa, Johanna

    2015-05-04

    Sodium valproate (VPA) is a potentially hepatotoxic antiepileptic drug. Risk of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity is increased in patients with mitochondrial diseases and especially in patients with POLG1 gene mutations. We used a HepG2 cell in vitro model to investigate the effect of VPA on mitochondrial activity. Cells were incubated in glucose medium and mitochondrial respiration-inducing medium supplemented with galactose and pyruvate. VPA treatments were carried out at concentrations of 0-2.0mM for 24-72 h. In both media, VPA caused decrease in oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential. VPA exposure led to depleted ATP levels in HepG2 cells incubated in galactose medium suggesting dysfunction in mitochondrial ATP production. In addition, VPA exposure for 72 h increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), but adversely decreased protein levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase SOD2, suggesting oxidative stress caused by impaired elimination of mitochondrial ROS and a novel pathomechanism related to VPA toxicity. Increased cell death and decrease in cell number was detected under both metabolic conditions. However, immunoblotting did not show any changes in the protein levels of the catalytic subunit A of mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ, the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II and IV, ATP synthase, E3 subunit dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase of pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase. Our results show that VPA inhibits mitochondrial respiration and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and increased cell death, thus suggesting an essential role of mitochondria in VPA-induced hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  3. Investigation of Mitochondrial Dysfunction by Sequential Microplate-Based Respiration Measurements from Intact and Permeabilized Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria. PMID:22496810

  4. Recombinant Mitochondrial Transcription Factor A with N-terminal Mitochondrial Transduction Domain Increases Respiration and Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Portell, Francisco R.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a scalable procedure to produce human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) modified with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) and mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) that allow it to cross membranes and enter mitochondria through its “mitochondrial transduction domain” (MTD=PTD+MLS). Alexa488-labeled MTD-TFAM rapidly entered the mitochondrial compartment of cybrid cells carrying the G11778A LHON mutation. MTD-TFAM reversibly increased respiration and levels of respiratory proteins. In vivo treatment of mice with MTD-TFAM increased motor endurance and complex I-driven respiration in mitochondria from brain and skeletal muscle. MTD-TFAM increases mitochondrial bioenergetics and holds promise for treatment of mitochondrial diseases involving deficiencies of energy production. PMID:19460293

  5. Perturbation in mitochondrial network dynamics and in complex I dependent cellular respiration in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Marina; Brenner-Lavie, Hanit; Ari, Shunit Gal-Ben; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondria have been suggested to be involved in the pathology of bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying mitochondrial dysfunction is unclear. Mitochondrial network dynamics, which reflects cellular metabolic state, is important for embryonic development, synapse formation, and neurodegeneration. This study aimed to investigate mitochondrial network dynamics and its plausible association with abnormal cellular oxygen consumption in schizophrenia. Viable Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes (lymphoblastoids) from DSM-IV diagnosed patients with schizophrenia (n = 17), BD (n = 15), and healthy control subjects (n = 15) were assessed for mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial dynamics, and relevant protein levels by oxygraph, confocal microscopy, and immunoblotting, respectively. Respiration of schizophrenia-derived lymphoblastoids was significantly lower compared with control subjects, and was twice as sensitive to dopamine (DA)-induced inhibition. Unlike DA, haloperidol inhibited complex I-driven respiration to a similar extent in both schizophrenia and the control cells. Both drugs interact with complex I but at different sites. At the site of DA interaction, we found alterations in protein levels of three subunits of complex I in schizophrenia. In addition, we observed structural and connectivity perturbations in the mitochondrial network, associated with alterations in the profusion protein OPA1, which was similarly reduced in schizophrenia prefrontal cortex specimens. None of these alterations were observed in the BD cells, which were similar to control cells. We show impaired mitochondrial network dynamics associated with reduced cellular respiration and complex I abnormalities in schizophrenia but not in BD. If these findings represent disease-specific alterations, they may become an endophenotype biomarker for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Mitochondrial respiration protects against oxygen-associated DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ho Joong; Ma, Wenzhe; Wang, Ping-yuan; Hynes, James; O'Riordan, Tomas C.; Combs, Christian A.; McCoy, J. Philip; Bunz, Fred; Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Hwang, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is not only required for oxidative phosphorylation but also serves as the essential substrate for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is implicated in ageing and tumorigenesis. Although the mitochondrion is known for its bioenergetic function, the symbiotic theory originally proposed that it provided protection against the toxicity of increasing oxygen in the primordial atmosphere. Using human cells lacking Synthesis of Cytochrome c Oxidase 2 (SCO2 –/–), we have tested the oxygen toxicity hypothesis. These cells are oxidative phosphorylation defective and glycolysis dependent; they exhibit increased viability under hypoxia and feature an inverted growth response to oxygen compared with wild-type cells. SCO2 –/– cells have increased intracellular oxygen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) levels, which result in increased ROS and oxidative DNA damage. Using this isogenic cell line, we have revealed the genotoxicity of ambient oxygen. Our study highlights the importance of mitochondrial respiration both for bioenergetic benefits and for maintaining genomic stability in an oxygen-rich environment. PMID:20975668

  7. Respiration and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Germinating Embryos of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Brambl, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Function of the cyanide-sensitive mitochondrial electron transport system was required for germination of the Zea mays embryo. Respiration of the standard electron transport system (rather than the alternate oxidase) began immediately upon initiation of imbibition. This respiration depended upon cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase that were conserved in an active form in the quiescent embryo rather than upon newly synthesized or assembled enzyme complexes. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled subunits of these enzymes showed that the initiation of mitochondrial biogenetic activities, including de novo synthesis of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded enzyme subunit peptides, was strongly induced after 6 hours of embryo germination. Undetectable or very low levels of transcripts for subunits 1 and 2 of the F1-ATPase and subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase were present in the quiescent embryo; these transcripts accumulated rapidly between 6 and 12 hours of germination and their translation products were rapidly synthesized between 6 and 24 hours. An exception was the gene for subunit 9 of the ATPase; transcripts of this mitochondrial gene were abundant in the dry embryo and rapidly accumulated further upon initiation of imbibition; they were translated actively during the first 6 hours. We isolated and sequenced a near full-length cDNA for subunit 2 (beta) of the F1-ATPase, and we compared the deduced protein sequence with related sequences of other organisms. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667450

  8. Coordinated activation of mitochondrial respiration and exocytosis mediated by PKC signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Chareyron, Isabelle; Dayon, Loïc; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Cominetti, Ornella; Pilar Giner Giménez, María; De Marchi, Umberto; Canto, Carles; Kussmann, Martin; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in pancreatic β-cell nutrient sensing by coupling their metabolism to plasma membrane excitability and insulin granule exocytosis. Whether non-nutrient secretagogues stimulate mitochondria as part of the molecular mechanism to promote insulin secretion is not known. Here, we show that PKC signaling, which is employed by many non-nutrient secretagogues, augments mitochondrial respiration in INS-1E (rat insulinoma cell line clone 1E) and human pancreatic β cells. The phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, accelerates mitochondrial respiration at both resting and stimulatory glucose concentrations. A range of inhibitors of novel PKC isoforms prevent phorbol ester-induced respiration. Respiratory response was blocked by oligomycin that demonstrated PKC-dependent acceleration of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Enhanced respiration was observed even when glycolysis was bypassed or fatty acid transport was blocked, which suggested that PKC regulates mitochondrial processes rather than upstream catabolic fluxes. A phosphoproteome study of phorbol ester-stimulated INS-1E cells maintained under resting (2.5 mM) glucose revealed a large number of phosphorylation sites that were altered during short-term activation of PKC signaling. The data set was enriched for proteins that are involved in gene expression, cytoskeleton remodeling, secretory vesicle transport, and exocytosis. Interactome analysis identified PKC, C-Raf, and ERK1/2 as the central phosphointeraction cluster. Prevention of ERK1/2 signaling by using a MEK1 inhibitor caused a marked decreased in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced mitochondrial respiration. ERK1/2 signaling module therefore links PKC activation to downstream mitochondrial activation. We conclude that non-nutrient secretagogues act, in part, via PKC and downstream ERK1/2 signaling to stimulate mitochondrial energy production to compensate for energy expenditure that is linked to β-cell activation

  9. Cardiac contractile function and mitochondrial respiration in diabetes-related mouse models.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Camille; Marechal, Xavier; Montaigne, David; Neviere, Remi; Lancel, Steve

    2014-08-21

    Pathophysiological processes underlying diabetic-related cardiomyopathies are complex. Mitochondria dysfunction is often described as a cause of cardiac impairment but its extent may depend on the type of experimental diabetes. Here we proposed to compare drug- or diet-induced models of diabetes in terms of metabolic features, cardiac and mitochondrial functions. Mice were fed with regular chow or fat-enriched diet. After three weeks, they received either citrate or streptozotocin injections for five consecutive days. Metabolic parameters, myocardial contractile function and mitochondrial respiration were measured after three more weeks. Fat mass volumes were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Oral glucose tolerance test, insulin tolerance test, triglyceride and adipocytokine quantification were evaluated to establish metabolic profiles. Cardiac function was assessed ex vivo onto a Langendorff column. Isolated cardiac mitochondria respiration was obtained using high-resolution oxygraphy. Mice fed with the fat-enriched regimen presented abdominal obesity, increased blood glucose, elevated leptin level, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Mice treated with streptozotocin, independently of the regimen, lost their capacity to release insulin in response to glucose ingestion. Mice fed with regular chow diet and injected with streptozotocin developed cardiac dysfunction without mitochondrial respiration defect. However, both groups of high-fat diet fed mice developed cardiac alterations associated with reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, despite an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis signalling. We explored three animal models mimicking type 1 and 2 diabetes. While cardiac dysfunction was present in the three groups of mice, mitochondrial respiration impairment was only obvious in models reproducing features of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Mitochondrial respiration in hearts of copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, A.M.; Saari, J.T. USDA/ARS, Grand Forks, ND )

    1991-03-11

    Morphological observations indicate that dietary copper deficiency causes structural damage of cardiac mitochondria. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial function is impaired as well. Male, weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets deficient or sufficient in copper for 4 wks. Copper deficiency was verified by measurement of plasma (ND (CuD) vs 0.46 {plus minus} 0.15 {mu}g/ml (CuS)) and kidney copper. Mitochondria were isolated and P/O ratio, state 3 and state 4 respiration rate and acceptor control index (ACI) were determined using succinate or pyruvate/malate as substrate. Determinations were made polarographically at 30C in a reaction medium consisting of 0.25 M sucrose, 0.1 mM EDTA, 200 mM MgCl and 200 mM sodium phosphate buffer. State 3 respiration rate in mitochondria from CuD hearts was 30% lower than in CuS mitochondria when succinate was used as substrate and 28% lower when pyruvate/malate was used. Copper deficiency reduced state 4 respiration rate by 31% when succinate was used and 16% when pyruvate/malate was used. P/O ratio and ACI were not significantly affected by copper deficiency. The observed decreases in respiration rates are consistent with decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity shown by others to occur in mitochondria isolated from hearts of copper-deficient rats.

  11. Mitochondrial Respiration Is Reduced in Atherosclerosis, Promoting Necrotic Core Formation and Reducing Relative Fibrous Cap Thickness.

    PubMed

    Yu, Emma P K; Reinhold, Johannes; Yu, Haixiang; Starks, Lakshi; Uryga, Anna K; Foote, Kirsty; Finigan, Alison; Figg, Nichola; Pung, Yuh-Fen; Logan, Angela; Murphy, Michael P; Bennett, Martin

    2017-09-28

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage is present in murine and human atherosclerotic plaques. However, whether endogenous levels of mtDNA damage are sufficient to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and whether decreasing mtDNA damage and improving mitochondrial respiration affects plaque burden or composition are unclear. We examined mitochondrial respiration in human atherosclerotic plaques and whether augmenting mitochondrial respiration affects atherogenesis. Human atherosclerotic plaques showed marked mitochondrial dysfunction, manifested as reduced mtDNA copy number and oxygen consumption rate in fibrous cap and core regions. Vascular smooth muscle cells derived from plaques showed impaired mitochondrial respiration, reduced complex I expression, and increased mitophagy, which was induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice showed decreased mtDNA integrity and mitochondrial respiration, associated with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. To determine whether alleviating mtDNA damage and increasing mitochondrial respiration affects atherogenesis, we studied ApoE(-/-) mice overexpressing the mitochondrial helicase Twinkle (Tw(+)/ApoE(-/-)). Tw(+)/ApoE(-/-) mice showed increased mtDNA integrity, copy number, respiratory complex abundance, and respiration. Tw(+)/ApoE(-/-) mice had decreased necrotic core and increased fibrous cap areas, and Tw(+)/ApoE(-/-) bone marrow transplantation also reduced core areas. Twinkle increased vascular smooth muscle cell mtDNA integrity and respiration. Twinkle also promoted vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and protected both vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Endogenous mtDNA damage in mouse and human atherosclerosis is associated with significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration. Reducing mtDNA damage and increasing mitochondrial respiration decrease necrotic core and increase fibrous cap areas independently of changes

  12. Fluoride decreased the sperm ATP of mice through inhabiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zilong; Zhang, Wen; Xue, Xingchen; Zhang, Yuliang; Niu, Ruiyan; Li, Xuying; Li, Baojun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-01

    Fluoride-induced low sperm motility was observed in accumulated investigations. However, the effect of fluoride exposure on ATP generation which is essential to sperm motility remains to be elucidated. In this study, 120 healthy male mice were orally administrated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg L(-1) NaF for 90 d. Results showed that compared with controls, fluoride ingestion significantly reduced sperm count, survival, as well as mobility and total ATP level in sperm untreated with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or pyruvate, which was used to establish glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration model, respectively. Data further revealed that sperm mobility and ATP level under mitochondrial respiration condition were significantly suppressed, while no statistical difference occurred in the model of glycolysis, indicating ATP derived from mitochondria was affected. Moreover, mRNA expressions of mitochondrial cytochrome b (mt-Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (mt-COX2), two important molecules in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), were down-regulated in all fluoride treatment groups. Mitochondria in sperm of mice exposed to 100 mg L(-1) NaF appeared to be irregular and vacuolated. These findings suggested that decreased sperm motility induced by fluoride may result from low ATP generation due to the disturbed ETC in sperm mitochondrial.

  13. Tributyltin (TBT) and mitochondrial respiration in mussel digestive gland.

    PubMed

    Nesci, Salvatore; Ventrella, Vittoria; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of organotins and especially tri-n-butyltin (TBT) on mitochondria is well known. However as far as we are aware, effects on mitochondrial respiration are unexplored in mollusks. In this work mitochondria isolated from the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis and susceptive to the classical respiratory chain inhibitors, were assayed in the presence of micromolar TBT concentrations to investigate mitochondrial respiratory activities. Intact and freeze-thawed mitochondria were used. TBT significantly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of glutamate/malate or succinate as substrates. Conversely cytochrome c oxidase activity (complex IV), assayed both polarographically and spectrophotometrically, was unaffected. The addition of 1,4-dithioerythritol (DTE) decreased the TBT-driven inhibition of complexes I and III. The TBT capability of covalent binding to thiol groups of mitochondrial proteins in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed by the aid of Ellman's reagent. Data strongly suggests that TBT may prevent the electron transfer from complexes I and III to downhill respiratory chain complexes by binding to critical SH residues.

  14. Isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase regulates mitochondrial respiration and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teh, J T; Zhu, W L; Ilkayeva, O R; Li, Y; Gooding, J; Casey, P J; Summers, S A; Newgard, C B; Wang, M

    2015-06-01

    Isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt) catalyzes the last of the three-step posttranslational protein prenylation process for the so-called CaaX proteins, which includes many signaling proteins, such as most small GTPases. Despite extensive studies on Icmt and its regulation of cell functions, the mechanisms of much of the impact of Icmt on cellular functions remain unclear. Our recent studies demonstrated that suppression of Icmt results in induction of autophagy, inhibition of cell growth and inhibition of proliferation in various cancer cell types, prompting this investigation of potential metabolic regulation by Icmt. We report here the findings that Icmt inhibition reduces the function of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in multiple cancer cell lines. In-depth oximetry analysis demonstrated that functions of mitochondrial complex I, II and III are subject to Icmt regulation. Consistently, Icmt inhibition decreased cellular ATP and depleted critical tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites, leading to suppression of cell anabolism and growth, and marked autophagy. Several different approaches demonstrated that the impact of Icmt inhibition on cell proliferation and viability was largely mediated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. This previously unappreciated function of Icmt, which can be therapeutically exploited, likely has a significant role in the impact of Icmt on tumorigenic processes.

  15. Thyrsiferol Inhibits Mitochondrial Respiration and HIF-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Fakhri; Falkenberg, Miriam; Ioannou, Efstathia; Roussis, Vassilios; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic marine red algal metabolite thyrsiferol (1) was found to inhibit hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in T47D human breast tumor cells (66% inhibition at 3 μM). Compound 1 also suppressed hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes (VEGF, GLUT-1) at the mRNA level, and displayed tumor cell line-selective time-dependent inhibition of cell viability/proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 selectively suppressed mitochondrial respiration at Complex I (IC50 3 μM). Thyrsiferol represents a prototypical, structurally unique electron transport chain inhibitor. The apparent rotenone-like activity may contribute to the observed cytotoxicity of 1 and play an important role in Laurencia chemical defense. PMID:21785662

  16. Insulin resistance in HIV-infected youth is associated with decreased mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Jody K.; Miller, Tracie L.; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial respiration in perinatally HIV-infected youth. Design: Case–control study. Methods: Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in perinatally HIV-infected youth in Tanner stages 2–5, 25 youth with IR (IR+) and 50 without IR (IR−) who were enrolled in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. IR was defined as a homeostatic model of assessment for IR value at least 4.0. A novel, high-throughput oximetry method was used to evaluate cellular respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in mitochondrial respiration markers between IR+ and IR− were evaluated, as were correlations between mitochondrial respiration markers and biochemical measurements. Results: IR+ and IR− youth were similar on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mean age was 16.5 and 15.6 years in IR+ and IR−, respectively. The IR+ group had significantly higher mean BMI and metabolic analytes (fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and venous lactate and pyruvate) compared with the IR−. Mitochondrial respiration markers were, on average, lower in the IR+ compared with IR−, including basal respiration (417.5 vs. 597.5 pmol, P = 0.074), ATP production (11 513 vs. 15 202 pmol, P = 0.078), proton leak (584.6 vs. 790.0 pmol, P = 0.033), maximal respiration (1815 vs. 2399 pmol, P = 0.025), and spare respiration capacity (1162 vs. 2017 pmol, P = 0.032). Nonmitochondrial respiration did not differ by IR status. The results did not change when adjusted for age. Conclusion: HIV-infected youth with IR have lower mitochondrial respiration markers when compared to youth without IR. Disordered mitochondrial respiration may be a potential mechanism for IR in this population. PMID:27755108

  17. Insulin resistance in HIV-infected youth is associated with decreased mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Jody K; Miller, Tracie L; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L; Geffner, Mitchell E; Van Dyke, Russell B; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2017-01-02

    To identify relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial respiration in perinatally HIV-infected youth. Case-control study. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in perinatally HIV-infected youth in Tanner stages 2-5, 25 youth with IR (IR+) and 50 without IR (IR-) who were enrolled in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. IR was defined as a homeostatic model of assessment for IR value at least 4.0. A novel, high-throughput oximetry method was used to evaluate cellular respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in mitochondrial respiration markers between IR+ and IR- were evaluated, as were correlations between mitochondrial respiration markers and biochemical measurements. IR+ and IR- youth were similar on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mean age was 16.5 and 15.6 years in IR+ and IR-, respectively. The IR+ group had significantly higher mean BMI and metabolic analytes (fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and venous lactate and pyruvate) compared with the IR-. Mitochondrial respiration markers were, on average, lower in the IR+ compared with IR-, including basal respiration (417.5 vs. 597.5 pmol, P = 0.074), ATP production (11 513 vs. 15 202 pmol, P = 0.078), proton leak (584.6 vs. 790.0 pmol, P = 0.033), maximal respiration (1815 vs. 2399 pmol, P = 0.025), and spare respiration capacity (1162 vs. 2017 pmol, P = 0.032). Nonmitochondrial respiration did not differ by IR status. The results did not change when adjusted for age. HIV-infected youth with IR have lower mitochondrial respiration markers when compared to youth without IR. Disordered mitochondrial respiration may be a potential mechanism for IR in this population.

  18. Glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration in mouse LDHC-null sperm.

    PubMed

    Odet, Fanny; Gabel, Scott; London, Robert E; Goldberg, Erwin; Eddy, Edward M

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrated previously that a knockout (KO) of the lactate dehydrogenase type C (Ldhc) gene disrupted male fertility and caused a considerable reduction in sperm glucose consumption, ATP production, and motility. While that study used mice with a mixed genetic background, the present study used C57BL/6 (B6) and 129S6 (129) Ldhc KO mice. We found that B6 KO males were subfertile and 129 KO males were infertile. Sperm from 129 wild-type (WT) mice have a lower glycolytic rate than sperm from B6 WT mice, resulting in a greater reduction in ATP production in 129 KO sperm than in B6 KO sperm. The lower glycolytic rate in 129 sperm offered a novel opportunity to examine the role of mitochondrial respiration in sperm ATP production and motility. We observed that in media containing a mitochondrial substrate (pyruvate or lactate) as the sole energy source, ATP levels and progressive motility in 129 KO sperm were similar to those in 129 WT sperm. However, when glucose was added, lactate was unable to maintain ATP levels or progressive motility in 129 KO sperm. The rate of respiration (ZO2) was high when 129 KO or WT sperm were incubated with lactate alone, but addition of glucose caused a reduction in ZO2. These results indicate that in the absence of glucose, 129 sperm can produce ATP via oxidative phosphorylation, but in the presence of glucose, oxidative phosphorylation is suppressed and the sperm utilize aerobic glycolysis, a phenomenon known as the Crabtree effect.

  19. Mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with depressive subsymptoms and severity of major depression.

    PubMed

    Karabatsiakis, A; Böck, C; Salinas-Manrique, J; Kolassa, S; Calzia, E; Dietrich, D E; Kolassa, I-T

    2014-06-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction might have a central role in the pathophysiology of depression. Phenotypically, depression is characterized by lack of energy, concentration problems and fatigue. These symptoms might be partially explained by reduced availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a consequence of impaired mitochondrial functioning. This study investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), an established model to investigate the pathophysiology of depression. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in intact PBMCs in 22 individuals with a diagnosis of major depression (MD) compared with 22 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution respirometry. Individuals with MD showed significantly impaired mitochondrial functioning: routine and uncoupled respiration as well as spare respiratory capacity, coupling efficiency and ATP turnover-related respiration were significantly lower in the MD compared with the control group. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration was significantly negatively correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms, in particular, with loss of energy, difficulties concentrating and fatigue. The results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the biomolecular pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. The decreased immune capability observed in MD leading to a higher risk of comorbidities could be attributable to impaired energy supply due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus mitochondrial respiration in PBMCs and its functional consequences might be an interesting target for new therapeutical approaches in the treatment of MD and immune-related comorbidities.

  20. Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

  1. Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

  2. Pig Brain Mitochondria as a Biological Model for Study of Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation is a key process of intracellular energy transfer by which mitochondria produce ATP. Isolated mitochondria serve as a biological model for understanding the mitochondrial respiration control, effects of various biologically active substances, and pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate pig brain mitochondria as a proper biological model for investigation of activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Oxygen consumption rates of isolated pig brain mitochondria were measured using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration of crude mitochondrial fraction, mitochondria purified in sucrose gradient, and mitochondria purified in Percoll gradient were assayed as a function of storage time. Oxygen flux and various mitochondrial respiratory control ratios were not changed within two days of mitochondria storage on ice. Leak respiration was found higher and Complex I-linked respiration lower in purified mitochondria compared to the crude mitochondrial fraction. Damage to both outer and inner mitochondrial membrane caused by the isolation procedure was the greatest after purification in a sucrose gradient. We confirmed that pig brain mitochondria can serve as a biological model for investigation of mitochondrial respiration. The advantage of this biological model is the stability of respiratory parameters for more than 48 h and the possibility to isolate large amounts of mitochondria from specific brain areas without the need to kill laboratory animals. We suggest the use of high-resolution respirometry of pig brain mitochondria for research of the neuroprotective effects and/or mitochondrial toxicity of new medical drugs.

  3. SMG-1 kinase attenuates mitochondrial ROS production but not cell respiration deficits during hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Resseguie, Emily A; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2017-07-27

    Supplemental oxygen (hyperoxia) used to treat individuals in respiratory distress causes cell injury by enhancing the production of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. The suppressor of morphogenesis of genitalia (SMG-1) kinase is activated during hyperoxia and promotes cell survival by phosphorylating the tumor suppressor p53 on serine 15. Here, we investigate whether SMG-1 and p53 blunt this vicious cycle of progressive ROS production and decline in mitochondrial respiration seen during hyperoxia. Human lung adenocarcinoma A549 and H1299 or colon carcinoma HCT116 cells were depleted of SMG-1, UPF-1, or p53 using RNA interference, and then exposed to room air (21% oxygen) or hyperoxia (95% oxygen). Immunoblotting was used to evaluate protein expression; a Seahorse Bioanalyzer was used to assess cellular respiration; and flow cytometry was used to evaluate fluorescence intensity of cells stained with mitochondrial or redox sensitive dyes. Hyperoxia increased mitochondrial and cytoplasmic ROS and suppressed mitochondrial respiration without changing mitochondrial mass or membrane potential. Depletion of SMG-1 or its cofactor, UPF1, significantly enhanced hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial but not cytosolic ROS abundance. They did not affect mitochondrial mass, membrane potential, or hyperoxia-induced deficits in mitochondrial respiration. Genetic depletion of p53 in A549 cells and ablation of the p53 gene in H1299 or HCT116 cells revealed that SMG-1 influences mitochondrial ROS through activation of p53. Our findings show that hyperoxia does not promote a vicious cycle of progressive mitochondrial ROS and dysfunction because SMG-1-p53 signaling attenuates production of mitochondrial ROS without preserving respiration. This suggests antioxidant therapies that blunt ROS production during hyperoxia may not suffice to restore cellular respiration.

  4. Soil respiration under climate warming: differential response of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Lingli; Piao, Shilong; Janssens, Ivan A; Tang, Jianwu; Liu, Weixing; Chi, Yonggang; Wang, Jing; Xu, Shan

    2014-10-01

    Despite decades of research, how climate warming alters the global flux of soil respiration is still poorly characterized. Here, we use meta-analysis to synthesize 202 soil respiration datasets from 50 ecosystem warming experiments across multiple terrestrial ecosystems. We found that, on average, warming by 2 °C increased soil respiration by 12% during the early warming years, but warming-induced drought partially offset this effect. More significantly, the two components of soil respiration, heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration showed distinct responses. The warming effect on autotrophic respiration was not statistically detectable during the early warming years, but nonetheless decreased with treatment duration. In contrast, warming by 2 °C increased heterotrophic respiration by an average of 21%, and this stimulation remained stable over the warming duration. This result challenged the assumption that microbial activity would acclimate to the rising temperature. Together, our findings demonstrate that distinguishing heterotrophic respiration and autotrophic respiration would allow us better understand and predict the long-term response of soil respiration to warming. The dependence of soil respiration on soil moisture condition also underscores the importance of incorporating warming-induced soil hydrological changes when modeling soil respiration under climate change. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Sulfide-inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at very low oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-09-15

    Our aim was to study the ability of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the rate of elimination of sulfide through the pathway linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operating under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide's inhibition of cellular respiration would occur faster under continuous sulfide exposure when the oxygen concentration is in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5-1×10(6) cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37 °C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73±0.05 μM, 3.1±0.2 μM, and 6.2±0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3;3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2]min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6 [15.5;28.1]min (coupled) and 35.9 [27.4;59.2]min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4]min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7]min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results confirm that the onset of inhibition of cell respiration by sulfide occurs earlier under a continuous exposure when approaching

  6. Inhibiting prenylation augments chemotherapy efficacy in renal cell carcinoma through dual inhibition on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiangrong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Peng, Xiaochun; Huang, Wei

    2017-09-22

    Prenylation is a posttranslational lipid modification required for the proper functions of a number of proteins involved in cell regulation. Here, we show that prenylation inhibition is important for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) growth, survival and response to chemotherapy, and its underlying mechanism may be contributed to mitochondrial dysfunction. We first demonstrated that a HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor pitavastatin inhibited mevalonate pathway and thereby prenylation in RCC cells. In addition, pitavastatin is effective in inhibiting growth and inducing apoptosis in a panel of RCC cell lines. Combination of pitavastatin and paclitaxel is significantly more effective than pitavastatin or paclitaxel alone as shown by both in vitro cell culture system and in vivo RCC xenograft model. Importantly, pitavastatin treatment inhibits mitochondrial respiration via suppressing mitochondrial complex I and II enzyme activities. Interestingly, different from mitochondrial inhibitor phenformin that inhibits mitochondrial respiration but activates glycolytic rate in RCC cells, pitavastatin significantly decreases glycolytic rate. The dual inhibitory action of pitavastatin on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis results in remarkable energy depletion and oxidative stress in RCC cells. In addition, inhibition of prenylation by depleting Isoprenylcysteine carboxylmethyltransferase (Icmt) also mimics the inhibitory effects of pitavastatin in RCC cells. Our work demonstrates the previously unappreciated association between prenylation inhibition and energy metabolism in RCC, which can be therapeutically exploited, likely in tumors that largely rely on energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondrial impairment by PPAR agonists and statins identified via immunocaptured OXPHOS complex activities and respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Nadanaciva, Sashi; Dykens, James A.; Bernal, Autumn; Capaldi, Roderick A.; Will, Yvonne

    2007-09-15

    Mitochondrial impairment is increasingly implicated in the etiology of toxicity caused by some thiazolidinediones, fibrates, and statins. We examined the effects of members of these drug classes on respiration of isolated rat liver mitochondria using a phosphorescent oxygen sensitive probe and on the activity of individual oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes using a recently developed immunocapture technique. Of the six thiazolidinediones examined, ciglitazone, troglitazone, and darglitazone potently disrupted mitochondrial respiration. In accord with these data, ciglitazone and troglitazone were also potent inhibitors of Complexes II + III, IV, and V, while darglitazone predominantly inhibited Complex IV. Of the six statins evaluated, lovastatin, simvastatin, and cerivastatin impaired mitochondrial respiration the most, with simvastatin and lovastatin impairing multiple OXPHOS Complexes. Within the class of fibrates, gemfibrozil more potently impaired respiration than fenofibrate, clofibrate, or ciprofibrate. Gemfibrozil only modestly inhibited Complex I, fenofibrate inhibited Complexes I, II + III, and V, and clofibrate inhibited Complex V. Our findings with the two complementary methods indicate that (1) some members of each class impair mitochondrial respiration, whereas others have little or no effect, and (2) the rank order of mitochondrial impairment accords with clinical adverse events observed with these drugs. Since the statins are frequently co-prescribed with the fibrates or thiazolidinediones, various combinations of these three drug classes were also analyzed for their mitochondrial effects. In several cases, the combination additively uncoupled or inhibited respiration, suggesting that some combinations are more likely to yield clinically relevant drug-induced mitochondrial side effects than others.

  8. Effect of the antitumoral alkylating agent 3-bromopyruvate on mitochondrial respiration: role of mitochondrially bound hexokinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Clara; da Silva, Ana Paula Pereira; Galina, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The alkylating agent 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) has been used as an anti-tumoral drug due to its anti-proliferative property in hepatomas cells. This propriety is believed to disturb glycolysis and respiration, which leads to a decreased rate of ATP synthesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the alkylating agent 3-BrPA on the respiratory states and the metabolic steps of the mitochondria of mice liver, brain and in human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), O(2) consumption and dehydrogenase activities were rapidly dissipated/or inhibited by 3-BrPA in respiration medium containing ADP and succinate as respiratory substrate. 3-BrPA inhibition was reverted by reduced glutathione (GSH). Respiration induced by yeast soluble hexokinase (HK) was rapidly inhibited by 3-BrPA. Similar results were observed using mice brain mitochondria that present HK naturally bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. When the adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) was blocked by the carboxyatractiloside, the 3-BrPA effect was significantly delayed. In permeabilized human hepatoma HepG2 cells that present HK type II bound to mitochondria (mt-HK II), the inhibiting effect occurred faster when the endogenous HK activity was activated by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG). Inhibition of mt-HK II by glucose-6-phosphate retards the mitochondria to react with 3-BrPA. The HK activities recovered in HepG2 cells treated or not with 3-BrPA were practically the same. These results suggest that mitochondrially bound HK supporting the ADP/ATP exchange activity levels facilitates the 3-BrPA inhibition reaction in tumors mitochondria by a proton motive force-dependent dynamic equilibrium between sensitive and less sensitive SDH in the electron transport system.

  9. Antibacterial peptides and mitochondrial presequences affect mitochondrial coupling, respiration and protein import.

    PubMed

    Hugosson, M; Andreu, D; Boman, H G; Glaser, E

    1994-08-01

    Cecropins A and P1, antibacterial peptides from insects and from pig and some related peptides released respiratory control, inhibited protein import and at higher concentrations also inhibited respiration. However, PR-39, an antibacterial peptide from pig intestine, was found to be almost inert towards mitochondria. The concentrations at which the three mitochondrial functions were effected varied for different peptides. Melittin, magainin and Cecropin-A-(1,13)-Melittin(1,13)-NH2, a hybrid between cecropin A and melittin, were most potent, while the two cecropins acted at higher concentrations. The biosynthesis of cecropin A is known and the intermediates are synthesized. We have used four peptides from this pathway to investigate their effects on coupling, respiration and protein import into mitochondria. Mature cecropin A followed by the preproprotein were most aggressive whereas the intermediates were less active or inert. The efficiency of different derivatives of cecropin A as uncouplers correlates well with their capacity to release membrane potential measured as fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine 123. Inhibition of respiration was found to be dependent on membrane potential and was most pronounced with mature cecropin A, less so with its three precursors. We also found that three peptides derived from mitochondrial presequences showed antibacterial activity. It is concluded that, there are similarities in the functions of antibacterial peptides and mitochondrial presequences, uncoupling activity in mitochondria cannot be correlated with the antibacterial activity (contrary to a previous suggestion), the processing of preprocecropin A may have evolved in such a way that there is a minimum of membrane damage from the intermediates in the pathway, and peptides produced for delivery outside of an animal have evolved to be more aggressive against mitochondria than peptides for delivery inside of the animal.

  10. NF-κB controls energy homeostasis and metabolic adaptation by upregulating mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Claudio; Leow, Shi Chi; Anso, Elena; Rocha, Sonia; Thotakura, Anil K.; Tornatore, Laura; Moretti, Marta; De Smaele, Enrico; Beg, Amer A.; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Franzoso, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process1,2. It requires active reprogramming of cellular bioenergetic pathways towards glucose metabolism to support anabolic growth1,2. NF-κB/Rel transcription factors coordinate many of the signals that drive proliferation during Immunity, inflammation and oncogenesis3, but whether NF-κB regulates the metabolic reprogramming required for cell division during these processes is unknown. Here, we report that NF-κB organizes energy metabolism networks by controlling the balance between the utilization of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. NF-κB inhibition causes cellular reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis under basal conditions and induces necrosis on glucose starvation. The metabolic reorganization that results from NF-κB inhibition overcomes the requirement for tumour suppressor mutation in oncogenic transformation and impairs metabolic adaptation in cancer in vivo. This NF-κB-dependent metabolic pathway involves stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation through upregulation of mitochondrial synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2; ref. 4). Our findings identify NF-κB as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial respiration and establish a role for NF-κB in metabolic adaptation in normal cells and cancer. PMID:21968997

  11. NF-κB controls energy homeostasis and metabolic adaptation by upregulating mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Claudio; Leow, Shi Chi; Anso, Elena; Rocha, Sonia; Thotakura, Anil K; Tornatore, Laura; Moretti, Marta; De Smaele, Enrico; Beg, Amer A; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chandel, Navdeep S; Franzoso, Guido

    2011-08-28

    Cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process. It requires active reprogramming of cellular bioenergetic pathways towards glucose metabolism to support anabolic growth. NF-κB/Rel transcription factors coordinate many of the signals that drive proliferation during immunity, inflammation and oncogenesis, but whether NF-κB regulates the metabolic reprogramming required for cell division during these processes is unknown. Here, we report that NF-κB organizes energy metabolism networks by controlling the balance between the utilization of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. NF-κB inhibition causes cellular reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis under basal conditions and induces necrosis on glucose starvation. The metabolic reorganization that results from NF-κB inhibition overcomes the requirement for tumour suppressor mutation in oncogenic transformation and impairs metabolic adaptation in cancer in vivo. This NF-κB-dependent metabolic pathway involves stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation through upregulation of mitochondrial synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2; ref. ). Our findings identify NF-κB as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial respiration and establish a role for NF-κB in metabolic adaptation in normal cells and cancer.

  12. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase maintains respiration and preserves photosynthetic capacity during moderate drought in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum 'Petit Havana SR1' wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Ascaridia galli: mitochondrial respiration in free-living and parasitic stages.

    PubMed

    Fry, M; Jenkins, D C

    1983-08-01

    Aerobic respiratory pathways have been delineated and respiratory efficiency has been assessed in mitochondria isolated from embryonated eggs, infective larvae, and adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Ascaridia galli. Mitochondrial respiration in free-living stages of N. brasiliensis is mediated mainly by a mammalian-like antimycin A- and cyanide-sensitive pathway; specific respiratory activity is high and oxidative phosphorylation efficient. In mitochondria of adult N. brasiliensis, antimycin A- and cyanide-sensitive respiration is decreased relative to respiration though an alternative pathway, and specific respiratory activity and mitochondrial efficiency are lower. Respiration in mitochondria from embryonated eggs and tissues of adult A. galli is comparable, and apparently mediated by an antimycin A- and cyanide-insensitive alternative respiratory pathway; no evidence for the presence of a mammalian-like respiratory pathway in embryonated eggs of A. galli was found. The results of this study are compared to mitochondrial respiration in eggs, larvae, and adult body wall muscle of Ascaris suum.

  14. Bcl-2 induces pro-oxidant state by engaging mitochondrial respiration in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z X; Pervaiz, S

    2007-09-01

    Mitochondrial respiration, the key process behind cellular energy production, is critical for cell proliferation, growth and survival. However, the regulation of mitochondrial respiratory function in tumor cells is not well understood. In this study, we propose a model whereby tumor cells possess the capacity to fine-tune the balance between energy demands and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) status, to maintain a milieu optimal for survival. This is achieved through the moderation of mitochondrial respiration, depending on the ROS context within the organelle, with the main players being Bcl-2 and cytochrome c oxidase (COX). We report a higher level of COX activity, oxygen consumption and mitochondrial respiration in tumor cells overexpressing Bcl-2. Transient overexpression, gene silencing and pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-2 corroborate these findings. Interestingly, Bcl-2 is also able to regulate mitochondrial respiration and COX activity in the face of mounting ROS levels, triggered by mitochondrial complex inhibitors. In this respect, it is plausible to suggest that Bcl-2 may be able to create an environment, most suited for survival by adjusting mitochondrial respiration accordingly to meet energy requirements, without incurring an overwhelming, detrimental increase in intracellular ROS.

  15. Mitochondrial respiration links TOR Complex 2 signaling to calcium regulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2017-03-21

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved regulator of cell growth and functions within 2 different protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, where TORC2 positively controls macroautophagy/autophagy during amino acid starvation. Under these conditions, TORC2 signaling inhibits the activity of the calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin and promotes the general amino acid control (GAAC) response and autophagy. Here we demonstrate that TORC2 regulates calcineurin by controlling the respiratory activity of mitochondria. In particular, we find that mitochondrial oxidative stress affects the calcium channel regulatory protein Mid1, which we show is an essential upstream activator of calcineurin. Thus, these findings describe a novel regulation for autophagy that involves TORC2 signaling, mitochondrial respiration, and calcium homeostasis.

  16. Is cell aging caused by respiration-dependent injury to the mitochondrial genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. E.; Yengoyan, L. S.; Miquel, J.; Cottrell, S. F.; Economos, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Though intrinsic mitochondrial aging has been considered before as a possible cause of cellular senescence, the mechanisms of such mitochondrial aging have remained obscure. In this article, the hypothesis of free-radical-induced inhibition of mitochondrial replenishment in fixed postmitotic cells is expanded. It is maintained that the respiration-dependent production of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals may not be fully counteracted, leading to a continuous production of lipoperoxides and malonaldehyde in actively respiring mitochondria. These compounds, in turn, can easily react with the mitochondrial DNA which is in close spatial relationship with the inner mitochondrial membrane, producing an injury that the mitochondria may be unable to counteract because of their apparent lack of adequate repair mechanisms. Mitochondrial division may thus be inhibited leading to age-related reduction of mitochondrial numbers, a deficit in energy production with a concomitant decrease in protein synthesis, deterioration of physiological performance, and, therefore, of organismic performance.

  17. Is cell aging caused by respiration-dependent injury to the mitochondrial genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. E.; Yengoyan, L. S.; Miquel, J.; Cottrell, S. F.; Economos, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Though intrinsic mitochondrial aging has been considered before as a possible cause of cellular senescence, the mechanisms of such mitochondrial aging have remained obscure. In this article, the hypothesis of free-radical-induced inhibition of mitochondrial replenishment in fixed postmitotic cells is expanded. It is maintained that the respiration-dependent production of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals may not be fully counteracted, leading to a continuous production of lipoperoxides and malonaldehyde in actively respiring mitochondria. These compounds, in turn, can easily react with the mitochondrial DNA which is in close spatial relationship with the inner mitochondrial membrane, producing an injury that the mitochondria may be unable to counteract because of their apparent lack of adequate repair mechanisms. Mitochondrial division may thus be inhibited leading to age-related reduction of mitochondrial numbers, a deficit in energy production with a concomitant decrease in protein synthesis, deterioration of physiological performance, and, therefore, of organismic performance.

  18. Impaired ALDH2 activity decreases the mitochondrial respiration in H9C2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Vishal R; Deshpande, Mandar; Pan, Guodong; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Palaniyandi, Suresh S

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated reactive aldehydes induce cellular stress. In cardiovascular diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, lipid-peroxidation derived reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) are known to contribute to the pathogenesis. 4HNE is involved in ROS formation, abnormal calcium handling and more importantly defective mitochondrial respiration. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily contains NAD(P)(+)-dependent isozymes which can detoxify endogenous and exogenous aldehydes into non-toxic carboxylic acids. Therefore we hypothesize that 4HNE afflicts mitochondrial respiration and leads to cell death by impairing ALDH2 activity in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell lines. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were treated with 25, 50 and 75 μM 4HNE and its vehicle, ethanol as well as 25, 50 and 75 μM disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of ALDH2 and its vehicle (DMSO) for 4 h. 4HNE significantly decreased ALDH2 activity, ALDH2 protein levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity, and increased 4HNE adduct formation and cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. ALDH2 inhibition by DSF and ALDH2 siRNA attenuated ALDH2 activity besides reducing ALDH2 levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity and increased cell death. Our results indicate that ALDH2 impairment can lead to poor mitochondrial respiration and increased cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  20. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R.; Andtbacka, Robert H. I.; Trinity, Joel D.; Hyngstrom, John R.; Garten, Ryan S.; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Ives, Stephen J.; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s−1·mg−1, P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g−1·min−1, P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s−1·mg−1, P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production. PMID:24906913

  1. Intramyocellular ceramides and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration are partially regulated by Toll-like receptor 4 during hindlimb unloading.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Nelson, Daniel S; Barrows, Katherine M; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2016-11-01

    Physical inactivity and disuse result in skeletal muscle metabolic disruption, including insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in contributing to metabolic decline with muscle disuse is unknown. Therefore, our goal was to determine whether TLR4 is an underlying mechanism of insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and skeletal muscle ceramide accumulation following muscle disuse in mice. To address this hypothesis, we subjected (n = 6-8/group) male WT and TLR4(-/-) mice to 2 wk of hindlimb unloading (HU), while a second group of mice served as ambulatory wild-type controls (WT CON, TLR4(-/-) CON). Mice were assessed for insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose tolerance], and hindlimb muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were used to assess muscle sphingolipid abundance, mitochondrial respiration [respiratory control ratio (RCR)], and NF-κB signaling. The primary finding was that HU resulted in insulin resistance, increased total ceramides, specifically Cer18:0 and Cer20:0, and decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. Importantly, TLR4(-/-) HU mice were protected from insulin resistance and altered NF-κB signaling and were partly resistant to muscle atrophy, ceramide accumulation, and decreased RCR. Skeletal muscle ceramides and RCR were correlated with insulin resistance. We conclude that TLR4 is an upstream regulator of insulin sensitivity, while partly upregulating muscle ceramides and worsening mitochondrial respiration during 2 wk of HU.

  2. Sulfide-Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration at Very Low Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to study the capacity of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the capacity of the pathway metabolizing and eliminating sulfide, which is linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operates under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide’s inhibition of cellular respiration would be dependent of the oxygen concentration in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5 – 1 × 106 cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37°C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73 ± 0.05 μM, 3.1 ± 0.2 μM, and 6.2 ± 0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3; 3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2] min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6[15.5;28.1] min (coupled) and 35.9[27.4;59.2] min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4] min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7] min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results suggest that elimination of sulfide in these cells is limited by oxygen availability when approaching the anoxic condition. This

  3. Redox-optimized ROS balance and the relationship between mitochondrial respiration and ROS.

    PubMed

    Cortassa, Sonia; O'Rourke, Brian; Aon, Miguel A

    2014-02-01

    The Redox-Optimized ROS Balance [R-ORB] hypothesis postulates that the redox environment [RE] is the main intermediary between mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species [ROS]. According to R-ORB, ROS emission levels will attain a minimum vs. RE when respiratory rate (VO2) reaches a maximum following ADP stimulation, a tenet that we test herein in isolated heart mitochondria under forward electron transport [FET]. ROS emission increased two-fold as a function of changes in the RE (~400 to ~900mV·mM) in state 4 respiration elicited by increasing glutamate/malate (G/M). In G/M energized mitochondria, ROS emission decreases two-fold for RE ~500 to ~300mV·mM in state 3 respiration at increasing ADP. Stressed mitochondria released higher ROS, that was only weakly dependent on RE under state 3. As a function of VO2, the ROS dependence on RE was strong between ~550 and ~350mV·mM, when VO2 is maximal, primarily due to changes in glutathione redox potential. A similar dependence was observed with stressed mitochondria, but over a significantly more oxidized RE and ~3-fold higher ROS emission overall, as compared with non-stressed controls. We conclude that under non-stressful conditions mitochondrial ROS efflux decreases when the RE becomes less reduced within a range in which VO2 is maximal. These results agree with the R-ORB postulate that mitochondria minimize ROS emission as they maximize VO2 and ATP synthesis. This relationship is altered quantitatively, but not qualitatively, by oxidative stress although stressed mitochondria exhibit diminished energetic performance and increased ROS release. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nek5 interacts with mitochondrial proteins and interferes negatively in mitochondrial mediated cell death and respiration.

    PubMed

    Melo Hanchuk, Talita D; Papa, Priscila Ferreira; La Guardia, Paolo G; Vercesi, Anibal E; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are involved in energy supply, signaling, cell death and cellular differentiation and have been implicated in several human diseases. Neks (NIMA-related kinases) represent a family of mammal protein kinases that play essential roles in cell-cycle progression, but other functions have recently been related. A yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen was performed to identify and characterize Nek5 interaction partners and the mitochondrial proteins Cox11, MTX-2 and BCLAF1 were retrieved. Apoptosis assay showed protective effects of stable hNek5 expression from Hek293-T's cell death after thapsigargin treatment (2 μM). Nek5 silenced cells as well as cells expressing a "kinase dead" version of Nek5, displayed an increase in ROS formation after 4 h of thapsigargin treatment. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity was found decreased upon stable hNek5expression. Cells silenced for hNek5 on the other hand presented 1.7 fold increased basal rates of respiration, especially at the electrons transfer steps from TMPD to cytochrome c and at the complex II. In conclusion, our data suggest for the first time mitochondrial localization and functions for Nek5 and its participation in cell death and cell respiration regulation. Stable expression of hNek5 in Hek293T cells resulted in enhanced cell viability, decreased cell death and drug resistance, while depletion of hNek5by shRNA overcame cancer cell drug resistance and induced apoptosis in vitro. Stable expression of hNek5 also inhibits thapsigargin promoted apoptosis and the respiratory chain complex IV in HEK293T cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Maneesh G; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T; Baraban, Scott C; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS.

  6. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome123

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Maneesh G.; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS. PMID:27066534

  7. Microchambers with Solid-State Phosphorescent Sensor for Measuring Single Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ted D.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that, even within a single cell, multiple copies of the mitochondrial genome may be present (genetic heteroplasmy). It would be interesting to develop techniques to determine if and to what extent this genetic variation results in functional variation from one mitochondrion to the next (functional heteroplasmy). Measuring mitochondrial respiration can reveal the organelles’ functional capacity for Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and determine mitochondrial damage that may arise from genetic or age related defects. However, available technologies require significant quantities of mitochondria. Here, we develop a technology to assay the respiration of a single mitochondrion. Our “micro-respirometer” consists of micron sized chambers etched out of borofloat glass substrates and coated with an oxygen sensitive phosphorescent dye Pt(II) meso-tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) mixed with polystyrene. The chambers are sealed with a polydimethylsiloxane layer coated with oxygen impermeable Viton rubber to prevent diffusion of oxygen from the environment. As the mitochondria consume oxygen in the chamber, the phosphorescence signal increases, allowing direct determination of the respiration rate. Experiments with coupled vs. uncoupled mitochondria showed a substantial difference in respiration, confirming the validity of the microchambers as single mitochondrial respirometers. This demonstration could enable future high-throughput assays of mitochondrial respiration and benefit the study of mitochondrial functional heterogeneity, and its role in health and disease. PMID:27409618

  8. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  9. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration. PMID:23061049

  10. Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Producing β-Cells: General Characteristics and Adaptive Effects of Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hals, Ingrid K; Bruerberg, Simon Gustafson; Ma, Zuheng; Scholz, Hanne; Björklund, Anneli; Grill, Valdemar

    2015-01-01

    To provide novel insights on mitochondrial respiration in β-cells and the adaptive effects of hypoxia. Insulin-producing INS-1 832/13 cells were exposed to 18 hours of hypoxia followed by 20-22 hours re-oxygenation. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry in both intact and permeabilized cells, in the latter after establishing three functional substrate-uncoupler-inhibitor titration (SUIT) protocols. Concomitant measurements included proteins of mitochondrial complexes (Western blotting), ATP and insulin secretion. Intact cells exhibited a high degree of intrinsic uncoupling, comprising about 50% of oxygen consumption in the basal respiratory state. Hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation increased maximal overall respiration. Exploratory experiments in peremabilized cells could not show induction of respiration by malate or pyruvate as reducing substrates, thus glutamate and succinate were used as mitochondrial substrates in SUIT protocols. Permeabilized cells displayed a high capacity for oxidative phosphorylation for both complex I- and II-linked substrates in relation to maximum capacity of electron transfer. Previous hypoxia decreased phosphorylation control of complex I-linked respiration, but not in complex II-linked respiration. Coupling control ratios showed increased coupling efficiency for both complex I- and II-linked substrates in hypoxia-exposed cells. Respiratory rates overall were increased. Also previous hypoxia increased proteins of mitochondrial complexes I and II (Western blotting) in INS-1 cells as well as in rat and human islets. Mitochondrial effects were accompanied by unchanged levels of ATP, increased basal and preserved glucose-induced insulin secretion. Exposure of INS-1 832/13 cells to hypoxia, followed by a re-oxygenation period increases substrate-stimulated respiratory capacity and coupling efficiency. Such effects are accompanied by up-regulation of mitochondrial complexes also in pancreatic islets

  11. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-01-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells. PMID:9163322

  12. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-04-15

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells.

  13. Induction of endogenous uncoupling protein 3 suppresses mitochondrial oxidant emission during fatty acid-supported respiration.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ethan J; Yamazaki, Hanae; Neufer, P Darrell

    2007-10-26

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) expression increases dramatically in skeletal muscle under metabolic states associated with elevated lipid metabolism, yet the function of UCP3 in a physiological context remains controversial. Here, in situ mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission and respiration were measured in permeabilized fiber bundles prepared from both rat and mouse (wild-type) gastrocnemius muscle after a single bout of exercise plus 18 h of recovery (Ex/R) that induced a approximately 2-4-fold increase in UCP3 protein. Elevated uncoupling activity (i.e. GDP inhibitable) was evident in Ex/R fibers only upon the addition of palmitate (known activator of UCP3) or under substrate conditions eliciting substantial rates of H(2)O(2) production (i.e. respiration supported by succinate or palmitoyl-L-carnitine/malate but not pyruvate/malate), indicative of UCP3 activation by endogenous reactive oxygen species. In mice completely lacking UCP3 (ucp3(-/-)), Ex/R failed to induce uncoupling activity. Surprisingly, when UCP3 activity was inhibited by GDP (rats) or in the absence of UCP3 (ucp3(-/-)), H(2)O(2) emission was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Ex/R versus non-exercised control fibers. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the oxidant emitting potential of mitochondria is increased in skeletal muscle during recovery from exercise, possibly as a consequence of prolonged reliance on lipid metabolism and/or altered mitochondrial biochemistry/morphology and that induction of UCP3 in vivo mediates an increase in uncoupling activity that restores mitochondrial H(2)O(2) emission to non-exercised, control levels.

  14. The Caulerpa Pigment Caulerpin Inhibits HIF-1 Activation and Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Morgan, J. Brian; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Liu, Rui; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Mahdi, Fakhri; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) represents an important molecular target for anticancer drug discovery. In a T47D cell-based reporter assay, the Caulerpa spp. algal pigment caulerpin (1) inhibited hypoxia-induced as well as 1,10-phenanthroline-induced HIF-1 activation. The angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is regulated by HIF-1. Caulerpin (10 μM) suppressed hypoxic induction of secreted VEGF protein and the ability of hypoxic T47D cell-conditioned media to promote tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Under hypoxic conditions, 1 (10 μM) blocked the induction of HIF-1α protein, the oxygen-regulated subunit that controls HIF-1 activity. Reactive oxygen species produced by mitochondrial complex III are believed to act as a signal of cellular hypoxia that leads to HIF-1α protein induction and activation. Further mechanistic studies revealed that 1 inhibits mitochondrial respiration at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Under hypoxic conditions, it is proposed that 1 may disrupt mitochondrial ROS-regulated HIF-1 activation and HIF-1 downstream target gene expression by inhibiting the transport or delivery of electrons to complex III. PMID:19921787

  15. Cybrid Models of Parkinson's Disease Show Variable Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Genotype-Respiration Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Paula M.; Dunham, Lisa D.; Quigley, Caitlin K.; Morton, Stephanie L.; Bergquist, Kristen E.; Bennett, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD) is a nervous system-wide disease that presents with a bradykinetic movement disorder and frequently progresses to include depression and cognitive impairment. Cybrid models of sPD are based on expression of sPD platelet mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in neural cells and demonstrate some similarities to sPD brains. In sPD and CTL cybrids we characterized aspects of mitochondrial biogenesis, mtDNA genomics, composition of the respirasome and the relationships among isolated mitochondrial and intact cell respiration. Cybrid mtDNA levels varied and correlated with expression of PGC-1α a transcriptional co-activator regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. Levels of mtDNA heteroplasmic mutations were asymmetrically distributed across the mitochondrial genome; numbers of heteroplasmies were more evenly distributed. Neither levels nor numbers of heteroplasmies distinguished sPD from CTL. sPD cybrid mitochondrial ETC subunit protein levels were not altered. Isolated mitochondrial complex I respiration rates showed limited correlation with whole cell complex I respiration rates in both sPD and CTL cybrids. Intact cell respiration during the normoxic-anoxic transition yielded Km values for oxygen that directly related to respiration rates in CTL but not in sPD cell lines. Both sPD and CTL cybrid cells are substantially heterogeneous in mitochondrial genomic and physiologic properties. Our results suggest that mtDNA depletion may occur in sPD neurons and could reflect impairment of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cybrids remain a valuable model for some aspects of sPD but their heterogeneity mitigates against a simple designation of sPD phenotype in this cell model. PMID:19815014

  16. Dose response of endotoxin on hepatocyte and muscle mitochondrial respiration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeger, Victor; Brandt, Sebastian; Porta, Francesca; Jakob, Stephan M; Takala, Jukka; Djafarzadeh, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Results on mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis are controversial. We aimed to assess effects of LPS at wide dose and time ranges on hepatocytes and isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were exposed to placebo or LPS (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL) for 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours and primary human hepatocytes to 1 μg/mL LPS or placebo (4, 8, and 16 hours). Mitochondria from porcine skeletal muscle samples were exposed to increasing doses of LPS (0.1-100 μg/mg) for 2 and 4 hours. Respiration rates of intact and permeabilized cells and isolated mitochondria were measured by high-resolution respirometry. In HepG2 cells, LPS reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP content but did not modify basal respiration. Stimulated complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In primary human hepatocytes, stimulated mitochondrial complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In isolated porcine skeletal muscle mitochondria, stimulated respiration decreased at high doses (50 and 100 μg/mL LPS). LPS reduced cellular ATP content of HepG2 cells, most likely as a result of the induced decrease in membrane potential. LPS decreased cellular and isolated mitochondrial respiration in a time-dependent, dose-dependent and complex-dependent manner.

  17. Gastrocnemius mitochondrial respiration: are there any differences between men and women?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jonathan R; Swanson, Stanley A; Casale, George P; Johanning, Jason M; Papoutsi, Evlampia; Koutakis, Panagiotis; Miserlis, Dimitrios; Zhu, Zhen; Pipinos, Iraklis I

    2013-11-01

    Work on human and mouse skeletal muscle by our group and others has demonstrated that aging and age-related degenerative diseases are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, which may be more prevalent in males. There have been, however, no studies that specifically examine the influence of male or female sex on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. The purpose of this study was to compare mitochondrial respiration in the gastrocnemius of adult men and women. Gastrocnemius muscle was obtained from male (n = 19) and female (n = 11) human subjects with healthy lower-extremity musculoskeletal and arterial systems and normal ambulatory function. All patients were undergoing operations for the treatment of varicose veins in their legs. Mitochondrial respiration was determined with a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles. Complex I-, II-, III-, and IV-dependent respiration was measured individually and normalized to muscle weight, total protein content, and citrate synthase (CS, index of mitochondrial content). Male and female patients had no evidence of musculoskeletal or arterial disease and did not differ with regard to age, race, body mass index, or other clinical characteristics. Complex I-, II-, III-, and IV-dependent respiration normalized to muscle weight, total protein content, and CS did not statistically differ for males compared with females. Our study evaluates, for the first time, gastrocnemius mitochondrial respiration of adult men and women who have healthy musculoskeletal and arterial systems and normal ambulatory function. Our data demonstrate there are no differences in the respiration of gastrocnemius mitochondria between men and women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols.

  19. A novel fission-independent role of dynamin-related protein 1 in cardiac mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiliang; Wang, Pei; Bisetto, Sara; Yoon, Yisang; Chen, Quan; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Wang, Wang

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria in adult cardiomyocytes exhibit static morphology and infrequent dynamic changes, despite the high abundance of fission and fusion regulatory proteins in the heart. Previous reports have indicated that fusion proteins may bear functions beyond morphology regulation. Here, we investigated the role of fission protein, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), on mitochondrial respiration regulation in adult cardiomyocytes. By using genetic or pharmacological approaches, we manipulated the activity or protein level of fission and fusion proteins and found they mildly influenced mitochondrial morphology in adult rodent cardiomyocytes, which is in contrast to their significant effect in H9C2 cardiac myoblasts. Intriguingly, inhibiting endogenous DRP1 by dominant-negative DRP1 mutation (K38A), shRNA, or Mdivi-1 suppressed maximal respiration and respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria from adult mouse heart or in adult cardiomyocytes from rat. Meanwhile, basal respiration was increased due to increased proton leak. Facilitating mitofusin-mediated fusion by S3 compound, however, failed to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in adult cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, DRP1 inhibition did not affect the maximal activity of individual respiratory chain complexes or the assembly of supercomplexes. Knocking out cyclophilin D, a regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), abolished the effect of DRP1 inhibition on respiration. Finally, DRP1 inhibition decreased transient mPTP-mediated mitochondrial flashes, delayed laser-induced mPTP opening and suppressed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results uncover a novel non-canonical function of the fission protein, DRP1 in maintaining or positively stimulating mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics and ROS signalling in adult cardiomyocyte, which is likely independent of morphological changes. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The

  20. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  1. Mammalian liver cytochrome c is tyrosine-48 phosphorylated in vivo, inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Lee, Icksoo; Salomon, Arthur R; Yu, Kebing; Hüttemann, Maik

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is part of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), accepting electrons from bc(1) complex and transferring them to cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). The ETC generates the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is used by ATP synthase to produce ATP. In addition, the release of Cyt c from the mitochondria often commits a cell to undergo apoptosis. Considering its central role in life (respiration) and death (apoptosis) decisions one would expect tight regulation of Cyt c function. Reversible phosphorylation is a main cellular regulatory mechanism, but the effect of cell signaling targeting the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system is not well understood, and only a small number of proteins that can be phosphorylated have been identified to date. We have recently shown that Cyt c isolated from cow heart tissue is phosphorylated on tyrosine 97 in vivo, which leads to inhibition of respiration in the reaction with CcO. In this study we isolated Cyt c from a different organ, cow liver, under conditions preserving the physiological phosphorylation state. Western analysis with a phosphotyrosine specific antibody suggested that liver Cyt c is phosphorylated. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation site was unambiguously assigned to Tyr-48 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IMAC/nano-LC/ESI-MS), and not to the previously identified phospho-Tyr-97 in cow heart. As is true of Tyr-97, Tyr-48 is conserved in eukaryotes. As one possible consequence of Tyr-48 phosphorylation we analyzed the in vitro reaction kinetics with isolated cow liver CcO revealing striking differences. Maximal turnover of Tyr-48 phosphorylated Cyt c was 3.7 s(-1) whereas dephosphorylation resulted in a 2.2 fold increase in activity to 8.2 s(-1). Effects of Tyr-48 phosphorylation based on the Cyt c crystal structure are discussed.

  2. JNK interaction with Sab mediates ER stress induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Win, S; Than, T A; Fernandez-Checa, J C; Kaplowitz, N

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to better understand the mechanism and importance of sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and effects of ER stress on mitochondria by determining the role of mitochondrial JNK binding protein, Sab. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a rapid and marked decline in basal mitochondrial respiration and reserve-capacity followed by delayed mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of mitochondrial Sab prevented ER stress-induced sustained JNK activation, impaired respiration, and apoptosis, but did not alter the magnitude or time course of activation of ER stress pathways. P-JNK plus adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) added to isolated liver mitochondria promoted superoxide production, which was amplified by addition of calcium and inhibited by a blocking peptide corresponding to the JNK binding site on Sab (KIM1). This peptide also blocked tunicamycin-induced inhibition of cellular respiration. In conclusion, ER stress triggers an interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab, which leads to impaired respiration and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, sustaining JNK activation culminating in apoptosis. PMID:24407242

  3. JNK interaction with Sab mediates ER stress induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and cell death.

    PubMed

    Win, S; Than, T A; Fernandez-Checa, J C; Kaplowitz, N

    2014-01-09

    Our aim was to better understand the mechanism and importance of sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and effects of ER stress on mitochondria by determining the role of mitochondrial JNK binding protein, Sab. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a rapid and marked decline in basal mitochondrial respiration and reserve-capacity followed by delayed mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of mitochondrial Sab prevented ER stress-induced sustained JNK activation, impaired respiration, and apoptosis, but did not alter the magnitude or time course of activation of ER stress pathways. P-JNK plus adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) added to isolated liver mitochondria promoted superoxide production, which was amplified by addition of calcium and inhibited by a blocking peptide corresponding to the JNK binding site on Sab (KIM1). This peptide also blocked tunicamycin-induced inhibition of cellular respiration. In conclusion, ER stress triggers an interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab, which leads to impaired respiration and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, sustaining JNK activation culminating in apoptosis.

  4. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  5. Mitochondrial Respiration Is Impaired during Late-Stage Hamster Prion Infection.

    PubMed

    Faris, Robert; Moore, Roger A; Ward, Anne; Sturdevant, Dan E; Priola, Suzette A

    2017-09-15

    Mitochondria are crucial to proper neuronal function and overall brain health. Mitochondrial dysfunction within the brain has been observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease. Several markers of decreased mitochondrial activity during prion infection have been reported, yet the bioenergetic respiratory status of mitochondria from prion-infected animals is unknown. Here we show that clinically ill transgenic mice overexpressing hamster prion protein (Tg7) infected with the hamster prion strain 263K suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in response to the respiratory complex II substrate succinate. Characterization of the mitochondrial proteome of purified brain mitochondria from infected and uninfected Tg7 mice showed significant differences in the relative abundance of key mitochondrial electron transport proteins in 263K-infected animals relative to that in controls. Our results suggest that at clinical stages of prion infection, dysregulation of respiratory chain proteins may lead to impairment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain.IMPORTANCE Mitochondrial dysfunction is present in most major neurodegenerative diseases, and some studies have suggested that mitochondrial processes may be altered during prion disease. Here we show that hamster prion-infected transgenic mice overexpressing the hamster prion protein (Tg7 mice) suffer from mitochondrial respiratory deficits. Tg7 mice infected with the 263K hamster prion strain have little or no signs of mitochondrial dysfunction at the disease midpoint but suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial respiration at the clinical phase of disease. A proteomic analysis of the isolated brain mitochondria from clinically affected animals showed that several proteins involved in electron transport, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein synthesis were dysregulated. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly exacerbated by prion protein

  6. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  7. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Meclizine Inhibits Mitochondrial Respiration through Direct Targeting of Cytosolic Phosphoethanolamine Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Vishal M.; Zhu, Lin; Baker, Charli D.; Cracan, Valentin; Yaseen, Abbas; Jain, Mohit; Clish, Clary B.; Brookes, Paul S.; Bakovic, Marica; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified meclizine, an over-the-counter drug, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Curiously, meclizine blunted respiration in intact cells but not in isolated mitochondria, suggesting an unorthodox mechanism. Using a metabolic profiling approach, we now show that treatment with meclizine leads to a sharp elevation of cellular phosphoethanolamine, an intermediate in the ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway of phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Metabolic labeling and in vitro enzyme assays confirmed direct inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PCYT2). Inhibition of PCYT2 by meclizine led to rapid accumulation of its substrate, phosphoethanolamine, which is itself an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Our work identifies the first pharmacologic inhibitor of the Kennedy pathway, demonstrates that its biosynthetic intermediate is an endogenous inhibitor of respiration, and provides key mechanistic insights that may facilitate repurposing meclizine for disorders of energy metabolism. PMID:24142790

  9. Meclizine inhibits mitochondrial respiration through direct targeting of cytosolic phosphoethanolamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Zhu, Lin; Baker, Charli D; Cracan, Valentin; Yaseen, Abbas; Jain, Mohit; Clish, Clary B; Brookes, Paul S; Bakovic, Marica; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2013-12-06

    We recently identified meclizine, an over-the-counter drug, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Curiously, meclizine blunted respiration in intact cells but not in isolated mitochondria, suggesting an unorthodox mechanism. Using a metabolic profiling approach, we now show that treatment with meclizine leads to a sharp elevation of cellular phosphoethanolamine, an intermediate in the ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway of phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Metabolic labeling and in vitro enzyme assays confirmed direct inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PCYT2). Inhibition of PCYT2 by meclizine led to rapid accumulation of its substrate, phosphoethanolamine, which is itself an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Our work identifies the first pharmacologic inhibitor of the Kennedy pathway, demonstrates that its biosynthetic intermediate is an endogenous inhibitor of respiration, and provides key mechanistic insights that may facilitate repurposing meclizine for disorders of energy metabolism.

  10. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration prevents cancer in a mouse model of Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping-yuan; Li, Jie; Walcott, Farzana L.; Kang, Ju-Gyeong; Starost, Matthew F.; Talagala, S. Lalith; Zhuang, Jie; Park, Ji-Hoon; Huffstutler, Rebecca D.; Bryla, Christina M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Pollak, Michael; Annunziata, Christina M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Fojo, Antonio Tito; Hwang, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a cancer predisposition disorder caused by germline mutations in TP53 that can lead to increased mitochondrial metabolism in patients. However, the implications of altered mitochondrial function for tumorigenesis in LFS are unclear. Here, we have reported that genetic or pharmacologic disruption of mitochondrial respiration improves cancer-free survival in a mouse model of LFS that expresses mutant p53. Mechanistically, inhibition of mitochondrial function increased autophagy and decreased the aberrant proliferation signaling caused by mutant p53. In a pilot study, LFS patients treated with metformin exhibited decreases in mitochondrial activity concomitant with activation of antiproliferation signaling, thus reproducing the effects of disrupting mitochondrial function observed in LFS mice. These observations indicate that a commonly prescribed diabetic medicine can restrain mitochondrial metabolism and tumorigenesis in an LFS model, supporting its further consideration for cancer prevention in LFS patients. PMID:27869650

  11. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  12. Rotenone induces cell death in primary dopaminergic culture by increasing ROS production and inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Radad, Khaled; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Gille, Gabriele

    2006-09-01

    Although the definite etiology of Parkinson's disease is still unclear, increasing evidence has suggested an important role for environmental factors such as exposure to pesticides in increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. In the present study, primary cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were applied to investigate the toxic effects and underlying mechanisms of rotenone-induced neuronal cell death relevant to Parkinson's disease. Results revealed that rotenone destroyed dopaminergic neurons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Consistent with the cytotoxic effect of rotenone as evidenced by dopaminergic cell loss, it significantly increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, the number of necrotic cells in the culture and the number of nuclei showing apoptotic features. Rotenone exerted toxicity by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species production and shifting respiration to a more anaerobic state.

  13. Protective effect of creatine against inhibition by methylglyoxal of mitochondrial respiration of cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumya Sinha; Biswas, Swati; Ray, Manju; Ray, Subhankar

    2003-06-01

    Previous publications from our laboratory have shown that methylglyoxal inhibits mitochondrial respiration of malignant and cardiac cells, but it has no effect on mitochondrial respiration of other normal cells [Biswas, Ray, Misra, Dutta and Ray (1997) Biochem. J. 323, 343-348; Ray, Biswas and Ray (1997) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 171, 95-103]. However, this inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is not significant in cardiac tissue slices. Moreover, post-mitochondrial supernatant (PMS) of cardiac cells could almost completely protect the mitochondrial respiration against the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal. A systematic search indicated that creatine present in cardiac cells is responsible for this protective effect. Glutathione has also some protective effect. However, creatine phosphate, creatinine, urea, glutathione disulphide and beta-mercaptoethanol have no protective effect. The inhibitory and protective effects of methylglyoxal and creatine respectively on cardiac mitochondrial respiration were studied with various concentrations of both methylglyoxal and creatine. Interestingly, neither creatine nor glutathione have any protective effect on the inhibition by methylglyoxal on the mitochondrial respiration of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. The creatine and glutathione contents of several PMS, which were tested for the possible protective effect, were measured. The activities of two important enzymes, namely glyoxalase I and creatine kinase, which act upon glutathione plus methylglyoxal and creatine respectively, were also measured in different PMS. Whether mitochondrial creatine kinase had any role in the protective effect of creatine had also been investigated using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, an inhibitor of creatine kinase. The differential effect of creatine on mitochondria of cardiac and malignant cells has been discussed with reference to the therapeutic potential of methylglyoxal.

  14. Lipophilic 2,5-Disubstituted Pyrroles from the Marine Sponge Mycale sp. Inhibit Mitochondrial Respiration and HIF-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shui-Chun; Liu, Yang; Morgan, J. Brian; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The lipid extract of the marine sponge Mycale sp. inhibited the activation of hypoxiainducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in a human breast tumor T47D cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided isolation and structure elucidation yielded 18 new lipophilic 2,5-disubstituted pyrroles, and eight structurally related known compounds. The active compounds inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF activation with moderate potency (IC50 values < 10 μM). Mechanistic studies revealed that the active compounds suppressed mitochondrial respiration by blocking NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) at concentrations that inhibited HIF-1 activation. Under hypoxic conditions, reactive oxygen species produced by mitochondrial complex III are believed to act as a signal of cellular hypoxia that leads to HIF-1α protein induction and activation. By inhibiting electron transport (or delivery) to complex III under hypoxic conditions, lipophilic Mycale pyrroles appear to disrupt mitochondrial ROS-regulated HIF-1 signaling. PMID:19845338

  15. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lactate as substrate for mitochondrial respiration in alveolar epithelial type II cells

    PubMed Central

    Lottes, Robyn G.; Newton, Danforth A.; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the many energy-demanding functions they perform and their physical location in the lung, alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells have a rapid cellular metabolism and the potential to influence substrate availability and bioenergetics both locally in the lung and throughout the body. A thorough understanding of ATII cell metabolic function in the healthy lung is necessary for determining how metabolic changes may contribute to pulmonary disease pathogenesis; however, lung metabolism is poorly understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine lactate utilization by primary ATII cells and the ATII model cell line, MLE-15, and link lactate consumption directly to mitochondrial ATP generation. ATII cells cultured in lactate undergo mitochondrial respiration at near-maximal levels, two times the rates of those grown in glucose, and oxygen consumption under these conditions is directly linked to mitochondrial ATP generation. When both lactate and glucose are available as metabolic substrate, the presence of lactate alters glucose metabolism in ATII to favor reduced glycolytic function in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that lactate is used in addition to glucose when both substrates are available. Lactate use by ATII mitochondria is dependent on monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-mediated import, and ATII cells express MCT1, the isoform that mediates lactate import by cells in other lactate-consuming tissues. The balance of lactate production and consumption may play an important role in the maintenance of healthy lung homeostasis, whereas disruption of lactate consumption by factors that impair mitochondrial metabolism, such as hypoxia, may contribute to lactic acid build-up in disease. PMID:25747963

  17. Lactate as substrate for mitochondrial respiration in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Lottes, Robyn G; Newton, Danforth A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Baatz, John E

    2015-05-01

    Because of the many energy-demanding functions they perform and their physical location in the lung, alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells have a rapid cellular metabolism and the potential to influence substrate availability and bioenergetics both locally in the lung and throughout the body. A thorough understanding of ATII cell metabolic function in the healthy lung is necessary for determining how metabolic changes may contribute to pulmonary disease pathogenesis; however, lung metabolism is poorly understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine lactate utilization by primary ATII cells and the ATII model cell line, MLE-15, and link lactate consumption directly to mitochondrial ATP generation. ATII cells cultured in lactate undergo mitochondrial respiration at near-maximal levels, two times the rates of those grown in glucose, and oxygen consumption under these conditions is directly linked to mitochondrial ATP generation. When both lactate and glucose are available as metabolic substrate, the presence of lactate alters glucose metabolism in ATII to favor reduced glycolytic function in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that lactate is used in addition to glucose when both substrates are available. Lactate use by ATII mitochondria is dependent on monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-mediated import, and ATII cells express MCT1, the isoform that mediates lactate import by cells in other lactate-consuming tissues. The balance of lactate production and consumption may play an important role in the maintenance of healthy lung homeostasis, whereas disruption of lactate consumption by factors that impair mitochondrial metabolism, such as hypoxia, may contribute to lactic acid build-up in disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Soil respiration under different land uses in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84-98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86-1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  19. Soil Respiration under Different Land Uses in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84–98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86–1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  20. Structure-activity relationships for perfluoroalkane-induced in vitro interference with rat liver mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Wallace, K B; Kissling, G E; Melnick, R L; Blystone, C R

    2013-10-09

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) represent a broad class of commercial products designed primarily for the coatings industry. However, detection of residues globally in a variety of species led to the discontinuation of production in the U.S. Although PFAAs cause activation of the PPARα and CAR nuclear receptors, interference with mitochondrial bioenergetics has been implicated as an alternative mechanism of cytotoxicity. Although the mechanisms by which the eight carbon chain PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial bioenergetics are fairly well described, the activities of the more highly substituted or shorter chain PFAAs are far less well characterized. The current investigation was designed to explore structure-activity relationships by which PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial respiration in vitro. Freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with one of 16 different PFAAs, including perfluorinated carboxylic, acetic, and sulfonic acids, sulfonamides and sulfamido acetates, and alcohols. The effect on mitochondrial respiration was measured at five concentrations and dose-response curves were generated to describe the effects on state 3 and 4 respiration and respiratory control. With the exception of PFOS, all PFAAs at sufficiently high concentrations (>20μM) stimulated state 4 and inhibited state 3 respiration. Stimulation of state 4 respiration was most pronounced for the carboxylic acids and the sulfonamides, which supports prior evidence that the perfluorinated carboxylic and acetic acids induce the mitochondrial permeability transition, whereas the sulfonamides are protonophoric uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. In both cases, potency increased with increasing carbon number, with a prominent inflection point between the six and eight carbon congeners. The results provide a foundation for classifying PFAAs according to specific modes of mitochondrial activity and, in combination with toxicokinetic considerations, establishing structure

  1. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  2. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17μmol.m−2.s−1) and clipping (2.06μmol.m−2.s−1) than under grazing (1.65μmol.m−2.s−1) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China. PMID:26808376

  3. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. Omega-3 supplementation alters mitochondrial membrane composition and respiration kinetics in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Herbst, E A F; Paglialunga, S; Gerling, C; Whitfield, J; Mukai, K; Chabowski, A; Heigenhauser, G J F; Spriet, L L; Holloway, G P

    2014-03-15

    Studies have shown increased incorporation of omega-3 fatty acids into whole skeletal muscle following supplementation, although little has been done to investigate the potential impact on the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes and the functional consequences on mitochondrial bioenergetics. Therefore, we supplemented young healthy male subjects (n = 18) with fish oils [2 g eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 1 g docosahexanoic acid (DHA) per day] for 12 weeks and skeletal muscle biopsies were taken prior to (Pre) and following (Post) supplementation for the analysis of mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition and various assessments of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Total EPA and DHA content in mitochondrial membranes increased (P < 0.05) ∼450 and ∼320%, respectively, and displaced some omega-6 species in several phospholipid populations. Mitochondrial respiration, determined in permeabilized muscle fibres, demonstrated no change in maximal substrate-supported respiration, or in the sensitivity (apparent Km) and maximal capacity for pyruvate-supported respiration. In contrast, mitochondrial responses during ADP titrations demonstrated an enhanced ADP sensitivity (decreased apparent Km) that was independent of the creatine kinase shuttle. As the content of ANT1, ANT2, and subunits of the electron transport chain were unaltered by supplementation, these data suggest that prolonged omega-3 intake improves ADP kinetics in human skeletal muscle mitochondria through alterations in membrane structure and/or post-translational modification of ATP synthase and ANT isoforms. Omega-3 supplementation also increased the capacity for mitochondrial reactive oxygen species emission without altering the content of oxidative products, suggesting the absence of oxidative damage. The current data strongly emphasize a role for omega-3s in reorganizing the composition of mitochondrial membranes while promoting improvements in ADP sensitivity.

  5. Microbiopsies versus Bergström needle for skeletal muscle sampling: impact on maximal mitochondrial respiration rate.

    PubMed

    Isner-Horobeti, M E; Charton, A; Daussin, F; Geny, B; Dufour, S P; Richard, R

    2014-05-01

    Microbiopsies are increasingly used as an alternative to the standard Bergström technique for skeletal muscle sampling. The potential impact of these two different procedures on mitochondrial respiration rate is unknown. The objective of this work was to compare microbiopsies versus Bergström procedure on mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. 52 vastus lateralis muscle samples were obtained from 13 anesthetized pigs, either with a Bergström [6 gauges (G)] needle or with microbiopsy needles (12, 14, 18G). Maximal mitochondrial respiration (V GM-ADP) was assessed using an oxygraphic method on permeabilized fibers. The weight of the muscle samples and V GM-ADP decreased with the increasing gauge of the needles. A positive nonlinear relationship was observed between the weight of the muscle sample and the level of maximal mitochondrial respiration (r = 0.99, p < 0.05) and between needle size and maximal mitochondrial respiration (r = 0.99, p < 0.05). Microbiopsies give lower muscle sample weight and maximal rate of mitochondrial respiration compared to the standard Bergström needle.Therefore, the higher the gauge (i.e. the smaller the size) of the microbiopsy needle, the lower is the maximal rate of respiration. Microbiopsies of skeletal muscle underestimate the maximal mitochondrial respiration rate, and this finding needs to be highlighted for adequate interpretation and comparison with literature data.

  6. Statin-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets in rats and human with dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Vevera, J; Fišar, Z; Nekovářová, T; Vrablík, M; Zlatohlávek, L; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Raboch, J; Valeš, K

    2016-11-23

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used drugs for lowering blood lipid levels and preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, statins can have serious adverse effects, which may be related to development of mitochondrial dysfunctions. The aim of study was to demonstrate the in vivo effect of high and therapeutic doses of statins on mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets. Model approach was used in the study. Simvastatin was administered to rats at a high dose for 4 weeks. Humans were treated with therapeutic doses of rosuvastatin or atorvastatin for 6 weeks. Platelet mitochondrial respiration was measured using high-resolution respirometry. In rats, a significantly lower physiological respiratory rate was found in intact platelets of simvastatin-treated rats compared to controls. In humans, no significant changes in mitochondrial respiration were detected in intact platelets; however, decreased complex I-linked respiration was observed after statin treatment in permeabilized platelets. We propose that the small in vivo effect of statins on platelet energy metabolism can be attributed to drug effects on complex I of the electron transport system. Both intact and permeabilized platelets can be used as a readily available biological model to study changes in cellular energy metabolism in patients treated with statins.

  7. Respirator Performance against Nanoparticles under Simulated Workplace Activities

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Evanly; Zhuang, Ziqing; Horvatin, Matthew; Liu, Yuewei; He, Xinjian; Rengasamy, Samy

    2017-01-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs) are commonly used by workers for protection against potentially hazardous particles, including engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of these types of respirators against 10–400 nm particles using human subjects exposed to NaCl aerosols under simulated workplace activities. Simulated workplace protection factors (SWPFs) were measured for eight combinations of respirator models (2 N95 FFRs, 2 P100 FFRs, 2 N95 EHRs, and 2 P100 EHRs) worn by 25 healthy test subjects (13 females and 12 males) with varying face sizes. Before beginning a SWPF test for a given respirator model, each subject had to pass a quantitative fit test. Each SWPF test was performed using a protocol of six exercises for 3 min each: (i) normal breathing, (ii) deep breathing, (iii) moving head side to side, (iv) moving head up and down, (v) bending at the waist, and (vi) a simulated laboratory-vessel cleaning motion. Two scanning mobility particle sizers were used simultaneously to measure the upstream (outside the respirator) and downstream (inside the respirator) test aerosol; SWPF was then calculated as a ratio of the upstream and downstream particle concentrations. In general, geometric mean SWPF (GM-SWPF) was highest for the P100 EHRs, followed by P100 FFRs, N95 EHRs, and N95 FFRs. This trend holds true for nanoparticles (10–100 nm), larger size particles (100–400 nm), and the ‘all size’ range (10–400 nm). All respirators provided better or similar performance levels for 10–100 nm particles as compared to larger 100–400 nm particles. This study found that class P100 respirators provided higher SWPFs compared to class N95 respirators (P<0.05) for both FFR and EHR types. All respirators provided expected performance (i.e. fifth percentile SWPF > 10) against all particle size ranges tested. PMID:26180261

  8. Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Producing β-Cells: General Characteristics and Adaptive Effects of Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zuheng; Scholz, Hanne; Björklund, Anneli; Grill, Valdemar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide novel insights on mitochondrial respiration in β-cells and the adaptive effects of hypoxia. Methods and Design Insulin-producing INS-1 832/13 cells were exposed to 18 hours of hypoxia followed by 20–22 hours re-oxygenation. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry in both intact and permeabilized cells, in the latter after establishing three functional substrate-uncoupler-inhibitor titration (SUIT) protocols. Concomitant measurements included proteins of mitochondrial complexes (Western blotting), ATP and insulin secretion. Results Intact cells exhibited a high degree of intrinsic uncoupling, comprising about 50% of oxygen consumption in the basal respiratory state. Hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation increased maximal overall respiration. Exploratory experiments in peremabilized cells could not show induction of respiration by malate or pyruvate as reducing substrates, thus glutamate and succinate were used as mitochondrial substrates in SUIT protocols. Permeabilized cells displayed a high capacity for oxidative phosphorylation for both complex I- and II-linked substrates in relation to maximum capacity of electron transfer. Previous hypoxia decreased phosphorylation control of complex I-linked respiration, but not in complex II-linked respiration. Coupling control ratios showed increased coupling efficiency for both complex I- and II-linked substrates in hypoxia-exposed cells. Respiratory rates overall were increased. Also previous hypoxia increased proteins of mitochondrial complexes I and II (Western blotting) in INS-1 cells as well as in rat and human islets. Mitochondrial effects were accompanied by unchanged levels of ATP, increased basal and preserved glucose-induced insulin secretion. Conclusions Exposure of INS-1 832/13 cells to hypoxia, followed by a re-oxygenation period increases substrate-stimulated respiratory capacity and coupling efficiency. Such effects are accompanied by up-regulation of

  9. Sab (Sh3bp5) dependence of JNK mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in palmitic acid induced hepatocyte lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Le, Bao Han Allison; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained JNK activation by saturated fatty acids plays a role in lipotoxicity and the pathogenesis of NASH. We have reported that the interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab leads to inhibition of respiration, increased ROS, cell death and hepatotoxicity. We tested whether this pathway underlies palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipotoxicity in hepatocytes. Methods Primary mouse hepatocytes from adeno-shlacZ or adeno-shSab treated mice and Huh7 cells were used. Results In PMH, PA dose dependently up to 1mM stimulated oxygen consumption rate (OCR) due to mitochondrial β-oxidation. At ≥ 1.5mM, PA gradually reduced OCR, followed by cell death. Inhibition of JNK, caspases or treatment with antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) protected PMH against cell death. Sab knockdown or a membrane permeable Sab blocking peptide prevented PA-induced mitochondrial impairment, but inhibited only the late phase of both JNK activation (beyond 4 hours) and cell death. PA increased P-PERK and downstream target CHOP in PMH but failed to activate the IRE-1α arm of the UPR. However, Sab silencing did not affect PA-induced PERK activation. Conversely, specific inhibition of PERK prevented JNK activation and cell death, indicating a major role upstream of JNK activation. Conclusions The effect of P-JNK on mitochondria plays a key role in PA-mediated lipotoxicity. The interplay of P-JNK with mitochondrial Sab leads to impaired respiration, ROS production, sustained JNK activation, and apoptosis. PMID:25666017

  10. Dose Response of Endotoxin on Hepatocyte and Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Sebastian; Porta, Francesca; Jakob, Stephan M.; Takala, Jukka; Djafarzadeh, Siamak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Results on mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis are controversial. We aimed to assess effects of LPS at wide dose and time ranges on hepatocytes and isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria. Methods. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) were exposed to placebo or LPS (0.1, 1, and 10 μg/mL) for 4, 8, 16, and 24 hours and primary human hepatocytes to 1 μg/mL LPS or placebo (4, 8, and 16 hours). Mitochondria from porcine skeletal muscle samples were exposed to increasing doses of LPS (0.1–100 μg/mg) for 2 and 4 hours. Respiration rates of intact and permeabilized cells and isolated mitochondria were measured by high-resolution respirometry. Results. In HepG2 cells, LPS reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP content but did not modify basal respiration. Stimulated complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In primary human hepatocytes, stimulated mitochondrial complex II respiration was reduced time-dependently using 1 μg/mL LPS. In isolated porcine skeletal muscle mitochondria, stimulated respiration decreased at high doses (50 and 100 μg/mL LPS). Conclusion. LPS reduced cellular ATP content of HepG2 cells, most likely as a result of the induced decrease in membrane potential. LPS decreased cellular and isolated mitochondrial respiration in a time-dependent, dose-dependent and complex-dependent manner. PMID:25649304

  11. Modifications in Retinal Mitochondrial Respiration Precede Type 2 Diabetes and Protracted Microvascular Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Han, Woo Hyun; Gotzmann, Jonathan; Kuny, Sharee; Huang, Hui; Chan, Catherine B; Lemieux, Hélène; Sauvé, Yves

    2017-08-01

    To characterize retinal mitochondrial respiration associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) progression in a cone-rich diurnal rodent, the Nile rat (genus Arvicanthis, species niloticus). Nile rats were fed a standard rodent diet that resulted in rising glucose levels from 6 months. Age-matched control animals were fed a high-fiber diet that prevented diabetes up to 18 months. The functional status of specific retinal mitochondrial components and mitochondrial outer membrane integrity were studied by using high-resolution respirometry. Ocular complications were documented with funduscopy, electroretinography (ERG), and trypsin digestion of retinal vasculature. Mitochondrial functional changes were detected during hyperinsulinemia with maintained normoglycemia (2 months), corresponding to stage 1 of human T2D. Our data showed increased contribution of mitochondrial respiration through the NADH pathway relative to maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity, with simultaneous electron entry into NADH (Complex I and related dehydrogenases) and succinate (Complex II) pathways. These compensatory events coincided with compromised mitochondrial outer membrane integrity. The first clinical sign of retinopathy (pericyte loss) was only detected at 12 months (after 6 months of sustained hyperglycemia) alongside a common ocular complication of diabetes, cataractogenesis. Further prolongation of hyperglycemia (from 12 to 18 months) led to capillary degeneration and delayed photopic ERG oscillatory potentials. Oxidative phosphorylation compensatory changes in the retina can be detected as early as 2 months, before development of hyperglycemia, and are associated with reduced mitochondrial outer membrane integrity.

  12. Mitochondrial respiration in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue from patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Kraunsøe, Regitze; Boushel, Robert; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Schjerling, Peter; Qvortrup, Klaus; Støckel, Mikael; Mikines, Kári J; Dela, Flemming

    2010-06-15

    Adipose tissue exerts important endocrine and metabolic functions in health and disease. Yet the bioenergetics of this tissue is not characterized in humans and possible regional differences are not elucidated. Using high resolution respirometry, mitochondrial respiration was quantified in human abdominal subcutaneous and intra-abdominal visceral (omentum majus) adipose tissue from biopsies obtained in 20 obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) were determined by the PCR technique for estimation of mitochondrial density. Adipose tissue samples were permeabilized and respirometric measurements were performed in duplicate at 37 degrees C. Substrates (glutamate (G) + malate (M) + octanoyl carnitine (O) + succinate (S)) were added sequentially to provide electrons to complex I + II. ADP ((D)) for state 3 respiration was added after GM. Uncoupled respiration was measured after addition of FCCP. Visceral fat contained more mitochondria per milligram of tissue than subcutaneous fat, but the cells were smaller. Robust, stable oxygen fluxes were found in both tissues, and coupled state 3 (GMOS(D)) and uncoupled respiration were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in visceral (0.95 +/- 0.05 and 1.15 +/- 0.06 pmol O(2) s(1) mg(1), respectively) compared with subcutaneous (0.76 +/- 0.04 and 0.98 +/- 0.05 pmol O(2) s(1) mg(1), respectively) adipose tissue. Expressed per mtDNA, visceral adipose tissue had significantly (P < 0.05) lower mitochondrial respiration. Substrate control ratios were higher and uncoupling control ratio lower (P < 0.05) in visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue. We conclude that visceral fat is bioenergetically more active and more sensitive to mitochondrial substrate supply than subcutaneous fat. Oxidative phosphorylation has a higher relative activity in visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  13. The effect of age on mitochondrial enzymes and respiration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P D; Hill, B T; Franks, L M

    1975-01-01

    There was no significant difference between the levels of cytochrome oxidase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenates or in mitochondria isolated from the livers of 6-month-old and 30-month-old C57/BL mice. Little change with age was found in the cytochemical localisation of either enzyme. There were no significant changes in endogenous, state III or state IV respiration of mitochondria isolated from the livers of young and old mice.

  14. D-β-Hydroxybutyrate rescues mitochondrial respiration and mitigates features of Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Kim; Perier, Celine; Caspersen, Casper; Teismann, Peter; Wu, Du-Chu; Yan, Shi-Du; Naini, Ali; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Przedborski, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a loss of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons accompanied by a deficit in mitochondrial respiration. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is a neurotoxin that causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration and a mitochondrial deficit reminiscent of PD. Here we show that the infusion of the ketone body D-β-hydroxybutyrate (DβHB) in mice confers partial protection against dopaminergic neurodegeneration and motor deficits induced by MPTP. These effects appear to be mediated by a complex II–dependent mechanism that leads to improved mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. Because of the safety record of ketone bodies in the treatment of epilepsy and their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, DβHB may be a novel neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:12975474

  15. D-beta-hydroxybutyrate rescues mitochondrial respiration and mitigates features of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Tieu, Kim; Perier, Celine; Caspersen, Casper; Teismann, Peter; Wu, Du-Chu; Yan, Shi-Du; Naini, Ali; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Przedborski, Serge

    2003-09-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a loss of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons accompanied by a deficit in mitochondrial respiration. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is a neurotoxin that causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration and a mitochondrial deficit reminiscent of PD. Here we show that the infusion of the ketone body d-beta-hydroxybutyrate (DbetaHB) in mice confers partial protection against dopaminergic neurodegeneration and motor deficits induced by MPTP. These effects appear to be mediated by a complex II-dependent mechanism that leads to improved mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. Because of the safety record of ketone bodies in the treatment of epilepsy and their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, DbetaHB may be a novel neuroprotective therapy for PD.

  16. [Contribution of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration under elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application].

    PubMed

    Kou, Tai-ji; Xu, Xiao-feng; Zhu, Jian-guo; Xie, Zu-bin; Guo, Da-yong; Miao, Yan-fang

    2011-10-01

    With the support of free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) system and by using isotope 13C technique, and through planting wheat (Triticum aestivum L., C3 crop) on a soil having been planted with maize (Zea mays L., C4 crop) for many years, this paper studied the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen application on the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 and the wheat rhizosphere respiration. With the growth of wheat, the delta 13C value of soil emitted CO2 had a gradual decrease. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (200 micromol mol(-1)) decreased the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 at booting and heading stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 250 kg hm(-2) (HN), and at jointing and booting stages significantly when the nitrogen application rate was 150 kg hm(-2) (LN). Nevertheless, the elevated atmospheric CO2 promoted the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration at booting and heading stages significantly. From jointing stage to maturing stage, the proportions of wheat rhizosphere respiration to soil respiration were 24%-48% (HN) and 21%-48% (LN) under elevated atmospheric CO2, and 20%-36% (HN) and 19%-32% (LN) under ambient atmospheric CO2. Under both elevated and ambient atmospheric CO2 concentrations, the delta 13C value of emitted CO2 and the rhizosphere respiration had different responses to the increased nitrogen application rate, and there was a significant interactive effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application rate on the wheat rhizosphere respiration at jointing stage.

  17. Metabolic depression during warm torpor in the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus) does not affect mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide release.

    PubMed

    Grimpo, Kirsten; Kutschke, Maria; Kastl, Anja; Meyer, Carola W; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Exner, Cornelia; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Small mammals actively decrease metabolism during daily torpor and hibernation to save energy. Recently, depression of mitochondrial substrate oxidation in isolated liver mitochondria was observed and associated to hypothermic/hypometabolic states in Djungarian hamsters, mice and hibernators. We aimed to clarify whether hypothermia or hypometabolism causes mitochondrial depression during torpor by studying the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus), a desert rodent which performs daily torpor at high ambient temperatures of 32°C. Notably, metabolic rate but not body temperature is significantly decreased under these conditions. In isolated liver, heart, skeletal muscle or kidney mitochondria we found no depression of respiration. Moderate cold exposure lowered torpor body temperature but had minor effects on minimal metabolic rate in torpor. Neither decreased body temperature nor metabolic rate impacted mitochondrial respiration. Measurements of mitochondrial proton leak kinetics and determination of P/O ratio revealed no differences in mitochondrial efficiency. Hydrogen peroxide release from mitochondria was not affected. We conclude that interspecies differences of mitochondrial depression during torpor do not support a general relationship between mitochondrial respiration, body temperature and metabolic rate. In Golden spiny mice, reduction of metabolic rate at mild temperatures is not triggered by depression of substrate oxidation as found in liver mitochondria from other cold-exposed rodents.

  18. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  19. Inhibition of uncoupled respiration in tumor cells. A possible role of mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L

    1993-08-23

    Uncouplers CCCP (2-4 microM) or DNP (200-400 microM) when added to EL-4 thymoma or Ehrlich carcinoma ascites cells initially stimulated endogenous respiration about 2-fold but then inhibited it to a first-order rate 20-25% of controls. This inhibition was accelerated by intracellular acidification or by A23187, a Ca2+/H(+)-antiporter (i.e. when mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux was stimulated) whereas Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of uniporter-driven Ca2+ efflux, significantly slowed down the effect of uncouplers. The respiratory inhibition was associated with NAD(P)H oxidation and was partially reversed by exogenous substrates (glutamine or glucose). In the permeabilized cells, endogenous and glutamine-supported respiration was inhibited by EGTA, while succinate-supported respiration was Ca2+ independent. It is suggested that mitochondrial Ca2+ is necessary for NADH-dependent respiration of tumor cells, and uncouplers inhibit it by activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux.

  20. Down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptors by blockade of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Hernández, I; De la Torre, M P; García, I; Santiago, E; Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1995-10-13

    We have studied the effect of blockade of mitochondrial respiration on the binding of human 125I-TNF alpha to L929 cell receptors. Specific TNF alpha binding was decreased to about 20-40% of controls by blocking mitochondrial respiration. This effect was dose- and time-related and was observed independently of the level at which the respiration was blocked (respiratory chain, proton backflow, ATPase, anaerobiosis). This blockade had no effect on the half-life of the specific TNF alpha binding, the internalization or degradation of TNF alpha-receptor complexes, or the number of TNF alpha-binding sites. Scatchard analysis of TNF alpha binding data indicated a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of these binding sites. These effects did not appear to be related to the protein kinase C activity or to reactive oxygen radicals, since they were not antagonized by pretreatment of cells with oxygen radical scavengers, deferoxamine, or inhibitors of protein kinase C. Decrease in TNF alpha binding capacity correlated significantly with cellular ATP content (r = 0.94; p < 0.01) and with the cytocidal activity of TNF alpha against L929 cells. These findings suggest that blockade of mitochondrial respiration down-regulates the binding of TNF alpha to cells, most likely by changing the affinity of receptors for this cytokine. This down-regulation may increase the resistance of cells to TNF alpha cytotoxicity.

  1. Pyruvate fuels mitochondrial respiration and proliferation of breast cancer cells: effect of monocarboxylate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Chang, Ching-Fang; Hogg, Neil

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the fact that cancer cells have an altered metabolic phenotype, and this metabolic reprogramming is required to drive the biosynthesis pathways necessary for rapid replication and proliferation. Specifically, the importance of citric acid cycle-generated intermediates in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation has been recently appreciated. One function of MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) is to transport the citric acid cycle substrate pyruvate across the plasma membrane and into mitochondria, and inhibition of MCTs has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to target metabolic pathways in cancer. In the present paper, we examined the effect of different metabolic substrates (glucose and pyruvate) on mitochondrial function and proliferation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that cancer cells proliferate more rapidly in the presence of exogenous pyruvate when compared with lactate. Pyruvate supplementation fuelled mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the reserve respiratory capacity, and this increase in mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. In addition, inhibition of cellular pyruvate uptake using the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased cell growth. These data demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in proliferative responses and highlight a novel mechanism of action for MCT inhibitors through suppression of pyruvate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration.

  2. Pyruvate fuels mitochondrial respiration and proliferation of breast cancer cells: effect of monocarboxylate transporter inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Diers, Anne R.; Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Chang, Ching-Fang; Hogg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the fact that cancer cells have an altered metabolic phenotype, and this metabolic reprogramming is required to drive biosynthesis pathways necessary for rapid replication and proliferation. Specifically, the importance of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle-generated intermediates in the regulation of cancer cells proliferation has been recently appreciated. One function of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) is to transport the TCA cycle substrate pyruvate across the plasma membrane and into mitochondria, and inhibition of MCTs has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to target metabolic pathways in cancer. Here, we examined the effect of different metabolic substrates (glucose and pyruvate) on mitochondrial function and proliferation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that cancer cells proliferate more rapidly in the presence of exogenous pyruvate when compared to lactate. Pyruvate supplementation fueled mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the reserve respiratory capacity, and this increase in mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. In addition, inhibition of cellular pyruvate uptake using the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased cell growth. These data demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in proliferative responses and highlight a novel mechanism of action for MCT inhibitors through suppression of pyruvate-fueled mitochondrial respiration. PMID:22458763

  3. Homocysteine activates T cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling and increasing mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juan; Lü, Silin; Ding, Yanhong; Zheng, Ming; Wang, Xian

    2016-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accelerates atherosclerosis by increasing proliferation and stimulating cytokine secretion in T cells. However, whether homocysteine (Hcy)-mediated T cell activation is associated with metabolic reprogramming is unclear. Here, our in vivo and in vitro studies showed that Hcy-stimulated splenic T-cell activation in mice was accompanied by increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium, mitochondrial mass and respiration. Inhibiting mitochondrial ROS production and calcium signals or blocking mitochondrial respiration largely blunted Hcy-induced T-cell interferon γ (IFN-γ) secretion and proliferation. Hcy also enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in T cells, and inhibition of ER stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid blocked Hcy-induced T-cell activation. Mechanistically, Hcy increased ER-mitochondria coupling, and uncoupling ER-mitochondria by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole attenuated Hcy-stimulated mitochondrial reprogramming, IFN-γ secretion and proliferation in T cells, suggesting that juxtaposition of ER and mitochondria is required for Hcy-promoted mitochondrial function and T-cell activation. In conclusion, Hcy promotes T-cell activation by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling and regulating metabolic reprogramming.

  4. A mitochondrial-targeted ubiquinone modulates muscle lipid profile and improves mitochondrial respiration in obesogenic diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Charles; Fouret, Gilles; Lambert, Karen; Ferreri, Carla; Rieusset, Jennifer; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Lecomte, Jérôme; Ebabe Elle, Raymond; Badia, Eric; Murphy, Michael P; Feillet-Coudray, Christine

    2016-04-14

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome components including abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance is increasing in both developed and developing countries. It is generally accepted that the development of these features is preceded by, or accompanied with, impaired mitochondrial function. The present study was designed to analyse the effects of a mitochondrial-targeted lipophilic ubiquinone (MitoQ) on muscle lipid profile modulation and mitochondrial function in obesogenic diet-fed rats. For this purpose, twenty-four young male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed one of the following diets: (1) control, (2) high fat (HF) and (3) HF+MitoQ. After 8 weeks, mitochondrial function markers and lipid metabolism/profile modifications in skeletal muscle were measured. The HF diet was effective at inducing the major features of the metabolic syndrome--namely, obesity, hepatic enlargement and glucose intolerance. MitoQ intake prevented the increase in rat body weight, attenuated the increase in adipose tissue and liver weights and partially reversed glucose intolerance. At the muscle level, the HF diet induced moderate TAG accumulation associated with important modifications in the muscle phospholipid classes and in the fatty acid composition of total muscle lipid. These lipid modifications were accompanied with decrease in mitochondrial respiration. MitoQ intake corrected the lipid alterations and restored mitochondrial respiration. These results indicate that MitoQ protected obesogenic diet-fed rats from some features of the metabolic syndrome through its effects on muscle lipid metabolism and mitochondrial activity. These findings suggest that MitoQ is a promising candidate for future human trials in the metabolic syndrome prevention.

  5. The role of mitochondrial respiration in salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Richard P; Taylor, Nicolas L; Millar, A Harvey

    2011-11-01

    NaCl is the most abundant salt in salinity-affected land. The ability of plants to sift the water table, limit NaCl uptake, compartmentalise Na⁺/Cl⁻ ions and prevent negative ionic and osmotic effects on cell function, are the foundations of salinity tolerance mechanisms. In this review, we show that although the quantitative response of respiratory rate to changes in salt concentration is complex, the properties of respiratory processes are crucial for tolerance during ion exclusion and tissue tolerance. We consider whole-plant gas exchange and carbon balance analysis alongside the salt responses of mitochondrial properties and genetic studies manipulating respiratory processes. We showcase the importance of efficient ATP generation, dampened reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial osmolytes for salinity tolerance in plants. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nitrite-nitric oxide control of mitochondrial respiration at the frontier of anoxia.

    PubMed

    Benamar, Abdelilah; Rolletschek, Hardy; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Curien, Gilles; Mostefai, H Ahmed; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Macherel, David

    2008-10-01

    Actively respiring animal and plant tissues experience hypoxia because of mitochondrial O(2) consumption. Controlling oxygen balance is a critical issue that involves in mammals hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) mediated transcriptional regulation, cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunit adjustment and nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator in vasodilatation and oxygen homeostasis. In plants, NO, mainly derived from nitrite, is also an important signalling molecule. We describe here a mechanism by which mitochondrial respiration is adjusted to prevent a tissue to reach anoxia. During pea seed germination, the internal atmosphere was strongly hypoxic due to very active mitochondrial respiration. There was no sign of fermentation, suggesting a down-regulation of O(2) consumption near anoxia. Mitochondria were found to finely regulate their surrounding O(2) level through a nitrite-dependent NO production, which was ascertained using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping of NO within membranes. At low O(2), nitrite is reduced into NO, likely at complex III, and in turn reversibly inhibits COX, provoking a rise to a higher steady state level of oxygen. Since NO can be re-oxidized into nitrite chemically or by COX, a nitrite-NO pool is maintained, preventing mitochondrial anoxia. Such an evolutionarily conserved mechanism should have an important role for oxygen homeostasis in tissues undergoing hypoxia.

  7. Transferrin receptor regulates pancreatic cancer growth by modulating mitochondrial respiration and ROS generation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Seung Min; Hwang, Sunsook; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2016-03-11

    The transferrin receptor (TfR1) is upregulated in malignant cells and its expression is associated with cancer progression. Because of its pre-eminent role in cell proliferation, TfR1 has been an important target for the development of cancer therapy. Although TfR1 is highly expressed in pancreatic cancers, what it carries out in these refractory cancers remains poorly understood. Here we report that TfR1 supports mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which is required for their tumorigenic growth. Elevated TfR1 expression in PDAC cells contributes to oxidative phosphorylation, which allows for the generation of ROS. Importantly, mitochondrial-derived ROS are essential for PDAC growth. However, exogenous iron supplement cannot rescue the defects caused by TfR1 knockdown. Moreover, we found that TfR1 expression determines PDAC cells sensitivity to oxidative stress. Together, our findings reveal that TfR1 can contribute to the mitochondrial respiration and ROS production, which have essential roles in growth and survival of pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) exhibits an elevated transferrin receptor (TfR1) expression in comparison with non-transformed pancreatic cells. • TfR1 is required for PDAC growth by regulating mitochondrial respiration and ROS production. • TfR1 functions as a determinant of cell viability to oxidative stress in PDAC cells.

  8. Mercury and protein thiols: Stimulation of mitochondrial F1FO-ATPase and inhibition of respiration.

    PubMed

    Nesci, Salvatore; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Ventrella, Vittoria; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2016-12-25

    In spite of the known widespread toxicity of mercury, its impact on mitochondrial bioenergetics is a still poorly explored topic. Even if many studies have dealt with mercury poisoning of mitochondrial respiration, as far as we are aware Hg(2+) effects on individual complexes are not so clear. In the present study changes in swine heart mitochondrial respiration and F1FO-ATPase (F-ATPase) activity promoted by micromolar Hg(2+) concentrations were investigated. Hg(2+) was found to inhibit the respiration of NADH-energized mitochondria, whereas it was ineffective when the substrate was succinate. Interestingly, the same micromolar Hg(2+) doses which inhibited the NADH-O2 activity stimulated the F-ATPase, most likely by interacting with adjacent thiol residues. Accordingly, Hg(2+) dose-dependently decreased protein thiols and all the elicited effects on mitochondrial complexes were reversed by the thiol reducing agent DTE. These findings clearly indicate that Hg(2+) interacts with Cys residues of these complexes and differently modulate their functionality by modifying the redox state of thiol groups. The results, which cast light on some implications of metal-thiol interactions up to now not fully explored, may contribute to clarify the molecular mechanisms of mercury toxicity to mitochondria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential after low-flow ischemia are not affected by ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Dodoni, Giuliano; Konietzka, Ina; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd; Schulz, Rainer

    2007-11-01

    Mitochondrial function following prolonged ischemia and subsequent reperfusion is better preserved by ischemic preconditioning (IP). In the present study, we analyzed whether or not IP has an impact on mitochondrial function at the end of a sustained ischemic period. Göttinger minipigs were subjected to 90-min low-flow ischemia without (n=5) and with (n=5) a preconditioning cycle of 10-min ischemia and 15-min reperfusion. Mitochondria were isolated from the ischemic or preconditioned anterior wall (AW) and the control posterior wall (PW) at the end of ischemia. Basal mitochondrial respiration was not different between AW and PW. The ADP-stimulated (state 3) respiration in AW mitochondria compared to PW mitochondria was equally decreased in non-preconditioned and preconditioned pigs. The uncoupled respiration as well as the membrane potential (rhodamine 123 fluorescence) were not significantly different between groups. However, the recovery of the membrane potential (Delta rhodamine 123 fluorescence/s) after the addition of ADP was delayed in mitochondria obtained from AW compared to PW, both in non-preconditioned and in preconditioned pig hearts. Neither the amount of marker proteins for complexes of the electron transport chain nor the level of reactive oxygen species were affected by ischemia without or with IP. State 3 respiration and recovery of membrane potential were impaired in pig mitochondria after 90 min of low-flow ischemia. IP did not improve mitochondrial function during ischemia. Therefore, the preservation of mitochondrial function by IP may occur during reperfusion rather than during the sustained ischemic period.

  10. Age-dependent reductions in mitochondrial respiration are exacerbated by calcium in the female rat heart.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J Craig; Machikas, Alexandra M; Korzick, Donna H

    2012-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease mortality increases rapidly after menopause by poorly defined mechanisms. Because mitochondrial function and Ca(2+) sensitivity are important regulators of cell death after myocardial ischemia, we sought to determine whether aging and/or estrogen deficiency (ovariectomy) increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) sensitivity. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in ventricular mitochondria isolated from adult (6 months; n = 26) and aged (24 months; n = 25), intact or ovariectomized female rats using the substrates α-ketoglutarate/malate (complex I); succinate/rotenone (complex II); ascorbate/N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine/antimycin (complex IV). State 2 and 3 respiration was initiated by sequential addition of mitochondria and adenosine diphosphate. Ca(2+) sensitivity was assessed by Ca(2+)-induced swelling of de-energized mitochondria and reduction in state 3 respiration. Propylpyrazole triol (PPT) was administered intraperitoneally 45 minutes before euthanasia to assess mitochondrial protective effects through estrogen receptor (ER) α activation. Aging decreased the respiratory control index (RCI; state 3/state 2) for complexes I and II by 12% and 8%, respectively, independent of ovary status (P < 0.05). Of interest, Ca(2+) induced a greater decrease (18%-30%; P < 0.05) in complex I state 3 respiration in aged and ovariectomized animals, and mitochondrial swelling occurred twice as quickly in aged (vs adult) female rats (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with PPT increased RCI by 8% and 7% at complexes I and II, respectively (P < 0.05) but surprisingly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity. Age-dependent decreases in RCI and sensitization to Ca(2+) may explain in part the age-associated reductions in female ischemic tolerance; however, protection afforded by ER agonism involves more complex mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Does high-sucrose diet alter skeletal muscle and liver mitochondrial respiration?

    PubMed

    Lambert, K; Py, G; Robert, E; Mercier, J

    2003-09-01

    A diet high in sucrose or fructose progressively impairs glucose and lipid metabolism, which leads to insulin resistance. As mitochondria are the sites of the oxidation and utilization of these substrates, we hypothesized that a high sucrose diet would alter mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were fed high-sucrose (SU) or control (CTL) diet for one week; mitochondrial respiration was investigated in mitochondria isolated from liver and both glycolytic and oxidative muscles, with pyruvate and palmitate as substrates. To test for metabolic disturbances, we measured not only glycogen content in muscles and liver, but also lactate, glucose and triglyceride blood concentrations. After one week of high-sucrose intake, we found no change in blood concentration of these variables, but glycogen content was significantly increased in liver (17.28 +/- 2.98 mg/g tissue SU vs 6.47 +/- 1.67 mg/g tissue CTL), oxidative muscle (1.59 +/- 0.21 mg/g tissue SU vs 0.70 +/- 0.24 mg/g tissue CTL) though not in glycolytic muscle (1.72 +/- 0.44 mg/g tissue SU vs 1.52 +/- 0.20 mg/g tissue CTL). State 3 mitochondrial respiration was significantly decreased in SU rats compared with CTL (p < 0.05) with pyruvate, while no change was observed with palmitate. This study shows that 1-week of high-sucrose diet altered mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation in rats and suggests that, in the context of a high-sucrose diet, impaired mitochondrial respiration could contributed to the development of insulin resistance.

  12. Role of UCP3 in state 4 respiration during contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Adhihetty, Peter J; Hood, David A

    2004-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) function in skeletal muscle, we assessed basal UCP3 protein content in rat intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial subfractions in conjunction with measurements of state 4 respiration. UCP3 content was 1.3-fold (P < 0.05) greater in IMF compared with SS mitochondria. State 4 respiration was 2.6-fold greater (P < 0.05) in the IMF subfraction than in SS mitochondria. GDP attenuated state 4 respiration by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) in both subfractions. The UCP3 activator oleic acid (OA) significantly increased state 4 respiration in IMF mitochondria only. We used chronic electrical stimulation (3 h/day for 7 days) to investigate the relationship between changes in UCP3 protein expression and alterations in state 4 respiration during contractile activity-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. UCP3 content was increased by 1.9- and 2.3-fold in IMF and SS mitochondria, respectively, which exceeded the concurrent 40% (P < 0.05) increase in cytochrome-c oxidase activity. Chronic contractile activity increased state 4 respiration by 1.4-fold (P < 0.05) in IMF mitochondria, but no effect was observed in the SS subfraction. The uncoupling function of UCP3 accounted for 50-57% of the OA-induced increase in state 4 respiration in IMF mitochondria, which was independent of the induced twofold difference in UCP3 content due to chronic contractile activity. Thus modifications in UCP3 function are more important than changes in UCP3 expression in modifying state 4 respiration. This effect is evident in IMF but not SS mitochondria. We conclude that UCP3 at physiological concentrations accounts for a significant portion of state 4 respiration in both IMF and SS mitochondria, with the contribution being greater in the IMF subfraction. In addition, the contradiction between human and rat training studies with respect to UCP3 protein expression may partly be explained by the greater than twofold

  13. Measuring mitochondrial respiration in intact single muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Rosemary A.; Jackson, Kathryn C.; Khairallah, Ramzi J.; Ward, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle is a vital tool for understanding regulation of cellular bioenergetics. Currently, a number of different experimental approaches are employed to quantify mitochondrial function, with each involving either mechanically or chemically induced disruption of cellular membranes. Here, we describe a novel approach that allows for the quantification of substrate-induced mitochondria-driven oxygen consumption in intact single skeletal muscle fibers isolated from adult mice. Specifically, we isolated intact muscle fibers from the flexor digitorum brevis muscle and placed the fibers in culture conditions overnight. We then quantified oxygen consumption rates using a highly sensitive microplate format. Peak oxygen consumption rates were significantly increased by 3.4-fold and 2.9-fold by simultaneous stimulation with the uncoupling agent, carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), and/or pyruvate or palmitate exposure, respectively. However, when calculating the total oxygen consumed over the entire treatment, palmitate exposure resulted in significantly more oxygen consumption compared with pyruvate. Further, as proof of principle for the procedure, we isolated fibers from the mdx mouse model, which has known mitochondrial deficits. We found significant reductions in initial and peak oxygen consumption of 51% and 61% compared with fibers isolated from the wild-type (WT) animals, respectively. In addition, we determined that fibers isolated from mdx mice exhibited less total oxygen consumption in response to the FCCP + pyruvate stimulation compared with the WT mice. This novel approach allows the user to make mitochondria-specific measures in a nondisrupted muscle fiber that has been isolated from a whole muscle. PMID:22160545

  14. Measuring mitochondrial respiration in intact single muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Rosemary A; Jackson, Kathryn C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Ward, Christopher W; Spangenburg, Espen E

    2012-03-15

    Measurement of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle is a vital tool for understanding regulation of cellular bioenergetics. Currently, a number of different experimental approaches are employed to quantify mitochondrial function, with each involving either mechanically or chemically induced disruption of cellular membranes. Here, we describe a novel approach that allows for the quantification of substrate-induced mitochondria-driven oxygen consumption in intact single skeletal muscle fibers isolated from adult mice. Specifically, we isolated intact muscle fibers from the flexor digitorum brevis muscle and placed the fibers in culture conditions overnight. We then quantified oxygen consumption rates using a highly sensitive microplate format. Peak oxygen consumption rates were significantly increased by 3.4-fold and 2.9-fold by simultaneous stimulation with the uncoupling agent, carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP), and/or pyruvate or palmitate exposure, respectively. However, when calculating the total oxygen consumed over the entire treatment, palmitate exposure resulted in significantly more oxygen consumption compared with pyruvate. Further, as proof of principle for the procedure, we isolated fibers from the mdx mouse model, which has known mitochondrial deficits. We found significant reductions in initial and peak oxygen consumption of 51% and 61% compared with fibers isolated from the wild-type (WT) animals, respectively. In addition, we determined that fibers isolated from mdx mice exhibited less total oxygen consumption in response to the FCCP + pyruvate stimulation compared with the WT mice. This novel approach allows the user to make mitochondria-specific measures in a nondisrupted muscle fiber that has been isolated from a whole muscle.

  15. Mitochondrial Alternative Oxidase Maintains Respiration and Preserves Photosynthetic Capacity during Moderate Drought in Nicotiana tabacum1[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D.; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum ‘Petit Havana SR1’ wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity. PMID:25204647

  16. Mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine level modulates Cyt c oxidase activity to maintain respiration capacity in Arabidopsis thaliana rosette leaves.

    PubMed

    Otsuru, Masumi; Yu, Yanbo; Mizoi, Junya; Kawamoto-Fujioka, Mari; Wang, Jinyin; Fujiki, Yuki; Nishida, Ikuo

    2013-10-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine is the predominant phospholipid of the mitochondrial inner membrane. In Arabidopsis, pect1-4 mutants exhibit reduced cellular phosphatidylethanolamine levels owing to reduced CTP:phosphorylethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PECT; EC 2.7.7.14) activity. Consequently, pect1-4 mutants may have decreased mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine levels, thereby affecting respiration capacity. Wild-type and pect1-4 plants grew similarly under a short-day condition until 5 weeks, when pect1-4 leaves had slightly less Chl. Total respiration was comparable between wild-type and pect1-4 leaves at 3 weeks and then increased 2-fold in the wild-type but only 1.1-fold in pect1-4 leaves. Compared with the wild type, the Cyt oxidase pathway capacity was reduced by 36% in pect1-4 leaves at 5 weeks and by 43% in pect1-4 mitochondria in 5-week-old rosette leaves. Maximal Cyt c oxidase (COX) activity was 20% lower in pect1-4 mitochondria than in wild-type mitochondria at 5 weeks despite comparable COX II protein levels in mitochondria at that time. Furthermore, COX II protein levels doubled in both wild-type and pect1-4 mitochondria between 3 and 5 weeks. Phosphatidylethanolamine levels were similar between mitochondria from these plants at 3 weeks and then increased by 6.4% in wild-type mitochondria and decreased by 6.5% in pect1-4 mitochondria by 5 weeks. Phosphatidylcholine levels compensated for the decreases in phosphatidylethanolamine levels. COX activity was lower in pect1-4 mitochondria at 5 weeks, most probably due to reduced phosphatidylethanolamine levels and/or an altered phosphatidylethanolamine:phosphatidylcholine ratio. Thus, PECT1 regulates mitochondrial phosphatidylethanolamine levels, which are important for maintaining respiration capacity in Arabidopsis leaves during prolonged growth under short-day conditions.

  17. The proline metabolism intermediate Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate directly inhibits the mitochondrial respiration in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akira; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-07-30

    The proline metabolism intermediate Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) induces cell death in animals, plants and yeasts. To elucidate how P5C triggers cell death, we analyzed P5C metabolism, mitochondrial respiration and superoxide anion generation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene disruption analysis revealed that P5C-mediated cell death was not due to P5C metabolism. Interestingly, deficiency in mitochondrial respiration suppressed the sensitivity of yeast cells to P5C. In addition, we found that P5C inhibits the mitochondrial respiration and induces a burst of superoxide anions from the mitochondria. We propose that P5C regulates cell death via the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of low-level laser therapy on mitochondrial respiration and nitrosyl complex content.

    PubMed

    Buravlev, Evgeny A; Zhidkova, Tatyana V; Vladimirov, Yury A; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2014-11-01

    Among the photochemical reactions responsible for therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation, the photolysis of nitrosyl iron complexes of iron-containing proteins is of primary importance. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of blue laser radiation on the respiration rate and photolysis of nitrosyl complexes of iron-sulfur clusters (NO-FeS) in mitochondria, subjected to NO as well as the possibility of NO transfer from NO-FeS to hemoglobin. It was shown that mitochondrial respiration in State 3 (V3) and State 4 (V4), according to Chance, dramatically decreased in the presence of 3 mM NO, but laser radiation (λ = 442 nm, 30 J/cm(2)) restored the respiration rates virtually to the initial level. At the same time, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra showed that laser irradiation decomposed nitrosyl complexes produced by the addition of NO to mitochondria. EPR signal of nitrosyl complexes of FeS-clusters, formed in the presence of 3 mM NO, was maximal in hypoxic mitochondria, and disappeared in a dose-dependent manner, almost completely at the irradiation dose 120 J/cm(2). EPR measurements showed that the addition of lysed erythrocytes to mitochondria decreased the amount of nitrosyl complexes in iron-sulfur clusters and produced the accumulation of NO-hemoglobin. On the other hand, the addition of lysed erythrocytes to mitochondria, preincubated with nitric oxide, restored mitochondrial respiration rates V3 and V4 to initial levels. We may conclude that there are two possible ways to destroy FeS nitrosyl complexes in mitochondria and recover mitochondrial respiration inhibited by NO: laser irradiation and ample supply of the compounds with high affinity to nitric oxide, including hemoglobin.

  19. Cytochrome p450nor, a novel class of mitochondrial cytochrome P450 involved in nitrate respiration in the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Takaya, N; Suzuki, S; Kuwazaki, S; Shoun, H; Maruo, F; Yamaguchi, M; Takeo, K

    1999-12-15

    Fusarium oxysporum, an imperfect filamentous fungus performs nitrate respiration under limited oxygen. In the respiratory system, Cytochrome P450nor (P450nor) is thought to catalyze the last step; reduction of nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. We examined its intracellular localization using enzymatic, spectroscopic, and immunological analyses to show that P450nor is found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. Translational fusions between the putative mitochondrial targeting signal on the amino terminus of P450nor and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase resulted in significant beta-galactosidase activity in the mitochondrial fraction of nitrate-respiring cells, suggesting that one of the isoforms of P450nor (P450norA) is in anaerobic mitochondrion of F. oxysporum and acts as nitric oxide reductase. Furthermore, these findings suggest the involvement of P450nor in nitrate respiration in mitochondria.

  20. Increased platelet mitochondrial respiration after cardiac arrest and resuscitation as a potential peripheral biosignature of cerebral bioenergetic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Michael A; Sutton, Robert M; Karlsson, Michael; Sjövall, Fredrik; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A; Margulies, Susan S; Kilbaugh, Todd J

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) results in a sepsis-like syndrome with activation of the innate immune system and increased mitochondrial bioenergetics. To determine if platelet mitochondrial respiration increases following CA in a porcine pediatric model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF) CA, and if this readily obtained biomarker is associated with decreased brain mitochondrial respiration. CA protocol: 7 min of asphyxia, followed by VF, protocolized titration of compression depth to systolic blood pressure of 90 mmHg and vasopressor administration to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mmHg. platelet integrated mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) function evaluated pre- and post-CA/ROSC four hours after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Secondary outcome: correlation of platelet mitochondrial bioenergetics to cerebral bioenergetic function. Platelet maximal oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOSCI+CII), P < 0.02, and maximal respiratory capacity (ETSCI+CII), P < 0.04, were both significantly increased compared to pre-arrest values. This was primarily due to a significant increase in succinate-supported respiration through Complex II (OXPHOSCII, P < 0.02 and ETSCII, P < 0.03). Higher respiration was not due to uncoupling, as the LEAKCI + CII respiration (mitochondrial respiration independent of ATP-production) was unchanged after CA/ROSC. Larger increases in platelet mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) compared to pre-CA RCR were significantly correlated with lower RCRs in the cortex (P < 0.03) and hippocampus (P < 0.04) compared to sham respiration. Platelet mitochondrial respiration is significantly increased four hours after ROSC. Future studies will identify mechanistic relationships between this serum biomarker and altered cerebral bioenergetics function following cardiac arrest.

  1. Effects of chronic caloric restriction on mitochondrial respiration in the ischemic reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Tom L; Belke, Terry; Driedzic, William R

    2002-04-01

    Dietary restriction increases life span and delays the development of age-related diseases in rodents. We have recently demonstrated that chronic dietary restriction is beneficial on recovery of heart function following ischemia. We studied whether the metabolic basis of this benefit is associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were assigned to an ad libitum-fed (AL) group and a food restricted (FR) group, in which food intake was reduced to 55% of the amount consumed by the AL group. Following an 8-month period of restricted caloric intake, isolated working hearts perfused with glucose and high levels of fatty acids were subjected to global ischemia followed by reperfusion. At the end of reperfusion, total heart mitochondria respiration was assessed in the presence of pyruvate, tricarboxylic acid intermediates, and palmitoylcarnitine. Recovery of heart function following ischemia was greater in FR hearts compared to AL hearts. Paralleling these changes in heart function was an increase in state 3 respiration with pyruvate. The respiratory control ratios in the presence of pyruvate and tricarboxylic acid intermediates were higher in FR hearts compared to AL hearts, indicating well-coupled mitochondria. Overall energy production, expressed as the ADP:O ratio and the oxidative phosphorylation rate, was also improved in FR hearts. Our results indicate that the beneficial effect of FR on recovery of heart function following ischemia is associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration.

  2. Parkin loss leads to PARIS-dependent declines in mitochondrial mass and respiration

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Daniel A.; Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Bower, Aaron; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in parkin lead to early-onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease (PD) and inactivation of parkin is thought to contribute to sporadic PD. Adult knockout of parkin in the ventral midbrain of mice leads to an age-dependent loss of dopamine neurons that is dependent on the accumulation of parkin interacting substrate (PARIS), zinc finger protein 746 (ZNF746), and its transcriptional repression of PGC-1α. Here we show that adult knockout of parkin in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial size, number, and protein markers consistent with a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis. This decrease in mitochondrial mass is prevented by short hairpin RNA knockdown of PARIS. PARIS overexpression in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial number and protein markers and PGC-1α–dependent deficits in mitochondrial respiration. Taken together, these results suggest that parkin loss impairs mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to declining function of the mitochondrial pool and cell death. PMID:26324925

  3. Co-regulation of mitochondrial respiration by proline dehydrogenase/oxidase and succinate.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Chad N; Liu, Wei; Alvord, W Gregory; Phang, James M

    2016-03-01

    Proline dehydrogenase/oxidase (PRODH/POX) is a mitochondrial protein critical to multiple stress pathways. Because of the roles of PRODH/POX in signaling, and its shared localization to the mitochondrial inner membrane with the electron transport chain (ETC), we investigated whether there was a direct relationship between PRODH/POX and regulation of the ETC. We found that PRODH/POX binds directly to CoQ1 and that CoQ1-dependent PRODH/POX activity required functional Complex III and Complex IV. PRODH/POX supported respiration in living cells during nutrient stress; however, expression of PRODH/POX resulted in an overall decrease in respiratory fitness. Effects on respiratory fitness were inhibited by DHP and NAC, indicating that these effects were mediated by PRODH/POX-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. PRODH/POX expression resulted in a dose-dependent down-regulation of Complexes I-IV of the ETC, and this effect was also mitigated by the addition of DHP and NAC. We found that succinate was an uncompetitive inhibitor of PRODH/POX activity, inhibited ROS generation by PRODH/POX, and alleviated PRODH/POX effects on respiratory fitness. The findings demonstrate novel cross-talk between proline and succinate respiration in vivo and provide mechanistic insights into observations from previous animal studies. Our results suggest a potential regulatory loop between PRODH/POX and succinate in regulation of mitochondrial respiration.

  4. Mitochondrial respiration in muscle and liver from cold-acclimated hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Zaninovich, Angel A; Rebagliati, Ines; Raices, Marcela; Ricci, Conrado; Hagmuller, Karl

    2003-10-01

    The effects of long-term cold exposure on muscle and liver mitochondrial oxygen consumption in hypothyroid and normal rats were examined. Thyroid ablation was performed after 8-wk acclimation to 4 degrees C. Hypothyroid and normal controls remained in the cold for an additional 8 wk. At the end of 16-wk cold exposure, all hypothyroid rats were alive and normothermic and had normal body weight. At ambient temperature (24 degrees C), thyroid ablation induced a 65% fall in muscle mitochondrial oxygen consumption, which was reversed by thyroxine but not by norepinephrine administration. After cold acclimation was reached, suppression of thyroid function reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration by 30%, but the hypothyroid values remained about threefold higher than those in hypothyroid muscle in the warm. Blockade of beta- and alpha1-adrenergic receptors in both hypothyroid and normal rats produced hypothermia in vivo and a fall in muscle, liver, and brown adipose tissue mitochondria respiration in vitro. In normal rats, cold acclimation enhanced muscle respiration by 35%, in liver 18%, and in brown adipose tissue 450% over values in the warm. The results demonstrate that thyroid hormones, in the presence of norepinephrine, are major determinants of thermogenic activity in muscle and liver of cold-acclimated rats. After thyroid ablation, cold-induced nonshivering thermogenesis replaced 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-induced thermogenesis, and normal body temperature was maintained.

  5. Simvastatin impairs ADP-stimulated respiration and increases mitochondrial oxidative stress in primary human skeletal myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna; Anderson, Ethan J.; Lin, Chien-Te; Kane, Daniel A.; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Cortright, Ronald N.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Statins, the widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, cause adverse skeletal muscle side effects ranging from fatigue to fatal rhabdomyolysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration, oxidative stress, and cell death in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells (i.e. myotubes). Simvastatin induced a dose dependent decrease in viability of proliferating and differentiating primary human muscle precursor cells, and a similar dose-dependent effect was noted in differentiated myoblasts and myotubes. Additionally, there were decreases in myotube number and size following 48 h of simvastatin treatment (5 µM). In permeabilized myotubes, maximal ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, supported by palmitoyl-carnitine + malate (PCM, complex I and II substrates) and glutamate + malate (GM, complex I substrates), was 32–37% lower (P<0.05) in simvastatin treated (5 µM) vs. control myotubes, providing evidence of impaired respiration at complex I. Mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generation were significantly greater in the simvastatin treated human skeletal myotube cultures compared to control. In addition, simvastatin markedly increased protein levels of Bax (pro-apoptotic, +53%) and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic, +100%, P<0.05), mitochondrial PTP opening (+44%, P<0.05), and TUNEL-positive nuclei in human skeletal myotubes, demonstrating up-regulation of mitochondrial-mediated myonuclear apoptotic mechanisms. These data demonstrate that simvastatin induces myotube atrophy and cell loss associated with impaired ADP-stimulated maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis in primary human skeletal myotubes, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie human statin-induced myopathy. PMID:22080086

  6. Simvastatin impairs ADP-stimulated respiration and increases mitochondrial oxidative stress in primary human skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna; Anderson, Ethan J; Lin, Chien-Te; Kane, Daniel A; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Cortright, Ronald N; Bamman, Marcas M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Statins, the widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, cause adverse skeletal muscle side effects ranging from fatigue to fatal rhabdomyolysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration, oxidative stress, and cell death in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells (i.e., myotubes). Simvastatin induced a dose-dependent decrease in viability of proliferating and differentiating primary human muscle precursor cells, and a similar dose-dependent effect was noted in differentiated myoblasts and myotubes. Additionally, there were decreases in myotube number and size following 48 h of simvastatin treatment (5 μM). In permeabilized myotubes, maximal ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, supported by palmitoylcarnitine+malate (PCM, complex I and II substrates) and glutamate+malate (GM, complex I substrates), was 32-37% lower (P<0.05) in simvastatin-treated (5 μM) vs control myotubes, providing evidence of impaired respiration at complex I. Mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generation were significantly greater in the simvastatin-treated human skeletal myotube cultures compared to control. In addition, simvastatin markedly increased protein levels of Bax (proapoptotic, +53%) and Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic, +100%, P<0.05), mitochondrial PTP opening (+44%, P<0.05), and TUNEL-positive nuclei in human skeletal myotubes, demonstrating up-regulation of mitochondrial-mediated myonuclear apoptotic mechanisms. These data demonstrate that simvastatin induces myotube atrophy and cell loss associated with impaired ADP-stimulated maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis in primary human skeletal myotubes, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie human statin-induced myopathy.

  7. Cytochrome c oxidase maintains mitochondrial respiration during partial inhibition by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Callender, Miriam; Hollis, Veronica; Frakich, Nanci; Mateo, Jesús; Moncada, Salvador

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), generated endogenously in NO-synthase-transfected cells, increases the reduction of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) at O2 concentrations ([O2]) above those at which it inhibits cell respiration. Thus, in cells respiring to anoxia, the addition of 2.5 microM L-arginine at 70 microM O2 resulted in reduction of CcO and inhibition of respiration at [O2] of 64.0+/-0.8 and 24.8+/-0.8 microM, respectively. This separation of the two effects of NO is related to electron turnover of the enzyme, because the addition of electron donors resulted in inhibition of respiration at progressively higher [O2], and to their eventual convergence. Our results indicate that partial inhibition of CcO by NO leads to an accumulation of reduced cytochrome c and, consequently, to an increase in electron flux through the enzyme population not inhibited by NO. Thus, respiration is maintained without compromising the bioenergetic status of the cell. We suggest that this is a physiological mechanism regulated by the flux of electrons in the mitochondria and by the changing ratio of O2:NO, either during hypoxia or, as a consequence of increases in NO, as a result of cell stress.

  8. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  9. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  10. In Vitro Effects of Cognitives and Nootropics on Mitochondrial Respiration and Monoamine Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-09-23

    Impairment of mitochondrial metabolism, particularly the electron transport chain (ETC), as well as increased oxidative stress might play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some effects of drugs used for symptomatic AD treatment may be related to their direct action on mitochondrial function. In vitro effects of pharmacologically different cognitives (galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine, 7-MEOTA, memantine) and nootropic drugs (latrepirdine, piracetam) were investigated on selected mitochondrial parameters: activities of ETC complexes I, II + III, and IV, citrate synthase, monoamine oxidase (MAO), oxygen consumption rate, and hydrogen peroxide production of pig brain mitochondria. Complex I activity was decreased by galantamine, donepezil, and memantine; complex II + III activity was increased by galantamine. None of the tested drugs caused significant changes in the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, even at high concentrations. Except galantamine, all tested drugs were selective MAO-A inhibitors. Latrepirdine, donepezil, and 7-MEOTA were found to be the most potent MAO-A inhibitors. Succinate-induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production was not significantly affected by the drugs tested. The direct effect of cognitives and nootropics used in the treatment of AD on mitochondrial respiration is relatively small. The safest drugs in terms of disturbing mitochondrial function appear to be piracetam and rivastigmine. The MAO-A inhibition by cognitives and nootropics may also participate in mitochondrial neuroprotection. The results support the future research aimed at measuring the effects of currently used drugs or newly synthesized drugs on mitochondrial functioning in order to understand their mechanism of action.

  11. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Jayson R.; Trinity, Joel D.; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S.; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J.; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease. PMID:26272320

  12. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease.

  13. The diabetes medication Canagliflozin reduces cancer cell proliferation by inhibiting mitochondrial complex-I supported respiration.

    PubMed

    Villani, Linda A; Smith, Brennan K; Marcinko, Katarina; Ford, Rebecca J; Broadfield, Lindsay A; Green, Alex E; Houde, Vanessa P; Muti, Paola; Tsakiridis, Theodoros; Steinberg, Gregory R

    2016-10-01

    The sodium-glucose transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors Canagliflozin and Dapagliflozin are recently approved medications for type 2 diabetes. Recent studies indicate that SGLT2 inhibitors may inhibit the growth of some cancer cells but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. Cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival were used to assess the sensitivity of prostate and lung cancer cell growth to the SGLT2 inhibitors. Oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification rate, cellular ATP, glucose uptake, lipogenesis, and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and the p70S6 kinase were assessed. Overexpression of a protein that maintains complex-I supported mitochondrial respiration (NDI1) was used to establish the importance of this pathway for mediating the anti-proliferative effects of Canagliflozin. Clinically achievable concentrations of Canagliflozin, but not Dapagliflozin, inhibit cellular proliferation and clonogenic survival of prostate and lung cancer cells alone and in combination with ionizing radiation and the chemotherapy Docetaxel. Canagliflozin reduced glucose uptake, mitochondrial complex-I supported respiration, ATP, and lipogenesis while increasing the activating phosphorylation of AMPK. The overexpression of NDI1 blocked the anti-proliferative effects of Canagliflozin indicating reductions in mitochondrial respiration are critical for anti-proliferative actions. These data indicate that like the biguanide metformin, Canagliflozin not only lowers blood glucose but also inhibits complex-I supported respiration and cellular proliferation in prostate and lung cancer cells. These observations support the initiation of studies evaluating the clinical efficacy of Canagliflozin on limiting tumorigenesis in pre-clinical animal models as well epidemiological studies on cancer incidence relative to other glucose lowering therapies in clinical populations.

  14. Equilibration of adenylates in the mitochondrial intermembrane space maintains respiration and regulates cytosolic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Kleczkowski, Leszek A

    2006-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (AK) uses one each of Mg-complexed and free adenylates as substrates in both directions of its reaction. It is very active in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS), but is absent from the mitochondrial matrix where low [ADP] upon intensive respiration limits the respiratory rate. AK activity in the IMS is linked to ATP/ADP exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane by using ATP (imported from the matrix) and AMP as substrates, the latter provided by apyrase and other AMP-generating reactions. The ADP formed by AK is exported to the matrix (in exchange for ATP), providing a mechanism for regeneration of ADP during respiration. From the AK equilibrium, and taking pH values characteristic of subcellular compartments, [Mg2+] in the IMS is calculated as 0.4-0.5 mM and in the cytosol as 0.2-0.3 mM, whereas the MgATP:MgADP ratio in the IMS and cytosol is 6-9 and 10-15, respectively. These represent optimal conditions for transport of adenylates (via the maintenance of an ATPfree:ADPfree ratio close to 1) and mitochondrial respiratory rates (via the maintenance of submillimolar [ADPfree] in the IMS). This, in turn, has important consequences for mitochondrial and cytosolic metabolism, including regulation of the protein phosphorylation rate (via changes in the MgATP:AMPfree ratio) and allosteric regulation of mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes. Metabolomic consequences are discussed in connection with the calculation of metabolic fluxes from subcompartmental distributions of total adenylates and Mg2+.

  15. Effects of respirators under heat/work conditions

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.; Dukes-Dobos, F.; Smith, R.

    1984-06-01

    Physiological responses and perceived strain of five unacclimatized male subjects were studied. The subjects were exposed to heat during an exercise task and were evaluated while wearing half and full facepiece, cartridge-type, air-purifying respirators, and without a respirator. The exercise consisted of walking on a treadmill for a period of 1 hour in a controlled environmental chamber at each of two different energy expenditure levels (200 and 400 kcal/hr)(approx. = 58 and 116 Watts) and two different heat exposures (air temperatures of 25/sup 0/C and 43.3./sup 0/C). The results indicated that wearing a full facepiece respirator imposed significant physiological strain added to that caused by the heat and workloads used in the study. Five of the six physiological measures show this increased physiological strain: (1) heart rate; (2) minute ventilation; (3) oxygen consumption; (4) energy expenditure; and (5) oral temperature. There was no detectable effect on sweat rate. Although subjective ratings indicated more discomfort with increasing physiological strain, the observed correlations between such measures were low (T/sub b/ < .60). The net consequence of the significant effects indicates that workers' tolerance to moderate or high levels of work under hot conditions while wearing a respirator is reduced. The reduction is more pronounced when wearing a full mask than when wearing a half mask. Changes in respirator design which minimize respiratory dead space are suggested to alleviate this problem. Otherwise, prevention of excessive physiological strain from respirator use when working at moderate or higher levels at hot job sites could necessitate more rest breaks or limiting work time under such conditions.

  16. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  17. Herba Cistanche extract enhances mitochondrial glutathione status and respiration in rat hearts, with possible induction of uncoupling proteins.

    PubMed

    Siu, Ada Hoi-Ling; Ko, Kam Ming

    2010-05-01

    Herba Cistanche, a Chinese herb derived from the whole plant of Cistanche deserticola Y.C. Ma (Orobanchaceae), has been shown to enhance mitochondrial ATP generation and to protect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury ex vivo in rats. To define the role of mitochondria in the cardioprotective action of Herba Cistanche, we investigated the effect of Herba Cistanche treatment on mitochondrial glutathione status and functional parameters in rat hearts. Treatment with a methanol extract of Herba Cistanche enhanced mitochondrial glutathione status, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) content, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, an increase in State 4 respiration, indicative of uncoupled respiration, was observed in mitochondria isolated from Herba Cistanche-treated rat hearts. The enhancement of mitochondrial glutathione status and functional ability, as well as the putative induction of uncoupling proteins, may be related to cardioprotection afforded by Herba Cistanche treatment protecting against I/R injury.

  18. Similar qualitative and quantitative changes of mitochondrial respiration following strength and endurance training in normoxia and hypoxia in sedentary humans.

    PubMed

    Pesta, Dominik; Hoppel, Florian; Macek, Christian; Messner, Hubert; Faulhaber, Martin; Kobel, Conrad; Parson, Walther; Burtscher, Martin; Schocke, Michael; Gnaiger, Erich

    2011-10-01

    Endurance and strength training are established as distinct exercise modalities, increasing either mitochondrial density or myofibrillar units. Recent research, however, suggests that mitochondrial biogenesis is stimulated by both training modalities. To test the training "specificity" hypothesis, mitochondrial respiration was studied in permeabilized muscle fibers from 25 sedentary adults after endurance (ET) or strength training (ST) in normoxia or hypoxia [fraction of inspired oxygen (Fi(O(2))) = 21% or 13.5%]. Biopsies were taken from the musculus vastus lateralis, and cycle-ergometric incremental maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) exercise tests were performed under normoxia, before and after the 10-wk training program. The main finding was a significant increase (P < 0.05) of fatty acid oxidation capacity per muscle mass, after endurance and strength training under normoxia [2.6- and 2.4-fold for endurance training normoxia group (ET(N)) and strength training normoxia group (ST(N)); n = 8 and 3] and hypoxia [2.0-fold for the endurance training hypoxia group (ET(H)) and strength training hypoxia group (ST(H)); n = 7 and 7], and higher coupling control of oxidative phosphorylation. The enhanced lipid oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was mainly (87%) due to qualitative mitochondrial changes increasing the relative capacity for fatty acid oxidation (P < 0.01). Mitochondrial tissue-density contributed to a smaller extent (13%), reflected by the gain in muscle mass-specific respiratory capacity with a physiological substrate cocktail (glutamate, malate, succinate, and octanoylcarnitine). No significant increase was observed in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content. Physiological OXPHOS capacity increased significantly in ET(N) (P < 0.01), with the same trend in ET(H) and ST(H) (P < 0.1). The limitation of flux by the phosphorylation system was diminished after training. Importantly, key mitochondrial adaptations were similar after endurance and strength

  19. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  20. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  1. Free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) signaling affects insulin secretion by enhancing mitochondrial respiration during palmitate exposure.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Hjalti; Bergsten, Peter; Sargsyan, Ernest

    2015-12-01

    Fatty acids affect insulin secretion via metabolism and FFAR1-mediated signaling. Recent reports indicate that these two pathways act synergistically. Still it remains unclear how they interrelate. Taking into account the key role of mitochondria in insulin secretion, we attempted to dissect the metabolic and FFAR1-mediated effects of fatty acids on mitochondrial function. One-hour culture of MIN6 cells with palmitate significantly enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Antagonism or silencing of FFAR1 prevented the palmitate-induced rise in respiration. On the other hand, in the absence of extracellular palmitate FFAR1 agonists caused a modest increase in respiration. Using an agonist of the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and PKC inhibitor we found that in the presence of the fatty acid mitochondrial respiration is regulated via Gαq protein-coupled receptor signaling. The increase in respiration in palmitate-treated cells was largely due to increased glucose utilization and oxidation. However, glucose utilization was not dependent on FFAR1 signaling. Collectively, these results indicate that mitochondrial respiration in palmitate-treated cells is enhanced via combined action of intracellular metabolism of the fatty acid and the Gαq-coupled FFAR1 signaling. Long-term palmitate exposure reduced ATP-coupling efficiency of mitochondria and deteriorated insulin secretion. The presence of the FFAR1 antagonist during culture did not improve ATP-coupling efficiency, however, it resulted in enhanced mitochondrial respiration and improved insulin secretion after culture. Taken together, our study demonstrates that during palmitate exposure, integrated actions of fatty acid metabolism and fatty acid-induced FFAR1 signaling on mitochondrial respiration underlie the synergistic action of the two pathways on insulin secretion.

  2. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase acts to dampen the generation of active oxygen species during a period of rapid respiration induced to support a high rate of nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Yip, Justine Y. H.; Vanlerberghe, Greg C.

    2001-07-01

    When wild type (wt) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) suspension cells were grown under phosphate (P) limitation, they contained large amounts of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX). When these cells were resupplied with P, there was a large, immediate and sustained stimulation of respiration to support a period of rapid P uptake. Two lines of evidence suggest that the abundant level of AOX present in wt cells contributed to this stimulated rate of respiration. First, when P-limited transgenic antisense tobacco cells (AS8) lacking AOX were resupplied with P, the stimulation of respiration was much less dramatic even though these cells displayed similar rates of P uptake. Second, while the stimulated rate of respiration in AS8 cells was insensitive (as expected) to the AOX inhibitor n-propyl gallate (nPG), much of the stimulated rate of respiration in wt cells could be inhibited by nPG. Given the non-phosphorylating nature of AOX respiration, wt cells required higher rates of electron transport to O2 than AS8 cells to support similar rates of P uptake. The utilization of AOX by wt cells during P uptake was apparently not occurring because the cytochrome (Cyt) pathway alone could not fully support the rate of P uptake, as the respiration of cells lacking AOX (either untreated AS8 cells or wt cells treated with nPG) supported similar rates of P uptake as wt cells with abundant AOX. Rather, we provide in vivo evidence that the utilization of AOX during the period of high respiration supporting P uptake was to dampen the mitochondrial generation of active oxygen species (AOS).

  3. Characterization of the respiration-induced yeast mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Patrick C; Pfeiffer, Douglas R

    2013-12-01

    When isolated mitochondria from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidize respiratory substrates in the absence of phosphate and ADP, the yeast mitochondrial unselective channel, also called the yeast permeability transition pore (yPTP), opens in the inner membrane, dissipating the electrochemical gradient. ATP also induces yPTP opening. yPTP opening allows mannitol transport into isolated mitochondria of laboratory yeast strains, but mannitol is not readily permeable through the yPTP in an industrial yeast strain, Yeast Foam. The presence of oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, allowed for respiration-induced mannitol permeability in mitochondria from this strain. Potassium (K+) had varied effects on the respiration-induced yPTP, depending on the concentration of the respiratory substrate added. At low respiratory substrate concentrations K+ inhibited respiration-induced yPTP opening, while at high substrate concentrations this effect diminished. However, at the high respiratory substrate concentrations, the presence of K+ partially prevented phosphate inhibition of yPTP opening. Phosphate was found to inhibit respiration-induced yPTP opening by binding a site on the matrix space side of the inner membrane in addition to its known inhibitory effect of donating protons to the matrix space to prevent the pH change necessary for yPTP opening. The respiration-induced yPTP was also inhibited by NAD, Mg2+, NH4 + or the oxyanion vanadate polymerized to decavanadate. The results demonstrate similar effectors of the respiration-induced yPTP as those previously described for the ATP-induced yPTP and reconcile previous strain-dependent differences in yPTP solute selectivity.

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali; Kolko, Miriam; Moons, Lieve; Van Hove, Inge

    2017-03-29

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells.

  5. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl₂), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl₂ supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl₂ supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl₂ supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning.

  6. Mitochondrial Respiration in Human Colorectal and Breast Cancer Clinical Material Is Regulated Differently

    PubMed Central

    Koit, Andre; Ounpuu, Lyudmila; Klepinin, Aleksandr; Chekulayev, Vladimir; Timohhina, Natalja; Tepp, Kersti; Puurand, Marju; Truu, Laura; Heck, Karoliina; Valvere, Vahur; Guzun, Rita

    2017-01-01

    We conducted quantitative cellular respiration analysis on samples taken from human breast cancer (HBC) and human colorectal cancer (HCC) patients. Respiratory capacity is not lost as a result of tumor formation and even though, functionally, complex I in HCC was found to be suppressed, it was not evident on the protein level. Additionally, metabolic control analysis was used to quantify the role of components of mitochondrial interactosome. The main rate-controlling steps in HBC are complex IV and adenine nucleotide transporter, but in HCC, complexes I and III. Our kinetic measurements confirmed previous studies that respiratory chain complexes I and III in HBC and HCC can be assembled into supercomplexes with a possible partial addition from the complex IV pool. Therefore, the kinetic method can be a useful addition in studying supercomplexes in cell lines or human samples. In addition, when results from culture cells were compared to those from clinical samples, clear differences were present, but we also detected two different types of mitochondria within clinical HBC samples, possibly linked to two-compartment metabolism. Taken together, our data show that mitochondrial respiration and regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability have substantial differences between these two cancer types when compared to each other to their adjacent healthy tissue or to respective cell cultures. PMID:28781720

  7. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05) and maximal (50%, p<0.05) OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  8. Secreted Human Adipose Leptin Decreases Mitochondrial Respiration in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05) and maximal (50%, p<0.05) OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24073224

  9. The dysfunction of ATPases due to impaired mitochondrial respiration in phosgene-induced pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xu-Jun; Li, Ying-Na; Liang, Xin; Wang, Peng; Hai, Chun-Xu

    2008-02-29

    Phosgene is a toxic gas that is widely used in modern industry, and its inhalation can cause severe pulmonary edema. There is no effective clinical treatment because the mechanism of phosgene-induced pulmonary edema still remains unclear. Many studies have demonstrated that the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase plays a critical role in clearing pulmonary edema and the inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein expression has been found in many other pulmonary edema models. In the present study, after the mice were exposed to phosgene, there was serious pulmonary edema, indicating the dysfunction of the ATPases in mice. However, in vitro enzyme study showed that there were increases in the activities of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase. Further investigation showed that the ATP content and mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) in the lungs decreased significantly. The oxidative stress product, malondialdehyde (MDA), increased while the antioxidants (GSH, SOD, and TAC) decreased significantly. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is the target of phosgene. The dysfunction of ATPases due to impaired mitochondrial respiration may be a new mechanism of phosgene-induced pulmonary edema.

  10. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  11. The Ability of PAS, Acetylsalicylic Acid and Calcium Disodium EDTA to Protect Against the Toxic Effects of Manganese on Mitochondrial Respiration in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sherine; Davis, Kiyya; Saddler, Claudette; Joseph, Jevaun; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal that at excessive levels in brain causes Manganism, a condition similar to Parkinson's disease. Previously we showed that Mn had a neurotoxic effect on the dopaminergic, but not serotonergic, innervation of the lateral ciliated cells in the gill of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. While the mechanism of action of Mn toxicity is not completely understood, studies suggest that Mn toxicity may involve mitochondrial damage and resulting neural dysfunction in the brain’s dopaminergic system. In this study we utilized micro-batch chambers and oxygen probes to measure oyster gill mitochondrial respiration in the presence of Mn and potential Mn blockers. The addition of Mn to respiring mitochondria caused a dose dependent decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption. Pretreating mitochondria with calcium disodium EDTA (caEDTA), p aminosalicylic acid (PAS) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) before Mn additions, provided full protection against the toxic effects of Mn. While mitochondrial pretreatment with any of the 3 drugs effectively blocked Mn toxicity, none of the drugs tested was able to reverse the decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption seen in Mn treated mitochondria. The study found that high levels of Mn had a toxic effect on gill mitochondrial O2 consumption and that this effect could be blocked by the drugs caEDTA, PAS and ASA. C. virginica continues to be a good model with which to investigate the mechanism that underlies manganese neurotoxcity and in the pharmacological study of drugs to treat or prevent Manganism. PMID:21977482

  12. The Ability of PAS, Acetylsalicylic Acid and Calcium Disodium EDTA to Protect Against the Toxic Effects of Manganese on Mitochondrial Respiration in Gill of Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sherine; Davis, Kiyya; Saddler, Claudette; Joseph, Jevaun; Catapane, Edward J; Carroll, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal that at excessive levels in brain causes Manganism, a condition similar to Parkinson's disease. Previously we showed that Mn had a neurotoxic effect on the dopaminergic, but not serotonergic, innervation of the lateral ciliated cells in the gill of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. While the mechanism of action of Mn toxicity is not completely understood, studies suggest that Mn toxicity may involve mitochondrial damage and resulting neural dysfunction in the brain's dopaminergic system. In this study we utilized micro-batch chambers and oxygen probes to measure oyster gill mitochondrial respiration in the presence of Mn and potential Mn blockers. The addition of Mn to respiring mitochondria caused a dose dependent decrease in mitochondrial O(2) consumption. Pretreating mitochondria with calcium disodium EDTA (caEDTA), p aminosalicylic acid (PAS) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) before Mn additions, provided full protection against the toxic effects of Mn. While mitochondrial pretreatment with any of the 3 drugs effectively blocked Mn toxicity, none of the drugs tested was able to reverse the decrease in mitochondrial O(2) consumption seen in Mn treated mitochondria. The study found that high levels of Mn had a toxic effect on gill mitochondrial O(2) consumption and that this effect could be blocked by the drugs caEDTA, PAS and ASA. C. virginica continues to be a good model with which to investigate the mechanism that underlies manganese neurotoxcity and in the pharmacological study of drugs to treat or prevent Manganism.

  13. Two weeks of metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle of AMPK kinase dead but not wild type mice.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jonas M; Larsen, Steen; Helge, Jørn W; Dela, Flemming; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is used as an anti-diabetic drug. Metformin ameliorates insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and skeletal muscle. Reduced mitochondrial content has been reported in type 2 diabetic muscles and it may contribute to decreased insulin sensitivity characteristic for diabetic muscles. The molecular mechanism behind the effect of metformin is not fully clarified but inhibition of complex I in the mitochondria and also activation of the 5'AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported in muscle. Furthermore, both AMPK activation and metformin treatment have been associated with stimulation of mitochondrial function and biogenesis. However, a causal relationship in skeletal muscle has not been investigated. We hypothesized that potential effects of in vivo metformin treatment on mitochondrial function and protein expressions in skeletal muscle are dependent upon AMPK signaling. We investigated this by two weeks of oral metformin treatment of muscle specific kinase dead α(2) (KD) AMPK mice and wild type (WT) littermates. We measured mitochondrial respiration and protein activity and expressions of key enzymes involved in mitochondrial carbohydrate and fat metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial respiration, HAD and CS activity, PDH and complex I-V and cytochrome c protein expression were all reduced in AMPK KD compared to WT tibialis anterior muscles. Surprisingly, metformin treatment only enhanced respiration in AMPK KD mice and thereby rescued the respiration defect compared to the WT mice. Metformin did not influence protein activities or expressions in either WT or AMPK KD mice.We conclude that two weeks of in vivo metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in the mitochondrial deficient AMPK KD but not WT mice. The improvement seems to be unrelated to AMPK, and does not involve changes in key mitochondrial proteins.

  14. Two Weeks of Metformin Treatment Enhances Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of AMPK Kinase Dead but Not Wild Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Helge, Jørn W.; Dela, Flemming; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is used as an anti-diabetic drug. Metformin ameliorates insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and skeletal muscle. Reduced mitochondrial content has been reported in type 2 diabetic muscles and it may contribute to decreased insulin sensitivity characteristic for diabetic muscles. The molecular mechanism behind the effect of metformin is not fully clarified but inhibition of complex I in the mitochondria and also activation of the 5′AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported in muscle. Furthermore, both AMPK activation and metformin treatment have been associated with stimulation of mitochondrial function and biogenesis. However, a causal relationship in skeletal muscle has not been investigated. We hypothesized that potential effects of in vivo metformin treatment on mitochondrial function and protein expressions in skeletal muscle are dependent upon AMPK signaling. We investigated this by two weeks of oral metformin treatment of muscle specific kinase dead α2 (KD) AMPK mice and wild type (WT) littermates. We measured mitochondrial respiration and protein activity and expressions of key enzymes involved in mitochondrial carbohydrate and fat metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial respiration, HAD and CS activity, PDH and complex I-V and cytochrome c protein expression were all reduced in AMPK KD compared to WT tibialis anterior muscles. Surprisingly, metformin treatment only enhanced respiration in AMPK KD mice and thereby rescued the respiration defect compared to the WT mice. Metformin did not influence protein activities or expressions in either WT or AMPK KD mice. We conclude that two weeks of in vivo metformin treatment enhances mitochondrial respiration in the mitochondrial deficient AMPK KD but not WT mice. The improvement seems to be unrelated to AMPK, and does not involve changes in key mitochondrial proteins. PMID:23341947

  15. Endothelial cell respiration is affected by the oxygen tension during shear exposure: role of mitochondrial peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles I; Han, Zhaosheng; Presley, Tennille; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Ilangovan, Govindasamy; Alevriadou, B Rita

    2008-07-01

    Cultured vascular endothelial cell (EC) exposure to steady laminar shear stress results in peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation intramitochondrially and inactivation of the electron transport chain. We examined whether the "hyperoxic state" of 21% O(2), compared with more physiological O(2) tensions (Po(2)), increases the shear-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and mitochondrial superoxide (O(2)(*-)) generation leading to ONOO(-) formation and suppression of respiration. Electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was used to measure O(2) consumption rates of bovine aortic ECs sheared (10 dyn/cm(2), 30 min) at 5%, 10%, or 21% O(2) or left static at 5% or 21% O(2). Respiration was inhibited to a greater extent when ECs were sheared at 21% O(2) than at lower Po(2) or left static at different Po(2). Flow in the presence of an endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor or a ONOO(-) scavenger abolished the inhibitory effect. EC transfection with an adenovirus that expresses manganese superoxide dismutase in mitochondria, and not a control virus, blocked the inhibitory effect. Intracellular and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production was higher in ECs sheared at 21% than at 5% O(2), as determined by dihydroethidium and MitoSOX red fluorescence, respectively, and the latter was, at least in part, NO-dependent. Accumulation of NO metabolites in media of ECs sheared at 21% O(2) was modestly increased compared with ECs sheared at lower Po(2), suggesting that eNOS activity may be higher at 21% O(2). Hence, the hyperoxia of in vitro EC flow studies, via increased NO and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production, leads to enhanced ONOO(-) formation intramitochondrially and suppression of respiration.

  16. Mitochondrial Respiration after One Session of Calf Raise Exercise in Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Healthy Older Adults.

    PubMed

    van Schaardenburgh, Michel; Wohlwend, Martin; Rognmo, Øivind; Mattsson, Erney J R

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for energy production in the muscle cell and for this they are dependent upon a sufficient supply of oxygen by the circulation. Exercise training has shown to be a potent stimulus for physiological adaptations and mitochondria play a central role. Whether changes in mitochondrial respiration are seen after exercise in patients with a reduced circulation is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the time course and whether one session of calf raise exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration in the calf muscle of patients with peripheral vascular disease. One group of patients with peripheral vascular disease (n = 11) and one group of healthy older adults (n = 11) were included. Patients performed one session of continuous calf raises followed by 5 extra repetitions after initiation of pain. Healthy older adults performed 100 continuous calf raises. Gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were collected at baseline and 15 minutes, one hour, three hours and 24 hours after one session of calf raise exercise. A multi substrate (octanoylcarnitine, malate, adp, glutamate, succinate, FCCP, rotenone) approach was used to analyze mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers. Mixed-linear model for repeated measures was used for statistical analyses. Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a lower baseline respiration supported by complex I and they increase respiration supported by complex II at one hour post-exercise. Healthy older adults increase respiration supported by electron transfer flavoprotein and complex I at one hour and 24 hours post-exercise. Our results indicate a shift towards mitochondrial respiration supported by complex II as being a pathophysiological component of peripheral vascular disease. Furthermore exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration already after one session of calf raise exercise in patients with peripheral vascular disease and healthy older adults. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01842412.

  17. Mitochondrial Respiration after One Session of Calf Raise Exercise in Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wohlwend, Martin; Rognmo, Øivind; Mattsson, Erney J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mitochondria are essential for energy production in the muscle cell and for this they are dependent upon a sufficient supply of oxygen by the circulation. Exercise training has shown to be a potent stimulus for physiological adaptations and mitochondria play a central role. Whether changes in mitochondrial respiration are seen after exercise in patients with a reduced circulation is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the time course and whether one session of calf raise exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration in the calf muscle of patients with peripheral vascular disease. Methods One group of patients with peripheral vascular disease (n = 11) and one group of healthy older adults (n = 11) were included. Patients performed one session of continuous calf raises followed by 5 extra repetitions after initiation of pain. Healthy older adults performed 100 continuous calf raises. Gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were collected at baseline and 15 minutes, one hour, three hours and 24 hours after one session of calf raise exercise. A multi substrate (octanoylcarnitine, malate, adp, glutamate, succinate, FCCP, rotenone) approach was used to analyze mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers. Mixed-linear model for repeated measures was used for statistical analyses. Results Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a lower baseline respiration supported by complex I and they increase respiration supported by complex II at one hour post-exercise. Healthy older adults increase respiration supported by electron transfer flavoprotein and complex I at one hour and 24 hours post-exercise. Conclusion Our results indicate a shift towards mitochondrial respiration supported by complex II as being a pathophysiological component of peripheral vascular disease. Furthermore exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration already after one session of calf raise exercise in patients with peripheral vascular disease and healthy older adults. Trial

  18. Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration and Rapid Depletion of Mitochondrial Glutathione by β-Phenethyl Isothiocyanate: Mechanisms for Anti-Leukemia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Zhao; Hu, Yumin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aims β-Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a natural product with potent anticancer activity against human leukemia cells including drug-resistant primary leukemia cells from patients. This study aimed at investigating the key mechanisms that contribute to the potent anti-leukemia activity of PEITC and at evaluating its therapeutic potential. Results Our study showed that PEITC caused a rapid depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) and a significant elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide, and induced a disruption of the mitochondrial electron transport complex I manifested by an early degradation of NADH dehydrogenase Fe-S protein-3 and a significant suppression of mitochondrial respiration. Using biochemical and pharmacological approaches, we further showed that inhibition of mitochondrial respiration alone by rotenone caused only a moderate cytotoxicity in leukemia cells, whereas a combination of respiratory inhibition and an ROS-generating agent exhibited a synergistic effect against leukemia and lymphoma cells. Innovation and Conclusion Although PEITC is a reactive compound and might have multiple mechanisms of action, we showed that a rapid depletion of GSH and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration are two important early events that induced synergistic cytotoxicity in leukemia cells. These findings not only suggest that PEITC is a promising compound for potential use in leukemia treatment, but also provide a basis for developing new therapeutic strategies to effectively kill leukemia cells by using a novel combination to modulate ROS and inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2911–2921. PMID:21827296

  19. Over-expression of COQ10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibits mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Zampol, Mariana A.; Busso, Cleverson; Gomes, Fernando; Ferreira-Junior, Jose Ribamar; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Barros, Mario H.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} COQ10 deletion elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}, a synthetic diffusible ubiquinone. {yields} The significance that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined by testing over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. {yields} Inhibition of CoQ function due to Coq10p excess strength our hypothesis of Coq10p function in CoQ delivery. {yields} Respiratory deficiency caused by more Coq10p was specific and restored by Q{sub 2} in mitochondria or by Coq8p in cells. {yields} Coq8p over-production on other coq mutants revealed a surprisingly higher stability of other Coq proteins. -- Abstract: COQ10 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}. Rescue of respiration by Q{sub 2} is a characteristic of mutants blocked in coenzyme Q{sub 6} synthesis. Unlike Q{sub 6} deficient mutants, mitochondria of the coq10 null mutant have wild-type concentrations of Q{sub 6}. The physiological significance of earlier observations that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined in the present study by testing the in vivo effect of over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. Mitochondria with elevated levels of Coq10p display reduced respiration in the bc1 span of the electron transport chain, which can be restored with exogenous Q{sub 2}. This suggests that in vivo binding of Q{sub 6} by excess Coq10p reduces the pool of this redox carrier available for its normal function in providing electrons to the bc1 complex. This is confirmed by observing that extra Coq8p relieves the inhibitory effect of excess Coq10p. Coq8p is a putative kinase, and a high-copy suppressor of the coq10 null mutant. As shown here, when over-produced in coq mutants, Coq8p counteracts turnover of Coq3p and Coq4p subunits of the Q-biosynthetic complex. This can account for the observed rescue by COQ8 of the respiratory defect in strains

  20. Allotopic expression of a mitochondrial alternative oxidase confers cyanide resistance to human cell respiration.

    PubMed

    Hakkaart, Gerrit A J; Dassa, Emmanuel P; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2006-03-01

    Human mitochondrial respiration is distinct from that of most plants, microorganisms and even some metazoans in that it reduces molecular oxygen only through the highly cyanide-sensitive enzyme cytochrome c oxidase. Here we show that expression of the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX), recently identified in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, is well tolerated by cultured human cells and confers spectacular cyanide resistance to mitochondrial substrate oxidation. The expressed AOX seems to be confined to mitochondria. AOX involvement in electron flow is triggered by a highly reduced redox status of the respiratory chain (RC) and enhanced by pyruvate; otherwise, the enzyme remains essentially inactive. AOX expression promises to be a valuable tool to limit the deleterious consequences of RC deficiency in human cells and whole animals.

  1. Allotopic expression of a mitochondrial alternative oxidase confers cyanide resistance to human cell respiration

    PubMed Central

    Hakkaart, Gerrit A J; Dassa, Emmanuel P; Jacobs, Howard T; Rustin, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Human mitochondrial respiration is distinct from that of most plants, microorganisms and even some metazoans in that it reduces molecular oxygen only through the highly cyanide-sensitive enzyme cytochrome c oxidase. Here we show that expression of the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase (AOX), recently identified in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, is well tolerated by cultured human cells and confers spectacular cyanide resistance to mitochondrial substrate oxidation. The expressed AOX seems to be confined to mitochondria. AOX involvement in electron flow is triggered by a highly reduced redox status of the respiratory chain (RC) and enhanced by pyruvate; otherwise, the enzyme remains essentially inactive. AOX expression promises to be a valuable tool to limit the deleterious consequences of RC deficiency in human cells and whole animals. PMID:16322757

  2. Respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasyan, I. I.; Makarov, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the physiological indices of respiration, respiratory metabolism and energy consumption in spacecrews under weightlessness conditions manifest themselves in increased metabolic rates, higher pulmonary ventilation volume, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide elimination, energy consumption levels in proportion to reduction in neuroemotional and psychic stress, adaptation to weightlessness and work-rest cycles, and finally in a relative stabilization of metabolic processes due to hemodynamic shifts.

  3. [State of mitochondrial respiration and calcium capacity in livers of rats with different resistance to hypoxia after injections of L-arginine].

    PubMed

    Kurhaliuk, N M

    2001-01-01

    In experiments on rats with different resistance to hypoxia are investigated processes of mitochondrial respiration, oxidative phosphorylation and calcium capacity in liver under precursor nitric oxide L-arginine (600 mg/kg) and blockator nitric oxide synthase L-NNA (35 mg/kg) injections. We are used next substrates of oxidation: 0.35 mM succinate, 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate, 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate and 2 mM malonic acid. Increasing of ADP-stimulation respiration states under exogenous L-arginine injection, decreasing efficacy of respiration processes (respiration control on Chance and ADP/O) under such substrates oxidation, testify to oxide energy support decreasing and reversing nitric oxide inhibit in such conditions. This will be used as mechanism cell regulation succinate dehydrogenase activity. It has shown that L-arginine injection increase calcium mitochondrial capacity low resistance to hypoxia rats using substrates of oxidation succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate to control meanings of high resistance rats. Effects of nitric oxide precursor influence on this processes limit NO-synthase inhibitor L-NNA.

  4. Increased ER-mitochondrial coupling promotes mitochondrial respiration and bioenergetics during early phases of ER stress.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Roberto; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Bui, Michael; Quiroga, Clara; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Verdejo, Hugo E; Ferreira, Jorge; Iglewski, Myriam; Chiong, Mario; Simmen, Thomas; Zorzano, Antonio; Hill, Joseph A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Lavandero, Sergio

    2011-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), but that beyond a certain degree of ER damage, this response triggers apoptotic pathways. The general mechanisms of the UPR and its apoptotic pathways are well characterized. However, the metabolic events that occur during the adaptive phase of ER stress, before the cell death response, remain unknown. Here, we show that, during the onset of ER stress, the reticular and mitochondrial networks are redistributed towards the perinuclear area and their points of connection are increased in a microtubule-dependent fashion. A localized increase in mitochondrial transmembrane potential is observed only in redistributed mitochondria, whereas mitochondria that remain in other subcellular zones display no significant changes. Spatial re-organization of these organelles correlates with an increase in ATP levels, oxygen consumption, reductive power and increased mitochondrial Ca²⁺ uptake. Accordingly, uncoupling of the organelles or blocking Ca²⁺ transfer impaired the metabolic response, rendering cells more vulnerable to ER stress. Overall, these data indicate that ER stress induces an early increase in mitochondrial metabolism that depends crucially upon organelle coupling and Ca²⁺ transfer, which, by enhancing cellular bioenergetics, establishes the metabolic basis for the adaptation to this response.

  5. SDF-1/CXCL12 modulates mitochondrial respiration of immature blood cells in a bi-phasic manner.

    PubMed

    Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCL12 is a potent chemokine required for the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Previous data from our group has shown that in an SDF-1/CXCL12 transgenic mouse model, lineage(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) bone marrow cells have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential versus wild-type. These results suggested that SDF-1/CXCL12 may function to keep mitochondrial respiration low in immature blood cells in the bone marrow. Low mitochondrial metabolism helps to maintain low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can influence differentiation. To test whether SDF-1/CXCL12 regulates mitochondrial metabolism, we employed the human leukemia cell line HL-60, that expresses high levels of the SDF-1/CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, as a model of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. We treated HL-60 cells with SDF-1/CXCL12 for 2 and 24h. Oxygen consumption rates (OCR), mitochondrial-associated ATP production, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potential of HL-60 cells were significantly reduced at 2h and increased at 24h as compared to untreated control cells. These biphasic effects of SDF-1/CXCL12 were reproduced with lineage negative primary mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting a novel function of SDF-1/CXCL12 in modulating mitochondrial respiration by regulating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, ATP production and mitochondrial content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Carnosine Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells through Both of the Mitochondrial Respiration and Glycolysis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25115854

  7. Carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells through both of the mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis pathways.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy.

  8. Relationship between redox potentials, the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and the production of toxic oxygen species by flavonoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hodnick, W.F.; Milosavljevic, E.B.; Nelson, J.H.; Pardini, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and produce oxy-radicals. They have also been shown to possess diverse biological activities, some of which have been speculated to be dependent upon their redox activity. The authors have investigated the redox behavior of a series of structurally related flavonoids employing cyclic voltammetry under physiological conditions. The flavonoids that autoxidized and produced oxygen radicals had reduction potentials (E 1/2) significantly lower (-30 to +60 mV) than those that didn't autoxidize (+130 to +340 mV). The E 1/2 values for the autoxidizable flavonoids compare to the E 1/2 range of -70 to +30 mv (le/sup -/ reduction potential) for optimum quinone induced production of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mitochondrial NADH-CoQ reductase (complex I). The authors reported that the most potent flavonoid inhibitors of mitochondrial succinate-CoQ reductase (complex II) possessed hydroxyl configurations capable of supporting redox reactions. For a series of 3,5,7-trihydroxyflavones which differed by b-ring hydroxylation it was found that decreasing E 1/2 of the flavonoids was associated with decreasing I/sub 50/ values towards succinoxidase. These findings suggest that the electrochemical properties of the flavonoids may contribute to their biological activity.

  9. Effect of endogenous nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiration of rat hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Curran, R.D.; Ochoa, J.B.; Harbrecht, B.G.; Hoffman, R.A.; Simmons, R.L.; Billiar, T.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Nitric oxide, a highly reactive radical, was recently identified as an intermediate of L-arginine metabolism in mammalian cells. We have shown that nitric oxide synthesis is induced in vitro in cultured hepatocytes by supernatants from activated Kupffer cells or in vivo by injecting rats with nonviable Corynebacterium parvum. In both cases, nitric oxide biosynthesis in hepatocytes was associated with suppression of total protein synthesis. This study attempts to determine the effect of nitric oxide biosynthesis on the activity of specific hepatocytic mitochondrial enzymes and to determine whether inhibition of protein synthesis is caused by suppression of energy metabolism. Exposure of hepatocytes to supernatants from activated Kupffer cells led to a 30% decrease of aconitase (Krebs cycle) and complex I (mitochondrial electron transport chain) activity. Using NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, we demonstrated that the inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity was due, in part, to the action of nitric oxide. In contrast, in vivo nitric oxide synthesis of hepatocytes from Corynebacterium parvum-treated animals had no effect on mitochondrial respiration. This suggests that inhibition of protein synthesis by nitric oxide is not likely to be mediated by inhibition of energy metabolism.

  10. Stat3 promotes mitochondrial transcription and oxidative respiration during maintenance and induction of naive pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Carbognin, Elena; Betto, Riccardo M; Soriano, Maria E; Smith, Austin G; Martello, Graziano

    2016-03-15

    Transcription factor Stat3 directs self-renewal of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells downstream of the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Stat3 upregulates pivotal transcription factors in the ES cell gene regulatory network to sustain naïve identity. Stat3 also contributes to the rapid proliferation of ES cells. Here, we show that Stat3 increases the expression of mitochondrial-encoded transcripts and enhances oxidative metabolism. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that Stat3 binds to the mitochondrial genome, consistent with direct transcriptional regulation. An engineered form of Stat3 that localizes predominantly to mitochondria is sufficient to support enhanced proliferation of ES cells, but not to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. Furthermore, during reprogramming from primed to naïve states of pluripotency, Stat3 similarly upregulates mitochondrial transcripts and facilitates metabolic resetting. These findings suggest that the potent stimulation of naïve pluripotency by LIF/Stat3 is attributable to parallel and synergistic induction of both mitochondrial respiration and nuclear transcription factors.

  11. Reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes formed via the isoprostane pathway disrupt mitochondrial respiration and calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stavrovskaya, Irina G; Baranov, Sergei V; Guo, Xiaofeng; Davies, Sean S; Roberts, L Jackson; Kristal, Bruce S

    2010-08-15

    Isoketals (IsoKs) are gamma-ketoaldehydes formed via the isoprostane pathway of arachidonic acid peroxidation and are among the most reactive by-products of lipid peroxidation. IsoKs selectively adduct to protein lysine residues and are highly cytotoxic, but the targets and molecular events involved in IsoK-induced cell death are poorly defined. Our previous work established that physiologically relevant aldehydes induce mitochondrial dysfunction (Kristal et al., J. Biol. Chem.271:6033-6038; 1996). We therefore examined whether IsoKs induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Incubation of mitochondria with synthetic IsoKs in the presence or absence of Ca(2+) was associated with alterations in mitochondrial respiration, membrane potential (DeltaPsi), and pyridine nucleotide redox state. IsoKs dose dependently (0.5-4microM) accelerated liver mitochondria swelling induced by low concentrations of Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) or by the prooxidant tert-butylhydroperoxide, and release of cytochrome c, with similar observations in heart/brain mitochondria. The mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) inhibitor cyclosporine A delayed IsoK-induced mitochondria dysfunction. The actions of IsoKs are consistent with interactions with cytochrome c, a protein rich in lysine residues. Direct reaction of IsoKs with select lysines in cytochrome c was demonstrated using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Overall, these results suggest that IsoKs may, in part, mediate their cytotoxic effects through induction of the mPT and subsequent activation of downstream cell death cascades.

  12. Mesodermal developmental gene Tbx15 impairs adipocyte differentiation and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gesta, Stephane; Bezy, Olivier; Mori, Marcelo A; Macotela, Yazmin; Lee, Kevin Y; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-02-15

    Increased intraabdominal (visceral) fat is associated with a high risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We have previously shown that the mesodermal developmental transcription factor Tbx15 is highly differentially expressed between visceral and subcutaneous (s.c.) fat in both humans and rodents, and in humans visceral fat Tbx15 expression is decreased in obesity. Here we show that, in mice, Tbx15 is 260-fold more highly expressed in s.c. preadipocytes than in epididymal preadipocytes. Overexpression of Tbx15 in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes impairs adipocyte differentiation and decreases triglyceride content. This defect in differentiation can be corrected by stimulating cells with the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (Rosi). However, triglyceride accumulation remains decreased by ∼50%, due to a decrease in basal lipogenic rate and increase in basal lipolytic rate. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes overexpressing Tbx15 also have a 15% reduction in mitochondrial mass and a 28% reduction in basal mitochondrial respiration (P = 0.004) and ATP turnover (P = 0.02), and a 45% (P = 0.003) reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity. Thus, differential expression of Tbx15 between fat depots plays an important role in the interdepot differences in adipocyte differentiation, triglyceride accumulation, and mitochondrial function that may contribute to the risk of diabetes and metabolic disease.

  13. Essential role of Drosophila black-pearl is mediated by its effects on mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumit; Short, Mary K.; Stanley, E. Richard; Jubinsky, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    Black-pearl (Blp) is a highly conserved, essential inner-mitochondrial membrane protein. The yeast Blp homologue, Magmas/Pam16, is required for mitochondrial protein transport, growth, and survival. Our purpose was to determine the role of Drosophila Blp in mitochondrial function, cell survival, and proliferation. To this end, we performed mitotic recombination in Drosophila melanogaster, RNAi-mediated knockdown, MitoTracker staining, measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), flow cytometry, electron transport chain complex assays, and hemocyte isolation from Drosophila larvae. Proliferation-defective, Blp-deficient Drosophila Schneider cells exhibited mitochondrial membrane depolarization, a 60% decrease in ATP levels, increased amounts of ROS (3.5-fold), cell cycle arrest, and activation of autophagy that were associated with a selective 65% reduction of cytochrome c oxidase activity. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) rescued Blp-RNAi-treated cells from cell cycle arrest, indicating that increased production of ROS is the primary cause of the proliferation and survival defects in Blp-depleted cells. blp hypomorph larvae had a 35% decreased number of plasmatocytes with a 45% reduced active mitochondrial staining and their viability was increased 2-fold by administration of NAC, which blocked melanotic lesions. Loss of Blp decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, causing ROS production, which selectively affects mitochondria-rich plasmatocyte survival and function, leading to melanotic lesions in Blp-deficient flies.—Roy, S., Short, M. K., Stanley, E. R., Jubinsky, P. T. Essential role of Drosophila black-pearl is mediated by its effects on mitochondrial respiration. PMID:22700875

  14. L-propionylcarnitine enhancement of substrate oxidation and mitochondrial respiration in the diabetic rat heart.

    PubMed

    Broderick, T L; Haloftis, G; Paulson, D J

    1996-02-01

    This study was designed to determine whether L-propionylcarnitine (LPC) treatment is beneficial in preventing the depression in cardiac function from occurring in chronic diabetes. Diabetes was induced by tail vein injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). Two weeks later, treatment was initiated by supplementing the drinking water with LPC at the concentration of 1 mg/ml. Following a 6-week treatment period, myocardial substrate utilization and cardiac function were determined in isolated working hearts. In a separate group of hearts, the effects of LPC treatment on mitochondrial respiration were also determined. The results showed that diabetic hearts, compared with those of controls, oxidized glucose at a much lower rate, but oxidized palmitate at a similar rate. The effect of diabetes compared a controls was also characterized by a pronounced decrease in cardiac pump function. Following treatment with LPC, however, there was a marked increase in the rates at which glucose and palmitate were oxidized by diabetic hearts, and a significant improvement in cardiac pump performance. In addition, the depression of cardiac mitochondrial respiration seen in diabetes was prevented with LPC treatment. Our findings show that the depression of cardiac pump function by diabetes can be prevented with chronic LPC treatment. Possible mechanisms for this beneficial effect include an energetically favorable shift in glucose and fatty acid metabolism.

  15. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    PubMed Central

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  16. Short-term training alters the control of mitochondrial respiration rate before maximal oxidative ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Layec, Gwenael; Haseler, Luke J.; Hoff, Jan; Hart, Corey R.; Liu, Xin; Le Fur, Yann; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Short-term exercise training may induce metabolic and performance adaptations before any changes in mitochondrial enzyme potential. However, there has not been a study that has directly assessed changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacity or metabolic control as a consequence of such training in vivo. Therefore, we used 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to examine the effect of short-term plantar flexion exercise training on phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics and the control of respiration rate. Method To this aim, we investigated 12 healthy men, experienced with this exercise modality (TRA), and 7 time-control subjects (TC). Results After 5 days of training, maximum work rate during incremental plantar flexion exercise was significantly improved (P < 0.01). During the recovery period, the maximal rate of oxidative ATP synthesis (PRE: 28 ± 13 mM.min−1; POST: 26 ± 15 mM.min−1) and the PCr recovery time constant (PRE: 31 ± 19 s; POST: 29 ± 16) were not significantly altered. In contrast, the Hill coefficient (nH) describing the cooperativity between respiration rate and ADP was significantly increased in TRA (PRE:nH = 2.7 ± 1.4; POST: nH = 3.4 ± 1.9, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there were no systematic variations in any of these variables in TC. Conclusion This study reveals that 5 days of training induces rapid adaptation in the allosteric control of respiration rate by ADP before any substantial improvement in muscle oxidative capacity occurs. PMID:23582030

  17. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Patrick M; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A F

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  19. Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

  20. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Iashikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-05-22

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes. PMID:26000717

  2. Corrections by melatonin of liver mitochondrial disorders under diabetes and acute intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheshchevik, Vitali T; Dremza, Iosif K; Lapshina, Elena A; Zabrodskaya, Svetlana V; Kujawa, Jolanta; Zavodnik, Ilya B

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanisms of oxidative damage of the liver mitochondria under diabetes and intoxication in rats as well as to evaluate the possibility of corrections of mitochondrial disorders by pharmacological doses of melatonin. The experimental (30 days) streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus caused a significant damage of the respiratory activity in rat liver mitochondria. In the case of succinate as a respiratory substrate, the ADP-stimulated respiration rate V₃ considerably decreased (by 25%, p < 0·05) as well as the acceptor control ratio (ACR) V₃/V₂ markedly diminished (by 25%, p < 0·01). We observed a decrease of the ADP-stimulated respiration rate V₃ by 35% (p < 0·05), with glutamate as substrate. In this case, ACR also decreased (by 20%, p < 0·05). Surprisingly, the phosphorylation coefficient ADP/O did not change under diabetic liver damage. Acute rat carbon tetrachloride-induced intoxication resulted in considerable decrease of the phosphorylation coefficient because of uncoupling of the oxidation and phosphorylation processes in the liver mitochondria. The melatonin administration during diabetes (10 mg·kg⁻¹ body weight, 30 days, daily) showed a considerable protective effect on the liver mitochondrial function, reversing the decreased respiration rate V₃ and the diminished ACR to the control values both for succinate-dependent respiration and for glutamate-dependent respiration. The melatonin administration to intoxicated animals (10 mg·kg⁻¹ body weight, three times) partially increased the rate of succinate-dependent respiration coupled with phosphorylation. The impairment of mitochondrial respiratory plays a key role in the development of liver injury under diabetes and intoxication. Melatonin might be considered as an effector that regulates the mitochondrial function under diabetes.

  3. Black tea high-molecular-weight polyphenol increases the motility of sea urchin sperm by activating mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Ayako; Shiba, Kogiku; Ozawa, Tetsuo; Nakano, Kentaro; Inaba, Kazuo; Numata, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria activation factor (MAF) is a high-molecular-weight polyphenol purified from black tea that activates mitochondrial respiration. It increased the mitochondrial membrane potential and motility of sea urchin sperm, by up to 8%, to the same extent as sperm-activating peptides (SAPs) secreted by the egg. Unlike SAPs, MAF had no effect on sperm swimming behavior, suggesting that the mechanism of sperm activation by MAF is different from that of SAPs.

  4. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  5. Effect of body size on organ-specific mitochondrial respiration rate of the largemouth bronze gudgeon.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yiping; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Yurong; Huang, Qingda

    2013-06-01

    The effects of body size on the mitochondrial respiration rate were assessed in the heart, brain, gill, liver, and red muscle of largemouth bronze gudgeon, Coreius guichenoti, from the Yangtze River. Body mass had a significant influence on the state 3 oxygen consumption rate of the mitochondria from the heart, gill, and red muscle. The relationships between body mass (M, g) and state 3 oxygen consumption rate (V(state 3), nmol O min(-1) mg(-1)) of the mitochondria were represented by the following: V(state 3) = 3.56M(0.71) for heart, V(state 3) = 4.64M(0.50) for red muscle, and V(state 3) = 473.73M(-0.82) for gill. There was a significant difference in V(state 3), V(state 4), and respiratory control ratio among organs and all were highest in the heart. Our results suggest that the relationship between mitochondrial respiratory rate and body size varies among organs. The high mitochondrial respiratory rate in the heart of the largemouth gudgeon suggests that it has the highest oxidative capacity.

  6. Calcium channel regulator Mid1 links TORC2-mediated changes in mitochondrial respiration to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2016-12-19

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that recycles cytoplasmic contents and is crucial for cell survival during stress. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates autophagy as part of two distinct protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. TORC1 negatively regulates autophagy according to nitrogen availability. In contrast, TORC2 functions as a positive regulator of autophagy during amino acid starvation, via its target kinase Ypk1, by repressing the activity of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and promoting the general amino acid control (GAAC) response. Precisely how TORC2-Ypk1 signaling regulates calcineurin within this pathway remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of calcineurin requires Mid1, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized calcium channel regulatory protein implicated in the oxidative stress response. We find that normal mitochondrial respiration is perturbed in TORC2-Ypk1-deficient cells, which results in the accumulation of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species that signal to Mid1 to activate calcineurin, thereby inhibiting the GAAC response and autophagy. These findings describe a novel pathway involving TORC2, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and calcium homeostasis for autophagy regulation.

  7. Glycated human albumin alters mitochondrial respiration in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Baret, Pascal; Le Sage, Fanny; Planesse, Cynthia; Meilhac, Olivier; Devin, Anne; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Rondeau, Philippe

    2017-07-08

    Diabetes and obesity are strongly associated with increased levels of circulating advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). These two molecular phenomena affect the physiology of adipose tissue, a biological driver of the metabolic syndrome, leading to an inflammatory profile and insulin resistance, which could contribute to obesity/diabetes-associated complications, such as cardiovascular diseases. Herein, we investigated the impact of AGEs on mitochondrial bioenergetics in murine preadipocyte cells (3T3-L1) and cellular redox homeostasis. We show that incubation of preadipocytes with AGEs stimulates mitochondrial activity and respiration while inducing oxidative stress. This AGE-induced intracellular ROS production was blocked by diphenylene iodonium, an NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor. In parallel, antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase) were found to be activated upon AGE treatment. Our results suggest that AGE-induced oxidative stress is generated by NAD(P)H oxidase and leads to a cellular proliferation arrest associated with enhanced mitochondrial metabolism and biogenesis, and with increased levels of ROS-detoxifying enzymes, as well. These new data show how AGEs may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage in preadipocytes and their potential links to diabetes progression. © 2017 BioFactors, 43(4):577-592, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Mitochondrial respiration and succinate dehydrogenase are suppressed early during entrance into a hibernation bout, but membrane remodeling is only transient.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dillon; Lloyd, Graham P; Thomas, Raymond H; Guglielmo, Chrisopher G; Staples, James F

    2011-07-01

    We examined respiration and lipid composition of liver mitochondria purified from a hibernator (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) in different stages of a torpor bout. Between interbout euthermia (body temperature, T (b), 37°C) and early entrance (T (b) 30°C), state 3 and state 4 respirations, fueled by 6 mM succinate, fell by over 50%. Mitochondrial respiration did not decline any further in the late entrance and torpor stages (T (b) 15 and 5°C, respectively). Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity declined in a similar pattern as mitochondrial respiration, and there was a significant positive correlation between state 3 respiration and SDH activity. However, unlike during arousal from torpor, oxaloacetate was not a major factor in inhibition of SDH. Analysis of mitochondrial lipids showed little change in neutral lipids or phospholipid classes, except for a transient decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine content in early entrance. In the transition from interbout euthermia to early entrance, we found transient increases in some saturated phospholipid fatty acids (16:0, 18:0) and decreases in some unsaturates (18:2, 20:4). These changes resulted in transient increases in total saturates and the ratio of saturates to unsaturates, and transient decreases in total unsaturates, total polyunsaturates, total n-6, the ratio of monounsaturates to polyunsaturates, and unsaturation index. None of these changes persisted into late entrance or torpor, nor did they correlate with mitochondrial respiration. We conclude that mitochondrial metabolic suppression during entrance into a torpor bout occurs very early and is likely related to acute regulation of electron transport chain enzymes rather than changes in membrane phospholipid composition.

  9. Ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production accompanied by upregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain function and mitochondrial content under control of the cell cycle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamazumi, Masayuki; Wada, Yusuke; Nakamura, Yoshinari; Nakamura, Hideo; Inanami, Osamu

    2012-07-15

    Whereas ionizing radiation (Ir) instantaneously causes the formation of water radiolysis products that contain some reactive oxygen species (ROS), ROS are also suggested to be released from biological sources in irradiated cells. It is now becoming clear that these ROS generated secondarily after Ir have a variety of biological roles. Although mitochondria are assumed to be responsible for this Ir-induced ROS production, it remains to be elucidated how Ir triggers it. Therefore, we conducted this study to decipher the mechanism of Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, Ir (10 Gy of X-rays) induced a time-dependent increase in the mitochondrial ROS level. Ir also increased mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial respiration, and mitochondrial ATP production, suggesting upregulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) function after Ir. Although we found that Ir slightly enhanced mitochondrial ETC complex II activity, the complex II inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid failed to reduce Ir-induced mitochondrial ROS production. Meanwhile, we observed that the mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA level were upregulated after Ir, indicating that Ir increased the mitochondrial content of the cell. Because irradiated cells are known to undergo cell cycle arrest under control of the checkpoint mechanisms, we examined the relationships between cell cycle and mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. We found that the cells in the G2/M phase had a higher mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level than cells in the G1 or S phase, regardless of whether the cells were irradiated. We also found that Ir-induced accumulation of the cells in the G2/M phase led to an increase in cells with a high mitochondrial content and cellular oxidative stress level. This suggested that Ir upregulated mitochondrial ETC function and mitochondrial content, resulting in mitochondrial ROS production, and that

  10. Reduced hepatic mitochondrial respiration following acute high-fat diet is prevented by PGC-1α overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Morris, E. Matthew; Jackman, Matthew R.; Meers, Grace M. E.; Johnson, Ginger C.; Lopez, Jordan L.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in substrate utilization and reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity following exposure to energy-dense, high-fat diets (HFD) are putatively key components in the development of obesity-related metabolic disease. We examined the effect of a 3-day HFD on isolated liver mitochondrial respiration and whole body energy utilization in obesity-prone (OP) rats. We also examined if hepatic overexpression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of mitochondrial respiratory capacity and biogenesis, would modify liver and whole body responses to the HFD. Acute, 3-day HFD (45% kcal) in OP rats resulted in increased daily energy intake, energy balance, weight gain, and adiposity, without an increase in liver triglyceride (triacylglycerol) accumulation. HFD-fed OP rats also displayed decreased whole body substrate switching from the dark to the light cycle, which was paired with reductions in hepatic mitochondrial respiration of multiple substrates in multiple respiratory states. Hepatic PGC-1α overexpression was observed to protect whole body substrate switching, as well as maintain mitochondrial respiration, following the acute HFD. Additionally, liver PGC-1α overexpression did not alter whole body dietary fatty acid oxidation but resulted in greater storage of dietary free fatty acids in liver lipid, primarily as triacylglycerol. Together, these data demonstrate that a short-term HFD can result in a decrease in metabolic flexibility and hepatic mitochondrial respiratory capacity in OP rats that is completely prevented by hepatic overexpression of PGC-1α. PMID:24091599

  11. Reduced hepatic mitochondrial respiration following acute high-fat diet is prevented by PGC-1α overexpression.

    PubMed

    Morris, E Matthew; Jackman, Matthew R; Meers, Grace M E; Johnson, Ginger C; Lopez, Jordan L; MacLean, Paul S; Thyfault, John P

    2013-12-01

    Changes in substrate utilization and reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity following exposure to energy-dense, high-fat diets (HFD) are putatively key components in the development of obesity-related metabolic disease. We examined the effect of a 3-day HFD on isolated liver mitochondrial respiration and whole body energy utilization in obesity-prone (OP) rats. We also examined if hepatic overexpression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of mitochondrial respiratory capacity and biogenesis, would modify liver and whole body responses to the HFD. Acute, 3-day HFD (45% kcal) in OP rats resulted in increased daily energy intake, energy balance, weight gain, and adiposity, without an increase in liver triglyceride (triacylglycerol) accumulation. HFD-fed OP rats also displayed decreased whole body substrate switching from the dark to the light cycle, which was paired with reductions in hepatic mitochondrial respiration of multiple substrates in multiple respiratory states. Hepatic PGC-1α overexpression was observed to protect whole body substrate switching, as well as maintain mitochondrial respiration, following the acute HFD. Additionally, liver PGC-1α overexpression did not alter whole body dietary fatty acid oxidation but resulted in greater storage of dietary free fatty acids in liver lipid, primarily as triacylglycerol. Together, these data demonstrate that a short-term HFD can result in a decrease in metabolic flexibility and hepatic mitochondrial respiratory capacity in OP rats that is completely prevented by hepatic overexpression of PGC-1α.

  12. Susceptibility to simvastatin-induced toxicity is partly determined by mitochondrial respiration and phosphorylation state of Akt.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Peter J; Zahno, Anja; Lindinger, Peter; Maseneni, Swarna; Felser, Andrea; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Brecht, Karin

    2011-12-01

    Statins are widely used to prevent cardiovascular diseases. They are well-tolerated, with side-effects mainly seen in skeletal muscle. How these side-effects are caused is unknown. We compared isolated primary mouse skeletal muscle myocytes, C2C12 myotubes and liver HepG2 cells to detect differences that could uncover why statins are toxic in skeletal muscle but less so in the liver. 10μM simvastatin caused a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in the primary mouse myocytes and C2C12 myotubes, but had no effect in the HepG2 cells. Mitochondrial integrity is maintained by multiple signaling pathways. One of these pathways, Igf-1/Akt signaling, is also heavily implicated in causing statin-induced toxicity by upregulating atrogin-1. We found that phosphorylated Akt was reduced in C2C12 myotubes but not in HepG2 cells. HepG2 mitochondrial respiration became susceptible to simvastatin-treatment after Akt inhibition, and mitochondrial respiration was rescued in Igf-1-treated C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that disruption of Igf-1/Akt signaling is a causative factor in simvastatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 myotubes, whereas HepG2 cells are protected by maintaining Igf-1/Akt signaling. We conclude that phosphorylation of Akt is a key indicator of susceptibility to statin-induced toxicity. How statins can disrupt Igf-1/Akt signaling is unknown. Statins reduce geranylgeranylation of small GTPases, such as Rap1. Previous studies implicate Rap1 as a link between cAMP/Epac and Igf-1/Akt signaling. Transient transfection of constitutively active Rap1 into C2C12 myotubes led to a partial rescue of simvastatin-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, providing a novel link between signaling and respiration.

  13. Higher mitochondrial respiration and uncoupling with reduced electron transport chain content in vivo in muscle of sedentary versus active subjects.

    PubMed

    Conley, Kevin E; Amara, Catherine E; Bajpeyi, Sudip; Costford, Sheila R; Murray, Kori; Jubrias, Sharon A; Arakaki, Lori; Marcinek, David J; Smith, Steven R

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the disparity between muscle metabolic rate and mitochondrial metabolism in human muscle of sedentary vs. active individuals. Chronic activity level was characterized by a physical activity questionnaire and a triaxial accelerometer as well as a maximal oxygen uptake test. The ATP and O(2) fluxes and mitochondrial coupling (ATP/O(2) or P/O) in resting muscle as well as mitochondrial capacity (ATP(max)) were determined in vivo in human vastus lateralis muscle using magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy on 24 sedentary and seven active subjects. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for electron transport chain content (using complex III as a representative marker) and mitochondrial proteins associated with antioxidant protection. Sedentary muscle had lower electron transport chain complex content (65% of the active group) in proportion to the reduction in ATP(max) (0.69 ± 0.07 vs. 1.07 ± 0.06 mM sec(-1)) as compared with active subjects. This lower ATP(max) paired with an unchanged O(2) flux in resting muscle between groups resulted in a doubling of O(2) flux per ATP(max) (3.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2 μM O(2) per mM ATP) that reflected mitochondrial uncoupling (P/O = 1.41 ± 0.1 vs. 2.1 ± 0.3) and greater UCP3/complex III (6.0 ± 0.7 vs. 3.8 ± 0.3) in sedentary vs. active subjects. A smaller mitochondrial pool serving the same O(2) flux resulted in elevated mitochondrial respiration in sedentary muscle. In addition, uncoupling contributed to this higher mitochondrial respiration. This finding resolves the paradox of stable muscle metabolism but greater mitochondrial respiration in muscle of inactive vs. active subjects.

  14. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased fatigue resistance followed by severe muscle weakness in skeletal muscle of mitochondrial DNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Hernández, Andrés; Fahlström, Andreas; Cheng, Arthur J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bruton, Joseph D; Ulfhake, Brun; Westerblad, Håkan

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction can drastically impair muscle function, with weakness and exercise intolerance as key symptoms. Here we examine the time course of development of muscle dysfunction in a mouse model of premature ageing induced by defective proofreading function of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase (mtDNA mutator mouse). Isolated fast-twitch muscles and single muscle fibres from young (3-5 months) and end-stage (11 months) mtDNA mutator mice were compared to age-matched control mice. Force and free myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured under resting conditions and during fatigue induced by repeated tetani. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice displayed no weakness in the rested state, but had lower force and [Ca(2+)](i) than control mice during induction of fatigue. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice showed decreased activities of citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, reduced expression of cytochrome c oxidase, and decreased expression of triggers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PPARα, AMPK). Muscles from end-stage mtDNA mutator mice showed weakness under resting conditions with markedly decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)](i), force per cross-sectional area and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA1). In conclusion, fast-twitch muscles of prematurely ageing mtDNA mutator mice display a sequence of deleterious mitochondrial-to-nucleus signalling with an initial decrease in oxidative capacity, which was not counteracted by activation of signalling to increase mitochondrial biogenesis. This was followed by severe muscle weakness in the end stage. These results have implication for normal ageing and suggest that decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity due to a sedentary lifestyle may predispose towards muscle weakness developing later in life.

  15. Substrate-specific changes in mitochondrial respiration in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jason C L; Staples, James F

    2014-04-01

    During torpor, the metabolic rate (MR) of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is considerably lower relative to euthermia, resulting in part from temperature-independent mitochondrial metabolic suppression in liver and skeletal muscle, which together account for ~40% of basal MR. Although heart accounts for very little (<0.5%) of basal MR, in the present study, we showed that respiration rates were decreased up to 60% during torpor in both subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IM) mitochondria from cardiac muscle. We further demonstrated pronounced seasonal (summer vs. winter [i.e., interbout] euthermia) changes in respiration rates in both mitochondrial subpopulations in this tissue, consistent with a shift in fuel use away from carbohydrates and proteins and towards fatty acids and ketones. By contrast, these seasonal changes in respiration rates were not observed in either SS or IM mitochondria isolated from hind limb skeletal muscle. Both populations of skeletal muscle mitochondria, however, did exhibit metabolic suppression during torpor, and this suppression was 2- to 3-fold greater in IM mitochondria, which provide ATP for Ca(2+)- and myosin ATPases, the activities of which are likely quite low in skeletal muscle during torpor because animals are immobile. Finally, these changes in mitochondrial respiration rates were still evident when standardized to citrate synthase activity rather than to total mitochondrial protein.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Mutator Mice Confer Respiration Defects and B-Cell Lymphoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ0) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan. PMID:23418460

  17. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0)) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Melser, Su; Bénard, Giovanni; Ramos, Almudena; Reguero, Leire; Arrabal, Sergio; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Suarez, Juan; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Puente, Nagore; Marsicano, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1), where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis) and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM) was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12 and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant difference was

  19. Mitochondrial respiration inhibition after exposure to UWB pulses as a possible mechanism of antitumor action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, L.; Romanchenko, I.; Bolshakov, M.; Rostov, V.

    2017-05-01

    The respiration of isolated mice liver mitochondria after exposure to nanosecond UWB pulses (0.15 - 36 kV/cm, 0.6 - 1.0 GHz centre frequency, 3 - 20 ns pulse duration) has been investigated. The respiratory control (RC, the ratio of oxygen consumption) was estimated. The possibility of mitochondrial membrane electroporation was detected as the decrease in the electrical resistance, according to the β-dispersion of the electric current. The monotonous decrease of RC after 1000 UWB pulses from 0.15 kV/cm was observed, the ohmic resistance of mitochondria suspension was reduced. The obtained data indicate the inhibitory effect of UWB pulses on a state of irradiated mitochondria and its membrane.

  20. A Squared Michaelis-Menten Function of Substrate Concentration for Plant Mitochondrial Respiration 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Alan T.; Wiskich, Joseph T.; Dry, Ian B.

    1990-01-01

    Dry and Wiskich ([1987] Arch Biochem Biophys 257: 92-99) have published data showing the response of plant mitochondrial respiration to increasing additions of oxaloacetate or malate when these substrates have been depleted by inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase by malonate, and coenzyme A (CoA) has been sequestered as acetyl-CoA by pyruvate dehydrogenase. In the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, it is shown that the response is given by a Michaelis-Menten curve, but in its absence, when malate has to supply substrate for dehydrogenation as well as to liberate CoA via malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, the response is presumably the product of two Michaelis-Menten functions, which can be approximated by the square of a single function. PMID:16667257

  1. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  2. Enhanced Heme Function and Mitochondrial Respiration Promote the Progression of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Sullivan, Laura A.; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  3. Temperature and cell-type dependency of sulfide effects on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Groeger, Michael; Matallo, Jose; McCook, Oscar; Wagner, Florian; Wachter, Ulrich; Bastian, Olga; Gierer, Saskia; Reich, Vera; Stahl, Bettina; Huber-Lang, Markus; Szabó, Csaba; Georgieff, Michael; Radermacher, Peter; Calzia, Enrico; Wagner, Katja

    2012-10-01

    Previous studies suggest that sulfide-induced inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (cCox) and, consequently, the metabolic and toxic effects of sulfide are less pronounced at low body temperature. Because the temperature-dependent effects of sulfide on the inflammatory response are still a matter of debate, we investigated the impact of varying temperature on the cCox excess capacity and the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation by the sulfide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase in macrophage-derived cell lines (AMJ2-C11 and RAW 264.7). Using an oxygraph chamber, the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration was measured by stepwise titrations with sulfide and the nonmetabolizable cCox inhibitor sodium azide at 25°C and 37°C. Using the latter of the two inhibitors, the excess capacity of the cCox was obtained. Furthermore, we quantified the capacity of these cells to withstand sulfide inhibition by measuring the amount required to inhibit respiration by 50% and 90% and the viability of the cells after 24-h exposure to 100 ppm of hydrogen sulfide. At low titration rates, the AMJ2-C11 cells, but not the RAW 264.7 cells, increased their capacity to withstand exogenously added sulfide. This effect was even greater at 25°C than at 37°C. Furthermore, only the AMJ2-C11 cells remained viable after sulfide exposure for 24 h. In contrast, only in the RAW 264.7 cells that an increase in cCox excess capacity was found at low temperatures. In macrophage-derived cell lines, both the excess capacity of cCox and the efficiency of sulfide elimination may increase at low temperatures. These properties may modify the effects of sulfide in immune cells and, potentially, the inflammatory response during sulfide exposure at different body temperatures.

  4. Loss of Pink1 modulates synaptic mitochondrial bioenergetics in the rat striatum prior to motor symptoms: concomitant complex I respiratory defects and increased complex II-mediated respiration.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Kelly L; Villeneuve, Lance M; Purnell, Phillip R; Ottemann, Brendan M; Emanuel, Katy; Fox, Howard S

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (Pink1), a mitochondrial serine/threonine kinase, cause a recessive inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD). Pink1 deletion in rats results in a progressive PD-like phenotype, characterized by significant motor deficits starting at 4 months of age. Despite the evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, the pathogenic mechanism underlying disease due to Pink1-deficiency remains obscure. Striatal synaptic mitochondria from 3-month-old Pink1-deficient rats were characterized using bioenergetic and mass spectroscopy (MS)-based proteomic analyses. Striatal synaptic mitochondria from Pink1-deficient rats exhibit decreased complex I-driven respiration and increased complex II-mediated respiration compared with wild-type rats. MS-based proteomics revealed 69 of the 811 quantified mitochondrial proteins were differentially expressed between Pink1-deficient rats and controls. Down-regulation of several electron carrier proteins, which shuttle electrons to reduce ubiquinone at complex III, in the Pink1-knockouts suggests disruption of the linkage between fatty acid, amino acid, and choline metabolism and the mitochondrial respiratory system. These results suggest that complex II activity is increased to compensate for loss of electron transfer mechanisms due to reduced complex I activity and loss of electron carriers within striatal nerve terminals early during disease progression. This may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Cardiomyocyte mitochondrial respiration is reduced by receptor for advanced glycation end-product signaling in a ceramide-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael B; Swensen, Adam C; Winden, Duane R; Bodine, Jared S; Bikman, Benjamin T; Reynolds, Paul R

    2015-07-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. The role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is already well established in numerous comorbidities, including cardiomyopathy. Given the role of AGEs and their receptor, RAGE, in activating inflammatory pathways, we sought to determine whether ceramides could be a mediator of RAGE-induced altered heart mitochondrial function. Using an in vitro model, we treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes with the AGE carboxy-methyllysine before mitochondrial respiration assessment. We discovered that mitochondrial respiration was significantly impaired in AGE-treated cells, but not when cotreated with myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide biosynthesis. Moreover, we exposed wild-type and RAGE knockout mice to secondhand cigarette smoke and found reduced mitochondrial respiration in the left ventricular myocardium from wild-type mice, but RAGE knockout mice were protected from this effect. Finally, conditional overexpression of RAGE in the lungs of transgenic mice elicited a robust increase in left ventricular ceramides in the absence of smoke exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest a RAGE-ceramide axis as an important contributor to AGE-mediated disrupted cardiomyocyte mitochondrial function.

  6. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3/vitamin D receptor suppresses brown adipocyte differentiation and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Carolyn J; Bae, Jiyoung; Esposito, Debora; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Hu, Pan; Chen, Jiangang; Zhao, Ling

    2015-09-01

    The vitamin D system plays a role in metabolism regulation. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) suppressed 3T3-L1 white adipocyte differentiation. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout mice showed increased energy expenditure, whereas mice with adipose-specific VDR over-expression showed decreased energy expenditure. Brown adipose tissue (BAT), now known to be present in adult humans, functions in non-shivering thermogenesis by uncoupling ATP synthesis from respiration and plays an important role in energy expenditure. However, the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3/VDR on brown adipocyte differentiation and mitochondrial respiration have not been reported. mRNA expression of VDR and the metabolizing enzymes 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1) and 24-hydroxylase (CYP24A1) were examined in BAT of mice models of obesity and during brown adipocyte differentiation. The effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 and VDR over-expression on brown adipocyte differentiation and functional outcomes were evaluated. No significant changes in mRNA of VDR and CYP27B1 were noted in both diet-induced obese (DIO) and ob/ob mice, whereas uncoupling protein 1 mRNA was downregulated in BAT of ob/ob, but not DIO mice when compared to the controls. In contrast, mRNA of VDR, CYP24A1, and CYP27B1 were downregulated during brown adipocyte differentiation in vitro. 1,25(OH)2D3 dose-dependently suppressed brown adipocyte differentiation, accompanied by suppressed isoproterenol-stimulated oxygen consumption rates (OCR), maximal OCR and OCR from proton leak. Consistently, over-expression of VDR also suppressed brown adipocyte differentiation. Further, both 1,25(OH)2D3 and VDR over-expression suppressed PPARγ transactivation in brown preadipocytes. Our results demonstrate the suppressive effects of 1,25(OH)2D3/VDR signaling on brown adipocyte differentiation and mitochondrial respiration. The role of 1,25(OH)2D3/VDR system in regulating BAT development and function in obesity warrant further investigation.

  7. A Novel Malate Dehydrogenase 2 Inhibitor Suppresses Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kusik; Kim, Inhyub; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Kyeong; Won, Misun

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 inhibitor LW6, an aryloxyacetylamino benzoic acid derivative, inhibits malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) activity during the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In this study, we present a novel MDH2 inhibitor compound 7 containing benzohydrazide moiety, which was identified through structure-based virtual screening of chemical library. Similar to LW6, compound 7 inhibited MDH2 activity in a competitive fashion, thereby reducing NADH level. Consequently, compound 7 reduced oxygen consumption and ATP production during the mitochondrial respiration cycle, resulting in increased intracellular oxygen concentration. Therefore, compound 7 suppressed the accumulation of HIF-1α and expression of its target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Moreover, reduction in ATP content activated AMPK, thereby inactivating ACC and mTOR the downstream pathways. As expected, compound 7 exhibited significant growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. Compound 7 demonstrated substantial anti-tumor efficacy in an in vivo xenograft assay using HCT116 mouse model. Taken together, a novel MDH2 inhibitor, compound 7, suppressed HIF-1α accumulation via reduction of oxygen consumption and ATP production, integrating metabolism into anti-cancer efficacy in cancer cells. PMID:27611801

  8. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism.

  9. A somatic T15091C mutation in the Cytb gene of mouse mitochondrial DNA dominantly induces respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chisato; Takibuchi, Gaku; Shimizu, Akinori; Mito, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-08-07

    Our previous studies provided evidence that mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations that cause mitochondrial respiration defects behave in a recessive manner, because the induction of respiration defects could be prevented with the help of a small proportion (10%-20%) of mtDNA without the mutations. However, subsequent studies found the induction of respiration defects by the accelerated accumulation of a small proportion of mtDNA with various somatic mutations, indicating the presence of mtDNA mutations that behave in a dominant manner. Here, to provide the evidence for the presence of dominant mutations in mtDNA, we used mouse lung carcinoma P29 cells and examined whether some mtDNA molecules possess somatic mutations that dominantly induce respiration defects. Cloning and sequence analysis of 40-48 mtDNA molecules from P29 cells was carried out to screen for somatic mutations in protein-coding genes, because mutations in these genes could dominantly regulate respiration defects by formation of abnormal polypeptides. We found 108 missense mutations existing in one or more of 40-48 mtDNA molecules. Of these missense mutations, a T15091C mutation in the Cytb gene was expected to be pathogenic due to the presence of its orthologous mutation in mtDNA from a patient with cardiomyopathy. After isolation of many subclones from parental P29 cells, we obtained subclones with various proportions of T15091C mtDNA, and showed that the respiration defects were induced in a subclone with only 49% T15091C mtDNA. Because the induction of respiration defects could not be prevented with the help of the remaining 51% mtDNA without the T15091C mutation, the results indicate that the T15091C mutation in mtDNA dominantly induced the respiration defects.

  10. Targeting the maize T-urf13 product into tobacco mitochondria confers methomyl sensitivity to mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, F; Bernier, B; Buxant, R; Williams, M E; Levings, C S; Boutry, M

    1995-02-14

    The URF13 protein, which is encoded by the maize mitochondrial T-urf13 gene, is thought to be responsible for pathotoxin and methomyl sensitivity and male sterility. We have investigated whether T-urf13 confers toxin sensitivity and male sterility when expressed in another plant species. The coding sequence of T-urf13 was fused to a mitochondrial targeting presequence, placed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, and introduced into tobacco by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Plants expressing high levels of URF13 were methomyl sensitive. Subcellular analysis indicated that URF13 is mainly associated with the mitochondria. Adding methomyl to isolated mitochondria stimulated NADH-linked respiration and uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that URF13 was imported into the mitochondria, and conferred toxin sensitivity. Most control plants, which expressed the T-urf13c construct lacking the mitochondrial presequence, were methomyl sensitive and contained URF13 in a membrane fraction. Subcellular fractionation by sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that URF13 sedimented at several positions, suggesting the protein is associated with various organelles, including mitochondria. No methomyl effect was observed in isolated mitochondria, however, indicating that URF13 was not imported and did not confer toxin sensitivity to the mitochondria. Thus, URF13 confers toxin sensitivity to transgenic tobacco with or without import into the mitochondria. There was no correlation between the expression of URF13 and male sterility, suggesting either that URF13 does not cause male sterility in transgenic tobacco or that URF13 is not expressed in sufficient amounts in the appropriate anther cells.

  11. Depression of mitochondrial respiration during daily torpor of the Djungarian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, is specific for liver and correlates with body temperature.

    PubMed

    Kutschke, Maria; Grimpo, Kirsten; Kastl, Anja; Schneider, Sandra; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Exner, Cornelia; Jastroch, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Small mammals actively decrease metabolism during daily torpor and hibernation to save energy. Increasing evidence suggests depression of mitochondrial respiration during daily torpor of the Djungarian hamster but tissue-specificity and relation to torpor depth is unknown. We first confirmed a previous study by Brown and colleagues reporting on the depressed substrate oxidation in isolated liver mitochondria of the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) during daily torpor. Next, we show that mitochondrial respiration is not depressed in kidneys, skeletal muscle and heart. In liver mitochondria, we found that state 3 and state 4 respirations correlate with body temperature, suggesting inhibition related to torpor depth and to metabolic rate. We conclude that molecular events leading to depression of mitochondrial respiration during daily torpor are specific to liver and linked to a decrease in body temperature. Different tissue-specificity of mitochondrial depression may assist to compare and identify the molecular nature of mitochondrial alterations during torpor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Mitochondrial Genome Impacts Respiration but Not Fermentation in Interspecific Saccharomyces Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Michel; Salin, Benedicte; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has high rate of nucleotide substitution leading to different mitochondrial haplotypes called mitotypes. However, the impact of mitochondrial genetic variant on phenotypic variation has been poorly considered in microorganisms because mtDNA encodes very few genes compared to nuclear DNA, and also because mitochondrial inheritance is not uniparental. Here we propose original material to unravel mitotype impact on phenotype: we produced interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum species, using fully homozygous diploid parental strains. For two different interspecific crosses involving different parental strains, we recovered 10 independent hybrids per cross, and allowed mtDNA fixation after around 80 generations. We developed PCR-based markers for the rapid discrimination of S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum mitochondrial DNA. For both crosses, we were able to isolate fully isogenic hybrids at the nuclear level, yet possessing either S. cerevisiae mtDNA (Sc-mtDNA) or S. uvarum mtDNA (Su-mtDNA). Under fermentative conditions, the mitotype has no phenotypic impact on fermentation kinetics and products, which was expected since mtDNA are not necessary for fermentative metabolism. Alternatively, under respiratory conditions, hybrids with Sc-mtDNA have higher population growth performance, associated with higher respiratory rate. Indeed, far from the hypothesis that mtDNA variation is neutral, our work shows that mitochondrial polymorphism can have a strong impact on fitness components and hence on the evolutionary fate of the yeast populations. We hypothesize that under fermentative conditions, hybrids may fix stochastically one or the other mt-DNA, while respiratory environments may increase the probability to fix Sc-mtDNA. PMID:24086452

  13. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity.

  14. Alteration of dark respiration and reduction of phototrophic growth in a mitochondrial DNA deletion mutant of Chlamydomonas lacking cob, nd4, and the 3' end of nd5.

    PubMed Central

    Duby, F; Matagne, R F

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a new type of mitochondrial mutation (dum24; for dark uniparental minus inheritance) of the unicellular photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The mutant fails to grow under heterotrophic conditions and displays reduced growth under both photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In reciprocal crosses between mutant and wild-type cells, the meiotic progeny only inherit the phenotype of the mating-type minus parent, indicating that the dum24 mutation exclusively affects the mitochondrial genome. Digestion with various restriction enzymes followed by DNA gel blot hybridizations with specific probes demonstrated that dum24 cells contain four types of altered mitochondrial genomes: deleted monomers lacking cob, nd4, and the 3' end of the nd5 gene; deleted monomers deprived of cob, nd4, nd5, and the 5' end of the cox1 coding sequence; and two types of dimers produced by end-to-end fusions between monomers similarly or differently deleted. Due to these mitochondrial DNA alterations, complex I activity, the cytochrome pathway of respiration, and presumably, the three phosphorylation sites associated with these enzyme activities are lacking in the mutant. The low respiratory rate of the dum24 cells results from the activities of rotenone-resistant NADH dehydrogenase, complex II, and alternative oxidase, with none of these enzymes being coupled to ATP production. To our knowledge, this type of mitochondrial mutation has never been described for photosynthetic organisms or more generally for obligate aerobes. PMID:9878636

  15. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Menshikova, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J; Standley, Robert A; Helbling, Nicole L; Dubis, Gabriel S; Ritov, Vladimir B; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E; Smith, Steven R; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G S; Houmard, Joseph A; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2015-11-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery-induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  16. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; Menshikova, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J.; Standley, Robert A.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Dubis, Gabriel S.; Ritov, Vladimir B.; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E.; Smith, Steven R.; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Houmard, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery–induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26293505

  17. A carbon monoxide-releasing molecule (CORM-3) uncouples mitochondrial respiration and modulates the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lo Iacono, Luisa; Boczkowski, Jorge; Zini, Roland; Salouage, Issam; Berdeaux, Alain; Motterlini, Roberto; Morin, Didier

    2011-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), produced during the degradation of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase, is an important signaling mediator in mammalian cells. Here we show that precise delivery of CO to isolated heart mitochondria using a water-soluble CO-releasing molecule (CORM-3) uncouples respiration. Addition of low-micromolar concentrations of CORM-3 (1-20 μM), but not an inactive compound that does not release CO, significantly increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (State 2 respiration) in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, higher concentrations of CORM-3 (100 μM) suppressed ADP-dependent respiration through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase. The uncoupling effect mediated by CORM-3 was inhibited in the presence of the CO scavenger myoglobin. Moreover, this effect was associated with a gradual decrease in membrane potential (ψ) over time and was partially reversed by malonate, an inhibitor of complex II activity. Similarly, inhibition of uncoupling proteins or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter attenuated the effect of CORM-3 on both State 2 respiration and Δψ. Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) produced by mitochondria respiring from complex I-linked substrates (pyruvate/malate) was increased by CORM-3. However, respiration initiated via complex II using succinate resulted in a fivefold increase in H₂O₂ production and this effect was significantly inhibited by CORM-3. These findings disclose a counterintuitive action of CORM-3 suggesting that CO at low levels acts as an important regulator of mitochondrial respiration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitochondrial respiration and genomic analysis provide insight into the influence of the symbiotic bacterium on host trypanosomatid oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Martins, A C; Machado, A C L; Klein, C C; Ciapina, L; Gonzaga, L; Vasconcelos, A T R; Sagot, M F; DE Souza, W; Einicker-Lamas, M; Galina, A; Motta, M C M

    2015-02-01

    Certain trypanosomatids co-evolve with an endosymbiotic bacterium in a mutualistic relationship that is characterized by intense metabolic exchanges. Symbionts were able to respire for up to 4 h after isolation from Angomonas deanei. FCCP (carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) similarly increased respiration in wild-type and aposymbiotic protozoa, though a higher maximal O2 consumption capacity was observed in the symbiont-containing cells. Rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, did not affect A. deanei respiration, whereas TTFA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone), a complex II activity inhibitor, completely blocked respiration in both strains. Antimycin A and cyanide, inhibitors of complexes III and IV, respectively, abolished O2 consumption, but the aposymbiotic protozoa were more sensitive to both compounds. Oligomycin did not affect cell respiration, whereas carboxyatractyloside (CAT), an inhibitor of the ADP-ATP translocator, slightly reduced O2 consumption. In the A. deanei genome, sequences encoding most proteins of the respiratory chain are present. The symbiont genome lost part of the electron transport system (ETS), but complex I, a cytochrome d oxidase, and FoF1-ATP synthase remain. In conclusion, this work suggests that the symbiont influences the mitochondrial respiration of the host protozoan.

  19. Mitofusin 1 and optic atrophy 1 shift metabolism to mitochondrial respiration during aging.

    PubMed

    Son, Jyung Mean; Sarsour, Ehab H; Kakkerla Balaraju, Anurag; Fussell, Jenna; Kalen, Amanda L; Wagner, Brett A; Buettner, Garry R; Goswami, Prabhat C

    2017-10-01

    Replicative and chronological lifespan are two different modes of cellular aging. Chronological lifespan is defined as the duration during which quiescent normal cells retain their capacity to re-enter the proliferative cycle. This study investigated whether changes in metabolism occur during aging of quiescent normal human fibroblasts (NHFs) and the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Bioenergetics measurements were taken in quiescent NHFs from younger (newborn, 3-day, 5-month, and 1-year) and older (58-, 61-, 63-, 68-, and 70-year) healthy donors as well as NHFs from the same individual at different ages (29, 36, and 46 years). Results show significant changes in cellular metabolism during aging of quiescent NHFs: Old NHFs exhibit a significant decrease in glycolytic flux and lactate levels, and increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and ATP levels compared to young NHFs. Results from the Seahorse XF Cell Mito Stress Test show that old NHFs with a lower Bioenergetic Health Index (BHI) are more prone to oxidative stress compared to young NHFs with a higher BHI. The increase in OCR in old NHFs is associated with a shift in mitochondrial dynamics more toward fusion. Genetic knockdown of mitofusin 1 (MFN1) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) in old NHFs decreased OCR and shifted metabolism more toward glycolysis. Downregulation of MFN1 and OPA1 also suppressed the radiation-induced increase in doubling time of NHFs. In summary, results show that a metabolic shift from glycolysis in young to mitochondrial respiration in old NHFs occurs during chronological lifespan, and MFN1 and OPA1 regulate this process. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Tubulin binding blocks mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel and regulates respiration

    PubMed Central

    Rostovtseva, Tatiana K.; Sheldon, Kely L.; Hassanzadeh, Elnaz; Monge, Claire; Saks, Valdur; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Sackett, Dan L.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) permeability has dual importance: in normal metabolite and energy exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm and thus in control of respiration, and in apoptosis by release of apoptogenic factors into the cytosol. However, the mechanism of this regulation, dependent on the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the major channel of MOM, remains controversial. A long-standing puzzle is that in permeabilized cells, adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is less accessible to cytosolic ADP than in isolated mitochondria. We solve this puzzle by finding a missing player in the regulation of MOM permeability: the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. We show that nanomolar concentrations of dimeric tubulin induce voltage-sensitive reversible closure of VDAC reconstituted into planar phospholipid membranes. Tubulin strikingly increases VDAC voltage sensitivity and at physiological salt conditions could induce VDAC closure at <10 mV transmembrane potentials. Experiments with isolated mitochondria confirm these findings. Tubulin added to isolated mitochondria decreases ADP availability to ANT, partially restoring the low MOM permeability (high apparent Km for ADP) found in permeabilized cells. Our findings suggest a previously unknown mechanism of regulation of mitochondrial energetics, governed by VDAC and tubulin at the mitochondria–cytosol interface. This tubulin–VDAC interaction requires tubulin anionic C-terminal tail (CTT) peptides. The significance of this interaction may be reflected in the evolutionary conservation of length and anionic charge in CTT throughout eukaryotes, despite wide changes in the exact sequence. Additionally, tubulins that have lost significant length or anionic character are only found in cells that do not have mitochondria. PMID:19033201

  1. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration in AMPKα2 kinase-dead mice.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S; Kristensen, J M; Stride, N; Wojtaszewski, J F P; Helge, J W; Dela, F

    2012-06-01

    To study whether the phenotypical characteristics (exercise intolerance; reduced spontaneous activity) of the AMPKα2 kinase-dead (KD) mice can be explained by a reduced mitochondrial respiratory flux rates (JO(2) ) in skeletal muscle. Secondly, the effect of the maturation process on JO(2) was studied. In tibialis anterior (almost exclusively type 2 fibres) muscle from young (12-17 weeks, n = 7) and mature (25-27 weeks, n = 12) KD and wild-type (WT) (12-17 weeks, n = 9; 25-27 weeks, n = 11) littermates, JO(2) was quantified in permeabilized fibres ex vivo by respirometry, using a substrate-uncoupler-inhibitor-titration (SUIT) protocol: malate, octanoyl carnitine, ADP and glutamate (GMO(3) ), + succinate (GMOS(3) ), + uncoupler (U) and inhibitor (rotenone) of complex I respiration. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was measured as an index of mitochondrial content. Citrate synthase activity was highest in young WT animals and lower in KD animals compared with age-matched WT. JO(2) per mg tissue was lower (P < 0.05) in KD animals (state GMOS(3) ). No uncoupling effect was seen in any of the animals. Normalized oxygen flux (JO(2) /CS) revealed a uniform pattern across the SUIT protocol with no effect of KD. However, JO(2) /CS was higher [GMO(3) , GMOS(3) , U and rotenone (only WT)] in the mature compared with the young mice - irrespective of the genotype (P < 0.05). Exercise intolerance and reduced activity level seen in KD mice may be explained by reduced JO(2) in the maximally coupled respiratory state. Furthermore, an enhancement of oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrion is seen with the maturation process. © 2011 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2011 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  2. Tubulin binding blocks mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel and regulates respiration.

    PubMed

    Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Sheldon, Kely L; Hassanzadeh, Elnaz; Monge, Claire; Saks, Valdur; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Sackett, Dan L

    2008-12-02

    Regulation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) permeability has dual importance: in normal metabolite and energy exchange between mitochondria and cytoplasm and thus in control of respiration, and in apoptosis by release of apoptogenic factors into the cytosol. However, the mechanism of this regulation, dependent on the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), the major channel of MOM, remains controversial. A long-standing puzzle is that in permeabilized cells, adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is less accessible to cytosolic ADP than in isolated mitochondria. We solve this puzzle by finding a missing player in the regulation of MOM permeability: the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. We show that nanomolar concentrations of dimeric tubulin induce voltage-sensitive reversible closure of VDAC reconstituted into planar phospholipid membranes. Tubulin strikingly increases VDAC voltage sensitivity and at physiological salt conditions could induce VDAC closure at <10 mV transmembrane potentials. Experiments with isolated mitochondria confirm these findings. Tubulin added to isolated mitochondria decreases ADP availability to ANT, partially restoring the low MOM permeability (high apparent K(m) for ADP) found in permeabilized cells. Our findings suggest a previously unknown mechanism of regulation of mitochondrial energetics, governed by VDAC and tubulin at the mitochondria-cytosol interface. This tubulin-VDAC interaction requires tubulin anionic C-terminal tail (CTT) peptides. The significance of this interaction may be reflected in the evolutionary conservation of length and anionic charge in CTT throughout eukaryotes, despite wide changes in the exact sequence. Additionally, tubulins that have lost significant length or anionic character are only found in cells that do not have mitochondria.

  3. Caspase-independent mitochondrial cell death results from loss of respiration, not cytotoxic protein release.

    PubMed

    Lartigue, Lydia; Kushnareva, Yulia; Seong, Youngmo; Lin, Helen; Faustin, Benjamin; Newmeyer, Donald D

    2009-12-01

    In apoptosis, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggers caspase-dependent death. However, cells undergo clonogenic death even if caspases are blocked. One proposed mechanism involved the release of cytotoxic proteins (e.g., AIF and endoG) from mitochondria. To initiate MOMP directly without side effects, we created a tamoxifen-switchable BimS fusion protein. Surprisingly, even after MOMP, caspase-inhibited cells replicated DNA and divided for approximately 48 h before undergoing proliferation arrest. AIF and endoG remained in mitochondria. However, cells gradually lost mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content, and DNA synthesis slowed to a halt by 72 h. These defects resulted from a partial loss of respiratory function, occurring 4-8 h after MOMP, that was not merely due to dispersion of cytochrome c. In particular, Complex I activity was completely lost, and Complex IV activity was reduced by approximately 70%, whereas Complex II was unaffected. Later, cells exhibited a more profound loss of mitochondrial protein constituents. Thus, under caspase inhibition, MOMP-induced clonogenic death results from a progressive loss of mitochondrial function, rather than the release of cytotoxic proteins from mitochondria.

  4. Oxidative stress in skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial respiration and limits exercise capacity in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Takashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hirabayashi, Kagami; Matsushima, Shouji; Inoue, Naoki; Ohta, Yukihiro; Hamaguchi, Sanae; Sobirin, Mochamad A; Ono, Taisuke; Suga, Tadashi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Fumio; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    Insulin resistance or diabetes is associated with limited exercise capacity, which can be caused by the abnormal energy metabolism in skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress is involved in mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress could cause mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle and make contribution to exercise intolerance in diabetes. C57/BL6J mice were fed on normal diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 8 wk to induce obesity with insulin resistance and diabetes. Treadmill tests with expired gas analysis were performed to determine the exercise capacity and whole body oxygen uptake (Vo(2)). The work (vertical distance x body weight) to exhaustion was reduced in the HFD mice by 36%, accompanied by a 16% decrease of peak Vo(2). Mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration, electron transport chain complex I and III activities, and mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle were decreased in the HFD mice. Furthermore, superoxide production and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in skeletal muscle were significantly increased in the HFD mice. Intriguingly, the treatment of HFD-fed mice with apocynin [10 mmol/l; an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase activation] improved exercise intolerance and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle without affecting glucose metabolism itself. The exercise capacity and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle were impaired in type 2 diabetes, which might be due to enhanced oxidative stress. Therapies designed to regulate oxidative stress and maintain mitochondrial function could be beneficial to improve the exercise capacity in type 2 diabetes.

  5. Effects of anionic xenobiotics on rat kidney. I--Tissue and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, J B; Krall, A R; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-15

    The polar 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) metabolite, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)acetic acid (DDA), and the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), were previously shown to be accumulated to high levels in liver and kidney via the organic acid transport system, raising the possibility of organ-specific toxicity secondary to transport. In these studies, accumulation of DDA was shown to depress oxygen consumption by renal cortical slices at high doses (0.1 and 1mM). Isolated renal and hepatic mitochondria were uncoupled by low doses of DDA (5-10 nmoles/mg mitochondrial protein. Maximal uncoupling was seen at 50-70 nmoles/mg. 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T also produced uncoupling, but at doses of 70 nmoles/mg or higher. All agents were more effective with alpha-ketoglutarate or pyruvate-malate), all three agents also depressed State 3 (ADP-stimulated) respiration. Again, DDA was more effective than 2,4-D or 2,4,5-T. These results suggest that accumulation of these or other anionic xenobiotics may lead to toxicity in those tissues possessing the organic anion transport system.

  6. Selection of rodent species appropriate for mtDNA transfer to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice expressing mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Shunkei; Shimizu, Akinori; Hayashi, Chisato; Imanishi, Hirotake; Hashizume, Osamu; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that transmitochondrial mito-mice with nuclear DNA from Mus musculus and mtDNA from M. spretus do not express respiration defects, whereas those with mtDNA from Rattus norvegicus cannot be generated from ES cybrids with mtDNA from R. norvegicus due to inducing significant respiration defects and resultant losing multipotency. Here, we isolated transmitochondrial cybrids with mtDNA from various rodent species classified between M. spretus and R. norvegicus, and compared the O2 consumption rates. The results showed a strong negative correlation between phylogenetic distance and reduction of O2 consumption rates, which would be due to the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and the resultant incompatibility between the nuclear genome from M. musculus and the mitochondrial genome from the other rodent species. These observations suggested that M. caroli was an appropriate mtDNA donor to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice with nuclear DNA from M. musculus. Then, we generated ES cybrids with M. caroli mtDNA, and found that these ES cybrids expressed respiration defects without losing multipotency and can be used to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice expressing mitochondrial disorders.

  7. Inhibition of glycolate and D-lactate metabolism in a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant deficient in mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Husic, Diane W.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility that glycolate oxidation in unicellular green algae is linked to mitochondrial electron transport, rather than to peroxisomal metabolism as in higher plants and animals, was studied in a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (dk97) deficient in cytochrome oxidase. This mutant had normal rates of dark respiration (40 ± 15 μmol of O2 uptake per hr per mg of chlorophyll) but had only 11% of wild-type levels of cytochrome oxidase activity. Salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) reduced the dark respiration rate of dk97 cells by 71%, but cyanide did not significantly inhibit this rate. During photosynthesis in the presence of SHAM, glycolate oxidation was blocked, resulting in glycolate accumulation and excretion by mutant cells but not by wild-type Chlamydomonas. D-Lactate, which accumulated after brief periods of anaerobiosis in Chlamydomonas, was reoxidized by air-grown cells only aerobically in the light, and reoxidation of D-lactate was blocked by SHAM in the dk97 cells. Thus, glycolate and D-lactate dehydrogenase activities are both linked to mitochondrial electron transport in Chlamydomonas. During photosynthetic 14CO2 fixation by dk97 cells in the presence of SHAM, 14C-labeled tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates accumulated, indicating that, in Chlamydomonas, mitochondrial respiration functions during photosynthesis. PMID:16578800

  8. Mitochondrial respiration and ROS emission during β-oxidation in the heart: An experimental-computational study.

    PubMed

    Cortassa, Sonia; Sollott, Steven J; Aon, Miguel A

    2017-06-01

    Lipids are main fuels for cellular energy and mitochondria their major oxidation site. Yet unknown is to what extent the fuel role of lipids is influenced by their uncoupling effects, and how this affects mitochondrial energetics, redox balance and the emission of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Employing a combined experimental-computational approach, we comparatively analyze β-oxidation of palmitoyl CoA (PCoA) in isolated heart mitochondria from Sham and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic (T1DM) guinea pigs (GPs). Parallel high throughput measurements of the rates of oxygen consumption (VO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) emission as a function of PCoA concentration, in the presence of L-carnitine and malate, were performed. We found that PCoA concentration < 200 nmol/mg mito protein resulted in low H2O2 emission flux, increasing thereafter in Sham and T1DM GPs under both states 4 and 3 respiration with diabetic mitochondria releasing higher amounts of ROS. Respiratory uncoupling and ROS excess occurred at PCoA > 600 nmol/mg mito prot, in both control and diabetic animals. Also, for the first time, we show that an integrated two compartment mitochondrial model of β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids and main energy-redox processes is able to simulate the relationship between VO2 and H2O2 emission as a function of lipid concentration. Model and experimental results indicate that PCoA oxidation and its concentration-dependent uncoupling effect, together with a partial lipid-dependent decrease in the rate of superoxide generation, modulate H2O2 emission as a function of VO2. Results indicate that keeping low levels of intracellular lipid is crucial for mitochondria and cells to maintain ROS within physiological levels compatible with signaling and reliable energy supply.

  9. The essential oils component p-cymene induces proton leak through Fo-ATP synthase and uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Custódio, José BA; Ribeiro, Mariana V; Silva, Filomena SG; Machado, Marisa; Sousa, M Céu

    2011-01-01

    Essential oils can be used as antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic agents or to preserve and give flavors to foods. The activity of phenolic-rich essential oils has been observed in fractions containing thymol and carvacrol which show synergistic effects with their precursor p-cymene. Their mode of action is related to several targets in the cell but specific mechanisms of activity and cytotoxic effects remain poorly characterized. Given the importance of mitochondria for cellular functions and their critical role in a vast number of diseases, this work evaluated the effects of p-cymene on mitochondrial functions. It was observed that p-cymene did not change the oxygen consumption by respiratory chain (state 2 respiration). However, p-cymene decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), depressed the rate of ADP phosphorylation (state 3), and stimulated the oxygen consumption after phosphorylation of ADP (state 4). The respiratory control ratio (state 3/state 4) was decreased as a consequence of the inhibition of state 3 and stimulation of state 4 respiration but the ADP/O index remained unaltered as well as the mitochondrial Ca2+ fluxes. Moreover, p-cymene did not induce mitochondrial membrane disruption but depressed the Δψ, and the stimulatory effect observed on state 4, similar to the effect observed on state 2 respiration plus ATP, was inhibited by oligomycin. These effects suggest that p-cymene allows a proton leak through the Fo fraction of the phosphorylative system, changing the mitochondrial proton motive force and ATP synthesis capacity. Therefore, these data suggest mitochondria as a target for p-cymene toxicity action mechanisms. PMID:27186111

  10. Formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 Module on Mitochondria Governs Energy Deprivation-Induced Autophagy by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Yi, Cong; Tong, Jingjing; Lu, Puzhong; Wang, Yizheng; Zhang, Jinxie; Sun, Chen; Yuan, Kangning; Xue, Renyu; Zou, Bing; Li, Nianzhong; Xiao, Shuhua; Dai, Chong; Huang, Yuwei; Xu, Liling; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Miao, Di; Deng, Haiteng; Li, Hongliang; Yu, Li

    2017-04-10

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining glucose homeostasis, but the mechanism by which energy deprivation activates autophagy is not fully understood. We show that Mec1/ATR, a member of the DNA damage response pathway, is essential for glucose starvation-induced autophagy. Mec1, Atg13, Atg1, and the energy-sensing kinase Snf1 are recruited to mitochondria shortly after glucose starvation. Mec1 is recruited through the adaptor protein Ggc1. Snf1 phosphorylates Mec1 on the mitochondrial surface, leading to recruitment of Atg1 to mitochondria. Furthermore, the Snf1-mediated Mec1 phosphorylation and mitochondrial recruitment of Atg1 are essential for maintaining mitochondrial respiration during glucose starvation, and active mitochondrial respiration is required for energy deprivation-activated autophagy. Thus, formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 module on mitochondria governs energy deprivation-induced autophagy by regulating mitochondrial respiration.

  11. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bcl-2 family proteins as regulators of cancer cell invasion and metastasis: a review focusing on mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Um, Hong-Duck

    2016-02-02

    Although Bcl-2 family proteins were originally identified as key regulators of apoptosis, an impressive body of evidence has shown that pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 family, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, can also promote cell migration, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Interestingly, cell invasion was recently found to be suppressed by multidomain pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bax and Bak. While the mechanisms underlying these new functions of Bcl-2 proteins are just beginning to be studied, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as inducers of cell invasion and the production of ROS from mitochondrial respiration is known to be promoted and suppressed by the pro-survival and multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, respectively. Here, I review the evidence supporting the ability of Bcl-2 proteins to regulate cancer cell invasion and metastasis, and discuss our current understanding of their underlying mechanisms, with a particular focus on mitochondrial respiration and ROS, which could have implications for the development of strategies to overcome tumor progression.

  13. TGF-β1-Mediated Differentiation of Fibroblasts Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial Content and Cellular Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Godic, Zarko; Rizvi, Farhan; Emelyanova, Larisa; Ross, Gracious; Richards, John; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Jahangir, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    Objectivs Cytokine-dependent activation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a key event in fibrosis, is accompanied by phenotypic changes with increased secretory and contractile properties dependent on increased energy utilization, yet changes in the energetic profile of these cells are not fully described. We hypothesize that the TGF-β1-mediated transformation of myofibroblasts is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and function when compared to naive fibroblasts. Methods Cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, a profibrotic cytokine, or vehicle were assessed for transformation to myofibroblasts (appearance of α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA] stress fibers) and associated changes in mitochondrial content and functions using laser confocal microscopy, Seahorse respirometry, multi-well plate reader and biochemical protocols. Expression of mitochondrial-specific proteins was determined using western blotting, and the mitochondrial DNA quantified using Mitochondrial DNA isolation kit. Results Treatment with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) induced transformation of naive fibroblasts into myofibroblasts with a threefold increase in the expression of α-SMA (6.85 ± 0.27 RU) compared to cells not treated with TGF-β1 (2.52 ± 0.11 RU). TGF-β1 exposure increased the number of mitochondria in the cells, as monitored by membrane potential sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine, and expression of mitochondria-specific proteins; voltage-dependent anion channels (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.23 ± 0.05 RU) and adenine nucleotide transporter (0.61 ± 0.11 vs. 0.22 ± 0.05 RU), as well as mitochondrial DNA content (530 ± 12 μg DNA/106 cells vs. 307 ± 9 μg DNA/106 cells in control). TGF-β1 treatment was associated with an increase in mitochondrial function with a twofold increase in baseline oxygen consumption rate (2.25 ± 0.03 vs. 1.13 ± 0.1 nmol O2/min/106 cells) and FCCP-induced mitochondrial respiration (2.87 ± 0.03 vs. 1.46 ± 0.15 nmol O2/min/106 cells

  14. Cyclopamine tartrate, an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, strongly interferes with mitochondrial function and suppresses aerobic respiration in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Sohoni, Sagar; Kalainayakan, Sarada Preeta; Garrossian, Massoud; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-24

    Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is associated with the development of many cancers including prostate cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and basal cell carcinoma. The Hh signaling pathway has been one of the most intensely investigated targets for cancer therapy, and a number of compounds inhibiting Hh signaling are being tested clinically for treating many cancers. Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three most common cancers (colon, breast, and prostate) combined. Cyclopamine was the first compound found to inhibit Hh signaling and has been invaluable for understanding the function of Hh signaling in development and cancer. To find novel strategies for combating lung cancer, we decided to characterize the effect of cyclopamine tartrate (CycT), an improved analogue of cyclopamine, on lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. The effect of CycT on oxygen consumption and proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines was quantified by using an Oxygraph system and live cell counting, respectively. Apoptosis was detected by using Annexin V and Propidium Iodide staining. CycT's impact on ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial morphology in NSCLC cells was monitored by using fluorometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy were used to detect the levels and localization of Hh signaling targets, mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and heme-related proteins in various NSCLC cells. Our findings identified a novel function of CycT, as well as another Hh inhibitor SANT1, to disrupt mitochondrial function and aerobic respiration. Our results showed that CycT, like glutamine depletion, caused a substantial decrease in oxygen consumption in a number of NSCLC cell lines, suppressed NSCLC cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis. Further, we found that CycT increased ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and

  15. TGF-β1-mediated differentiation of fibroblasts is associated with increased mitochondrial content and cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Godic, Zarko; Rizvi, Farhan; Emelyanova, Larisa; Ross, Gracious; Richards, John; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Jahangir, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    Cytokine-dependent activation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a key event in fibrosis, is accompanied by phenotypic changes with increased secretory and contractile properties dependent on increased energy utilization, yet changes in the energetic profile of these cells are not fully described. We hypothesize that the TGF-β1-mediated transformation of myofibroblasts is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and function when compared to naive fibroblasts. Cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, a profibrotic cytokine, or vehicle were assessed for transformation to myofibroblasts (appearance of α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA] stress fibers) and associated changes in mitochondrial content and functions using laser confocal microscopy, Seahorse respirometry, multi-well plate reader and biochemical protocols. Expression of mitochondrial-specific proteins was determined using western blotting, and the mitochondrial DNA quantified using Mitochondrial DNA isolation kit. Treatment with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) induced transformation of naive fibroblasts into myofibroblasts with a threefold increase in the expression of α-SMA (6.85 ± 0.27 RU) compared to cells not treated with TGF-β1 (2.52 ± 0.11 RU). TGF-β1 exposure increased the number of mitochondria in the cells, as monitored by membrane potential sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine, and expression of mitochondria-specific proteins; voltage-dependent anion channels (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.23 ± 0.05 RU) and adenine nucleotide transporter (0.61 ± 0.11 vs. 0.22 ± 0.05 RU), as well as mitochondrial DNA content (530 ± 12 μg DNA/106 cells vs. 307 ± 9 μg DNA/106 cells in control). TGF-β1 treatment was associated with an increase in mitochondrial function with a twofold increase in baseline oxygen consumption rate (2.25 ± 0.03 vs. 1.13 ± 0.1 nmol O2/min/106 cells) and FCCP-induced mitochondrial respiration (2.87 ± 0.03 vs. 1.46 ± 0.15 nmol O2/min/106 cells). TGF-β1 induced differentiation

  16. Left Ventricular Transmural Gradient in Mitochondrial Respiration Is Associated with Increased Sub-Endocardium Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Productions

    PubMed Central

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Hoang Minh, Tam; Charles, Anne-Laure; Mazzucotelli, Jean-Philippe; Zoll, Joffrey; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricle (LV) transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration has been recently reported. However, to date, the physiological mechanisms involved in the lower endocardium mitochondrial respiration chain capacity still remain to be determined. Since, nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression in the heart has spatial heterogeneity and might impair mitochondrial function, we investigated a potential association between LV transmural NO and mitochondrial function gradient. Methods: Maximal oxidative capacity (VMax) and relative contributions of the respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VSucc) and IV (VTMPD), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase activity), coupling, NO (electron paramagnetic resonance), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (H2O2 and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining) were determined in rat sub-endocardium (Endo) and sub-epicardium (Epi). Further, the effect of a direct NO donor (MAHMA NONOate) on maximal mitochondrial respiratory rates (Vmax) was determined. Results: Mitochondrial respiratory chain activities were reduced in the Endo compared with the Epi (−16.92%; P = 0.04 for Vmax and –18.73%; P = 0.02, for Vsucc, respectively). NO production was two-fold higher in the Endo compared with the Epi (P = 0.002) and interestingly, increasing NO concentration reduced Vmax. Mitochondrial H2O2 and LV ROS productions were significantly increased in Endo compared to Epi, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial coupling being similar in the two layers. Conclusions: LV mitochondrial respiration transmural gradient is likely related to NO and possibly ROS increased production in the sub-endocardium. PMID:27582709

  17. Left Ventricular Transmural Gradient in Mitochondrial Respiration Is Associated with Increased Sub-Endocardium Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Productions.

    PubMed

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Hoang Minh, Tam; Charles, Anne-Laure; Mazzucotelli, Jean-Philippe; Zoll, Joffrey; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricle (LV) transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration has been recently reported. However, to date, the physiological mechanisms involved in the lower endocardium mitochondrial respiration chain capacity still remain to be determined. Since, nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression in the heart has spatial heterogeneity and might impair mitochondrial function, we investigated a potential association between LV transmural NO and mitochondrial function gradient. Maximal oxidative capacity (VMax) and relative contributions of the respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VSucc) and IV (VTMPD), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase activity), coupling, NO (electron paramagnetic resonance), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (H2O2 and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining) were determined in rat sub-endocardium (Endo) and sub-epicardium (Epi). Further, the effect of a direct NO donor (MAHMA NONOate) on maximal mitochondrial respiratory rates (Vmax) was determined. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activities were reduced in the Endo compared with the Epi (-16.92%; P = 0.04 for Vmax and -18.73%; P = 0.02, for Vsucc, respectively). NO production was two-fold higher in the Endo compared with the Epi (P = 0.002) and interestingly, increasing NO concentration reduced Vmax. Mitochondrial H2O2 and LV ROS productions were significantly increased in Endo compared to Epi, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial coupling being similar in the two layers. LV mitochondrial respiration transmural gradient is likely related to NO and possibly ROS increased production in the sub-endocardium.

  18. The study of the mechanism of arsenite toxicity in respiration-deficient cells reveals that NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide promotes the same downstream events mediated by mitochondrial superoxide in respiration-proficient cells.

    PubMed

    Guidarelli, Andrea; Fiorani, Mara; Carloni, Silvia; Cerioni, Liana; Balduini, Walter; Cantoni, Orazio

    2016-09-15

    We herein report the results from a comparative study of arsenite toxicity in respiration-proficient (RP) and -deficient (RD) U937 cells. An initial characterization of these cells led to the demonstration that the respiration-deficient phenotype is not associated with apparent changes in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential. In addition, similar levels of superoxide (O2(.-)) were generated by RP and RD cells in response to stimuli specifically triggering respiratory chain-independent mitochondrial mechanisms or extramitochondrial, NADPH-oxidase dependent, mechanisms. At the concentration of 2.5μM, arsenite elicited selective formation of O2(.-) in the respiratory chain of RP cells, with hardly any contribution of the above mechanisms. Under these conditions, O2(.-) triggered downstream events leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, autophagy and apoptosis. RD cells challenged with similar levels of arsenite failed to generate O2(.-) because of the lack of a functional respiratory chain and were therefore resistant to the toxic effects mediated by the metalloid. Their resistance, however, was lost after exposure to four fold greater concentrations of arsenite, coincidentally with the release of O2(.-) mediated by NADPH oxidase. Interestingly, extramitochondrial O2(.-) triggered the same downstream events and an identical mode of death previously observed in RP cells. Taken together, the results obtained in this study indicate that arsenite toxicity is strictly dependent on O2(.-) availability that, regardless of whether generated in the mitochondrial or extramitochondrial compartments, triggers similar downstream events leading to ER stress, autophagy and apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase Lowers Leaf Respiration and Alters Photorespiration and Plant Growth in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J.; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M.; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD+-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO2 assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO2 assimilation/intercellular CO2 curves at low CO2, and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms linking

  20. Mitochondrial p53 mediates a transcription-independent regulation of cell respiration and interacts with the mitochondrial F₁F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergeaud, Marie; Mathieu, Lise; Guillaume, Arnaud; Moll, Ute M; Mignotte, Bernard; Le Floch, Nathalie; Vayssière, Jean-Luc; Rincheval, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    We and others previously reported that endogenous p53 can be located at mitochondria in the absence of stress, suggesting that p53 has a role in the normal physiology of this organelle. The aim of this study was to characterize in unstressed cells the intramitochondrial localization of p53 and identify new partners and functions of p53 in mitochondria. We find that the intramitochondrial pool of p53 is located in the intermembrane space and the matrix. Of note, unstressed HCT116 p53(+/+) cells simultaneously show increased O₂ consumption and decreased mitochondrial superoxide production compared with their p53-null counterpart. This data was confirmed by stable H1299 cell lines expressing low levels of p53 specifically targeted to the matrix. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP), a subunit of the F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex, as a new partner of endogenous p53, specifically interacting with p53 localized in the matrix. Interestingly, this interaction seems implicated in mitochondrial p53 localization. Moreover, p53 localized in the matrix promotes the assembly of F₁F₀-ATP synthase. Taking into account that deregulations of mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species production are tightly linked to cancer development, we suggest that mitochondrial p53 may be an important regulator of normal mitochondrial and cellular physiology, potentially exerting tumor suppression activity inside mitochondria.

  1. Mitochondrial p53 mediates a transcription-independent regulation of cell respiration and interacts with the mitochondrial F₁F₀-ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bergeaud, Marie; Mathieu, Lise; Guillaume, Arnaud; Moll, Ute M; Mignotte, Bernard; Le Floch, Nathalie; Vayssière, Jean-Luc; Rincheval, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    We and others previously reported that endogenous p53 can be located at mitochondria in the absence of stress, suggesting that p53 has a role in the normal physiology of this organelle. The aim of this study was to characterize in unstressed cells the intramitochondrial localization of p53 and identify new partners and functions of p53 in mitochondria. We find that the intramitochondrial pool of p53 is located in the intermembrane space and the matrix. Of note, unstressed HCT116 p53+/+ cells simultaneously show increased O₂ consumption and decreased mitochondrial superoxide production compared with their p53-null counterpart. This data was confirmed by stable H1299 cell lines expressing low levels of p53 specifically targeted to the matrix. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP), a subunit of the F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex, as a new partner of endogenous p53, specifically interacting with p53 localized in the matrix. Interestingly, this interaction seems implicated in mitochondrial p53 localization. Moreover, p53 localized in the matrix promotes the assembly of F₁F₀-ATP synthase. Taking into account that deregulations of mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species production are tightly linked to cancer development, we suggest that mitochondrial p53 may be an important regulator of normal mitochondrial and cellular physiology, potentially exerting tumor suppression activity inside mitochondria. PMID:23966169

  2. Respiration state IV-generated ROS destroy the mitochondrial bilayer packing order in vitro. An EPR study.

    PubMed

    Megli, Francesco M; Sabatini, Karen

    2003-08-28

    The aim of the present study was to detect defective structural properties in bilayers of mitochondrial phospholipids after oxidative stress of isolated mitochondria in vitro, reportedly during respiration state IV. The structural behaviour of extracted phospholipids was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry in oriented phospholipid bilayers spin-labelled with 5-doxyl-lecithin, by detecting of the degree of EPR spectral anisotropy loss, indicative of the phospholipid bilayer packing order. Bilayers of phospholipids from untreated mitochondria showed the highest spectral anisotropy, hence highly ordered structure, while chemically oxidised phospholipid yielded almost completely disordered supported phospholipid bilayers. Samples from mitochondria after respiration state IV showed bilayer disorder increasing with oxidation time, while inclusion of the antioxidant resveratrol in the respiration medium almost completely prevented bilayer disordering. On the other hand, beta-n-doxylstearoyl-lecithin spin-labelled mitochondria showed unchanged order parameter S at C positions 5, 12 and 16 after respiration state IV, confirming the insensitivity of this parameter to phospholipid oxidative stress. It is concluded that reactive oxygen species attack to the membrane affects lipid packing order more than fluidity, and that EPR anisotropy loss reveals oxidative damage to the bilayer better than the order parameter.

  3. Correlation between fluidising effects on phospholipid membranes and mitochondrial respiration of propofol and p-nitrosophenol homologues.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Wisniewska, Anna; Fiore, Cristina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2003-03-25

    Nitrosopropofol (2-6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol) has dramatic consequences for respiration, ATP synthesis and the transmembrane potential of isolated rat liver mitochondria at concentrations at which propofol (2-6-diisopropylphenol) does not cause any apparent effects. These results correlate well with the observation that nitrosopropofol is also a stronger perturbing agent of phospholipid membranes. In this paper we verify the possible biological activity of different phenols and nitrosophenols on mitochondrial respiration. We then discuss their interactions with phospholipid liposomes, studied with differential scanning calorimetry, spin labelling techniques and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, in order to obtain information on drug distribution and the modifications they impose on lipid bilayer. The results of the experiments performed on mitochondria and model membranes prove an interesting correlation between the effects of the molecules on both systems.

  4. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

  5. [Contribution of litter to soil respiration under different land-use types in Sanjiang Plain].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Song, Chang-Chun; Guo, Yue-Dong; Liu, De-Yan; Yang, Gui-Sheng

    2009-11-01

    By the soil respiration system of Li-6400, the characteristics of soil respiration with and without litter were investigated to explore the litter's contributions to soil respiration and its correlations with the input of litter and environmental factors under different land-use types in Sanjiang Plain. Results demonstrated that the average contribution of litter to soil respiration ranged from - 0.21 to 0.64 micromol/(m2 x s) in the growing season under the four land-use types. The contribution rate showed in the following order: wetland (14%) > artificial forest (12%) > soybean field (8%) > abandoned land (- 5%). As to abandoned land, the value was negative, and the litter inhibited soil respiration. The litter' s contributions to soil respiration may depend on the balance between the decomposition of litter and its shielding effects on soil respiration. There were highly significant correlations between litter's contributions to soil respiration and soil temperature at 10cm depth except for soybean field. Moreover, the influence of rainfall associated with the input of litter, which suggested that besides decomposition litter may take part in the ecological effect of climate changes in the future.

  6. Activation of pattern recognition receptors in brown adipocytes induces inflammation and suppresses uncoupling protein 1 expression and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jiyoung; Ricciardi, Carolyn J; Esposito, Debora; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Hu, Pan; Curry, Benjamin J; Brown, Patricia L; Gao, Zhanguo; Biggerstaff, John P; Chen, Jiangang; Zhao, Ling

    2014-05-15

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR), Toll-like receptors (TLR), and nucleotide-oligomerization domain-containing proteins (NOD) play critical roles in mediating inflammation and modulating functions in white adipocytes in obesity. However, the role of PRR activation in brown adipocytes, which are recently found to be present in adult humans, has not been studied. Here we report that mRNA of TLR4, TLR2, NOD1, and NOD2 is upregulated, paralleled with upregulated mRNA of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the obese mice. During brown adipocyte differentiation, mRNA and protein expression of NOD1 and TLR4, but not TLR2 and NOD2, is also increased. Activation of TLR4, TLR2, or NOD1 in brown adipocytes induces activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, leading to inflammatory cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression and/or protein secretion. Moreover, activation of TLR4, TLR2, or NOD1 attenuates both basal and isoproterenol-induced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) expression without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid accumulation in brown adipocytes. Cellular bioenergetics measurements confirm that attenuation of UCP-1 expression by PRR activation is accompanied by suppression of both basal and isoproterenol-stimulated oxygen consumption rates and isoproterenol-induced uncoupled respiration from proton leak; however, maximal respiration and ATP-coupled respiration are not changed. Further, the attenuation of UCP-1 by PRR activation appears to be mediated through downregulation of the UCP-1 promoter activities. Taken together, our results demonstrate the role of selected PRR activation in inducing inflammation and downregulation of UCP-1 expression and mitochondrial respiration in brown adipocytes. Our results uncover novel targets in BAT for obesity treatment and prevention. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. β-Cell deletion of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors impedes mitochondrial respiration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Merrick S; Hancock, Chad R; Ray, Jason D; Kener, Kyle B; Draney, Carrie; Garland, Kevin; Hardman, Jeremy; Bikman, Benjamin T; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell insulin secretion is dependent on proper mitochondrial function. Various studies have clearly shown that the Nr4a family of orphan nuclear receptors is essential for fuel utilization and mitochondrial function in liver, muscle, and adipose. Previously, we have demonstrated that overexpression of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 is sufficient to induce proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined whether Nr4a expression impacts pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial function. Here, we show that β-cell mitochondrial respiration is dependent on the nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cells was significantly decreased in β-cells lacking Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Furthermore, respiration rates of intact cells deficient for Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 in the presence of 16 mM glucose resulted in decreased glucose mediated oxygen consumption. Consistent with this reduction in respiration, a significant decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rates is observed with deletion of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Interestingly, the changes in respiration and insulin secretion occur without a reduction in mitochondrial content, suggesting decreased mitochondrial function. We establish that knockdown of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 results in decreased expression of the mitochondrial dehydrogenase subunits Idh3g and Sdhb. We demonstrate that loss of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 impedes production of ATP and ultimately inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that the orphan nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 are critical for β-cell mitochondrial function and insulin secretion. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Microbial Mechanisms Underlying Acidity-induced Reduction in Soil Respiration Under Nitrogen Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, S.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are receiving increasing amounts of reactive nitrogen (N) due to anthropogenic activities, which largely changes soil respiration and its feedback to climate change. N enrichment can not only increase N availability but also induce soil acidification, both may affect soil microbial activity and root growth with a consequent impact on soil respiration. However, it remains unclear whether elevated N availability or soil acidity has greater impact on soil respiration (Rs). We conducted a manipulative experiment to simulate N enrichment (10 g m-2 yr-1 NH4NO3) and soil acidity (0.552 mol H+ m-2 yr-1 sulfuric acid) and studied their effects on Rs and its components in a temperate forest. Our results showed that soil pH was reduced by 0.2 under N addition or acid addition treatment. Acid addition significantly decreased autotrophic respiration (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) by 21.5% and 22.7% in 2014, 34.8% and 21.9% in 2015, respectively, resulting in a reduction of Rs by 22.2% in 2014 and 26.1% in 2015. Nitrogen enrichment reduced Ra, Rh, Rs by 21.9%, 16.2%, 18.6% in 2014 and 22.1%, 5.9%, 11.7% in 2015, respectively. The reductions of Rs and its components were attributable to decrease of fine root biomass, microbial biomass, and cellulose degrading enzymes. N addition did not change microbial community but acid addition increased both fungal and arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi PLFAs, and N plus acid addition significantly enhanced fungal to bacterial ratio. All the hydrolase enzymes were reduced more by soil acidity (43-50%) than nitrogen addition (30-39%). Structural equation model showed that soil acidity played more important role than N availability in reducing soil respiration mainly by changing microbial extracellular enzymes. We therefore suggest that N deposition induced indirect effect of soil acidification on microbial properties is critical and should be taken into account to better understand and predict ecosystem C cycling in

  9. Effects of isoquinoline derivatives structurally related to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    McNaught, K S; Thull, U; Carrupt, P A; Altomare, C; Cellamare, S; Carotti, A; Testa, B; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1996-06-14

    Isoquinoline derivatives exert 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-like activity as inhibitors of complex I and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain mitochondrial fragments. We now examine the ability of 19 isoquinoline derivatives and MPP+ to accumulate and inhibit respiration in intact rat liver mitochondria, assessed using polarographic techniques. None of the compounds examined inhibited respiration supported by either succinate + rotenone or tetramethylparaphenylenediamine (TMPD) + ascorbate. However, with glutamate + malate as substrates, 15 isoquinoline derivatives and MPP+ inhibited state 3 and, to a lesser extent, state 4 respiration in a time-dependent manner. None of the isoquinoline derivatives were more potent than MPP+. 6,7-Dimethoxy-1-styryl-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Qualitative structure-activity relationship studies revealed that isoquinolinium cations were more active than isoquinolines in inhibiting mitochondrial respiration; these, in turn, were more active than dihydroisoquinolines and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship studies using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis showed that the inhibitory potency of isoquinoline derivatives was determined by steric, rather than electrostatic, properties of the compounds. A hypothetical binding site was identified that may be related to a rate-limiting transport process, rather than to enzyme inhibition. In conclusion, isoquinoline derivatives are less potent in inhibiting respiration in intact mitochondria than impairing complex I activity in mitochondrial fragments. This suggests that isoquinoline derivatives are not accumulated by mitochondria as avidly as MPP+. The activity of charged and neutral isoquinoline derivatives implicates both active and passive processes by which these compounds enter mitochondria, although the quaternary nitrogen moiety of the isoquinolinium cations favours

  10. Knockout of Drosophila RNase ZL impairs mitochondrial transcript processing, respiration and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xie; Dubrovsky, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    RNase ZL is a highly conserved tRNA 3′-end processing endoribonuclease. Similar to its mammalian counterpart, Drosophila RNase ZL (dRNaseZ) has a mitochondria targeting signal (MTS) flanked by two methionines at the N-terminus. Alternative translation initiation yields two protein forms: the long one is mitochondrial, and the short one may localize in the nucleus or cytosol. Here, we have generated a mitochondria specific knockout of the dRNaseZ gene. In this in vivo model, cells deprived of dRNaseZ activity display impaired mitochondrial polycistronic transcript processing, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a switch to aerobic glycolysis compensating for cellular ATP. Damaged mitochondria impose a cell cycle delay at the G2 phase disrupting cell proliferation without affecting cell viability. Antioxidants attenuate genotoxic stress and rescue cell proliferation, implying a critical role for ROS. We suggest that under a low-stress condition, ROS activate tumor suppressor p53, which modulates cell cycle progression and promotes cell survival. Transcriptional profiling of p53 targets confirms upregulation of antioxidant and cycB-Cdk1 inhibitor genes without induction of apoptotic genes. This study implicates Drosophila RNase ZL in a novel retrograde signaling pathway initiated by the damage in mitochondria and manifested in a cell cycle delay before the mitotic entry. PMID:26553808

  11. Reduced mitochondrial respiration in the ischemic as well as in the remote nonischemic region in postmyocardial infarction remodeling.

    PubMed

    Galan, Diogo T; Bito, Virginie; Claus, Piet; Holemans, Patricia; Abi-Char, Joëlle; Nagaraju, Chandan K; Dries, Eef; Vermeulen, Kristel; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Sipido, Karin R; Driesen, Ronald B

    2016-11-01

    Scarring and remodeling of the left ventricle (LV) after myocardial infarction (MI) results in ischemic cardiomyopathy with reduced contractile function. Regional differences related to persisting ischemia may exist. We investigated the hypothesis that mitochondrial function and structure is altered in the myocardium adjacent to MI with reduced perfusion (MIadjacent) and less so in the remote, nonischemic myocardium (MIremote). We used a pig model of chronic coronary stenosis and MI (n = 13). Functional and perfusion MR imaging 6 wk after intervention showed reduced ejection fraction and increased global wall stress compared with sham-operated animals (Sham; n = 14). Regional strain in MIadjacent was reduced with reduced contractile reserve; in MIremote strain was also reduced but responsive to dobutamine and perfusion was normal compared with Sham. Capillary density was unchanged. Cardiac myocytes isolated from both regions had reduced basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate, as well as through complex I and II, but complex IV activity was unchanged. Reduced respiration was not associated with detectable reduction of mitochondrial density. There was no significant change in AMPK or glucose transporter expression levels, but glycogen content was significantly increased in both MIadjacent and MIremote Glycogen accumulation was predominantly perinuclear; mitochondria in this area were smaller but only in MIadjacent where also subsarcolemmal mitochondria were smaller. In conclusion, after MI reduction of mitochondrial respiration and glycogen accumulation occur in all LV regions suggesting that reduced perfusion does not lead to additional specific changes and that increased hemodynamic load is the major driver for changes in mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Troglitazone Stimulates Cancer Cell Uptake of 18F-FDG by Suppressing Mitochondrial Respiration and Augments Sensitivity to Glucose Restriction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Su Jin; Jung, Kyung-Ho; Quach, Cung Hoa Thien; Park, Jin-Won; Lee, Jin Hee; Cho, Young Seok; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated how troglitazone influences cancer cell glucose metabolism and uptake of (18)F-FDG, and we investigated its molecular mechanism and relation to the drug's anticancer effect. Human T47D breast and HCT116 colon cancer cells that had been treated with troglitazone were measured for (18)F-FDG uptake, lactate release, oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular reactive oxygen species. Viable cell content was measured by sulforhodamine-B assays. Treatment with 20 μM troglitazone for 1 h acutely increased (18)F-FDG uptake in multiple breast cancer cell lines, whereas HCT116 cells showed a delayed reaction. In T47D cells, the response occurred in a dose-dependent (threefold increase by 40 μΜ) manner independent of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and was accompanied by a twofold increase of lactate production, consistent with enhanced glycolytic flux. Troglitazone-treated cells showed severe reductions of the oxygen consumption rate, indicating suppression of mitochondrial respiration, which was accompanied by significantly decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased concentration of reactive oxygen species. Troglitazone dose-dependently reduced T47D and HCT116 cell content, which was significantly potentiated by restriction of glucose availability. In T47D cells, cell reduction closely correlated with the magnitude of increase in relative (18)F-FDG uptake (r = 0.821, P = 0.001). Troglitazone stimulates cancer cell uptake of (18)F-FDG through a shift of metabolism toward glycolytic flux, likely as an adaptive response to impaired mitochondrial oxidative respiration. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors induce apoptosis in non-tumorigenic melan-a cells associated with inhibition of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Franco A; Zecchin, Karina G; La Guardia, Paolo G; Ortega, Rose M; Alberici, Luciane C; Costa, Rute A P; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Graner, Edgard; Castilho, Roger F; Vercesi, Aníbal E

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous synthesis of palmitate, a saturated long-chain fatty acid. In contrast to most normal tissues, a variety of human cancers overexpress FASN. One such cancer is cutaneous melanoma, in which the level of FASN expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We previously reported that two FASN inhibitors, cerulenin and orlistat, induce apoptosis in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of these inhibitors on non-tumorigenic melan-a cells. Cerulenin and orlistat treatments were found to induce apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation, in addition to inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activating caspases-9 and -3. Transfection with FASN siRNA did not result in apoptosis. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that treatment with the FASN inhibitors did not alter either the mitochondrial free fatty acid content or composition. This result suggests that cerulenin- and orlistat-induced apoptosis events are independent of FASN inhibition. Analysis of the energy-linked functions of melan-a mitochondria demonstrated the inhibition of respiration, followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the stimulation of superoxide anion generation. The inhibition of NADH-linked substrate oxidation was approximately 40% and 61% for cerulenin and orlistat treatments, respectively, and the inhibition of succinate oxidation was approximately 46% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, no significant inhibition occurred when respiration was supported by the complex IV substrate N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). The protection conferred by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicates that the FASN inhibitors induced apoptosis through an oxidative stress-associated mechanism. In combination, the present results demonstrate that cerulenin and orlistat induce

  14. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Induce Apoptosis in Non-Tumorigenic Melan-A Cells Associated with Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Rossato, Franco A.; Zecchin, Karina G.; La Guardia, Paolo G.; Ortega, Rose M.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Costa, Rute A. P.; Catharino, Rodrigo R.; Graner, Edgard; Castilho, Roger F.; Vercesi, Aníbal E.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous synthesis of palmitate, a saturated long-chain fatty acid. In contrast to most normal tissues, a variety of human cancers overexpress FASN. One such cancer is cutaneous melanoma, in which the level of FASN expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We previously reported that two FASN inhibitors, cerulenin and orlistat, induce apoptosis in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of these inhibitors on non-tumorigenic melan-a cells. Cerulenin and orlistat treatments were found to induce apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation, in addition to inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activating caspases-9 and -3. Transfection with FASN siRNA did not result in apoptosis. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that treatment with the FASN inhibitors did not alter either the mitochondrial free fatty acid content or composition. This result suggests that cerulenin- and orlistat-induced apoptosis events are independent of FASN inhibition. Analysis of the energy-linked functions of melan-a mitochondria demonstrated the inhibition of respiration, followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the stimulation of superoxide anion generation. The inhibition of NADH-linked substrate oxidation was approximately 40% and 61% for cerulenin and orlistat treatments, respectively, and the inhibition of succinate oxidation was approximately 46% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, no significant inhibition occurred when respiration was supported by the complex IV substrate N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). The protection conferred by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicates that the FASN inhibitors induced apoptosis through an oxidative stress-associated mechanism. In combination, the present results demonstrate that cerulenin and orlistat

  15. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  16. Mitochondrial respiration and microRNA expression in right and left atrium of patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Slagsvold, Katrine Hordnes; Johnsen, Anne Berit; Rognmo, Oivind; Høydal, Morten Andre; Wisløff, Ulrik; Wahba, Alexander

    2014-07-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia with a potential to cause serious complications. Mitochondria play central roles in cardiomyocyte function and have been implicated in AF pathophysiology. MicroRNA (miR) are suggested to influence both mitochondrial function and the development of AF. Yet mitochondrial function and miR expression remain largely unexplored in human atrial tissue. This study aims to investigate mitochondrial function and miR expression in the right (RA) and left atria (LA) of patients with AF and sinus rhythm (SR). Myocardial tissue from the RA and LA appendages was investigated in 37 patients with AF (n = 21) or SR (n = 16) undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and/or heart valve surgery. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in situ after tissue permeabilization by saponin. MiR expression was assessed by miR array and real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Maximal mitochondrial respiratory rate was increased in both RA and LA tissue of patients with AF vs. SR. Biatrial downregulation of miR-208a and upregulation of miR-106b, -144, and -451 were observed in AF vs. SR. In addition, miR-15b was upregulated in AF within RA only, and miR-106a, -18a, -18b, -19a, -19b, -23a, -25, -30a, -363, -486-5p, -590-5p, and -93 were upregulated in AF within LA only. These findings suggest that mitochondrial function and miR are involved in AF pathophysiology and should be areas of focus in the exploration for potential novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. [Effects of simulated warming on soil respiration in a cropland under winter wheat-soybean rotation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Shu-Tao; Hu, Zheng-Hua; Ren, Jing-Quan; Shen, Xiao-Shuai

    2012-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of simulated warming on soil respiration in a cropland under winter wheat-soybean rotation. Randomized experiments were carried out in the cropland. 6 Plots were arranged and there were 2 treatments, simulated warming and control. A portable soil CO2 fluxes system (LI-8100) was used to measure soil respiration rates. Soil CO2 production rates were determined by using a Barometric Process Separation (BaPS) method. Soil temperature and soil moisture were simultaneously determined when measuring soil respiration rates. Results indicated that soil respiration rates in different treatments showed similar seasonal variability, in accordance with the variability in soil temperature. Seasonal mean soil respiration rates for simulated warming and control treatments were 3.54 and 2.49 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively, during the winter wheat growth season, while they were 4.80 and 4.14 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively, during the soybean growth season. Simulated warming significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced soil respiration during both the winter wheat and soybean growth seasons. The impact of simulated warming on soil respiration was particularly obvious during the later growth stages of winter wheat (from heading to maturity stages) and soybean (from flowing to maturity stages). Further investigations suggested that, for both the winter wheat and soybean growth seasons, the relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature could be well explained (P < 0.01) by exponential functions. The temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil respiration in the simulated warming treatments was significantly higher than that in the control treatments. The Q10 values for the simulated warming and control treatments were 1.83 and 1.26, respectively, during the winter wheat growth season, while they were 2.85 and 1.70, respectively, during the soybean growth season. This study showed that simulated warming significantly increased

  18. [Endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit: dependence of respiration of secretory cells on activity of ryanodine- and IP3 - sensitive Ca(2+)-channels].

    PubMed

    Velykopols'ka, O Iu; Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2012-01-01

    Using Clark oxygen electrode, dependence of mitochondrial functions on Ca(2+)-release channels activity of Chironomus plumosus L. larvae salivary glands suspension was investigated. Cells were ATP-permeabilized in order to enable penetration of exogenous oxidative substrates. Activation of plasmalemmal P2X-receptors (as well as P2Y-receptors) per se does not modify the endogenous respiration of salivary gland suspension. That is, Ca(2+)-influx from extracellular medium does not influence functional activity of mitochondria, although they are located along the basal part of the plasma membrane. Activation of RyRs intensifies endogenous respiration and pyruvate-malate-stimulated respiration, but not succinate-stimulated respiration. Neither activation of IP3Rs (via P2Y-receptors activation), nor their inhibition alters endogenous respiration. Nevertheless, IP3Rs inhibition by 2-APB intensifies succinate-stimulated respiration. All abovementioned facts testify that Ca2+, released from stores via channels, alters functional activity of mitochondria, and undoubtedly confirm the existence of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit in Ch. plumosus larvae salivary glands secretory cells. In steady state of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit the spontaneous activity of IP3Rs is observed; released through IP3Rs, Ca2+ is accumulated in mitochondria via uniporter and modulates oxidative processes. Activation of RyRs induces the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to the active state, which is required to intensify cell respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. As expected, the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to inactivated state (i. e. inhibition of Ca(2+)-release channels at excessive [Ca2+]i) limits the duration of signal transduction, has protective nature and prevents apoptosis.

  19. RESPIRATION AND MITOCHONDRIAL CONTENT IN SINGLE NEURONS OF THE SUPRAOPTIC NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Eneström, Sverker; Hamberger, Anders

    1968-01-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the possible correlation of total volume of mitochondria per cell with the rate of succinate oxidation in isolated nerve cell bodies, after various functional stresses in the experimental animals. Significant cytological effects were found in the nerve cells of the supraoptic nucleus in rats which had been thirsting for 4–12 days or had been given 2% sodium chloride solution as a substitute for drinking water for a few weeks. Quantitation of mitochondria was done from electron micrographs. The cell volumes were calculated from sections of Epon-embedded tissue under phase-contrast microscopy. Succinate oxidation was measured on groups of 10 nerve cells with the microdiver technique. As a result of either thirst or sodium chloride load, the volume of mitochondria per nerve cell more than doubled. The rate of succinate oxidation was not changed after the rats had been thirsting but was enhanced by over 100% after they had drunk sodium chloride. A linear relationship was found for the amount of mitochondria versus respiration in the supraoptic neurons for all experimental groups except the thirsting animals. The mitochondria in the supraoptic neurons from thirsting animals were of the same size or smaller than those in controls, whereas in animals given sodium chloride solution the mitochondria were considerably enlarged. The observed effects were specific for the supraoptic nucleus. PMID:4874493

  20. Electron transport chain defect and inefficient respiration may underlie pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites)-associated mitochondrial dysfunction in broilers.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, D; Beers, K; Bottje, W G

    2001-04-01

    By using a series of chemical inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, a site-specific defect in the electron transport chain was identified in mitochondria obtained from broilers with pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS; ascites). Located at the succinate:ubiquinone oxido-reductase (Complex II:CoQ) interface, this defect would allow electrons to leak from the respiratory chain and consume oxygen by forming reactive oxygen species at a greater rate than in control mitochondria. Lower levels of the primary antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol, and glutathione (GSH) in PHS mitochondria confirmed the presence of oxidative stress. Respiration studies of PHS liver mitochondria also revealed disease-associated decreases in the respiratory control ratio (RCR, an index of electron transport chain coupling). Differences in the RCR as well as the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to O ratio (an index of oxidative phosphorylation) between control and PHS mitochondria were accentuated by sequential additions of ADP to isolated mitochondria. In a second experiment, similar improvements in functional indices following sequential additions of ADP and responses to respiratory chain inhibitors were observed in liver mitochondria isolated from Single Comb White Leghorn (SCWL) males (resistant to PHS) similar to that observed in control broiler mitochondria in Experiment 1. The combined results indicate the presence of a site-specific defect at either Complex II, ubiquinone, or both in liver mitochondria obtained from broilers with PHS that may be responsible for the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction observed in this costly metabolic disease.

  1. Anthocyanins block ischemia-induced apoptosis in the perfused heart and support mitochondrial respiration potentially by reducing cytosolic cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Skemiene, Kristina; Rakauskaite, Gintare; Trumbeckaite, Sonata; Liobikas, Julius; Brown, Guy C; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2013-01-01

    Anthocynanins, found in fruits and vegetables, have a variety of protective properties, which have generally been attributed to their antioxidant capacity. However, antioxidants are generally strong reductants, and some reductants have been found to block apoptosis by reducing cytosolic cytochrome c, which prevents caspase activation. We tested the ability of various anthocyanins: to reduce cytochrome c, to support cytochrome c-induced mitochondrial respiration and to inhibit apoptosis induced by heart ischemia. Anthocyanins such as delphinidin-3-glucoside (Dp3G) and cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3G) were able to reduce cytochrome c directly and rapidly, whereas pelargonidin-3-glucoside (Pg3G), malvinidin-3-glucoside (Mv3G) and peonidin-3-glucoside (Pn3G) had relatively low cytochrome c reducing activities. Dp3G and Cy3G but not Pg3G supported mitochondrial state 4 respiration in the presence of exogenous cytochrome c. Pre-perfusion of hearts with 20 μM Cy3G but not Pg3G prevented ischemia-induced caspase activation. This suggests that the ability of anthocyanins to block caspase activation may be due to their ability to reduce cytosolic cytochrome c. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaptation and therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration and improved glucose metabolism in nondiabetic obese women during a very low calorie dietary intervention leading to rapid weight loss.

    PubMed

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Svendsen, Pernille F; Skovbro, Mette; Boushel, Robert; Haugaard, Steen B; Schjerling, Peter; Schrauwen, Patrick; Hesselink, Matthijs K C; Nilas, Lisbeth; Madsbad, Sten; Dela, Flemming

    2009-08-01

    Reduced oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle has been proposed to lead to accumulation of intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) and insulin resistance. We have measured mitochondrial respiration before and after a 10% low-calorie-induced weight loss in young obese women to examine the relationship between mitochondrial function, IMTG, and insulin resistance. Nine obese women (age, 32.3 years [SD, 3.0]; body mass index, 33.4 kg/m(2) [SD, 2.6]) completed a 53-day (SE, 3.8) very low calorie diet (VLCD) of 500 to 600 kcal/d without altering physical activity. The target of the intervention was a 10% weight loss; and measurements of mitochondrial respiration, IMTG, respiratory exchange ratio, citrate synthase activity, mitochondrial DNA copy number, plasma insulin, 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test, and free fatty acids were performed before and after weight loss. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in permeabilized muscle fibers using high-resolution respirometry. Average weight loss was 11.5% (P < .05), but the levels of IMTG remained unchanged. Fasting plasma glucose, plasma insulin homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and insulin sensitivity index (composite) obtained during 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test improved significantly. Mitochondrial respiration per milligram tissue decreased by approximately 25% (P < .05), but citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA copy number remained unchanged. Respiratory exchange ratio decreased from 0.87 (SE, 0.01) to 0.79 (SE, 0.02) (P < .05) as a sign of increased whole-body fat oxidation. Markers of insulin sensitivity improved after the very low calorie diet; but mitochondrial function decreased, and IMTG remained unchanged. Our results do not support a direct relationship between mitochondrial function and insulin resistance in young obese women and do not support a direct relationship between IMTG and insulin sensitivity in young obese women during weight loss.

  3. Effects of chloroplast dysfunction on mitochondria: white sectors in variegated leaves have higher mitochondrial DNA levels and lower dark respiration rates than green sectors.

    PubMed

    Toshoji, Haruka; Katsumata, Tomomi; Takusagawa, Mari; Yusa, Yoichi; Sakai, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Co-ordination between plastids and mitochondria is so essential that there should be extensive inter-organellar crosstalk during development of plant cells. Indeed, chloroplast dysfunction in white leaves of plastid ribosome-deficient mutant barley, albostrians, is reportedly accompanied by increases in the levels of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial transcripts, suggesting that (i) developmental/physiological status of plastids (or heterotrophic growth condition of albino leaves) can affect the status of mitochondrial genome, and (ii) the function of the affected mitochondria may also be up-regulated accordingly. However, functional aspects of the mitochondria affected by chloroplast dysfunction have not yet been examined in detail. Here, we examined the effects of chloroplast dysfunction on mitochondrial DNA level and dark respiration rate, by comparing white and green sectors within individual variegated leaves, using 12 ornamental plants as experimental materials. The pattern of leaf variegation differed from species to species, suggesting that different mechanisms were involved in the formation of white sectors in different species. Quantitative hybridization analysis revealed that mitochondrial DNA levels were generally higher in white sectors than in green sectors. In spite of the elevated mitochondrial DNA levels, however, dark respiration rates in white sectors were generally lower than those in green sectors. Several possible mechanisms for elevation of mitochondrial DNA level and suppression of dark respiration rates in white sectors are discussed.

  4. Cardioprotection by modulation of mitochondrial respiration during ischemia–reperfusion: Role of apoptosis-inducing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Aijun; Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Blockade of electron transport prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria during IR. •Blockade of electron transport decreases caspase-independent cell death during IR. •Mitochondrial AIF content is down-regulated in Harlequin mice. •Blockade of electron transport protects Harlequin mouse hearts during IR. •Amobarbital protection is partially dependent on mitochondrial AIF content. -- Abstract: The transient, reversible blockade of electron transport (BET) during ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion protects mitochondria and decreases cardiac injury. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is located within the mitochondrial intermembrane space. A release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nucleus triggers caspase-independent cell death. We asked if BET prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria as a mechanism of protection in the buffer perfused heart. BET during ischemia with amobarbital, a rapidly reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, attenuated a release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol, in turn decreasing the formation of cleaved and activated PARP-1. These results suggest that BET-mediated protection may occur through prevention of the loss of AIF from mitochondria during ischemia–reperfusion. In order to further clarify the role of mitochondrial AIF in BET-mediated protection, Harlequin (Hq) mice, a genetic model with mitochondrial AIF deficiency, were used to test whether BET could still decrease cell injury in Hq mouse hearts during reperfusion. BET during ischemia protected Hq mouse hearts against ischemia–reperfusion injury and improved mitochondrial function in these hearts during reperfusion. Thus, cardiac injury can still be decreased in the presence of down-regulated mitochondrial AIF content. Taken together, BET during ischemia protects both hearts with normal mitochondrial AIF content and hearts with mitochondrial AIF deficiency. Although preservation of mitochondrial AIF content plays a key role in

  5. Bcl-2 inhibitors sensitize tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis by uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration in human leukemic CEM cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ji-Hui; Yu, Ming; Liu, Feng-Ting; Newland, Adrian C; Jia, Li

    2004-05-15

    Previous studies have shown that the lymphoblastic leukemia CEM cell line is resistant to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis because of a low expression of caspase-8. Bcl-2 inhibitors, BH3I-2' and HA14-1, are small cell-permeable nonpeptide compounds, are able to induce apoptosis by mediating cytochrome c release, and also lead to dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim). This study aimed to use the Bcl-2 inhibitors to sensitize CEM cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by switching on the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. We found that a low dose of BH3I-2' or HA14-1, which did not induce cytochrome c release, greatly sensitized CEM cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In a similar manner to the classical uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), both BH3I-2' and HA14-1 induced a reduction in DeltaPsim, a generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), an increased mitochondrial respiration, and a decreased ATP synthesis. This uncoupling function of the Bcl-2 inhibitors was responsible for the synergy with TRAIL-induced apoptosis. CCCP per se did not induce apoptosis but again sensitized CEM cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis by uncoupling mitochondrial respiration. The uncoupling effect facilitated TRAIL-induced Bax conformational change and cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Inhibition of caspases failed to block TRAIL-mediated cell death when mitochondrial respiration was uncoupled. We observed that BH3I-2', HA14-1, or CCCP can overcome resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant cell lines, such as CEM, HL-60, and U937. Our results suggest that the uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration can sensitize leukemic cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. However, caspase activation per se does not represent an irreversible point of commitment to TRAIL-induced cell death when mitochondrial respiration is uncoupled.

  6. High mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic capacity represent a metabolic phenotype of human tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Malinarich, Frano; Duan, Kaibo; Hamid, Raudhah Abdull; Bijin, Au; Lin, Wu Xue; Poidinger, Michael; Fairhurst, Anna-Marie; Connolly, John E

    2015-06-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) regulate the balance between immunity and tolerance through selective activation by environmental and pathogen-derived triggers. To characterize the rapid changes that occur during this process, we analyzed the underlying metabolic activity across a spectrum of functional DC activation states, from immunogenic to tolerogenic. We found that in contrast to the pronounced proinflammatory program of mature DCs, tolerogenic DCs displayed a markedly augmented catabolic pathway, related to oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis. Functionally, tolerogenic DCs demonstrated the highest mitochondrial oxidative activity, production of reactive oxygen species, superoxide, and increased spare respiratory capacity. Furthermore, assembled, electron transport chain complexes were significantly more abundant in tolerogenic DCs. At the level of glycolysis, tolerogenic and mature DCs showed similar glycolytic rates, but glycolytic capacity and reserve were more pronounced in tolerogenic DCs. The enhanced glycolytic reserve and respiratory capacity observed in these DCs were reflected in a higher metabolic plasticity to maintain intracellular ATP content. Interestingly, tolerogenic and mature DCs manifested substantially different expression of proteins involved in the fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathway, and FAO activity was significantly higher in tolerogenic DCs. Inhibition of FAO prevented the function of tolerogenic DCs and partially restored T cell stimulatory capacity, demonstrating their dependence on this pathway. Overall, tolerogenic DCs show metabolic signatures of increased oxidative phosphorylation programing, a shift in redox state, and high plasticity for metabolic adaptation. These observations point to a mechanism for rapid genome-wide reprograming by modulation of underlying cellular metabolism during DC differentiation.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in tissue homogenates and calculation of effective P/O ratios.

    PubMed

    Salin, Karine; Villasevil, Eugenia M; Auer, Sonya K; Anderson, Graeme J; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B; Chinopoulos, Christos

    2016-10-01

    The use of tissue homogenate has greatly aided the study of the functioning of mitochondria. However, the amount of ATP produced per oxygen molecule consumed, that is, the effective P/O ratio, has never been measured directly in tissue homogenate. Here we combine and refine existing methods previously used in permeabilized cells and isolated mitochondria to simultaneously measure mitochondrial ATP production (JATP) and oxygen consumption (JO2) in tissue homogenate. A major improvement over existing methods is in the control of ATPases that otherwise interfere with the ATP assay: our modified technique facilitates simultaneous measurement of the rates of "uncorrected" ATP synthesis and of ATP hydrolysis, thus minimizing the amount of tissue and time needed. Finally, we develop a novel method of calculating effective P/O ratios which corrects measurements of JATP and JO2 for rates of nonmitochondrial ATP hydrolysis and respiration, respectively. Measurements of JATP and JO2 in liver homogenates from brown trout (Salmo trutta) were highly reproducible, although activity declined once homogenates were 2 h old. We compared mitochondrial properties from fed and food-deprived animals to demonstrate that the method can detect mitochondrial flexibility in P/O ratios in response to nutritional state. This method simplifies studies examining the mitochondrial bioenergetics of tissue homogenates, obviating the need for differential centrifugation or chemical permeabilization and avoiding the use of nonmitochondrial ATPase inhibitors. We conclude that our approach for characterizing effective P/O ratio opens up new possibilities in the study of mitochondrial function in very small samples, where the use of other methods is limited. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  8. Cyanide-resistant respiration in Euglena gracilis does not correlate with mitochondrial cytochrome O content

    SciTech Connect

    Devars, S.; Uribe, A.; Torres-Marquez, M.E.; Gonzalez-Halphen, D. ); Moreno-Sanchez, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Basal respiration Euglena gracilis cells grown in the dark with distinct carbon sources showed different sensitivity to KCN: 1-10% inhibition by 0.1 mM KCM for cells grown with glutamate+malate (g+m) and 40-55% for those grown with peptone+acetate (p+a). The basal respiration was stimulated 1.6 to 2.4 times by TMPD: the values reached by cells grown in g+m resembled those of p+a cells, suggesting a similar maximal cytochrome oxidase activity in both types. Dixon plots for KCM showed two components in basal and TMPD-stimulated respiration with K{sub i} values of 4-10 and 70-80 {mu}M for TMPC-stimulated respiration and 20-50 and 400-600 {mu}M for basal activity. Thus, the distinct sensitivities to KCN seems not to be due to a different content of aa{sub 3} in the cells, not to different K{sub i} for the inhibitor. Diphenyl amine, an inhibitor of alternate respiratory pathways, inhibited 85-95% basal respiration with a single K{sub i} value of 0.15-0.2 mM and 40-60% TMPD-stimulated activity. Determination of cytochrome o content, the postulated alternate oxidase, showed no differences in the cells grown with distinct carbon sources. Then the different sensitivity to cyanide is more likely related to the oxidation of different substrates.

  9. METHYLENE BLUE IMPROVES MITOCHONDRIAL RESPIRATION AND DECREASES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN A SUBSTRATE-DEPENDENT MANNER IN DIABETIC RAT HEARTS.

    PubMed

    Duicu, Oana M; Privistirescu, Andreea; Wolf, Adrian; Petrus, Alexandra; Dănilă, Maria D; Ratiu, Corina; Muntean, Danina M; Sturza, Adrian

    2017-07-24

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been systematically associated with compromised mitochondrial energetics and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that underlie its progression to heart failure. Methylene blue is a redox-drug with reported protective effects mainly on brain mitochondria. The present study was purported to characterize the effects of acute administration of methylene blue on mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 production, and calcium sensitivity in rat heart mitochondria isolated from healthy and 2 months (streptozotocin-induced) diabetic rats. Mitochondrial respiratory function was assessed by high-resolution respirometry. Hydrogen peroxide production and calcium retention capacity were measured spectrofluorimetrically. The addition of methylene blue (0.1 μM) elicited an increase in oxygen consumption of mitochondria energized with complex I and II substrates in both normal and diseased mitochondria. Interestingly, methylene blue elicited a significant increase in H2O2 release in the presence of CI substrates (glutamate-malate), but had an opposite effect in mitochondria energized with CII substrate (succinate). No changes in the calcium retention capacity of healthy or diabetic mitochondria were found in the presence of methylene blue. In conclusion, in cardiac mitochondria isolated from diabetic and non-diabetic rat hearts, methylene blue improved respiratory function and elicited a dichotomic, substrate-dependent effect on ROS production.

  10. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-09-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. PMID:26195569

  12. Mitochondrial protein import under kinase surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Opalińska, Magdalena; Meisinger, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Despite the simplicity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its basic cellular machinery tremendously mirrors that of higher eukaryotic counterparts. Thus, this unicellular organism turned out to be an invaluable model system to study the countless mechanisms that govern life of the cell. Recently, it has also enabled the deciphering of signalling pathways that control flux of mitochondrial proteins to the organelle according to metabolic requirements. For decades mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles that are only partially incorporated into cellular signalling networks. Consequently, only little has been known about the role of reversible phosphorylation as a meaningful mechanism that orchestrates mitochondrial biology accordingly to cellular needs. Therefore, research in this direction has been vastly neglected. However, findings over the past few years have changed this view and new exciting fields in mitochondrial biology have emerged. Here, we summarize recent discoveries in the yeast model system that point towards a vital role of reversible phosphorylation in regulation of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:28357222

  13. Variations in dark respiration and mitochondrial numbers within needles of Pinus radiata grown in ambient or elevated CO2 partial pressure.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kevin L; Anderson, O Roger; Tissue, David T; Turnbull, Matthew H; Whitehead, David

    2004-03-01

    Within-leaf variations in cell size, mitochondrial numbers and dark respiration rates were compared in the most recently expanded tip, the mid-section and base of needles of Pinus radiata D. Don trees grown for 4 years in open-top chambers at ambient (36 Pa) or elevated (65 Pa) carbon dioxide partial pressure (p(CO2)a). Mitochondrial numbers and respiratory activity varied along the length of the needle, with the highest number of mitochondria per unit cytoplasm and the highest rate of respiration per unit leaf area at the base of the needle. Regardless of the location of the cells (tip, middle or basal sections), needles collected from trees grown in elevated p(CO2)a had nearly twice the number of mitochondria per unit cytoplasm as those grown in ambient p(CO2)a. This stimulation of mitochondrial density by growth at elevated p(CO2)a was greater at the tip of the needle (2.7 times more mitochondria than in needles grown in ambient CO2) than at the base of the needle (1.7 times). The mean size of individual mitochondria was unaffected either by growth at elevated p(CO2)a or by position along the needle. Tree growth at elevated p(CO2)a had a variable effect on respiration per unit leaf area, significantly increasing respiration in the tip of the needles (+25%) and decreasing respiration at the mid-section and base of the needles (-14% and -25%, respectively). Although a simple relationship between respiration per unit leaf area and mitochondrial number per unit cytoplasm was found within each CO2 treatment, the variable effect of growth at elevated p(CO2)a on respiration along the length of the needles indicates that a more complex relationship must determine the association between structure and function in these needles.

  14. The acclimation of photosynthesis and respiration to temperature in the C3 -C4 intermediate Salsola divaricata: induction of high respiratory CO2 release under low temperature.

    PubMed

    Gandin, Anthony; Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E; Cousins, Asaph B

    2014-11-01

    Photosynthesis in C(3) -C(4) intermediates reduces carbon loss by photorespiration through refixing photorespired CO(2) within bundle sheath cells. This is beneficial under warm temperatures where rates of photorespiration are high; however, it is unknown how photosynthesis in C(3) -C(4) plants acclimates to growth under cold conditions. Therefore, the cold tolerance of the C(3) -C(4) Salsola divaricata was tested to determine whether it reverts to C(3) photosynthesis when grown under low temperatures. Plants were grown under cold (15/10 °C), moderate (25/18 °C) or hot (35/25 °C) day/night temperatures and analysed to determine how photosynthesis, respiration and C(3) -C(4) features acclimate to these growth conditions. The CO(2) compensation point and net rates of CO(2) assimilation in cold-grown plants changed dramatically when measured in response to temperature. However, this was not due to the loss of C(3) -C(4) intermediacy, but rather to a large increase in mitochondrial respiration supported primarily by the non-phosphorylating alternative oxidative pathway (AOP) and, to a lesser degree, the cytochrome oxidative pathway (COP). The increase in respiration and AOP capacity in cold-grown plants likely protects against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria and photodamage in chloroplasts by consuming excess reductant via the alternative mitochondrial respiratory electron transport chain.

  15. Pinus sylvestris switches respiration substrates under shading but not during drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Fischer, Sarah; Hanf, Stefan; Frosch, Torsten; Poppp, Jürgen; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Reduced carbon assimilation during prolonged drought forces trees to rely on stored carbon to maintain vital processes like respiration. It has been shown, however, that the use of carbohydrates, a major carbon storage pool and main respiratory substrate in plants, strongly declines with deceasing plant hydration. Yet, no empirical evidence has been produced to what degree other carbon storage compounds like lipids and proteins may fuel respiration during drought. We exposed young scots pine trees to carbon limitation using either drought or shading and assessed respiratory substrate use by monitoring the respiratory quotient, δ13C of respired CO2and concentrations of the major storage compounds, i.e. carbohydrates (COH), lipids and amino acids. Generally, respiration was dominated by the most abundant substrate. Only shaded trees shifted from carbohydrate-dominated to lipid-dominated respiration and showed progressive carbohydrate depletion. In drought trees respiration was strongly reduced and fueled with carbohydrates from also strongly reduced carbon assimilation. Initial COH content was maintained during drought probably due to reduced COH mobilization and use and the maintained COH content may have prevented lipid catabolism via sugar signaling. Our results suggest that respiratory substrates other than carbohydrates are used under carbohydrate limitation but not during drought. Thus, respiratory substrate change cannot provide an efficient means to counterbalance carbon limitation under natural drought.

  16. Pinus sylvestris switches respiration substrates under shading but not during drought.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sarah; Hanf, Stefan; Frosch, Torsten; Gleixner, Gerd; Popp, Jürgen; Trumbore, Susan; Hartmann, Henrik

    2015-08-01

    Reduced carbon (C) assimilation during prolonged drought forces trees to rely on stored C to maintain vital processes like respiration. It has been shown, however, that the use of carbohydrates, a major C storage pool and apparently the main respiratory substrate in plants, strongly declines with decreasing plant hydration. Yet no empirical evidence has been produced to what degree other C storage compounds like lipids and proteins may fuel respiration during drought. We exposed young scots pine trees to C limitation using either drought or shading and assessed respiratory substrate use by monitoring the respiratory quotient, δ(13) C of respired CO2 and concentrations of the major storage compounds, that is, carbohydrates, lipids and amino acids. Only shaded trees shifted from carbohydrate-dominated to lipid-dominated respiration and showed progressive carbohydrate depletion. In drought trees, the fraction of carbohydrates used in respiration did not decline but respiration rates were strongly reduced. The lower consumption and potentially allocation from other organs may have caused initial carbohydrate content to remain constant during the experiment. Our results suggest that respiratory substrates other than carbohydrates are used under carbohydrate limitation but not during drought. Thus, respiratory substrate shift cannot provide an efficient means to counterbalance C limitation under natural drought.

  17. Cold acclimation allows Drosophila flies to maintain mitochondrial functioning under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Colinet, Hervé; Renault, David; Roussel, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Environmental stress generally disturbs cellular homeostasis. Researchers have hypothesized that chilling injury is linked to a shortage of ATP. However, previous studies conducted on insects exposed to nonfreezing low temperatures presented conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the mitochondrial bioenergetics of Drosophila melanogaster flies exposed to chronic cold stress (4 °C). We assessed mitochondrial oxygen consumption while monitoring the rate of ATP synthesis at various times (0, 1, 2, and 3 days) during prolonged cold stress and at two assay temperatures (25 and 4 °C). We compared organelle responses between cold-susceptible and cold-acclimated phenotypes. Continuous exposure to low temperature provoked temporal declines in the rates of mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis. Respiratory control ratios (RCRs) suggested that mitochondria were not critically uncoupled. Nevertheless, after 3 days of continuous cold stress, a sharp decline in the mitochondrial ATP synthesis rate was observed in control flies when they were assayed at low temperature. This change was associated with reduced survival capacity in control flies. In contrast, cold-acclimated flies exhibited high survival and maintained higher rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and coupling (i.e., higher RCRs). Adaptive changes due to cold acclimation observed in the whole organism were thus manifested in isolated mitochondria. Our observations suggest that cold tolerance is linked to the ability to maintain bioenergetics capacity under cold stress.

  18. Evolutionary implications of mitochondrial genetic variation: mitochondrial genetic effects on OXPHOS respiration and mitochondrial quantity change with age and sex in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J N; Pichaud, N; Camus, M F; Côté, G; Blier, P U; Dowling, D K

    2016-04-01

    The ancient acquisition of the mitochondrion into the ancestor of modern-day eukaryotes is thought to have been pivotal in facilitating the evolution of complex life. Mitochondria retain their own diminutive genome, with mitochondrial genes encoding core subunits involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Traditionally, it was assumed that there was little scope for genetic variation to accumulate and be maintained within the mitochondrial genome. However, in the past decade, mitochondrial genetic variation has been routinely tied to the expression of life-history traits such as fertility, development and longevity. To examine whether these broad-scale effects on life-history trait expression might ultimately find their root in mitochondrially mediated effects on core bioenergetic function, we measured the effects of genetic variation across twelve different mitochondrial haplotypes on respiratory capacity and mitochondrial quantity in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We used strains of flies that differed only in their mitochondrial haplotype, and tested each sex separately at two different adult ages. Mitochondrial haplotypes affected both respiratory capacity and mitochondrial quantity. However, these effects were highly context-dependent, with the genetic effects contingent on both the sex and the age of the flies. These sex- and age-specific genetic effects are likely to resonate across the entire organismal life-history, providing insights into how mitochondrial genetic variation may contribute to sex-specific trajectories of life-history evolution.

  19. Mitochondrial-targeted aryl hydrocarbon receptor and the impact of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on cellular respiration and the mitochondrial proteome.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Dornbos, Peter; Steidemann, Michelle; Dunivin, Taylor K; Rizzo, Mike; LaPres, John J

    2016-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor within the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain superfamily. Exposure to the most potent AHR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), is associated with various pathological effects including metabolic syndrome. While research over the last several years has demonstrated a role for oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction in AHR-dependent TCDD-induced toxicity, the role of the mitochondria in this process has not been fully explored. Our previous research suggested that a portion of the cellular pool of AHR could be found in the mitochondria (mitoAHR). Using a protease protection assay with digitonin extraction, we have now shown that this mitoAHR is localized to the inter-membrane space (IMS) of the organelle. TCDD exposure induced a degradation of mitoAHR similar to that of cytosolic AHR. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that translocase of outer-mitochondrial membrane 20 (TOMM20) was involved in the import of AHR into the mitochondria. In addition, TCDD altered cellular respiration in an AHR-dependent manner to maintain respiratory efficiency as measured by oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) identified a battery of proteins within the mitochondrial proteome influenced by TCDD in an AHR-dependent manner. Among these, 17 proteins with fold changes≥2 are associated with various metabolic pathways, suggesting a role of mitochondrial retrograde signaling in TCDD-mediated pathologies. Collectively, these studies suggest that mitoAHR is localized to the IMS and AHR-dependent TCDD-induced toxicity, including metabolic dysfunction, wasting syndrome, and hepatic steatosis, involves mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle but not cardiac muscle of the green-striped burrowing frog, a natural model of muscle disuse.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Beau D; Hickey, Anthony J R; Cramp, Rebecca L; Franklin, Craig E

    2014-04-01

    Suppression of disuse-induced muscle atrophy has been associated with altered mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mammals. However, despite extended hindlimb immobility, aestivating animals exhibit little skeletal muscle atrophy compared with artificially immobilised mammalian models. Therefore, we studied mitochondrial respiration and ROS (H2O2) production in permeabilised muscle fibres of the green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. Mitochondrial respiration within saponin-permeabilised skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres was measured concurrently with ROS production using high-resolution respirometry coupled to custom-made fluorometers. After 4 months of aestivation, C. alboguttata had significantly depressed whole-body metabolism by ~70% relative to control (active) frogs, and mitochondrial respiration in saponin-permeabilised skeletal muscle fibres decreased by almost 50% both in the absence of ADP and during oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial ROS production showed up to an 88% depression in aestivating skeletal muscle when malate, succinate and pyruvate were present at concentrations likely to reflect those in vivo. The percentage ROS released per O2 molecule consumed was also ~94% less at these concentrations, indicating an intrinsic difference in ROS production capacities during aestivation. We also examined mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in permeabilised cardiac muscle fibres and found that aestivating frogs maintained respiratory flux and ROS production at control levels. These results show that aestivating C. alboguttata has the capacity to independently regulate mitochondrial function in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Furthermore, this work indicates that ROS production can be suppressed in the disused skeletal muscle of aestivating frogs, which may in turn protect against potential oxidative damage and preserve skeletal muscle structure during aestivation and following arousal.

  1. From the Cover: Arsenite Uncouples Mitochondrial Respiration and Induces a Warburg-like Effect in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Godebo, Tewodros R; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Maurer, Laura L; Hirschey, Matthew D; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-08-01

    Millions of people worldwide are chronically exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. Despite decades of research studying the carcinogenic potential of arsenic, the mechanisms by which arsenic causes cancer and other diseases remain poorly understood. Mitochondria appear to be an important target of arsenic toxicity. The trivalent arsenical, arsenite, can induce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, inhibit enzymes involved in energy metabolism, and induce aerobic glycolysis in vitro, suggesting that metabolic dysfunction may be important in arsenic-induced disease. Here, using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a novel metabolic inhibition assay, we report an in vivo induction of aerobic glycolysis following arsenite exposure. Furthermore, arsenite exposure induced severe mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered pyruvate metabolism; reduced steady-state ATP levels, ATP-linked respiration and spare respiratory capacity; and increased proton leak. We also found evidence that induction of autophagy is an important protective response to arsenite exposure. Because these results demonstrate that mitochondria are an important in vivo target of arsenite toxicity, we hypothesized that deficiencies in mitochondrial electron transport chain genes, which cause mitochondrial disease in humans, would sensitize nematodes to arsenite. In agreement with this, nematodes deficient in electron transport chain complexes I, II, and III, but not ATP synthase, were sensitive to arsenite exposure, thus identifying a novel class of gene-environment interactions that warrant further investigation in the human populace. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Arabidopsis kinesin KP1 specifically interacts with VDAC3, a mitochondrial protein, and regulates respiration during seed germination at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Yong; Chen, Zi-Wei; Xu, Tao; Qu, Zhe; Pan, Xiao-Di; Qin, Xing-Hua; Ren, Dong-Tao; Liu, Guo-Qin

    2011-03-01

    The involvement of cytoskeleton-related proteins in regulating mitochondrial respiration has been revealed in mammalian cells. However, it is unclear if there is a relationship between the microtubule-based motor protein kinesin and mitochondrial respiration. In this research, we demonstrate that a plant-specific kinesin, Kinesin-like protein 1 (KP1; At KIN14 h), is involved in respiratory regulation during seed germination at a low temperature. Using in vitro biochemical methods and in vivo transgenic cell observations, we demonstrate that KP1 is able to localize to mitochondria via its tail domain (C terminus) and specifically interacts with a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 3 (VDAC3). Targeting of the KP1-tail to mitochondria is dependent on the presence of VDAC3. When grown at 4° C, KP1 dominant-negative mutants (TAILOEs) and vdac3 mutants exhibited a higher seed germination frequency. All germinating seeds of the kp1 and vdac3 mutants had increased oxygen consumption; the respiration balance between the cytochrome pathway and the alternative oxidase pathway was disrupted, and the ATP level was reduced. We conclude that the plant-specific kinesin, KP1, specifically interacts with VDAC3 on the mitochondrial outer membrane and that both KP1 and VDAC3 regulate aerobic respiration during seed germination at low temperature.

  3. Arabidopsis Kinesin KP1 Specifically Interacts with VDAC3, a Mitochondrial Protein, and Regulates Respiration during Seed Germination at Low Temperature[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Yong; Chen, Zi-Wei; Xu, Tao; Qu, Zhe; Pan, Xiao-Di; Qin, Xing-Hua; Ren, Dong-Tao; Liu, Guo-Qin

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of cytoskeleton-related proteins in regulating mitochondrial respiration has been revealed in mammalian cells. However, it is unclear if there is a relationship between the microtubule-based motor protein kinesin and mitochondrial respiration. In this research, we demonstrate that a plant-specific kinesin, Kinesin-like protein 1 (KP1; At KIN14 h), is involved in respiratory regulation during seed germination at a low temperature. Using in vitro biochemical methods and in vivo transgenic cell observations, we demonstrate that KP1 is able to localize to mitochondria via its tail domain (C terminus) and specifically interacts with a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 3 (VDAC3). Targeting of the KP1-tail to mitochondria is dependent on the presence of VDAC3. When grown at 4°C, KP1 dominant-negative mutants (TAILOEs) and vdac3 mutants exhibited a higher seed germination frequency. All germinating seeds of the kp1 and vdac3 mutants had increased oxygen consumption; the respiration balance between the cytochrome pathway and the alternative oxidase pathway was disrupted, and the ATP level was reduced. We conclude that the plant-specific kinesin, KP1, specifically interacts with VDAC3 on the mitochondrial outer membrane and that both KP1 and VDAC3 regulate aerobic respiration during seed germination at low temperature. PMID:21406623

  4. T cell metabolism. The protein LEM promotes CD8⁺ T cell immunity through effects on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Okoye, Isobel; Wang, Lihui; Pallmer, Katharina; Richter, Kirsten; Ichimura, Takahuru; Haas, Robert; Crouse, Josh; Choi, Onjee; Heathcote, Dean; Lovo, Elena; Mauro, Claudio; Abdi, Reza; Oxenius, Annette; Rutschmann, Sophie; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2015-05-29

    Protective CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity requires a massive expansion in cell number and the development of long-lived memory cells. Using forward genetics in mice, we identified an orphan protein named lymphocyte expansion molecule (LEM) that promoted antigen-dependent CD8(+) T cell proliferation, effector function, and memory cell generation in response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Generation of LEM-deficient mice confirmed these results. Through interaction with CR6 interacting factor (CRIF1), LEM controlled the levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and respiration, resulting in the production of pro-proliferative mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS). LEM provides a link between immune activation and the expansion of protective CD8(+) T cells driven by OXPHOS and represents a pathway for the restoration of long-term protective immunity based on metabolically modified cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Calcium-regulation of mitochondrial respiration maintains ATP homeostasis and requires ARALAR/AGC1-malate aspartate shuttle in intact cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Folch, Irene; Rueda, Carlos B; Amigo, Ignacio; del Arco, Araceli; Saheki, Takeyori; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2013-08-28

    Neuronal respiration is controlled by ATP demand and Ca2+ but the roles played by each are unknown, as any Ca2+ signal also impacts on ATP demand. Ca2+ can control mitochondrial function through Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial carriers, the aspartate-glutamate and ATP-Mg/Pi carriers, ARALAR/AGC1 and SCaMC-3, respectively, or in the matrix after Ca2+ transport through the Ca2+ uniporter. We have studied the role of Ca2+ signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in intact mouse cortical neurons in basal conditions and in response to increased workload caused by increases in [Na+]cyt (veratridine, high-K+ depolarization) and/or [Ca2+]cyt (carbachol). Respiration in nonstimulated neurons on 2.5-5 mm glucose depends on ARALAR-malate aspartate shuttle (MAS), with a 46% drop in aralar KO neurons. All stimulation conditions induced increased OCR (oxygen consumption rate) in the presence of Ca2+, which was prevented by BAPTA-AM loading (to preserve the workload), or in Ca2+-free medium (which also lowers cell workload). SCaMC-3 limits respiration only in response to high workloads and robust Ca2+ signals. In every condition tested Ca2+ activation of ARALAR-MAS was required to fully stimulate coupled respiration by promoting pyruvate entry into mitochondria. In aralar KO neurons, respiration was stimulated by veratridine, but not by KCl or carbachol, indicating that the Ca2+ uniporter pathway played a role in the first, but not in the second condition, even though KCl caused an increase in [Ca2+]mit. The results suggest a requirement for ARALAR-MAS in priming pyruvate entry in mitochondria as a step needed to activate respiration by Ca2+ in response to moderate workloads.

  6. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Gao, Q; Zhou, Y; Dier, U; Hempel, N; Hochwald, S N

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions, including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins, including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC.

  7. The reduction of reactive oxygen species formation by mitochondrial alternative respiration in tomato basal defense against TMV infection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang-Wen-Ke; Shi, Kai; Fu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Dong, De-Kun; Jiang, Yu-Ping; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Liang, Wu-Sheng; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2012-02-01

    The role of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) and the relationship between systemic AOX induction, ROS formation, and systemic plant basal defense to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were investigated in tomato plants. The results showed that TMV inoculation significantly increased the level of AOX gene transcripts, ubiquinone reduction levels, pyruvate content, and cyanide-resistant respiration (CN-resistant R) in upper, un-inoculated leaves. Pretreatment with potassium cyanide (KCN, a cytochrome pathway inhibitor) greatly increased CN-resistant R and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, while application of salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, an AOX inhibitor) blocked the AOX activity and enhanced the production of ROS in the plants. Furthermore, TMV systemic infection was enhanced by SHAM and reduced by KCN pretreatment, as compared with the un-pretreated TMV counterpart. In addition, KCN application significantly diminished TMV-induced increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and dehydroascorbate/total ascorbate pool, while an opposite change was observed with SHAM-pretreated plants. These results suggest that the systemic induction of the mitochondrial AOX pathway plays a critical role in the reduction of ROS to enhance basal defenses. Additional antioxidant systems were also coordinately regulated in the maintenance of the cellular redox homeostasis.

  8. Suppression of mitochondrial respiration with auraptene inhibits the progression of renal cell carcinoma: involvement of HIF-1α degradation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunseon; Han, Jeongsu; Kim, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jungim; Lee, Min Joung; Jeong, Soyeon; Ryu, Min Jeong; Seo, Kang-Sik; Choi, Song-Yi; Shong, Minho; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-11-10

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression resulting from the uncontrolled migration and enhanced angiogenesis is an obstacle to effective therapeutic intervention. Tumor metabolism has distinctive feature called Warburg effect, which enhances the aerobic glycolysis rapidly supplying the energy for migration of tumor. To manipulate this metabolic change characteristic of aggressive tumors, we utilized the citrus extract, auraptene, known as a mitochondrial inhibitor, testing its anticancer effects against the RCC4 cell line. We found that auraptene impaired RCC4 cell motility through reduction of mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic pathway-related genes. It also strongly disrupted VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), a key regulator of cancer metabolism, migration and angiogenesis that is stably expressed in RCCs by virtue of a genetic mutation in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor protein, was impeded by auraptene, which blocked HIF-1a translation initiation without causing cytotoxicity. We suggest that blockade HIF-1a and reforming energy metabolism with auraptene is an effective approach for suspension RCC progression.

  9. Suppression of mitochondrial respiration with auraptene inhibits the progression of renal cell carcinoma: involvement of HIF-1α degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yunseon; Han, Jeongsu; Kim, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jungim; Lee, Min Joung; Jeong, Soyeon; Ryu, Min Jeong; Seo, Kang-Sik; Choi, Song-Yi; Shong, Minho; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression resulting from the uncontrolled migration and enhanced angiogenesis is an obstacle to effective therapeutic intervention. Tumor metabolism has distinctive feature called Warburg effect, which enhances the aerobic glycolysis rapidly supplying the energy for migration of tumor. To manipulate this metabolic change characteristic of aggressive tumors, we utilized the citrus extract, auraptene, known as a mitochondrial inhibitor, testing its anticancer effects against the RCC4 cell line. We found that auraptene impaired RCC4 cell motility through reduction of mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic pathway-related genes. It also strongly disrupted VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), a key regulator of cancer metabolism, migration and angiogenesis that is stably expressed in RCCs by virtue of a genetic mutation in the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor protein, was impeded by auraptene, which blocked HIF-1a translation initiation without causing cytotoxicity. We suggest that blockade HIF-1a and reforming energy metabolism with auraptene is an effective approach for suspension RCC progression. PMID:26474388

  10. Resveratrol Co-Treatment Attenuates the Effects of HIV Protease Inhibitors on Rat Body Weight and Enhances Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Burger; Mapanga, Rudo F.; Norton, Gavin R.

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1990s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) emerged as a global health pandemic, with sub-Saharan Africa the hardest hit. While the successful roll-out of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy provided significant relief to HIV-positive individuals, such treatment can also elicit damaging side-effects. Here especially HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) are implicated in the onset of cardio-metabolic complications such as type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. As there is a paucity of data regarding suitable co-treatments within this context, this preclinical study investigated whether resveratrol (RSV), aspirin (ASP) or vitamin C (VitC) co-treatment is able to blunt side-effects in a rat model of chronic PI exposure (Lopinavir/Ritonavir treatment for 4 months). Body weights and weight gain, blood metabolite levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides), echocardiography and cardiac mitochondrial respiration were assessed in PI-treated rats ± various co-treatments. Our data reveal that PI treatment significantly lowered body weight and cardiac respiratory function while no significant changes were found for heart function and blood metabolite levels. Moreover, all co-treatments ameliorated the PI-induced decrease in body weight after 4 months of PI treatment, while RSV co-treatment enhanced cardiac mitochondrial respiratory capacity in PI-treated rats. This pilot study therefore provides novel hypotheses regarding RSV co-treatment that should be further assessed in greater detail. PMID:28107484

  11. Synergism of antifungal activity between mitochondrial respiration inhibitors and kojic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Co-application of certain types of compounds with conventional antimicrobial drugs results in the enhancement of efficacy of drugs through a mechanism termed chemosensitization. We show that kojic acid (KA), a natural product, is a potent chemosensitizer to complex III inhibitors of mitochondrial re...

  12. Oncostatic-Cytoprotective Effect of Melatonin and Other Bioactive Molecules: A Common Target in Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Nicola; Borziani, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    For several years, oncostatic and antiproliferative properties, as well as thoses of cell death induction through 5-methoxy-N-acetiltryptamine or melatonin treatment, have been known. Paradoxically, its remarkable scavenger, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic characteristics in neurodegeneration models, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are known too. Analogous results have been confirmed by a large literature to be associated to the use of many other bioactive molecules such as resveratrol, tocopherol derivatives or vitamin E and others. It is interesting to note that the two opposite situations, namely the neoplastic pathology and the neurodegeneration, are characterized by deep alterations of the metabolome, of mitochondrial function and of oxygen consumption, so that the oncostatic and cytoprotective action can find a potential rationalization because of the different metabolic and mitochondrial situations, and in the effect that these molecules exercise on the mitochondrial function. In this review we discuss historical and general aspects of melatonin, relations between cancers and the metabolome and between neurodegeneration and the metabolome, and the possible effects of melatonin and of other bioactive molecules on metabolic and mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, we suggest a common general mechanism as responsible for the oncostatic/cytoprotective effect of melatonin and of other molecules examined. PMID:26959015

  13. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  14. Endothelial inflammation induced by excess glucose is associated with cytosolic glucose-6-phosphate but not increased mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Ian R; Gilbert, Merle; Maloney, Ezekiel; Hockenbery, David M.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Kim, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose levels suppresses responses to insulin, including induction of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase activity, through pro-inflammatory signaling via the IKKβ-NF-κB pathway. In the current study, we aimed to identify metabolic responses to glucose excess that mediate endothelial cell inflammation and insulin resistance. Since endothelial cells decrease their rate of oxygen consumption (OCR) in response to glucose, we hypothesized that increased mitochondrial function would not mediate these cell’s response to excess substrate. Methods The effects of glycolytic and mitochondrial fuels on metabolic intermediates and end products of glycolytic and oxidative metabolism, including glucose-6 phosphate (G6P), lactate, CO2, NAD(P)H, and OCR, were measured in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells and correlated with IKKβ activation. Results In response to increases in glucose concentration from low to physiological levels (0 to 5 mM), production of G6P, lactate, NAD(P)H and CO2 each increased as expected, while OCR was sharply reduced. IKKβ activation was detected at glucose concentrations above 5 mM, which was associated with parallel increases of G6P levels, whereas downstream metabolic pathways were insensitive to excess substrate. Conclusions/interpretation Activation of IKKβ by excess glucose correlates with increased levels of the glycolytic intermediate G6P, but not with lactate generation or OCR, which are inhibited well below saturation levels at physiologic glucose concentrations. These findings suggest that oxidative stress due to increased mitochondrial respiration is unlikely to mediate endothelial inflammation induced by excess glucose and suggests instead the involvement of G6P accumulation in the adverse effects of hyperglycemia on endothelial cells. PMID:19219423

  15. The antidiabetic drug metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Dringen, Ralf

    2017-03-19

    Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that is used daily by millions of patients worldwide. Metformin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and has recently been shown to increase glucose consumption and lactate release in cultured astrocytes. However, potential effects of metformin on mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism in astrocytes are unknown. We investigated this by mapping (13) C labeling in TCA cycle intermediates and corresponding amino acids after incubation of primary rat astrocytes with [U-(13) C]glucose. The presence of metformin did not compromise the viability of cultured astrocytes during 4 hr of incubation, but almost doubled cellular glucose consumption and lactate release. Compared with control cells, the presence of metformin dramatically lowered the molecular (13) C carbon labeling (MCL) of the cellular TCA cycle intermediates citrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, and malate, as well as the MCL of the TCA cycle intermediate-derived amino acids glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate. In addition to the total molecular (13) C labeling, analysis of the individual isotopomers of TCA cycle intermediates confirmed a severe decline in labeling and a significant lowering in TCA cycling ratio in metformin-treated astrocytes. Finally, the oxygen consumption of mitochondria isolated from metformin-treated astrocytes was drastically reduced in the presence of complex I substrates, but not of complex II substrates. These data demonstrate that exposure to metformin strongly impairs complex I-mediated mitochondrial respiration in astrocytes, which is likely to cause the observed decrease in labeling of mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates and the stimulation of glycolytic lactate production. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Soil respiration responses to variation in temperature and moisture availability under woody plants and grasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravalprukskul, P.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Woody plant encroachment into grasslands, such as in the southwestern US, is thought to have altered regional carbon fluxes due to the differences in structure and function between grasses and woody plants. It is unknown how climate change predictions for such areas, particularly warmer temperatures and fewer but larger precipitation events, might further acerbate our ability to estimate flux dynamics. Soil respiration, a key flux affecting ecosystem carbon balance, has been increasingly studied, but the exact effects of temperature and precipitation changes on flux rates have not been fully determined, particularly their interactive effects. The goal of this study was to compare soil respiration responses to different temperatures in soils under native southwestern mesquites and grasses undergoing a precipitation pulse, whilst removing other confounding factors, such as soil history, through the controlled environments within Biosphere 2. Mesquites and grasses were transplanted into ground basalt within two environments maintained at a 4°C temperature difference, the projected temperature increase from climate change. Post-transplant soil samples were incubated between 10 and 40°C to determine the temperature sensitivities of soils from each microhabitat within a month of this transplant. A single-peak, best-fit model for grass soils suggested a weak temperature sensitivity, while mesquite soils showed little to no sensitivity. Additionally, all plants underwent a drought treatment prior to the precipitation event, and soil respiration rates were tracked over several days using the collar technique. This portion of the study allowed for an estimation of the sensitivity of soil respiration to precipitation pulses under a variety of antecedent moisture conditions. Initial results illustrate that soils under mesquites tend to respire significantly more than soil under grasses or in bare soils over the course of a precipitation event. Together, these results suggest

  17. Herba Cistanches stimulates cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2013-01-01

    Earlier findings demonstrated that pretreatment of Herba Cistanches [the dried whole plant of Cistanche deserticola Y.C. Ma (Orobanchaceae)], a "Yang-invigorating" Chinese tonic herb, stimulated the ATP-generation capacity (ATP-GC) in mitochondria isolated from rat heart ex vivo. The enhancement of mitochondrial ATP-GC by Herba Cistanches was associated with induction of glutathione antioxidant status and protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. This study investigated the relationship between enhancements in mitochondrial ATP-GC and glutathione antioxidant status in H9c2 cardiomyocytes using a semipurified fraction of Herba Cistanches (HCF1). HCF1 (10-300 ng/mL) was tested for its effects on mitochondrial ATP generation, glutathione antioxidant status and protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cardiomyocytes and rat hearts. HCF1 at 30 ng/mL increased mitochondrial ATP-GC and ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration (by 50 and 100%, respectively) in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. The stimulation of mitochondrial respiration was associated with the induction of mitochondrial uncoupling (27%) and enhancement of cellular glutathione redox cycling as well as protection against hypoxia/reoxygenation (hypox/reoxy)-induced apoptosis (by 60%). While HCF1 treatment increased reactive oxygen species generation from mitochondrial respiration in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, pretreatment with antioxidants (DMTU) abrogated the HCF1-induced cellular responses and the associated cytoprotective effect. HCF1 pretreatment (1.14 and 3.41 mg/kg × 14) also protected against myocardial I/R injury in rats (by 13 and 32%), presumably mediated by the induction of glutathione antioxidant response. The long-term intake of HCF1 may offer a prospect for the prevention of ischemic heart disease.

  18. Parkinson’s Disease: The Link Between Monoamine Oxidase and Mitochondrial Respiration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    into the carboxylic acid derivative  DOPAC .           Figure 1 shown below illustrates the critical chemical reactions that led to Dr. Cohen’s main aim...catecholamines such as  DOPAC (dopa‐acetic acid) or DOPAL (dopa‐aldehyde)  should not cause any mitochondrial inhibition if the inhibition was exclusively a...inhibit mitochondria in a dose‐dependent  fashion, the metabolites of dopamine including  DOPAC  were fairly potent inhibitors of  mitochondrial ETC activity

  19. Hexokinase II acts through UCP3 to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and maintain aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Dumouchel, Tyler; Aguer, Céline; deKemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-07-15

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) mitigates mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) production, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies have also examined UCP3 effects, including decreased ROS production, during metabolic states when fatty acid oxidation is high (e.g. a fasting state). However, the role of UCP3 when carbohydrate oxidation is high (e.g. fed state) has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we show that mitochondrial-bound HK (hexokinase) II curtails oxidative stress and enhances aerobic metabolism of glucose in the fed state in a UCP3-dependent manner. Genetic knockout or inhibition of UCP3 significantly decreased mitochondrial-bound HKII. Furthermore, UCP3 was required for the HKII-mediated decrease in mitochondrial ROS emission. Intriguingly, the UCP3-mediated modulation of mitochondria-associated HKII was only observed in cells cultured under high-glucose conditions. UCP3 was required to maintain high rates of aerobic metabolism in high-glucose-treated cells and in muscle of fed mice. Deficiency in UCP3 resulted in a metabolic shift that favoured anaerobic glycolytic metabolism, increased glucose uptake and increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. PET (positron emission tomography) of [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake confirmed these findings in UCP3-knockout and wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings link the anti-oxidative and metabolic functions of UCP3 through a surprising molecular connection with mitochondrial-bound HKII.

  20. High glucose-induced mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species in mouse cerebral pericytes is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases: Implications for cerebral microvascular disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gul N; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A; Price, Tulin O

    2013-10-18

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration.

  1. High Glucose-Induced Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Cerebral Pericytes is Reversed by Pharmacological Inhibition of Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrases: Implications for Cerebral Microvascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gul N.; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A.; Price, Tulin O.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration. PMID:24076121

  2. Response of mitochondrial thioredoxin PsTrxo1, antioxidant enzymes, and respiration to salinity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Martí, María C; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Camejo, Daymi; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Lázaro, Juan J; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal transduction in plants. Redox regulation is an essential feature of mitochondrial function, with thioredoxin (Trx), involved in disulphide/dithiol interchange, playing a prominent role. To explore the participation of mitochondrial PsTrxo1, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), peroxiredoxin (PsPrxII F), and alternative oxidase (AOX) under salt stress, their transcriptional and protein levels were analysed in pea plants growing under 150 mM NaCl for a short and a long period. The activities of mitochondrial Mn-SOD and Trx together with the in vivo activities of the alternative pathway (AP) and the cytochrome pathway (CP) were also determined, combined with the characterization of the plant physiological status as well as the mitochondrial oxidative indicators. The analysis of protein and mRNA levels and activities revealed the importance of the post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of these proteins in the response to salt stress. Increases in AOX protein amount correlated with increases in AP capacity, whereas in vivo AP activity was maintained under salt stress. Similarly, Mn-SOD activity was also maintained. Under all the stress treatments, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and CP activity were decreased although the oxidative stress in leaves was only moderate. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was found in mitochondria isolated from leaves under the short-term salinity conditions. In addition, an increase in mitochondrial Trx activity was produced in response to the long-term NaCl treatment. The results support a role for PsTrxo1 as a component of the defence system induced by NaCl in pea mitochondria, providing the cell with a mechanism by which it can respond to changing environment protecting mitochondria from oxidative stress together with Mn-SOD, AOX, and PrxII F.

  3. Response of mitochondrial thioredoxin PsTrxo1, antioxidant enzymes, and respiration to salinity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves

    PubMed Central

    Camejo, Daymi; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Lázaro, Juan J.; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal transduction in plants. Redox regulation is an essential feature of mitochondrial function, with thioredoxin (Trx), involved in disulphide/dithiol interchange, playing a prominent role. To explore the participation of mitochondrial PsTrxo1, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), peroxiredoxin (PsPrxII F), and alternative oxidase (AOX) under salt stress, their transcriptional and protein levels were analysed in pea plants growing under 150 mM NaCl for a short and a long period. The activities of mitochondrial Mn-SOD and Trx together with the in vivo activities of the alternative pathway (AP) and the cytochrome pathway (CP) were also determined, combined with the characterization of the plant physiological status as well as the mitochondrial oxidative indicators. The analysis of protein and mRNA levels and activities revealed the importance of the post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of these proteins in the response to salt stress. Increases in AOX protein amount correlated with increases in AP capacity, whereas in vivo AP activity was maintained under salt stress. Similarly, Mn-SOD activity was also maintained. Under all the stress treatments, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and CP activity were decreased although the oxidative stress in leaves was only moderate. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was found in mitochondria isolated from leaves under the short-term salinity conditions. In addition, an increase in mitochondrial Trx activity was produced in response to the long-term NaCl treatment. The results support a role for PsTrxo1 as a component of the defence system induced by NaCl in pea mitochondria, providing the cell with a mechanism by which it can respond to changing environment protecting mitochondria from oxidative stress together with Mn-SOD, AOX, and PrxII F. PMID:21460385

  4. Resveratrol induces mitochondrial respiration and apoptosis in SW620 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Rosselló, Mª Del Mar; Hernández-López, Reyniel; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi; Valle, Adamo

    2017-02-01

    The polyphenol resveratrol (RSV) is found in the skin of red grapes and has been reported to exhibit anticancer properties. The antitumor effects of RSV in the gastrointestinal tract have gained considerable interest due to the high exposure of this tissue to this dietary compound. One of the hallmarks of cancer cells is their particular metabolism mainly relying on glycolysis for ATP production rather than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Although RSV has been described to act as a calorie-restriction mimetic, modulating energy metabolism in normal tissues, little efforts have been done to study the effects of this polyphenol in the metabolism of cancer cells. Taking this into account, the aim of this study was to explore metabolic effects of this polyphenol in colon cancer. Oxygen consumption, ATP levels, Western blotting and other molecular biology techniques were carried out to characterize the metabolic signature of RSV in SW620 colon cancer cells. Paradoxically, the cytotoxic effects of RSV were associated with an increase in oxygen consumption supported by mitochondrial biogenesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. This partial reversion of the Warburg effect was followed by hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane and ROS production, leading to an increased apoptosis. Our results propose that the anticancer mechanisms of RSV could reside in targeting cancer cell metabolism, promoting mitochondrial electron transport chain overload and, ultimately, increasing ROS production. These results shed new light into the anticancer mechanism of RSV supporting the ability of this compound in potentiating the effects of chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential are not required for apoptosis and anti-apoptotic action of Bcl-2 in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shchepina, L A; Popova, E N; Pletjushkina, O Yu; Chernyak, B V

    2002-02-01

    The release of cytochrome c from intermembrane space of mitochondria into cytosol is one of the critical events in apoptotic cell death. The important anti-apoptotic oncoprotein Bcl-2 inhibits this process. In the present study it was shown that apoptosis and release of cytochrome c induced by staurosporine or by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in HeLa cells were not affected by inhibitors of respiration (rotenone, myxothiazol, antimycin A) or by uncouplers (CCCP, DNP) that decrease the membrane potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane. The inhibitors of respiration and the uncouplers did not affect also the anti-apoptotic activity of Bcl-2.

  6. Plant feedbacks on soil respiration in a poplar plantation under elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Lukac, Martin; Godbold, Douglas L.; Marinari, Sara; de Angelis, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    FACE experiments offered a unique occasion to investigate plant-soil relationship in terrestrial ecosystems. Changes in plant productivity and carbon (C) allocation under elevated CO2 have the potential to alter soil processes mediated by microorganisms. Also, fertilization can strongly affect plant-soil relationships through both direct and indirect effects. A fast growing poplar plantation was treated for six consecutive years with elevated CO2 at two nitrogen (N) levels. In the frame of plant responses to these environmental factors, our intent is to investigate plant-soil relationships and their impact on soil CO2 emissions. In particular, feedbacks of root productivity on soil respiration and heterotrophic community have been assessed in the last two years of the field experiment. In the POP-EUROFACE fast growing poplar plantation, the enhancement of atmospheric CO2 concentration induced an increase of fine root biomass and productivity, and consequently rhizodeposition. Concurrently, N addition reduced total root biomass but did not affect productivity. Soil respiration was deeply impacted by elevated CO2, with increases up to 95%, independent of N availability. The increase involved both auto and rhizomicrobial components of soil respiration. Indeed, the root-rhizosphere continuum stimulated the rhizomicrobial respiration, with the prompt loss of part of the extra C fixed through photosynthesis in elevated CO2. In fact, whereas the basal soil respiration was significantly dependent on fine root standing biomass, total soil respiration and the rhizomicrobial component during the growing season were significantly dependent on fine root productivity. This mechanism was also evident in the year following the end of CO2 enrichment, when no "residual" effects of elevated CO2 on soil respiration were observed, in unfertilized soil. The relationship between root productivity and heterotrophic respiration was mediated by the pattern of labile C availability in soil

  7. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  8. Carbon monoxide released by CORM-401 uncouples mitochondrial respiration and inhibits glycolysis in endothelial cells: A role for mitoBKCa channels.

    PubMed

    Kaczara, Patrycja; Motterlini, Roberto; Rosen, Gerald M; Augustynek, Bartlomiej; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Szewczyk, Adam; Foresti, Roberta; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a product of heme degradation by heme oxygenases, plays an important role in vascular homeostasis. Recent evidence indicates that mitochondria are among a number of molecular targets that mediate the cellular actions of CO. In the present study we characterized the effects of CO released from CORM-401 on mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in intact human endothelial cells using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry and the Seahorse XF technology. We found that CORM-401 (10-100μM) induced a persistent increase in the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied by inhibition of glycolysis (extracellular acidification rate, ECAR) and a decrease in ATP-turnover. Furthermore, CORM-401 increased proton leak, diminished mitochondrial reserve capacity and enhanced non-mitochondrial respiration. Inactive CORM-401 (iCORM-401) neither induced mitochondrial uncoupling nor inhibited glycolysis, supporting a direct role of CO in the endothelial metabolic response induced by CORM-401. Interestingly, blockade of mitochondrial large-conductance calcium-regulated potassium ion channels (mitoBKCa) with paxilline abolished the increase in OCR promoted by CORM-401 without affecting ECAR; patch-clamp experiments confirmed that CO derived from CORM-401 activated mitoBKCa channels present in mitochondria. Conversely, stabilization of glycolysis by MG132 prevented CORM-401-mediated decrease in ECAR but did not modify the OCR response. In summary, we demonstrated in intact endothelial cells that CO induces a two-component metabolic response: uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration dependent on the activation of mitoBKCa channels and inhibition of glycolysis independent of mitoBKCa channels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Case Studies in Physiology: Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis and Respiration in Response to the Energetic Stress of an Ultra-Endurance Race.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Adam R; Castor, William M; Wolff, Christopher A; Musci, Robert V; Reid, Justin J; Laurin, Jaime L; Valenti, Zackary J; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F

    2017-09-07

    The 2016 Colorado Trail Race (CTR) was an ultra-endurance mountain bike race where competitors cycled for up to 24 hrs/day between altitudes of 1675 to 4025 meters to complete 800 kilometers and 21,000 meters of elevation gain. In one athlete, we had the unique opportunity to characterize skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mitochondrial respiration in response to a normal activity control period (CON) and the CTR. We hypothesized that mitochondrial protein synthesis would be elevated and mitochondrial respiration would be maintained during the extreme stresses of the CTR. Titrated and bolus doses of ADP were provided to determine substrate-specific oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and electron transport system (ETS) capacities in permeabilized muscle fibers via high-resolution respirometry. Protein synthetic rates were determined by daily oral consumption of deuterium oxide ((2)H2O). The endurance athlete had OXPHOS (226 pmol·s(-1)·mg tissue(-1)) and ETS (231 pmol·s(-1)·mg tissue(-1)) capacities that rank amongst the highest published to date in humans. Mitochondrial (3.2 fold), cytoplasmic (2.3 fold), and myofibrillar (1.5 fold) protein synthesis rates were greater during CTR compared to CON. With titrated ADP doses, the apparent Km of ADP, OXPHOS, and ETS increased after the CTR. With provision of ADP boluses after the CTR, the addition of fatty acids (-12 and -14%) mitigated the decline in OXPHOS and ETS capacity during carbohydrate-supported respiration (-26 and -31%). In the face of extreme stresses during the CTR, elevated rates of mitochondrial protein synthesis may contribute to rapid adaptations in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  10. [Priming Effects of Soil Moisture on Soil Respiration Under Different Tillage Practices].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Ai-zhen; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Sheng-long; Sun, Bing-jie; Liu, Si-yi

    2016-03-15

    In the early stage of an incubation experiment, soil respiration has a sensitive response to different levels of soil moisture. To investigate the effects of soil moisture on soil respiration under different tillage practices, we designed an incubation trial using air-dried soil samples collected from tillage experiment station established on black soils in 2001. The tillage experiment consisted of no-tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT), and conventional tillage (CT). According to field capacity (water-holding capacity, WHC), we set nine moisture levels including 30%, 60%, 90%, 120%, 150%, 180%, 210%, 240%, 270% WHC. During the 22-day short-term incubation, soil CO₂ emission was measured. In the early stage of incubation, the priming effects occurred under all tillage practices. There were positive correlations between soil respiration and soil moisture. In addition to drought and flood conditions, soil CO₂ fluxes followed the order of NT > RT > CT. We fitted the relationship between soil moisture and soil CO₂ fluxes under different tillage practices. In the range of 30%-270% WHC, soil CO₂ fluxes and soil moisture fitted a quadratic regression equation under NT, and linear regression equations under RT and CT. Under the conditions of 30%-210% WHC of both NT and RT, soil CO₂ fluxes and soil moisture were well fitted by the logarithmic equation with fitting coefficient R² = 0.966 and 0.956, respectively.

  11. Odontologic use of copper/aluminum alloys: mitochondrial respiration as sensitive parameter of biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon A; Carvalho, Antônio A V F; Azevedo, Antônio L M; Cruz, Cecília B B V; Maia, Antônio Wanderley C

    2003-01-01

    Copper/aluminum alloys are largely utilized in odontological restorations because they are less expensive than gold or platinum. However, tarnishing and important corrosion in intrabuccal prostheses made with copper/aluminum alloys after 28 days of use have been reported. Several kinds of food and beverage may attack and corrode these alloys. Copper is an essential component of several important enzymes directly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Aluminum, in contrast, is very toxic and, when absorbed, plasma values as small as 1.65 to 21.55 microg/dl can cause severe lesions to the nervous system, kidneys, and bone marrow. Because mitochondria are extremely sensitive to minimal variation of cellular physiology, the direct relationship between the mitocondrial respiratory chain and cell lesions has been used as a sensitive parameter to evaluate cellular aggression by external agents. This work consisted in the polarographic study of mitochondrial respiratory metabolism of livers and kidneys of rabbits with femoral implants of titanium or copper/aluminum alloy screws. The experimental results obtained did not show physiological modifications of hepatic or renal mitochondria isolated from animals of the three experimental groups, which indicate good biocompatibility of copper/ aluminum alloys and suggest their odontological use.

  12. Adipose-specific knockout of raptor results in lean mice with enhanced mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Polak, Pazit; Cybulski, Nadine; Feige, Jerome N; Auwerx, Johan; Rüegg, Markus A; Hall, Michael N

    2008-11-01

    raptor is a specific and essential component of mammalian TOR complex 1 (mTORC1), a key regulator of cell growth and metabolism. To investigate a role of adipose mTORC1 in regulation of adipose and whole-body metabolism, we generated mice with an adipose-specific knockout of raptor (raptor(ad-/-)). Compared to control littermates, raptor(ad-/-) mice had substantially less adipose tissue, were protected against diet-induced obesity and hypercholesterolemia, and exhibited improved insulin sensitivity. Leanness was in spite of reduced physical activity and unaffected caloric intake, lipolysis, and absorption of lipids from the food. White adipose tissue of raptor(ad-/-) mice displayed enhanced expression of genes encoding mitochondrial uncoupling proteins characteristic of brown fat. Leanness of the raptor(ad-/-) mice was attributed to elevated energy expenditure due to mitochondrial uncoupling. These results suggest that adipose mTORC1 is a regulator of adipose metabolism and, thereby, controls whole-body energy homeostasis.

  13. Multiple mechanisms underlying troglitazone-induced mitochondrial permeability transition

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Takuya; Norioka, Misaki; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2010-11-01

    Troglitazone, a thiazolidinedione class antidiabetic drug, was withdrawn from the market because of its severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. It causes a mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), which may in part contribute to its hepatotoxicity. In the present study, the mechanism of troglitazone mitochondrial toxicity was investigated in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was attenuated by bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}-independent phospholipase A{sub 2} (iPLA{sub 2}). In contrast, that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was exacerbated by BEL. This exacerbation was diminished by addition of 2 mM glutathione, an antioxidant. Oxygen consumption by state 3 respiration in isolated mitochondria was also decreased by troglitazone, but it was not affected by BEL. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was completely attenuated in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was not affected. Addition of 1 {mu}M cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of MPT pores, completely attenuated swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone while it only partly diminished that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone. Thus, the MPT induced by 10 and 50 {mu}M troglitazone are regulated by different mechanism; the MPT induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone is regulated by the activation of iPLA{sub 2} and caused by the opening of CsA-regulating MPT pores followed by accumulation of Ca{sup 2+} in mitochondria, while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone is partly regulated by reactive oxygen species and mainly caused by the opening of CsA-insensitive MPT pores.

  14. Defective mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced AP endonuclease 1 activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Hejl, Anne-Mette; Dinh, Thuan-Son T; Keijzers, Guido; Hansen, Åse M; Desler, Claus; Moreno-Villanueva, Maria; Bürkle, Alexander; Rasmussen, Lene J; Waldemar, Gunhild; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-10-01

    Accurate biomarkers for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are badly needed. Recent reports suggest that dysfunctional mitochondria and DNA damage are associated with AD development. In this report, we measured various cellular parameters, related to mitochondrial bioenergetics and DNA damage, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of AD and control participants, for biomarker discovery. PBMCs were isolated from 53 patients with AD of mild to moderate degree and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Tests were performed on the PBMCs from as many of these participants as possible. We measured glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration fluxes using the Seahorse Bioscience flux analyzer, mitochondrial ROS production using flow cytometry, dNTP levels by way of a DNA polymerization assay, DNA strand breaks using the Fluorometric detection of Alkaline DNA Unwinding (FADU) assay, and APE1 incision activity (in cell lysates) on a DNA substrate containing an AP site (to estimate DNA repair efficiency). In the PBMCs of AD patients, we found reduced basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, reduced proton leak, higher dATP level, and lower AP endonuclease 1 activity, depending on adjustments for gender and/or age. This study reveals impaired mitochondrial respiration, altered dNTP pools and reduced DNA repair activity in PBMCs of AD patients, thus suggesting that these biochemical activities may be useful as biomarkers for AD.

  15. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) Protein Attenuates Doxorubicin-induced Oxidative Stress and Improves Mitochondrial Respiration in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kyle G; Cole, Laura K; Xiang, Bo; Chen, Keyun; Ma, Xiuli; Myal, Yvonne; Hatch, Grant M; Tong, Qiang; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-04-24

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent effective in the treatment of many cancers. However, cardiac dysfunction caused by DOX limits its clinical use. DOX is believed to be harmful to cardiomyocytes by interfering with the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin and causing inefficient electron transfer resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) is a class III lysine deacetylase that is localized to the mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress resistance enzymes such as superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2). The purpose of this study was to determine whether SIRT3 prevents DOX-induced mitochondrial ROS production. Administration of DOX to mice suppressed cardiac SIRT3 expression, and DOX induced a dose-dependent decrease in SIRT3 and SOD2 expression in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. SIRT3-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced significantly more ROS in the presence of DOX compared with wild-type cells. Overexpression of wild-type SIRT3 increased cardiolipin levels and rescued mitochondrial respiration and SOD2 expression in DOX-treated H9c2 cardiomyocytes and attenuated the amount of ROS produced following DOX treatment. These effects were absent when a deacetylase-deficient SIRT3 was expressed in H9c2 cells. Our results suggest that overexpression of SIRT3 attenuates DOX-induced ROS production, and this may involve increased SOD2 expression and improved mitochondrial bioenergetics. SIRT3 activation could be a potential therapy for DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  16. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianliang; Gao, Qile; Zhou, Ying; Dier, Usawadee; Hempel, Nadine; Hochwald, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability, and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC. PMID:26119934

  17. Developmental significance of cyanide-resistant respiration under stressed conditions: experiments in Dictyostelium cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kei; Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Amagai, Aiko; Maeda, Yasuo

    2010-09-01

    We have previously reported that benzohydroxamic acid (BHAM), a potent inhibitor of cyanide (CN)-resistant respiration mediated by alternative oxidase (AOX), induces formation of unique cell masses (i.e., stalk-like cells with a large vacuole and thick cell wall) in starved Dictyostelium cells. Unexpectedly, however, aox-null cells prepared by homologous recombination exhibited normal development under normal culture conditions on agar, indicating that BHAM-induced stalk formation is not solely attributable to inhibition of CN-resistant respiration. This also suggests that a series of pharmacological approaches in the field of life science has serious limitations. Under stress (e.g., in submerged culture), starved aox-null cells exhibited slightly delayed aggregation compared with parental Ax-2 cells; most cells remained as loose aggregates even after prolonged incubation. Also, the developmental defects of aox-null cells became more marked upon incubation for 30 min just after starvation in the presence of ≥ 1.75 mmol/L H(2)O(2). This seems to indicate that CN-resistant respiration could mitigate cellular damage through reactive oxygen species (ROS), because AOX has a potential role in reduction of ROS production. Starved aox-null cells did not develop in the presence of 5 mmol/L KCN (which completely inhibited the conventional cytochrome-mediated respiration) and remained as non-aggregated single cells on agar even after prolonged incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, however, parental Ax-2 cells were found to develop normally, forming fruiting bodies even in the presence of 10 mmol/L KCN. Taken together, these results suggest that CN-resistant respiration might compensate for the production of adenosine tri-phosphate via oxidative phosphorylation.

  18. Soil acid cations induced reduction in soil respiration under nitrogen enrichment and soil acidification.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Sun, Jian; Tian, Dashuan; Wang, Jinsong; Ha, Denglong; Qu, Yuxi; Jing, Guangwei; Niu, Shuli

    2017-09-16

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition and soil acidification both can largely change soil microbial activity and root growth with a consequent impact on soil respiration (Rs). However, it remains unclear which one, N enrichment or soil acidification, plays more important role in impacting soil respiration. We conducted a manipulative experiment to simulate N enrichment (10gm(-2)yr(-1) NH4NO3) and soil acidity (0.552molH(+)m(-2)yr(-1) sulfuric acid) and compared their effects on Rs and its components in a subtropical forest. The results showed that soil pH was reduced by 0.4 similarly under N addition or acid addition after 3years' treatment. Acid addition decreased autotrophic respiration (Ra) by 22-35% and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) by 22-23%, resulting in a reduction of Rs by 22-26% in the two years. N addition reduced Ra, Rh, Rs less than acid addition did. The reductions of Rs and its components were attributed to increase of soil acid cations and reduction of cellulose degrading enzymes activity. N addition and soil acidification significantly enhanced fungal to bacterial ratio. All the cellulose degrading enzymes were reduced more by soil acidity (43-50%) than N addition (30-39%). The principal component scores of degrading enzymes activity showed significantly positive relationships with Rh. Structural equation model showed that soil acidification played more important role than N enrichment in changing Rs and its components. We therefore suggest that soil acidification is an important mechanism underlying soil respiration changes, and should be incorporated into biogeochemical models to improve the prediction of ecosystem C cycling in the future scenarios of anthropogenic N deposition and acid enrichment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of selenium and vitamin E deficiencies in lambs on hepatic microsomal hemoproteins and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Whanger, P D; Tripp, M J; Weswig, P H

    1977-06-01

    Microsomal hemoprotein levels and delta-amino levulinic acid dehydrase activity were determined in livers and rate of oxygen uptake, ADP:O ratios, and respiration control index were determined on mitochondria from muscle, liver, and heart of normal and white muscle diseased (WMD) lambs. WMD lambs were produced by feeding their dams either low selenium purified or alfalfa hay diets. Vitamin E and/or selenium was injected in a 2 x 2 factorial treatment in the ewes fed purified diets. Hepatic microsomal cytochrome P 450 levels and total heme content were significantly lower in WMD lambs. Cytochrome b5 content was significantly lower in lambs on the -E-Se or -E + Se treatments than those on the +E--Se treatment, but the cytochrome b5 content was not different between WMD and normal lambs from ewes fed the hay diet. No differences were found in hepatic delta-amino levulinic acid dehydrase activity, or in the rate of oxygen uptake, ADP:O ratios or respiratory control index between mitochondria from normal and WMD lamb tissue on any of the treatments.

  20. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  1. Mitochondrial-Nuclear Communication by Prohibitin Shuttling Under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Srinivas; He, Weilue; Atkinson, Cameron; Smith, Joey; Liu, Zhicong; Elledge, Beth; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nuclear communication is critical to maintain mitochondrial activity under stress conditions. Adaptation of the mitochondria-nucleus network to changes in the intracellular oxidation and reduction milieu is critical for the survival of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, in relation to their high oxygen demand and rapid metabolism. However, the generation and transmittal of mitochondrial signal to the nucleus remains elusive. Previously, our in vivo study revealed that prohibitin is up-regulated in the retina but is down-regulated in RPE in the aging and diabetic model. In this study, the functional role of prohibitin in the retina and the RPE was studied using biochemical methods, including lipid binding assay, 2D gel electrophoresis, immunocytochemistry, Western blot, and knockdown approach. Protein depletion by siRNA characterized prohibitin as an anti-apoptotic molecule in mitochondria, while lipid binding assay demonstrated subcellular communications between mitochondria and the nucleus under oxidative stress. The changes of the expressions and localization of mitochondrial prohibitin triggered by reactive oxygen species are crucial for mitochondrial integrity. We propose that prohibitin shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus as an anti-apoptotic molecule and a transcriptional regulator under stress environment in the retina and RPE. PMID:21879722

  2. Mitochondrial dynamics underlying thermal plasticity of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) hearts.

    PubMed

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans O; Mark, Felix C

    2012-09-01

    In the eurythermal cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, performance depends on hearts that ensure systemic oxygen supply over a broad range of temperatures. We therefore aimed to identify adjustments in energetic cardiac capacity and underlying mitochondrial function supporting thermal acclimation and adaptation that could be crucial for the cuttlefish's competitive success in variable environments. Two genetically distinct cuttlefish populations were acclimated to 11, 16 and 21°C. Subsequently, skinned and permeabilised heart fibres were used to assess mitochondrial functioning by means of high-resolution respirometry and a substrate-inhibitor protocol, followed by measurements of cardiac citrate synthase and cytosolic enzyme activities. Temperate English Channel cuttlefish had lower mitochondrial capacities but larger hearts than subtropical Adriatic cuttlefish. Warm acclimation to 21°C decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in Adriatic cuttlefish and increased complex IV activity in English Channel cuttlefish. However, compensation of mitochondrial capacities did not occur during cold acclimation to 11°C. In systemic hearts, the thermal sensitivity of mitochondrial substrate oxidation was high for proline and pyruvate but low for succinate. Oxygen efficiency of catabolism rose as temperature changed from 11 to 21°C via shifts to oxygen-conserving oxidation of proline and pyruvate and via reduced relative proton leak. The changes observed for substrate oxidation, mitochondrial complexes, relative proton leak and heart mass improve energetic efficiency and essentially seem to extend tolerance to high temperatures and reduce associated tissue hypoxia. We conclude that cuttlefish sustain cardiac performance and, thus, systemic oxygen delivery over short- and long-term changes of temperature and environmental conditions by multiple adjustments in cellular and mitochondrial energetics.

  3. Genomic basis for stimulated respiration by plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Andrew D B; Xu, Fangxiu; Gillespie, Kelly M; McGrath, Justin M; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Ort, Donald R

    2009-03-03

    Photosynthetic and respiratory exchanges of CO(2) by plants with the atmosphere are significantly larger than anthropogenic CO(2) emissions, and these fluxes will change as growing conditions are altered by climate change. Understanding feedbacks in CO(2) exchange is important to predicting future atmospheric [CO(2)] and climate change. At the tissue and plant scale, respiration is a key determinant of growth and yield. Although the stimulation of C(3) photosynthesis by growth at elevated [CO(2)] can be predicted with confidence, the nature of changes in respiration is less certain. This is largely because the mechanism of the respiratory response is insufficiently understood. Molecular, biochemical and physiological changes in the carbon metabolism of soybean in a free-air CO(2) enrichment experiment were investigated over 2 growing seasons. Growth of soybean at elevated [CO(2)] (550 micromol x mol(-1)) under field conditions stimulated the rate of nighttime respiration by 37%. Greater respiratory capacity was driven by greater abundance of transcripts encoding enzymes throughout the respiratory pathway, which would be needed for the greater number of mitochondria that have been observed in the leaves of plants grown at elevated [CO(2)]. Greater respiratory quotient and leaf carbohydrate content at elevated [CO(2)] indicate that stimulated respiration was supported by the additional carbohydrate available from enhanced photosynthesis at elevated [CO(2)]. If this response is consistent across many species, the future stimulation of net primary productivity could be reduced significantly. Greater foliar respiration at elevated [CO(2)] will reduce plant carbon balance, but could facilitate greater yields through enhanced photoassimilate export to sink tissues.

  4. Artificial neural network model for estimating the soil respiration under different land uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Mitra; Sarikhani, Mohammad Reza; Safari Sinegani, Ali Akbar; Ahmadi, Abbas; Keesstra, Saskia

    2017-04-01

    Soil respiration is a biological process in microbes that convert organic carbon to atmospheric CO2. This process is considered to be one of the largest global carbon fluxes and is affected by different physicochemical and biological properties of soil, land usageuse, vegetation types and climate patterns. The aim of this study was to estimate the soil basal (BR) and substrate induced respiration (SIR) of 150 data obtained from soil samples collected from depth (0-25 cm) under different land uses by Artificial Neural Network. Soil samples were chosen from three provinces of Iran, with humid subtropical and semi-arid climate patterns. In each soil sample, soil texture, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE), organic carbon (OC), OC fractionation data e.g. light fraction OC (LOC), heavy fraction OC (HOC), cold water extractable OC (COC) and warm water extractable OC (WOC), population of fungi, bacteria and actinomycete, BR and SIR were measured. Our goal was to use the most efficient ANN-model to predict soil respiration with simple soil data. Our results indicated that in an ANN model containing all the measured parameters, the R2 and RMSE values for BR prediction were 0.64 and 0.047 while these statistical indicators for SIR obtained 0.58 and 0.15, respectively. The R2 and RMSE values of the BR-ANN and SIR-ANN predicted models comprising 7 variables (including OC, pH, EC, CCE and soil texture) were estimated at 0.66, 0.043 and 0.52, 0.16, respectively. It was concluded that ANN modeling is a reliable method for predicting soil respiration. KEYWORDS: Artificial neural network; Land use; Soil physicochemical properties; Soil respiration; Soil microorganism

  5. Genomic basis for stimulated respiration by plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Leakey, Andrew D. B.; Xu, Fangxiu; Gillespie, Kelly M.; McGrath, Justin M.; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A.; Ort, Donald R.

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthetic and respiratory exchanges of CO2 by plants with the atmosphere are significantly larger than anthropogenic CO2 emissions, and these fluxes will change as growing conditions are altered by climate change. Understanding feedbacks in CO2 exchange is important to predicting future atmospheric [CO2] and climate change. At the tissue and plant scale, respiration is a key determinant of growth and yield. Although the stimulation of C3 photosynthesis by growth at elevated [CO2] can be predicted with confidence, the nature of changes in respiration is less certain. This is largely because the mechanism of the respiratory response is insufficiently understood. Molecular, biochemical and physiological changes in the carbon metabolism of soybean in a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment were investigated over 2 growing seasons. Growth of soybean at elevated [CO2] (550 μmol·mol−1) under field conditions stimulated the rate of nighttime respiration by 37%. Greater respiratory capacity was driven by greater abundance of transcripts encoding enzymes throughout the respiratory pathway, which would be needed for the greater number of mitochondria that have been observed in the leaves of plants grown at elevated [CO2]. Greater respiratory quotient and leaf carbohydrate content at elevated [CO2] indicate that stimulated respiration was supported by the additional carbohydrate available from enhanced photosynthesis at elevated [CO2]. If this response is consistent across many species, the future stimulation of net primary productivity could be reduced significantly. Greater foliar respiration at elevated [CO2] will reduce plant carbon balance, but could facilitate greater yields through enhanced photoassimilate export to sink tissues. PMID:19204289

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the ischemic brain under lithium treatment. Link to mitochondrial disorders under stroke.

    PubMed

    Silachev, Denis N; Gulyaev, Mikhail V; Zorova, Ljubava D; Khailova, Ljudmila S; Gubsky, Leonid V; Pirogov, Yury A; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Sukhikh, Gennady T; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2015-07-25

    Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria are one of the main factors in the pathogenesis in different organs including brain. The pathogenesis after brain damage is caused not only by the change in bioenergetics, but also involves impairment of alternative functions of mitochondria, particularly those related to the control of cell death. In this study we evaluated partial metabolic pathways under the simulation of a stroke by using the occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in rats. The analysis shows that the induced switch to a non-oxidative energy metabolism (glycolysis) due to the block of tissue oxygen supply does not ensure the adequate supply of the tissue with ATP. Moreover, the well-known acidification of the ischemic tissue is not associated with the so-called traditionally and incorrectly considered "lactic acidosis" (the generation of lactate from glucose by itself does not lead to excessive generation of protons), but occurs because of the consumption of tissue ATP under its reduced resynthesis. Incubation of mitochondria isolated from normal rat brain at neutral and slightly acidic pH, mimicking the intracellular pH of normal and ischemic tissues correspondingly, revealed serious changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics, partially reflected in the magnitude of respiratory control and the basal and maximally stimulated respiration rates. Measurement of available metabolites by (1)H MR spectra of normal and ischemia-damaged brains showed a significant increase in lactate and myo-inositol and a moderate decrease in N-acetylaspartate 24h after reperfusion. Remarkably, the administration of lithium chloride in the reperfusion phase normalized the levels of metabolites. Moreover, the introduction of lithium salts (chloride or succinate) in the bloodstream, restored after ischemia, reduced both the size of the ischemia-induced brain damage and the degree of brain swelling. Besides, post-ischemic introduction of lithium salts largely restored the

  7. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  8. Melatonin reduces oxidant damage and promotes mitochondrial respiration: implications for aging.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun Xian; Manchester, Lucien C; El-Sawi, Mamdouh R

    2002-04-01

    Melatonin has a number of properties as a consequence of which it could be beneficial to animals as they age. Of particular interest are its ubiquitous actions as a direct and indirect antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Besides directly detoxifying a variety of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species, at least one product that is formed as a result of these interactions is also a potent free radical scavenger. Thus, the product that is formed when melatonin detoxifies hydrogen peroxide, that is, N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine is an efficient scavenger, at least equivalent to melatonin itself. This antioxidant cascade increases the ability of melatonin to resist oxidative damage. Other actions of melatonin, such as stimulation of antioxidative enzymes also improves its status as an antioxidant. Finally, recent observations documenting melatonin's ability to stimulate electron transport and ATP production in the inner-mitochondrial membrane also has relevance for melatonin as an agent that could alter processes of aging. These findings, coupled with diminished melatonin production in advanced age, has prompted scientists to consider melatonin in the context of aging. As of this writing there is no definitive evidence to prove that melatonin alters the rate of aging, although data relating to melatonin deferring some age-related degenerative conditions is accumulating rapidly.

  9. The inter-relationship of ascorbate transport, metabolism and mitochondrial, plastidic respiration.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Asard, Han

    2013-09-20

    Ascorbate, this multifaceted small molecular weight carbohydrate derivative, plays important roles in a range of cellular processes in plant cells, from the regulation of cell cycle, through cell expansion and senescence. Beyond these physiological functions, ascorbate has a critical role in responses to abiotic stresses, such as high light, high salinity, or drought. The biosynthesis, recycling, and intracellular transport are important elements of the balancing of ascorbate level to the always-changing conditions and demands. A bidirectional tight relationship was described between ascorbate biosynthesis and the mitochondrial electron transfer chain (mETC), since L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH), the enzyme catalyzing the ultimate step of ascorbate biosynthesis, uses oxidized cytochrome c as the only electron acceptor and has a role in the assembly of Complex I. A similar bidirectional relationship was revealed between the photosynthetic apparatus and ascorbate biosynthesis since the electron flux through the photosynthetic ETC affects the biosynthesis of ascorbate and the level of ascorbate could affect photosynthesis. The details of this regulatory network of photosynthetic electron transfer, respiratory electron transfer, and ascorbate biosynthesis are still not clear, as are the potential regulatory role and the regulation of intracellular ascorbate transport and fluxes. The elucidation of the role of ascorbate as an important element of the network of photosynthetic, respiratory ETC and tricarboxylic acid cycle will contribute to understanding plant cell responses to different stress conditions.

  10. The Inter-Relationship of Ascorbate Transport, Metabolism and Mitochondrial, Plastidic Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Bánhegyi, Gábor; Asard, Han

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Ascorbate, this multifaceted small molecular weight carbohydrate derivative, plays important roles in a range of cellular processes in plant cells, from the regulation of cell cycle, through cell expansion and senescence. Beyond these physiological functions, ascorbate has a critical role in responses to abiotic stresses, such as high light, high salinity, or drought. The biosynthesis, recycling, and intracellular transport are important elements of the balancing of ascorbate level to the always-changing conditions and demands. Recent Advances: A bidirectional tight relationship was described between ascorbate biosynthesis and the mitochondrial electron transfer chain (mETC), since L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH), the enzyme catalyzing the ultimate step of ascorbate biosynthesis, uses oxidized cytochrome c as the only electron acceptor and has a role in the assembly of Complex I. A similar bidirectional relationship was revealed between the photosynthetic apparatus and ascorbate biosynthesis since the electron flux through the photosynthetic ETC affects the biosynthesis of ascorbate and the level of ascorbate could affect photosynthesis. Critical Issues: The details of this regulatory network of photosynthetic electron transfer, respiratory electron transfer, and ascorbate biosynthesis are still not clear, as are the potential regulatory role and the regulation of intracellular ascorbate transport and fluxes. Future Directions: The elucidation of the role of ascorbate as an important element of the network of photosynthetic, respiratory ETC and tricarboxylic acid cycle will contribute to understanding plant cell responses to different stress conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1036–1044. PMID:23259603

  11. Effects of carbon monoxide (CO) delivery by a CO donor or hemoglobin on vascular hypoxia inducible factor 1α and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Chad E N; Alayash, Abdu I

    2012-01-01

    We examined carbon monoxide (CO) delivery by carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) or hemoglobin (Hb) on cellular oxygen sensing and mitochondrial respiration in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). CORM-2 reduced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in normoxic and hypoxic cells, but while Hb alone significantly reduced HIF-1α stabilization in hypoxic cells, CO delivered by Hb (Hb-CO) had no effect on HIF-1α stabilization. CO dose-dependently increased basal oxygen consumption and reduced overall mitochondrial respiratory capacity. Hb-CO increased basal oxygen consumption but did not alter respiratory capacity. Together, CO reduced ET-1, and, at low doses, had no effect on endothelial mitochondria oxygen consumption. CO ligation to Hb may be developed further as non-vasoactive oxygen therapeutic without compromising mitochondrial function.

  12. Cell death of rice roots under salt stress may be mediated by cyanide-resistant respiration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hanqing; Hou, Xiuli; Li, Xin; Sun, Kun; Wang, Rongfang; Zhang, Tengguo; Ding, Yanping

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with solutions containing high concentrations of NaCl (200 or 300 mM) induced cell death in rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots, as well as the application of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, the pretreatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of H2O2, partially alleviated the root cell death induced by 200 mM NaCl. These observations suggest that the cell death of rice roots under high salt stress is linked to H2O2 accumulation in vivo. NaCl stress increased the level of cyanide-resistant respiration to some extent and enhanced the transcript levels of the alternative oxidase (AOX) genes AOX1a and AOX1b in rice roots. High-salt-stressed (200 mM NaCl) rice roots pretreated with 1 mM salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), a specific inhibitor of alternative oxidase, exhibited higher levels of cell death and H2O2 production than roots subjected to either 200 mM NaCl stress or SHAM treatment alone. These results suggest that cyanide-resistant respiration could play a role in mediating root cell death under high salt stress. Furthermore, this function of cyanide-resistant respiration could relate to its ability to reduce the generation of H2O2.

  13. Similar nature of inhibition of mitochondrial respiration of heart tissue and malignant cells by methylglyoxal. A vital clue to understand the biochemical basis of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Biswas, S; Ray, M

    1997-06-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of heart and of several other organs of normal animals of different species has been tested. The results indicate that methylglyoxal (3.5 mM) strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus pyruvate-dependent respiration of exclusively heart mitochondria of normal animals of different species. Whereas, with the same substrates, but at a higher concentration of methylglyoxal (7.5 mM), the respiration of mitochondria of other organs of normal animals is not inhibited. Methylglyoxal also inhibits the respiration of slices of rat and toad hearts. But this inhibition is less pronounced. However, methylglyoxal (15 mM) fails to have any effect on perfused toad heart. Using rat heart mitochondria as a model, the effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption was also tested with different respiratory substrates, electron donors at different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and site-specific inhibitors to identify the specific respiratory complex which might be involved in the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal. The results strongly suggest that methylglyoxal inhibits the electron flow through complex I of rat heart mitochondrial respiratory chain. Moreover, lactaldehyde (0.6 mM), a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of rat heart mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal (2.5 mM). The effect of methylglyoxal on heart mitochondria as described in the present paper is strikingly similar to the results of our previous work with mitochondria of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells and leukemic leukocytes. We have recently proposed a new hypothesis on cancer which suggests that excessive ATP formation in cells may lead to malignancy. The above mentioned similarity apparently provides a solid experimental foundation for the proposed hypothesis which has been discussed.

  14. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of insulinoma INS-1E cells is associated with elevation of both respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Spacek, Tomás; Santorová, Jitka; Zacharovová, Klára; Berková, Zuzana; Hlavatá, Lydie; Saudek, Frantisek; Jezek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Increased ATP/ADP ratio resulting from enhanced glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation represents a plausible mechanism controlling the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Although specific bioenergetics might be involved, parallel studies of cell respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) during GSIS are lacking. Using high resolution respirometry and parallel DeltaPsi(m) monitoring by two distinct fluorescence probes we have quantified bioenergetics in rat insulinoma INS-1E cells representing a suitable model to study in vitro insulin secretion. Upon glucose addition to glucose-depleted cells we demonstrated a simultaneous increase in respiration and DeltaPsi(m) during GSIS and showed that the endogenous state 3/state 4 respiratory ratio hyperbolically increased with glucose, approaching the maximum oxidative phosphorylation rate at maximum GSIS. Attempting to assess the basis of the "toxic" effect of fatty acids on insulin secretion, GSIS was studied after linoleic acid addition, which diminished respiration increase, DeltaPsi(m) jump, and magnitude of insulin release, and reduced state 3/state 4 dependencies on glucose. Its effects were due to protonophoric function, i.e. uncoupling, since without glucose, linoleic acid accelerated both state 3 and state 4 respiration by similar extent. In turn, state 3 respiration increased marginally with linoleic acid at 10-20mM glucose. We conclude that upon glucose addition in physiological range, the INS-1E cells are able to regulate the oxidative phosphorylation rate from nearly zero to maximum and that the impairment of GSIS by linoleic acid is caused by mitochondrial uncoupling. These findings may be relevant to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes.

  15. Contribution of silver nanoparticles to extend Salmonella typhimurium growth under various respiration regimes.

    PubMed

    Hidouri, Slah; Yohmes, Mannoubia Ben; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2016-10-01

    Living cells interact with different forms of metal; the resulted biochemical alteration depends on the dose. Over an average dose in ionic form, metals interact with respiration processes at various levels, and it induces oxidative stress by shifting the whole oxydoreduction equilibrium. To correct the toxicity, cell develops different ways to cancel the effect of the exceeded charges, and it reduces the ion to get a more stable form. In the case of nanoparticles, the reactivity of surface has been enhanced that can alter the biological mechanisms; the cell may develop different strategies to minimize this reactivity. The current study is focused on the pursuing of cell behavior regarding the presence of nanoparticles and their associated metals. Nanoparticles have been synthesized using bio-reducing agents and then were structurally characterized using X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis, and infra-red spectroscopy. The oxydoreduction flexibility of the post-synthesis modified nanoparticles was tested in vitro. Interactions with cells were done using Salmonella under various respiration conditions. The final results show the possible correction of oxidative stress effects and the recuperation of respiration.

  16. Glycation inhibitors extend yeast chronological lifespan by reducing advanced glycation end products and by back regulation of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Rubina S; Banarjee, Reema M; Deshmukh, Arati B; Patil, Gouri V; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-03-06

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) are implicated in aging process. Thus, reducing AGEs by using glycation inhibitors may help in attenuating the aging process. In this study using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast system, we show that Aminoguanidine (AMG), a well-known glycation inhibitor, decreases the AGE modification of proteins in non-calorie restriction (NR) (2% glucose) and extends chronological lifespan (CLS) similar to that of calorie restriction (CR) condition (0.5% glucose). Proteomic analysis revealed that AMG back regulates the expression of differentially expressed proteins especially those involved in mitochondrial respiration in NR condition, suggesting that it switches metabolism from fermentation to respiration, mimicking CR. AMG induced back regulation of differentially expressed proteins could be possibly due to its chemical effect or indirectly by glycation inhibition. To delineate this, Metformin (MET), a structural analog of AMG and a mild glycation inhibitor and Hydralazine (HYD), another potent glycation inhibitor but not structural analog of AMG were used. HYD was more effective than MET in mimicking AMG suggesting that glycation inhibition was responsible for restoration of differentially expressed proteins. Thus glycation inhibitors particularly AMG, HYD and MET extend yeast CLS by reducing AGEs, modulating the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and possibly by scavenging glucose.

  17. Elongator-dependent modification of cytoplasmic tRNALysUUU is required for mitochondrial function under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tigano, Marco; Ruotolo, Roberta; Dallabona, Cristina; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni; Donnini, Claudia; Ottonello, Simone

    2015-01-01

    To gain a wider view of the pathways that regulate mitochondrial function, we combined the effect of heat stress on respiratory capacity with the discovery potential of a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 105 new genes whose deletion impairs respiratory growth at 37°C by interfering with processes such as transcriptional regulation, ubiquitination and cytosolic tRNA wobble uridine modification via 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine formation. The latter process, specifically required for efficient decoding of AA-ending codons under stress conditions, was covered by multiple genes belonging to the Elongator (e.g. ELP3) and urmylation (e.g., NCS6) pathways. ELP3 or NCS6 deletants had impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. Their respiratory deficiency was selectively rescued by overexpression of tRNALysUUU as well by overexpression of genes (BCK1 and HFM1) with a strong bias for the AAA codon read by this tRNA. These data extend the mitochondrial regulome, demonstrate that heat stress can impair respiration by disturbing cytoplasmic translation of proteins critically involved in mitochondrial function and document, for the first time, the involvement in such process of the Elongator and urmylation pathways. Given the conservation of these pathways, the present findings may pave the way to a better understanding of the human mitochondrial regulome in health and disease. PMID:26240381

  18. Elongator-dependent modification of cytoplasmic tRNALysUUU is required for mitochondrial function under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Tigano, Marco; Ruotolo, Roberta; Dallabona, Cristina; Fontanesi, Flavia; Barrientos, Antoni; Donnini, Claudia; Ottonello, Simone

    2015-09-30

    To gain a wider view of the pathways that regulate mitochondrial function, we combined the effect of heat stress on respiratory capacity with the discovery potential of a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 105 new genes whose deletion impairs respiratory growth at 37°C by interfering with processes such as transcriptional regulation, ubiquitination and cytosolic tRNA wobble uridine modification via 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine formation. The latter process, specifically required for efficient decoding of AA-ending codons under stress conditions, was covered by multiple genes belonging to the Elongator (e.g. ELP3) and urmylation (e.g., NCS6) pathways. ELP3 or NCS6 deletants had impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis. Their respiratory deficiency was selectively rescued by overexpression of tRNA(Lys) UUU as well by overexpression of genes (BCK1 and HFM1) with a strong bias for the AAA codon read by this tRNA. These data extend the mitochondrial regulome, demonstrate that heat stress can impair respiration by disturbing cytoplasmic translation of proteins critically involved in mitochondrial function and document, for the first time, the involvement in such process of the Elongator and urmylation pathways. Given the conservation of these pathways, the present findings may pave the way to a better understanding of the human mitochondrial regulome in health and disease. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Improvement of mitochondrial NAD(+)/FAD(+)-linked state-3 respiration by caffeine attenuates quinolinic acid induced motor impairment in rats: implications in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Jitendriya; Kumar, Anil

    2014-12-01

    Chronic quinolinic acid (QA) lesions in rats closely resemble Huntington's disease like conditions. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have long been implicated in the neurotoxic effects of QA acting through N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Reports suggest that inhibition of adenosine A2A receptor function elicits neuroprotective effect in QA induced neurotoxicity in rats. Caffeine, a preferential A2A receptor antagonist imitates antioxidant like actions and exerts neuroprotective effects in various neurodegenerative conditions. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of caffeine against QA induced neurotoxicity in rats. In the present study, QA (200nmol/2μl saline) has been administered bilaterally to the striatum of rats followed by chronic caffeine (10, 20 and 40mg/kg) administration for 21 days. Motor performance of the animals was evaluated in weekly intervals and subsequently after 21 days, the animals were sacrificed and measurement of mitochondrial complexes activity, respiration rate and endogenous antioxidant levels were carried out in the striatal region. Single intrastriatal QA administration resulted in drastic reduction in body weight, marked motor impairment (decreased total locomotor activity in actophotometer and impaired grip strength in rotarod), increased oxidative stress, impaired mitochondrial complexes activities and decreased state 3 respiration (NAD(+)/FAD(+)-linked) in rats. However, chronic treatment of caffeine for 21 days significantly attenuated the QA induced behavioural, biochemical and mitochondrial alterations displaying neuroprotective efficacy. The study highlights the possible involvement of A2A receptor antagonism in the neuroprotective effect of caffeine against QA induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in rats. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of chlorinated phenolics and quinones with the mitochondrial respiration: a comparison of the o- and p-chlorinated quinones and hydroquinones

    SciTech Connect

    Pritsos, C.A.; Pointon, M.; Pardini, R.S.

    1987-05-01

    Interest in the environmental toxicology of chlorinated catechols and their analogous quinones was prompted by their acute toxicity towards fish and other aquatic organisms. Chlorophenols, such as pentachlorophenol, as well as tetrachlorocatechol have been suggested to uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation while chloranil and tetrachloro-o-benzoquinone have been shown to inhibit liver mitochondrial respiration, which may be related to their cytotoxicity. Another chlorinated quinone fungicide, 2,3 dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone (CNQ) has been studied and shown to both uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and inhibit respiration in liver and heart mitochondria. CNQ was shown to undergo redox cycling with mitochondria, with a concomitant production of toxic oxygen species including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These reactive oxygen species were associated with the generation of mitochondrial oxidative stress, and were related to the toxic action of CNQ. Based upon these previous findings, the authors examined the interaction of both the ortho and para isomers of tetrachloro-benzoquinone and their corresponding hydroquinones with mitochondria in order to prove their mechanism of actions and compare the reactions of the various isomers.

  1. ARALAR/AGC1 deficiency, a neurodevelopmental disorder with severe impairment of neuronal mitochondrial respiration, does not produce a primary increase in brain lactate.

    PubMed

    Juaristi, Inés; García-Martín, María L; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Pardo, Beatriz

    2017-07-01

    ARALAR/AGC1 (aspartate-glutamate mitochondrial carrier 1) is an important component of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS). AGC1-deficiency is a rare disease causing global cerebral hypomyelination, developmental arrest, hypotonia, and epilepsy (OMIM ID #612949); the aralar-KO mouse recapitulates the major findings in humans. This study was aimed at understanding the impact of ARALAR-deficiency in brain lactate levels as a biomarker. We report that lactate was equally abundant in wild-type and aralar-KO mouse brain in vivo at postnatal day 17. We find that lactate production upon mitochondrial blockade depends on up-regulation of lactate formation in astrocytes rather than in neurons. However, ARALAR-deficiency decreased cell respiration in neurons, not astrocytes, which maintained unchanged respiration and lactate production. As the primary site of ARALAR-deficiency is neuronal, this explains the lack of accumulation of brain lactate in ARALAR-deficiency in humans and mice. On the other hand, we find that the cytosolic and mitochondrial components of the glycerol phosphate shuttle are present in astrocytes with similar activities. This suggests that glycerol phosphate shuttle is the main NADH shuttle in astrocytes and explains the absence of effects of ARALAR-deficiency in these cells. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Stomatin-like protein 2 deficiency in T cells is associated with altered mitochondrial respiration and defective CD4+ T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Christie, Darah A; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Blagih, Julianna; Dunn, Stanley D; St-Pierre, Julie; Jones, Russell G; Hatch, Grant M; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2012-11-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mostly mitochondrial protein that regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function and modulates T cell activation. To determine the mechanism of action of SLP-2, we generated T cell-specific SLP-2-deficient mice. These mice had normal numbers of thymocytes and T cells in the periphery. However, conventional SLP-2-deficient T cells had a posttranscriptional defect in IL-2 production in response to TCR ligation, and this translated into reduced CD4(+) T cell responses. SLP-2 deficiency was associated with impaired cardiolipin compartmentalization in mitochondrial membranes, decreased levels of the NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) iron-sulfur protein 3, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1β subcomplex subunit 8, and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) 1α subcomplex subunit 9 of respiratory complex I, and decreased activity of this complex as well as of complex II plus III of the respiratory chain. In addition, SLP-2-deficient T cells showed a significant increase in uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and a greater reliance on glycolysis. Based on these results, we propose that SLP-2 organizes the mitochondrial membrane compartmentalization of cardiolipin, which is required for optimal assembly and function of respiratory chain complexes. This function, in T cells, helps to ensure proper metabolic response during activation.

  3. Investigating the role of respiration in plant salinity tolerance by analyzing mitochondrial proteomes from wheat and a salinity-tolerant Amphiploid (wheat × Lophopyrum elongatum).

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Richard P; Millar, A Harvey; Taylor, Nicolas L

    2013-11-01

    The effect of salinity on mitochondrial properties was investigated by comparing the reference wheat variety Chinese Spring (CS) to a salt-tolerant amphiploid (AMP). The octoploid AMP genotype was previously generated by combining hexaploid bread wheat (CS) with the diploid wild wheatgrass adapted to salt marshes, Lophopyrum elongatum. Here we used a combination of physiological, biochemical, and proteomic analyses to explore the mitochondrial and respiratory response to salinity in these two genotypes. The AMP showed greater growth tolerance to salinity treatments and altered respiration rate in both roots and shoots. A proteomic workflow of 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was used to compare the protein composition of isolated mitochondrial samples from roots and shoots of both genotypes, following control or salt treatment. A large set of mitochondrial proteins were identified as responsive to salinity in both genotypes, notably enzymes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Genotypic differences in mitochondrial composition were also identified, with AMP exhibiting a higher abundance of manganese superoxide dismutase, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, aconitase, malate dehydrogenase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase compared to CS. We present peptide fragmentation spectra derived from some of these AMP-specific protein spots, which could serve as biomarkers to track superior protein variants.

  4. Seasonal Patterns of Soil Respiration and Related Soil Biochemical Properties under Nitrogen Addition in Winter Wheat Field

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guopeng; Houssou, Albert A.; Wu, Huijun; Cai, Dianxiong; Wu, Xueping; Gao, Lili; Li, Jing; Wang, Bisheng; Li, Shengping

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the changes of soil respiration under increasing N fertilizer in cropland ecosystems is crucial to accurately predicting global warming. This study explored seasonal variations of soil respiration and its controlling biochemical properties under a gradient of Nitrogen addition during two consecutive winter wheat growing seasons (2013–2015). N was applied at four different levels: 0, 120, 180 and 240 kg N ha-1 year-1 (denoted as N0, N12, N18 and N24, respectively). Soil respiration exhibited significant seasonal variation and was significantly affected by soil temperature with Q10 ranging from 2.04 to 2.46 and from 1.49 to 1.53 during 2013–2014 and 2014–2015 winter wheat growing season, respectively. Soil moisture had no significant effect on soil respiration during 2013–2014 winter wheat growing season but showed a significant and negative correlation with soil respiration during 2014–2015 winter wheat growing season. Soil respiration under N24 treatment was significantly higher than N0 treatment. Averaged over the two growing seasons, N12, N18 and N24 significantly increased soil respiration by 13.4, 16.4 and 25.4% compared with N0, respectively. N addition also significantly increased easily extractable glomalin-related soil protein (EEG), soil organic carbon (SOC), total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. In addition, soil respiration was significantly and positively correlated with β-glucosidase activity, EEG, SOC, total N, ammonium N and nitrate N contents. The results indicated that high N fertilization improved soil chemical properties, but significantly increased soil respiration. PMID:26629695

  5. Mouse somatic mutation orthologous to MELAS A3302G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene confers respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Akinori; Enoki, Shunkei; Ishikawa, Kaori; Mito, Takayuki; Obata, Kanae; Nagashima, Ruriko; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-11-27

    We searched for mtDNA harboring somatic mutations in mouse B82 cells, and found an A2748G mutation orthologous to the A3302G mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene reported in a patient with MELAS, the most prevalent mitochondrial disease. We isolated subclones of B82 cells until we obtained one subclone harboring >95% A2748G mtDNA. Cytoplasmic transfer of A2748G mtDNA resulted in cotransfer of A2748G mtDNA and respiration defects into mouse ES cells. Thus, A2748G mtDNA is responsible for respiration defects, and the ES cells harboring A2748G mtDNA may be useful for generation of transmitochondrial mice harboring A2748G mtDNA as potential disease models of MELAS.

  6. THE STATUS OF RESPIRATION IN THE METHODS OF DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE COMPARED WITH THAT UNDER THE METHOD OF INTRATRACHEAL INSUFFLATION

    PubMed Central

    Auer, John; Meltzer, S. J.

    1911-01-01

    The maintenance of life of an individual with an open double pneumothorax under differential pressure depends essentially upon the normal position of the lower lobes of the lungs and their close approximation to the diaphragm, especially of the posterior parts of the lobes. A complete dislodgment of both lower lobes leads invariably to the death of the individual, which may occur in a very short time, or after fifteen to twenty-five minutes. In all cases the respiration is affected first; it slows almost at once and stops invariably before the heart. The result is the same whether the vagi are intact or both nerves are cut. Exceptionally, respiration may continue even after the separation of the lungs from the diaphragm, but only by having all the lobes well approximated to the thoracic walls. When by dislodgment of the lower lobes the respiration is stopped and the heart is feeble and slow, or stopped completely, it is rarely possible to restore life by artificial respiration or by other appropriate means. The extent of the exchange of gases occurring in normal respiration, with closed thoracic cavity, exceeds greatly the need for the maintenance of life, since normal respiration is provided with an abundance of factors of safety. Under differential pressure, however, life is carried on with an exchange of gases which amounts to a small fraction only of the extent of the exchange that takes place in normal respiration; respiration under differential pressure is, therefore, deprived of all factors of safety and is incapable of resisting the dangers of exceptional incidents. Deaths occurring in connection with the differential pressure have their cause essentially in this unguarded state of the function of respiration. Under tracheal insufflation, the function of respiration is surrounded with effective safeguards, at least as much as is normal respiration. Dislodgment of the lungs has no detrimental effect. After complete collapse of the lungs, capillary adhesions

  7. Decreased photosynthesis and growth with reduced respiration in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown under elevated CO2 over 1800 generations.

    PubMed

    Li, Futian; Beardall, John; Collins, Sinéad; Gao, Kunshan

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the long-term responses of marine phytoplankton to ongoing ocean acidification (OA) are appearing rapidly in the literature. However, only a few of these have investigated diatoms, which is disproportionate to their contribution to global primary production. Here we show that a population of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, after growing under elevated CO2 (1000 μatm, HCL, pHT : 7.70) for 1860 generations, showed significant differences in photosynthesis and growth from a population maintained in ambient CO2 and then transferred to elevated CO2 for 20 generations (HC). The HCL population had lower mitochondrial respiration, than did the control population maintained in ambient CO2 (400 μatm, LCL, pHT : 8.02) for 1860 generations. Although the cells had higher respiratory carbon loss within 20 generations under the elevated CO2 , being consistent to previous findings, they downregulated their respiration to sustain their growth in longer duration under the OA condition. Responses of phytoplankton to OA may depend on the timescale for which they are exposed due to fluctuations in physiological traits over time. This study provides the first evidence that populations of the model species, P. tricornutum, differ phenotypically from each other after having been grown for differing spans of time under OA conditions, suggesting that long-term changes should be measured to understand responses of primary producers to OA, especially in waters with diatom-dominated phytoplankton assemblages.

  8. Isoniazid-induced cell death is precipitated by underlying mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Zhang, Carmen; Schwall, Christine T; Alder, Nathan N; Pinkert, Carl A; Krueger, Winfried; Rasmussen, Theodore; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2013-12-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an antituberculosis drug that has been associated with idiosyncratic liver injury in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are still unclear, but there is growing evidence that INH and/or its major metabolite, hydrazine, may interfere with mitochondrial function. However, hepatic mitochondria have a large reserve capacity, and minor disruption of energy homeostasis does not necessarily induce cell death. We explored whether pharmacologic or genetic impairment of mitochondrial complex I may amplify mitochondrial dysfunction and precipitate INH-induced hepatocellular injury. We found that INH (≤ 3000 μM) did not induce cell injury in cultured mouse hepatocytes, although it decreased hepatocellular respiration and ATP levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, coexposure of hepatocytes to INH and nontoxic concentrations of the complex I inhibitors rotenone (3 μM) or piericidin A (30 nM) resulted in massive ATP depletion and cell death. Although both rotenone and piericidin A increased MitoSox-reactive fluorescence, Mito-TEMPO or N-acetylcysteine did not attenuate the extent of cytotoxicity. However, preincubation of cells with the acylamidase inhibitor bis-p-nitrophenol phosphate provided protection from hepatocyte injury induced by rotenone/INH (but not rotenone/hydrazine), suggesting that hydrazine was the cell-damaging species. Indeed, we found that hydrazine directly inhibited the activity of solubilized complex II. Hepatocytes isolated from mutant Ndufs4(+/-) mice, although featuring moderately lower protein expression levels of this complex I subunit in liver mitochondria, exhibited unchanged hepatic complex I activity and were therefore not sensitized to INH. These data indicate that underlying inhibition of complex I, which alone is not acutely toxic, can trigger INH-induced hepatocellular injury.

  9. [Soil Microbial Respiration Under Different Soil Temperature Conditions and Its Relationship to Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon and Invertase].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Shu-tao; Hu, Zheng-hua; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the soil microbial respiration under different temperature conditions and its relationship to soil dissolved organic carbon ( DOC) and invertase, an indoor incubation experiment was performed. The soil samples used for the experiment were taken from Laoshan, Zijinshan, and Baohuashan. The responses of soil microbial respiration to the increasing temperature were studied. The soil DOC content and invertase activity were also measured at the end of incubation. Results showed that relationships between cumulative microbial respiration of different soils and soil temperature could be explained by exponential functions, which had P values lower than 0.001. The coefficient of temperature sensitivity (Q10 value) varied from 1.762 to 1.895. The Q10 value of cumulative microbial respiration decreased with the increase of soil temperature for all soils. The Q10 value of microbial respiration on 27 days after incubation was close to that of 1 day after incubation, indicating that the temperature sensitivity of recalcitrant organic carbon may be similar to that of labile organic carbon. For all soils, a highly significant ( P = 0.003 ) linear relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and soil DOC content could be observed. Soil DOC content could explain 31.6% variances of cumulative soil microbial respiration. For the individual soil and all soils, the relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and invertase activity could be explained by a highly significant (P < 0.01) linear regression function, which suggested that invertase was a good indicator of the magnitude of soil microbial respiration.

  10. In vivo cytochrome and alternative pathway respiration in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with altered alternative oxidase under different light conditions.

    PubMed

    Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Flexas, Jaume; Rasmusson, Allan G; Umbach, Ann L; Siedow, James N; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2011-08-01

    The in vivo activity of the alternative pathway (ν(alt)) has been studied using the oxygen isotope fractionation method in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana modified for the expression of the AtAOX1a gene by anti-sense (AS-12) or overexpression (XX-2). Under non-stressful conditions, ν(alt) was similar in all plant lines regardless of its different alternative pathway capacities (V(alt)). Total leaf respiration (V(t)) and V(alt) were directly related to growth light conditions while electron partitioning between the cytochrome pathway (CP) and alternative pathway (AP) was unchanged by light levels. Interestingly, the AP functioned at full capacity in anti-sense plants under both growth light conditions. The role of the AP in response to a high light stress induced by short-term high light treatment (HLT) was also studied. In wild type and XX-2, both CP and AP rates increased proportionally after HLT while in AS-12, where the AP was unable to increase its rate, the CP accommodated all the increase in respiration. The results obtained under high light stress suggest that flexibility in the response of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is involved in sustaining photosynthetic rates in response to this stress while the saturated AP in AS-12 plants may contribute to the observed increase in photoinhibition. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Nitric oxide and peroxynitrite exert distinct effects on mitochondrial respiration which are differentially blocked by glutathione or glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Lizasoain, I; Moro, M A; Knowles, R G; Darley-Usmar, V; Moncada, S

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite both inhibit respiration by brain submitochondrial particles, the former reversibly at cytochrome c oxidase, the latter irreversibly at complexes I-III. Both GSH (IC50 =10 microM) and glucose (IC50 = 8 mM) prevented inhibition of respiration by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), but neither glucose (100 mM) nor GSH (100 microM) affected that by NO. Thus, unless ONOO- is formed within mitochondria it is unlikely to inhibit respiration in cells directly, because of reactions with cellular thiols and carbohydrates. However, the reversible inhibition of respiration cytochrome c oxidase by NO is likely to occur (e.g. in the brain during ischaemia) and could be responsible for cytotoxicity. PMID:8615783

  12. Relationship between Liver Mitochondrial Respiration and Proton Leak in Low and High RFI Steers from Two Lineages of RFI Angus Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Acetoze, G.; Weber, K. L.; Ramsey, J. J.; Rossow, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate liver mitochondrial oxygen consumption and proton leak kinetics in progeny from two lineages of Angus bulls with high and low residual feed intake (RFI). Two Angus bulls were selected based on results from a genetic test for RFI and were used as sires. Eight offspring at 10-11 months of age from each sire were housed in individual pens for 70–105 days following a diet adaptation period of 14 days. Progeny of the low RFI sire had 0.57 kg/d (P = 0.05) lower average RFI than progeny of the high RFI sire. There was no difference in dry matter intake between low and high RFI steers, but low RFI steers gained more body weight (P = 0.02) and tended to have higher average daily gains (P = 0.07). State 3 and State 4 respiration, RCR, and proton leak did not differ between high and low RFI steers (P = 0.96, P = 0.81, P = 0.93, and P = 0.88, resp.). Therefore, the increase in bodyweight gain which distinguished the low RFI steers from the high RFI steers may be associated with other metabolic mechanisms that are not associated with liver mitochondrial respiration and proton leak kinetics. PMID:27347504

  13. Yeast dihydroxybutanone phosphate synthase, an enzyme of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway, has a second unrelated function in expression of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Jin, Can; Barrientos, Antoni; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2003-04-25

    aE280/U1 is a pet mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae partially deficient in cytochromes a, a3, and cytochrome b. The ability of this mutant to respire is restored by RIB3, a gene previously shown to code for 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (DHBP synthase), an enzyme of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway. The sequences of RIB3 from wild type and aE280/U1 indicated a single base change resulting in an A137T substitution. The alanine 137 is a conserved residue located in a cavity on the surface of the protein distant from the active site and from the subunit interaction domain involved in homodimer formation. The respiratory defect elicited by this mutation cannot be explained by a flavin insufficiency based on the following evidence: 1) growth of the aE280/U1 on respiratory substrates is not rescued by exogenous riboflavin; 2) the levels of flavin nucleotides are not significantly different in the mutant and wild type. We proposed that in addition to its known function in riboflavin synthesis, RIB3 also functions in expression of mitochondrial respiration. Restoration by riboflavin of growth of a rib3 deletion mutant on glucose but not glycerol/ethanol also supported this conclusion. An antibody against the N-terminal half of DHBP synthase was used to study its subcellular distribution. Most of the protein was localized in the cytosolic fraction, but a small fraction was detected in the mitochondrial intermembrane space.

  14. Mitochondrial accumulation under oxidative stress is due to defects in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Hui; Feng, Zhihui; Li, Yuan; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics maintains normal mitochondrial function by degrading damaged mitochondria and generating newborn mitochondria. The accumulation of damaged mitochondria influences the intracellular environment by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction, and thus initiating a vicious cycle. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial malfunction, which is involved in many cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanism of mitochondrial accumulation in cardiac myoblasts remains unclear. We observed mitochondrial dysfunction and an increase in mitochondrial mass under the oxidative conditions produced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) in cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells. However, in contrast to the increase in mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) decreased, suggesting that enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis may be not the primary cause of the mitochondrial accumulation. Therefore, we investigated changes in a number of proteins involved in autophagy. Beclin1, Atg12-Atg5 conjugate, Atg7 contents decreased but LC3-II accumulated in tBHP-treated H9c2 cells. Moreover, the capacity for acid hydrolysis decreased in H9c2 cells. We also demonstrated a decrease in DJ-1 protein under the oxidative conditions that deregulate mitochondrial dynamics. These results reveal that autophagy became defective under oxidative stress. We therefore suggest that defects in autophagy mediate mitochondrial accumulation under these conditions.

  15. Glucocorticoid Modulation of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatoma Cells Requires the Mitochondrial Fission Protein Drp1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Paz, José C.; Sebastián, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Liesa, Marc; Segalés, Jessica; Palacín, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance hepatic energy metabolism and gluconeogenesis partly through changes in mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial function is influenced by the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission events. However, whether glucocorticoids modulate mitochondrial function through the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is currently unknown. Results: Here, we report that the effects of dexamethasone on mitochondrial function and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells are dependent on the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Dexamethasone increased routine oxygen consumption, maximal respiratory capacity, superoxide anion, proton leak, and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells. Under these conditions, dexamethasone altered mitochondrial morphology, which was paralleled by a large increase in Drp1 expression, and reduced mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2. In vivo dexamethasone treatment also enhanced Drp1 expression in mouse liver. On the basis of these observations, we analyzed the dependence on the Drp1 function of dexamethasone effects on mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis. We show that the increase in mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis induced by dexamethasone are hampered by the inhibition of Drp1 function. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that the effects of glucocorticoids on hepatic metabolism require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Conclusion: In summary, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial effects of dexamethasone both on mitochondrial respiration and on the gluconeogenic pathway depend on Drp1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 366–378. PMID:22703557

  16. Guava fruit extract and its triterpene constituents have osteoanabolic effect: Stimulation of osteoblast differentiation by activation of mitochondrial respiration via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Porwal, Konica; Pal, Subhashis; Dev, Kapil; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Sinha, Neeraj; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the skeletal effect of guava triterpene-enriched extract (GE) in rats and identify osteogenic compounds thereof, and determine their modes of action. In growing female rats, GE at 250 mg/kg dose increased parameters of peak bone mass including femur length, bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical strength, suggesting that GE promoted modeling-directed bone growth. GE also stimulated bone regeneration at the site of bone injury. In adult osteopenic rats (osteopenia induced by ovariectomy, OVX) GE completely restored the lost bones at both axial and appendicular sites, suggesting a strong osteoanabolic effect. Serum metabolomics studies showed changes in several metabolites (some of which are related to bone metabolism) in OVX compared with ovary-intact control and GE treatment to OVX rats reversed those. Out of six abundantly present triterpenes in GE, ursolic acid (UA) and 2α-hydroxy ursolic acid (2α-UA) induced osteogenic differentiation in vitro as did GE by activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway assessed by phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Over-expressing of constitutively active GSK-3β (caGSK-3β) in osteoblasts abolished the differentiation-promoting effect of GE, UA and 2α-UA. All three increased both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration but only rotenone (inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transfer) and not 2-deoxyglucose (to block glycolysis) inhibited osteoblast differentiation. In addition, caGSK-3β over-expression attenuated the enhanced mitochondrial respiration caused by GE, UA and 2α-UA. We conclude that GE has osteoanabolic effect which is contributed by UA and 2α-UA, and involve activation of canonical Wnt signaling which in turn modulates cellular energy metabolism leading to osteoblast differentiation.

  17. Targeting Mitochondria by Zn(II)N-Alkylpyridylporphyrins: The Impact of Compound Sub-Mitochondrial Partition on Cell Respiration and Overall Photodynamic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Ahmad M.; Craik, James D.; Ezzeddine, Rima; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in aerobic ATP production and redox control. They harness crucial metabolic pathways and control cell death mechanisms, properties that make these organelles essential for survival of most eukaryotic cells. Cancer cells have altered cell death pathways and typically show a shift towards anaerobic glycolysis for energy production, factors which point to mitochondria as potential culprits in cancer development. Targeting mitochondria is an attractive approach to tumor control, but design of pharmaceutical agents based on rational approaches is still not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate which structural features of specially designed Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins would direct them to mitochondria and to particular mitochondrial targets. Since Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins can act as highly efficient photosensitizers, their localization can be confirmed by photodamage to particular mitochondrial components. Using cultured LS174T adenocarcinoma cells, we found that subcellular distribution of Zn-porphyrins is directed by the nature of the substituents attached to the meso pyridyl nitrogens at the porphyrin ring. Increasing the length of the aliphatic chain from one carbon (methyl) to six carbons (hexyl) increased mitochondrial uptake of the compounds. Such modifications also affected sub-mitochondrial distribution of the Zn-porphyrins. The amphiphilic hexyl derivative (ZnTnHex-2-PyP) localized in the vicinity of cytochrome c oxidase complex, causing its inactivation during illumination. Photoinactivation of critical cellular targets explains the superior efficiency of the hexyl derivative in causing mitochondrial photodamage, and suppressing cellular respiration and survival. Design of potent photosensitizers and redox-active scavengers of free radicals should take into consideration not only selective organelle uptake and localization, but also selective targeting of critical macromolecular structures. PMID

  18. Targeting mitochondria by Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins: the impact of compound sub-mitochondrial partition on cell respiration and overall photodynamic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Ahmad M; Craik, James D; Ezzeddine, Rima; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in aerobic ATP production and redox control. They harness crucial metabolic pathways and control cell death mechanisms, properties that make these organelles essential for survival of most eukaryotic cells. Cancer cells have altered cell death pathways and typically show a shift towards anaerobic glycolysis for energy production, factors which point to mitochondria as potential culprits in cancer development. Targeting mitochondria is an attractive approach to tumor control, but design of pharmaceutical agents based on rational approaches is still not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate which structural features of specially designed Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins would direct them to mitochondria and to particular mitochondrial targets. Since Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins can act as highly efficient photosensitizers, their localization can be confirmed by photodamage to particular mitochondrial components. Using cultured LS174T adenocarcinoma cells, we found that subcellular distribution of Zn-porphyrins is directed by the nature of the substituents attached to the meso pyridyl nitrogens at the porphyrin ring. Increasing the length of the aliphatic chain from one carbon (methyl) to six carbons (hexyl) increased mitochondrial uptake of the compounds. Such modifications also affected sub-mitochondrial distribution of the Zn-porphyrins. The amphiphilic hexyl derivative (ZnTnHex-2-PyP) localized in the vicinity of cytochrome c oxidase complex, causing its inactivation during illumination. Photoinactivation of critical cellular targets explains the superior efficiency of the hexyl derivative in causing mitochondrial photodamage, and suppressing cellular respiration and survival. Design of potent photosensitizers and redox-active scavengers of free radicals should take into consideration not only selective organelle uptake and localization, but also selective targeting of critical macromolecular structures.

  19. The temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration after permafrost thaw under oxic and anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernakovich, J. G.; Lynch, L.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon in permafrost soils may be vulnerable to decomposition under climate warming. The ensuing release of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) into the atmosphere would result in a positive climate feedback. General theory dictates that the activity of biological and chemical reactions doubles for every ten degree increase in temperature. However in Arctic soils, the temperature sensitivity of CO2 production is often larger than two, especially in experiments conducted at field relevant temperatures. Less is known about the