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Sample records for mixed culture sulphate-reducing

  1. Coexistence of a sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio species and the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 in defined chemostat cultures grown with various combinations of sulfate and tetrachloroethene.

    PubMed

    Drzyzga, O; Gerritse, J; Dijk, J A; Elissen, H; Gottschal, J C

    2001-02-01

    A two-member co-culture consisting of the dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1 and the sulphate-reducing Desulfovibrio sp. strain SULF1 was obtained via anaerobic enrichment from soil contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE). In this co-culture, PCE dechlorination to cis-dichloroethene was due to the activity of the dehalorespiring bacterium only. Chemostat experiments with lactate as the primary electron donor for both strains along with varying sulphate and PCE concentrations showed that the sulphate-reducing strain outnumbered the dehalogenating strain at relatively high ratios of sulphate/PCE. Stable co-cultures with both organisms present at similar cell densities were observed when both electron acceptors were supplied in the reservoir medium in nearly equimolar amounts. In the presence of low sulphate/PCE ratios, the Desulfitobacterium sp. became the numerically dominant strain within the chemostat co-culture. Surprisingly, in the absence of sulphate, strain SULF1 did not disappear completely from the co-culture despite the fact that there was no electron acceptor provided with the medium to be used by this sulphate reducer. Therefore, we propose a syntrophic association between the sulphate-reducing and the dehalorespiring bacteria via interspecies hydrogen transfer. The sulphate reducer was able to sustain growth in the chemostat co-culture by fermenting lactate and using the dehalogenating bacterium as a 'biological electron acceptor'. This is the first report describing growth of a sulphate-reducing bacterium in a defined two-member continuous culture by syntrophically coupling the electron and hydrogen transfer to a dehalorespiring bacterium.

  2. Diversity of bacteria and Archaea in sulphate-reducing enrichment cultures inoculated from serial dilution of Zostera noltii rhizosphere samples.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Ana; Antón, Josefa; De Wit, Rutger; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco

    2003-09-01

    We have analysed the diversity of culturable sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in Zostera noltii colonized sediments from Bassin d'Arcachon (France). Four organic substrates have been tested as well as the combination of H2 and CO2 to select for lithotrophic SRB. All energy sources were supplied in parallel cultures that were amended with yeast extract plus NH4+ and prepared without a source of combined nitrogen, the latter to select for diazotrophic SRB. The 10 different enrichment media were inoculated from serial dilution of rhizosphere samples. The highest dilution cultures yielding positive growth (i.e. 10-7) were studied by molecular techniques (16S rDNA clone libraries, RISA and ARDRA). Lactate as a single organic substrate in combination with a source of combined nitrogen resulted in selection of members of the Desulfovibrionaceae. Surprisingly, when lactate was added without a source of combined nitrogen, Desulfobacteriaceae were selected. A strong influence of the presence or absence of combined nitrogen was also observed for the substrates sucrose and fructose. Whereas the liquid culture growing on sucrose and NH4+ systematically yielded 16S rDNA clones related to an environmental unidentified green sulphur bacterium (OPS185), on plates we were able to isolate a SRB related to Desulfovibrio dechloracetivorans, which likely represents a non-described species. Under diazotrophic conditions, sucrose selected for SRB clones related to the cluster formed by Desulfovibrio zosterae, Desulfovibrio salexigens and Desulfovibrio bastinii. The corresponding isolate obtained on plates showed only low sequence similarity with this closest neighbour (93.8%), and we suggest that it also represents a non-described species. Surprisingly, a 16S rDNA sequence corresponding to an archaeon, i.e. a non-extremophile Crenoarchaeota, was retrieved from several of the SRB enrichment cultures even after subsequent transfers.

  3. In vitro batch cultures of gut microbiota from healthy and ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects suggest that sulphate-reducing bacteria levels are raised in UC and by a protein-rich diet.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Nazeha A; Walton, Gemma E; Gibson, Glenn R; Tuohy, Kieran M; Andrews, Simon C

    2014-02-01

    Imbalances in gut microbiota composition during ulcerative colitis (UC) indicate a role for the microbiota in propagating the disorder. Such effects were investigated using in vitro batch cultures (with/without mucin, peptone or starch) inoculated with faecal slurries from healthy or UC patients; the growth of five bacterial groups was monitored along with short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. Healthy cultures gave two-fold higher growth and SCFA levels with up to ten-fold higher butyrate production. Starch gave the highest growth and SCFA production (particularly butyrate), indicating starch-enhanced saccharolytic activity. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were the predominant bacterial group (of five examined) for UC inocula whereas they were the minority group for the healthy inocula. Furthermore, SRB growth was stimulated by peptone presumably due to the presence of sulphur-rich amino acids. The results suggest raised SRB levels in UC, which could contribute to the condition through release of toxic sulphide.

  4. Spatial and temporal changes in sulphate-reducing groundwater bacterial community structure in response to Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    PubMed

    Reed, D A; Toze, S; Chang, B

    2008-01-01

    The population dynamics of bacterial able to be cultured under sulphate reducing condition was studied in conjunction with changes in aquifer geochemistry using multivariate statistics for two contrasting Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) techniques at two different geographical locations (Perth, Western Australia and Adelaide, South Australia). Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to investigate spatial and temporal changes in the overall chemical signature of the aquifers using an array of chemical analytes which demonstrated a migrating geochemical plume. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) using DNA from sulphate-reducing bacteria cultures was used to detect spatial and temporal changes in population dynamics. Bacterial and geochemical evidence suggested that groundwater at greatest distance from the nutrient source was least affected by treated effluent recharge. The results suggested that bacterial populations that were able to be cultured in sulphate reducing media responded to the migrating chemical gradient and to the changes in aquifer geochemistry. Most noticeably, sulphate-reducing bacterial populations associated with the infiltration galleries were stable in community structure over time. Additionally, the biodiversity of these culturable bacteria was restored when aquifer geochemistry returned to ambient conditions during the recovery phase at the Adelaide Aquifer Storage and Recovery site.

  5. Influence of EPS isolated from thermophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria on carbon steel corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ze Hua; Liu, Tao; Liu, Hong Fang

    2011-05-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were isolated by centrifugation of thermophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grown in API-RP38 culture medium. The protein and polysaccharide fractions were quantified and the highest concentrations were extracted from a 14-day old culture. The effect of EPS on carbon steel corrosion was investigated by electrochemical techniques. At 30°C, a small amount of EPS in 3% NaCl solution inhibited corrosion, whilst excessive amounts of EPS facilitated corrosion. In addition, the inhibition efficiency of EPS decreased with temperature due to thermal desorption of the EPS. The results suggest that adsorbed EPS layers could be beneficial to anti-corrosion by hindering the reduction of oxygen. However, the accumulation of an EPS film could stimulate the anodic dissolution of the underlying steel by chelation of Fe2+ ions.

  6. Copper remediation by Eichhornia spp. and sulphate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dave, Shailesh; Damani, Maitry; Tipre, Devayani

    2010-01-15

    Eichhornia spp. biomass was collected from Chandola Lake, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Point of zero charge of the biomass was pH 7.3. Flask study showed pH 5 and 2-3h contact time as optimum conditions for copper sorption with 67.25% copper removal. At the end of 24h of contact time, copper removal reached to 85.0%, from 100 ppm copper containing solution. Copper loading capacity of the biomass ranged between 9.9 and 28.5 mg g(-1) of biomass. To understand the interaction among pH, temperature, presence of nickel and zinc in the system, 2(4) factorial experiment was performed. Under the experimental conditions pH and interactions between pH-nickel, temperature-pH and temperature-pH-nickel-zinc were found to be significant with 60-74.7% copper removal. Langmuir isotherm was better fit as compared to Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second order equation gave R(2) of 0.999 for biosorption kinetic of Eichhornia biomass. Reactor study showed 90% overall copper removal from 24 L of copper containing waste studied and sulphate-reducing bacteria played a significant role. SEMquant element analysis showed increase from 41.66% to 53.93%, 1.02-19.73% and 0.0-12.39% of chloride, aluminium and copper respectively in the loaded biomass as compare to unexposed biomass.

  7. Effect of growth temperature on cellular fatty acids in sulphate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2003-11-01

    The effect of growth temperature on the cellular fatty acid composition of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was studied in 12 species belonging to eight genera including psychrophiles and mesophiles. Most of these species were of marine origin. The investigated SRB with the exception of four Desulfobacter species exhibited only a minor increase in the proportion of cis-unsaturated fatty acids (by < or = 5% per 10 degrees C) when the growth temperature was decreased; psychrophiles maintained their typically high content of cis-unsaturated fatty acids (around 75% of total fatty acids) nearly constant. The four Desulfobacter species, however, increased the proportion of cis-unsaturated among total fatty acids significantly (by > or =14% per 10 degrees C; measured in late growth phase) with decreasing growth temperature. The ratio between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in Desulfobacter species changed not only with the growth temperature, but also with the growth state in batch cultures at constant temperature. Changes of cellular fatty acids were studied in detail with D. hydrogenophilus, the most psychrotolerant (growth range 0-35 degrees C) among the mesophilic SRB examined. Desulfobacter hydrogenophilus also formed cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid (a cyclopropane fatty acid) and 10-methylhexadecanoic acid. At low growth temperature (12 degrees C), the relative amount of these fatty acids was at least threefold lower; this questions the usefulness of 10-methylhexadecanoic acid as a reliable biomarker of Desulfobacter in cold sediments.

  8. [Adhesion of sulphate-reducing bacteria to steel under cathode polarization].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Koptieva, Zh P; Asaulenko, L H; Kozlova, I P

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion of different (as to their corrosion aggression) strains of sulphate-reducing bacteria to steel has been studied under cathode polarization at various potentials: -800, -900, -1000, -1200 mV. It has been established that cathode polarization differently affects the adhesion of strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria with various aggression to steel. Correlation between the bacterial strains aggression and the number of cells adhered to metal have been noted. The cells of aggressive strains of D. indonensis Indonesia and Desulfovibrio sp. Kiev-10 adhered to metal most actively at cathode depolarization (8.0 x 10(7) and 3.5 x 10(7) cell/cm2, respectively). Nonaggressive strains of bacteria D. desulfuricans Kiev-45 and Desulfobulbus sp. Portsmouth adhered to metal in a less quantity. The data obtained prove that the use of cathode protection without allowance for the microbe factor can lead to intensification of the corrosion process.

  9. Spore-forming, Desulfosporosinus-like sulphate-reducing bacteria from a shallow aquifer contaminated with gasoline.

    PubMed

    Robertson, W J; Franzmann, P D; Mee, B J

    2000-02-01

    Previous studies on the geochemistry of a shallow unconfined aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons suggested that the degradation of some hydrocarbons was linked to bacterial sulphate reduction. There was attenuation of naphthalene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), toluene, p-xylene and ethylbenzene in the groundwater with concomitant loss of sulphate. Here, the recovery of eight strains of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from the contaminated site is reported. All were straight or curved rod-shaped cells which formed endospores. Amplification and sequencing of the 16S rDNA indicated that the strains were all sulphate reducers of the Gram-positive line of descent, and were most closely related to Desulfosporosinus (previously Desulfotomaculum) orientis DSM 8344 (97-98.9% sequence similarity). The strains clustered in three phylogenetic groups based on 16S rRNA sequences. Whole cell fatty acid compositions were similar to those of D. orientis DSM 8344, and were consistent with previous studies of fatty acids in soil and groundwater from the site. Microcosms containing groundwater from this aquifer indicated a role for sulphate reduction in the degradation of [ring-UL-14C]toluene, but not for the degradation of [UL-14C]benzene which could also be degraded by the microcosms. Adding one of the strains that was isolated from the groundwater (strain T2) to sulphate-enriched microcosms increased the rate of toluene degradation four- to 10-fold but had no effect on the rate of benzene degradation. The addition of molybdate, an inhibitor of sulphate reduction, to the groundwater samples decreased the rate of toluene mineralization. There was no evidence to support the mineralization of [UL-14C]benzene, [ring-UL-14C]toluene or unlabelled m-xylene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, TMB or naphthalene by any of the strains in pure culture. Growth of all the strains was completely inhibited by 100 micromol l-1 TMB.

  10. Microbial fouling community analysis of the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor with emphasis on sulphate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, P; Joshi, M Hiren; Rao, T S

    2011-10-01

    Culture and molecular-based techniques were used to characterize bacterial diversity in the cooling water system of a fast breeder test reactor (FBTR). Techniques were selected for special emphasis on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Water samples from different locations of the FBTR cooling water system, in addition to biofilm scrapings from carbon steel coupons and a control SRB sample were characterized. Whole genome extraction of the water samples and SRB diversity by group specific primers were analysed using nested PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of the bacterial assay in the cooling water showed that the total culturable bacteria (TCB) ranged from 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron-reducing bacteria, 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron oxidizing bacteria, 10(2) to 10(3) cfu ml(-1) and SRB, 2-29 cfu ml(-1). However, the counts of the various bacterial types in the biofilm sample were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher. SRB diversity by the nested PCR-DGGE approach showed the presence of groups 1, 5 and 6 in the FBTR cooling water system; however, groups 2, 3 and 4 were not detected. The study demonstrated that the PCR protocol influenced the results of the diversity analysis. The paper further discusses the microbiota of the cooling water system and its relevance in biofouling.

  11. Detection of abundant sulphate-reducing bacteria in marine oxic sediment layers by a combined cultivation and molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, E B; Overmann, J; Cypionka, H

    2000-08-01

    The depth distribution and diversity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) was analysed in the upper intertidal zone of a sandy marine sediment of the Dutch island Schiermonnikoog. The upper centimetre of the sediment included the oxic-anoxic interface and was cut into five slices. With each slice, most probable number (MPN) dilution series were set up in microtitre plates using five different substrates. In the deeper sediment layers, up to 1 x 10(8) cm(-3) lactate-utilizing SRB were counted, corresponding to 23% of the total bacterial count. From the highest positive dilutions of the MPN series, 27 strains of SRB were isolated in pure culture. Sequencing of a 580 bp fragment of the 16S rDNA revealed that 21 isolates had identical sequences, also identical with that of the previously described species Desulfomicrobium apsheronum. However, the diversity of the isolates was higher with respect to their physiological properties: a total of 11 different phenotypes could be distinguished. Genomic fingerprinting by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revealed an even higher diversity of 22 different genotypes. A culture-independent analysis by PCR and denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that the partial 16S rDNA sequence of the isolated D. apsheronum strains constituted a significant fraction of the Desulfovibrionaceae. The high subspecies diversity suggests that this abundant aggregate-forming species may have evolved adaptations to different ecological niches in the oxic sediment layers.

  12. [Effect of corrosion inhibitor on the producing of exopolymer complex by sulphate-reducing bacteria].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Asaulenko, L H; Kozlova, I P

    2007-01-01

    It is established that the specific productivity of exopolymer complex (EPM) synthesized by the cells of sulphate-reducing bacteria in a biofilm was 1.5 times higher than in plankton. A sharp increase of the specific productivity of EPM in the biofilm is observed when corrosion inhibitor is introduced in the environment. The inhibitor concentration being 1.0 g/l, the biofilm cells produced almost 18 times more of EPM than the bacteria cells in plankton. It is shown that the film exopolymers include glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, ribose and three nondetermined sugars, while plankton cells also include rhamnose. Rhamnose appeared in the biofilm EPM composition and rhamnose, arabinose and fucose appeared in EPM of plankton cells as affected by the inhibitor. A necessity of investigating the biofilm formation for developing the methods of anticorrosive protection is discussed.

  13. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  14. Desulfovibrio alaskensis sp. nov., a sulphate-reducing bacterium from a soured oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Feio, Maria J; Zinkevich, Vitaly; Beech, Iwona B; Llobet-Brossa, Enric; Eaton, Peter; Schmitt, Jürgen; Guezennec, Jean

    2004-09-01

    A novel sulphate-reducing bacterium (Al1T) was recovered from a soured oil well in Purdu Bay, Alaska. Light and atomic force microscopy observations revealed that cells were Gram-negative, vibrio-shaped and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. The carbon and energy sources used by the isolate and the salinity, temperature and pH ranges facilitating its growth proved to be typical of a partial lactate-oxidizing, moderately halophilic, mesophilic, sulphate-reducing bacterium. Analysis of the fatty acid profile revealed that C(18 : 0), isoC(15 : 0) and isoC(17 : 1)omega7c were the predominant species. Fatty acid profile and complete 16S rRNA gene sequencing demonstrated the similarity between strain Al1T and members of the genus Desulfovibrio. The position of strain Al1T within the phylogenetic tree indicated that it clustered closely with Desulfovibrio vietnamensis DSM 10520T (98.9 % sequence similarity), a strain recovered from a similar habitat. However, whole-cell protein profiles, Fourier-transform infrared studies and DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated that, in spite of the high level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, there is sufficient dissimilarity at the DNA sequence level between D. vietnamensis DSM 10520T and strain Al1T (10.2 % similarity) to propose that strain Al1T belongs to a separate species within the genus Desulfovibrio. Based on the results obtained, the name Desulfovibrio alaskensis sp. nov. is therefore proposed, with Al1T (= NCIMB 13491T = DSM 16109T) as the type strain.

  15. Optimization study for Pb(II) and COD sequestration by consortium of sulphate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Anamika; Bishnoi, Narsi R.; Gupta, Asha

    2016-04-01

    In this study, initial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pb(II) ions was analysed to check optimum concentration of Pb(II) ions at which the growth of sulphate-reducing consortium (SRC) was found to be maximum. 80 ppm of Pb(II) ions was investigated as minimum inhibitory concentration for SRC. Influence of electron donors such as lactose, sucrose, glucose and sodium lactate was examined to investigate best carbon source for growth and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Sodium lactate was found to be the prime carbon source for SRC. Later optimization of various parameters was executed using Box-Behnken design model of response surface methodology to explore the effectiveness of three independent operating variables, namely, pH (5.0-9.0), temperature (32-42 °C) and time (5.0-9.0 days), on dependent variables, i.e. protein content, precipitation of Pb(II) ions, and removal of COD by SRC biomass. Maximum removal of COD and Pb(II) was observed to be 91 and 98 %, respectively, at pH 7.0 and temperature 37 °C and incubation time 7 days. According to response surface analysis and analysis of variance, the experimental data were perfectly fitted to the quadratic model, and the interactive influence of pH, temperature and time on Pb(II) and COD removal was highly significant. A high regression coefficient between the variables and response (r 2 = 0.9974) corroborate eminent evaluation of experimental data by second-order polynomial regression model. SEM and Fourier transform infrared analysis was performed to investigate morphology of PbS precipitates, sorption mechanism and involved functional groups in metal-free and metal-loaded biomass of SRC for Pb(II) binding.

  16. Biodegradation of mixed pesticides by mixed pesticide enriched cultures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, K Rama; Philip, Ligy

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the degradation kinetics of mixed (lindane, methyl parathion and carbofuran) pesticides by mixed pesticide enriched cultures (MEC) under various environmental conditions. The bacterial strains isolated from the mixed microbial consortium were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 9236), Bacillus sp. (MTCC 9235) and Chryseobacterium joostei (MTCC 9237). Batch studies were conducted to estimate the biokinetic parameters like the maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)), Yield Coefficient (Y(T)), half saturation concentration (K(s)) and inhibition concentration (Ki) for individual and mixed pesticide enriched cultures. The cultures enriched in a particular pollutant always showed high growth rate and low inhibition in that particular pollutant compared to MEC. After seven weeks of incubation, mixed pesticide enriched cultures were able to degrade 72% lindane, 95% carbofuran and 100% of methyl parathion in facultative co-metabolic conditions. In aerobic systems, degradation efficiencies of lindane methyl parathion and carbofuran were increased by the addition of 2g L(- 1) of dextrose. Though many metabolic compounds of mixed pesticides were observed at different time intervals, none of the metabolites were persistent. Based on the observed metabolites, a degradation pathway was postulated for different pesticides under various environmental conditions.

  17. Tracking down sulphate-reducing microorganisms by molecular and isotope-labelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loy, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) are of great ecological importance for carbon compound degradation and sulphur cycling in many anoxic ecosystems, including marine sediments, peatlands, and oil reservoirs. However, the activity of SRM can result in oil souring and pipeline corrosion and thus is also an economic burden for the oil industry. Molecular diversity surveys based on rRNA genes and dsrAB, genes that encode major subunits of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase, indicate that our view of the natural diversity of SRM (as we know it from cultivation) is far from being complete. This enormous phylogenetic diversity complicates unbiased identification and quantification of SRM by molecular methods such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time PCR or DNA microarrays. Combining these 16S rRNA and dsrAB-based molecular methods with substrate-mediated isotope labelling techniques is a potential solution for identification and functional characterization of yet uncultivated SRM. Using SRM in peatlands as an example, the problems and opportunities of these techniques for diagnosing and monitoring SRM in the environment will be discussed in this talk.

  18. Reduction of humic substances by halorespiring, sulphate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco J; de Bok, Frank A M; Duong-Dac, Tuan; Stams, Alfons J M; Lettinga, Gatze; Field, Jim A

    2002-01-01

    Physiologically distinct anaerobic microorganisms were explored for their ability to oxidize different substrates with humic acids or the humic analogue, anthraquinone-2,6-disulphonate (AQDS), as a terminal electron acceptor. Most of the microorganisms evaluated including, for example, the halorespiring bacterium, Desulfitobacterium PCE1, the sulphate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio G11 and the methanogenic archaeon, Methanospirillum hungatei JF1, could oxidize hydrogen linked to the reduction of humic acids or AQDS. Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans and Desulfitobacterium PCE1 could also convert lactate to acetate linked to the reduction of humic substances. Humus served as a terminal electron acceptor supporting growth of Desulfitobacterium species, which may explain the recovery of these microorganisms from organic rich environments in which the presence of chlorinated pollutants or sulphite is not expected. The results suggest that the ubiquity of humus reduction found in many different environments may be as a result of the increasing number of anaerobic microorganisms, which are known to be able to reduce humic substances.

  19. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    PubMed

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion.

  20. Endosymbiotic sulphate-reducing and sulphide-oxidizing bacteria in an oligochaete worm.

    PubMed

    Dubilier, N; Mülders, C; Ferdelman, T; de Beer, D; Pernthaler, A; Klein, M; Wagner, M; Erséus, C; Thiermann, F; Krieger, J; Giere, O; Amann, R

    2001-05-17

    Stable associations of more than one species of symbiont within a single host cell or tissue are assumed to be rare in metazoans because competition for space and resources between symbionts can be detrimental to the host. In animals with multiple endosymbionts, such as mussels from deep-sea hydrothermal vents and reef-building corals, the costs of competition between the symbionts are outweighed by the ecological and physiological flexibility gained by the hosts. A further option for the coexistence of multiple symbionts within a host is if these benefit directly from one another, but such symbioses have not been previously described. Here we show that in the gutless marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, endosymbiotic sulphate-reducing bacteria produce sulphide that can serve as an energy source for sulphide-oxidizing symbionts of the host. Thus, these symbionts do not compete for resources but rather share a mutalistic relationship with each other in an endosymbiotic sulphur cycle, in addition to their symbiotic relationship with the oligochaete host.

  1. Sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing communities in Brazilian mangrove sediments.

    PubMed

    Varon-Lopez, Maryeimy; Dias, Armando Cavalcante Franco; Fasanella, Cristiane Cipolla; Durrer, Ademir; Melo, Itamar Soares; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; Andreote, Fernando Dini

    2014-03-01

    Mangrove soils are anaerobic environments rich in sulphate and organic matter. Although the sulphur cycle is one of the major actors in this ecosystem, little is known regarding the sulphur bacteria communities in mangrove soils. We investigated the abundance, composition and diversity of sulphur-oxidizing (SOB) and sulphate-reducing (SRB) bacteria in sediments from three Brazilian mangrove communities: two contaminated, one with oil (OilMgv) and one with urban waste and sludge (AntMgv), and one pristine (PrsMgv). The community structures were assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and clone libraries, using genes for the enzymes adenosine-5'-phosphosulphate reductase (aprA) and sulphite reductase (Dsr) (dsrB). The abundance for qPCR showed the ratio dsrB/aprA to be variable among mangroves and higher according to the gradient observed for oil contamination in the OilMgv. The PCR-DGGE patterns analysed by Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling revealed differences among the structures of the three mangrove communities. The clone libraries showed that Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria and Deltaproteobacteria were the most abundant groups associated with sulphur cycling in mangrove sediments. We conclude that the microbial SOB and SRB communities in mangrove soils are different in each mangrove forest and that such microbial communities could possibly be used as a proxy for contamination in mangrove forests.

  2. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under drinking water relevant conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Three batch reactors were used in each experiment: (1) a positive control to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) a negative control to account for abiotic reactions, and (3) a cometabolism reactor to estimate cometabolism kinetic constants. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to all experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism was a significant loss mechanism (30% of the observed monochloramine loss). These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems. The results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; thus, cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems.

  3. Differential Counting in Mixed Cultures with Coulter Counters

    PubMed Central

    Drake, J. F.; Tsuchiya, H. M.

    1973-01-01

    A critical comparison of Coulter, viable, and microscope counts for several mixed cultures of microorganisms has been made. This investigation shows that Coulter counting can provide reliable estimates of microbial numbers in mixed cultures. Precautions and limitations of Coulter counting in mixed cultures are discussed. PMID:4199341

  4. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse.

  5. Activity of sulphate reducing bacteria according to COD/SO4(2-) ratio of acrylonitrile wastewater containing high sulphate.

    PubMed

    Byun, I G; Lee, T H; Kim, Y O; Song, S K; Park, T J

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the biodegradability of acrylonitrile wastewater, microbial inhibition effect of acrylonitrile wastewater on removal efficiency and the activity of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) according to COD/sulphate ratio. Acrylonitrile wastewater was hardly biodegradable in a biodegradability test, however, SRB activity was 57% for overall consumption of electron donor and it was relatively high value compared to 17% of reference test with glucose. COD removal of acrylonitrile wastewater was improved to 57% and 61% from 20% as the COD/sulphate ratio were 0.5 and 0.3 by sulphate addition to acrylonitrile wastewater. First order reaction rate constants k on organic removal of acrylonitrile wastewater were 0.001, 0.004 and 0.004 at each COD/sulphate ratio of 0.9, 0.5 and 0.3. Thus it was suggested that the activity of SRB was a significant factor for removing organics and sulphate simultaneously in acrylonitrile wastewater.

  6. Related assemblages of sulphate-reducing bacteria associated with ultradeep gold mines of South Africa and deep basalt aquifers of Washington State.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brett J; Moser, Duane P; MacGregor, Barbara J; Fishbain, Susan; Wagner, Michael; Fry, Norman K; Jackson, Brad; Speolstra, Nico; Loos, Steffen; Takai, Ken; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Fredrickson, Jim; Balkwill, David; Onstott, Tullis C; Wimpee, Charles F; Stahl, David A

    2003-04-01

    We characterized the diversity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) associated with South African gold mine boreholes and deep aquifer systems in Washington State, USA. Sterile cartridges filled with crushed country rock were installed on two hydrologically isolated and chemically distinct sites at depths of 3.2 and 2.7 km below the land surface (kmbls) to allow development of biofilms. Enrichments of sulphate-reducing chemolithotrophic (H2) and organotrophic (lactate) bacteria were established from each site under both meso- and thermophilic conditions. Dissimilatory sulphite reductase (Dsr) and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes amplified from DNA extracted from the cartridges were most closely related to the Gram-positive species Desulfotomaculum thermosapovorans and Desulfotomaculum geothermicum, or affiliated with a novel deeply branching clade. The dsr sequences recovered from the Washington State deep aquifer systems affiliated closely with the South African sequences, suggesting that Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria are widely distributed in the deep subsurface.

  7. Intelligent control of mixed-culture bioprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, D.L.; Larsen, E.D.; Miller, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    A hierarchical control system is being developed and applied to a mixed culture bioprocess in a continuous stirred tank reactor. A bioreactor, with its inherent complexity and non-linear behavior was an interesting, yet, difficult application for control theory. The bottom level of the hierarchy was implemented as a number of integrated set point controls and data acquisition modules. Within the second level was a diagnostic system that used expert knowledge to determine the operational status of the sensors, actuators, and control modules. A diagnostic program was successfully implemented for the detection of stirrer malfunctions, and to monitor liquid delivery rates and recalibrate the pumps when deviations from desired flow rates occurred. The highest control level was a supervisory shell that was developed using expert knowledge and the history of the reactor operation to determine the set points required to meet a set of production criteria. At this stage the supervisory shell analyzed the data to determine the state of the system. In future implementations, this shell will determine the set points required to optimize a cost function using expert knowledge and adaptive learning techniques.

  8. Comparison of Sulphate-reducing Bacterial Communities in Japanese Fish Farm Sediments with Different Levels of Organic Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ryuji; Mori, Yumi; Sakami, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    Fish farm sediments receive a large amount of organic matter from uneaten food and fecal material. This nutrient enrichment, or organic pollution, causes the accumulation of sulphide in the sediment from the action of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We investigated the effect of organic enrichment around coastal fish farms comparing the SRB community structure in these sediments. Sediment samples with different levels of organic pollution classified based upon the contents of acid-volatile sulphide and chemical oxygen demand were collected at three stations on the coast of western Japan. The SRB community composition was assessed using PCR amplification, cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the dissimilatory sulphite reductase β-subunit gene (dsrB) fragments using directly extracted sediment DNA. Sequencing of the cloned PCR products of dsrB showed the existence of different SRB groups in the sediments. The majority of dsrB sequences were associated with the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae. Clones related to the phylum Firmicutes were also detected from all sediment samples. Statistical comparison of sequences revealed that community compositions of SRB from polluted sediments significantly differed from those of moderately polluted sediments and unpolluted sediments (LIBSHUFF, p<0.05), showing a different distribution of SRB in the fish farm sediments. There is evidence showing that the organic enrichment of sediments influences the composition of SRB communities in sediments at marine fish farms. PMID:22791053

  9. A Post-Genomic View of the Ecophysiology, Catabolism and Biotechnological Relevance of Sulphate-Reducing Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Venceslau, Sofia S; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction is the unifying and defining trait of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). In their predominant habitats, sulphate-rich marine sediments, SRP have long been recognized to be major players in the carbon and sulphur cycles. Other, more recently appreciated, ecophysiological roles include activity in the deep biosphere, symbiotic relations, syntrophic associations, human microbiome/health and long-distance electron transfer. SRP include a high diversity of organisms, with large nutritional versatility and broad metabolic capacities, including anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons. Elucidation of novel catabolic capacities as well as progress in the understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks, energy metabolism, evolutionary processes and adaptation to changing environmental conditions has greatly benefited from genomics, functional OMICS approaches and advances in genetic accessibility and biochemical studies. Important biotechnological roles of SRP range from (i) wastewater and off gas treatment, (ii) bioremediation of metals and hydrocarbons and (iii) bioelectrochemistry, to undesired impacts such as (iv) souring in oil reservoirs and other environments, and (v) corrosion of iron and concrete. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of SRPs focusing mainly on works published after 2000. The wealth of publications in this period, covering many diverse areas, is a testimony to the large environmental, biogeochemical and technological relevance of these organisms and how much the field has progressed in these years, although many important questions and applications remain to be explored.

  10. dsrAB-based analysis of sulphate-reducing bacteria in moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kristi; Taylor, Michael W; Turner, Susan J

    2014-08-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important members of the sulphur cycle in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigate the diversity and activity of SRB within the developing and established biofilm of two moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems treating municipal wastewater in New Zealand. The larger of the two WWTPs (Moa Point) generates high levels of sulphide relative to the smaller Karori plant. Clone libraries of the dissimilatory (bi)sulphite reductase (dsrAB) genes and quantitative real-time PCR targeting dsrA transcripts were used to compare SRB communities between the two WWTPs. Desulfobulbus (35-53 % of total SRB sequences) and genera belonging to the family Desulfobacteraceae (27-41 %) dominated the SRB fraction of the developing biofilm on deployed plastic carriers at both sites, whereas Desulfovibrio and Desulfomicrobium were exclusively found at Moa Point. In contrast, the established biofilms from resident MBBR carriers were largely dominated by Desulfomonile tiedjei-like organisms (58-100 % of SRB sequences). The relative transcript abundance of dsrA genes (signifying active SRBs) increased with biofilm weight yet remained low overall, even in the mature biofilm stage. Our results indicate that although SRB are both present and active in the microbial community at both MBBR study sites, differences in the availability of sulphate may be contributing to the observed differences in sulphide production at these two plants.

  11. Regulation mechanisms in mixed and pure culture microbial fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hoelzle, Robert D; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J

    2014-11-01

    Mixed-culture fermentation is a key central process to enable next generation biofuels and biocommodity production due to economic and process advantages over application of pure cultures. However, a key limitation to the application of mixed-culture fermentation is predicting culture product response, related to metabolic regulation mechanisms. This is also a limitation in pure culture bacterial fermentation. This review evaluates recent literature in both pure and mixed culture studies with a focus on understanding how regulation and signaling mechanisms interact with metabolic routes and activity. In particular, we focus on how microorganisms balance electron sinking while maximizing catabolic energy generation. Analysis of these mechanisms and their effect on metabolism dynamics is absent in current models of mixed-culture fermentation. This limits process prediction and control, which in turn limits industrial application of mixed-culture fermentation. A key mechanism appears to be the role of internal electron mediating cofactors, and related regulatory signaling. This may determine direction of electrons towards either hydrogen or reduced organics as end-products and may form the basis for future mechanistic models.

  12. Characterization and reactivity assessment of organic substrates for sulphate-reducing bacteria in acid mine drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zagury, Gerald J; Kulnieks, Viktors I; Neculita, Carmen M

    2006-08-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), which contains high concentrations of sulphate and dissolved metals, is a serious environmental problem. It can be treated in situ by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), but effectiveness of the treatment process depends on the organic substrate chosen to supply the bacteria's carbon source. Six natural organic materials were characterized in order to investigate how well these promote sulphate reduction and metal precipitation by SRB. Maple wood chips, sphagnum peat moss, leaf compost, conifer compost, poultry manure and conifer sawdust were investigated in terms of their carbon (TOC, TIC, DOC) and nitrogen (TKN) content, as well as their easily available substances content (EAS). Single substrates, ethanol, a mixture of leaf compost (30% w/w), poultry manure (18% w/w), and maple wood chips (2% w/w), and the same mixture spiked with formaldehyde were then tested in a 70-day batch experiment to evaluate their performance in sulphate reduction and metal removal from synthetic AMD. Metal removal efficiency in batch reactors was as high as 100% for Fe, 99% for Mn, 99% for Cd, 99% for Ni, and 94% for Zn depending on reactive mixtures. Early metal removal (0-12d) was attributed to the precipitation of (oxy)hydroxides and carbonate minerals. The lowest metal and sulphate removal efficiency was found in the reactor containing poultry manure as the single carbon source despite its high DOC and EAS content. The mixture of organic materials was most effective in promoting sulphate reduction, followed by ethanol and maple wood chips, and single natural organic substrates generally showed low reactivity. Formaldehyde (0.015% (w/v)) provided only temporary bacterial inhibition. Although characterization of substrates on an individual basis provided insight on their chemical make-up, it did not give a clear indication of their ability to promote sulphate reduction and metal removal.

  13. Desulfomicrobium thermophilum sp. nov., a novel thermophilic sulphate-reducing bacterium isolated from a terrestrial hot spring in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Thevenieau, France; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard; Joulian, Catherine; Baena, Sandra

    2007-03-01

    A moderately thermophilic, sulphate-reducing bacterium, designated strain P6-2(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring located at a height of 2,500 m in the Andean region, Colombia (5 degrees 43'69''N, 73 degrees 6'10''W). Cells of strain P6-2(T) were rod-shaped, stained Gram-negative and were motile by means of a single polar flagellum. The strain grew lithotrophically with H(2) as the electron donor and organotrophically on lactate, pyruvate, ethanol, malate, fumarate, n-propanol and succinate in the presence of sulphate as the terminal electron acceptor. Fumarate and pyruvate was fermented. Strain P6-2(T) grew optimally at 55 degrees C (range 37-60 degrees C), pH 6.6 (range 5.8-8.8) in the presence of 0.5% NaCl (range 0-4.5%) with lactate and sulphate and produced acetate, CO(2) and H(2)S as the major end-products. Sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate could be used as electron acceptors but not elemental sulphur or nitrate. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 58.7 mol%. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis indicated that strain P6-2(T) was a member of the class Deltaproteobacteria, domain Bacteria with Desulfomicrobium baculatum being the closest relative (similarity value of 94%). Phylogeny of genes encoding alpha- and beta-subunits of the dissimilatory sulphite reductase (dsrAB genes) supported its affiliation to members of the genus Desulfomicrobium. On the basis of this evidence, we propose to assign strain P6-2(T) as new species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, D. thermophilum sp. nov., with strain P6-2(T) as the type strain (= DSM 16697(T) = CCUG 49732(T)).

  14. Changes in iso- and n-alkane distribution during biodegradation of crude oil under nitrate and sulphate reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Hasinger, Marion; Scherr, Kerstin E; Lundaa, Tserennyam; Bräuer, Leopold; Zach, Clemens; Loibner, Andreas Paul

    2012-02-20

    Crude oil consists of a large number of hydrocarbons with different susceptibility to microbial degradation. The influence of hydrocarbon structure and molecular weight on hydrocarbon biodegradation under anaerobic conditions is not fully explored. In this study oxygen, nitrate and sulphate served as terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) for the microbial degradation of a paraffin-rich crude oil in a freshly contaminated soil. During 185 days of incubation, alkanes from n-C11 to n-C39, three n- to iso-alkane ratios commonly used as weathering indicators and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) were quantified and statistically analyzed. The use of different TEAs for hydrocarbon degradation resulted in dissimilar degradative patterns for n- and iso-alkanes. While n-alkane biodegradation followed well-established patterns under aerobic conditions, lower molecular weight alkanes were found to be more recalcitrant than mid- to high-molecular weight alkanes under nitrate-reducing conditions. Biodegradation with sulphate as the TEA was most pronounced for long-chain (n-C32 to n-C39) alkanes. The observation of increasing ratios of n-C17 to pristane and of n-C18 to phytane provides first evidence of the preferential degradation of branched over normal alkanes under sulphate reducing conditions. The formation of distinctly different n- and iso-alkane biodegradation fingerprints under different electron accepting conditions may be used to assess the occurrence of specific degradation processes at a contaminated site. The use of n- to iso-alkane ratios for this purpose may require adjustment if applied for anaerobic sites.

  15. The induction of suppressor cells in mixed leucocyte cultures and in mixed leucocyte-non-lymphoid cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelec, G

    1980-01-01

    X-ray resistant porcine suppressor T cells expressing Ia-like antigens were obtained from mixed cultures of leucocytes and tissue cells (cultured kidney cells, liver cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts or X-irradiated leucocytes), and were assayed by their ability to suppress lymphocyte proliferation in a second mixed culture. All tissues tested induced suppressor cells although quantitative differences existed between them. Suppressor cell induction was under genetic control by at least two loci, one of which was within the major histocompatibility (MHC) complex. Suppressor cell function was restricted by the MHC type of the responding cell but not the stimulating cell in the second culture. PMID:6445866

  16. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls by mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R R; Chian, E S; Griffin, R A

    1979-01-01

    Three different enriched mixed cultures capable of degrading polychlorinated biphenylas were isolated from two soil samples and a river sediment, respectively. The predominant organisms found in all three mixed cultures were Alcaligenes odorans, Alcaligenes dentrificans, and an unidentified bacterium. The polychlorinated biphenyl isomers that were more water soluble and had lower chlorination were not only degraded at a faster rate than those that were less water soluble and had higher chlorination, but were also more completely utilized by these mixed cultures. This resulted in the presence in the environment of polychlorinated biphenyl residues consisting mainly of higher-chlorinated isomers. A form of cometabolism of polychlorinated biphenyls was also found with these cultures in the presence of acetate as the cosubstrate. PMID:110265

  17. Effects of propicillin on mixed continuous cultures of periodontal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, J S; van den Kieboom, C W

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test the antibiotic (1-phenoxypropyl)penicillin (propicillin) against a complex microflora of periodontal bacteria. This was accomplished by using a continuously growing mixed culture that was obtained by enrichment of periodontal plaque in human serum. Peptostreptococcus species, Prevotella intermedia, Lactobacillus, catenaforme, and Streptococcus species were dominant members of the enrichment culture. None of the strains isolated from the enrichment culture exhibited detectable beta-lactamase activity. MICs of propicillin for the organisms ranged from 0.1 to 1.2 mg/liter. Propicillin was added to the cultures in single doses that were repeated once or twice at 24-h intervals, that is, after 2.4 volume changes of the culture vessel. Analyses done 24 h after the last addition of propicillin revealed that total cell counts of the culture were hardly affected by 1 mg of propicillin per liter, although some changes in the microbial composition occurred. The relative insusceptibility of the culture might be explained by the low growth rate. Higher concentrations (5, 10, and 50 mg/liter) of the antibiotic caused 10- to 20-fold drops in total cell counts. In these cultures P. intermedia was selectively suppressed to below the detection level, whereas other organisms that were equally susceptible to propicillin were less affected. It was concluded that mixed continuous cultures are a useful tool for studying the effects of antibiotics against the periodontal microbiota. PMID:1952836

  18. Anaerobic oxidation of n-alkenes by sulphate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfatiferula: n-ketones as potential metabolites.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Vincent; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Rontani, Jean-François; Cros, Magali; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès

    2011-11-01

    Two alkene-degrading sulphate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfatiferula (Desulfatiferula olefinivorans strain LM2801(T) and Desulfatiferula sp. strain BE2801) were investigated for their 1-alkene metabolism. Their total cellular fatty acids were predominantly C-even when they were grown on C-even 1-alkene (1-hexadecene), whereas a mixture of fatty acids with C-odd or C-even carbon chains predominated when cells were grown on C-odd 1-alkene (1-pentadecene). This is consistent with the fatty acid composition of other sulphate-reducing strains previously reported to grow on n-alkenes. Linear and 3-OH-fatty acids appear to be the main fatty acids produced by the two Desulfatiferula strains. The analysis of their neutral lipids led to identifying several n-alkanols and n-ketones with the same number of carbon atoms as the alkene growth substrate and with functionality located between C-1 and C-5. Growth of strains LM2801(T) and BE2801 on (per) deuterated 1-alkenes provided direct evidence of their anaerobic transformation to corresponding 1-alkanols, n-ketones and linear (3-OH-) fatty acids. These results demonstrate that Desulfatiferula strains oxidize a 1-alkene by oxidation of the double bond at C-1, but also at C-2 to C-5 (after eventual isomerization of the double bond) yielding the corresponding C-2 to C-5 n-ketones (via the corresponding n-alkanols). The formation of specific 3-OH-fatty acids by elongation of shorter chain fatty acids was also demonstrated. Based on our observations, pathways for anaerobic 1-alkene metabolism in sulphate-reducing bacteria from the genus Desulfatiferula are proposed. They indicate that n-ketones can constitute new metabolites of the biodegradation of n-alkenes in anaerobic environments.

  19. Biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic compounds by mixed nitrifying cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Wilber, G.G.; Chakkamadathil, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    The ability of pure cultures of nitrifying bacteria, such as Nitrosomonas europaea, to oxidize chlorinated aliphatic compounds has been demonstrated previously in laboratory experiments. In the current study, mixed nitrifying cultures originating from a municipal wastewater plant were also tested for the ability to biotransform chlorinated aliphatic compounds, including trichloroethene (TCE). A number of variables were tested, including the effects of two different concentrations of TCE, the effect of culture density, and the influence of the primary substrate, ammonia, on the initial rate of TCE biotransformation. The primary conclusions of the research include the following. The mixed nitrifying cultures did exhibit the ability to transform TCE, and the initial rate of transformation (before oxygen limitations became significant) was directly proportional to the culture density. In general, the transformation rate of TCE was slightly faster at an initial concentration of 0.1 mg/L than at 1 mg/L. Lastly, high initial ammonia concentrations (300 mg/L) resulted in faster initial rates of TCE transformation than in cultures which started with lower ammonia concentrations.

  20. Characterization and activity studies of highly heavy metal resistant sulphate-reducing bacteria to be used in acid mine drainage decontamination.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, M Leonor; Barros, Raúl J; Veríssimo, A Raquel; Barreiros, M Alexandra; Costa, M Clara

    2009-07-30

    Biological treatment with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been considered as the most promising alternative for acid mine drainage (AMD) decontamination. Normally, these wastewaters contain high concentrations of sulphate and heavy metals, so the search for SRB highly resistant to metals is extremely important for the development of a bioremediation technology. A SRB consortium resistant to high concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Cu and Zn), similar to those typically present in AMD, was obtained among several environmental samples, from a wastewater treatment plant. The phylogenetic analysis of the dsr gene sequence revealed that this consortium contains species of SRB affiliated to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfobulbus rhabdoformis. The results show that the presence of usually lethal concentrations of Fe (400mg/L), Zn (150 mg/L) and Cu (80 mg/L) is not toxic for the sulphate-reducing bacteria present in this sample. As a consequence, a very good efficiency in terms of sulphate reduction and metals removal was obtained. Both ethanol and lactate can be used by this inoculum as carbon source. With the other samples tested sulphate reduction was inhibited by the presence of copper and zinc. This highly metal resistant consortium will be used to inoculate a bioreactor to carry out AMD decontamination.

  1. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  2. Soluble microbial products and their implications in mixed culture biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Rittmann, Bruce E; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are soluble organic compounds released during normal biomass metabolism in mixed culture biotechnology. In this review, we give the up-to-date status on several essential SMP issues: mechanisms of SMP formation, differentiation between utilization-associated products (UAP) and biomass-associated products (BAP), biodegradability of the SMP components, how formation of SMP by autotrophs controls effluent quality and supports a substantial population of heterotrophs, mathematical modeling that includes SMP, and improving effluent quality by controlling SMP. We also present two timely examples that highlight our current understanding and give an indication of how SMP affects the performance of modern mixed culture biotechnology: membrane fouling of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) and the dynamics of SMP in anaerobic systems.

  3. [Computer-assisted histocompatibility assessment in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)].

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D; Hajek-Rosenmayr, A

    1987-02-20

    Analysis of the results of mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) for compatibility testing preceding transplantation of bone marrow and other organs has so far required a vast input, both in terms of laboratory staff and work hours. We have developed a computer programme which performs this work rapidly. Graphics of the reaction patterns can be obtained, moreover, and these can prove a helpful tool in interpretation of the results.

  4. Inhibitory effects of nitrogen oxides on a mixed methanogenic culture.

    PubMed

    Tugtas, A Evren; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2007-02-15

    The effect of nitrate, nitrite, nitric oxide (NO), and nitrous oxide on a mixed, mesophilic (35 degrees C) methanogenic culture was investigated. Short-term inhibition assays were conducted at a concentration range of 10-350 mg N/L nitrate, 17-500 mg N/L nitrite, 0.02-0.8 mg N/L aqueous NO, and 19-191 mg N/L aqueous nitrous oxide. Simultaneous methane production and N-oxide reduction was observed in 10 and 30 mg N/L nitrate and 0.02 mg N/L aqueous NO-amended cultures. However, addition of N-oxide resulted in immediate cessation of methanogenesis in all other cultures. Methanogenesis completely recovered subsequent to the complete reduction of N-oxides to nitrogen gas in all N-oxide-amended cultures, with the exception of the 500 mg N/L nitrite- and 0.8 mg N/L aqueous NO-amended cultures. Partial recovery of methanogenesis was observed in the 500 mg N/L nitrite-amended culture in contrast to complete inhibition of methanogenesis in the 0.8 mg N/L aqueous NO-amended culture. Accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed in both cultures at the end of the incubation period. Among all N-oxides, NO exerted the most and nitrate exerted the least inhibitory effect on the fermentative/methanogenic consortia. The effect of multiple additions of nitrate (300 mg N/L) on the same methanogenic culture was also investigated. Long-term exposure of the methanogenic culture to nitrate resulted in an increase of N-oxide reduction rates and decrease of methane production rates, which was attributed to changes in the microbial community structure due to nitrate addition.

  5. Community dynamics of a mixed-bacterial culture growing on petroleum hydrocarbons in batch culture.

    PubMed

    Van Hamme, J D; Odumeru, J A; Ward, O P

    2000-05-01

    The effects of various hydrocarbon substrates, and a chemical surfactant capable of enhancing crude-oil biodegradation, on the community structure of a mixed-bacterial inoculum were examined in batch culture. Of 1000 TSA-culturable isolates, 68.6% were identified at the genus level or better by phospholipid fatty acid analysis over 7-day time course experiments. Cultures were exposed to 20 g/L Bow River crude oil with and without 0.625 g/L Igepal CO-630 (a nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactant), 5 g/L saturates, 5 g/L aromatics, or 125 g/L refinery sludge. A group of six genera dominated the cultures: Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas/Flavimonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Yersinia. Species from four of the genera were shown to be capable of hydrocarbon degradation, and counts of hydrocarbon degrading and total heterotrophic bacteria over time were nearly identical. Pseudomonas/Flavimonas and Stenotrophomonas normally dominated during the early portions of cultures, although the lag phase of Stenotrophomonas appears to have been increased by surfactant addition. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was the most frequently isolated microorganism during exposure to the saturate fraction of crude oil. Regardless of substrate, the culture medium supported a greater variety of organisms during the latter portions of cultures. Understanding the community structure and dynamics of mixed bacterial cultures involved in treatment of heterogeneous waste substrates may assist in process development and optimization studies.

  6. Emergence of Assortative Mixing between Clusters of Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Teller, Sara; Granell, Clara; De Domenico, Manlio; Soriano, Jordi; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the activity of neuronal cultures is considered to be a good proxy of the functional connectivity of in vivo neuronal tissues. Thus, the functional complex network inferred from activity patterns is a promising way to unravel the interplay between structure and functionality of neuronal systems. Here, we monitor the spontaneous self-sustained dynamics in neuronal cultures formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clusters). Dynamics is characterized by the fast activation of groups of clusters in sequences termed bursts. The analysis of the time delays between clusters' activations within the bursts allows the reconstruction of the directed functional connectivity of the network. We propose a method to statistically infer this connectivity and analyze the resulting properties of the associated complex networks. Surprisingly enough, in contrast to what has been reported for many biological networks, the clustered neuronal cultures present assortative mixing connectivity values, meaning that there is a preference for clusters to link to other clusters that share similar functional connectivity, as well as a rich-club core, which shapes a ‘connectivity backbone’ in the network. These results point out that the grouping of neurons and the assortative connectivity between clusters are intrinsic survival mechanisms of the culture. PMID:25188377

  7. Crystallisation and fractionation of selected polyhydroxyalkanoates produced from mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Laycock, Bronwyn; Arcos-Hernandez, Monica V; Langford, Alexandra; Pratt, Steven; Werker, Alan; Halley, Peter J; Lant, Paul A

    2014-06-25

    Poly[R-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-(R-3-hydroxyvalerate)] (PHBV) copolymers were produced from mixed cultures of biomass (activated sludge) fed with acetic acid (HAc) and propionic acid (HPr). Feeding was performed in such a way as to produce materials with a wide range of monomer compositions and microstructures. Solvent-cast thin films of these materials have recently been shown to exhibit a narrow range of mechanical properties similar to those of the homopolymer poly(R-3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) [1]. In this work, more detailed analyses of the thermal and crystallisation properties of these mixed-culture polyesters have revealed that they like comprise complex blends with broad compositional distribution of random and/or blocky copolymers of very different 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) contents and melting temperatures and thus have very different respective crystallisation kinetics. This blend complexity was confirmed by solvent fractionation of selected samples. The findings support the hypothesis that overall mechanical properties of these complex copolymer blend materials will be strongly influenced by the more rapidly crystallising components that form the matrix within which the slower crystallising components exist as microdomains. New opportunities in the material development of PHAs are likely to be found in establishing and exploiting such structure-function relationships.

  8. Glycerol fermentation by (open) mixed cultures: a chemostat study.

    PubMed

    Temudo, Margarida F; Poldermans, Rolf; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2008-08-15

    Glycerol is an important byproduct of bioethanol and biodiesel production processes. This study aims to evaluate its potential application in mixed culture fermentation processes to produce bulk chemicals. Two chemostat reactors were operated in parallel, one fed with glycerol and the other with glucose. Both reactors operated at a pH of 8 and a dilution rate of 0.1 h(-1). Glycerol was mainly converted into ethanol and formate. When operated under substrate limiting conditions, 60% of the substrate carbon was converted into ethanol and formate in a 1:1 ratio. This product spectrum showed sensitivity to the substrate concentration, which partly shifted towards 1,3-propanediol and acetate in a 2:1 ratio at increasing substrate concentrations. Glucose fermentation mainly generated acetate, ethanol and butyrate. At higher substrate concentrations, acetate and ethanol were the dominant products. Co-fermentations of glucose-glycerol were performed with both mixed cultures, previously cultivated on glucose and on glycerol. The product spectrum of the two experiments was very similar: the main products were ethanol and butyrate (38% and 34% of the COD converted, respectively). The product spectrum obtained for glucose and glycerol fermentation could be explained based on the general metabolic pathways found for fermentative microorganisms and on the metabolic constraints: maximization of the ATP production rate and balancing the reducing equivalents involved.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, G.; Koenig, J.; Ringpfeil, M.

    1995-12-31

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are a complex mixture of organic compounds, was demonstrated using a bacterial mixed culture selected from a contaminated site by the BIOPRACT GmbH. The investigations were carried out in a laboratory fermenter using emulsified tar oil as the substrate to determine the following: (1) concentration of the single PAH and of the sum of PAHs relative to fermentation time, (2) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) content in the outflowing air during fermentation, (3) chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the broth, and (4) toxicity of the broth before and after fermentation according to the bioluminescence test (DIN 38412, part 34/1). The results of this model experiment indicated that the investigated mixed culture is able to effectively metabolize the PAHs contained in tar oil, including the higher condensed compounds such as benzo(a)pyrene. In the first 8 days of fermentation, the PAH sum decreased to below 5% of the starting concentration connected with a five-fold reduction of the toxic effect on Vibrio fischeri. The PAH degradation rate correlated with the rate of COD decrease, the rate of evolving CO{sub 2}, and the consumption of O{sub 2}.

  10. Lindane removal by pure and mixed cultures of immobilized actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Saez, Juliana M; Benimeli, Claudia S; Amoroso, María J

    2012-11-01

    Lindane (γ-HCH) is an organochlorine insecticide that has been widely used in developing countries. It is known to persist in the environment and can cause serious health problems. One of the strategies adopted to remove lindane from the environment is bioremediation using microorganisms. Immobilized cells present advantages over free suspended cells, like their high degradation efficiency and protection against toxins. The aims of this work were: (1) To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces strains immobilized in four different matrices to remove lindane, (2) To select the support with optimum lindane removal by pure cultures, (3) To assay the selected support with consortia and (4) To evaluate the reusability of the immobilized cells. Four Streptomyces sp. strains had previously shown their ability to grow in the presence of lindane. Lindane removal by microorganisms immobilized was significantly higher than in free cells. Specifically immobilized cells in cloth sachets showed an improvement of around 25% in lindane removal compared to the abiotic control. Three strains showed significantly higher microbial growth when they were entrapped in silicone tubes. Strains immobilized in PVA-alginate demonstrated lowest growth. Mixed cultures immobilized inside cloth sachets showed no significant enhancement compared to pure cultures, reaching a maximum removal of 81% after 96 h for consortium I, consisting of the four immobilized strains together. Nevertheless, the cells could be reused for two additional cycles of 96 h each, obtaining a maximum removal efficiency of 71.5% when each of the four strains was immobilized in a separate bag (consortium III).

  11. Effects of storage on mixed-culture biological electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte; Modin, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    Storage methods are important to preserve the viability and biochemical characteristics of microbial cultures between experiments or during periods when bioreactors are inactive. Most of the research on storage has focused on isolates; however, there is an increasing interest in methods for mixed cultures, which are of relevance in environmental biotechnology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different storage methods on electrochemically active enrichment cultures. Acetate-oxidizing bioanodes generating a current density of about 5 A m−2 were enriched in a microbial electrolysis cell. The effect of five weeks of storage was evaluated using electrochemical techniques and microbial community analysis. Storage by refrigeration resulted in quicker re-activation than freezing in 10% glycerol, while the bioelectrochemical activity was entirely lost after storage using dehydration. The results showed that the bioelectrochemical activity of bioanodes stored at low temperature could be retained. However, during the re-activation period the bioanodes only recovered 75% of the current density generated before storage and the bacterial communities were different in composition and more diverse after storage than before. PMID:26678949

  12. Effects of storage on mixed-culture biological electrodes.

    PubMed

    Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte; Modin, Oskar

    2015-12-18

    Storage methods are important to preserve the viability and biochemical characteristics of microbial cultures between experiments or during periods when bioreactors are inactive. Most of the research on storage has focused on isolates; however, there is an increasing interest in methods for mixed cultures, which are of relevance in environmental biotechnology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different storage methods on electrochemically active enrichment cultures. Acetate-oxidizing bioanodes generating a current density of about 5 A m(-2) were enriched in a microbial electrolysis cell. The effect of five weeks of storage was evaluated using electrochemical techniques and microbial community analysis. Storage by refrigeration resulted in quicker re-activation than freezing in 10% glycerol, while the bioelectrochemical activity was entirely lost after storage using dehydration. The results showed that the bioelectrochemical activity of bioanodes stored at low temperature could be retained. However, during the re-activation period the bioanodes only recovered 75% of the current density generated before storage and the bacterial communities were different in composition and more diverse after storage than before.

  13. Competition of Invertebrates Mixed Culture in the Closed Aquatic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The study considers the experimental model of interactions between invertebrates (the cilates Paramecium caudatum, Paramecium bursaria and the rotifers Brachionis plicatilis) in the closed aquatic system. The infusoria P.caudatum can feed on yeast, bacteria and chlorella; in this experiment growth and reproduction were maintained by bacteria only. The P.bursaria - zoochlorella endosymbiosis is a natural model of a simple biotic cycle. P.bursaria consumes glucose and oxygen released by zoochlorella in the process of biosynthesis and releases nitrogenous compounds and carbon dioxide necessary for algal photosynthesis. The rotifers Br. plicatilis can consume algae, bacteria and detritus. Thus in experiment with the mixed culture of invertebrates they can use different food sources. However with any initial percentage of the invertebrates the end portion of P.bursaria reaches 90-99

  14. Exploring Race, Culture, and Family in the Identities of Mixed Heritage Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pecero, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Family plays an integral role in racial and cultural socialization, yet how mixed heritage students understand the concepts of race and culture in relation to family is unclear. This qualitative study explored the interplay of race, culture, and family in the identity constructions of 25 mixed heritage students. Findings suggest the centrality of…

  15. Dimethylamine biodegradation by mixed culture enriched from drinking water biofilter.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaobin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Jingxu; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojian; Xie, Shuguang

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylamine (DMA) is one of the important precursors of drinking water disinfection by-product N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Reduction of DMA to minimize the formation of carcinogenic NDMA in drinking water is of practical importance. Biodegradation plays a major role in elimination of DMA pollution in the environment, yet information on DMA removal by drinking water biofilter is still lacking. In this study, microcosms with different treatments were constructed to investigate the potential of DMA removal by a mixed culture enriched from a drinking water biofilter and the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources. DMA could be quickly mineralized by the enrichment culture. Amendment of a carbon source, instead of a nitrogen source, had a profound impact on DMA removal. A shift in bacterial community structure was observed with DMA biodegradation, affected by carbon and nitrogen sources. Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum group in DMA-degrading microcosms. Microorganisms from a variety of bacterial genera might be responsible for the rapid DMA mineralization.

  16. Methanogenic and sulphate reducing bacterial population levels in a full-scale anaerobic reactor treating pulp and paper industry wastewater using fluorescence in situ hybridisation.

    PubMed

    Ince, O; Kolukirik, M; Cetecioglu, Z; Eyice, O; Tamerler, C; Kasapgil Ince, B

    2007-01-01

    In this study, specific methanogenic activity (SMA) test and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) were respectively used to determine acetoclastic methanogenic capacity, and composition and number of methanogenic and sulphate reducing bacterial (SRB) populations within a full scale anaerobic contact reactor treating a pulp and paper industry effluent. The sludge samples were collected from three different heights along the anaerobic reactor having a difficulty of completely stirring. Performance of the anaerobic reactor in terms of COD removal efficiency varied between 47 and 55% at organic loading rates in a range of 1.6-1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and methane yield varied between 0.18 and 0.20 m3CH4kg CODrem(-1). The anaerobic reactor was not operated for 2 weeks during the monitoring period. According to SMA test results, potential methane production rate was 276 mLCH4 gVSS(-1) d(-1) before the off period of the reactor, however it decreased to 159 mL CH4 gVSS(-1) d(-1) after this period. SMA test and FISH results along the reactor height showed that the acetoclastic methanogenic activity of the sludge samples, the relative abundance of acetoclastic methanogens, hydrogenotrophic methanogens and acetate oxidising SRB decreased as the reactor height increased, however the relative abundance of non-acetate oxidising SRB increased.

  17. Nutrition and culture in professional football. A mixed method approach.

    PubMed

    Ono, Mutsumi; Kennedy, Eileen; Reeves, Sue; Cronin, Linda

    2012-02-01

    An adequate diet is essential for the optimal performance of professional football (soccer) players. Existing studies have shown that players fail to consume such a diet, without interrogating the reasons for this. The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties professional football players experience in consuming a diet for optimal performance. It utilized a mixed method approach, combining nutritional intake assessment with qualitative interviews, to ascertain both what was consumed and the wider cultural factors that affect consumption. The study found a high variability in individual intake which ranged widely from 2648 to 4606 kcal/day. In addition, the intake of carbohydrate was significantly lower than that recommended. The study revealed that the main food choices for carbohydrate and protein intake were pasta and chicken respectively. Interview results showed the importance of tradition within the world of professional football in structuring the players' approach to nutrition. In addition, the players' personal eating habits that derived from their class and national habitus restricted their food choice by conflicting with the dietary choices promoted within the professional football clubs.

  18. [Variation of bacteria numbers in fish-shrimp mix-culturing ecosystem].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiufen; Chen, Bijuan; Qu, Keming; Yuan, Youxian; Li, Jian; Sun, Xiutao; Zhao, Fazhen

    2002-06-01

    The study on variation of bacteria numbers in Penaeus chinensis-fish mix-culturing ecosystem in 1997. Indicated that at the beginning of culturing season, total number of heterotrophic bacteria and that of nitrate-reducing bacteria in mix-culturing ponds was low, but it was higher than that in mono-culturing shrimp pond. With time going on, the number of bacteria in mono-culturing pond increased rapidly and remained at a high level in August and September, an that in mix-culturing ponds also increased. But the latter increased slowly, and it was never over 10(4) cells.ml-1 and dropped in September. Number of bacteria in bottom of the ponds varied with the similar regulation, but the numbers was 10-100 times higher. The numbers of vibrio in mix-culturing ponds was always lower than that in contrastive pond at the same time. So, in fish-shrimp mix-culturing ponds, the contents of organic matter were lower and the total amount and variability of phytoplankton were higher than corresponding items in mono-culturing pond. It was concluded that mix-culture could stimulate and control the growth of heterotrophic bacteria, accelerate the degradation of organic pollutants, consequently fasten and stabilize the circulation of mater in ecosystem of ponds in culturing season.

  19. KINETICS OF CHROMATE REDUCTION DURING NAPHTHALENE DEGRADATION IN A MIXED CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mixed culture of Bacillus sp. K1 and Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA 505 was exposed to chromate and naphthalene. Batch experiments showed that chromate was reduced and naphthalene was degraded by the mixed culture. Chromate reduction occurred initially at a high rate followed by...

  20. Kinetics of chromate reduction during naphthalene degradation in a mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.; Sewell, G.W.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1996-11-05

    A mixed culture of Bacillus sp. K1 and Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA 505 was exposed to chromate and naphthalene. Batch experiments showed that chromate was reduced and naphthalene was degraded by the mixed culture. Chromate reduction occurred initially at a high rate followed by a decrease in rate until chromate reduction ceased. Chromate reduction decreased in the mixed culture when a lower ratio of S. paucimobilis EPA 505 to Bacillus sp. K1 was utilized. A kinetic model incorporating a term for the cell density ratio is proposed to describe chromate reduction in the mixed culture under both chromate limited and electron donor limited conditions. The validity of the model, and its parameter values, was verified by experimental data generated under a variety of initial population compositions and a broad range of chromate concentrations. The consistent result of experimental data with model predictions implies that the model is useful for evaluating the interactions and the use of mixed culture for chromate removal.

  1. Lactic acid production from submerged fermentation of broken rice using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Luiza Varela; de Barros Correa, Fabiane Fernanda; de Oliva Neto, Pedro; Mayer, Cassia Roberta Malacrida; Escaramboni, Bruna; Campioni, Tania Sila; de Barros, Natan Roberto; Herculano, Rondinelli Donizetti; Fernández Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo

    2017-04-01

    The present work aimed to characterize and optimize the submerged fermentation of broken rice for lactic acid (LA) production using undefined mixed culture from dewatered activated sludge. A microorganism with amylolytic activity, which also produces LA, Lactobacillus amylovorus, was used as a control to assess the extent of mixed culture on LA yield. Three level full factorial designs were performed to optimize and define the influence of fermentation temperature (20-50 °C), gelatinization time (30-60 min) and broken rice concentration in culture medium (40-80 g L(-1)) on LA production in pure and undefined mixed culture. LA production in mixed culture (9.76 g L(-1)) increased in sixfold respect to pure culture in optimal assessed experimental conditions. The optimal conditions for maximizing LA yield in mixed culture bioprocess were 31 °C temperature, 45 min gelatinization time and 79 g L(-1) broken rice concentration in culture medium. This study demonstrated the positive effect of undefined mixed culture from dewatered activated sludge to produce LA from culture medium formulated with broken rice. In addition, this work establishes the basis for an efficient and low-cost bioprocess to manufacture LA from this booming agro-industrial by-product.

  2. [Cooperation of mixed culturing bacteria in the hydrogen production by fermentation].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Xiangjing

    2003-03-01

    In order to discuss the cooperation of H2-producing fermentation bacteria (HPFB) in mixed culture, a batch test fed with glucose and complex organic substance (starch, beef, PEP and peptone) respectively, was conducted to investigate the effects of mixed culture on H2-producing ability. For the systemic and accurate analysis, three kinds of the mixed culture were use to this batch test. It included that the mixed culture with five strains of HPFB (B49, H1, LM12, LM11 and B51), B49 and three stains of non-HPFB (L10, Bacteroide 3-2, Sporobacterl), and B49 and hydrogen producing sludge. The results showed that the cooperation of mixed culturing bacteria was conditional on the substrates. When fed with glucose, which were easily utilized by HPB, the H2-producing ability of HPB was restrained because of the competition on the co-substrate between HPB and other fermentation bacteria, and it was quite difficult for the cooperation of mixed culturing bacteria to be performed. When fed with complex organic substance, the H2-producing ability of HPB was enhanced via the cooperation of mixed culturing bacteria. Furthermore, a strategy was put forward, that is, different kind of HPB cultures could be adopted according to the difference of substrates.

  3. A Review of International Cross-Cultural Mixed Messages and Their Implications for Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on the concept of international cross-cultural mixed messages. Although there is limited literature on this topic, the review suggests that messages from one's home culture and a second culture can result in conflicting expectations for one's own behavior and for the behavior of others. Double bind theory is…

  4. Spatial distributions of sulphur species and sulphate-reducing bacteria provide insights into sulphur redox cycling and biodegradation hot-spots in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Pilloni, Giovanni; Ruth-Anneser, Bettina; Lueders, Tillman; Griebler, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) has been proven to be one of the most relevant redox reactions in the biodegradation of contaminants in groundwater. However, the possible role of sulphur species of intermediate oxidation state, as well as the role of potential re-oxidative sulphur cycling in biodegradation particularly at the groundwater table are still poorly understood. Here we used a combination of stable isotope measurements of SO42-, H2S, and S0 as well as geochemical profiling of sulphur intermediates with special emphasis on SO32-, S2O32-, and S0 to unravel possible sulphur cycling in the biodegradation of aromatics in a hydrocarbon-contaminated porous aquifer. By linking these results to the quantification of total bacterial rRNA genes and respiratory genes of sulphate reducers, as well as pyrotag sequencing of bacterial communities over depth, light is shed on possible key-organisms involved. Our results substantiate the role of DSR in biodegradation of hydrocarbons (mainly toluene) in the highly active plume fringes above and beneath the plume core. In both zones the concentration of sulphur intermediates (S0, SO32- and S2O32-) was almost twice that of other sampling-depths, indicating intense sulphur redox cycling. The dual isotopic fingerprint of oxygen and sulphur in dissolved sulphate suggested a re-oxidation of reduced sulphur compounds to sulphate especially at the upper fringe zone. An isotopic shift in δ34S of S0 of nearly +4‰ compared to the δ34S values of H2S from the same depth linked to a high abundance (∼10%) of sequence reads related to Sulphuricurvum spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) in the same depth were indicative of intensive oxidation of S0 to sulphate in this zone. At the lower plume fringe S0 constituted the main inorganic sulphur species, possibly formed by abiotic re-oxidation of H2S with Fe(III)oxides subsequent to sulphate reduction. These results provide first insights into intense sulphur redox cycling in a hydrocarbon

  5. Sequential Mixed Cultures: From Syngas to Malic Acid.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Florian; Dörsam, Stefan; Veith, Nicolas; Zwick, Michaela; Neumann, Anke; Ochsenreither, Katrin; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation using acetogenic bacteria is an approach for production of bulk chemicals like acetate, ethanol, butanol, or 2,3-butandiol avoiding the fuel vs. food debate by using carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen from gasification of biomass or industrial waste gases. Suffering from energetic limitations, yields of C4-molecules produced by syngas fermentation are quite low compared with ABE fermentation using sugars as a substrate. On the other hand, fungal production of malic acid has high yields of product per gram metabolized substrate but is currently limited to sugar containing substrates. In this study, it was possible to show that Aspergilus oryzae is able to produce malic acid using acetate as sole carbon source which is a main product of acetogenic syngas fermentation. Bioreactor cultivations were conducted in 2.5 L stirred tank reactors. During the syngas fermentation part of the sequential mixed culture, Clostridium ljungdahlii was grown in modified Tanner medium and sparged with 20 mL/min of artificial syngas mimicking a composition of clean syngas from entrained bed gasification of straw (32.5 vol-% CO, 32.5 vol-% H2, 16 vol-% CO2, and 19 vol-% N2) using a microsparger. Syngas consumption was monitored via automated gas chromatographic measurement of the off-gas. For the fungal fermentation part gas sparging was switched to 0.6 L/min of air and a standard sparger. Ammonia content of medium for syngas fermentation was reduced to 0.33 g/L NH4Cl to meet the requirements for fungal production of dicarboxylic acids. Malic acid production performance of A. oryzae in organic acid production medium and syngas medium with acetate as sole carbon source was verified and gave YP∕S values of 0.28 g/g and 0.37 g/g respectively. Growth and acetate formation of C. ljungdahlii during syngas fermentation were not affected by the reduced ammonia content and 66 % of the consumed syngas was converted to acetate. The overall conversion

  6. Sequential Mixed Cultures: From Syngas to Malic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Florian; Dörsam, Stefan; Veith, Nicolas; Zwick, Michaela; Neumann, Anke; Ochsenreither, Katrin; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis gas (syngas) fermentation using acetogenic bacteria is an approach for production of bulk chemicals like acetate, ethanol, butanol, or 2,3-butandiol avoiding the fuel vs. food debate by using carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen from gasification of biomass or industrial waste gases. Suffering from energetic limitations, yields of C4-molecules produced by syngas fermentation are quite low compared with ABE fermentation using sugars as a substrate. On the other hand, fungal production of malic acid has high yields of product per gram metabolized substrate but is currently limited to sugar containing substrates. In this study, it was possible to show that Aspergilus oryzae is able to produce malic acid using acetate as sole carbon source which is a main product of acetogenic syngas fermentation. Bioreactor cultivations were conducted in 2.5 L stirred tank reactors. During the syngas fermentation part of the sequential mixed culture, Clostridium ljungdahlii was grown in modified Tanner medium and sparged with 20 mL/min of artificial syngas mimicking a composition of clean syngas from entrained bed gasification of straw (32.5 vol-% CO, 32.5 vol-% H2, 16 vol-% CO2, and 19 vol-% N2) using a microsparger. Syngas consumption was monitored via automated gas chromatographic measurement of the off-gas. For the fungal fermentation part gas sparging was switched to 0.6 L/min of air and a standard sparger. Ammonia content of medium for syngas fermentation was reduced to 0.33 g/L NH4Cl to meet the requirements for fungal production of dicarboxylic acids. Malic acid production performance of A. oryzae in organic acid production medium and syngas medium with acetate as sole carbon source was verified and gave YP∕S values of 0.28 g/g and 0.37 g/g respectively. Growth and acetate formation of C. ljungdahlii during syngas fermentation were not affected by the reduced ammonia content and 66 % of the consumed syngas was converted to acetate. The overall conversion

  7. [Genetic transfer of methycilline resistance in Staphylococus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus strains in mixed cultures].

    PubMed

    Młynarczyk, A; Młynarczyk, G; Jeljaszewicz, J

    1999-01-01

    In mixed cultures of staphylococci a transfer of the resistance to methicillin and penicillinase plasmids as well as tetracycline and chloramphenicol plasmids was investigated. It was shown that the resistance to methicillin was transferred in mixed cultures from one strain of S. aureus to another and from S. epidermidis to S. aureus. In both cases transfer of methicillin resistance required, the presence of penicillinase plasmid in recipient or donor strain. In the case of other markers transmission was independent. Moreover it was shown that the transfer of resistance genes in mixed cultures was mediated by bacteriophage of the serologic group A.

  8. Bioremediation of MGP soils with mixed fungal and bacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.J.B.; Fletcher, M.A.; Avila, O.I.; Munnecke, D.M.; Callanan, J.; Yunker, S.

    1995-12-31

    This culture selection study examines the degradation of polycyclic automatic hydrocarbon (PAH) by a number of brown- and white-rot fungi and bacterial cultures for the treatment of coal tar wastes. Cultures were screened for naphthalene degradation in shake flasks, and selected organisms were then examined for their ability to degrade a mixture of PAHs in aqueous culture. PAH degradation in the presence of the surfactant, TWEEN 80, was examined for some cultures. Many of the organisms were observed to be resistant to greater than 10 mg/L free cyanide. Solid substrate growth conditions were optimized for the selected fungal cultures in preparation for manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil microcosm experiments. The fungi generally produced more biomass under conditions of acidic to neutral pH, incubation at 30 C with 90% moisture saturation, and with granulated corncobs or alfalfa pellets supplied as a lignocellulosic substrate. Of the cultures screened, nine fungal cultures were selected based on their ability to degrade at least 40% of naphthalene, fluorene, or benzo(a)pyrene in 2 weeks or less. A bacterial culture capable of degrading 30 mg/L of naphthalene in 1 week was also selected, and the cultures were examined further in PAH-degradation studies in contaminated soils.

  9. Methodological issues in life cycle assessment of mixed-culture polyhydroxyalkanoate production utilising waste as feedstock.

    PubMed

    Heimersson, Sara; Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Peters, Gregory M; Werker, Alan; Svanström, Magdalena

    2014-06-25

    Assessing the environmental performance of emerging technologies using life cycle assessment (LCA) can be challenging due to a lack of data in relation to technologies, application areas or other life cycle considerations, or a lack of LCA methodology that address the specific concerns. Nevertheless, LCA can be a valuable tool in the environmental optimisation in the technology development phase. One emerging technology is the mixed-culture production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). PHA production by pure microbial cultures has been developed and assessed in several LCAs during the previous decade. Recent developments within mixed-culture PHA production call for environmental assessment to guide in technology development. Mixed-culture PHA production can use the organic content in wastewater as a feedstock; the production may then be integrated with wastewater treatment (WWT) processes. This means that mixed-culture PHA is produced as a by-product from services in the WWT. This article explores different methodological challenges for LCA of mixed-culture PHA production using organic material in wastewater as feedstock. LCAs of both pure- and mixed-culture PHA production were reviewed. Challenges, similarities and differences when assessing PHA production by mixed- or pure-cultures were identified and the resulting implications for methodological choices in LCA were evaluated and illustrated, using a case study with mixed- and pure-culture PHA model production systems, based on literature data. Environmental impacts of processes producing multiple products or services need to be allocated between the different products or services. Such situations occur both in feedstock production and when the studied system is providing multiple functions. The selection of allocation method is shown to determine the LCA results. The type of data used, for electricity in the energy system, is shown to be important for the results, which indicates, a strong regional dependency of

  10. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system. PMID:24912488

  11. Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture with a competition model.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of microbial growth in mixed culture was studied with a competition model that we had developed recently. The model, which is composed of the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model, is shown to successfully describe the microbial growth of two species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. With the parameter values of the model obtained from the experimental data on monoculture and mixed culture with two species, it then succeeded in predicting the simultaneous growth of the three species in mixed culture inoculated with various cell concentrations. To our knowledge, it is the first time for a prediction model for multiple (three) microbial species to be reported. The model, which is not built on any premise for specific microorganisms, may become a basic competition model for microorganisms in food and food materials.

  12. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under drinking water relevant conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Three batch reactors were used in each ...

  13. Mixed culture syngas fermentation and conversion of carboxylic acids into alcohols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kan; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Stevenson, Bradley S; Tanner, Ralph S; Wilkins, Mark R; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Higher alcohols such as n-butanol and n-hexanol have higher energy density than ethanol, are more compatible with current fuel infrastructure, and can be upgraded to jet and diesel fuels. Several organisms are known to convert syngas to ethanol, but very few can produce higher alcohols alone. As a potential solution, mixed culture fermentation between the syngas fermenting Alkalibaculum bacchi strain CP15 and propionic acid producer Clostridium propionicum was studied. The monoculture of CP15 produced only ethanol from syngas without initial addition of organic acids to the fermentation medium. However, the mixed culture produced ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol from syngas. The addition of propionic acid, butyric acid and hexanoic acid to the mixed culture resulted in a 50% higher conversion efficiency of these acids to their respective alcohols compared to CP15 monoculture. These findings illustrate the great potential of mixed culture syngas fermentation in production of higher alcohols.

  14. Perceptions of Organizational Culture of a Multi-Campus Community College District: Mixed Methods in Concert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuster Dale, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    This concurrent, mixed-methods case study analyzed perceptions of current and preferred organizational culture within a rural, multi-campus community college district. This phenomenon was examined by analyzing and comparing data collected by surveying all full-time employees utilizing the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and…

  15. Assessing Resilience across Cultures Using Mixed Methods: Construction of the Child and Youth Resilience Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Michael; Liebenberg, Linda

    2011-01-01

    An international team of investigators in 11 countries have worked collaboratively to develop a culturally and contextually relevant measure of youth resilience, the Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM-28). The team used a mixed methods design that facilitated understanding of both common and unique aspects of resilience across cultures.…

  16. Redox interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum in mixed culture under enological conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheraiti, Naoufel; Guezenec, Stéphane; Salmon, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Wine yeast starters that contain a mixture of different industrial yeasts with various properties may soon be introduced to the market. The mechanisms underlying the interactions between the different strains in the starter during alcoholic fermentation have never been investigated. We identified and investigated some of these interactions in a mixed culture containing two yeast strains grown under enological conditions. The inoculum contained the same amount (each) of a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a natural hybrid strain of S. cerevisiae and Saccharomyces uvarum. We identified interactions that affected biomass, by-product formation, and fermentation kinetics, and compared the redox ratios of monocultures of each strain with that of the mixed culture. The redox status of the mixed culture differed from that of the two monocultures, showing that the interactions between the yeast strains involved the diffusion of metabolite(s) within the mixed culture. Since acetaldehyde is a potential effector of fermentation, we investigated the kinetics of acetaldehyde production by the different cultures. The S. cerevisiae-S. uvarum hybrid strain produced large amounts of acetaldehyde for which the S. cerevisiae strain acted as a receiving strain in the mixed culture. Since yeast response to acetaldehyde involves the same mechanisms that participate in the response to other forms of stress, the acetaldehyde exchange between the two strains could play an important role in inhibiting some yeast strains and allowing the growth of others. Such interactions could be of particular importance in understanding the ecology of the colonization of complex fermentation media by S. cerevisiae.

  17. Study of CFU for individual microorganisms in mixed cultures with a known ratio using MBRT.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Venkatesh, Kv

    2014-01-01

    Determination of metabolically active cell count is an important step in designing, operating and controlling fermentation processes. It's particularly relevant in processes involving mixed cultures, where multiple species contribute to the total growth. The motivation for the current study is to develop a methodology to estimate metabolically active cell counts for the individual species in a mixed culture with approximate equal numbers. Further, the methodology should indicate the presence of a contaminant in short time periods since in the agar plate methods used frequently it takes about 24 h. We present a methodology based on the rate of Methylene blue (MB) reduction to evaluate total count of metabolically active cells. The standard curve relating the slope of MB reduction and CFU of the individual species could be used to measure the metabolic activity of each species in the mixed culture. The slope of MB reduction could also be used to obtain the growth rate of individual species in a mixed culture and that of the total cell count. These measurements were achieved in less than 6 minutes during the growth of the cells. Evaluating the metabolic activity of individual species in a mixed culture is tedious, difficult and time consuming. The Methylene Blue dye Reduction Test (MBRT) presented here is capable of quickly estimating colony forming units (CFU) of individual species in a mixed culture if the ratio of the numbers of cells is known. The method was used to dynamically detect the occurrence of a contaminating microorganism during fermentation. The protocol developed here can be adapted to applications in processes involving mixed cultures.

  18. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X Frank; Gregory, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro.

  19. Effects of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, H M; Martin, S A

    1999-09-01

    Previous research has shown that Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture increases lactate utilization and cellulose digestion by pure cultures of ruminal bacteria. Based on these pure culture results, in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations were conducted to determine the effects of 0.35 and 0.73 g/L of Sacc. cerevisiae culture on the fermentation of ground corn, maltose, alfalfa hay, bermudagrass hay, and lactate. In addition, experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of Sacc. cerevisiae culture and monensin on the mixed ruminal microorganism fermentation. In the presence of ground corn, both concentrations of Sacc. cerevisiae culture had little effect on final pH or fermentation products, except the 0.35 g/L treatment increased valerate concentration. Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture had little effect on final pH or fermentation products in maltose or lactate fermentations. When alfalfa hay was the substrate, 0.73 g/L of Sacc. cerevisiae culture increased propionate concentration and both treatments decreased the acetate to propionate ratio. In the case of Coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.73 g/L Sacc. cerevisiae culture increased concentrations of acetate, propionate, CH4, butyrate, isovalerate, valerate, and decreased the acetate to propionate ratio, whereas both treatments increased total volatile fatty acid concentrations. Similar to alfalfa hay, in vitro dry matter disappearance of Coastal bermudagrass hay was numerically increased in the presence of Sacc. cerevisiae culture. Monensin altered the fermentation by decreasing concentrations of CH4 and lactate and increasing concentrations of propionate. There was no interaction between Sacc. cerevisiae culture and monensin. In conclusion, the incorporation of Sacc. cerevisiae culture into mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations of ground corn, maltose, or lactate had little effect on final pH and fermentation products. However, in the presence of alfalfa hay or Coastal bermudagrass hay Sacc

  20. Cultural Consensus and Cultural Diversity: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Human Service Providers' Models of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses mixed methods and theory from cognitive anthropology to examine the cultural models of domestic violence among domestic violence agency workers, welfare workers, nurses, and a general population comparison group. Data collection and analysis uses quantitative and qualitative techniques, and the findings are integrated for…

  1. Prediction of competitive microbial growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model developed with the new logistic model and the Lotka-Volterra model successfully predicted the growth of bacteria in mixed culture using the mesophiles Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella at a constant temperature in our previous studies. In this study, we further studied the prediction of the growth of those bacteria in mixed culture at dynamic temperatures with various initial populations with the competition model. First, we studied the growth kinetics of the species in a monoculture at various constant temperatures ranging from 16℃ to 32℃. With the analyzed data in the monoculture, we then examined the prediction of bacterial growth in mixed culture with two and three species. The growth of the bacteria in the mixed culture at dynamic temperatures was successfully predicted with the model. The residuals between the observed and predicted populations at the data points were <0.5 log at most points, being 83.3% and 84.2% for the two-species mixture and the three-species mixture, respectively. The present study showed that the model could be applied to the competitive growth in mixed culture at dynamic temperature patterns.

  2. ECOLOGICAL FACTORS INFLUENCING THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN KLEBSIELLA AND SHIGELLA IN MIXED CULTURE.

    PubMed

    HENTGES, D J; FULTON, M

    1964-03-01

    Hentges, David J. (Loyola University, Chicago, Ill.), and MacDonald Fulton. Ecological factors influencing the relationships between Klebsiella and Shigella in mixed cultures. J. Bacteriol. 87:527-535. 1964.-Viable-cell counts of Shigella flexneri and Klebsiella (Aerobacter aerogenes) in pure and mixed culture were made during growth under predetermined conditions of temperature, pH, oxygen supply, and nutrient supply. In pure culture, environmental changes had marked effects on the Shigella populations. Klebsiella populations were not affected except at 44 C or when aerated; under these conditions, the populations were smaller. In nonaerated mixed culture, under different conditions of temperature, pH, and nutrient supply, Klebsiella interfered with the multiplication of Shigella. Exponential growth of Shigella was interrupted at about the time Klebsiella populations attained a maximal size. In contrast, the presence of Klebsiella in an aerated mixture had little or no effect on Shigella multiplication because Klebsiella failed to attain a maximal population. Different environmental conditions resulted in different Klebsiella to Shigella ratios in mixed cultures. When conditions were favorable for Shigella multiplication, as shown by pure culture controls, the proportion of Shigella in the mixture was generally greater than when conditions were unfavorable.

  3. Sulfolane degradation by mixed cultures and a bacterial isolate identified as a Variovorax sp.

    PubMed

    Greene, E A; Beatty, P H; Fedorak, P M

    2000-01-01

    Sulfolane (tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide) is used in the Sulfinol process for natural gas sweetening. At many sour-gas processing plants spills, landfills and leakage from unlined surface storage ponds have contaminated groundwaters with sulfolane. Due to its high water solubility and mobility in aquifers, sulfolane poses a risk for off-site contamination. This study investigated the aerobic biodegradation of sulfolane by two mixed microbial enrichment cultures and by three bacterial isolates. Sulfolane served as the sole C, S and energy source for these cultures. In the two mixed cultures, 60% and 80% of the sulfolane C was recovered as CO2, whereas in cultures of the three isolates only 40-42% of the substrate C was recovered as CO,. In the mixed cultures, 81% and 97% of the sulfolane S was converted to sulfate, and in the pure isolates, 55-90% of the substrate S was converted to sulfate. Thus, the mixed cultures were capable of greater mineralization than the pure isolates. One isolate, strain WP1, was identified using a combination of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, physiological traits and cell morphology. WP1 was determined to be most similar to Varioivorax paradoxus.

  4. Effect of culture phasing and mannanase on production of cellulase and hemicellulase by mixed culture of Trichoderma reesei D 1-6 and Aspergillus wentii Pt 2804

    SciTech Connect

    Ghose, T.K.; Panda, T.; Bisaria, V.S.

    1985-09-01

    Significant increase in extracellular cellulase and hemicellulase activities was observed in the biosynthesis of cellulase enzyme in mixed culture fermentation of Trichoderma reesei D 1-6 and Aspergillus wentii Pt 2804 when the A. wentii inoculation was phased by 15 hours. The optimal conditions of fermentation by the mixed culture have been established. Presence of mannanase has been found to affect the release as well as activity of cellulase enzyme produced in mixed culture.

  5. Mixing against culture vs mixing against nature: ontologization of prohibited interethnic relationships.

    PubMed

    Roncarati, Alessandra; Pérez, Juan A; Ravenna, Marcella; Navarro-Pertusa, Esperanza

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we develop the theory of ontologization: Social representations that prevent members of minority and majority groups who are living in contact with each other to mingle. The process of ontologization consists of separating some humans from their own species, and anchoring them in another environment, that of an animal, for example. We propose that underlying the famous slogan "equal but separate" is the social representation of interracial mixing as a "counter-nature" phenomenon. It is predicted that a sexual relationship between people of different "races" leads to a greater degree of ontologization, and, as such, this miscegenation will be explained in terms of biologistic thinking, like an instinctive nature or atavistic animal impulse. An experiment (N = 360) features the case of a woman who, though already in a stable relationship, is unfaithful to her partner. In a 2×3 factor design, the ethnic-national identity of this woman (in-group: Spanish/Italian vs out-group: Senegalese) and the ethnic-national identity of her lovers (in-group: Spanish/Italian vs out-group: Rumanian vs out-group: Senegalese) were manipulated. In general, results fit the hypothesis of ontologization in interracial conditions better, rather than the customary in-group favouritism and/or out-group discrimination bias. We then go on to discuss the way in which a biologistic way of thinking enables a differentiation at the human level, in terms of culture groups and nature groups, in "races," so that an interracial sexual relationship is seen as evidence of a wild and irrepressible impulse, which stigmatizes the people involved in these relationships. This research was supported by the Italian/Spanish Integrated Action Program HI2004_0241 and the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología BSO2003-00476/PSCE. Dans cet article, nous développons la théorie de l'ontologisation: des représentations sociales qui empêchent les membres des groupes minoritaire et majoritaire

  6. Formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium of microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Huzairy; Jin, Bo; Dai, Sheng; Ngau, Cornelius

    2016-11-01

    The formation of microbial biofilm while maintaining the electricity output is a challenging topic in microbial fuel cell (MFC) studies. This MFC critical factor becomes more significant when handling with industrial wastewater which normally contains refractory and toxic compounds. This study explores the formation of industrial mixed culture biofilm in chlorophenol cultivated medium through observing and characterizing microscopically its establishment on MFC anode surface. The mixed culture was found to develop its biofilm on the anode surface in the chlorophenol environment and established its maturity and dispersal stages with concurrent electricity generation and phenolic degradation. The mixed culture biofilm engaged the electron transfer roles in MFC by generating current density of 1.4 mA/m2 and removing 53 % of 2,4-dichlorophenol. The results support further research especially on hazardous wastewater treatment using a benign and sustainable method.

  7. Culturally Mixed Groups on International Campuses: An Opportunity for Inter-Cultural Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volet, S. E.; Ang, G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major educational goals of the internationalisation of higher education is to prepare students to function in an international and inter-cultural context. Cultural diversity on university campuses creates ideal social forums for inter-cultural learning, yet, one of the most disturbing aspects of the internationalisation of higher…

  8. Human mixed lymphocyte culture using separated lymphocyte populations.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, M R; Moore, M

    1977-01-01

    The ability of human blood lymphocyte populations enriched with T or B cells to act as responder and stimulator populations in the one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was investigated. T- and B-cell-enriched populations were obtained by separation of rosette-forming and non rosette-forming cells and T-cell-enriched populations were also obtained by nylon-fibre column filtration. Using cells prepared by rosette sedimentation, control unseparated and T-cell-enriched populations responded well when stimulated by mitomycin C-treated unseparated cells from a second individual; and stimulation by T- and B-enriched populations generally produced some response, although the magnitude was variable. B-cell-enriched populations gave virtually no response regardless of the composition of the stimulating populations. Nylon-column-enriched T-cell populations responded to stimulation by control unseparated cells but not to T cells purified by the same procedure. T-cell enriched populations prepared by the two methods thus had different activities in the MLR despite containing similar numbers of T cells suggesting that other factors, such as the presence of small numbers of accessory cells, are important in determining the magnitude of the MLR. PMID:139361

  9. Metabolites from the Fungal Endophyte Aspergillus austroafricanus in Axenic Culture and in Fungal-Bacterial Mixed Cultures.

    PubMed

    Ebrahim, Weaam; El-Neketi, Mona; Lewald, Laura-Isabell; Orfali, Raha S; Lin, Wenhan; Rehberg, Nidja; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Daletos, Georgios; Proksch, Peter

    2016-04-22

    The endophytic fungus Aspergillus austroafricanus isolated from leaves of the aquatic plant Eichhornia crassipes was fermented axenically on solid rice medium as well as in mixed cultures with Bacillus subtilis or with Streptomyces lividans. Chromatographic analysis of EtOAc extract of axenic cultures afforded two new metabolites, namely, the xanthone dimer austradixanthone (1) and the sesquiterpene (+)-austrosene (2), along with five known compounds (3-7). Austradixanthone (1) represents the first highly oxygenated heterodimeric xanthone derivative. When A. austroafricanus was grown in mixed cultures with B. subtilis or with S. lividans, several diphenyl ethers (8-11) including the new austramide (8) were induced up to 29-fold. The structures of new compounds were unambiguously elucidated using 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy, HRESIMS, and chemical derivatization. Compound 7 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against the murine lymphoma L5178Y cell line (EC50 is 12.6 μM). In addition, compounds 9 and 10, which were enhanced in mixed fungal/bacterial cultures, proved to be active against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 700699) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 25 μM each (6.6 μg/mL), whereas compound 11 revealed moderate antibacterial activity against B. subtilis 168 trpC2 with an MIC value of 34.8 μM (8 μg/mL).

  10. Evaluation of mono or mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria in type II sourdough system.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Şimşek, Ömer; Küçükçuban, Ayca; Nas, Sebahattin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mono and mixed lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures to determine suitable LAB combinations for a type II sourdough system. In this context, previously isolated sourdough LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, which included Lactobacillus plantarum PFC22, Lactobacillus brevis PFC31, Pediococcus acidilactici PFC38, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis PFC80, were used as mono or mixed culture combinations in a fermentation system to produce type II sourdough, and subsequently in bread dough production. Compared to the monoculture fermentation of dough, the use of mixed cultures shortened the adaptation period by half. In addition, the use of mixed cultures ensured higher microbial viability, and enhanced the fruity flavor during bread dough production. It was determined that the combination of L. plantarum PFC22 + P. acidilactici PFC38 + L. sanfranciscensis PFC80 is a promising culture mixture that can be used in the production of type II sourdough systems, and that may also contribute to an increase in metabolic activity during bread production process.

  11. Automated Static Culture System Cell Module Mixing Protocol and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Truong, Tuan; Goodwin, Thomas J,

    2004-01-01

    This report is a documentation of a fluid dynamic analysis of the proposed Automated Static Culture System (ASCS) cell module mixing protocol. The report consists of a review of some basic fluid dynamics principles appropriate for the mixing of a patch of high oxygen content media into the surrounding media which is initially depleted of oxygen, followed by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of this process for the proposed protocol over a range of the governing parameters. The time histories of oxygen concentration distributions and mechanical shear levels generated are used to characterize the mixing process for different parameter values.

  12. Leaching of pyrite by acidophilic heterotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria in pure and mixed cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Bacelar-Nicolau, P.; Johnson, D.B.

    1999-02-01

    Seven strains of heterotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophilic bacteria were examined to determine their abilities to promote oxidative dissolution of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) when they were grown in pure cultures and in mixed cultures with sulfur-oxidizing Thiobacillus spp. Only one of the isolates (strain T-24) oxidized pyrite when it was grown in pyrite-basal salts medium. However, when pyrite-containing cultures were supplemented with 0.02% (wt/vol) yeast extract, most of the isolates oxidized pyrite, and one (strain T-24) promoted rates of mineral dissolution similar to the rates observed with the iron-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus ferroxidans. Pyrite oxidation by another isolate (strain T-21) occurred in cultures containing between 0.005 and 0.05% (wt/vol) yeast extract but was completely inhibited in cultures containing 0.5% yeast extract. Ferrous iron was also needed for mineral dissolution by the iron-oxidizing heterotrophs, indicating that these organisms oxidize pyrite via the indirect mechanism. Mixed cultures of three isolates (strains T-21, T-232, and T-24) and the sulfur-oxidizing autotroph Thiobacillus thiooxidans promoted pyrite dissolution; since neither strains T-21 and T-23 nor T. thiooxidans could oxidize this mineral in yeast extract-free media, this was a novel example of bacterial synergism. Mixed cultures of strains T-21 and T-23 and the sulfur-oxidizing mixotroph Thiobacillus acidophilus also oxidized pyrite but to a lesser extent than did mixed cultures containing T. thiooxidans. Pyrite leaching by strain T -23 grown in an organic compound-rich medium and incubated either shaken or unshaken was also assessed. The potential environmental significance of iron-oxidizing heterotrophs in accelerating pyrite oxidation is discussed.

  13. Isolation and culture of adult human microglia within mixed glial cultures for functional experimentation and high-content analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amy M; Gibbons, Hannah M; Lill, Claire; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are thought to be involved in diseases of the adult human brain as well as normal aging processes. While neonatal and rodent microglia are often used in studies investigating microglial function, there are important differences between rodent microglia and their adult human counterparts. Human brain tissue provides a unique and valuable tool for microglial cell and molecular biology. Routine protocols can now enable use of this culture method in many laboratories. Detailed protocols and advice for culture of human brain microglia are provided here. We demonstrate the protocol for culturing human adult microglia within a mixed glial culture and use a phagocytosis assay as an example of the functional studies possible with these cells as well as a high-content analysis method of quantification.

  14. Mineralization of the s-triazine ring of atrazine by stable bacterial mixed cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, R T; Wackett, L P; Allan, D L

    1993-01-01

    Enrichment cultures containing atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) at a concentration of 100 ppm (0.46 mM) as a sole nitrogen source were obtained from soils exposed to repeated spills of atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor. Bacterial growth occurred concomitantly with formation of metabolites from atrazine and subsequent biosynthesis of protein. When ring-labeled [14C]atrazine was used, 80% or more of the s-triazine ring carbon atoms were liberated as 14CO2. Hydroxyatrazine may be an intermediate in the atrazine mineralization pathway. More than 200 pure cultures isolated from the enrichment cultures failed to utilize atrazine as a nitrogen source. Mixing pure cultures restored atrazine-mineralizing activity. Repeated transfer of the mixed cultures led to increased rates of atrazine metabolism. The rate of atrazine degradation, even at the elevated concentrations used, far exceeded the rates previously reported in soils, waters, and mixed and pure cultures of bacteria. PMID:8328795

  15. Separation of allelopathy from resource competition using rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures.

    PubMed

    He, Hai Bin; Wang, Hai Bin; Fang, Chang Xun; Lin, Zhi Hua; Yu, Zheng Ming; Lin, Wen Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Plant-plant interference is the combined effect of allelopathy, resource competition, and many other factors. Separating allelopathy from resource competition is almost impossible in natural systems but it is important to evaluate the relative contribution of each of the two mechanisms on plant interference. Research on allelopathy in natural and cultivated plant communities has been hindered in the absence of a reliable method that can separate allelopathic effect from resource competition. In this paper, the interactions between allelopathic rice accession PI312777, non-allelopathic rice accession Lemont and barnyardgrass were explored respectively by using a target (rice)-neighbor (barnyardgrass) mixed-culture in hydroponic system. The relative competitive intensity (RCI), the relative neighbor effect (RNE) and the competitive ratio (CR) were used to quantify the intensity of competition between each of the two different potentially allelopathic rice accessions and barnyardgrass. Use of hydroponic culture system enabled us to exclude any uncontrolled factors that might operate in the soil and we were able to separate allelopathy from resource competition between each rice accession and barnyardgrass. The RCI and RNE values showed that the plant-plant interaction was positive (facilitation) for PI312777 but that was negative (competition) for Lemont and barnyardgrass in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The CR values showed that one PI312777 plant was more competitive than 2 barnyardgrass plants. The allelopathic effects of PI312777 were much more intense than the resource competition in rice/barnyardgrass mixed cultures. The reverse was true for Lemont. These results demonstrate that the allelopathic effect of PI312777 was predominant in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The most significant result of our study is the discovery of an experimental design, target-neighbor mixed-culture in combination with competition indices, can successfully separate

  16. Separation of Allelopathy from Resource Competition Using Rice/Barnyardgrass Mixed-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chang Xun; Lin, Zhi Hua; Yu, Zheng Ming; Lin, Wen Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Plant-plant interference is the combined effect of allelopathy, resource competition, and many other factors. Separating allelopathy from resource competition is almost impossible in natural systems but it is important to evaluate the relative contribution of each of the two mechanisms on plant interference. Research on allelopathy in natural and cultivated plant communities has been hindered in the absence of a reliable method that can separate allelopathic effect from resource competition. In this paper, the interactions between allelopathic rice accession PI312777, non-allelopathic rice accession Lemont and barnyardgrass were explored respectively by using a target (rice)-neighbor (barnyardgrass) mixed-culture in hydroponic system. The relative competitive intensity (RCI), the relative neighbor effect (RNE) and the competitive ratio (CR) were used to quantify the intensity of competition between each of the two different potentially allelopathic rice accessions and barnyardgrass. Use of hydroponic culture system enabled us to exclude any uncontrolled factors that might operate in the soil and we were able to separate allelopathy from resource competition between each rice accession and barnyardgrass. The RCI and RNE values showed that the plant-plant interaction was positive (facilitation) for PI312777 but that was negative (competition) for Lemont and barnyardgrass in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The CR values showed that one PI312777 plant was more competitive than 2 barnyardgrass plants. The allelopathic effects of PI312777 were much more intense than the resource competition in rice/barnyardgrass mixed cultures. The reverse was true for Lemont. These results demonstrate that the allelopathic effect of PI312777 was predominant in rice/barnyardgrass mixed-cultures. The most significant result of our study is the discovery of an experimental design, target-neighbor mixed-culture in combination with competition indices, can successfully separate

  17. Development of a competition model for microbial growth in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Hiroshi; Munakata, Kanako; Sakha, Mohammad Z

    2014-01-01

    A novel competition model for describing bacterial growth in mixed culture was developed in this study. Several model candidates were made with our logistic growth model that precisely describes the growth of a monoculture of bacteria. These candidates were then evaluated for the usefulness in describing growth of two competing species in mixed culture using Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. Bacterial cells of two species grew at initial doses of 10(3), 10(4), and 10(5) CFU/g at 28ºC. Among the candidates, a model where the Lotka-Volterra model, a general competition model in ecology, was incorporated as a new term in our growth model was the best for describing all types of growth of two competitors in mixed culture. Moreover, the values for the competition coefficient in the model were stable at various combinations of the initial populations of the species. The Baranyi model could also successfully describe the above types of growth in mixed culture when it was coupled with the Gimenez and Dalgaard model. However, the values for the competition coefficients in the competition model varied with the conditions. The present study suggested that our model could be a basic model for describing microbial competition.

  18. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for Microbial Growth Kinetics of Mixed Culture System.

    PubMed

    Cotto, Ada; Looper, Jessica K; Mota, Linda C; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-11-01

    Microbial growth kinetics is often used to optimize environmental processes owing to its relation to the breakdown of substrate (contaminants). However, the quantification of bacterial populations in the environment is difficult owing to the challenges of monitoring a specific bacterial population within a diverse microbial community. Conventional methods are unable to detect and quantify the growth of individual strains separately in the mixed culture reactor. This work describes a novel quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based genomic approach to quantify each species in mixed culture and interpret its growth kinetics in the mixed system. Batch experiments were performed for both single and dual cultures of Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli K12 to obtain Monod kinetic parameters (μmax and Ks). The growth curves and kinetics obtained by conventional methods (i.e., dry weight measurement and absorbance reading) were compared with that obtained by qPCR assay. We anticipate that the adoption of this qPCR-based genomic assay can contribute significantly to traditional microbial kinetics, modeling practice, and the operation of bioreactors, where handling of complex mixed cultures is required.

  19. Quantification of Dehalospirillum multivorans in Mixed-Culture Biofilms with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Kreisel, P.; Eisenbeis, M.; Scholz-Muramatsu, H.

    1996-01-01

    A fast, highly selective and sensitive method to quantify specific biomasses in mixed-culture biofilms is described. It consists of detachment of a biofilm from its support material, resolution of the detached biofilm flocs in order to separate the enclosed cells and antigens, and quantification of specific biomass by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:16535389

  20. Comparing PTR-MS profile of milk inoculated with pure or mixed cultures of spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Alothman, Mohammad; Lusk, Karen A; Silcock, Patrick; Bremer, Phil J

    2017-06-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with UHT milk (n=8) inoculated with either pure inoculums of Pseudomonas fluorescens (two strains tested) or Chryseobacterium sp., or with mixed cultures of 2 or all 3 of the bacterial strains, and held at 4.5 °C for up to 26 days was measured using proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The VOCs evolved included a range of carbonyl compounds, alcohols, esters, and acids and had significant qualitative and quantitative differences between the inoculums. Milks inoculated with paired (mixed) bacterial cultures attained patterns similar to the VOC composition of one of the pure inoculums, which could be attributed to the domination of these bacteria within the mixed inoculum. This study will help to characterize the spoilage of milk and provide important insights into understanding the factors that limit the shelf life of milk.

  1. Bacterial Growth in Mixed Cultures on Dissolved Organic Carbon from Humic and Clear Waters

    PubMed Central

    Tranvik, Lars J.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions between bacterial assemblages and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from different sources were investigated. Mixed batch cultures were set up with water from a humic and a clear-water lake by a 1:20 dilution of the bacterial assemblage (1.0 μm of prefiltered lake water) with natural medium (sterile filtered lake water) in all four possible combinations of the two waters and their bacterial assemblages. Bacterial numbers and biomass, DOC, thymidine incorporation, ATP, and uptake of glucose and phenol were followed in these cultures. Growth curves and exponential growth rates were similar in all cultures, regardless of inoculum or medium. However, bacterial biomass produced was double in cultures based on water from the humic lake. The fraction of DOC consumed by heterotrophic bacteria during growth was in the same range, 15 to 22% of the total DOC pool, in all cultures. Bacterial growth efficiency, calculated from bacterial biomass produced and DOC consumed, was in the order of 20%. Glucose uptake reached a peak during exponential growth in all cultures. Phenol uptake was insignificant in the cultures based on the clear-water medium, but occurred in humic medium cultures after exponential growth. The similarity in the carbon budgets of all cultures indicated that the source of the bacterial assemblage did not have a significant effect on the overall carbon flux. However, fluxes of specific organic compounds differed, as reflected by glucose and phenol uptake, depending on the nature of the DOC and the bacterial assemblage. PMID:16347296

  2. The Cultural Politics of Mixed-Income Schools and Housing: A Racialized Discourse of Displacement, Exclusion, and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Pauline

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I examine the contested and racially coded cultural politics of creating mixed-income schools in mixed-income communities. Policymakers claim deconcentrating low-income people will reduce poverty and improve education. However, based on activist research in Chicago, I argue these policies are grounded in "culture of…

  3. Bacterial degradation of synthetic and kraft lignin by axenic and mixed culture and their metabolic products.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ram; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2013-11-01

    Pulp paper mill effluent has high pollution load due to presence of lignin and its derivatives as major colouring and polluting constituents. In this study, two lignin degrading bacteria IITRL1 and IITRSU7 were isolated and identified as Citrobacter freundii (FJ581026) and Citrobacter sp. (FJ581023), respectively. In degradation study by axenic and mixed culture, mixed bacterial culture was found more effective compared to axenic culture as it decolourized 85 and 62% of synthetic and kraft lignin whereas in axenic conditions, bacterium IITRL1 and IITRSU7 decolourized 61 and 64% synthetic and 49 and 54% kraft lignin, respectively. Further, the mixed bacterial culture also showed the removal of 71, 58% TOC; 78, 53% AOX; 70, 58% COD and 74, 58% lignin from synthetic and kraft lignin, respectively. The ligninolytic enzyme was characterized as manganese peroxidase by SDS-PAGE yielding a single band of 43 KDa. The HPLC analysis of degraded samples showed reduction as well as shifting of peaks compared to control indicating the degradation as well as transformation of compounds. Further, in GC-MS analysis of synthetic and kraft lignin degraded samples, hexadecanoic acid was found as recalcitrant compounds while 2,4,6-trichloro-phenol, 2,3,4,5-tetrachloro-phenol and pentachloro-phenol were detected as new metabolites.

  4. Biopolymers Production by Mixed Culture and Their Applications in Water and Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    More, Tanaji T; Yan, Song; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal; Surampalli, Rao Y

    2015-06-01

    Thirteen extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) producing bacterial strains were cultivated (as pure/mixed culture) in sterilized sludge (suspended solids: 25 g/L). The mixed culture produced higher concentrations of EPS (4.9 g/L) as compared to that of the pure culture (2.7-3.7 g/L). The harvested EPS were examined for their flocculation performance (turbidity removal and dewatering) in jar tests using kaolin suspensions with Ca2+. Broth (B-EPS) revealed high kaolin flocculating activity (91.2%) at very low concentrations (0.8 mg B-EPS/g kaolin) and it was comparable to the chemical polymer, Magnafloc-155 (90.4% at 0.2 mg/g kaolin). B-EPS also exhibited very good flocculation performance (turbidity removal %) in river water (93.5%), municipal wastewater (91.7%) and brewery wastewater (81.8%). The study revealed that the mixed culture consortium could be used for the production of highly efficient flocculants.

  5. How-to-Do-It. Isolation of Pure Cultures from Mixed Cultures: A Modern Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an alternative method of culture isolation that uses streaking on specialized media. An activity in which different media are tested for selectivity is presented including a list of materials and procedures. A chart of colony morphology is given. (CW)

  6. Lipid production by a mixed culture of oleaginous yeast and microalga from distillery and domestic mixed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiayin; Nip, Saiwa; Cheok, Wai Leong; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Shim, Hojae

    2014-12-01

    Lipid productivity by mixed culture of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied using 1:1 mixed real wastewater from distillery and local municipal wastewater treatment plant with initial soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) around 25,000 mg/L, initial cell density of 2×10(7) cells/mL (yeast) and 5×10(6) cells/mL (microalga), at 30 °C and 2.93 W/m2 (2000 lux, 12:12 h light and dark cycles). Lipid content and lipid yield achieved were 63.45±2.58% and 4.60±0.36 g/L with the associated removal efficiencies for SCOD, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) at 95.34±0.07%, 51.18±2.17%, and 89.29±4.91%, respectively, after 5 days of cultivation without the pH adjustment. Inoculation of microalgae at 40 h of the initial yeast cultivation and harvesting part of inactive biomass at 72 h by sedimentation could improve both lipid production and wastewater treatment efficiency under non-sterile conditions.

  7. Biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether by cold-adapted mixed and pure bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, G M; Uotila, J S; Häggblom, M M

    2007-04-01

    An aerobic mixed bacterial culture (CL-EMC-1) capable of utilizing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as the sole source of carbon and energy with a growth temperature range of 3 to 30 degrees C and optimum of 18 to 22 degrees C was enriched from activated sludge. Transient accumulation of tert-butanol (TBA) occurred during utilization of MTBE at temperatures from 3 degrees C to 14 degrees C, but TBA did not accumulate above 18 degrees C. The culture utilized MTBE at a concentration of up to 1.5 g l(-1) and TBA of up to 7 g l(-1). The culture grew on MTBE at a pH range of 5 to 9, with an optimum pH of 6.5 to 7.1. The specific growth rate of the CL-EMC-1 culture on 0.1 g l(-1) of MTBE at 22 degrees C and pH 7.1 was 0.012 h(-1), and the growth yield was 0.64 g (dry weight) g(-1). A new MTBE-utilizing bacterium, Variovorax paradoxus strain CL-8, isolated from the mixed culture utilized MTBE, TBA, 2-hydroxy isobutyrate, lactate, methacrylate, and acetate as sole sources of carbon and energy but not 2-propanol, acetone, methanol, formaldehyde, or formate. Two other isolates, Hyphomicrobium facilis strain CL-2 and Methylobacterium extorquens strain CL-4, isolated from the mixed culture were able to grow on C(1) compounds. The combined consortium could thus utilize all of the carbon of MTBE.

  8. Biocatalytic Desulfurization Capabilities of a Mixed Culture during Non-Destructive Utilization of Recalcitrant Organosulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Wael; El-Sayed, Wael S.; Abdul Raheem, Abdul Salam; Mohamed, Magdy E.; El Nayal, Ashraf M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the biodesulfurization potential of a mixed culture AK6 enriched from petroleum hydrocarbons-polluted soil with dibenzothiophene (DBT) as a sulfur source. In addition to DBT, AK6 utilized the following compounds as sulfur sources: 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT), benzothiophene (BT), and 4,6- dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DM-DBT). None of these compounds supported the growth of AK6 as the sole carbon and sulfur source. AK6 could not grow on dibenzylsulfide (DBS) as a sulfur source. The AK6 community structure changed according to the provided sulfur source. The major DGGE bands represented members of the genera Sphingobacterium, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Arthrobacter, Mycobacterium, and Rhodococcus. Sphingobacterium sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were abundant across all cultures utilizing any of the tested thiophenic S-compounds. Mycobacterium/Rhodococcus spp. were restricted to the 4-MDBT culture. The 4-MDBT culture had the highest species richness and diversity. Biodesulfurization of DBT by resting cells of AK6 produced 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-HBP) in addition to trace amounts of phenylacetate. AK6 transformed DBT to 2-hydroxybiphenyl with a specific activity of 9 ± 0.6 μM 2-HBP g dry cell weight−1 h−1. PCR confirmed the presence in the AK6 community of the sulfur-specific (4S) pathway genes dszB and dszC. Mixed cultures hold a better potential than axenic ones for the development of a biodesulfurization technology. PMID:26973637

  9. A moderately thermophilic mixed microbial culture for bioleaching of chalcopyrite concentrate at high pulp density.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuguang; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Chen, Xinhua; Zhou, Hongbo

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of samples (acid mine drainage, coal mine wastewater, and thermal spring) derived from different sites were collected in China. Thereafter, these samples were combined and then inoculated into a basal salts solution in which different substrates (ferrous sulfate, elemental sulfur, and chalcopyrite) served as energy sources. After that, the mixed cultures growing on different substrates were pooled equally, resulting in a final mixed culture. After being adapted to gradually increasing pulp densities of chalcopyrite concentrate by serial subculturing for more than 2 years, the final culture was able to efficiently leach the chalcopyrite at a pulp density of 20% (wt/vol). At that pulp density, the culture extracted 60.4% of copper from the chalcopyrite in 25 days. The bacterial and archaeal diversities during adaptation were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and constructing clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. The results show that the culture consisted mainly of four species, including Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus caldus, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Ferroplasma thermophilum, before adapting to a pulp density of 4%. However, L. ferriphilum could not be detected when the pulp density was greater than 4%. Real-time quantitative PCR was employed to monitor the microbial dynamics during bioleaching at a pulp density of 20%. The results show that A. caldus was the predominant species in the initial stage, while S. acidophilus rather than A. caldus became the predominant species in the middle stage. F. thermophilum accounted for the greatest proportion in the final stage.

  10. A Moderately Thermophilic Mixed Microbial Culture for Bioleaching of Chalcopyrite Concentrate at High Pulp Density

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuguang; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Chen, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Three kinds of samples (acid mine drainage, coal mine wastewater, and thermal spring) derived from different sites were collected in China. Thereafter, these samples were combined and then inoculated into a basal salts solution in which different substrates (ferrous sulfate, elemental sulfur, and chalcopyrite) served as energy sources. After that, the mixed cultures growing on different substrates were pooled equally, resulting in a final mixed culture. After being adapted to gradually increasing pulp densities of chalcopyrite concentrate by serial subculturing for more than 2 years, the final culture was able to efficiently leach the chalcopyrite at a pulp density of 20% (wt/vol). At that pulp density, the culture extracted 60.4% of copper from the chalcopyrite in 25 days. The bacterial and archaeal diversities during adaptation were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and constructing clone libraries of the 16S rRNA gene. The results show that the culture consisted mainly of four species, including Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidithiobacillus caldus, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Ferroplasma thermophilum, before adapting to a pulp density of 4%. However, L. ferriphilum could not be detected when the pulp density was greater than 4%. Real-time quantitative PCR was employed to monitor the microbial dynamics during bioleaching at a pulp density of 20%. The results show that A. caldus was the predominant species in the initial stage, while S. acidophilus rather than A. caldus became the predominant species in the middle stage. F. thermophilum accounted for the greatest proportion in the final stage. PMID:24242252

  11. Detection of Specific Strains and Variants of Streptococcus cremoris in Mixed Cultures by Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Hugenholtz, Jeroen; Veldkamp, Hans; Konings, Wil N.

    1987-01-01

    Antisera against four different strains of Streptococcus cremoris were raised by injecting rabbits with washed suspensions of whole cells. These antisera interacted specifically with the corresponding strain in a mixture of up to nine different S. cremoris strains. The antisera could be used for analyzing the composition of mixed cultures containing these strains by immunofluorescence. Competition experiments were performed in batch and continuous cultures under amino acid limitation. A bacteriophage-sensitive variant of S. cremoris SK11 (SK1128) could be distinguished from a bacteriophage-resistant variant (SK1143) by the same immunofluorescence technique. The competition between the two variants and the stability of both variants in pure cultures were followed with the specific antibodies. Antibodies against the purified proteolytic system of S. cremoris Wg2 were used to determine the presence of proteases by immunofluorescence in several S. cremoris strains under different culture conditions. The described immunofluorescence methods can be used to analyze complex mixed starter cultures common in the dairy industry as the strains and variants present in these mixtures can be recognized microscopically. Images PMID:16347256

  12. The cross-cultural nature of the relationship between schizotypy and mixed-handedness.

    PubMed

    Tsuang, Hui-Chun; Chen, Wei J; Kuo, Shu-Yu; Hsiao, Po-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Positive schizotypy is associated with non-right-handedness, which includes left- and mixed-handedness. However, because the underlying mechanisms might be different, it is important to examine whether both left- and mixed-handedness are associated with a high incidence of schizotypy. During 2009-2010, we used both the Perceptual Aberration Scale and Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire to assess 1315 undergraduate students in Taiwan for schizotypy and the Annett handedness questionnaire to assess handedness. Among the three-way classifications based on Annett's grouping, the fully left-handed group appeared to have the lowest score of positive schizotypy; next was the fully right-handed group and then the mixed-handed. Among the three-way classifications driven from cluster analysis, mixed-handers showed highest score of positive schizotypy. When handedness was treated continuously, both direction (e.g., Hand Preference Index) and consistency (e.g., Either hand use score) indicators were significantly correlated with schizotypy. The results of regression analyses showed that the quadratic handedness measure were negatively associated with schizotypy. The results remained similar after correcting for social pressure on left-handedness. In conclusion, the relationship between schizotypy and mixed-handedness appears to be cross-cultural. The dichotomous classification of handedness, right- vs. non-right-handedness, appears to be insufficient. Additional studies on the distinct mechanisms of mixed- and left-handedness are warranted.

  13. Mixed lymphocyte culture stimulatory and responding capacity of lymphocytes from patients with lymphoproliferative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, H; Vogt, W; Bochert, G; Schmidt, S; Moelle, R; Schaoua, H

    1975-01-01

    Lymphocyte reactivity in vitro was studied in patients with Hodgkin's disease, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphosarcoma. The responding capacity to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) was markedly depressed and delayed in all three groups of patients compared with the PHA response observed in lymphocyte cultures from normal individuals. In one-way mixed lymphocyte culture experiments a significant decrease in responding capacity of the patients' lymphocytes to lymphocytes from normal donors could be demonstrated. In contrast, the stimulatory capacity of the patients' lymphocytes was found to be intact, or only slightly reduced. PMID:128426

  14. Manganese as a controlling factor in mixed cultures of Lactobacillus plantarum and Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Bruyneel, B; Vande Woestyne, M; Verstraete, W

    1990-02-01

    Addition of manganese, at levels of 50 ppm, to a liquid growth medium simulating adverse silage conditions had no effect on the growth or on the fermentation pattern of Enterobacter cloacae and Proteus vulgaris. Yet, the manganese strongly enhanced the growth of Lactobacillus plantarum. Co-cultures of L. plantarum and E. cloacae or P. vulgaris were, by addition of manganese ions, significantly altered in the favour of the former. This finding can be of use in mixed cultures where Enterobacteriaceae act as spoiler microorganisms.

  15. Carboxylic acid production from brewer's spent grain via mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Wan, Caixia

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating carboxylic acid production from brewer's spent grain (BSG) via mixed culture fermentation. The results showed that the distribution of fermentation products was significantly affected by pH conditions and the addition of electron donors. Lactic acid was the dominant component under acidic and alkaline conditions while volatile fatty acids (VFAs) became dominant under the neutral condition. Furthermore, the neutral condition favored the chain elongation of carboxylic acids, especially with ethanol as the electron donor. Ethanol addition enhanced valeric acid and caproic acid production by 44% and 167%, respectively. Lactic acid addition also had positive effects on VFAs production under the neutral condition but limited to C2-C4 products. As a result, propionic acid and butyric acid production was increased by 109% and 152%, respectively. These findings provide substantial evidence for regulating carboxylic acid production during mixed culture fermentation of BSG by controlling pH and adding electron donors.

  16. Effects of space flight and mixing on bacterial growth in low volume cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacena, M. A.; Manfredi, B.; Todd, P.

    1999-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that liquid suspension bacterial cultures grow to higher cell concentrations in spaceflight than on Earth. None of these studies included ground-control experiments designed to evaluate the fluid effects potentially responsible for the reported increases. Therefore, the emphasis of this research was to both confirm differences in final cell concentration between 1g and microgravity cultures, and to examine the effects of mixing as a partial explanation for this difference. Flight experiments were performed in the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA), aboard Space Shuttle Missions STS-63 and STS-69, with simultaneous 1g static and agitated controls. Additional static 1g, agitated, and clino-rotated controls were performed in 9-ml culture tubes. This research revealed that both E. coli and B. subtilis samples cultured in space flight grew to higher final cell densities (120-345% increase) than simultaneous static 1g controls. The final cell concentration of E. coli cells cultured under agitation was 43% higher than in static 1g cultures and was 102% higher with clino-rotation. However, for B. subtilis cultures grown while being agitated on a shaker or clino-rotated, the final cell concentrations were nearly identical to those of the simultaneous static 1g controls. Therefore, these data suggest that the unique fluid quiescence in the microgravity environment (lack of sedimentation, creating unique transfer of nutrients and waste products), was responsible for the enhanced bacterial proliferation reported in this and other studies.

  17. Improvement in ammonium removal efficiency in wastewater treatment by mixed culture of Alcaligenes faecalis no. 4 and L1.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hung-Soo; Hirai, Mitsuyo; Shoda, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    To improve ammonium removal efficiency in wastewater treatment, a mixed culture of Alcaligenes faecalis no. 4 and its mutant L1, both of which have heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, was performed. In a batch culture, no. 4 has a higher denitrification ability than L1, but its ammonium removal rate was lower. In a mixed continuous culture in the ammonium loading range of 750 to 3500 mg-N/l/d, the average ammonium removal rate and the average denitrification ratio were 61 mg-N/l/h and 31%, respectively. In the mixed culture, the ammonium removal rate was twofold higher than that in a single culture of no. 4, the rate was similar to that in a single culture of L1, and the denitrification ratio was very high compared with that in the single culture of L1.

  18. Effect of hydrogen and carbon dioxide on carboxylic acids patterns in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Arslan, D; Steinbusch, K J J; Diels, L; De Wever, H; Buisman, C J N; Hamelers, H V M

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the carboxylate spectrum from mixed culture fermentation of three organic waste streams after supplying 2 bar hydrogen and carbon dioxide or a mixture of these two gases to the headspace. Under any modified headspace, propionate production was ceased and butyrate, caproate and the total carboxylate concentrations were higher than in the reactors with N(2) headspace (control). Production of one major compound was achieved under hydrogen and carbon dioxide mixed headspace after 4 weeks of incubation. Both the highest acetate concentration (17.4 g COD/l) and the highest fraction (87%) were observed in reactors with mixed hydrogen and carbon dioxide headspace independent of the substrate used. In the control reactor, acetate made up maximum 67% of the total products. For other products, the highest concentration and fraction were seldom observed together. Selective butyrate production reaching a 75% fraction was found under the carbon dioxide headspace on the carbohydrate rich waste.

  19. Anaerobic mixed-culture fermentation of aqueous ammonia-treated sugarcane bagasse in consolidated bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhihong; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2010-06-01

    The MixAlco process is an example of consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) in which anaerobic mixed-culture fermentation biochemically converts any biodegradable feedstock into carboxylate salts. Downstream processing thermochemically transforms the resulting salts into mixed alcohol fuels or gasoline. To enhance digestibility, sugarcane bagasse was treated under mild conditions (55 degrees C, 24 h, and 30% aqueous ammonia solution with a loading of 10 mL/g dry biomass). Using NH(4)HCO(3) buffer, the feedstock (80% ammonia-treated sugarcane bagasse/20% chicken manure) was anaerobically fermented by a mixed culture of marine microorganisms at 55 degrees C. Four-stage countercurrent fermentations were performed at various volatile solids loading rates (VSLRs) and liquid residence times (LRTs). The highest acid productivity (1.14 g/(L day)) occurred at a total acid concentration of 29.8 g/L. The highest conversion (65%) occurred at a total acid concentration of 27.6 g/L. The continuum particle distribution model (CPDM) predicted the experimental total acid concentrations and conversions within 4.98% and 10.41%, respectively. When using NH(4)HCO(3) buffer, ammonia pretreatment is an attractive option. The CPDM "map" shows that both high volatile solid conversions (78.8%) and high acid concentrations (32.6 g/L) are possible with 300 g/(L liquid) substrate concentration, 30 days LRT, 2 g/(L day) solid loading rate and NH(4)HCO(3) buffer.

  20. Effects of sequential mixed cultures of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on apple cider fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mengqi; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong

    2014-09-01

    The fermentation of cider by mixed cultures of Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was carried out to study their effect on the cider quality. The results showed that growth of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae was affected by each other during co-fermentation process. All the mixed cultures produced statistically the same level of ethanol as S. cerevisiae monoculture. The mixed fermentation could produce more variety and higher amounts of acetate esters, ethyl esters, higher alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Sensory evaluation demonstrated that ciders obtained from co-fermentation with W. anomalus gained higher scores than ciders fermented by pure S. cerevisiae, especially the co-fermentation cultures WS3, WS4, WS6, and WS8. Only 3 days of fermentation with W. anomalus in sequential mixtures were enough to improve the quality of cider. Wickerhamomyces anomalus could be used in association with S. cerevisiae to improve the quality of cider. The modulation of inoculation time may provide an effective means of manipulating cider aroma for different characteristics.

  1. Fermentation of residual glycerol by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 in pure and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Dams, Rosemeri I; Guilherme, Alexandre A; Vale, Maria S; Nunes, Vanja F; Leitão, Renato C; Santaella, Sandra T

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this research was to estimate the production of hydrogen, organic acids and alcohols by the strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 using residual glycerol as a carbon source. The experiments were carried out in pure and mixed cultures in batch experiments. Three different sources of inocula for mixed culture were used. Ruminal liquid from goats and sludge collected from two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors treating municipal wastewater and brewery effluent were tested for hydrogen, organic acids and alcohols production with or without C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The main detected end-products from the glycerol fermentation were hydrogen, organic acids (acetic, propionic, butyric and caproic) and alcohol (ethanol and 1,3-propanediol - 1,3PD). High hydrogen (0.44 mol H2/mol glycerol consumed) and 1,3PD (0.32 mol 1,3PD/mol glycerol consumed) yields were obtained when the strain C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was bioaugmented into the sludge from municipal wastewater using 5 g/L of glycerol. Significant concentrations of n-caproic acid were detected in the ruminal liquid when amended with C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. The results suggest that glycerol can be used for the generation of H2, 1,3PD and n-caproic acid using C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 as agent in pure or mixed cultures.

  2. Enhanced hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from glycerol by fermentation using mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Selembo, Priscilla A; Perez, Joe M; Lloyd, Wallis A; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-12-15

    The conversion of glycerol into high value products, such as hydrogen gas and 1,3-propanediol (PD), was examined using anaerobic fermentation with heat-treated mixed cultures. Glycerol fermentation produced 0.28 mol-H(2)/mol-glycerol (72 mL-H(2)/g-COD) and 0.69 mol-PD/mol-glycerol. Glucose fermentation using the same mixed cultures produced more hydrogen gas (1.06 mol-H(2)/mol-glucose) but no PD. Changing the source of inoculum affected gas production likely due to prior acclimation of bacteria to this type of substrate. Fermentation of the glycerol produced from biodiesel fuel production (70% glycerol content) produced 0.31 mol-H(2)/mol-glycerol (43 mL H(2)/g-COD) and 0.59 mol-PD/mol-glycerol. These are the highest yields yet reported for both hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol production from pure glycerol and the glycerol byproduct from biodiesel fuel production by fermentation using mixed cultures. These results demonstrate that production of biodiesel can be combined with production of hydrogen and 1,3-propanediol for maximum utilization of resources and minimization of waste.

  3. Metabolism of dibenzofuran by pseudomonas sp. strain HH69 and the mixed culture HH27

    SciTech Connect

    Fortnagel, P.; Harms, H.; Wittich, R.M. ); Krohn, S.; Meyer, H.; Sinnwell, V.; Wilkes, H.; Francke, W. )

    1990-04-01

    A Pseudomonas sp. strain, HH69, and a mixed culture, designated HH27, were isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples. The pure strain and the mixed culture grew aerobically on dibenzofuran as the sole source of carbon and energy. Degradation proceeded via salicylic acid which was branched into the gentisic acid and the catechol pathway. Both salicylic acid and gentisic acid accumulated in the culture medium of strain HH69. The acids were slowly metabolized after growth ceased. The enzymes responsible for their metabolism showed relatively low activities. Besides the above-mentioned acids, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, benzopyran-4-one (chrome), several 2-substituted chroman-4-ones, and traces of the four isomeric monohydroxydibenzofurans were identified in the culture medium. 2,2{prime},3-Trihydroxybiphenyl was isolated from the medium of a dibenzofuran-converting mutant derived from parent strain HH69, which can no longer grow on dibenzofuran. This gives evidence for a novel type of dioxygenases responsible for the attack on the biarylether structure of the dibenzofuran molecule. A meta-fission mechanism for cleavage of the dihydroxylated aromatic nucleus of 2,2{prime},3-trihydroxybiphenyl is suggested as the next enzymatic step in the degradative pathway.

  4. Competition during submerged mixed culture of Geotrichum candidum and Penicillium camembertii on glucose and threonine.

    PubMed

    Aziza, Majda; Amrane, Abdeltif

    2008-02-01

    Geotrichum candidum and Penicillium camembertii were cultivated in pure and mixed cultures on glucose and threonine. In pure cultures, G. candidum used glucose as a carbon and an energy source and threonine only as a nitrogen source, even after glucose exhaustion. Contrarily, when growing in isolation, P. camembertii used simultaneously threonine and glucose as carbon sources. A diauxic growth was recorded during the mixed culture of both species, which competed for glucose, the sole carbon source available for G. candidum growth, leading to higher glucose consumption rates than those recorded during pure cultures, while after glucose exhaustion, low growth was recorded in a second step, showing a 'competition' for threonine, the sole remaining carbon and nitrogen sources, confirmed by the increase of 1.0+/-0.1 log of the G. candidum Colony Forming Units. 'Competition' between G. candidum and P. camembertii for the limiting substrate was found to have a positive effect on growth, since it did not lead to the annihilation of one species, as usually observed, but in their coexistence, leading to a rather similar final number of the CFUs for the two populations. 'Competition' resulted in the absence of assimilation of the second available carbon substrate (lactate) as previously observed, or its use only as a nitrogen source, as was the case for threonine in this work.

  5. Degradation of mix hydrocarbons by immobilized cells of mix culture using a trickle fluidized bed reactor. Final report: June 1992--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chapatwala, K.D.

    1994-12-01

    The microorganisms capable of degrading mix hydrocarbons were isolated from the soil samples collected from the hydrocarbon contaminated sites. The mix cultures were identified as Pseudomonas acidovorans, Flavobacterium indoltheticum and Phyllobacterium rubiaceum. The bacterial cells of mix cultures were immobilized in calcium-alginate solution in the form of beads. A trickle fluidized bed air-uplift-type reactor designed to study the degradation of mix hydrocarbons was filled with 0.85% normal saline containing the immobilized cells of mix culture. The immobilized beads were aerated with different amounts of CO{sub 2}-free air. The normal saline saturated with BTXs was circulated in the bioreactors at the rate of 2--4 ml/min. The biodegradation of BTXs by the immobilized beads of mix culture was monitored by determining the concentrations of the BTXs and the metabolites formed during their degradation in the samples at regular intervals using GC. The peaks obtained through the degradation of BTXs were not identified and quantified in this study.

  6. Improved ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed cultures with Kluyveromyces lactis on high-sugar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Chizuru; Kurita, Osamu; Kubo, Tomoko

    2014-12-01

    The influence of non-Saccharomyces yeast, Kluyveromyces lactis, on metabolite formation and the ethanol tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mixed cultures was examined on synthetic minimal medium containing 20% glucose. In the late stage of fermentation after the complete death of K. lactis, S. cerevisiae in mixed cultures was more ethanol-tolerant than that in pure culture. The chronological life span of S. cerevisiae was shorter in pure culture than mixed cultures. The yeast cells of the late stationary phase both in pure and mixed cultures had a low buoyant density with no significant difference in the non-quiescence state between both cultures. In mixed cultures, the glycerol contents increased and the alanine contents decreased when compared with the pure culture of S. cerevisiae. The distinctive intracellular amino acid pool concerning its amino acid concentrations and its amino acid composition was observed in yeast cells with different ethanol tolerance in the death phase. Co-cultivation of K. lactis seems to prompt S. cerevisiae to be ethanol tolerant by forming opportune metabolites such as glycerol and alanine and/or changing the intracellular amino acid pool.

  7. Impact of mixed Torulaspora delbrueckii-Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture on high-sugar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bely, Marina; Stoeckle, Philippe; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2008-03-20

    Conventional wine yeasts produce high concentrations of volatile acidity, mainly acetic acid, during high-sugar fermentation. This alcoholic fermentation by-product is highly detrimental to wine quality and, in some cases, levels may even exceed legal limits. In this study, a non-conventional species, Torulaspora delbrueckii, was used, in pure cultures and mixed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast, to ferment botrytized musts. Fermentation rate, biomass growth, and the formation of volatile acidity, acetaldehyde, and glycerol were considered. This study demonstrated that T. delbrueckii, often described as a low acetic producer under standard conditions, retained this quality even in a high-sugar medium. Unlike S. cerevisiae, this species did not respond to the hyper-osmotic medium by increasing acetic production as soon as it is inoculated into the must. Nevertheless, this yeast produced low ethanol and biomass yields, and the fermentation was sluggish. As a result, T. delbrueckii fermentations do not reach the required ethanol content (14%vol.), although this species can survive at this concentration. A mixed culture of T. delbrueckii and S. cerevisiae was the best combination for improving the analytical profile of sweet wine, particularly volatile acidity and acetaldehyde production. A mixed T. delbrueckii/S. cerevisiae culture at a 20:1 ratio produced 53% less in volatile acidity and 60% less acetaldehyde than a pure culture of S. cerevisiae. Inoculating S. cerevisiae after 5 days' fermentation by T. delbrueckii had less effect on volatile acidity and acetaldehyde production and resulted in stuck fermentation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the behaviour of non-Saccharomyces and their potential application in wine industry.

  8. Neoplastic cells obtained from Hodgkin's disease are potent stimulators of human primary mixed lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Bostick-Bruton, F; Sauder, D N; Scala, G; Diehl, V

    1983-06-01

    Neoplastic cells obtained from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease have been maintained in culture since 1978. These tumor cells have been shown to have the cytologic features, cytochemical staining, and cell surface markers of Reed-Sternberg cells. In this study we demonstrate that the cell line termed L428 is a potent stimulator of the primary human mixed lymphocyte reaction. Significant proliferation occurred when mononuclear leukocytes obtained from normal donors were stimulated with radiated L428 cells at responder:stimulator ratios varying from 200:1 to 20:1. Proliferative responses occurred between days 3 and 6 of the cultures with maximal proliferation on day 5. Under optimal culture conditions, mean net proliferative response of 14 normal donors was 51,000 +/- 10,600 dpm. The mixed lymphocyte response was totally blocked by concentrations of monoclonal anti-Ia antibody that had no effect on concanavalin A-induced proliferation. However, the mixed lymphocyte response was not blocked by an anti-K562 cell monoclonal antibody of the same immunoglobulin subclass that binds to the L428 cells. Antigen processing by responder monocytes or Ia-positive cells was not required for the MLC. When responder T cells from two normals were depleted of Ia-bearing cells and monocytes, the mixed lymphocyte reaction between the two normals was eliminated, yet the stimulation of each normal by the L428 cells was not reduced. The cells that proliferated in response to stimulation by the L428 cells were T cells, primarily of the helper subset. No IL 1 activity could be detected in concentrated supernatants of L428 cultures after stimulation of L428 cells by mitogens, phorbol esters, or muramyl dipeptide, or in the MLC. All of these cultures contain fetal calf serum. However, the L428 cells are capable of producing IL 1, because IL 1 was detected when the L428 cells were stimulated with LPS in the absence of fetal calf serum. These neoplastic cells, obtained

  9. Culturing oil sands microbes as mixed species communities enhances ex situ model naphthenic acid degradation

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joseph A.; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Oil sands surface mining for bitumen results in the formation of oil sands process water (OSPW), containing acutely toxic naphthenic acids (NAs). Potential exists for OSPW toxicity to be mitigated by aerobic degradation of the NAs by microorganisms indigenous to the oil sands tailings ponds, the success of which is dependent on the methods used to exploit the metabolisms of the environmental microbial community. Having hypothesized that the xenobiotic tolerant biofilm mode-of-life may represent a feasible way to harness environmental microbes for ex situ treatment of OSPW NAs, we aerobically grew OSPW microbes as single and mixed species biofilm and planktonic cultures under various conditions for the purpose of assaying their ability to tolerate and degrade NAs. The NAs evaluated were a diverse mixture of eight commercially available model compounds. Confocal microscopy confirmed the ability of mixed and single species OSPW cultures to grow as biofilms in the presence of the NAs evaluated. qPCR enumeration demonstrated that the addition of supplemental nutrients at concentrations of 1 g L-1 resulted in a more numerous population than 0.001 g L-1 supplementation by approximately 1 order of magnitude. GC-FID analysis revealed that mixed species cultures (regardless of the mode of growth) are the most effective at degrading the NAs tested. All constituent NAs evaluated were degraded below detectable limits with the exception of 1-adamantane carboxylic acid (ACA); subsequent experimentation with ACA as the sole NA also failed to exhibit degradation of this compound. Single species cultures degraded select few NA compounds. The degradation trends highlighted many structure-persistence relationships among the eight NAs tested, demonstrating the effect of side chain configuration and alkyl branching on compound recalcitrance. Of all the isolates, the Rhodococcus spp. degraded the greatest number of NA compounds, although still less than the mixed species cultures

  10. Children's activities and their meanings for parents: a mixed-methods study in six Western cultures.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Sara; Zylicz, Piotr Olaf; Super, Charles M; Welles-Nyström, Barbara; Bermúdez, Moisés Ríos; Bonichini, Sabrina; Moscardino, Ughetta; Mavridis, Caroline Johnston

    2011-12-01

    Theoretical perspectives and research in sociology, anthropology, sociolinguistics, and cultural psychology converge in recognizing the significance of children's time spent in various activities, especially in the family context. Knowing how children's time is deployed, however, only gives us a partial answer to how children acquire competence; the other part must take into account the culturally constructed meanings of activities, from the perspective of those who organize and direct children's daily lives. In this article, we report on a study of children's routine daily activities and on the meanings that parents attribute to them in six Western middle-class cultural communities located in Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, and the United States (N = 183). Using week-long time diaries kept by parents, we first demonstrate similarities as well as significant differences in children's daily routines across the cultural samples. We then present brief vignettes--"a day in the life" --of children from each sample. Parent interviews were coded for themes in the meanings attributed to various activities. Excerpts from parent interviews, focusing on four major activities (meals, family time, play, school- or developmentally related activities), are presented to illustrate how cultural meanings and themes are woven into parents' organization and understanding of their children's daily lives. The results of this mixed-method approach provide a more reliable and nuanced picture of children's and families' daily lives than could be derived from either method alone.

  11. Insights into large-scale cell-culture reactors: I. Liquid mixing and oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael; Lübbert, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    In the pharmaceutical industry, it is state of the art to produce recombinant proteins and antibodies with animal-cell cultures using bioreactors with volumes of up to 20 m(3) . Recent guidelines and position papers for the industry by the US FDA and the European Medicines Agency stress the necessity of mechanistic insights into large-scale bioreactors. A detailed mechanistic view of their practically relevant subsystems is required as well as their mutual interactions, i.e., mixing or homogenization of the culture broth and sufficient mass and heat transfer. In large-scale bioreactors for animal-cell cultures, different agitation systems are employed. Here, we discuss details of the flows induced in stirred tank reactors relevant for animal-cell cultures. In addition, solutions of the governing fluid dynamic equations obtained with the so-called computational fluid dynamics are presented. Experimental data obtained with improved measurement techniques are shown. The results are compared to previous studies and it is found that they support current hypotheses or models. Progress in improving insights requires continuous interactions between more accurate measurements and physical models. The paper aims at promoting the basic mechanistic understanding of transport phenomena that are crucial for large-scale animal-cell culture reactors.

  12. Bioleaching of electronic scrap by mixed culture of moderately thermophilic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivǎnuş, D.; ǎnuş, R. C., IV; Cǎlmuc, F.

    2010-06-01

    A process for the metal recovery from electronic scrap using bacterial leaching was investigated. A mixed culture of moderately thermophilic microorganisms was enriched from acid mine drainages (AMDs) samples collected from several sulphide mines in Romania, and the bioleaching of electronic scrap was conducted both in shake flask and bioreactor. The results show that in the shake flask, the mixture can tolerate 50 g/L scrap after being acclimated to gradually increased concentrations of scrap. The copper extraction increases obviously in bioleaching of scrap with moderately thermophilic microorganisms supplemented with 0.4 g/L yeast extract at 180 r/min, 74% copper can be extracted in the pulp of 50 g/L scrap after 20 d. Compared with copper extractions of mesophilic culture, unacclimated culture and acclimated culture without addition of yeast extract, that of accliniated culture with addition of yeast extract is increased by 53%, 44% and 16%, respectively. In a completely stirred tank reactor, the mass fraction of copper and total iron extraction reach up to 81% and 56%, respectively. The results also indicate that it is necessary to add a large amount of acid to the pulp to extract copper from electronic scrap effectively.

  13. Degradation and total mineralization of monohalogenated biphenyls in natural sediment and mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kong, H L; Sayler, G S

    1983-01-01

    Mixed bacterial cultures obtained from polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated river sediments are capable of degrading monohalogenated biphenyls under simulated natural conditions. Culture conditions include river water as supportive medium and mixed bacterial cultures obtained from river sediments. Degradation occurs when the substrates are supplied as the sole carbon source or when added together with glucose. The degradation rates of 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorobiphenyl, at 30 micrograms ml-1, were 1.1, 1.6, and 2.0 micrograms ml-1 day-1, respectively. Monobrominated biphenyls, including 2-, 3-, and 4-bromobiphenyl, were degraded at rates of 2.3, 4.2, and 1.4 micrograms ml-1 day-1, respectively. Metabolites, including halogenated benzoates, were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. By using chlorophenyl ring-labeled monochlorobiphenyls as substrates, total mineralization (defined as CO2 production from the chlorophenyl ring) was observed for 4-chlorobiphenyl but not for 2-chlorobiphenyl. Rates of total mineralization of 4-chlorobiphenyl (at 39 to 385 micrograms ml-1 levels) were dependent on substrate concentration, whereas variation of cell number in the range of 10(5) to 10(7) cells ml-1 had no significant effects. Simulated sunlight enhanced the rate of mineralization by ca. 400%. PMID:6639021

  14. Monochloramine Cometabolism by Mixed-Culture Nitrifiers under Drinking Water Conditions.

    PubMed

    Maestre, Juan P; Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E

    2016-06-21

    Chloramines are the second most used secondary disinfectant by United States water utilities. However, chloramination may promote nitrifying bacteria. Recently, monochloramine cometabolism by the pure culture ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea, was shown to increase monochloramine demand. The current research investigated monochloramine cometabolism by nitrifying mixed cultures grown under more relevant drinking water conditions and harvested from sand-packed reactors before conducting suspended growth batch kinetic experiments. Four types of batch kinetic experiments were conducted: (1) positive controls to estimate ammonia kinetic parameters, (2) negative controls to account for biomass reactivity, (3) utilization associated product (UAP) controls to account for UAP reactivity, and (4) cometabolism experiments to estimate cometabolism kinetic parameters. Kinetic parameters were estimated in AQUASIM with a simultaneous fit to the experimental data. Cometabolism kinetics were best described by a first-order model. Monochloramine cometabolism kinetics were similar to those of ammonia metabolism, and monochloramine cometabolism accounted for 30% of the observed monochloramine loss. These results demonstrated that monochloramine cometabolism occurred in mixed cultures similar to those found in drinking water distribution systems; therefore, monochloramine cometabolism may be a significant contribution to monochloramine loss during nitrification episodes in drinking water distribution systems.

  15. Interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in predominant biofilm or planktonic forms of existence in mixed culture with Escherichia coli in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Marina V; Maslennikova, Irina L; Karpunina, Tamara I; Nesterova, Larisa Yu; Demakov, Vitaly A

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are known to be involved in mixed communities in diverse niches. In this study we examined the influence of the predominant form of cell existence of and the exometabolite production by P. aeruginosa strains on interspecies interactions, in vitro. Bacterial numbers of P. aeruginosa and E. coli in mixed plankton cultures and biofilms compared with their numbers in single plankton cultures and biofilms changed in a different way, but were in accordance with the form of P. aeruginosa cell existence. The mass of a mixed-species biofilm was greater than the mass of a single-species biofilm. Among the mixed biofilms, the one with the "planktonic" P. aeruginosa strain had the least biomass. The total pyocyanin and pyoverdin levels were found to be lower in all mixed plankton cultures. Despite this, clinical P. aeruginosa strains irrespective of the predominant form of existence ("biofilm" or "planktonic") had a higher total concentration of exometabolites than did the reference strain in 12-24 h mixed cultures. The metabolism of E. coli, according to its bioluminescence, was reduced in mixed cultures, and the decrease was by 20- to 100-fold greater with the clinical Pseudomonas strains than the reference Pseudomonas strain. Thus, both the predominant form of existence of and the exometabolite production by distinct P. aeruginosa strains should be considered to fully understand the interspecies relationship and bacteria survival in natural communities.

  16. Selection of an actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation. Pesticide effects on microbial morphology and bioemulsifier production.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, María S; Colin, Verónica L; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2016-02-01

    Chlordane bioremediation using actinobacteria mixed culture is an attractive clean-up technique. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers could increase the bioavailability of this pesticide. In order to select a defined actinobacteria mixed culture for chlordane remediation, compatibility assays were performed among six Streptomyces strains. The strains did not show growth inhibition, and they were assayed for chlordane removal, either as pure or as mixed cultures. In pure cultures, all of the strains showed specific dechlorination activity (1.42-24.20 EU mg(-1)) and chlordane removal abilities (91.3-95.5%). The specific dechlorination activity was mainly improved with cultures of three or four microorganisms. The mixed culture consisting of Streptomyces sp. A2-A5-A13 was selected. Their ability to produce bioemulsifiers in the presence of glucose or chlordane was tested, but no significant differences were observed (p > 0.05). However, the stability of the emulsions formed was linked to the carbon source used. Only in chlordane presence the emulsions retained 100% of their initial height. Finally, the selected consortium showed a high degree of sporulation in the pesticide presence. This is the first study on the effects that chlordane exerts on microbe morphology and emulsifier production for a defined mixed culture of Streptomyces with ability to remediate the pesticide.

  17. Efficient production of 1,3-propanediol from fermentation of crude glycerol with mixed cultures in a simple medium.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Donna; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the applicability of mixed cultures for 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) production from crude glycerol. Three different sources of mixed cultures were tested, where the mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant showed the best results. 1,3-PDO can be produced as the main product in this mixed culture with typical organic acids like acetic and butyric acids as by-products. The yield was in the range of 0.56-0.76 mol 1,3-PDO per mol glycerol consumed depending on the glycerol concentration. A final product concentration as high as 70 g/L was obtained in fed-batch cultivation with a productivity of 2.6 g/L h. 1,3-PDO can be kept in the culture several days after termination of the fermentation without being degraded. Degradation tests showed that 1,3-PDO is degraded much slower than other compounds in the fermentation broth. In comparison to 1,3-PDO production in typical pure cultures, the process developed in this work with a mixed culture achieved the same levels of product titer, yield and productivity, but has the decisive advantage of operation under complete non-sterile conditions. Moreover, a defined fermentation medium without yeast extract can be used and nitrogen gassing can be omitted during cultivation, leading to a strong reduction of investment and production costs.

  18. Assessing Subsurface Bioaugmentation of a Mixed Culture Capable of Chlorinated Solvent Cometabolism via Molecular Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, M. E.; Lim, H. K.; Semprini, L.; Giovanonni, S.; Vergin, K.; McCarty, P. L.; Hopkins, G. D.

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this project is the successful bioaugmentation of a mixed culture capable of aerobic cometabolism of chlorinated solvent mixtures into an aquifer test zone at Moffett Federal Airfield, CA (Moffett). The test zone consists of two parallel well legs both fed butane and oxygen. One leg will be bioaugmented and the other will serve as an indigenous control. Injection and extraction wells and six (3 per leg) intermediately placed groundwater monitoring points will be frequently monitored for chlorinated solvents, butane, dissolved oxygen, and pH. Groundwater will also be periodically analyzed for microbial content using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) analyses. In each well leg, two fully-penetrating wells containing solid media will be periodically analyzed for microbial colonization (T-RFLP). The mixed bioaugmentation culture originated from environmental samples taken from Hanford, WA. The culture was enriched on butane and tested for viability in Moffett groundwater and aquifer solids. A clone library was created from the 16S rDNA in the mixed culture and 86 clones were sorted based on RFLP patterns. Complete sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene from the three most prevalent clones revealed 45 clones similar to Acidovorax or Hydrogenophaga, gram negative proteobacterium, and 12 clones similar to Rhodococcus, a gram positive filamentous organism. Fluorescently-labeled rRNA probes were designed for FISH analyses and appropriate restriction enzymes were chosen for T-RFLP analyses based upon the sequence information. Microcosm tests were conducted prior to the initiation of the field study to evaluate butane, 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) degradation kinetics and microbial community composition. Bioaugmented microcosms began butane utilization sooner than non-bioaugmented ones in the presence and absence of 1,1-DCE, and were able to degrade more 1,1-DCE (up

  19. Methanol suppression of trichloroethylene degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b) and methane-oxidizing mixed cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, W.; Palumbo, A.V.; Strandberg, G.W.; Sriharan, S.

    1991-12-31

    The effect of methanol on trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by mixed and pure methylotrophic cultures was examined in batch culture experiments. Methanol was found to relieve growth inhibition of Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b) at high (14 mg/L) TCE concentrations. Degradation of TCE was determined by both radiolabeling and gas chromatography techniques. When cultures were grown on methanol over 10 to 14 d with 0.3 mg/L TCE, OB3b degraded 16.89 {+-} 0.82% (mean {+-} SD) of the TCE, and a mixed culture (DT type II) degraded 4.55 {+-} 0.11%. Mixed culture (JS type I) degraded 4.34 {+-} 0.06% of the TCE. When grown on methane with 0.3 mg/L TCE, 32.93 {+-} 2.01% of the TCE was degraded by OB3b, whereas the JS culture degraded 24.3 {+-} 1.38% of the TCE, and the DT culture degraded 34.3 {+-} 2.97% of the TCE. The addition of methanol to cultures grown on methane reduced TCE degradation to 16.21 {+-} 1.17% for OB3b and to 5.08 {+-} 0.56% for JS. Although methanol reduces the toxicity of TCE to the cultures, biodegradation of TCE cannot be sustained in methanol-grown cultures. Since high TCE concentrations appear to inhibit methane uptake and growth, we suggest the primary toxicity of TCE is directed towards the methane monooxygenase.

  20. Mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoates production from sugar molasses: the use of a 2-stage CSTR system for culture selection.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, M G E; Concas, S; Bengtsson, S; Reis, M A M

    2010-09-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are promising biodegradable polymers. The use of mixed microbial cultures (MMC) and low cost feedstocks have a positive impact on the cost-effectiveness of the process. It has typically been carried out in Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBR). In this study, a 2-stage CSTR system (under Feast and Famine conditions) was used to effectively select for PHA-storing organisms using fermented molasses as feedstock. The effect of influent substrate concentration (60-120 Cmmol VFA/L) and HRT ratio between the reactors (0.2-0.5h/h) on the system's selection efficiency was assessed. It was shown that Feast reactor residual substrate concentration impacted on the selective pressure for PHA storage (due to substrate-dependent kinetic limitation). Moreover, a residual substrate concentration coming from the Feast to the Famine reactor did not jeopardize the physiological adaptation required for enhanced PHA storage. The culture reached a maximum PHA content of 61%. This success opens new perspectives to the use of wastewater treatment infrastructure for PHA production, thus valorizing either excess sludge or wastewaters.

  1. Starter Culture Selection for Making Chinese Sesame-Flavored Liquor Based on Microbial Metabolic Activity in Mixed-Culture Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qun; Ling, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Selection of a starter culture with excellent viability and metabolic activity is important for inoculated fermentation of traditional food. To obtain a suitable starter culture for making Chinese sesame-flavored liquor, the yeast and bacterium community structures were investigated during spontaneous and solid-state fermentations of this type of liquor. Five dominant species in spontaneous fermentation were identified: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranaefaciens, Issatchenkia orientalis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The metabolic activity of each species in mixed and inoculated fermentations of liquor was investigated in 14 different cocultures that used different combinations of these species. The relationships between the microbial species and volatile metabolites were analyzed by partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis. We found that S. cerevisiae was positively correlated to nonanal, and B. licheniformis was positively associated with 2,3-butanediol, isobutyric acid, guaiacol, and 4-vinyl guaiacol, while I. orientalis was positively correlated to butyric acid, isovaleric acid, hexanoic acid, and 2,3-butanediol. These three species are excellent flavor producers for Chinese liquor. Although P. membranaefaciens and B. amyloliquefaciens were not efficient flavor producers, the addition of them alleviated competition among the other three species and altered their growth rates and flavor production. As a result, the coculture of all five dominant species produced the largest amount of flavor compounds. The result indicates that flavor producers and microbial interaction regulators are important for inoculated fermentation of Chinese sesame-flavored liquor. PMID:24814798

  2. Culture and mixed emotions: co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions in Japan and the United States.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuri; Uchida, Yukiko; Ellsworth, Phoebe C

    2010-06-01

    Previous cross-cultural comparisons of correlations between positive and negative emotions found that East Asians are more likely than Americans to feel dialectical emotions. However, not much is known about the co-occurrence of positive and negative emotions in a given situation. When asked to describe situations in which they felt mixed emotions, Japanese and American respondents listed mostly similar situations. By presenting these situations to another group of respondents, we found that Japanese reported more mixed emotions than Americans in the predominantly pleasant situations, whereas there were no cultural differences in mixed emotions in the predominantly unpleasant situations or the mixed situations. The appraisal of self-agency mediated cultural differences in mixed emotions in the predominantly pleasant situations. Study 2 replicated the findings by asking participants to recall how they felt in their past pleasant, unpleasant, and mixed situations. The findings suggest that both Americans and Japanese feel mixed emotions, but the kinds of situation in which they typically do so depends on culture.

  3. The highest inhibition coefficient of phenol biodegradation using an acclimated mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Mojtaba; Sharifi Abdar, Payman; Borghei, S Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study a membrane biological reactor (MBR) was operated at 25 ± 1 °C and pH = 7.5 ± 0.5 to treat synthetic wastewater containing high phenol concentrations. Removal efficiencies of phenol and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were evaluated at four various hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 24, 12, 8, and 4 hours. The removal rate of phenol (5.51 kg-Phenol kg-VSS(-1) d(-1)), observed at HRT of 4 h, was the highest phenol degradation rate in the literature. According to COD tests, there were no significant organic matter in the effluent, and phenol was degraded completely by mixed culture. Substrate inhibition was calculated from experimental growth parameters using the Haldane, Yano, and Edward equations. The results show that the Haldane equation is fitted to the experimental data in an excellent manner. Kinetic parameters were derived by nonlinear regression with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.974. The values for Haldane constants μmax, Ks, and Ki were 0.3085 h(-1), 416 mg L(-1) and 1,886 mg L(-1), respectively. The Ki value is the highest value obtained for mixed cultures degrading phenol under batch conditions.

  4. Optimum alcohol concentration for chain elongation in mixed-culture fermentation of cellulosic substrate.

    PubMed

    Lonkar, Sagar; Fu, Zhihong; Holtzapple, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA, e.g., caproic, heptanoic, caprylic acid) are more valuable than short-chain fatty acids (SCFA, e.g., acetic, propionic, butyric, valeric acid). SCFAs are major products in methane-inhibited mixed-culture anaerobic fermentation. By feeding ethanol to the fermentor, MCFA formation is enhanced through chain elongation. Microorganisms such as Clostridium kluyveri elongate short-chain acids by combining them with alcohol. Very low ethanol concentration reduces chain elongation rates, whereas very high ethanol concentrations inhibit microorganisms. To maximize MCFA production, different ethanol concentrations were investigated in the mixed-culture fermentation of office paper and chicken manure. At 10 g/L ethanol concentration, 10 g/L MCFA was formed. High ethanol concentrations (above 40 g/L) inhibit microorganisms resulting in no chain elongation. For chain elongation, propanol was found to be more inhibitory than ethanol. The data suggest that MCFA production will increase by continuously extracting MCFA and maintaining 5-10 g/L ethanol concentration by periodic addition. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2597-2604. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Metabolic energy-based modelling explains product yielding in anaerobic mixed culture fermentations.

    PubMed

    González-Cabaleiro, Rebeca; Lema, Juan M; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The fermentation of glucose using microbial mixed cultures is of great interest given its potential to convert wastes into valuable products at low cost, however, the difficulties associated with the control of the process still pose important challenges for its industrial implementation. A deeper understanding of the fermentation process involving metabolic and biochemical principles is very necessary to overcome these difficulties. In this work a novel metabolic energy based model is presented that accurately predicts for the first time the experimentally observed changes in product spectrum with pH. The model predicts the observed shift towards formate production at high pH, accompanied with ethanol and acetate production. Acetate (accompanied with a more reduced product) and butyrate are predicted main products at low pH. The production of propionate between pH 6 and 8 is also predicted. These results are mechanistically explained for the first time considering the impact that variable proton motive potential and active transport energy costs have in terms of energy harvest over different products yielding. The model results, in line with numerous reported experiments, validate the mechanistic and bioenergetics hypotheses that fermentative mixed cultures products yielding appears to be controlled by the principle of maximum energy harvest and the necessity of balancing the redox equivalents in absence of external electron acceptors.

  6. The impact of oxygen on the final alcohol content of wine fermented by a mixed starter culture.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pilar; Rojas, Virginia; Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a wine fermentation procedure that takes advantage of the metabolic features of a previously characterized Metschnikowia pulcherrima strain in order to reduce ethanol production. It involves the use of M. pulcherrima/Saccharomyces cerevisiae mixed cultures, controlled oxygenation conditions during the first 48 h of fermentation, and anaerobic conditions thereafter. The influence of different oxygenation regimes and initial inoculum composition on yeast physiology and final ethanol content was studied. The impact of oxygenation on yeast physiology goes beyond the first aerated step and influences yields and survival rates during the anaerobic stage. The activity of M. pulcherrima in mixed oxygenated cultures resulted in a clear reduction in ethanol yield, as compared to S. cerevisiae. Despite relatively low initial cell numbers, S. cerevisiae always predominated in mixed cultures by the end of the fermentation process. Strain replacement was faster under low oxygenation levels. M. pulcherrima confers an additional advantage in terms of dissolved oxygen, which drops to zero after a few hours of culture, even under highly aerated conditions, and this holds true for mixed cultures. Alcohol reduction values about 3.7 % (v/v) were obtained for mixed cultures under high aeration, but they were associated to unacceptable volatile acidity levels. In contrast, under optimized conditions, only 0.35 g/L acetic acid was produced, for an alcohol reduction of 2.2 % (v/v), and almost null dissolved oxygen during the process.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide removal and glutathione mixed disulfide formation during metabolic inhibition in mesencephalic cultures.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, J; Zeevalk, G D

    2001-06-01

    Compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism and oxidative stress have been associated with the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Our previous experiments exemplified the importance of GSH in the protection of neurons exposed to malonate, a reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase/complex II. This study further defines the role of oxidative stress during energy inhibition and begins to unravel the mechanisms by which GSH and other antioxidants may contribute to cell survival. Treatment of mesencephalic cultures with 10 microM buthionine sulfoximine for 24 h depleted total GSH by 60%, whereas 3 h exposure to 5 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole irreversibly inactivated catalase activity by 90%. Treatment of GSH-depleted cells with malonate (40 mM) for 6, 12 or 24 h both potentiated and accelerated the time course of malonate toxicity, however, inhibition of catalase had no effect. In contrast, concomitant treatment with buthionine sulfoximine plus 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole in the presence of malonate significantly potentiated toxicity over that observed with malonate plus either inhibitor alone. Consistent with these findings, GSH depletion enhanced malonate-induced reactive oxygen species generation prior to the onset of toxicity. These findings demonstrate that early generation of reactive oxygen species during mitochondrial inhibition contributes to cell damage and that GSH serves as a first line of defense in its removal. Pre-treatment of cultures with 400 microM ascorbate protected completely against malonate toxicity (50 mM, 12 h), whereas treatment with 1 mM Trolox provided partial protection. Protein-GSH mixed disulfide formation during oxidative stress has been suggested to either protect vulnerable protein thiols or conversely to contribute to toxicity. Malonate exposure (50 mM) for 12 h resulted in a modest increase in mixed disulfide formation. However, exposure to the protective combination of ascorbate plus malonate increased membrane

  8. Development and composition of a mixed culture for bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, E.J.P.; Voytek, M.A.; Lorah, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Microbial organisms capable of dechlorinating 1,1,2,2 tetrachloroethane (TeCA) and its chlorinated ethane and ethylene daughter products were enriched in surface sediments collected from the West Branch Canal Creek wetland area, leading to the formation of two mixed cultures using slightly different enrichment methods. Both WBC-1 and WBC-2 were capable of rapid and complete reductive dechlorination of TeCA and its daughter products (1,1,2-trichloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, trichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride) to ethylene, and addition of either culture to wetland sediment and to engineered peat/compost mixtures resulted in significant enhancement of dechlorination. However, the WBC-2 culture supported better sustained activity and was more readily scaled up for application in bioaugmentation treatments, whereas dechlorination activity was gradually lost in WBC-1. The microbial composition of WBC-1 and WBC-2 were determined by cloning and sequencing 500 base pairs of the 16S rDNA gene and the methyl co-reductase. Methanogens identified in the consortia were members of the Order Methanomicrobiales, which includes acetoclastic methanogens. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  9. Biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes by a methane-utilizing mixed culture.

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, M M; Taddeo, A R; Fogel, S

    1986-01-01

    Chlorinated ethenes are toxic substances which are widely distributed groundwater contaminants and are persistent in the subsurface environment. Reports on the biodegradation of these compounds under anaerobic conditions which might occur naturally in groundwater show that these substances degrade very slowly, if at all. Previous attempts to degrade chlorinated ethenes aerobically have produced conflicting results. A mixed culture containing methane-utilizing bacteria was obtained by methane enrichment of a sediment sample. Biodegradation experiments carried out in sealed culture bottles with radioactively labeled trichloroethylene (TCE) showed that approximately half of the radioactive carbon had been converted to 14CO2 and bacterial biomass. In addition to TCE, vinyl chloride and vinylidene chloride could be degraded to products which are not volatile chlorinated substances and are therefore likely to be further degraded to CO2. Two other chlorinated ethenes, cis and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, were shown to degrade to chlorinated products, which appeared to degrade further. A sixth chlorinated ethene, tetrachloroethylene, was not degraded by the methane-utilizing culture under these conditions. The biodegradation of TCE was inhibited by acetylene, a specific inhibitor of methane oxidation by methanotrophs. This observation supported the hypothesis that a methanotroph is responsible for the observed biodegradations. PMID:3085587

  10. Decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 recalcitrant auto-oxidation coloured by-products using an acclimatised mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Bay, Hui Han; Lim, Chi Kim; Kee, Thuan Chien; Ware, Ismail; Chan, Giek Far; Shahir, Shafinaz; Ibrahim, Zaharah

    2014-03-01

    This study focuses on the biodegradation of recalcitrant, coloured compounds resulting from auto-oxidation of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in a sequential facultative anaerobic-aerobic treatment system. A novel mixed bacterial culture, BAC-ZS, consisting of Brevibacillus panacihumi strain ZB1, Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain ZB2, and Enterococcus faecalis strain ZL bacteria were isolated from environmental samples. The acclimatisation of the mixed culture was carried out in an AO7 decolourised solution. The acclimatised mixed culture showed 98 % decolourisation within 2 h of facultative anaerobic treatment using yeast extract and glucose as co-substrate. Subsequent aerobic post treatment caused auto-oxidation reaction forming dark coloured compounds that reduced the percentage decolourisation to 73 %. Interestingly, further agitations of the mixed culture in the solution over a period of 48 h significantly decolourise the coloured compounds and increased the decolourisation percentage to 90 %. Analyses of the degradation compounds using UV-visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed complete degradation of recalcitrant AO7 by the novel BAC-ZS. Phytotoxicity tests using Cucumis sativus confirmed the dye solution after post aerobic treatment were less toxic compared to the parent dye. The quantitative real-time PCR revealed that E. faecalis strain ZL was the dominant strain in the acclimatised mix culture.

  11. The Cellular State Determines the Effect of Melatonin on the Survival of Mixed Cerebellar Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Daiane Gil; Markus, Regina P.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key transcription factor involved in neuroinflammation, is essential for the survival of neurons in situ and of cerebellar granule cells in culture. Melatonin is known to inhibit the activation of NF-κB and has a cytoprotective function. In this study, we evaluated whether the cytoprotective effect of melatonin depends on the state of activation of a mixed cerebellar culture that is composed predominantly of granule cells; we tested the effect of melatonin on cultured rat cerebellar cells stimulated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The addition of melatonin (0.1 nM–1 µM) reduced the survival of naïve cells while inhibiting LPS-induced cell death. Melatonin (100 nM) transiently (15 min) inhibited the nuclear translocation of both NF-κB dimers (p50/p50, p50/RelA) and, after 60 min, increased the activation of p50/RelA. Melatonin-induced p50/RelA activity in naïve cells resulted in the transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of NO. Otherwise, in cultures treated with LPS, melatonin blocked the LPS-induced activation of p50/RelA and the reduction in p50/p50 levels and inhibited iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Therefore, melatonin in vehicle-treated cells induces cell death, while it protects against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, we confirmed that melatonin is a neuroprotective drug when cerebellar cells are challenged; however, melatonin can also lead to cell death when the normal balance of the NF-κB pathway is disturbed. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the influence of cell context on the final output response of melatonin. PMID:25184316

  12. Inhibitory effect of 5- and 6-ring PAHs on pyrene mineralization by a mixed enrichment culture

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, M.; Agraujo, R.

    1995-12-31

    This research investigates the mineralization of pyrene in mixtures of PAHs to identify potential synergistic or antagonistic interactions that affect the degradation of individual compounds. Mineralization of {sup 14}C pyrene (25 RM) by a mixed enrichment culture was studied in systems containing mixtures of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in minimal salts medium (MSM). In the absence of the High Molecular Weight (HMW)-PAHs, the culture mineralized 62% of the added pyrene. Addition of an equal mixture of benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzanthracene, and benzo(g,h,i)peryiene (25 {micro}M total concentration) reduced pyrene mineralization to 25% after a 9-day lag phase. An increase on the molar concentration of the HMW-PAH mixture to 75 and 125 {micro}M decreased pyrene mineralization to 9.2 and 1%, respectively. Results from treatments containing individual (25 {micro}M each), or pairs of the HMW-compounds demonstrated that none of the three individual compounds caused a significant reduction in the extent of pyrene mineralization. However, the combination of benzo(a)pyrene and benzanthracene significantly inhibited pyrene activity. In addition, the presence of both benzo(a)pyrene and benzo(g,h,i)peryiene reduced mineralization by almost 23%. Determination of bacterial density by epifluorescence microscopy showed that mineralization of pyrene coincides with growth of the bacterial culture; presence of the 5- and 6-ring PAHs delayed growth with a concurrent inhibition of mineralization. When growth resumes, the inhibitory effect is reduced. A decrease of pyrene inhibition was also noted when MSM was replaced with sediment extract, or when sediment (1 {micro}g/ml) was added to the medium. These results suggest a synergistic inhibitory effect by combinations of specific HMW-PAHs rather than inhibition by individual compounds of the mixture on both the growth of the bacterial culture and the extent of pyrene mineralization.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mixed Culture of Blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) Juice: Synergism in the Aroma Compounds Production

    PubMed Central

    Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains. PMID:25506606

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel GH67 α-glucuronidase from a mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles C; Kibblewhite, Rena E; Wagschal, Kurt; Li, Ruiping; Robertson, George H; Orts, William J

    2012-08-01

    Hemicelluloses represent a large reservoir of carbohydrates that can be utilized for renewable products. Hydrolysis of hemicellulose into simple sugars is inhibited by its various chemical substituents. The glucuronic acid substituent is removed by the enzyme α-glucuronidase. A gene (deg75-AG) encoding a putative α-glucuronidase enzyme was isolated from a culture of mixed compost microorganisms. The gene was subcloned into a prokaryotic vector, and the enzyme was overexpressed and biochemically characterized. The DEG75-AG enzyme had optimum activity at 45 °C. Unlike other α-glucuronidases, the DEG75-AG had a more basic pH optimum of 7-8. When birchwood xylan was used as substrate, the addition of DEG75-AG increased hydrolysis twofold relative to xylanase alone.

  15. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies.

  16. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies. PMID:27110941

  17. CULTURALLY COMPETENT SERVICES WITHIN A STATEWIDE BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE TRANSFORMATION: A MIXED-METHOD ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Semansky, Rafael M.; Goodkind, Jessica; Sommerfeld, David H.; Willging, Cathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, New Mexico created a single health plan to administer all publicly-funded behavioral health services. Our mixed-method study combined surveys, document review, and ethnography to examine this reform’s influence on culturally competent services (CCS). Participants were executives, providers, and support staff of behavioral healthcare agencies. Key variables included language access services and organizational supports, i.e., training, self-assessments of CCS, and maintenance of client-level data. Survey and document review suggested minimal effects on statewide capacity for CCS during the first three years of the reform. Ethnographic research helped explain these findings: (1) state government, the managed behavioral health plan and agencies failed to champion CCS; and (2) increased administrative requirements minimized time and financial resources for CCS. There was also insufficient appreciation among providers for CCS. Although agencies made progress in addressing language assistance services, availability and quality remained limited. PMID:25937679

  18. Kinetic analysis of high-concentration isopropanol biodegradation by a solvent-tolerant mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Mark T; Meeyoo, Vissanu; Wright, Phillip C

    2002-06-20

    The ability of a previously enriched microbial population to utilize isopropanol (IPA) as the sole carbon source within a minimal salts medium is studied. The advantage of prior enrichment procedures for the improvement of IPA biodegradation performance is demonstrated for an IPA concentration of up to 24 g L(-1). Results showing the interrelationship between temperature and substrate utilization and inhibition levels at temperatures of between 2 degrees C and 45 degrees C are examined. Models of inhibition based on enzyme kinetics are assessed via nonlinear analysis, in order to accurately represent the growth kinetics of this solvent-tolerant mixed culture. The model that best describes the data is the Levenspiel substrate inhibition model, which can predict the maximum substrate level above which growth is completely limited. This is the first report of IPA treatment of up to 24 g L(-1) by an aerobic solvent-tolerant population.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mixed culture of blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius L.) juice: synergism in the aroma compounds production.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Rosales, Pedro Ulises; Ragazzo-Sánchez, Juan Arturo; Ruiz-Montañez, Gabriela; Ortiz-Basurto, Rosa Isela; Luna-Solano, Guadalupe; Calderón-Santoyo, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Blackberry (Rubus sp.) juice was fermented using four different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Vitilevure-CM4457, Enoferm-T306, ICV-K1, and Greroche Rhona-L3574) recognized because of their use in the wine industry. A medium alcoholic graduation spirit (<6°GL) with potential to be produced at an industrial scale was obtained. Alcoholic fermentations were performed at 28°C, 200 rpm, and noncontrolled pH. The synergistic effect on the aromatic compounds production during fermentation in mixed culture was compared with those obtained by monoculture and physic mixture of spirits produced in monoculture. The aromatic composition was determined by HS-SPME-GC. The differences in aromatic profile principally rely on the proportions in aromatic compounds and not on the number of those compounds. The multivariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and factorial discriminant analysis (DFA) permit to demonstrate the synergism between the strains.

  20. Mixed culture optimization for marigold flower ensilage via experimental design and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Bolaños, José Luis; Jiménez-Islas, Hugo; Botello-Alvarez, Enrique; Rico-Martínez, Ramiro

    2003-04-09

    Endogenous microorganisms isolated from the marigold flower (Tagetes erecta) were studied to understand the events taking place during its ensilage. Studies of the cellulase enzymatic activity and the ensilage process were undertaken. In both studies, the use of approximate second-order models and multiple lineal regression, within the context of an experimental mixture design using the response surface methodology as optimization strategy, determined that the microorganisms Flavobacterium IIb, Acinetobacter anitratus, and Rhizopus nigricans are the most significant in marigold flower ensilage and exhibit high cellulase activity. A mixed culture comprised of 9.8% Flavobacterium IIb, 41% A. anitratus, and 49.2% R. nigricans used during ensilage resulted in an increased yield of total xanthophylls extracted of 24.94 g/kg of dry weight compared with 12.92 for the uninoculated control ensilage.

  1. Coupling limonene formation and oxyfunctionalization by mixed-culture resting cell fermentation.

    PubMed

    Willrodt, Christian; Hoschek, Anna; Bühler, Bruno; Schmid, Andreas; Julsing, Mattijs K

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic engineering strategies mark a milestone for the fermentative production of bulk and fine chemicals. Yet, toxic products and volatile reaction intermediates with low solubilities remain challenging. Prominent examples are artificial multistep pathways like the production of perillyl acetate (POHAc) from glucose via limonene. For POHAc, these limitations can be overcome by mixed-culture fermentations. A limonene biosynthesis pathway and cytochrome P450 153A6 (CYP153A6) as regioselective hydroxylase are used in two distinct recombinant E. coli. POHAc formation from glucose in one recombinant cell was hindered by ineffective coupling of limonene synthesis and low rates of oxyfunctionalization. The optimization of P450 gene expression led to the formation of 6.20 ± 0.06 mg gcdw (-1) POHAc in a biphasic batch cultivation with glucose as sole carbon and energy source. Increasing the spatial proximity between limonene synthase and CYP153A6 by a genetic fusion of both enzymes changed the molar limonene/POHAc ratio from 3.2 to 1.6. Spatial separation of limonene biosynthesis from its oxyfunctionalization improved POHAc concentration 3.3-fold to 21.7 mg L(-1) as compared to a biphasic fermentation. Mixed-cultures of E. coli BL21 (DE3) containing the limonene biosynthesis pathway and E. coli MG1655 harboring either CYP153A6, or alternatively a cymene monooxygenase, showed POHAc formation rates of 0.06 or 0.11 U gcdw (-1) , respectively. This concept provides a novel framework for fermentative syntheses involving toxic, volatile, or barely soluble compounds or pathway intermediates.

  2. Species-specific viability analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia and Staphylococcus aureus in mixed culture by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial species coexist commonly in mixed communities, for instance those occurring in microbial infections of humans. Interspecies effects contribute to alterations in composition of communities with respect to species and thus, to the course and severity of infection. Therefore, knowledge concerning growth and viability of single species in medically-relevant mixed communities is of high interest to resolve complexity of interspecies dynamics and to support development of treatment strategies. In this study, a flow cytometric method was established to assess the species-specific viability in defined three-species mixed cultures. The method enables the characterization of viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia and Staphylococcus aureus, which are relevant to lung infections of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients. The method combines fluorescence detection by antibody and lectin labeling with viability fluorescence staining using SYBR®Green I and propidium iodide. In addition, species-specific cell enumeration analysis using quantitative terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (qT-RFLP) was used to monitor the growth dynamics. Finally, to investigate the impact of substrate availability on growth and viability, concentrations of main substrates and metabolites released were determined. Results For each species, the time course of growth and viability during mixed culture cultivations was obtained by using qT-RFLP analysis in combination with flow cytometry. Comparison between mixed and pure cultures revealed for every species differences in growth properties, e.g. enhanced growth of P. aeruginosa in mixed culture. Differences were also observed for B. cepacia and S. aureus in the time course of viability, e.g. an early and drastic reduction of viability of S. aureus in mixed culture. Overall, P. aeruginosa clearly dominated the mixed culture with regard to obtained cell concentrations. Conclusions In combination with q

  3. Studies on bioflocculant production by a mixed culture of Methylobacterium sp. Obi and Actinobacterium sp. Mayor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bioflocculants effect the aggregation of suspended solutes in solutions thus, a viable alternative to inorganic poly-ionic and synthetic organic flocculants which are associated with deleterious health problems. Consequently, a consortium of two bacteria species were evaluated for optimized bioflocculant yield following the inadequacies of axenic cultures. Results 16S rDNA nucleotide sequencing and BLAST analysis of nucleotide sequences were used to identify the bacterial species, carbon and nitrogen sources optimally supporting bioflocculant production were assessed and the purified bioflocculant characterized. Nucleotide sequences showed 97% and 96% similarity to Methylobacterium sp. AKB-2008-KU9 and Methylobacterium sp. strain 440. The second isolate, likewise, showed 98% similarity to Actinobacterium OR-221. The sequences were deposited in GenBank as Methylobacterium sp. Obi [accession number HQ537130] and Actinobacterium sp. Mayor [accession number JF799090]. Flocculating activity of 95% was obtained in the presence of Ca2+ and heat-stability was exhibited with retention of above 70% activity at 100°C in 30 min. In addition, bioflocculant yield was about 8.203 g/l. A dose of 1 mg/ml of purified bioflocculant was optimal for the clarification of Kaolin suspension (100 ml) following Jar test. FTIR spectrum revealed the presence of carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups amongst others. Conclusions The mixed culture produced bioflocculant with high flocculating activity and an improved yield. The efficiency observed with jar test may imply industrial applicability. PMID:23915393

  4. Fatty acids production from hydrogen and carbon dioxide by mixed culture in the membrane biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Man; Ding, Zhao-Wei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-10-15

    Gasification of waste to syngas (H2/CO2) is seen as a promising route to a circular economy. Biological conversion of the gaseous compounds into a liquid fuel or chemical, preferably medium chain fatty acids (caproate and caprylate) is an attractive concept. This study for the first time demonstrated in-situ production of medium chain fatty acids from H2 and CO2 in a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor by mixed microbial culture. The hydrogen was for 100% utilized within the biofilms attached on the outer surface of the hollow-fiber membrane. The obtained concentrations of acetate, butyrate, caproate and caprylate were 7.4, 1.8, 0.98 and 0.42 g/L, respectively. The biomass specific production rate of caproate (31.4 mmol-C/(L day g-biomass)) was similar to literature reports for suspended cell cultures while for caprylate the rate (19.1 mmol-C/(L day g-biomass)) was more than 6 times higher. Microbial community analysis showed the biofilms were dominated by Clostridium spp., such as Clostridium ljungdahlii and Clostridium kluyveri. This study demonstrates a potential technology for syngas fermentation in the hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactors.

  5. PHA production by mixed cultures: a way to valorize wastes from pulp industry.

    PubMed

    Queirós, Diogo; Rossetti, Simona; Serafim, Luísa S

    2014-04-01

    In this work, hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HSSL), a complex feedstock originating from the pulp industry, was tested for the first time as a substrate for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production by a mixed microbial culture (MMC) under aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) conditions. A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with HSSL was operated for 67days and the selected MMC reached a maximum PHA content of 67.6%. The MMC demonstrated a differential utilization of the carbon sources present in HSSL. Acetic acid was fully consumed, while xylose and lignosulphonates were partially consumed (30% and 14%, respectively). The selected culture was characterized by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH). Bacteria belonging to the three main classes were identified: Alpha- (72.7±4.0%), Beta- (11.1±0.37%) and Gammaproteobacteria (10.3±0.3%). Within Alphaproteobacteria, a small amount of Paracoccus (4.2±0.51%) and Defluvicoccus related to Tetrad Forming Organisms (9.0±0.28%) were detected.

  6. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes. PMID:27822203

  7. Consolidated Bioprocessing for Butyric Acid Production from Rice Straw with Undefined Mixed Culture.

    PubMed

    Ai, Binling; Chi, Xue; Meng, Jia; Sheng, Zhanwu; Zheng, Lili; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianzheng

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable source with great potential for biofuels and bioproducts. However, the cost of cellulolytic enzymes limits the utilization of the low-cost bioresource. This study aimed to develop a consolidated bioprocessing without the need of supplementary cellulase for butyric acid production from lignocellulosic biomass. A stirred-tank reactor with a working volume of 21 L was constructed and operated in batch and semi-continuous fermentation modes with a cellulolytic butyrate-producing microbial community. The semi-continuous fermentation with intermittent discharging of the culture broth and replenishment with fresh medium achieved the highest butyric acid productivity of 2.69 g/(L· d). In semi-continuous operation mode, the butyric acid and total carboxylic acid concentrations of 16.2 and 28.9 g/L, respectively, were achieved. Over the 21-day fermentation period, their cumulative yields reached 1189 and 2048 g, respectively, corresponding to 41 and 74% of the maximum theoretical yields based on the amount of NaOH pretreated rice straw fed in. This study demonstrated that an undefined mixed culture-based consolidated bioprocessing for butyric acid production can completely eliminate the cost of supplementary cellulolytic enzymes.

  8. Analysis of microbial community variation during the mixed culture fermentation of agricultural peel wastes to produce lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Gerritsen, Alida T; McDonald, Armando G

    2016-05-01

    Mixed cultures fermentation can be used to convert organic wastes into various chemicals and fuels. This study examined the fermentation performance of four batch reactors fed with different agricultural (orange, banana, and potato (mechanical and steam)) peel wastes using mixed cultures, and monitored the interval variation of reactor microbial communities with 16S rRNA genes using Illumina sequencing. All four reactors produced similar chemical profile with lactic acid (LA) as dominant compound. Acetic acid and ethanol were also observed with small fractions. The Illumina sequencing results revealed the diversity of microbial community decreased during fermentation and a community of largely lactic acid producing bacteria dominated by species of Lactobacillus developed.

  9. Increased diazinon hydrolysis to 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol in liquid medium by a specific Streptomyces mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Briceño, G; Schalchli, H; Rubilar, O; Tortella, G R; Mutis, A; Benimeli, C S; Palma, G; Diez, M C

    2016-08-01

    Actinobacteria identified as Streptomyces spp. were evaluated for their ability to remove diazinon as the only carbon source from a liquid medium. Single cultures of Streptomyces strains were exposed to diazinon at a concentration of 50 mg L(-1). After 96 h incubation, six of the eight cultures grew and five strains showed an increase in their total protein concentrations and changes in their protein profile. Up to 32% of the diazinon was removed by the single Streptomyces cultures. A compatibility assay showed that the different Streptomyces species were not antagonistic. Twenty-six mixed cultures were then prepared. Diazinon removal was increased when mixed cultures were used, and maximum diazinon removal of 62% was observed when the Streptomyces spp. strains AC5, AC9, GA11 and ISP13 were mixed; this was defined as the selected mixed culture (SMC). Diazinon removal was positively influenced by the addition of glucose into the liquid medium. Our study showed a diazinon degradation rate of 0.025 h(-1), half-life of 28 h(-1) and 2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinol (IMHP) production of 0.143 mg L h(-1). Rapid diazinon hydrolysis to IMHP was associated with a decrease in the pH of the medium as a consequence of microbial glucose metabolism and organic acid exudation. Moreover, the SMC of Streptomyces was able to remove IMHP. This work constitutes a new, if not the only, report on diazinon degradation by mixed cultures of Streptomyces spp. Given the high levels of diazinon removal, the SMC formed by four Streptomyces strains has the potential to be used to treat the diazinon present in environmental matrices.

  10. EPS production and bioremoval of heavy metals by mixed and pure bacterial cultures isolated from Ankara Stream.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Nur Koçberber; Kürkçü, Güliz; Kumruoğlu, Durna; Dönmez, Gönül

    2015-01-01

    This study is focused on isolation of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Cr(VI) resistant bacteria to assess their exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and related bioremoval capacities. Mixed cultures had higher heavy metal removal capacity in media with molasses (MAS) than the control cultures lacking this carbon (AS) containing 50 mg/l of heavy metal. The yields were 32%, 75.7%, and 51.1% in MAS, while the corresponding values were 29%, 55.1%, and 34.5% in AS, respectively. Purification of the strains 1, 5 and 6 present in the mixed cultures decreased the bioremoval capacities of the mixed culture samples, although these strains produced higher EPS amounts in MAS agar. Strain 5 had the highest Cu(II) (69.1%) and Cr(VI) (43.1%) removal rates at 25 mg/l initial concentration of each pollutant with EPS amounts of 0.74 g/l and 1.05 g/l, respectively. This strain was identified as Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The presented data show that especially mixed and also pure cultures of bacterial strains isolated from Ankara Stream could be assessed as potential bioremoval agents in the treatment of Cu(II) or Cr(VI) containing wastewaters.

  11. Developing Cultural Attitudes in Teacher Candidates through a Cross-Cultural Service Learning Intervention: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Victoria L. Ringling

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to ascertain the impact of an intense cultural classroom experience combined with a cross-cultural service-learning intervention experience on the cultural attitudes of teacher candidates. The research focused specifically on the study of the Lakota culture both currently and in the historical context and then…

  12. Isolation of mammary epithelial cells from three-dimensional mixed-cell spheroid co-culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Buchsbaum, Rachel J

    2012-04-30

    -dimensional cultures of mixed cell populations (co-cultures)(16-22). With continued co-culture the cells form spheroids with the fibroblasts clustering in the interior and the epithelial cells largely on the exterior of the spheroids and forming multi-cellular projections into the matrix. Manipulation of the fibroblasts that leads to altered epithelial cell invasiveness can be readily quantified by changes in numbers and length of epithelial projections(23). Furthermore, we have devised a method for isolating epithelial cells out of three-dimensional co-culture that facilitates analysis of the effects of fibroblast exposure on epithelial behavior. We have found that the effects of co-culture persist for weeks after epithelial cell isolation, permitting ample time to perform multiple assays. This method is adaptable to cells of varying malignant potential and requires no specialized equipment. This technique allows for rapid evaluation of in vitro cell models under multiple conditions, and the corresponding results can be compared to in vivo animal tissue models as well as human tissue samples.

  13. Polyhydroxyalkanoates production with mixed microbial cultures: from culture selection to polymer recovery in a high-rate continuous process.

    PubMed

    Villano, Marianna; Valentino, Francesco; Barbetta, Andrea; Martino, Lucrezia; Scandola, Mariastella; Majone, Mauro

    2014-06-25

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production with mixed microbial cultures (MMC) has been investigated by means of a sequential process involving three different stages, consisting of a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor for MMC selection, a PHA accumulation reactor and a polymer extraction reactor. All stages were performed under continuous operation for at least 4 months to check the overall process robustness as well as the related variability of polymer composition and properties. By operating both biological stages at high organic loads (8.5 and 29.1 gCOD/Ld, respectively) with a synthetic mixture of acetic and propionic acid, it was possible to continuously produce PHA at 1.43 g/Ld with stable performance (overall, the storage yield was 0.18 COD/COD). To identify the optimal operating conditions of the extraction reactor, two digestion solutions have been tested, NaOH (1m) and NaClO (5% active Cl2). The latter resulted in the best performance both in terms of yield of polymer recovery (around 100%, w/w) and purity (more than 90% of PHA content in the residual solids, on a weight basis). In spite of the stable operating conditions and performance, a large variation was observed for the HV content, ranging between 4 and 20 (%, w/w) for daily samples after accumulation and between 9 and 13 (%, w/w) for weekly average samples after extraction and lyophilization. The molecular weight of the produced polymer ranged between 3.4 × 10(5) and 5.4 × 10(5)g/mol with a large polydispersity index. By contrast, TGA and DSC analysis showed that the thermal polymer behavior did not substantially change over time, although it was strongly affected by the extraction agent used (NaClO or NaOH).

  14. To a cultural perspective of mixed reality events: a case study of event overflow in operas and concerts in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Jean-François; Cornish, Tracy; Margolis, Todd

    2012-12-01

    Mixed reality defines the sharing of a space-time between the real and the virtual world. The definition of this concept is further extended when virtual worlds such as Second Life® (SL) are included. Through cultural events such as concerts and operas, we will see that the main goal of these kinds of projects is not simply to offer a video and audio broadcast of these events in the digital dimension. The current challenge is to create interactions between the individuals who are in different shared spaces. By studying the unfolding of these events in its various phases-before, during, and after-we examine the culture of the event. We question how the culture of the event can be transposed in a mixed reality display, and how this kind of event can affect people on both sides of the "membrane" made by the technical configuration. Beyond the alignments and adjustments that we can see between the different individuals involved in these events, we examine more broadly the changes and mutations of the culture of the event in this specific configuration.

  15. Reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder mix has better overall characteristics than reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder.

    PubMed

    Song, Lijie; Aryana, Kayanush J

    2014-10-01

    For manufacture of commercial yogurt powder, yogurt has to go through a drying process, which substantially lowers the yogurt culture counts, so the potential health benefits of the yogurt culture bacteria are reduced. Also, upon reconstitution, commercial yogurt powder does not taste like yogurt and has an off-flavor. The objective was to study the microbial, physicochemical, and sensory characteristics of reconstituted yogurt from yogurt cultured milk powder (YCMP) mix and reconstituted yogurt from commercial yogurt powder (CYP). The CYP reconstituted yogurt was the control and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was the treatment. Microbial and physicochemical characteristics of the CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were analyzed daily for the first week and then weekly for a period of 8 wk. Sensory consumer testing of CYP reconstituted yogurt and YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt was conducted with 100 consumers. At 56 d, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had 5 log cfu/mL higher counts of Streptococcus thermophilus than the control (CYP reconstituted yogurt). Also, Lactobacillus bulgaricus counts of YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt were 6.55 log cfu/mL at 28 d and were 5.35 log cfu/mL at 56 d, whereas the CYP reconstituted yogurt from 28 d onwards had a count of <10 cfu/mL. The YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt also had significantly higher apparent viscosity and sensory scores for appearance, color, aroma, taste, thickness, overall liking, consumer acceptability, and purchase intent than CYP reconstituted yogurt. Overall, YCMP mix reconstituted yogurt had more desirable characteristics than CYP reconstituted yogurt.

  16. Investigation of the biotransformation of pentachlorophenol and pulp paper mill effluent decolorisation by the bacterial strains in a mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shail; Chandra, R; Patel, D K; Reddy, M M K; Rai, Vibhuti

    2008-09-01

    Mixed culture of two bacterial strains Bacillus sp. and Serratia marcescens showed potential pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation and decolorisation of pulp paper mill effluent. The physico-chemical quality of pulp paper mill effluent has been analyzed after 168 h incubation period degraded by mixed culture. The study revealed that it has decreased high load of BOD, COD, TS, TDS, TSS, sulphate, phosphate, total nitrogen, total phenols, metals and different salts (i.e. chloride, sodium, nitrate, potassium) at 168 h incubation period. PCP degradation in pulp paper mill effluent was confirmed by HPLC analysis. Mixed culture was found to degrade PCP up to (94%) present in pulp paper mill effluent with 1% glucose and 0.5% peptone (w/v) at 30+/-1 degrees C, pH 8.0+/-0.2 at 120 rpm in 168 h incubation period. The simultaneous release of chloride ion up to 1,200 mg/l at 168 h emphasized the bacterial dechlorination in the medium. The pulp paper mill effluent degradation was also supported by decline in pH, AOX (absorbable organic halides), color, D.O., BOD, COD and PCP. The analysis of pulp paper mill effluent degradation products by GC-MS analysis revealed the formation of low molecular weight compound like 2-chlorophenol (RT=3.8 min) and tetrachlorohydroquinone (RT=11.86 min) from PCP extracted degraded sample. Further, mixed culture may be used for bioremediation of PCP containing pulp paper mill waste in the environment.

  17. Selective enrichment media bias the types of salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the organism the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown...

  18. Neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin posttreatment against kainate-induced excitotoxicity in mixed spinal cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong Yoon; Won, You Jin; Lee, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jong Uk; Sung, In Young; Hwang, Seung Jun; Kim, Mi Jung; Hong, Hea Nam

    2009-01-01

    Although the neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) preconditioning are well known, the potential of postapplied EPO to protect neurons against excitotoxic injury has not been clearly established. Here we show that kainate (KA)-induced excitotoxicity, which plays a key role in secondary spinal cord injury, decreased neuron survival, inhibited neurite extension, and significantly reduced the expression of erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) in cultured spinal neurons. Posttreatment with EPO for 48 hr protected neurons against KA-induced injury, opposing KA-induced apoptosis and promoting regrowth of motoneuron neurites. These neuroprotective effects were paralleled by a restoration of EpoR expression. The importance of the EpoR signaling pathway was demonstrated using an EpoR blocking antibody, which neutralized the neuroprotective action of EPO posttreatment and prevented EPO-induced increases in EpoR expression. We also found that up-regulated EpoR stimulated the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) pathway, which is known to facilitate neuronal growth and neurite regeneration. Although EPO posttreatment modestly attenuated KA-induced reactive gliosis in mixed neuron-glial cultures, blocking EpoR activity did not alter glial fibrillary acidic protein expression or astrocyte proliferation. In conclusion, 48 hr treatment with EPO following KA exposure induced EpoR-dependent protection against excitotoxic injury, demonstrating that preconditioning is not a prerequisite for neuroprotection by EPO. The neuroprotective effects of EPO posttreatment were mediated by an EpoR-dependent signaling pathway that possibly involves JAK2. The neuroprotective effect of EPO posttreatment against KA excitotoxicity appears to reflect direct effects on neurons and not indirect effects mediated by astrocytes.

  19. Degradation of soil cyanide by single and mixed cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nwokoro, Ogbonnaya; Dibua, Marie Esther Uju

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study whether certain bacteria could be used for cyanide degradation in soil. The bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis were selected based on their good growth in a minimal medium containing 0.8 mg mL-1 potassium cyanide (KCN). In this study we tested their ability to reduce cyanide levels in a medium containing 1.5 mg mL-1 of KCN. Although both microorganisms reduced cyanide levels, Pseudomonas stutzeri was the more effective test organism. Later on, the selected cultures were grown, diluted and their various cell concentrations were used individually and in combination to test their ability of cyanide degradation in soil samples collected around a cassava processing mill. Bacillus subtilis caused degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil immediately with an inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) to 0.072 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) implying a 66.9 % reduction. Pseudomonas stutzeri cell concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) decreased soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil initially to 0.061 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) (72 % reduction). The mixed culture of the two bacteria produced the best degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil sample with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) initially to 0.025 mg g-1 soil with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) after 10 days incubation resulting in an 88.5 % degradation of soil cyanide. The analysed bacteria displayed high cyanide degradation potential and may be useful for efficient decontamination of cyanide contaminated sites.

  20. Improving flavor metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by mixed culture with Bacillus licheniformis for Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Wu, Qun; Wang, Li; Wang, Diqiang; Chen, Liangqiang; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Microbial interactions could impact the metabolic behavior of microbes involved in food fermentation, and therefore they are important for improving food quality. This study investigated the effect of Bacillus licheniformis, the dominant bacteria in the fermentation process of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor, on the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results indicated that S. cerevisiae inhibited the growth of B. licheniformis in all mixed culture systems and final viable cell count was lower than 20 cfu/mL. Although growth of S. cerevisiae was barely influenced by B. licheniformis, its metabolism was changed as initial inoculation ratio varied. The maximum ethanol productions were observed in S. cerevisiae and B. licheniformis at 10(6):10(7) and 10(6):10(8) ratios and have increased by 16.8 % compared with single culture of S. cerevisiae. According to flavor compounds, the culture ratio 10(6):10(6) showed the highest level of total concentrations of all different kinds of flavor compounds. Correlation analyses showed that 12 flavor compounds, including 4 fatty acids and their 2 corresponding esters, 1 terpene, and 5 aromatic compounds, that could only be produced by S. cerevisiae were significantly correlated with the initial inoculation amount of B. licheniformis. These metabolic changes in S. cerevisiae were not only a benefit for liquor aroma, but may also be related to its inhibition effect in mixed culture. This study could help to reveal the microbial interactions in Chinese liquor fermentation and provide guidance for optimal arrangement of mixed culture fermentation systems.

  1. Effects of pH and substrate concentrations on dark fermentative biohydrogen production from xylose by extreme thermophilic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chunsheng; Shi, Puyu; Xiao, Shumin; Sun, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Biohydrogen is considered as one of the most promising energy alternatives considering the climate and energy crisis. The dark fermentative hydrogen production from xylose at extreme thermophilic condition (70 °C) using mixed culture was conducted in this study. The effects of initial pH values (ranged from 5.0 to 10.0) and substrate concentrations (ranged from 2.5 to 15.0 g/L) on the hydrogen production, substrate degradation and metabolite distributions were investigated using batch-mode operations. Results showed that initial substrate pH values in the neutral region (6.0-7.0) were beneficial for hydrogen production. The fermentation at initial pH 7.0 and 7.5 g/L xylose reached an optimal hydrogen yield of 1.29 mol-H2/mol-xyloseconsumed. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate were the major liquid metabolites. The xylose biodegradation efficiency of the mixed culture decreased sharply at high initial culture pH values. The increase of xylose concentration resulted in the accumulation of propionate and an obvious decrease in the final pH value, as well as a low hydrogen yield. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that hydrogen producing bacteria were enriched by repeated culture under extreme thermophilic conditions. Also, the mixed culture was dominated with bacterial species related to Clostridium and Thermoanaerobacterium.

  2. The relationship between Mexican American cultural values and resilience among Mexican American college students: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Morgan Consoli, Melissa L; Llamas, Jasmin D

    2013-10-01

    The current study investigated the role of cultural values in the resilience of Mexican American college students. Utilizing mixed methodology, 124 self-identified Mexican American college students were asked to complete an online survey, including a demographic questionnaire, the Resilience Scale, Mexican American Cultural Values Scale, and 2 open-ended questions concerning overcoming adversity and cultural values. As hypothesized, Mexican American traditional cultural values (Familismo, Respeto, Religiosidad, and Traditional Gender Roles) predicted resilience, with Familismo accounting for the majority of the variance. Consensual qualitative research (Hill, Thompson, & Nutt Williams, 1997) was used to identify emergent domains and themes within the open-ended question responses. Traditional Mexican American Value themes included Familismo, Ethnic Identity, Religiosidad, Perseverance, and Respeto. Results highlight the important role that certain Mexican American cultural values play in providing strength for overcoming adversities.

  3. Towards industrially feasible treatment of potato starch processing waste by mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Li, Ying; Niu, Jia; Wang, Zhenyu; Yang, Qian

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed at reducing the pollution of the waste generated by the potato starch industry to the environment and transform the potato pulp and wastewater into single-cell protein (SCP) to be used as animal feed. The chemical oxygen demand of the wastewater was reduced from 26,700 to 9,100 mg/L by batch fermentation with mixed cultures in an aerated 10-L fermenter. The SCP products, with a crude protein content of 46.09 % (higher than soybean meal), were found palatable and safe for mice. During the treatment process, the microbial community was analyzed using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism for bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The results of the analysis suggested that Curacaobacter/Pseudoalteromonas and Paenibacillus/Bacillus were the main microorganisms in treating potato starch processing wastes. The 150-m(3)-scale fermentation demonstrated a potential for treatment in industrial applications. Fermentation of potato pulp and wastewater without adding an extra nitrogen source was a novel approach in treating the potato starch processing waste.

  4. Volatile compounds originating from mixed microbial cultures on building materials under various humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Korpi, A; Pasanen, A L; Pasanen, P

    1998-08-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials.

  5. Decolourisation and detoxification of synthetic molasses melanoidins by individual and mixed cultures of Bacillus spp.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Chandra, Ram

    2006-11-01

    The decolourisation of synthetic melanoidins (i.e., GGA, GAA, SGA, and SAA) by three Bacillus isolates (Bacillus thuringiensis (MTCC 4714), Bacillus brevis (MTCC 4716) and Bacillus sp. (MTCC 6506)) was studied. Significant reduction in the values of physicochemical parameters was noticed alongwith the decolourisation of all four melanoidins (10% v/v). B. thuringiensis (MTCC 4714) caused maximum decolourisation followed by B. brevis (MTCC 4716) and Bacillus sp. (MTCC 6506). A mixed culture comprised of these three strains was capable of decolourising all four melanoidins. The medium that contained glucose as a sole carbon source showed 15% more decolourisation than that containing both carbon and nitrogen sources. Melanoidin SGA was maximally decolourised (50%) while melanoidin GAA was decolourised least ( approximately 06%) in the presence of glucose as a sole energy source. The addition of 1% glucose as a supplementary carbon source was essential for co-metabolism of melanoidin complex. The decolourisation of synthetic melanoidin by three Bacillus spp. significantly reduced the toxicity to the tubificid worm (Tubifex tubifex, Müller).

  6. Use of mixed culture bacteria for photofermentive hydrogen of dark fermentation effluent.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Ahmed; El-Bery, Haitham; Kumari, Sheena; Bux, Faizal

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen production (HP) from dark fermentation effluent of starch wastewater via vertical tubular photo-bioreactor was investigated. The reactor was inoculated with mixed culture of bacteria and operated at light intensity of 190 W/m(2). Hydraulic retention time (HRT) and organic loading rate (OLR) was varied between 0.9 to 4.0 h and 3.2 to 16 g COD/l.d., respectively. Increasing the HRT from 0.9 to 2.5 h, significantly (P<0.05) increased HP from 1±0.04 to 3.05±0.19 l/d, respectively. However, minimal increase in HP occurred when increasing the HRT up to 4.0 h. The HP remained unaffected when increasing the OLR from 3.2 to 6.4 g COD/l.d. Further increase in the OLR up to 8.2 and 16 g COD/l.d., resulted in a drop in HP i.e. 0.96 and 0.19 l/d, respectively. Microbial community analysis of the reactor samples showed the presence and dominance of hydrogen producing purple non-sulfur phototrophic (PNS) bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris in the reactor.

  7. Oxygen suppresses light-driven anodic current generation by a mixed phototrophic culture.

    PubMed

    Darus, Libertus; Ledezma, Pablo; Keller, Jürg; Freguia, Stefano

    2014-12-02

    This paper describes the detrimental effect of photosynthetically evolved oxygen on anodic current generation in the presence of riboflavin upon illumination of a mixed phototrophic culture enriched from a freshwater pond at +0.6 V vs standard hydrogen electrode. In the presence of riboflavin, the phototrophic biomass in the anodic compartment produced an electrical current in response to light/dark cycles (12 h/12 h) over 12 months of operation, generating a maximum current density of 17.5 mA x m(-2) during the dark phase, whereas a much lower current of approximately 2 mA x m(-2) was generated during illumination. We found that the low current generation under light exposure was caused by high rates of reoxidation of reduced riboflavin by oxygen produced during photosynthesis. Quantification of biomass by fluorescence in situ hybridization images suggested that green algae were predominant in both the anode-based biofilm (55.1%) and the anolyte suspension (87.9%) with the remaining biovolume accounted for by bacteria. Genus-level sequencing analysis revealed that bacteria were dominated by cyanobacterium Leptolyngbia (∼35%), while the prevailing algae were Dictyosphaerium, Coelastrum, and Auxenochlorella. This study offers a key comprehension of mediator sensitivity to reoxidation by dissolved oxygen for improvement of microbial solar cell performance.

  8. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Alcohol production through volatile fatty acids reduction with hydrogen as electron donor by mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2008-09-01

    In this research we demonstrated a new method to produce alcohols. It was experimentally feasible to produce ethanol, propanol and butanol from solely volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with hydrogen as electron donor. In batch tests, VFAs such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids were reduced by mixed microbial cultures with a headspace of 1.5 bar of hydrogen. Observed alcohol concentrations were 3.69+/-0.25 mM of ethanol, 8.08+/-0.85 mM of propanol and 3.66+/-0.05 mM of n-butanol. The conversion efficiency based on the electron balance was 55.1+/-5.6% with acetate as substrate, 50.3+/-4.7% with propionate and 46.7+/-2.2% with n-butyrate. Methane was the most predominant by-product in each batch experiment, 33.6+/-9.6% of VFA and hydrogen was converted to methane with acetate as substrate; which was 27.1+/-7.1% with propionate and 36.6+/-2.2% with n-butyrate. This VFAs reducing renewable fuel production process does not require carbohydrates like fermentable sugars, but uses biomass with high water content or low sugar content that is unsuitable as feedstock for current fermentation processes. This so-called low-grade biomass is abundantly present in many agricultural areas and is economically very attractive feedstock for the production of biofuels.

  10. Bioleaching of metal concentrates of waste printed circuit boards by mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Nengwu; Xiang, Yun; Zhang, Ting; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi; Li, Ping; Wu, Jinhua

    2011-08-30

    Metal concentrates of printed circuit boards (PCBs) are the residue valuable metals from which non-metallic components are removed. The non-metallic components show bacterial toxicity in bioleaching process and can be recycled as well. In this study, the effects of initial pH, initial Fe(II) concentration, metal concentrate dosage, particle size, and inoculation quantity on the bioleaching were investigated so as to determine the optimum conditions and evaluate the feasibility of bioleaching of metal concentrates of PCBs by mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria (MCAB). The results showed that the initial pH and Fe(II) concentration played an important role in copper extraction and precipitate formation. Under the optimized conditions of initial pH 2.00, 12g/L initial Fe(II), 12g/L metal concentrate dosage, 10% inoculation quantity, and 60-80 mesh particle size, 96.8% the copper leaching efficiency was achieved in 45h, and aluminum and zinc 88.2% and 91.6% in 98h, respectively. All findings demonstrated that metals could be efficiently leached from metal concentrates of waste PCBs by using the MCAB, and the leaching period was shorten from about 8 days to 45h.

  11. Characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesized from microbial mixed cultures and of their nanobiocomposites with bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Villano, Marianna; Oliveira, Catarina; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Majone, Mauro; Reis, Maria; Lopez-Rubio, Amparo; Lagaron, Jose M

    2014-06-25

    The present work reports on the production and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with different valerate contents, which were synthesized from microbial mixed cultures, and the subsequent development of nanocomposites incorporating bacterial cellulose nanowhiskers (BCNW) via solution casting processing. The characterization of the pure biopolyesters showed that the properties of PHAs may be strongly modified by varying the valerate ratio in the poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) copolymer, as expected. Increasing the valerate content was seen to greatly decrease the melting temperature and enthalpy of the material, as well as its rigidity and stiffness, resulting in a more ductile behaviour. Additionally, the higher valerate PHA displayed higher permeability to water and oxygen and higher moisture sensitivity. Subsequently, BCNW were incorporated into both PHA grades, achieving a high level of dispersion for a 1 wt.-% loading, whereas some agglomeration took place for 3 wt.-% BCNW. As evidenced by DSC analyses, BCNW presented a nucleating effect on the PHA matrices. BCNW also increased the thermal stability of the polymeric matrices when properly dispersed due to strong matrix-filler interactions. Barrier properties were seen to depend on relative humidity and improved at low nanofiller loadings and low relative humidity.

  12. Effects of toxicity, aeration, and reductant supply on trichloroethylene transformation by a mixed methanotrophic culture

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Cohen, L. ); McCarty, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The trichloroethylene (TCE) transformation rate and capacity of a mixed methanotrophic culture at room temperature were measured to determine the effects of time without methane (resting), use of an alternative energy source (formate), aeration, and toxicity of TCE and its transformation products. The initial specific TCE transformation rate of resting cells was 0.6 mg of TCE per mg of cells per day, and they had a finite TCE transformation capacity of 0.036 mg of TCE per mg of cells. Formate addition resulted in increased initial specific TCE transformation rates (2.1 mg/mg of cells per day) and elevated transformation capacity (0.073 mg of TCE per mg of cells). Significant declines in methane conversion rates following exposure to TCE were observed for both resting and formate-fed cells, suggesting toxic effects caused by TCE or its transformation products. TCE transformation and methane consumption rates of resting cells decreased with time much more rapidly when cells were shaken and aerated than when they remained dormant, suggesting that the transformation ability of methanotrophs is best preserved by storage under anoxic conditions.

  13. Bioelectricity production from microbial fuel cell using mixed bacterial culture isolated from distillery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Samsudeen, N; Radhakrishnan, T K; Matheswaran, Manickam

    2015-11-01

    The effect of various system parameters such as wastewater Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) concentration, pH, conductivity, membrane size and thickness on efficient energy production using mixed isolated culture from the distillery wastewater in the MFC was studied. The power density increased with increase in the anolyte pH from 6 to 8. The peak power density and COD removal efficiency was observed as 63.8±0.65 mW/m(2) and 63.5±1.5% at pH 8, respectively. The MFC performance increased with increasing COD concentration (800-3200 mg/l), conductivity (1.1-9.7 mS/cm) and membrane area (8-24 cm(2)). The MFC operating with wastewater COD concentration of 3200 mg/l and its conductivity of 9.7 mS/cm produced the highest power density of 202±6 mW/m(2) with a corresponding current density of 412±12 mA/m(2). The results showed that the efficient electricity generation and simultaneous treatment of distillery wastewater can be attained in the MFC.

  14. Mixed Wastewater Coupled with CO2 for Microalgae Culturing and Nutrient Removal

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lili; Shi, Jianye; Miao, Xiaoling

    2015-01-01

    Biomass, nutrient removal capacity, lipid productivity and morphological changes of Chlorella sorokiniana and Desmodesmus communis were investigated in mixed wastewaters with different CO2 concentrations. Under optimal condition, which was 1:3 ratio of swine wastewater to second treated municipal wastewater with 5% CO2, the maximum biomass concentrations were 1.22 g L-1 and 0.84 g L-1 for C. sorokiniana and D. communis, respectively. Almost all of the ammonia and phosphorus were removed, the removal rates of total nitrogen were 88.05% for C. sorokiniana and 83.18% for D. communis. Lipid content reached 17.04% for C. sorokiniana and 20.37% for D. communis after 10 days culture. CO2 aeration increased intracellular particle numbers of both microalgae and made D. communis tend to be solitary. The research suggested the aeration of CO2 improve the tolerance of microalgae to high concentration of NH4-N, and nutrient excess stress could induce lipid accumulation of microalgae. PMID:26418261

  15. Influence of chemical surfactants on the biodegradation of crude oil by a mixed bacterial culture.

    PubMed

    Van Hamme, J D; Ward, O P

    1999-02-01

    The effects of surfactant physicochemical properties, such as the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) and molecular structure, on the biodegradation of 2% w/v Bow River crude oil by a mixed-bacterial culture were examined. Viable counts increased 4.6-fold and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) biodegradation increased 57% in the presence of Igepal CO-630, a nonylphenol ethoxylate (HLB 13, 0.625 g/L). Only the nonylphenol ethoxylate with an HLB value of 13 substantially enhanced biodegradation. The surfactants from other chemical classes with HLB values of 13 (0.625 g/L) had no effect or were inhibitory. TPH biodegradation enhancement by Igepal CO-630 occurred at concentrations above the critical micelle concentration. When the effect of surfactant on individual oil fractions was examined, the biodegradation enhancement for the saturate and aromatic fractions was the same. In all cases, biodegradation resulted in increased resin and asphaltene concentrations. Optimal surfactant concentrations for TPH biodegradation reduced resin and asphaltene formation. Chemical surfactants have the potential to improve crude oil biodegradation in complex microbial systems, and surfactant selection should consider factors such as molecular structure, HLB, and surfactant concentration.

  16. Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from fermented cheese whey by using a mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bianca; Pepè Sciarria, Tommy; Reis, Maria; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Two fermented cheese wheys (FCW), FCW1 composed of lactic, acetic and butyric acids in the proportion of 58/16/26 (% CODOrganic Acid (OA)) and FCW2 composed of acetic, propionic, butyric, lactic and valeric acids in the proportion of 58/19/13/6/4 (% CODOA) were used to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by using a pre-selected mixed microbial culture (MMC). PHA accumulation gave for fermented FCW1 a PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.24±0.02mgCODPHAmgCODSolubleSubstrate(SS)(-1) and a total PHA production, referred to the substrate used, of 60gPHAkgcheesewheyTotalSolids(TS)(-1). For fermented FCW2 results were: PHA yield (Ytot) of 0.42±0.03mgCODPHAmgCODSS(-1) and PHA from a substrate of 70gPHAkgcheesewheyTS(-1). Qualitatively, PHAs from FCW1 was made up exclusively of 3-hydroxybutyrate (HB), while those obtained from FCW2 were composed of 40% of 3-hydroxyvalerate (HV) and 60% of HB.

  17. High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-11-01

    High-purity propionate production from glycerol in mixed culture fermentation (MCF) induced by high ammonium concentration was investigated. Fed-batch experiments revealed that higher ammonium concentration (>2.9g/L) had simultaneous negative effects on acetate and propionate degradation. Propionate production and yield was up to 22.6g/L and 0.45g COD/g COD glycerol, respectively, with a purity of 96%. Sequential batch experiments demonstrated that the yields of propionate were 0.3±0.05, 0.32±0.01, and 0.34±0.03g COD/g COD at a glycerol concentration of 2.78, 4.38, and 5.56g/L, respectively, and the purity of propionate was 91-100%. Microbial community analysis showed that the phylum Firmicutes dominated the bacterial community at different glycerol concentrations. However, the Methanosaeta population decreased from 46% to 6% when glycerol concentration increased from 2.78 to 5.56g/L, resulting in lower acetate degradation rate. Thus, the present study might provide an alternative option for the production of propionate from glycerol via MCF.

  18. Chemical characterization and anaerobic biodegradability of hydrothermal liquefaction aqueous products from mixed-culture wastewater algae.

    PubMed

    Tommaso, Giovana; Chen, Wan-Ting; Li, Peng; Schideman, Lance; Zhang, Yuanhui

    2015-02-01

    This study examined the chemical characteristics and the anaerobic degradability of the aqueous product from hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL-ap) from the conversion of mixed-culture algal biomass grown in a wastewater treatment system. The effects of the HTL reaction times from 0 to 1.5 h, and reaction temperatures from 260 °C to 320 °C on the anaerobic degradability of the HTL-ap were quantified using biomethane potential assays. Comparing chemical oxygen demand data for HTL-ap from different operating conditions, indicated that organic matter may partition from organic phase to aqueous phase at 320 °C. Moderate lag phase and the highest cumulative methane production were observed when HTL-ap was obtained at 320 °C. The longest lag phase and the smallest production rate were observed in the process fed with HTL-ap obtained at 300 °C. Nevertheless, after overcoming adaptation issues, this HTL-ap led to the second highest accumulated specific methane production. Acetogenesis was identified as a possible rate-limiting pathway.

  19. Inoculation of paperboard mill sludge versus mixed culture bacteria for hydrogen production from paperboard mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Ahmed; Tawfik, Ahmed; Danial, Amal

    2016-02-01

    A comparative evaluation of paperboard mill sludge (PMS) versus mixed culture bacteria (MCB) as inoculum for hydrogen production from paperboard mill wastewater (PMW) was investigated. The experiments were conducted at different initial cultivation pHs, inoculums to substrate ratios (ISRs gVS/gCOD), and hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The peak hydrogen yield (HY) of 5.29 ± 0.16 and 1.22 ± 0.11 mmol/gCODinitial was occurred at pH = 5 for MCB and PMS, respectively. At pH of 5, the HY and COD removal achieved the highest values of 2.26 ± 0.14 mmol/gCODinitial and 86 ± 1.6% at ISR = 6 for MCB, and 2.38 ± 0.25 mmol/gCODinitial and 60.4 ± 2.5% at ISRs = 3 for PMS. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 93.75 ± 8.9 mmol/day at HRT = 9.6 h from continuous upflow anaerobic reactor inoculated with MCB. Meanwhile, the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragments indicated a dominance of a novel hydrogen-producing bacterium of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia for PMS microbial community. On the other hand, Escherichia fergusonii and Enterobacter hormaechei were the predominant species for MCB.

  20. Influence of ammonium on the accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in aerobic open mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katja; Kleerebezem, Robbert; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-05-17

    Mixed microbial cultures enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) can accumulate large amounts of the bioplastic PHB under conditions of ammonium starvation. If waste streams are to be used as a substrate, nutrient starvation may not always be achievable. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ammonium on PHB production in the PHB production stage of the process. The biomass was enriched in an acetate-fed (carbon limited) feast-famine SBR operated at 30 degrees C, 1-d sludge residence time and with a cycle length of 12h. The biomass was used in three fed-batch experiments with medium C/N ratios of infinity (ammonium starvation), 40 Cmol Nmol(-1) (ammonium limitation) and 8 Cmol Nmol(-1) (ammonium excess) and acetate as the carbon source. Under conditions of ammonium starvation the biomass reached a maximum PHB content of 89 wt% after 7.6h, under ammonium limitation 77 wt% after 9.3h and under ammonium excess 69 wt% after 4.4h. PHB contents decreased after these maxima were reached. PHB production slowed down more with time with larger ammonium availability. Growth led to a dilution of the PHB pool after the maximum PHB content was reached. Nutrient starvation seems thus to be the best strategy for maximal PHB production.

  1. Stoichiometric control of live cell mixing to enable fluidically-encoded co-culture models in perfused microbioreactor arrays.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, P; Glass, N; Otte, E; Rasponi, M; Cooper-White, J J

    2016-02-01

    In vivo, tissues are maintained and repaired through interactions between the present (different) cell types, which communicate with each other through both the secretion of paracrine factors and direct cell-cell contacts. In order to investigate and better understand this dynamic, complex interplay among diverse cell populations, we must develop new in vitro co-culture strategies that enable us to recapitulate such native tissue complexity. In this work, a microfluidic mixer based on a staggered herringbone design was computationally designed and experimentally validated that features the ability to mix large, non-diffusive particles (i.e. live cells) in a programmed manner. This is the first time that the herringbone mixer concept has been shown to effectively mix particles of the size range applicable to live cells. The cell mixer allowed for sequentially mixing of two cell types to generate reverse linear concentration co-culture patterns. Once validated, the mixer was integrated into a perfused microbioreactor array as an upstream module to deliver mixed cells to five downstream culture units, each consisting of ten serially-connected circular microculture chambers. This novel cell mixer microbioreactor array (CM-MBA) platform was validated through the establishment of spatio-temporally tunable osteogenic co-culture models, investigating the role of pre-osteoblastic cells (SAOS2) on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) commitment to an osteogenic endpoint. An increase on expression of alkaline phosphatase in sequential (downstream) chambers, consistent with the initial linear distribution of SAOS2, suggests not only osteoblastic cell-driven hMSCs induction towards the osteogenic phenotype, but also the importance of paracrine signaling. In conclusion, the cell mixer microbioreactor array combines the ability to rapidly establish cell co-culture models in a high-throughput, programmable fashion, with the additional advantage of maintaining cells in culture

  2. Oxygen Limited Bioreactors System For Nitrogen Removal Using Immobilized Mix Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, B. K.; Sumino, T.; Saiki, Y.; Kazama, F.

    2005-12-01

    Recently nutrients concentrations especially nitrogen in natural water is alarming in the world wide. Most of the effort is being done on the removal of high concentration of nitrogen especially from the wastewater treatment plants. The removal efficiency is targeted in all considering the effluent discharge standard set by the national environment agency. In many cases, it does not meet the required standard and receiving water is being polluted. Eutrophication in natural water bodies has been reported even if the nitrogen concentration is low and self purification of natural systems itself is not sufficient to remove the nitrogen due to complex phenomenon. In order to recover the pristine water environment, it is very essential to explore bioreactor systems for natural water systems using immobilized mix culture. Microorganism were entrapped in Polyethylene glycol (PEG) prepolymer gel and cut into 3mm cubic immobilized pellets. Four laboratory scale micro bio-reactors having 0.1 L volumes were packed with immobilized pellets with 50% compact ratio. RUN1, RUN2, RUN3 and RUN4 were packed with immobilized pellets from reservoirs sediments, activated sludge (AS), mixed of AS, AG and biodegradable plastic and anaerobic granules (AG) respectively. Water from Shiokawa Reservoirs was feed to all reactors with supplemental ammonia and nitrite nitrogen as specified in the results and discussions. The reactors were operated dark incubated room in continuous flow mode with hydraulic retention time of 12 hours under oxygen limiting condition. Ammonium, nitrate nitrite nitrogen and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations were measured as described in APWA and AWWA (1998). Laboratory scale four bioreactors containing different combination of immobilized cell were monitored for 218 days. Influent NH4+-N and NO2--N concentration were 2.27±0.43 and 2.05±0.41 mg/l respectively. Average dissolved oxygen concentration and pH in the reactors were 0.40-2.5 mg/l and pH 6

  3. An Adjustable Gas-Mixing Device to Increase Feasibility of In Vitro Culture of Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, Sarah K.; Ahouidi, Ambroise D.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge to conducting high-impact and reproducible studies of the mechanisms of P. falciparum drug resistance, invasion, virulence, and immunity is the lack of robust and sustainable in vitro culture in the field. While the technology exists and is routinely utilized in developed countries, various factors–from cost, to supply, to quality–make it hard to implement in malaria endemic countries. Here, we design and rigorously evaluate an adjustable gas-mixing device for the in vitro culture of P. falciparum parasites in the field to circumvent this challenge. The device accurately replicates the gas concentrations needed to culture laboratory isolates, short-term adapted field isolates, cryopreserved previously non-adapted isolates, as well as to adapt ex vivo isolates to in vitro culture in the field. We also show an advantage over existing alternatives both in cost and in supply. Furthermore, the adjustable nature of the device makes it an ideal tool for many applications in which varied gas concentrations could be critical to culture success. This adjustable gas-mixing device will dramatically improve the feasibility of in vitro culture of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in malaria endemic countries given its numerous advantages. PMID:24603696

  4. An adjustable gas-mixing device to increase feasibility of in vitro culture of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the field.

    PubMed

    Bei, Amy K; Patel, Saurabh D; Volkman, Sarah K; Ahouidi, Ambroise D; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-01-01

    A challenge to conducting high-impact and reproducible studies of the mechanisms of P. falciparum drug resistance, invasion, virulence, and immunity is the lack of robust and sustainable in vitro culture in the field. While the technology exists and is routinely utilized in developed countries, various factors-from cost, to supply, to quality-make it hard to implement in malaria endemic countries. Here, we design and rigorously evaluate an adjustable gas-mixing device for the in vitro culture of P. falciparum parasites in the field to circumvent this challenge. The device accurately replicates the gas concentrations needed to culture laboratory isolates, short-term adapted field isolates, cryopreserved previously non-adapted isolates, as well as to adapt ex vivo isolates to in vitro culture in the field. We also show an advantage over existing alternatives both in cost and in supply. Furthermore, the adjustable nature of the device makes it an ideal tool for many applications in which varied gas concentrations could be critical to culture success. This adjustable gas-mixing device will dramatically improve the feasibility of in vitro culture of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in malaria endemic countries given its numerous advantages.

  5. Changing Perspectives: Validation Framework Review of Examples of Mixed Methods Research into Culturally Relevant Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Patrick Dean

    2016-01-01

    Mixed methods research becomes more utilized in education research every year. As this pluralist paradigm begins to take hold, it becomes more and more necessary to take a critical eye to studies making use of different mixed methods approaches. An area of education research that has yet struggled to find a foothold with mixed methodology is…

  6. Inoculation with a mixed degrading culture improves the pesticide removal of an on-farm biopurification system.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Pieter; De Gelder, Leen; Boon, Nico

    2013-10-01

    To investigate whether the pesticide removal in on-farm biopurification systems (BPS) filled with two different types of substrata (biomix and plastic carriers) is affected by inoculation with a pesticide-degrading strain or mixed culture, lab-scale BPS used to treat chloropropham point source contaminations were bioaugmented with either a specialized chloropropham-degrading strain or a chloropropham-degrading enrichment culture. Application of both inoculum types leads to an accelerated degradation activity in the columns filled with plastic carriers. For both substratum types, inoculation with the mixed culture resulted in a lower breakthrough of the toxic intermediate 3-chloroaniline at high hydraulic loads, compared to inoculation with the pure isolate and no inoculation. This study suggests that the use of plastic carrier materials could be a proficient alternative to the use of a conventional biomix as a substratum in on-farm BPS and that inoculation with a mixed degrading culture can reduce the leaching of more mobile toxic intermediates.

  7. Effect of tetrandrine on calcium-dependent tumour necrosis factor-alpha production in glia-neurone mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Yang, Li; Yan, Hong-Li; Wang, Meng; Xiao, Ji-Gao

    2005-10-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha is believed to have a deleterious role in the pathophysiology of brain injury. Tetrandrine has protective effect on neuronal cells, however, the mechanisms involved in its action have not been clearly established. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of tetrandrine on calcium-dependent tumour necrosis factor-alpha production in glia-neurone mixed cultures. Glia-neurone mixed cultures were treated by addition of Ca2+ regulating agents for a period of 6 hr. Tetrandrine or/and TMB-8 were added 30 min. before the stimulation. The supernatant tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Exposure of lipopolysaccharide 10 and 100 ng/ml caused significant increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha production respectively, with no alteration in cultures treated with 1 ng/ml lipopolysaccharide. Glia-neurone mixed cultures exhibited a marked elevation in tumour necrosis factor-alpha production after exposure to CaCl2, KCl, thapsigargin, BHQ and norepinephrine in the presence of lipopolysaccharide at 1 ng/ml respectively. Tetrandrine 0.3, 1, and 3 microM concentration-dependently reduced tumour necrosis factor-alpha production evoked by CaCl2 or KCl. Tetrandrine preincubation had no significant effect on the response to Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin or BHQ. Norepinephrine-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha production was significantly reduced by tetrandrine and almost abolished by combination of tetrandrine and intracellular Ca2+ release inhibitor TMB-8. These results suggested that tetrandrine at a concentration of 0.3, 1, or 3 microM inhibited tumour necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Ca2+ entry in glia-neurone mixed cultures.

  8. Multi-enzyme production by pure and mixed cultures of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Maturano, Y Paola; Rodríguez Assaf, Leticia A; Toro, M Eugenia; Nally, M Cristina; Vallejo, Martha; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía I; Combina, Mariana; Vazquez, Fabio

    2012-04-02

    Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts release enzymes that are able to transform neutral compounds of grape berries into active aromatic compounds, a process that enhances the sensory attributes of wines. So far, there exists only little information about enzymatic activity in mixed cultures of Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces during grape must fermentations. The aim of the present work was to determine the ability of yeasts to produce extracellular enzymes of enological relevance (β-glucosidases, pectinases, proteases, amylases or xylanases) in pure and mixed Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces cultures during fermentation. Pure and mixed cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BSc562, Hanseniaspora vinae BHv438 and Torulaspora delbrueckii BTd259 were assayed: 1% S. cerevisiae/99% H. vinae, 10% S. cerevisiae/90% H. vinae, 1% S. cerevisiae/99% T. delbrueckii and 10% S. cerevisiae/90% T. delbrueckii. Microvinifications were carried out with fresh must without pressing from Vitis vinifera L. c.v. Pedro Jiménez, an autochthonous variety from Argentina. Non-Saccharomyces species survived during 15-18days (BTd259) or until the end of the fermentation (BHv438) and influenced enzymatic profiles of mixed cultures. The results suggest that high concentrations of sugars did not affect enzymatic activity. β-Glucosidase and pectinase activities seemed to be adversely affected by an increase in ethanol: activity diminished with increasing fermentation time. Throughout the fermentation, Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces isolates assayed produced a broad range of enzymes of enological interest that catalyze hydrolysis of polymers present in grape juice. Vinifications carried out by a pure or mixed culture of BTd259 (99% of T. delbrueckii) showed the highest production of all enzymes assayed except for β-glucosidase. In mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae outgrew H. vinae, and T. delbrueckii was only detected until halfway the fermentation process. Nevertheless, their secreted

  9. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation by cultures enriched from oil sands tailings ponds involves multiple species capable of fumarate addition.

    PubMed

    Tan, BoonFei; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    A methanogenic short-chain alkane-degrading culture (SCADC) was enriched from oil sands tailings and transferred several times with a mixture of C6, C7, C8 and C10 n-alkanes as the predominant organic carbon source, plus 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane as minor components. Cultures produced ∼40% of the maximum theoretical methane during 18 months incubation while depleting the n-alkanes, 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane. Substrate depletion correlated with detection of metabolites characteristic of fumarate activation of 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane, but not n-alkane metabolites. During active methanogenesis with the mixed alkanes, reverse-transcription PCR confirmed the expression of functional genes (assA and bssA) associated with hydrocarbon addition to fumarate. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified during active alkane degradation revealed enrichment of Clostridia (particularly Peptococcaceae) and methanogenic Archaea (Methanosaetaceae and Methanomicrobiaceae). Methanogenic cultures transferred into medium containing sulphate produced sulphide, depleted n-alkanes and produced the corresponding succinylated alkane metabolites, but were slow to degrade 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane; these cultures were enriched in Deltaproteobacteria rather than Clostridia. 3-Methylpentane was not degraded by any cultures. Thus, nominally methanogenic oil sands tailings harbour dynamic and versatile hydrocarbon-degrading fermentative syntrophs and sulphate reducers capable of degrading n-, iso- and cyclo-alkanes by addition to fumarate.

  10. Reducing the blame culture through clinical audit in nuclear medicine: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P; Hubert, J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify the barriers and facilitators of doctors’ engagement with clinical audit and to explore how and why these factors influenced doctors’ decisions to engage with the NHS National Clinical Audit Programme. Design A single-embedded case study. Mixed methods sequential approach with explorative pilot study and follow-up survey. Pilot study comprised 13 semi-structured interviews with purposefully selected consultant doctors over a six-month period. Interview data coded and analysed using directed thematic content analysis with themes compared against the study’s propositions. Themes derived from the pilot study informed the online survey question items. Exploratory factor analysis using STATA and descriptive statistical methods applied to summarise findings. Data triangulation techniques used to corroborate and validate findings across the different methodological techniques. Setting NHS National PET-CT Clinical Audit Programme. Participants Doctors reporting on the Audit Programme. Main Outcome measures Extent of engagement with clinical audit, factors that influence engagement with clinical audit. Results Online survey: 58/59 doctors responded (98.3%). Audit was found to be initially threatening (79%); audit was reassuring (85%); audit helped validate professional competence (93%); participation in audit improved reporting skills (76%). Three key factors accounted for 97.6% of the variance in survey responses: (1) perception of audit’s usefulness, (2) a common purpose, (3) a supportive blame free culture of trust. Factor 1 influenced medical engagement most. Conclusions The study documents performance feedback as a key facilitator of medical engagement with clinical audit. It found that medical engagement with clinical audit was associated with reduced levels of professional anxiety and higher levels of perceived self-efficacy. PMID:28210493

  11. Critical assessment of extracellular polymeric substances extraction methods from mixed culture biomass.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Domingo-Félez, Carlos; Mutlu, A Gizem; Smets, Barth F

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have a presumed determinant role in the structure, architecture, strength, filterability, and settling behaviour of microbial solids in biological wastewater treatment processes. Consequently, numerous EPS extraction protocols have recently been published that aim to optimize the trade off between high EPS recovery and low cell lysis. Despite extensive efforts, the obtained results are often contradictory, even when analysing similar biomass samples and using similar experimental conditions, which greatly complicates the selection of an extraction protocol. This study presents a rigorous and critical assessment of existing physical and chemical EPS extraction methods applied to mixed-culture biomass samples (nitrifying, nitritation-anammox, and activated sludge biomass). A novel fluorescence-based method was developed and calibrated to quantify the lysis potential of different EPS extraction protocols. We concluded that commonly used methods to assess cell lysis (DNA concentrations or G6PDH activities in EPS extracts) do not correlate with cell viability. Furthermore, we discovered that the presence of certain chemicals in EPS extracts results in severe underestimation of protein and carbohydrate concentrations by using standard analytical methods. Keeping both maximum EPS extraction yields and minimal biomass lysis as criteria, it was identified a sonication-based extraction method as the best to determine and compare tightly-bound EPS fractions in different biomass samples. Protein was consistently the main EPS component in all analysed samples. However, EPS from nitrifying enrichments was richer in DNA, the activated sludge EPS had a higher content in humic acids and carbohydrates, and the nitritation-anammox EPS, while similar in composition to the nitrifier EPS, had a lower fraction of hydrophobic biopolymers. In general, the easily-extractable EPS fraction was more abundant in carbohydrates and humic substances, while

  12. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  13. Predator-specific enrichment of actinobacteria from a cosmopolitan freshwater clade in mixed continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Pernthaler, J; Posch, T; Simek, K; Vrba, J; Pernthaler, A; Glöckner, F O; Nübel, U; Psenner, R; Amann, R

    2001-05-01

    We investigated whether individual populations of freshwater bacteria in mixed experimental communities may exhibit specific responses to the presence of different bacterivorous protists. In two successive experiments, a two-stage continuous cultivation system was inoculated with nonaxenic batch cultures of the cryptophyte Cryptomonas sp. Algal exudates provided the sole source of organic carbon for growth of the accompanying microflora. The dynamics of several 16S rRNA-defined bacterial populations were followed in the experimental communities. Although the composition and stability of the two microbial communities differed, numerous members of the first assemblage could again be detected during the second experiment. The introduction of a size-selectively feeding mixotrophic nanoflagellate (Ochromonas sp.) always resulted in an immediate bloom of a single phylotype population of members of the class Actinobacteria (Ac1). These bacteria were phylogenetically affiliated with an uncultured lineage of gram-positive bacteria that have been found in freshwater habitats only. The Ac1 cells were close to the average size of freshwater bacterioplankton and significantly smaller than any of the other experimental community members. In contrast, no increase of the Ac1 population was observed in vessels exposed to the bacterivorous ciliate Cyclidium glaucoma. However, when the Ochromonas sp. was added after the establishment of C. glaucoma, the proportion of population Ac1 within the microbial community rapidly increased. Populations of a beta proteobacterial phylotype related to an Aquabacterium sp. decreased relative to the total bacterial communities following the addition of either predator, albeit to different extents. The community structure of pelagic microbial assemblages can therefore be influenced by the taxonomic composition of the predator community.

  14. Development of a systematic feedback isolation approach for targeted strains from mixed culture systems.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Pramod; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Miyamoto, Hirokuni; Miyamoto, Hisashi; Okugawa, Yuki; Sakai, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Elucidation of functions of bacteria in a mixed culture system (MCS) such as composting, activated sludge system is difficult, since the system is complicating with many unisolated bacteria. Here, we developed a systematic feedback isolation strategy for the isolation and rapid screening of multiple targeted strains from MCS. Six major strains (Corynebacterium sphenisci, Bacillus thermocloacae, Bacillus thermoamylovorans, Bacillus smithii, Bacillus humi, and Bacillus coagulans), which are detected by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis in our previous study on MCS for l-lactic acid production, were targeted for isolation. Based on information of suitable cultivation conditions (e.g., media, pH, temperature) from the literature, feedback isolation was performed to form 136 colonies. The following direct colony matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was optimised as the second screening to narrow down 20 candidate colonies from similar spectra patterns with six closest type strains. This step could distinguish bacteria at the species level with distance similarity scores ≥0.55 corresponding to 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity ≥98.2%, suggesting that this is an effective technique to minimize isolates close to targeted type strains. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that two targeted strains and one strain related to the target had successfully been isolated, showing high similarities (99.5-100%) with the sequences from the DGGE bands, and that the other candidates were affiliated with three strains that were closely related to the target species. This study proposes a new method for systematic feedback isolation that may be useful for isolating targeted strains from MCS for further investigation.

  15. Photometabolic production of hydrogen from organic substrates by free and immobilized mixed cultures of rhodospirillum rubrum and klebsiella pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Weetall, H.H.; Sharma, B.P.; Detar, C.C.

    1981-03-01

    A culture of R. rubrum cells apparently contaminated with K. pneumoniae were immobilized by entrapment in agar. This system was used as a model for hydrogen production by photometabolic means. Observed results indicated that the contaminant exerted a major influence on the observed results. This preparation, when immobilized and used in a specifically designed reactor with glucose substrate, showed operational half-lives of approximately 1000 hr. The feasibility of using this ''mixed'' culture for producing hydrogen from acid hydrolyzed cellulose and wood sawdust was also examined. 5 refs.

  16. Biochemical Study of Mixed Culture Prototype in a Closed Ecological System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischer, R. G.

    1960-01-01

    Since June 1, 1960, the date of initiation of this research project, efforts have been directed toward studying cultural and fermentation patterns and the methodology of pure culture isolation of prototype microorganisms to be employed in closed ecological systems.

  17. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-06-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 +/- 0.06, 1.0 +/- 0.13 and 0.4 +/- 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  18. Production of ethanol directly from potato starch by mixed culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger using electrochemical bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bo Young; Kim, Dae Hee; Na, Byung Kwan; Ahn, Dae Hee; Park, Doo Hyun

    2008-03-01

    When cultivated aerobically, Aspergillus niger hyphae produced extracellular glucoamylase, which catalyzes the saccharification of unliquified potato starch into glucose, but not when grown under anaerobic conditions. The Km and Vmax of the extracellular glucoamylase were 652.3 mg starch l-1 and 253.3 mg glucose l-1 min-1, respectively. In mixed culture of A. niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, oxygen had a negative influence on the alcohol fermentation of yeast, but activated fungal growth. Therefore, oxygen is a critical factor for ethanol production in the mixed culture, and its generation through electrolysis of water in an electrochemical bioreactor needs to be optimized for ethanol production from starch by coculture of fungal hyphae and yeast cells. By applying pulsed electric fields (PEF) into the electrochemical bioreactor, ethanol production from starch improved significantly: Ethanol produced from 50 g potato starch l-1 by a mixed culture of A. niger and S. cerevisiae was about 5 g l-1 in a conventional bioreactor, but was 9 g l-1 in 5 volts of PEF and about 19 g l-1 in 4 volts of PEF for 5 days.

  19. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-06-12

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 ± 0.06, 1.0 ± 0.13 and 0.4 ± 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  20. Development of a mixed mode adsorption process for the direct product sequestration of an extracellular protease from microbial batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, G E; Luechau, F; Burton, S C; Lyddiatt, A

    2000-04-28

    Direct product sequestration of extracellular proteins from microbial batch cultures can be achieved by continuous or intermittent broth recycle through an external extractive loop. Here, we describe the development of a fluidisable, mixed mode adsorbent, designed to tolerate increasing ionic strength (synonymous with extended productive batch cultures). This facilitated operations for the integrated recovery of an extracellular acid protease from cultures of Yarrowia lipolytica. Mixed mode adsorbents were prepared using chemistries containing hydrophobic and ionic groups. Matrix hydrophobicity and titration ranges were matched to the requirements of integrated protease adsorption. A single expanded bed was able to service the productive phase of growth without recourse to the pH adjustment of the broth previously required for ion exchange adsorption. This resulted in increased yields of product, accompanied by further increases in enzyme specific activity. A step change from pH 4.5 to 2.6, across the isoelectric point of the protease, enabled high resolution fixed bed elution induced by electrostatic repulsion. The generic application of mixed mode chemistries, which combine the physical robustness of ion-exchange ligands in sanitisation and sterilisation procedures with a selectivity, which approaches that of affinity interactions, is discussed.

  1. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 ± 0.06, 1.0 ± 0.13 and 0.4 ± 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation. PMID:24920064

  2. Finding Balance in a Mix of Culture: Appreciation of Diversity through Multicultural Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nethsinghe, Rohan

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the understandings of cultural diversity as enacted in multicultural music education and is located in Victoria, which is identified as the most culturally diverse state in Australia with a population that comes from various countries and speaks many languages. This cultural diversity is reflected in the schools. This…

  3. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides.

  4. Transcriptomic responses of mixed cultures of ascomycete fungi to lignocellulose using dual RNA-seq reveal inter-species antagonism and limited beneficial effects on CAZyme expression.

    PubMed

    Daly, Paul; van Munster, Jolanda M; Kokolski, Matthew; Sang, Fei; Blythe, Martin J; Malla, Sunir; Velasco de Castro Oliveira, Juliana; Goldman, Gustavo H; Archer, David B

    2016-05-02

    Gaining new knowledge through fungal monoculture responses to lignocellulose is a widely used approach that can lead to better cocktails for lignocellulose saccharification (the enzymatic release of sugars which are subsequently used to make biofuels). However, responses in lignocellulose mixed cultures are rarely studied in the same detail even though in nature fungi often degrade lignocellulose as mixed communities. Using a dual RNA-seq approach, we describe the first study of the transcriptional responses of wild-type strains of Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei and Penicillium chrysogenum in two and three mixed species shake-flask cultures with wheat straw. Based on quantification of species-specific rRNA, a set of conditions was identified where mixed cultures could be sampled so as to obtain sufficient RNA-seq reads for analysis from each species. The number of differentially-expressed genes varied from a couple of thousand to fewer than one hundred. The proportion of carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZy) encoding transcripts was lower in the majority of the mixed cultures compared to the respective straw monocultures. A small subset of P. chrysogenum CAZy genes showed five to ten-fold significantly increased transcript abundance in a two-species mixed culture with T. reesei. However, a substantial number of T. reesei CAZy transcripts showed reduced abundance in mixed cultures. The highly induced genes in mixed cultures indicated that fungal antagonism was a major part of the mixed cultures. In line with this, secondary metabolite producing gene clusters showed increased transcript abundance in mixed cultures and also mixed cultures with T. reesei led to a decrease in the mycelial biomass of A. niger. Significantly higher monomeric sugar release from straw was only measured using a minority of the mixed culture filtrates and there was no overall improvement. This study demonstrates fungal interaction with changes in transcripts, enzyme activities and biomass

  5. Power generation from cellulose using mixed and pure cultures of cellulose-degrading bacteria in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Sedky H A; Kim, Yong Seong; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2012-10-10

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used to generate electricity from various organic compounds such as acetate, glucose, and lactate. We demonstrate here that electricity can be produced in an MFC using cellulose as the electron donor source. Tests were conducted using two-chambered MFCs, the anode medium was inoculated with mixed or pure culture of cellulose-degrading bacteria Nocardiopsis sp. KNU (S strain) or Streptomyces enissocaesilis KNU (K strain), and the catholyte in the cathode compartment was 50mM ferricyanide as catholyte. The power density for the mixed culture was 0.188 mW (188 mW/m(2)) at a current of 0.5mA when 1g/L cellulose was used. However, the power density decreased as the cellulose concentration in the anode compartment decreased. The columbic efficiencies (CEs) ranged from 41.5 to 33.4%, corresponding to an initial cellulose concentration of 0.1-1.0 g/L. For the pure culture, cellobioase enzyme was added to increase the conversion of cellulose to simple sugars, since electricity production is very low. The power densities for S and K strain pure cultures with cellobioase were 162 mW/m(2) and 145 mW/m(2), respectively. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments showed the presence of peaks at 380, 500, and 720 mV vs. Ag/AgCl for the mixed bacterial culture, indicating its electrochemical activity without an external mediator. Furthermore, this MFC system employs a unique microbial ecology in which both the electron donor (cellulose) and the electron acceptor (carbon paper) are insoluble.

  6. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds.

  7. Biohydrogen production from arabinose and glucose using extreme thermophilic anaerobic mixed cultures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Second generation hydrogen fermentation technologies using organic agricultural and forestry wastes are emerging. The efficient microbial fermentation of hexoses and pentoses resulting from the pretreatment of lingocellulosic materials is essential for the success of these processes. Results Conversion of arabinose and glucose to hydrogen, by extreme thermophilic, anaerobic, mixed cultures was studied in continuous (70°C, pH 5.5) and batch (70°C, pH 5.5 and pH 7) assays. Two expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors, Rarab and Rgluc, were continuously fed with arabinose and glucose, respectively. No significant differences in reactor performance were observed for arabinose and glucose organic loading rates (OLR) ranging from 4.3 to 7.1 kgCOD m-3 d-1. However, for an OLR of 14.2 kgCOD m-3 d-1, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen yield were higher in Rarab than in Rgluc (average hydrogen production rate of 3.2 and 2.0 LH2 L-1 d-1 and hydrogen yield of 1.10 and 0.75 molH2 mol-1substrate for Rarab and Rgluc, respectively). Lower hydrogen production in Rgluc was associated with higher lactate production. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed no significant difference on the bacterial community composition between operational periods and between the reactors. Increased hydrogen production was observed in batch experiments when hydrogen partial pressure was kept low, both with arabinose and glucose as substrate. Sugars were completely consumed and hydrogen production stimulated (62% higher) when pH 7 was used instead of pH 5.5. Conclusions Continuous hydrogen production rate from arabinose was significantly higher than from glucose, when higher organic loading rate was used. The effect of hydrogen partial pressure on hydrogen production from glucose in batch mode was related to the extent of sugar utilization and not to the efficiency of substrate conversion to hydrogen. Furthermore, at pH 7.0, sugars uptake, hydrogen production

  8. Impact of nitrogen feeding regulation on polyhydroxyalkanoates production by mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fernando; Campanari, Sabrina; Matteo, Stefania; Valentino, Francesco; Majone, Mauro; Villano, Marianna

    2017-07-25

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) is typically used for selecting mixed microbial cultures (MMC) for polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production. Since many waste streams suitable as process feedstock for PHA production are nitrogen-deficient, a nutrient supply in the SBR is typically required to allow for efficient microbial growth. The scope of this study was to devise a nitrogen feeding strategy which allows controlling the nitrogen levels during the feast and famine regime of a lab-scale SBR, thereby selecting for PHA-storing microorganisms. At the beginning of the cycle the reactor was fed with a synthetic mixture of acetic and propionic acids at an overall organic load rate of 8.5gCODL(-1)d(-1) (i.e. 260CmmolL(-1)d(-1)), whereas nitrogen (in the form of ammonium sulphate) was added either simultaneously to the carbon feed (coupled feeding strategy) or after the end of the feast phase (uncoupled feeding strategy). As a main result, PHA production was more than doubled (up to about 1300±64mgCODL(-1)) when carbon and nitrogen were separately fed and the higher PHA production also corresponded to an 82% increase in the polymer HV content (up to 20±1%, wtwt(-1)). Three SBR runs were performed with the uncoupled carbon and nitrogen feeding at different carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios (of 14.3, 17.9, and 22.3CmolNmol(-1), respectively) which were varied by progressively reducing the concentration of the nitrogen feeding. In spite of a comparable PHA storage yield at 14.3 and 17.9CmolNmol(-1) (0.41±0.05 gCODPHA gCODVFA(-1) and 0.38±0.05 gCODPHA gCODVFA(-1), respectively), the storage response of the selected MMC significantly decreased when the C/N ratio was set at the highest investigated value. Notably, an increase in this parameter also resulted in a change in the HV content in the polymer regardless the composition of the organic acids solution.

  9. Batch growth kinetics of an indigenous mixed microbial culture utilizing m-cresol as the sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Pichiah; Pakshirajan, K; Saha, Prabirkumar

    2009-02-15

    An indigenous mixed microbial culture, isolated from a sewage treatment plant located in Guwahati was used to study biodegradation of m-cresol in batch shake flasks. m-Cresol concentration in the growth media was varied from 100mg/L to 900mg/L. The degradation kinetics was found to follow a three-half-order model at all initial m-cresol concentrations with regression values greater than 0.97. A maximum observed specific degradation rate of 0.585h(-1) was observed at 200mg/L m-cresol concentration in the medium. In the range of m-cresol concentrations used in the study, specific growth rate of the culture and specific degradation rates were observed to follow substrate inhibition kinetics. These two rates were fitted to kinetic models of Edward, Haldane, Luong, Han-Levenspiel, and Yano-Koga that are used to explain substrate inhibition on growth of microbial culture. Out of these models Luong and Han-Levenspiel models fitted the experimental data best with lowest root mean square error values. Biokinetic constants estimated from these two models showed good potential of the indigenous mixed culture in degrading m-cresol in wastewaters.

  10. Three-dimensional culture of a mixed mullerian tumor of the ovary: expression of in vivo characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Prewett, T. L.; Spaulding, G. F.; Becker, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) is a novel in vitro cell culture system used to successfully culture a cell line derived from a heterologous mixed mullerian tumor cell of the ovary. Although the original tumor was comprised of both epithelial and mesodermal components, long-term culture in conventional flasks established a cell line from this tumor with homogeneous epitheliallike growth characteristics (1). Cells from Passage 36 were seeded into a Rotating-Wall Vessel containing Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads. Scanning electron micrographs of tumor cells cultured for 32 d in the RWV showed the presence of heterogeneous cell populations organized into three-dimensional tissuelike architecture. Immunocytochemical analysis confirmed the cellular heterogeneity, as demonstrated by expression of both epithelial and mesenchymal antigens. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification demonstrated the presence of mRNA for cellular oncogenes HER-2/neu, H-ras, K-ras, and tumor suppressor p53. Thus, there are two advantages to propagation of tissue in the RWV culture system:(a) tissue diversification representing populations present in the original tumor, and (b) the three-dimensional freedom to organize tissues morphologically akin to those observed in vivo. These data indicate that the RWV culture system is suitable for generating large quantities of ovarian tumor cells in vitro that are amenable to immunocytochemical, oncogenic, morphologic characteristics demonstrated in vivo.

  11. Mixed culture models for predicting intestinal microbial interactions between Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus in the presence of probiotic Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Yang, J J; Niu, C C; Guo, X H

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus has been proposed as a probiotic due to its in vivo effectiveness in the gastrointestinal tract through antimicrobial activities. The present study investigates the effects of Lactobacillus alone or in the presence of Bacillus subtilis MA139 on the inhibition of pathogenic Escherichia coli K88. Mixed cultures were used to predict the possible interactions among these bacteria within the intestinal tract of animals. B. subtilis MA139 was first assayed for its inhibition against E. coli K88 both under shaking and static culture conditions. A co-culture assay was employed under static conditions to test the inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus reuteri on E. coli K88, with or without addition of B. subtilis MA139. The results showed that B. subtilis MA139 had marked inhibition against E. coli K88 under shaking conditions and weak inhibition under static conditions. Lactobacillus alone as well as in combination with B. subtilis MA139 spores exerted strong inhibition against E. coli K88 under static conditions. However, the inhibition by Lactobacillus in combination with B. subilis spores was much higher than that by Lactobacillus alone (P<0.01). B. subtilis MA139 significantly decreased the pH and oxidation-reduction potential values of the co-culture broth compared to that of Lactobacillus alone (P<0.05). The viability of Lactobacillus increased when co-cultured with B. subtilis MA139 because of significantly higher Lactobacillus counts and lower pH values in the broth (P<0.05). The role of Bacillus in the mixed culture models suggests that Bacillus may produce beneficial effects by increasing the viability of lactobacilli and subsequently inhibiting the growth of pathogenic E. coli. Therefore, the combination of Bacillus and Lactobacillus species as a probiotic is recommended.

  12. Genomic Characterization of Dairy Associated Leuconostoc Species and Diversity of Leuconostocs in Undefined Mixed Mesophilic Starter Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Frantzen, Cyril A.; Kot, Witold; Pedersen, Thomas B.; Ardö, Ylva M.; Broadbent, Jeff R.; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H.; Dal Bello, Fabio; Østlie, Hilde M.; Kleppen, Hans P.; Vogensen, Finn K.; Holo, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Undefined mesophilic mixed (DL-type) starter cultures are composed of predominantly Lactococcus lactis subspecies and 1–10% Leuconostoc spp. The composition of the Leuconostoc population in the starter culture ultimately affects the characteristics and the quality of the final product. The scientific basis for the taxonomy of dairy relevant leuconostocs can be traced back 50 years, and no documentation on the genomic diversity of leuconostocs in starter cultures exists. We present data on the Leuconostoc population in five DL-type starter cultures commonly used by the dairy industry. The analyses were performed using traditional cultivation methods, and further augmented by next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Bacterial counts for starter cultures cultivated on two different media, MRS and MPCA, revealed large differences in the relative abundance of leuconostocs. Most of the leuconostocs in two of the starter cultures were unable to grow on MRS, emphasizing the limitations of culture-based methods and the importance of careful media selection or use of culture independent methods. Pan-genomic analysis of 59 Leuconostoc genomes enabled differentiation into twelve robust lineages. The genomic analyses show that the dairy-associated leuconostocs are highly adapted to their environment, characterized by the acquisition of genotype traits, such as the ability to metabolize citrate. In particular, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris display telltale signs of a degenerative evolution, likely resulting from a long period of growth in milk in association with lactococci. Great differences in the metabolic potential between Leuconostoc species and subspecies were revealed. Using targeted amplicon sequencing, the composition of the Leuconostoc population in the five commercial starter cultures was shown to be significantly different. Three of the cultures were dominated by Ln. mesenteroides subspecies cremoris. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides dominated in two of

  13. Genomic Characterization of Dairy Associated Leuconostoc Species and Diversity of Leuconostocs in Undefined Mixed Mesophilic Starter Cultures.

    PubMed

    Frantzen, Cyril A; Kot, Witold; Pedersen, Thomas B; Ardö, Ylva M; Broadbent, Jeff R; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H; Dal Bello, Fabio; Østlie, Hilde M; Kleppen, Hans P; Vogensen, Finn K; Holo, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Undefined mesophilic mixed (DL-type) starter cultures are composed of predominantly Lactococcus lactis subspecies and 1-10% Leuconostoc spp. The composition of the Leuconostoc population in the starter culture ultimately affects the characteristics and the quality of the final product. The scientific basis for the taxonomy of dairy relevant leuconostocs can be traced back 50 years, and no documentation on the genomic diversity of leuconostocs in starter cultures exists. We present data on the Leuconostoc population in five DL-type starter cultures commonly used by the dairy industry. The analyses were performed using traditional cultivation methods, and further augmented by next-generation DNA sequencing methods. Bacterial counts for starter cultures cultivated on two different media, MRS and MPCA, revealed large differences in the relative abundance of leuconostocs. Most of the leuconostocs in two of the starter cultures were unable to grow on MRS, emphasizing the limitations of culture-based methods and the importance of careful media selection or use of culture independent methods. Pan-genomic analysis of 59 Leuconostoc genomes enabled differentiation into twelve robust lineages. The genomic analyses show that the dairy-associated leuconostocs are highly adapted to their environment, characterized by the acquisition of genotype traits, such as the ability to metabolize citrate. In particular, Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris display telltale signs of a degenerative evolution, likely resulting from a long period of growth in milk in association with lactococci. Great differences in the metabolic potential between Leuconostoc species and subspecies were revealed. Using targeted amplicon sequencing, the composition of the Leuconostoc population in the five commercial starter cultures was shown to be significantly different. Three of the cultures were dominated by Ln. mesenteroides subspecies cremoris. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides dominated in two of the

  14. Sensitivity of Scenedesmus obliquus and Microcystis aeruginosa to atrazine: effects of acclimation and mixed cultures, and their removal ability.

    PubMed

    Chalifour, Annie; LeBlanc, André; Sleno, Lekha; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Atrazine is an herbicide frequently detected in watercourses that can affect the phytoplankton community, thus impacting the whole food chain. This study aims, firstly, to measure the sensitivity of monocultures of the green alga Scenedemus obliquus and toxic and non-toxic strains of the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa before, during and after a 30-day acclimation period to 0.1 µM of atrazine. Secondly, the sensitivity of S. obliquus and M. aeruginosa to atrazine in mixed cultures was evaluated. Finally, the ability of these strains to remove atrazine from the media was measured. We demonstrated that both strains of M. aeruginosa had higher growth rate-based EC50 values than S. obliquus when exposed to atrazine, even though their photosynthesis-based EC50 values were lower. After being exposed to 0.1 µM of atrazine for 1 month, only the photosynthesis-based EC50 of S. obliquus increased significantly. In mixed cultures, the growth rate of the non-toxic strain of M. aeruginosa was higher than S. obliquus at high concentrations of atrazine, resulting in a ratio of M. aeruginosa to total cell count of 0.6. This lower sensitivity might be related to the higher growth rate of cyanobacteria at low light intensity. Finally, a negligible fraction of atrazine was removed from the culture media by S. obliquus or M. aeruginosa over 6 days. These results bring new insights on the acclimation of some phytoplankton species to atrazine and its effect on the competition between S. obliquus and M. aeruginosa in mixed cultures.

  15. Photosynthetic mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from individual and mixed volatile fatty acids (VFAs): substrate preferences and co-substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Fradinho, J C; Oehmen, A; Reis, M A M

    2014-09-20

    This work studied the effect of the substrate feeding composition on the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation capacity of an acetate enriched photosynthetic mixed culture (PMC). From the six tested organic acids - malate, citrate, lactate, acetate, propionate and butyrate - only the three volatile fatty acids (VFAs) enabled PHA production, with acetate and butyrate leading to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation and propionate leading to a HB:HV copolymer with a 51% fraction of hydroxyvalerate (HV). Also, results showed an acceleration of butyrate and propionate consumption when fed in the presence of acetate, suggesting that the latter can act as a co-substrate for butyrate and propionate uptake. Furthermore, results suggest that some PMC bacterial groups present a substrate preference for butyrate in relation to acetate and propionate. These findings indicate the possibility of feeding the PMC with cheap VFA rich fermented wastes, leading to a more cost-effective and environmentally sustainable PHA production system.

  16. Relative contributions of mercury bioavailability and microbial growth rate on net methylmercury production by anaerobic mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Deshusses, Marc A; Porter, Kaitlyn A; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-09-01

    Monomethylmercury (MeHg) is produced in many aquatic environments by anaerobic microorganisms that take up and methylate inorganic forms of Hg(II). Net methylation of Hg(II) appears to be correlated with factors that affect the activity of the anaerobic microbial community and factors that increase the bioavailability of Hg(II) to these organisms. However, the relative importance of one versus the other is difficult to elucidate even though this information can greatly assist remediation efforts and risk assessments. Here, we investigated the effects of Hg speciation (dissolved Hg and nanoparticulate HgS) and microbial activity on the net production of MeHg using two mixed microbial cultures that were enriched from marine sediments under sulfate reducing conditions. The cultures were amended with dissolved Hg (added as a dissolved nitrate salt) and nanoparticulate HgS, and grown under different carbon substrate concentrations. The results indicated that net mercury methylation was the highest for cultures incubated in the greatest carbon substrate concentration (60 mM) compared to incubations with less carbon (0.6 and 6 mM), regardless of the form of mercury amended. Net MeHg production in cultures exposed to HgS nanoparticles was significantly slower than in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg; however, the difference diminished with slower growing cultures with low carbon addition (0.6 mM). The net Hg methylation rate was found to correlate with sulfate reduction rate in cultures exposed to dissolved Hg, while methylation rate was roughly constant for cultures exposed to nanoparticulate HgS. These results indicated a potential threshold of microbial productivity: below this point net MeHg production was limited by microbial activity, regardless of Hg bioavailability. Above this threshold of productivity, Hg speciation became a contributing factor towards net MeHg production.

  17. A Mixed Methods Study of Culturally Proficient Practices in an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simone, Pamela S.

    2012-01-01

    The problem addressed in this study was that leaders at an urban elementary school had not examined the implementation of culturally proficient practices, nor the challenges, barriers, or support needed for implementation. The purpose of the study was to inform instructional and leadership practices involving culturally proficient instruction.…

  18. Bioethanol production from mixed sugars by Scheffersomyces stipitis free and immobilized cells, and co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Isabella; De Canio, Paola; Cuna, Daniela; Liuzzi, Federico; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2013-09-25

    Bioethanol can be produced from several biomasses including lignocellulosic materials. Besides 6-carbon sugars that represent the prevalent carbohydrates, some of these feedstocks contain significant amounts of 5-carbon sugars. One common limit of the major part of the xylose-fermenting yeasts is the diauxic shift between the uptake of glucose and xylose during the fermentation of mixed syrups. Thus, optimized fermentation strategies are required. In this paper the ability of Scheffersomyces stipitis strain NRRLY-11544 to ferment mixed syrups with a total sugar concentration in the range 40-80 g/L was investigated by using mono cultures, co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Bakers Yeast Type II and single cultures immobilized in silica-hydrogel films. The experimental design for the fermentations with immobilized cells included the process analysis in function of two parameters: the fraction of the gel in the broth and the concentration of the cells loaded in the gel. Furthermore, for each total sugars level, the fermentative course of S. stipitis was analyzed at several glucose-to xylose ratios. The results indicated that the use of S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae in free co-cultures ensured faster processes than single cultures of S. stipitis either free or immobilized. However, the rapid production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae inhibited S. stipitis and caused a stuck of the process. Immobilization of S. stipitis in silica-hydrogel increased the relative consumption rate of xylose-to-glucose by 2-6 times depending on the composition of the fermentation medium. Furthermore the films performances appeared stable over three weeks of continuous operations. However, on the whole, the final process yields obtained with the immobilized cells were not meaningfully different from that of the free cells. This was probably due to concurrent fermentations operated by the cells released in the broth. Optimization of the carrier characteristics could improve the

  19. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-01-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains. PMID:9212417

  20. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-07-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains.

  1. Prolonged exposure of mixed aerobic cultures to low temperature and benzalkonium chloride affect the rate and extent of nitrification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeongwoo; Tezel, Ulas; Li, Kexun; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2015-03-01

    The combined effect of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and prolonged exposure to low temperature on nitrification was investigated. Ammonia oxidation at 22-24°C by an enriched nitrifying culture was inhibited at increasing BAC concentrations and ceased at 15 mg BAC/L. The non-competitive inhibition coefficient was 1.5±0.9 mg BAC/L. Nitrification tests were conducted without and with BAC at 5mg/L using an aerobic, mixed heterotrophic/nitrifying culture maintained at a temperature range of 24-10°C. Maintaining this culture at 10°C for over one month in the absence of BAC, resulted in slower nitrification kinetics compared to those measured when the culture was first exposed to 10°C. BAC was degraded by the heterotrophic population, but its degradation rate decreased significantly as the culture temperature decreased to 10°C. These results confirm the negative impact of quaternary ammonium compounds on the nitrification process, which is further exacerbated by prolonged, low temperature conditions.

  2. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto, Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-01

    Enriched-immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  3. Incorporating Cultural Perspectives into Diabetes Self-Management Programs for East Asian Immigrants: A Mixed-Study Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Chorong; Nam, Soohyun; Whittemore, Robin

    2016-04-01

    It is important to understand East Asian immigrants (EAIs)' unique perspectives in managing diabetes in order to provide culturally-competent care. However, it is not known whether EAIs' perspectives are addressed in diabetes self-management interventions developed for EAIs. Therefore, a mixed-study review was conducted to identify EAIs' perspective from qualitative research (n = 9 studies) and to evaluate the components of EAI diabetes self-management interventions (n = 7). Themes from the qualitative synthesis demonstrated that EAIs have unique cultural values and traditional health beliefs while struggling with multi-contextual barriers due to immigration. The evaluation of EAI diabetes self-management interventions revealed that there was a lack of consensus on cultural strategies for EAIs' across the interventions. Addressing language barriers was the only factor consistently integrated in the cultural components of intervention by employing bilingual interventionists. EAIs' perspectives and experiences need to be incorporated in the future diabetes self-management interventions to better provide culturally-competent care.

  4. Biohydrogen production from rotten orange with immobilized mixed culture: Effect of immobilization media for various composition of substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Damayanti, Astrilia; Sarto,; Syamsiah, Siti; Sediawan, Wahyudi B.

    2015-12-29

    Enriched–immobilized mixed culture was utilized to produce biohydrogen in mesophilic condition under anaerobic condition using rotten orange as substrate. The process was conducted in batch reactors for 100 hours. Microbial cultures from three different sources were subject to a series of enrichment and immobilized in two different types of media, i.e. calcium alginate (CA, 2%) and mixture of alginate and activated carbon (CAC, 1:1). The performance of immobilized culture in each media was tested for biohydrogen production using four different substrate compositions, namely orange meat (OM), orange meat added with peel (OMP), orange meat added with limonene (OML), and mixture of orange meat and peel added with limonene (OMPL). The results show that, with immobilized culture in CA, the variation of substrate composition gave significant effect on the production of biohydrogen. The highest production of biohydrogen was detected for substrate containing only orange meet, i.e. 2.5%, which was about 3-5 times higher than biohydrogen production from other compositions of substrate. The use of immobilized culture in CAC in general has increased the hydrogen production by 2-7 times depending on the composition of substrate, i.e. 5.4%, 4.8%, 5.1%, and 4.4% for OM, OMP, OML, and OMPL, respectively. The addition of activated carbon has eliminated the effect of inhibitory compounds in the substrate. The major soluble metabolites were acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid.

  5. Characterization of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, K.J.; Bielaga, B.A.; Jackowski, K.; Oduson, O.; Kilbane, J. II

    1992-12-31

    Growth assays reveal that Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can utilize a wide range of organosulfur compounds as the sole source of sulfur. Compounds that are utilized include thiophenes, sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, sulfoxides, and sulfones. None of the organosulfur compounds tested can serve as a carbon source. A convenient spectrophotometric assay (Gibbs assay) based on the chromogenic reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide with aromatic hydroxyl groups was developed and used in conjunction with GC/MS analysis to examine the kinetics of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cell cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. The desulfurization trait is expressed at uniform levels during the mid-exponential phase, reaches a maximum during idiophase, and then declines in stationary-phase cells. Desulfurization rates for dibenzothiophene (DBT) range from 8 to 15 {mu}M of DBT/10{sup 12} cells/hour. Mixtures of genetically marked Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 and an organisms incapable of cleaning carbon-sulfur bonds in relevant test compounds, Enterobacter cloacae, were prepared in ratios that varied over six orders of magnitude. Growth studies revealed that Enterobacter cloacae was able to gain access to sulfur liberated from organosulfur compounds by IGTS8; however, cell-to-cell contact was required. These data also indicate that the desulfurization activity of IGTS8 cells in mixed cultures may be as much as 200-fold higher than in axenic cultures.

  6. Effect of low pH start-up on continuous mixed-culture lactic acid fermentation of dairy effluent.

    PubMed

    Choi, Gyucheol; Kim, Jaai; Lee, Changsoo

    2016-12-01

    Mixed-culture fermentation that does not require an energy-intensive sterilization process is a viable approach for the economically feasible production of lactic acid (LA) due to the potential use of organic waste as feedstock. This study investigated mixed-culture LA fermentation of whey, a high-strength organic wastewater, in continuous mode. Variations in the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 120 to 8 h under different pH regimes in two thermophilic reactors (55 °C) were compared for their fermentation performance. One reactor was maintained at a low pH (pH 3.0) during operation at HRTs of 120 to 24 h and then adjusted to pH 5.5 in the later phases of fermentation at HRTs of 24 to 8 h (R1), while the second reactor was maintained at pH 5.5 throughout the experiment (R2). Although the LA production in R1 was negligible at low pH, it increased dramatically after the pH was raised to 5.5 and exceeded that in R2 when stabilized at HRTs of 8 and 12 h. The maximum yield (0.62 g LA/g substrate fed as the chemical oxygen demand (COD) equivalent), the production rate (11.5 g/L day), and the selectivity (95 %) of LA were all determined at a 12-h HRT in R1. Additionally, molecular and statistical analyses revealed that changes in the HRT and the pH significantly affected the bacterial community structure and thus the fermentation characteristics of the experimental reactors. Bacillus coagulans was likely the predominant LA producer in both reactors. The overall results suggest that low pH start-up has a positive effect on yield and selectivity in mixed-culture LA fermentation.

  7. Cultural Socialization in Families with Adopted Korean Adolescents: A Mixed-Method, Multi-Informant Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Myo; Reichwald, Reed; Lee, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Transracial, transnational families understand and transmit cultural socialization messages in ways that differ from same-race families. This study explored the ways in which transracial, transnational adoptive families discuss race and ethnicity and how these family discussions compared to self-reports from adoptive parents and adolescents regarding the level of parental engagement in cultural socialization. Of the thirty families with at least one adolescent-aged child (60% female, average age 17.8 years) who was adopted from South Korea, nine families acknowledged racial and ethnic differences, six families rejected racial and ethnic differences, and fifteen families held a discrepancy of views. Parents also reported significantly greater engagement in cultural socialization than adolescents’ reports of parental engagement. However, only adolescent self-reports of parental engagement in cultural socialization matched the qualitative coding of family conversations. PMID:24235782

  8. Growth assays with mixed cultures of cyanobacteria and algae assessed by in vivo fluorescence: One step closer to real ecosystems?

    PubMed

    Gregor, Jakub; Jancula, Daniel; Marsálek, Blahoslav

    2008-02-01

    A growth toxicity assay with mixed cultures of cyanobacteria and algae using in vivo fluorescence is presented. Test organisms (the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the cyanobacterium Aphanothece clathrata) growing alone and in a mixture were exposed to selected chemicals. P. subcapitata featured a higher sensitivity to toxicants in the presence of A. clathrata compared to the single species assay. On the other hand, growth of a cyanobacterium was not affected by the presence or absence of the green alga. The proposed method seems to be suitable for pre-screening studies of toxicants (algistatic agents, herbicides) applied into the aquatic environment and for the assessment of their impact on natural phytoplankton communities.

  9. Acute impact of erythromycin and tetracycline on the kinetics of nitrification and organic carbon removal in mixed microbial culture.

    PubMed

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Pala-Ozkok, Ilke; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2013-09-01

    The study evaluated acute impact of erythromycin and tetracycline on nitrification and organic carbon removal kinetics in mixed microbial culture. Acclimated biomass was obtained from a fill and draw reactor fed with peptone mixture selected as synthetic substrate and operated at a sludge age of 10 days. Acute inhibition was tested in batch reactors involving a control unit started solely with substrate and the others with additional doses of each antibiotic. Modeling indicated that both steps of nitrification were totally blocked by erythromycin. Tetracycline inhibited and retarded nitrification kinetics at 50 mg/L and stopped nitrite oxidation at 200 mg/L, leading to nitrite accumulation. Both antibiotics also affected organic carbon removal by inducing partial inactivation of the heterotrophic community in the culture, increased substrate storage and accelerated endogenous respiration, with a relatively slight impact on heterotrophic growth. Major inhibitory effect was on process stoichiometry, leading to partial utilization of organic substrate.

  10. The Role of Leadership and Culture in Creating Meaningful Assessment: A Mixed Methods Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guetterman, Timothy C.; Mitchell, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    With increased demands for institutional accountability and improved student learning, involvement in assessment has become a fundamental role of higher education faculty (Rhodes, 2010). However, faculty members and administrators often question whether assessment efforts do indeed improve student learning (Hutchings, 2010). This mixed methods…

  11. The Politics of Culture: Understanding Local Political Resistance to Detracking in Racially Mixed Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Amy Stuart; Serna, Irene

    1996-01-01

    A 3-year study of 10 racially mixed schools implementing detracking shows how elite parents undermine the reforms by threatening flight, co-opting those educators who have power and authority, obtaining support of the "not-quite elite," and using bribes. (SK)

  12. Mixed-species biofilms cultured from an oil sand tailings pond can biomineralize metals.

    PubMed

    Golby, Susanne; Ceri, Howard; Marques, Lyriam L R; Turner, Raymond J

    2014-07-01

    Here, we used an in vitro biofilm approach to study metal resistance and/or tolerance of mixed-species biofilms grown from an oil sand tailings pond in northern Alberta, Canada. Metals can be inhibitory to microbial hydrocarbon degradation. If microorganisms are exposed to metal concentrations above their resistance levels, metabolic activities and hydrocarbon degradation can be slowed significantly, if not inhibited completely. For this reason, bioremediation strategies may be most effective if metal-resistant microorganisms are used. Viability was measured after exposure to a range of concentrations of ions of Cu, Ag, Pb, Ni, Zn, V, Cr, and Sr. Mixed-species biofilms were found to be extremely metal resistant; up to 20 mg/L of Pb, 16 mg/L of Zn, 1,000 mg/L of Sr, and 3.2 mg/L of Ni. Metal mineralization was observed by visualization with scanning electron microscopy with metal crystals of Cu, Ag, Pb, and Sr exuding from the biofilms. Following metal exposure, the mixed-species biofilms were analyzed by molecular methods and were found to maintain high levels of species complexity. A single species isolated from the community (Rhodococcus erythropolis) was used as a comparison against the mixed-community biofilm and was seen to be much less tolerant to metal stress than the community and did not biomineralize the metals.

  13. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase causes delayed neurotoxicity in primary mixed neuronal-glial cortical cultures.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Brahmbhatt, H P; Mong, J A; Dawson, T M

    1994-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent biological messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). There are several potential sources of NO production in the CNS, including neurons and endothelial cells which express NO synthase (NOS) constitutively. Astrocytes and microglia can be induced by cytokines to express a NOS isoform similar to macrophage NOS (mNOS). Primary mixed glial cultures exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or a combination of LPS and gamma-interferon (INF-gamma) produce nitrite, a breakdown product of NO formation, in a dose-dependent manner. Nitrite production is detectable at 12 hr, peaks at 48 hr and is sustained for at least 96 hr. The NOS inhibitor, nitro-L-arginine (NArg), inhibits nitrite formation, but the immunosuppressant agent, FK506, does not. In mixed glial-neuronal cultures exposed to 50 ng LPS or 5 ng LPS and 1 microgram INF-gamma, neurons begin to die at 48 hr, approx. 24-36 hr after detectable nitrite production. Neurotoxicity is attenuated by 100 microM NArg. These data indicate that expression of inducible mNOS causes delayed neurotoxicity.

  14. Effect of pH and retention time on volatile fatty acids production during mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Ewelina; Chwiałkowska, Joanna; Stodolny, Mikołaj; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    Mixed culture fermentation consists of stable microbial population hence waste could be potentially used as a substrates. The aim of the work was to investigate the impact of pH and retention time on the anaerobic mixed culture fermentation. Trials at different pH (4-12) in unbuffered systems were conducted for 5, 10 and 15days. The highest VFAs concentration was achieved after 15days at pH 10 (0.62g/gVSadded), promising results were also achieved for pH 11 (0.54g/gVSadded). For pH 4 and short retention time propionic acid was the major product instead of acetic acid. For batches run at 15days (besides pH 6) caproic acid presence was noticed whereas at pH 11 occurrence of succinic was quantified. Significant correlation between operational factors and fermentation's effluents was proved. Throughout changing simple operating parameters one could design process to produce desirable concentration and composition of VFAs.

  15. [Enlargement test studies of bio-hydrogen production using artificial wastewater of corn stalk fermentation lixivium by mixed culture].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao-Lin; Wei, Rui-Xia; Fan, Yao-Ting; Xing, Yan; Hou, Hong-Wei

    2007-08-01

    Conversion of artificial corn stalk wastewater, which was prepared according to the main composition of the corn stalk fermentation lixivium, into bio-hydrogen gas by mixed culture was performed in a 20 L half-continuous flow fermenter. The influences of several environmental factors on the bio-hydrogen production, such as HRT, C/N ratio, Fe2+ and artificial corn stalk wastewater concentration were discussed in the tests. The experimental results showed that HRT, C/N ratio, Fe2+ and artificial corn stalk wastewater concentration significantly affected the fermentation hydrogen production. The maximum H2 yield of 11.80 mol/kg, H2 concentration of 56% and hydrogen production rate of 8.81 L/(L x d) were obtained at HRT = 10 h, C/N = 100, Fe2+ concentration of 100 mg/L and substrate concentration of 12.5 g/L by mixed culture, respectively. In the fermentation hydrogen-producing process, the conversion efficiency of the substrate was more than 90%, and 39.40% of COD was removed from the reactor. The main by-products in the liquid phase were acetic acid, butyric acid, propionic acid and a little ethanol and butanol throughout this study.

  16. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Sugar Beet Pulp with Mixed Bacterial Cultures for Lactic Acid and Propylene Glycol Production.

    PubMed

    Berlowska, Joanna; Cieciura, Weronika; Borowski, Sebastian; Dudkiewicz, Marta; Binczarski, Michal; Witonska, Izabela; Otlewska, Anna; Kregiel, Dorota

    2016-10-17

    Research into fermentative production of lactic acid from agricultural by-products has recently concentrated on the direct conversion of biomass, whereby pure sugars are replaced with inexpensive feedstock in the process of lactic acid production. In our studies, for the first time, the source of carbon used is sugar beet pulp, generated as a by-product of industrial sugar production. In this paper, we focus on the simultaneous saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass and fermentation of lactic acid, using mixed cultures with complementary assimilation profiles. Lactic acid is one of the primary platform chemicals, and can be used to synthesize a wide variety of useful products, including green propylene glycol. A series of controlled batch fermentations was conducted under various conditions, including pretreatment with enzymatic hydrolysis. Inoculation was performed in two sequential stages, to avoid carbon catabolite repression. Biologically-synthesized lactic acid was catalytically reduced to propylene glycol over 5% Ru/C. The highest lactic acid yield was obtained with mixed cultures. The yield of propylene glycol from the biological lactic acid was similar to that obtained with a water solution of pure lactic acid. Our results show that simultaneous saccharification and fermentation enables generation of lactic acid, suitable for further chemical transformations, from agricultural residues.

  17. Biofilm formation and interspecies interactions in mixed cultures of thermo-acidophilic archaea Acidianus spp. and Sulfolobus metallicus.

    PubMed

    Castro, Camila; Zhang, Ruiyong; Liu, Jing; Bellenberg, Sören; Neu, Thomas R; Donati, Edgardo; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of biofilm formation by bioleaching microorganisms is of great importance for influencing mineral dissolution rates and to prevent acid mine drainage (AMD). Thermo-acidophilic archaea such as Acidianus, Sulfolobus and Metallosphaera are of special interest due to their ability to perform leaching at high temperatures, thereby enhancing leaching rates. In this work, leaching experiments and visualization by microscopy of cell attachment and biofilm formation patterns of the crenarchaeotes Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) and the Acidianus isolates DSM 29038 and DSM 29099 in pure and mixed cultures on sulfur or pyrite were studied. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) combined with fluorescent dyes as well as fluorescently labeled lectins were used to visualize different components (e.g. DNA, proteins or glycoconjugates) of the aforementioned species. The data indicate that cell attachment and the subsequently formed biofilms were species- and substrate-dependent. Pyrite leaching experiments coupled with pre-colonization and further inoculation with a second species suggest that both species may negatively influence each other during pyrite leaching with respect to initial attachment and pyrite dissolution rates. In addition, the investigation of binary biofilms on pyrite showed that both species were heterogeneously distributed on pyrite surfaces in the form of individual cells or microcolonies. Physical contact between the two species seems to occur, as revealed by specific lectins able to specifically bind single species within mixed cultures.

  18. Comparative metabolomic-based metabolic mechanism hypothesis for microbial mixed cultures utilizing cane molasses wastewater for higher 2-phenylethanol production.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xinrong; Qi, Haishan; Mu, Li; Wen, Jianping; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-10-08

    The mixed microbes coculture method in cane molasses wastewater (CMW) was adopted to produce 2-phenylethanol (2-PE). Comparative metabolomics combined with multivariate statistical analysis was performed to profile the differences of overall intracellular metabolites concentration for the mixed microbes cocultured under two different fermentation conditions with low and high 2-PE production. In total 102 intracellular metabolites were identified, and 17 of them involved in six pathways were responsible for 2-PE biosynthesis. After further analysis of metabolites and verification by feeding experiment, an overall metabolic mechanism hypothesis for the microbial mixed cultures (MMC) utilizing CMW for higher 2-PE production was presented. The results demonstrated that the branches of intracellular pyruvate metabolic flux, as well as the flux of phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, glutamate, proline, leucine, threonine, and oleic acid, were closely related to 2-PE production and cell growth, which provided theoretical guidance for domestication and selection of species as well as medium optimization for MMC metabolizing CMW to enhance 2-PE yield.

  19. Cultural Border Crossing in Three Urban Classrooms: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roopnarine, Rupnarain

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the instruction of four youth cultural border crossing behaviors: flexibility, being at ease, playfulness, and citizenship as an intervention aimed at helping students to transition across three borders, student to student, student to science, and student to teacher. The research involved 12 ninth- and 10th-grade…

  20. Nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater using single and mixed culture systems of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Zhang, Renduo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of single and mixed culture of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria on nitrogen removal and N2O emission in treatment of wastewater. Denitrifying endophytes of Pseudomonas sp. B2, Streptomyces sp. A9, and Fusarium sp. F3 isolated from rice plants were utilized for treatment of synthetic wastewater containing nitrate and nitrite. Experiments were conducted under shaking and static conditions. Results showed that under the static condition, more than 97 % of nitrate removal efficiencies were reached in all the treatments containing B2. The nitrate removal rates within the first 12 h in the treatments of B2, B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 were 7.3, 9.8, 11, and 11 mg L(-1) h(-1), respectively. Under the shaking condition, 100 % of nitrite was removed in all the treatments containing B2. The presence of A9 and F3 with B2 increased the nitrite removal rates under both the shaking and static conditions. Compared to the B2 system, the mixed systems of B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 reduced N2O emission (78.4 vs. 19.4, 1.80, and 0.03 μM in 4 weeks, respectively). Our results suggested that B2 is an important strain that enhances nitrogen removal from wastewater. Mixed cultures of B2 with A9 and F3 can remove more nitrate and nitrite from wastewater and reduce nitrite accumulation and N2O emission in the denitrification process.

  1. Adaptation of a mixed culture of acidophiles for a tank biooxidation of refractory gold concentrates containing a high concentration of arsenic.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeongsik; Silva, Rene A; Park, Jeonghyun; Lee, Eunseong; Park, Jayhyun; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-05-01

    We adapted a mixed culture of acidophiles to high arsenic concentrations to confirm the possibility of achieving more than 70% biooxidation of refractory gold concentrates containing high arsenic (As) concentration. The biooxidation process was applied to refractory gold concentrates containing approximately 139.67 g/kg of total As in a stirred tank reactor using an adapted mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans. The percentage of the biooxidation process was analyzed based on the total As removal efficiency. The As removal was monitored by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, conducted every 24 h. The results obtained with the adapted culture were compared with the percentage of biooxidation obtained with a non-adapted mixed culture of A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans, and with their respective pure cultures. The percentages of biooxidation obtained during 358 h of reaction were 72.20%, 38.20%, 27.70%, and 11.45% for adapted culture, non-adapted culture, and pure cultures of A. thiooxidans and A. ferrooxidans, respectively. The adapted culture showed a peak maximum percentage of biooxidation of 77% at 120 h of reaction, confirming that it is possible to obtain biooxidation percentages over 70% in gold concentrates containing high As concentrations.

  2. Selective enrichment media bias the types of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from mixed strain cultures and complex enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For foodborne outbreak investigations it can be difficult to isolate the relevant strain from food and/or environmental sources. If the sample is contaminated by more than one strain of the pathogen the relevant strain might be missed. In this study mixed cultures of Salmonella enterica were grown in one set of standard enrichment media to see if culture bias patterns emerged. Nineteen strains representing four serogroups and ten serotypes were compared in four-strain mixtures in Salmonella-only and in cattle fecal culture enrichment backgrounds using Salmonella enrichment media. One or more strain(s) emerged as dominant in each mixture. No serotype was most fit, but strains of serogroups C2 and E were more likely to dominate enrichment culture mixtures than strains of serogroups B or C1. Different versions of Rappaport-Vassiliadis (RV) medium gave different patterns of strain dominance in both Salmonella-only and fecal enrichment culture backgrounds. The fittest strains belonged to serogroups C1, C2, and E, and included strains of S. Infantis, S. Thompson S. Newport, S. 6,8:d:-, and S. Give. Strains of serogroup B, which included serotypes often seen in outbreaks such as S. Typhimurium, S. Saintpaul, and S. Schwarzengrund were less likely to emerge as dominant strains in the mixtures when using standard RV as part of the enrichment. Using a more nutrient-rich version of RV as part of the protocol led to a different pattern of strains emerging, however some were still present in very low numbers in the resulting population. These results indicate that outbreak investigations of food and/or other environmental samples should include multiple enrichment protocols to ensure isolation of target strains of Salmonella.

  3. Cultural border crossing in three urban classrooms: A mixed methods study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roopnarine, Rupnarain

    This study examined the effects of the instruction of four youth cultural border crossing behaviors: flexibility, being at ease, playfulness, and citizenship as an intervention aimed at helping students to transition across three borders, student to student, student to science, and student to teacher. The research involved 12 ninth- and 10th-grade students in a large urban school district in three diverse classrooms, A, B, and C. Four students in each classroom volunteered for the study. The students in Groups A and B were in 9th grade Living Environment and students in Group B were in 10th grade chemistry. These students participated in this instructional intervention for three months. The study was conducted using both quantitative and qualitative methods based on participant observations, interviews, and questionnaire. The result indicated that there was no significant effect of the cultural border crossing instructions on the students' interactions across the three borders examined. However, the instructions helped Group A and Group B to be more flexible but not group C. Also, the instructions helped Group A to be more playful and at ease but not Group B and C. The instructions also helped Group A to show more citizenship but not Group B and C. In addition, there was no difference between the pretest and posttest cultural bother crossing behavior. Moreover, qualitative data analysis showed that the participants were more flexible, at ease, and playful among peers than across student to teacher and student to science borders. Also, the use of citizenship in the three groups showed no effect on the participants' interaction with peers. Although, the findings showed no effect of cultural border crossing instructions on students' interactions, it is suggested that we continue to find ways to help students feel more comfortable in science.

  4. Effects of exposure times on the toxic response of ammonia oxidizing mixed culture (AOMC) to phenol and chlorinated phenols.

    PubMed

    Tantasut, J; Satoh, H; Parkpian, P; Mongkolsuk, S

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of exposure times on the response of ammonia oxidizing mixed culture (AOMC) to phenolic compounds while having the future goal to develop a biosensor using AOMC for toxicity monitoring. AOMC was used instead of purified nitrifying culture because of the ease of culture development. The oxygen utilization rate (OUR) was measured during three exposure periods; 0-15, 25-40 and 50-65 min. It was found that phenolic compounds have a strong inhibitory effect on AOMC. The percentage of OUR reduction increased with higher concentrations and the extended exposure times improved the toxic response of AOMC, especially to the lower concentrations (0.25, 0.50, 1.0 mg/L). Further, AOMC detoxifying mechanisms might result in the reduction of toxic response when the longest exposure time was applied. However, at the higher concentrations (2.5 and 5.0 mg/L), the extended exposure times did not have a critical effect on the response pattern of AOMC, especially for phenol and mono-chlorinated phenols. It was illustrated that AOMC is very sensitive to phenolic compounds and its sensitivity is high enough for the detection of phenolic compounds at the level of effluent standard in Thailand and Japan with a rapid response time of 15 min. To improve the sensitivity of AOMC to low phenolic compound concentrations, an extended exposure time of 25-40 min would be recommended.

  5. Development of a floating photobioreactor with internal partitions for efficient utilization of ocean wave into improved mass transfer and algal culture mixing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Hong, Seong-Joo; Lim, Sang-Min; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Culturing microalgae in the ocean has potentials that may reduce the production cost and provide an option for an economic biofuel production from microalgae. The ocean holds great potentials for mass microalgal cultivation with its high specific heat, mixing energy from waves, and large cultivable area. Suitable photobioreactors (PBRs) that are capable of integrating marine energy into the culture systems need to be developed for the successful ocean cultivation. In this study, prototype floating PBRs were designed and constructed using transparent low-density polyethylene film for microalgal culture in the ocean. To improve the mixing efficiency, various types of internal partitions were introduced within PBRs. Three different types of internal partitions were evaluated for their effects on the mixing efficiency in terms of mass transfer (k(L)a) and mixing time in the PBRs. The partition type with the best mixing efficiency was selected, and the number of partitions was varied from one to three for investigation of its effect on mixing efficiency. When the number of partitions is increased, mass transfer increased in proportion to the number of partitions. However, mixing time was not directly related to the number of partitions. When a green microalga, Tetraselmis sp. was cultivated using PBRs with the selected partition under semi-continuous mode in the ocean, biomass and fatty acid productivities in the PBRs were increased by up to 50 % and 44% at high initial cell density, respectively, compared to non-partitioned ones. The results of internally partitioned PBRs demonstrated potentials for culturing microalgae by efficiently utilizing ocean wave energy into culture mixing in the ocean.

  6. Do furanic and phenolic compounds of lignocellulosic and algae biomass hydrolyzate inhibit anaerobic mixed cultures? A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Monlau, F; Sambusiti, C; Barakat, A; Quéméneur, M; Trably, E; Steyer, J-P; Carrère, H

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest on the use of both lignocellulosic and algae biomass to produce biofuels (i.e. biohydrogen, ethanol and methane), as future alternatives to fossil fuels. In this purpose, thermal and thermo-chemical pretreatments have been widely investigated to overcome the natural physico-chemical barriers of such biomass and to enhance biofuel production from lignocellulosic residues and, more recently, marine biomass (i.e. macro and microalgae). However, the pretreatment technologies lead not only to the conversion of carbohydrate polymers (ie cellulose, hemicelluloses, starch, agar) to soluble monomeric sugar (ie glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose), but also the generation of various by-products (i.e. furfural and 5-HMF). In the case of lignocellulosic residues, part of the lignin can also be degraded in lignin derived by-products, mainly composed of phenolic compounds. Although the negative impact of such by-products on ethanol production has been widely described in literature, studies on their impact on biohydrogen and methane production operated with mixed cultures are still very limited. This review aims to summarise and discuss literature data on the impact of pre-treatment by-products on H2-producing dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion processes when using mixed cultures as inoculum. As a summary, furanic (5-HMF, furfural) and phenolic compounds were found to be stronger inhibitors of the microbial dark fermentation than the full anaerobic digestion process. Such observations can be explained by differences in process parameters: anaerobic digestion is performed with more complex mixed cultures, lower substrate/inoculum and by-products/inoculum ratios and longer batch incubation times than dark fermentation. Finally, it has been reported that, during dark fermentation process, the presence of by-products could lead to a metabolic shift from H2-producing pathways (i.e. acetate and butyrate) to non-H2-producing pathways (i

  7. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  8. Influence of wine-related physicochemical factors on the growth and metabolism of non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces yeasts in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Lucía M; de Nadra, María C Manca; Bru, Elena; Farías, Marta E

    2009-02-01

    The influence of two physicochemical factors involved in winemaking, temperature and SO(2), on the kinetics and metabolic behavior of Kloeckera apiculata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was examined. Highest biomass was reached at 15 and 25 degrees C for K. apiculata and S. cerevisiae, respectively. Pure cultures of K. apiculata died off early with increasing temperature, but in co-culture with S. cerevisiae it showed higher viability and a change in the death curve from exponential to linear. Statistical analysis revealed that metabolite production was significantly different for the three cultures and also at the different fermentation temperatures. Besides, the interaction between culture type and temperature was significant. At temperatures from 15 to 30 degrees C the mixed culture showed similar ethanol and lower acetic acid production compared with a pure culture of K. apiculata. SO(2) addition slightly increased survival of the non-Saccharomyces species in pure and mixed cultures. Statistical evaluation indicated that culture type and SO(2) addition significantly affected metabolite production, but the interaction between culture and SO(2) was not significant. These results contribute to current knowledge of enological factors and their effect on prevalence and fermentative activities of the composite yeast flora and the statistical significance emphasizes the importance of the combined influence of the culture type and physicochemical factors on the production of fermentation metabolites.

  9. Comparison of fecal culture and Danish Mix-ELISA for determination of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica prevalence in growing swine.

    PubMed

    Funk, J A; Harris, I T; Davies, P R

    2005-04-25

    In the USA, control of food-borne salmonellosis associated with meat consumption has been predominantly focused at slaughter and processing. It is expected that standards at slaughter and processing will become more stringent, creating pressure to reduce prevalence of Salmonella-positive food animals through on-farm interventions. The aim of this study was to compare traditional fecal culture and the Danish Mix-ELISA (DME) for determination of Salmonella prevalence pre-harvest in swine. In Trial 1, five cohorts of individually identified pigs were longitudinally sampled during the growing period to compare the kinetics of prevalence as estimated by fecal culture and the DME. In Trial 2, the correlation between fecal prevalence and seroprevalence was estimated pre-marketing in 49 groups of pigs. In Trial 1, fecal prevalence and seroprevalence showed similar kinetics, with a tendency of a higher OD% cut-off to more closely approximate fecal prevalence. In Trial 2, correlations between fecal culture and the DME were 0.40, 0.36, 0.43, and 0.43 (p<0.001) for OD% cut-offs > or =10, 20, 30, and 40, respectively. Based on these results, a higher OD% cut-off would be recommended if more approximate estimation of fecal prevalence is desired and longitudinal sampling would be suggested for evaluating the impact of on-farm interventions for Salmonella reduction whether utilizing fecal culture or the DME. Further evaluation of the impact of Salmonella serovar present on farms on seroprevalence and the relationship of on-farm seroprevalence with food safety risk are needed prior to utilizing the DME for pre-harvest Salmonella diagnostics in the US swine herd.

  10. Why and How Do Nursing Homes Implement Culture Change Practices? Insights from Qualitative Interviews in a Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Renée R.; Looze, Jessica; Tyler, Denise; Lepore, Michael; Miller, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the process of instituting culture change (CC) practices in nursing homes (NHs). Methods NH Directors of Nursing (DONs) and Administrators (NHAs) at 4,149 United States NHs were surveyed about CC practices. Follow-up interviews with 64 NHAs were conducted and analyzed by a multidisciplinary team which reconciled interpretations recorded in an audit trail. Results The themes include: 1) Reasons for implementing CC practices vary; 2) NH approaches to implementing CC practices are diverse; 3) NHs consider resident mix in deciding to implement practices; 4) NHAs note benefits and few implementation costs of implementing CC practices; 5) Implementation of changes is challenging and strategies for change are tailored to the challenges encountered; 6) Education and communication efforts are vital ways to institute change; and 7) NHA and other staff leadership is key to implementing changes. Discussion Diverse strategies and leadership skills appear to help NHs implement reform practices, including CC innovations. PMID:24652888

  11. Modeling and optimization of glutamic acid production using mixed culture of Corynebacterium glutamicum NCIM2168 and Pseudomonas reptilivora NCIM2598.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajaram Shyam; Moorthy, Innasi Muthu Ganesh; Baskar, Rajoo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a hybrid system of response surface methodology followed by genetic algorithm has been adopted to optimize the production medium for L-glutamic acid fermentation with mixed cultures of Corynebacterium glutamicum and Pseudomonas reptilovora. The optimal combination of media components for maximal production of L-glutamic acid was found to be 49.99 g L(-1) of glucose, 10 g L(-1) of urea, 18.06% (v/v) of salt solution, and 4.99% (v/v) of inoculum size. The experimental glutamic acid yield at optimum condition was 19.69 g L(-1), which coincided well to the value predicted by the model (19.61 g L(-1)). Using this methodology, a nonlinear regression model was developed for the glutamic acid production. The model was validated statistically and the determination coefficient (R (2)) was found to be 0.99.

  12. Nitroxides as anti-biofilm compounds for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed-culture biofilms.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Stefanie-Ann; Kyi, Caroline; Schiesser, Carl H

    2015-04-28

    A series of 23 nitroxides () was tested for biofilm modulatory activity using a crystal violet staining technique. 3-(Dodecane-1-thiyl)-4-(hydroxymethyl)-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrrolinoxyl () was found to significantly suppress biofilm formation and elicit dispersal events in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed-culture biofilms. Twitching and swarming motilities were enhanced by nitroxide , leaving the planktonic-specific swimming motility unaffected and suggesting that the mechanism of -mediated biofilm modulation is linked to the hyperactivation of surface-associated cell motilities. Preliminary structure-activity relationship studies identify the dodecanethiyl chain, hydroxymethyl substituent and the free radical moiety to be structural features pertinent to the anti-biofilm activity of .

  13. Improvement of the anodic bioelectrocatalytic activity of mixed culture biofilms by a simple consecutive electrochemical selection procedure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Harnisch, Falk; Fricke, Katja; Sietmann, Rabea; Schröder, Uwe

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the anodic, bioelectrocatalytic performance of wastewater inoculum based, mixed culture microbial biofilms can be considerably improved by using a consecutive, purely electrochemical selection and biofilm acclimatization procedure. The procedure may represent an alternative to a repetitive mechanical biofilm removal, re-suspension and electrochemically facilitated biofilm formation. By using the proposed technique, the bioelectrocatalytic current density was increased from the primary to the secondary biofilm from 250 microAcm(-2) to about 500 microAcm(-2); and the power density of respective microbial fuel cells could be increased from 686 mWm(-2) to 1487 mWm(-2). The electrochemical characterization of the biofilms reveals a strong similarity to Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms, which may indicate a dominating role of this bacterium in the biofilms.

  14. Kinetics of nitrate and sulfate removal using a mixed microbial culture with or without limited-oxygen fed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-Jun; Chen, Chuan; Wang, Ai-Jie; Guo, Hong-Liang; Yuan, Ye; Lee, Duu-Jong; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2014-07-01

    The biological degradation of nitrate and sulfate was investigated using a mixed microbial culture and lactate as the carbon source, with or without limited-oxygen fed. It was found that sulfate reduction was slightly inhibited by nitrate, since after nitrate depletion the sulfate reduction rate increased from 0.37 mg SO4 (2-)/mg VSS d to 0.71 mg SO4 (2-)/mg VSS d, and the maximum rate of sulfate reduction in the presence of nitrate corresponded to 56 % of the non-inhibited sulfate reduction rate determined after nitrate depleted. However, simultaneous but not sequential reduction of both oxy-anions was observed in this study, unlike some literature reports in which sulfate reduction starts only after depletion of nitrate, and this case might be due to the fact that lactate was always kept above the limiting conditions. At limited oxygen, the inhibited effect on sulfate reduction by nitrate was relieved, and the sulfate reduction rate seemed relatively higher than that obtained without limited-oxygen fed, whereas kept almost constant (0.86-0.89 mg SO4 (2-)/mg VSS d) cross the six ROS states. In contrast, nitrate reduction rates decreased substantially with the increase in the initial limited-oxygen fed, showing an inhibited effect on nitrate reduction by oxygen. Kinetic parameters determined for the mixed microbial culture showed that the maximum specific sulfate utilization rate obtained (0.098 ± 0.022 mg SO4 (2-)/(mg VSS h)) was similar to the reported typical value (0.1 mg SO4 (2-)/(mg VSS h)), also indicating a moderate inhibited effect by nitrate.

  15. Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Primary Mixed Neural Cell Cultures: Uptake, Oxidative Stress and Acute Calcium Responses

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Andrea; Rott, Stephanie; Mantion, Alexandre; Graf, Philipp; Plendl, Johanna; Thünemann, Andreas F.; Meier, Wolfgang P.; Taubert, Andreas; Luch, Andreas; Reiser, Georg

    2012-01-01

    In the body, nanoparticles can be systemically distributed and then may affect secondary target organs, such as the central nervous system (CNS). Putative adverse effects on the CNS are rarely investigated to date. Here, we used a mixed primary cell model consisting mainly of neurons and astrocytes and a minor proportion of oligodendrocytes to analyze the effects of well-characterized 20 and 40 nm silver nanoparticles (SNP). Similar gold nanoparticles served as control and proved inert for all endpoints tested. SNP induced a strong size-dependent cytotoxicity. Additionally, in the low concentration range (up to 10 μg/ml of SNP), the further differentiated cultures were more sensitive to SNP treatment. For detailed studies, we used low/medium dose concentrations (up to 20 μg/ml) and found strong oxidative stress responses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected along with the formation of protein carbonyls and the induction of heme oxygenase-1. We observed an acute calcium response, which clearly preceded oxidative stress responses. ROS formation was reduced by antioxidants, whereas the calcium response could not be alleviated by antioxidants. Finally, we looked into the responses of neurons and astrocytes separately. Astrocytes were much more vulnerable to SNP treatment compared with neurons. Consistently, SNP were mainly taken up by astrocytes and not by neurons. Immunofluorescence studies of mixed cell cultures indicated stronger effects on astrocyte morphology. Altogether, we can demonstrate strong effects of SNP associated with calcium dysregulation and ROS formation in primary neural cells, which were detectable already at moderate dosages. PMID:22240980

  16. [An experimental study and a mathematical model of interactions in mixed culture of invertebrates and algae in the "producer-consumer" aquatic biotic cycle].

    PubMed

    Pis'man, T I; Bogdanova, O N

    2004-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out, and a mathematical model of interaction between invertebrates (infusoria Paramecium caudatum and rotifera Brachionus plicatilis) and algae (Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus quadricauda) in the "producer-consumer" aquatic biotic cycle with spatially divided links was constructed. The model describes the dynamics of a mixed culture of infusoria and rotifera in the "consumer" link, when they consume a mixed culture of algae coming from the "producer" link. A negative influence of products of algae Scenedesmus metabolism upon the reproduction of infusoria P. caudatum was revealed. Taking this into account, a qualitative coincidence of the results of mathematical modeling with experimental data was obtained. It was shown that the co-existence of mixed algae culture in the "producer" link with invertebrates in the "consumer" link in the "producer-consumer" aquatic biotic cycle is impossible because of the displacement of infusoria P. caudatum by rotifera Brachionus plicatilis.

  17. Responses of neotropical mangrove seedlings grown in monoculture and mixed culture under treatments of hydroperiod and salinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardona-Olarte, P.; Twilley, R.R.; Krauss, K.W.; Rivera-Monroy, V.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the combined effects of salinity and hydroperiod on seedlings of Rhizophora mangle and Laguncularia racemosa grown under experimental conditions of monoculture and mixed culture by using a simulated tidal system. The objective was to test hypotheses relative to species interactions to either tidal or permanent flooding at salinities of 10 or 40 g/l. Four-month-old seedlings were experimentally manipulated under these environmental conditions in two types of species interactions: (1) seedlings of the same species were grown separately in containers from September 2000 to August 2001 to evaluate intraspecific response and (2) seedlings of each species were mixed in containers to evaluate interspecific, competitive responses from August 2002 to April 2003. Overall, L. racemosa was strongly sensitive to treatment combinations while R. mangle showed little effect. Most plant responses of L. racemosa were affected by both salinity and hydroperiod, with hydroperiod inducing more effects than salinity. Compared to R. mangle, L. racemosa in all treatment combinations had higher relative growth rate, leaf area ratio, specific leaf area, stem elongation, total length of branches, net primary production, and stem height. Rhizophora mangle had higher biomass allocation to roots. Species growth differentiation was more pronounced at low salinity, with few species differences at high salinity under permanent flooding. These results suggest that under low to mild stress by hydroperiod and salinity, L. racemosa exhibits responses that favor its competitive dominance over R. mangle. This advantage, however, is strongly reduced as stress from salinity and hydroperiod increase. ?? Springer 2006.

  18. Monophyletic group of unclassified γ-Proteobacteria dominates in mixed culture biofilm of high-performing oxygen reducing biocathode.

    PubMed

    Rothballer, Michael; Picot, Matthieu; Sieper, Tina; Arends, Jan B A; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Boon, Nico; Buisman, Cees J N; Barrière, Frédéric; Strik, David P B T B

    2015-12-01

    Several mixed microbial communities have been reported to show robust bioelectrocatalysis of oxygen reduction over time at applicable operation conditions. However, clarification of electron transfer mechanism(s) and identification of essential micro-organisms have not been realised. Therefore, the objective of this study was to shape oxygen reducing biocathodes with different microbial communities by means of surface modification using the electrochemical reduction of two different diazonium salts in order to discuss the relation of microbial composition and performance. The resulting oxygen reducing mixed culture biocathodes had complex bacterial biofilms variable in size and shape as observed by confocal and electron microscopy. Sequence analysis of ribosomal 16S rDNA revealed a putative correlation between the abundance of certain microbiota and biocathode performance. The best performing biocathode developed on the unmodified graphite electrode and reached a high current density for oxygen reducing biocathodes at neutral pH (0.9 A/m(2)). This correlated with the highest domination (60.7%) of a monophyletic group of unclassified γ-Proteobacteria. These results corroborate earlier reports by other groups, however, higher current densities and higher presence of these unclassified bacteria were observed in this work. Therefore, members of this group are likely key-players for highly performing oxygen reducing biocathodes.

  19. Performance of peanut mutants and their offspring generated from mixed high-energy particle field radiation and tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, J S; Qiao, L X; Zhao, L S; Wang, P; Guo, B T; Liu, L X; Sui, J M

    2015-09-09

    To develop new ways to breed peanut, we irradiated seeds of the Luhua 11 cultivar with a mixed high-energy particle field at different doses. The embryonic leaflets were extracted as explants and incubated on somatic embryo induction medium and then on somatic embryo germination and regeneration medium. After being grafted, the M1-generation plants were transplanted, and seeds from each M1-generation plant were harvested. In the following year, the M2-generation seeds were planted separately. Some M2-generation plants showed distinct character segregation relative to the mutagenic parent in terms of vigor, fertility, plant height, branch number, and pod size and shape. M2-generation plants that had a high pod weight per plant tended to produce M3-generation offspring that also had a high pod weight per plant, much higher than that of the mutagenic parent, Luhua 11. M4-generation seeds varied greatly in quality, and 35 individuals with an increased fat content (>55%) were obtained. Overall, the results indicate that the combination of mutagenesis via mixed high-energy particle field exposure and tissue culture is promising for peanut breeding.

  20. Simultaneous production and separation of biohydrogen in mixed culture systems by continuous dark fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Morales, Juan E; Tapia-Venegas, Estela; Toledo-Alarcón, Javiera; Ruiz-Filippi, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production by dark fermentation is one promising technology. However, there are challenges in improving the performance and efficiency of the process. The important factors that must be considered to obtain a suitable process are the source of the inoculum and its pre-treatment, types of substrates, the reactor configurations and the hydrogen partial pressure. Furthermore, to obtain high-quality hydrogen, it is necessary to integrate an effective separation procedure that is compatible with the intrinsic characteristics of a biological process. Recent studies have suggested that a stable and robust process could be established if there was an effective selection of a mixed microbial consortium with metabolic pathways directly targeted to high hydrogen yields. Additionally, the integration of membrane technology for the extraction and separation of the hydrogen produced has advantages for the upgrading step, because this technology could play an important role in reducing the negative effect of the hydrogen partial pressure. Using this technology, it has been possible to implement a production-purification system, the 'hydrogen-extractive membrane bioreactor'. This configuration has great potential for direct applications, such as fuel cells, but studies of new membrane materials, module designs and reactor configurations are required to achieve higher separation efficiencies.

  1. Effective remediation of fish processing waste using mixed culture biofilms capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification.

    PubMed

    Markande, Anoop R; Kapagunta, Chandrika; Patil, Pooja S; Nayak, Binaya B

    2016-09-01

    Fish processing waste water causes pollution and eutrophication of water bodies when released untreated. Use of bacteria capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) as biofilms on carriers in a moving bed bioreactor (MBBR) is a popular approach but seldom used for fish processing waste water remediation. Here, we studied the variations in biofilm formation and application activities by isolates Lysinibacillus sp. HT13, Alcaligenes sp. HT15 and Proteus sp. HT37 previously reported by us. While HT13 and HT15 formed significantly higher biofilms in polystyrene microtitre plates than on carriers, HT37 exhibited highest on carriers. A consortium of the three selected bacteria grown as biofilm on MBBR carriers exhibited better remediation of ammonia (200-600 ppm and 50 mM) than the individual isolates on carriers. The mixed biofilm set on the carriers was used for nitrogenous waste removal from fish processing waste water in 2 and 20 L setups. The total nitrogen estimated by elemental analysis showed complete remediation from 250 ppm in both 2 and 20 L waste water systems within 48 h. The usual toxic nitrogenous components-ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were also remediated efficiently.

  2. Microbial reduction and precipitation of vanadium (V) in groundwater by immobilized mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Hao, Liting; Tian, Caixing; Yuan, Songhu; Feng, Chuanping; Ni, Jinren; Borthwick, Alistair G L

    2015-09-01

    Vanadium is an important contaminant impacted by natural and industrial activities. Vanadium (V) reduction efficiency as high as 87.0% was achieved by employing immobilized mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculated seed within 12h operation, while V(IV) was the main reduction product which precipitated instantly. Increasing initial V(V) concentration resulted in the decrease of V(V) removal efficiency, while this index increased first and then decreased with the increase of initial COD concentration, pH and conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis indicated the decreased microbial diversity. V(V) reduction was realized through dissimilatory reduction process by significantly enhanced Lactococcus and Enterobacter with oxidation of lactic and acetic acids from fermentative microorganisms such as the enriched Paludibacter and the newly appeared Acetobacterium, Oscillibacter. This study is helpful to detect new functional species for V(V) reduction and constitutes a step ahead in developing in situ bioremediations of vanadium contamination.

  3. Community Perspectives: Mixed-Methods Investigation of Culture, Stress, Resilience, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Jones, Felica; Roubinov, Danielle; Tsai, Sid; Jones, Loretta; Lu, Michael; Hobel, Calvin

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented ethnic and socioeconomic disparities, our understanding of child, maternal and family health is based disproportionately on White middle-class populations in the United States. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funded the Community Child Health Network (CCHN) in 2004, a partnership of five academic institutions and community organizations, to collaborate in the design and conduct of a study to foster new understandings of these disparities. Reported here are findings from a pilot study conducted at one site to inform CCHN regarding community views of stress, coping resources, family and health. Mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) interviews were conducted with 54 adult participants recruited from public healthcare clinics to obtain both their self-reports and their reports of their communities' perspectives. Findings include the pervasiveness of experiences of racism and gender differences in support seeking and coping behavior. There was little recognition of some common health conditions, such as low birth weight and preterm birth, which disproportionately affect poor and minority communities. Many indicators of strength and resilience in individuals, families, and the communities at large emerged in these interviews. Communities were described as valuing achievement and upward mobility. Participants also indicated an intuitive understanding of effective parenting and of the roles of nature (genetics) and nurture (environment and behavior) in determining child health. The results inform intervention and stress research in underrepresented communities. PMID:20629246

  4. Mixed culture biofilms of Salmonella Typhimurium and cultivable indigenous microorganisms on lettuce show enhanced resistance of their sessile cells to cold oxygen plasma.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Han, Noori; Zhang, Cheng-Yi; Ha, Sang-Do

    2015-04-01

    Control of foodborne pathogens in fresh produce is crucial for food safety, and numerous Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) outbreaks have been reported already. The present study was done to assess effectiveness of cold oxygen plasma (COP) against biofilms of ST mixed with cultivable indigenous microorganisms (CIM). ST and CIM were grown at 15 °C as monocultures and mixed cultures for planktonic state, biofilm on stainless steel, and lettuce leaves. Thereafter, the samples were treated with COP and surviving populations were counted using plate counting methods. Biofilms and stomatal colonization were examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and food quality was assessed after treatment. Mixed cultures of ST and CIM showed an antagonistic interaction on lettuce but not on SS or in planktonic state. Mixed cultures showed significantly (p < 0.05) greater resistance to COP compared to monoculture biofilms on lettuce but not on SS or planktonic state. Shift from smooth to rugose colony type was found for planktonic and for biofilms on SS but not on lettuce for ST. Mixed culture biofilms colonized stomata on the inside as demonstrated by FESEM. Although, lettuce quality was not affected by COP, this technology has to be optimized for further development of the successful inactivation of complex multispecies biofilm structures presented by real food environment.

  5. Insights into large-scale cell-culture reactors: II. Gas-phase mixing and CO₂ stripping.

    PubMed

    Sieblist, Christian; Hägeholz, Oliver; Aehle, Mathias; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael; Lübbert, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Most discussions about stirred tank bioreactors for cell cultures focus on liquid-phase motions and neglect the importance of the gas phase for mixing, power input and especially CO(2) stripping. Particularly in large production reactors, CO(2) removal from the culture is known to be a major problem. Here, we show that stripping is mainly affected by the change of the gas composition during the movement of the gas phase through the bioreactor from the sparger system towards the headspace. A mathematical model for CO(2)-stripping and O(2)-mass transfer is presented taking gas-residence times into account. The gas phase is not moving through the reactor in form of a plug flow as often assumed. The model is validated by measurement data. Further measurement results are presented that show how the gas is partly recirculated by the impellers, thus increasing the gas-residence time. The gas-residence times can be measured easily with stimulus-response techniques. The results offer further insights on the gas-residence time distributions in stirred tank reactors.

  6. Critical analysis of hydrogen production from mixed culture fermentation under thermophilic condition (60 °C).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hang; Zeng, Raymond J; O'Sullivan, Cathryn; Clarke, William P

    2016-06-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from mixed culture fermentation (MCF) of glucose was studied by conducting a comprehensive product measurement and detailed mass balance analysis of their contributions to the final H2 yield. The culture used in this study was enriched on glucose at 60 °C through a sequential batch operation consisting of daily glucose feeds, headspace purging and medium replacement every third day in serum bottles for over 2 years. 2-Bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was only required during the first three 3-day cycles to permanently eliminate methanogenic activity. Daily glucose feeds were fully consumed within 24 h, with a persistent H2 yield of 2.7 ± 0.1 mol H2/mol glucose, even when H2 was allowed to accumulate over the 3-day cycle. The measured H2 production exceeded by 14 % the theoretical production of H2 associated with the fermentation products, dominated by acetate and butyrate. Follow-up experiments using acetate with a (13)C-labelled methyl group showed that the excess H2 production was not due to acetate oxidation. Chemical formula analysis of the biomass showed a more reduced form of C5H11.8O2.1N1.1 suggesting that the biomass formation may even consume produced H2 from fermentation.

  7. Concomitant biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate production from dark fermentation effluents by adapted Rhodobacter sphaeroides and mixed photofermentative cultures.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Valentino, Serena; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    This work aimed at investigating concomitant production of biohydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) by photofermentation (PF) using dark fermentation effluents (DFE). An adapted culture of Rhodobacter sphaeroides AV1b (pH 6.5, 24±2°C) achieved H2 and PHB yields of 256 (±2) NmLH2/g Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and 273.8mgPHB/gCOD (32.5±3% of the dry cells weight (DCW)), respectively. When a diluted (1:2) DFE medium was applied to the adapted pure and mixed photofermentative culture, the respective H2 yields were 164.0 (±12) and 71.3 (±6) NmLH2/gCOD and the PHB yields were 212.1 (±105.2) and 50.7 (±2.7) mgPHB/gCOD added, corresponding to 24 (±0.7) and 6.3 (±0) % DCW, respectively. The concomitant H2 and PHB production from the PF process gave a good DFE post treatment achieving up to 80% COD removal from the initial DFE.

  8. Development of bioelectrocatalytic activity stimulates mixed-culture reduction of glycerol in a bioelectrochemical system

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Freguia, Stefano; Dennis, Paul G; Keller, Jürg; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    In a microbial bioelectrochemical system (BES), organic substrate such as glycerol can be reductively converted to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) by a mixed population biofilm growing on the cathode. Here, we show that 1,3-PDO yields positively correlated to the electrons supplied, increasing from 0.27 ± 0.13 to 0.57 ± 0.09 mol PDO mol−1 glycerol when the cathodic current switched from 1 A m−2 to 10 A m−2. Electrochemical measurements with linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) demonstrated that the biofilm was bioelectrocatalytically active and that the cathodic current was greatly enhanced only in the presence of both biofilm and glycerol, with an onset potential of −0.46 V. This indicates that glycerol or its degradation products effectively served as cathodic electron acceptor. During long-term operation (> 150 days), however, the yield decreased gradually to 0.13 ± 0.02 mol PDO mol−1 glycerol, and the current–product correlation disappeared. The onset potentials for cathodic current decreased to −0.58 V in the LSV tests at this stage, irrespective of the presence or absence of glycerol, with electrons from the cathode almost exclusively used for hydrogen evolution (accounted for 99.9% and 89.5% of the electrons transferred at glycerol and glycerol-free conditions respectively). Community analysis evidenced a decreasing relative abundance of Citrobacter in the biofilm, indicating a community succession leading to cathode independent processes relative to the glycerol. It is thus shown here that in processes where substrate conversion can occur independently of the electrode, electroactive microorganisms can be outcompeted and effectively disconnected from the substrate. PMID:25817314

  9. Effect of feeding corn, hull-less or hulled barley on fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fellner, V; Burns, J C; Marshall, D S

    2008-05-01

    Increased demands for corn grain warrant the evaluation of alternative grain types for ruminant production systems. This study was conducted to determine the effects of hulled and hull-less barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars compared with corn (Zea mays L.) as an alternative grain type on fermentation in cultures of mixed ruminal microorganisms. Three continuous fermentors were fed 14 g of dry feed per day (divided equally between 2 feedings) consisting of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) hay pellets (40% of dry matter) and 1) ground corn, 2) hulled barley, or 3) hull-less barley concentrate (60% of dry matter) in each fermentor. Following an adaptation period of 5 d, culture samples were taken at 2 h after the morning feeding on d 6, 7, and 8 of each period for analysis. A second run of the fermentors followed the same treatment sequence to provide replication. Culture pH was reduced with corn (5.55) and did not differ between barley cultivars (average pH 5.89). Total volatile fatty acid concentration and acetate to propionate ratio were not different across grain type or barley cultivar with the exception of greater total volatile fatty acid concentrations with hull-less barley. Corn produced less methane (14.6 mmol/d) and ammonia-N (7.3 mg/100 mL) compared with barley (33.1 mmol/d and 22 mg/100 mL, respectively); methane was greater with hull-less barley but ammonia-N concentration was similar between the 2 barley cultivars. Hull-less barley had greater digestibility compared with hulled barley, and corn had reduced digestibility compared with barley. Concentrations of C18:0 were greater and those of C18:1 and C18:2 lesser in cultures fed hulled and hull-less barley compared with corn. Our data indicate that grain type and barley cultivar have an impact on ruminal fermentation. The lesser starch concentration of barley minimized the drop in culture pH and improved digestibility.

  10. Essential oils have different effects on human pathogenic and commensal bacteria in mixed faecal fermentations compared with pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Dinesh; Louis, Petra; Losa, Riccardo; Zweifel, Béatrice; Wallace, R John

    2015-02-01

    A static batch culture system inoculated with human faeces was used to determine the influence of essential oil compounds (EOCs) on mixed faecal microbiota. Bacteria were quantified using quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA genes. Incubation for 24 h of diluted faeces from six individuals caused enrichment of Bifidobacterium spp., but proportions of other major groups were unaffected. Thymol and geraniol at 500 p.p.m. suppressed total bacteria, resulting in minimal fermentation. Thymol at 100 p.p.m. had no effect, nor did eugenol or nerolidol at 100 or 500 p.p.m. except for a slight suppression of Eubacterium hallii. Methyl isoeugenol at 100 or 500 p.p.m. suppressed the growth of total bacteria, accompanied by a large fall in the molar proportion of propionate formed. The relative abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii was unaffected except with thymol at 500 p.p.m. The ability of EOCs to control numbers of the pathogen Clostridium difficile was investigated in a separate experiment, in which the faecal suspensions were amended by the addition of pure culture of C. difficile. Numbers of C. difficile were suppressed by thymol and methyl isoeugenol at 500 p.p.m. and to a lesser extent at 100 p.p.m. Eugenol and geraniol gave rather similar suppression of C. difficile numbers at both 100 and 500 p.p.m. Nerolidol had no significant effect. It was concluded from these and previous pure-culture experiments that thymol and geraniol at around 100 p.p.m. could be effective in suppressing pathogens in the small intestine, with no concern for beneficial commensal colonic bacteria in the distal gut.

  11. Thionine increases electricity generation from microbial fuel cell using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and exoelectrogenic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Najafpour, Ghasem Darzi; Ghoreyshi, Ali Asghar; Talebnia, Farid; Premier, Giuliano C; Bakeri, Gholamreza; Kim, Jung Rae; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been shown to be capable of clean energy production through the oxidation of biodegradable organic waste using various bacterial species as biocatalysts. In this study we found Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previously known electrochemcially inactive or less active species, can be acclimated with an electron mediator thionine for electrogenic biofilm formation in MFC, and electricity production is improved with facilitation of electron transfer. Power generation of MFC was also significantly increased by thionine with both aerated and non-aerated cathode. With electrochemically active biofilm enriched with swine wastewater, MFC power increased more significantly by addition of thionine. The optimum mediator concentration was 500 mM of thionine with S. cerevisae in MFC with the maximum voltage and current generation in the microbial fuel cell were 420 mV and 700 mA/m(2), respectively. Cyclic voltametry shows that thionine improves oxidizing and reducing capability in both pure culture and acclimated biofilm as compared to non-mediated cell. The results obtained indicated that thionine has great potential to enhance power generation from unmediated yeast or electrochemically active biofilm in MFC.

  12. Shear and mixing effects on cells in agitated microcarrier tissue culture reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1987-01-01

    Tissue cells are known to be sensitive to mechanical stresses imposed on them by agitation in bioreactors. The amount of agitation provided in a microcarrier or suspension bioreactor should be only enough to provide effective homogeneity. Three distinct flow regions can be identified in the reactor: bulk turbulent flow, bulk laminar flow and boundary-layer flows. Possible mechanisms of cell damage are examined by analyzing the motion of microcarriers or free cells relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. The primary mechanisms of cell damage appear to result from: (1) direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies; (2) collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow; and (3) collisions against the impeller or other stationary surfaces. If the smallest eddies of turbulent flow are of the same size as the microcarrier beads, they may cause high shear stresses on the cells. Eddies the size of the average interbead spacing may cause bead-bead collisions which damage cells. The severity of the collisions increases when the eddies are also of the same size as the beads. Impeller collisions occur when beads cannot avoid the impeller leading edge as it advances through the liquid. The implications of the results of this analysis on the design and operation of tissue culture reactors are discussed.

  13. Characterization and performance of anodic mixed culture biofilms in submersed microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Saba, Beenish; Christy, Ann D; Yu, Zhongtang; Co, Anne C; Islam, Rafiq; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2017-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were designed for laboratory scale experiments to study electroactive biofilms in anodic chambers. Anodic biofilms and current generation during biofilm growth were examined using single chambered MFCs submersed in algal catholyte. A culture of the marine green alga Nanochloropsis salina was used as a biocatholyte, and a rumen fluid microbiota was the anodic chamber inoculum. Electrical impedance spectroscopy was performed under varying external resistance once a week to identify mass transport limitations at the biofilm-electrolyte interface during the four-week experiment. The power generation increased from 249 to 461mWm(-2) during the time course. Confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging showed that the depth of the bacterial biofilm on the anode was about 65μm. There were more viable bacteria on the biofilm surface and near the biofilm-electrolyte interface as compared to those close to the anode surface. The results suggest that biofilm growth on the anode creates a conductive layer, which can help overcome mass transport limitations in MFCs.

  14. Cultural responses to pain in UK children of primary school age: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Azize, Pary M; Endacott, Ruth; Cattani, Allegra; Humphreys, Ann

    2014-06-01

    Pain-measurement tools are often criticized for not addressing the influence of culture and ethnicity on pain. This study examined how children who speak English as a primary or additional language discuss pain. Two methods were used in six focus group interviews with 34 children aged 4-7 years: (i) use of drawings from the Pediatric Pain Inventory to capture the language used by children to describe pain; and (ii) observation of the children's placing of pain drawings on red/amber/green paper to denote perceived severity of pain. The findings demonstrated that children with English as an additional language used less elaborate language when talking about pain, but tended to talk about the pictures prior to deciding where they should be placed. For these children, there was a positive significant relationship between language, age, and length of stay in the UK. The children's placement of pain drawings varied according to language background, sex, and age. The findings emphasize the need for sufficient time to assess pain adequately in children who do not speak English as a first language.

  15. Acetate accumulation enhances mixed culture fermentation of biomass to lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Khor, Way Cern; Roume, Hugo; Coma, Marta; Vervaeren, Han; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-10-01

    Lactic acid is a high-in-demand chemical, which can be produced through fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstock. However, fermentation of complex substrate produces a mixture of products at efficiencies too low to justify a production process. We hypothesized that the background acetic acid concentration plays a critical role in lactic acid yield; therefore, its retention via selective extraction of lactic acid or its addition would improve overall lactic acid production and eliminate net production of acetic acid. To test this hypothesis, we added 10 g/L of acetate to fermentation broth to investigate its effect on products composition and concentration and bacterial community evolution using several substrate-inoculum combinations. With rumen fluid inoculum, lactate concentrations increased by 80 ± 12 % (cornstarch, p < 0.05) and 16.7 ± 0.4 % (extruded grass, p < 0.05) while with pure culture inoculum (Lactobacillus delbrueckii and genetically modified (GM) Escherichia coli), a 4 to 23 % increase was observed. Using rumen fluid inoculum, the bacterial community was enriched within 8 days to >69 % lactic acid bacteria (LAB), predominantly Lactobacillaceae. Higher acetate concentration promoted a more diverse LAB population, especially on non-inoculated bottles. In subsequent tests, acetate was added in a semi-continuous percolation system with grass as substrate. These tests confirmed our findings producing lactate at concentrations 26 ± 5 % (p < 0.05) higher than the control reactor over 20 days operation. Overall, our work shows that recirculating acetate has the potential to boost lactic acid production from waste biomass to levels more attractive for application.

  16. Motivating Teachers towards Expertise Development: A Mixed-Methods Study of the Relationships between School Culture, Internal Factors, and State of Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayeaux, Amanda Shuford

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential mixed-methods research was to discover the impact school culture, internal factors, and the state of flow has upon motivating a teacher to develop teaching expertise. This research was designed to find answers concerning why and how individual teachers can nurture their existing internal factors to increase their…

  17. Effect of supplementing orchardgrass herbage with a total mixed ration or flaxseed fermentation profile and bacterial protein synthesis in continuous culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to evaluate the effects of herbage, a total mixed ration (TMR) and flaxseed on nutrient digestibility and microbial N synthesis. Treatments were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Each fermentor was fed a to...

  18. Teachers' and School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Cultural Competence in Working with Newly Arrived Latino Immigrant Students: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardiola Castillo, Irma V.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teachers' and school counselors' perceptions of their cultural competence in working with newly arrived Latino immigrant students by using a mixed instrument with closed-ended and open-ended items. Multicultural Counseling Competencies (MCC) served as the theoretical framework for this study (Sue,…

  19. Striving and Thriving in a Foreign Culture: A Mixed Method Approach on Adult International Students' Experience in U.S.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Dianbing; Yang, Xinxiao

    2014-01-01

    In this mixed method study, we examined the experience of a sample of international students in four American universities to identify the factors that might enhance their ability in surviving and thriving in a foreign country within the context of university internationalization. The research explored the concepts of cultural values, behaviors,…

  20. Biodegradation of Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE) by Mixed Culture of Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus and Aspergillus niger in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Atefeh; Pourbabaee, Ahmad Ali; Alikhani, Hossein Ali; Shabani, Farzin; Esmaeili, Ensieh

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two strains of Aspergillus sp. and Lysinibacillus sp. with remarkable abilities to degrade low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were isolated from landfill soils in Tehran using enrichment culture and screening procedures. The biodegradation process was performed for 126 days in soil using UV- and non-UV-irradiated pure LDPE films without pro-oxidant additives in the presence and absence of mixed cultures of selected microorganisms. The process was monitored by measuring the microbial population, the biomass carbon, pH and respiration in the soil, and the mechanical properties of the films. The carbon dioxide measurements in the soil showed that the biodegradation in the un-inoculated treatments were slow and were about 7.6% and 8.6% of the mineralisation measured for the non-UV-irradiated and UV-irradiated LDPE, respectively, after 126 days. In contrast, in the presence of the selected microorganisms, biodegradation was much more efficient and the percentages of biodegradation were 29.5% and 15.8% for the UV-irradiated and non-UV-irradiated films, respectively. The percentage decrease in the carbonyl index was higher for the UV-irradiated LDPE when the biodegradation was performed in soil inoculated with the selected microorganisms. The percentage elongation of the films decreased during the biodegradation process. The Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine structural, morphological and surface changes on polyethylene. These analyses showed that the selected microorganisms could modify and colonise both types of polyethylene. This study also confirmed the ability of these isolates to utilise virgin polyethylene without pro-oxidant additives and oxidation pretreatment, as the carbon source. PMID:24086254

  1. Biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by mixed culture of Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus and Aspergillus niger in soil.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Atefeh; Pourbabaee, Ahmad Ali; Alikhani, Hossein Ali; Shabani, Farzin; Esmaeili, Ensieh

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two strains of Aspergillus sp. and Lysinibacillus sp. with remarkable abilities to degrade low-density polyethylene (LDPE) were isolated from landfill soils in Tehran using enrichment culture and screening procedures. The biodegradation process was performed for 126 days in soil using UV- and non-UV-irradiated pure LDPE films without pro-oxidant additives in the presence and absence of mixed cultures of selected microorganisms. The process was monitored by measuring the microbial population, the biomass carbon, pH and respiration in the soil, and the mechanical properties of the films. The carbon dioxide measurements in the soil showed that the biodegradation in the un-inoculated treatments were slow and were about 7.6% and 8.6% of the mineralisation measured for the non-UV-irradiated and UV-irradiated LDPE, respectively, after 126 days. In contrast, in the presence of the selected microorganisms, biodegradation was much more efficient and the percentages of biodegradation were 29.5% and 15.8% for the UV-irradiated and non-UV-irradiated films, respectively. The percentage decrease in the carbonyl index was higher for the UV-irradiated LDPE when the biodegradation was performed in soil inoculated with the selected microorganisms. The percentage elongation of the films decreased during the biodegradation process. The Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine structural, morphological and surface changes on polyethylene. These analyses showed that the selected microorganisms could modify and colonise both types of polyethylene. This study also confirmed the ability of these isolates to utilise virgin polyethylene without pro-oxidant additives and oxidation pretreatment, as the carbon source.

  2. Comparison of microtitre plates with flat-bottomed and round-bottomed wells for mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC).

    PubMed

    Herva, E

    1977-04-01

    To compare microtitre plates with flat-bottomed and round-bottomed wells and to standardize a method for mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), the effects of cell number, culture time, 3H-thymidine concentration and labelling time were studied. On both plates, allogeneic cells induced increased RNA synthesis beginning at about 30 hours and increased DNA synthesis beginning at about 50 hours, if suitable cell numbers were used. On plates with flat-bottomed wells, 1.5 X 10(5) responding and stimulating cells per well had near-exponential growth on day four and five, often through day six; on plates with round-bottomed wells the corresponding cell number was 0.25-1.0 (optimally 0.5) X 10(5). Near these cell numbers, the response depended closely on the number of responding cells. On plates with flat-bottomed wells, stimulating cells had a dose-dependent effect on the response, whereas on plates with round-bottomed wells, increasing the stimulating cell dose did not consistently strengthen the response. Both plate types proved suitable for MLC experiments; plates with round-bottomed wells have the obvious advantage of requiring smaller cell numbers. 3H-thymidine (spec, act 2000 mCi/mmol) self-suppressed its incorporation, which increased only slightly or even decreased if labelling time exceeded 12-18 hours. Relative responses remained virtually unaltered, however, with 3H-concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 micronCi/ml and with labelling times of 8 and 24 hours.

  3. Effect of nitrogen source on methanol oxidation and genetic diversity of methylotrophic mixed cultures enriched from pulp and paper mill biofilms.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Callie W; Lindner, Angela S

    2011-04-01

    Methanol-oxidizing bacteria may play an important role in the development and use of biological treatment systems for the removal of methanol from industrial effluents. Optimization of methanol degradation potential in such systems is contingent on availability of nutrients, such as nitrogen, in the most favorable form and concentration. To that end, this study examined the variation in growth, methanol degradation, and bacterial diversity of two mixed methylotrophic cultures that were provided nitrogen either as ammonium or nitrate and in three different concentrations. Methanol-degrading cultures were enriched from biofilms sampled at a pulp and paper mill and grown in liquid batch culture with methanol as the only carbon source and either ammonium or nitrate as the only added nitrogen source. Results indicate that growth and methanol removal of the mixed cultures increase directly with increased nitrogen, added in either form. However, methanol removal and bacterial diversity, as observed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) methods, were higher when using nitrate as the nitrogen source for enrichment and growth, rather than ammonium. Based on results described here, nitrate may potentially be a better nitrogen source when enriching or working with mixed methylotrophic cultures, and possibly more effective when used as a nutrient addition to biofilters.

  4. Biohydrogen production in granular up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors with mixed cultures under hyper-thermophilic temperature (70 degrees C).

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulos, Thomas A; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2006-06-05

    Hyper-thermophilic hydrogen production without methane was demonstrated for the first time in granular up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) system fed with glucose using mixed cultures. The maximum hydrogen yield in this study was 2.47 +/- 0.15 mol H2/mol glucose. This high yield has never been previously reported in mixed culture systems and it was likely due to more favorable thermodynamic conditions at hyper-thermophilic temperatures. Different start-up strategies (bromoethanosulfonate (BES) addition and flow recycle) were evaluated. BES addition during start-up prevented the establishment of methanogenic cultures in granules. Flow recycle was important to achieve higher hydrogen yield through enriching better hydrogen-producing organisms and reduced the start-up period as well. This study indicated UASB system was a promising system for hydrogen production.

  5. Feasibility, acceptability and clinical utility of the Cultural Formulation Interview: mixed-methods results from the DSM-5 international field trial.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Lam, Peter C; Galfalvy, Hanga; Weiss, Mitchell G; Kirmayer, Laurence J; Paralikar, Vasudeo; Deshpande, Smita N; Díaz, Esperanza; Nicasio, Andel V; Boiler, Marit; Alarcón, Renato D; Rohlof, Hans; Groen, Simon; van Dijk, Rob C J; Jadhav, Sushrut; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Ndetei, David; Scalco, Monica Z; Bassiri, Kavoos; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Ton, Hendry; Westermeyer, Joseph; Vega-Dienstmaier, Johann M

    2017-04-01

    BackgroundThere is a need for clinical tools to identify cultural issues in diagnostic assessment.AimsTo assess the feasibility, acceptability and clinical utility of the DSM-5 Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI) in routine clinical practice.MethodMixed-methods evaluation of field trial data from six countries. The CFI was administered to diagnostically diverse psychiatric out-patients during a diagnostic interview. In post-evaluation sessions, patients and clinicians completed debriefing qualitative interviews and Likert-scale questionnaires. The duration of CFI administration and the full diagnostic session were monitored.ResultsMixed-methods data from 318 patients and 75 clinicians found the CFI feasible, acceptable and useful. Clinician feasibility ratings were significantly lower than patient ratings and other clinician-assessed outcomes. After administering one CFI, however, clinician feasibility ratings improved significantly and subsequent interviews required less time.ConclusionsThe CFI was included in DSM-5 as a feasible, acceptable and useful cultural assessment tool.

  6. Quantification of toxic and inhibitory impact of copper and zinc on mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Utgikar, Vivek P; Tabak, Henry H; Haines, John R; Govind, Rakesh

    2003-05-05

    The adverse effects of copper and zinc on an acetate-utilizing mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at concentrations below the toxic concentration (minimum metal concentration at which no sulfate reduction is observed) are reported in this paper. Mathematical models were developed to incorporate the toxic and inhibitory effects (defined as the reduction in bacterial population upon exposure to the metal and the decrease in the metabolic rate of sulfate reduction by the SRB, respectively) into the sulfate-reduction biokinetics. The characteristic toxicity and inhibition constants were obtained from the measurements of bacterial populations and dissolved metal concentrations in serum bottle studies conducted at 35 degrees C and pH 6.6. Both copper and zinc had toxic and inhibitory effects on SRB. The toxicity constants for copper and zinc were 10.6 and 2.9 mM(-1), respectively, indicating that exposure to copper resulted in a higher mortality of SRB than did exposure to zinc. The values of the inhibition constants were found to be 17.9 +/- 2.5 and 25.2 +/- 1.0 mM(-1) for copper and zinc, respectively. This implies that dissolved zinc was slightly more inhibitory to SRB than copper. The models presented in the paper can be used to predict the response of a sulfate-reduction bioreactor to heavy metals during acid mine drainage treatment.

  7. Towards Effective and Socio-Culturally Appropriate Sanitation and Hygiene Interventions in the Philippines: A Mixed Method Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pfadenhauer, Lisa Maria; Rehfuess, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) represent an important health burden in the Philippines. The non-governmental organisation Fit for School intends to complement its handwashing programme in schools with sanitation interventions. The objectives of this mixed-method study therefore were to describe WASH practices and their impact on childhood diarrhoea in the Philippines, and to examine socio-cultural and environmental factors underlying defecation and anal cleansing practices in Northern Mindanao. We quantified the effect of WASH practices on diarrhoea through logistic regression models, using the Philippine Demographic and Health Survey 2008. When adjusting for non-modifiable factors, susceptibility and socioeconomic factors, WASH factors failed to show a statistically significant effect. Focus group discussions were held with women in urban and rural Northern Mindanao, and findings analysed using thematic analysis. Defecation and anal cleansing behaviours were constrained by the physical environment, particularly the lack of clean, safe, comfortable and private facilities. Individual determinants of behaviour were influenced by habit and motivations such as disgust, with some evidence of planned behaviour. Where available, water was the preferred material for anal cleansing. This study combines nationally-representative quantitative data with local in-depth qualitative insights, constituting critical formative research in the development of effective and appropriate interventions. PMID:25664699

  8. Properties of a trichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-dechlorinating mixed culture with a Dehalococcoides as putative dechlorinating species.

    PubMed

    Ballerstedt, Hendrik; Hantke, Janina; Bunge, Michael; Werner, Birgit; Gerritse, Jan; Andreesen, Jan R; Lechner, Ute

    2004-02-01

    An anaerobic mixed culture enriched over 16 transfers (1/10) from Saale river sediment reductively dehalogenated 1,2,4- and 1,2,3-trichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TrCDD) to di- and monochlorinated congeners in the presence of pyruvate (or lactate) and fumarate as cosubstrates. Besides TrCDD, tetrachloroethene and 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene were dechlorinated. Dioxin dehalogenation was sensitive to pasteurization, but was not remarkably influenced by inhibitors of methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria or Gram-positive bacteria. The rate of 1,3-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin formation increased with rising initial concentrations of 1,2,4-TrCDD (1-250 microM) from 0.05 to 5.4 micromol l(-1) day(-1). Two isolates, belonging to Sulfurospirillum and Trichococcus, did not show reductive dehalogenation. 16S rDNA-targeted methods further revealed the presence of Acetobacterium, Desulfitobacterium, Desulfuromonas and Dehalococcoides. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) indicated the presence of Dehalococcoides in highest most probable number (MPN) dilutions that were positive for dioxin dechlorination.

  9. Hydrothermal liquefaction of mixed-culture algal biomass from wastewater treatment system into bio-crude oil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Zhang, Yuanhui; Zhang, Jixiang; Yu, Guo; Schideman, Lance C; Zhang, Peng; Minarick, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a mixed-culture algal biomass harvested from a functioning wastewater treatment system (AW) was hydrothermally converted into bio-crude oils. The highest bio-crude oil yield (49% of volatile matter) and the highest energy recovery were obtained at 300 °C with 1 h retention time. The highest heating value of the bio-crude oil was 33.3 MJ/kg, produced at 320 °C and 1h retention time. Thermogravimetric analysis showed approximately 60% of the bio-crude oils were distilled in the range of 200-550 °C; and the solid residue might be suitable for use in asphalt. GC-MS results indicated that the bio-crude oil contained hydrocarbons and fatty acids, while the aqueous product was rich in organic acids and cyclic amines. The nitrogen recovery (NR) in the bio-crude oil ranged from 8.41% to 16.8%, which was lower than the typical range of 25%-53% from previous studies.

  10. A modified metabolic model for mixed culture fermentation with energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction and metabolite transport energy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Man; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Zeng, Raymond J

    2013-07-01

    A modified metabolic model for mixed culture fermentation (MCF) is proposed with the consideration of an energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction and the transport energy of metabolites. The production of H2 related to NADH/NAD(+) and Fdred/Fdox is proposed to be divided in three processes in view of energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction. This assumption could fine-tune the intracellular redox balance and regulate the distribution of metabolites. With respect to metabolite transport energy, the proton motive force is considered to be constant, while the transport rate coefficient is proposed to be proportional to the octanol-water partition coefficient. The modeling results for a glucose fermentation in a continuous stirred tank reactor show that the metabolite distribution is consistent with the literature: (1) acetate, butyrate, and ethanol are main products at acidic pH, while the production shifts to acetate and propionate at neutral and alkali pH; (2) the main products acetate, ethanol, and butyrate shift to ethanol at higher glucose concentration; (3) the changes for acetate and butyrate are following an increasing hydrogen partial pressure. The findings demonstrate that our modified model is more realistic than previous proposed model concepts. It also indicates that inclusion of an energy conserving electron bifurcation reaction and metabolite transport energy for MCF is sound in the viewpoint of biochemistry and physiology.

  11. Mitigation of soil N2O emission by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Itakura, Manabu; Shimomura, Yumi; Wang, Yong; Yamamoto, Akinori; Tago, Kanako; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2016-09-01

    Agricultural soil is the largest source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. Soybean is an important leguminous crop worldwide. Soybean hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules. In soybean ecosystems, N2O emissions often increase during decomposition of the root nodules. Our previous study showed that N2O reductase can be used to mitigate N2O emission from soybean fields during nodule decomposition by inoculation with nosZ++ strains [mutants with increased N2O reductase (N2OR) activity] of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. Here, we show that N2O emission can be reduced at the field scale by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous nosZ+ strains of B. diazoefficiens USDA110 group isolated from Japanese agricultural fields. Our results also suggested that nodule nitrogen is the main source of N2O production during nodule decomposition. Isolating nosZ+ strains from local soybean fields would be more applicable and feasible for many soybean-producing countries than generating mutants.

  12. Mitigation of soil N2O emission by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Hiroko; Hoshino, Yuko Takada; Itakura, Manabu; Shimomura, Yumi; Wang, Yong; Yamamoto, Akinori; Tago, Kanako; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Hayatsu, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural soil is the largest source of nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas. Soybean is an important leguminous crop worldwide. Soybean hosts symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria (rhizobia) in root nodules. In soybean ecosystems, N2O emissions often increase during decomposition of the root nodules. Our previous study showed that N2O reductase can be used to mitigate N2O emission from soybean fields during nodule decomposition by inoculation with nosZ++ strains [mutants with increased N2O reductase (N2OR) activity] of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens. Here, we show that N2O emission can be reduced at the field scale by inoculation with a mixed culture of indigenous nosZ+ strains of B. diazoefficiens USDA110 group isolated from Japanese agricultural fields. Our results also suggested that nodule nitrogen is the main source of N2O production during nodule decomposition. Isolating nosZ+ strains from local soybean fields would be more applicable and feasible for many soybean-producing countries than generating mutants. PMID:27633524

  13. Towards effective and socio-culturally appropriate sanitation and hygiene interventions in the Philippines: a mixed method approach.

    PubMed

    Pfadenhauer, Lisa Maria; Rehfuess, Eva

    2015-02-05

    Inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) represent an important health burden in the Philippines. The non-governmental organisation Fit for School intends to complement its handwashing programme in schools with sanitation interventions. The objectives of this mixed-method study therefore were to describe WASH practices and their impact on childhood diarrhoea in the Philippines, and to examine socio-cultural and environmental factors underlying defecation and anal cleansing practices in Northern Mindanao. We quantified the effect of WASH practices on diarrhoea through logistic regression models, using the Philippine Demographic and Health Survey 2008. When adjusting for non-modifiable factors, susceptibility and socioeconomic factors, WASH factors failed to show a statistically significant effect. Focus group discussions were held with women in urban and rural Northern Mindanao, and findings analysed using thematic analysis. Defecation and anal cleansing behaviours were constrained by the physical environment, particularly the lack of clean, safe, comfortable and private facilities. Individual determinants of behaviour were influenced by habit and motivations such as disgust, with some evidence of planned behaviour. Where available, water was the preferred material for anal cleansing. This study combines nationally-representative quantitative data with local in-depth qualitative insights, constituting critical formative research in the development of effective and appropriate interventions.

  14. [The effect of infestation by mixed culture of Beauveria bassiana and Paecilomyces farinosus on reduction in numbers of experimental culture Blattella germanica L].

    PubMed

    Zukowski, K; Bajan, C; Popowska-Nowak, E

    1999-01-01

    In this paper results of infestation of Blatella germanica L with mixed culture of insecticidal fungi belonging to one two species are presented. In the first stage of experiment the insects were infested first with B. bassiana spores and later with P. farinosus spores (strains L and P) was used as first and B. bassiana as second with time sequence of only 24 and 72 hours. Out of one species cultures tests were done alternately with strains L and P of P. farinosus. The control insects were always infested with fungi applied to cockroach in the first place. From comparison of data it results that irrespective of the time that elapsed from application of the first pathogen to the time of application of the second pathogen the number of dead individuals was always higher in experimental series than in control i.e. when only one pathogen was applied. After 30 days of experiment the highest mortality in females amounted to, 3.3% and in males--80.0% whereas in the control it amounted 6.6% and 20.0%. Respectively, after feeding on diet infested only with one pathogen. After 50 years the highest mortality amounted to 20% in females and 100% in males with control of 30% and 53.3% in meals and females, respectively. When the sequence of pathogen application was reversed, mortality after 30 day amounted to 53.3% in females and 36.7% in meals with corresponding numbers in controls beginning 26.6% and 26.6%, respectively. After elapse of 50 days the highest mortality in females was 90% and in males--100% with control showing mortality of 36.7% and 63.3% respectively. From comparison of numerical data complied in Table 1 it results that most advantageous time span between first and second infestation with fungi is 48 h. Mortality of cockroaches infested with fungi of two different species was higher than in insects infested with one species of fungi.

  15. Cross cultural evaluation of the Warwick-Edinburgh mental well-being scale (WEMWBS) -a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to validate the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) among English speaking adults representing two of the minority ethnic groups living in the UK, self-identified as Chinese or Pakistani by background, in a mixed methods study. Methods Quantitative data were collected in two cities in the West Midlands, UK. Item response, dimensionality, internal consistency, and construct validity of the WEMWBS were assessed in Chinese and Pakistani groups separately, using data from both cities combined. Qualitative data were collected in the first city in eight focus groups of different ages recruited by the community workers. Three mixed sex Chinese and five single sex Pakistani groups discussed ease of completion and comprehension of items, together with overall reactions to the scale and underlying concept. Results of quantitative and qualitative analysis were examined for commonalities and differences. Results Item completion and item total correlations were satisfactory in both groups. In the Chinese data, Exploratory Factor Analysis showed a single factor with loadings ranging from 0.60 to 0.82 for all 14 items. In the Pakistani data, three factors reached statistical significance; however, a substantial drop in eigenvalues between the first and second factors and the limited variance explained by the second and third factors supported a one-factor model. All items loaded on this factor from 0.51 to 0.83. In the Chinese and Pakistani data respectively, Cronbach’s alpha was 0.92 (0.89 – 0.94) and 0.91 (0.88 – 0.94); Spearman’s correlation with GHQ-12 was - 0.63 (−0.73 to −0.49) and −0.55 (−0.70 to −0.36), and with the WHO-5 0.62 (0.46-0.75) and 0.64 (0.50 to 0.76). Qualitative analysis revealed good comprehension and ease of completion of almost all items. Some culturally determined differences in understanding of mental well-being, which varied both between and within communities, emerged. Conclusions The WEMWBS was well

  16. Mixed culture of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris for lipid production from industrial wastes and its use as biodiesel feedstock.

    PubMed

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Suwannarat, Warangkana; Niyomdecha, Rujira

    2011-07-01

    A mixed culture of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris was performed to enhance lipid production from industrial wastes. These included effluent from seafood processing plant and molasses from sugar cane plant. In the mixed culture, the yeast grew faster and the lipid production was higher than that in the pure cultures. This could be because microalga acted as an oxygen generator for yeast, while yeast provided CO(2) to microalga and both carried out the production of lipids. The optimal conditions for lipid production by the mixed culture were as follows: ratio of yeast to microalga at 1:1; initial pH at 5.0; molasses concentration at 1%; shaking speed at 200 rpm; and light intensity at 5.0 klux under 16:8 hours light and dark cycles. Under these conditions, the highest biomass of 4.63±0.15 g/L and lipid production of 2.88±0.16 g/L were obtained after five days of cultivation. In addition, the plant oil-like fatty acid composition of yeast and microalgal lipids suggested their high potential for use as biodiesel feedstock.

  17. Long-term operation of microbial electrosynthesis cell reducing CO2 to multi-carbon chemicals with a mixed culture avoiding methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bajracharya, Suman; Yuliasni, Rustiana; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien; Buisman, Cees J N; Strik, David P B T B; Pant, Deepak

    2017-02-01

    In microbial electrosynthesis (MES), CO2 can be reduced preferably to multi-carbon chemicals by a biocathode-based process which uses electrochemically active bacteria as catalysts. A mixed anaerobic consortium from biological origin typically produces methane from CO2 reduction which circumvents production of multi-carbon compounds. This study aimed to develop a stable and robust CO2 reducing biocathode from a mixed culture inoculum avoiding the methane generation. An effective approach was demonstrated based on (i) an enrichment procedure involving inoculum pre-treatment and several culture transfers in H2:CO2 media, (ii) a transfer from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth and (iii) a sequential batch operation. Biomass growth and gradual acclimation to CO2 electro-reduction accomplished a maximum acetate production rate of 400mgLcatholyte(-1)d(-1) at -1V (vs. Ag/AgCl). Methane was never detected in more than 300days of operation. Accumulation of acetate up to 7-10gL(-1) was repeatedly attained by supplying (80:20) CO2:N2 mixture at -0.9 to -1V (vs. Ag/AgCl). In addition, ethanol and butyrate were also produced from CO2 reduction. Thus, a robust CO2 reducing biocathode can be developed from a mixed culture avoiding methane generation by adopting the specific culture enrichment and operation procedures without the direct addition of chemical inhibitor.

  18. Potential of Kalopanax septemlobus leaf extract in synthesis of silver nanoparticles for selective inhibition of specific bacterial strain in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Sawant, Shailesh S; Kim, Beom Soo

    2014-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesised using Kalopanax septemlobus plant leaf extracts. UV-visible spectrophotometric, Fourier-transform infrared, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses confirmed synthesis of AgNPs. TEM micrographs revealed presence of well-dispersed AgNPs predominantly of small size and different shapes with an average particle size of 30.8 nm. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests of AgNP treatments revealed variability in sensitivity of bacteria Bacillus cereus and Saccharophagus degradans under study. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of the AgNPs for B. cereus and S. degradans were found to be 30 and 10 μg/mL, respectively. The mixed culture of B. cereus and S. degradans treated with AgNPs at 10 μg/mL showed increase in growth with time, suggesting survival of bacteria in liquid media. The plating of mixed culture before AgNP treatment showed presence of both bacteria, but 24-h-old mixed culture treated with AgNPs at the concentration of 10 μg/mL showed presence of B. cereus colonies. SEM micrographs revealed damage to S. degradans cells but no effect on B. cereus cells after AgNP treatment. Confocal microscopic observations of AgNP-treated mixed cultures by Nile blue A staining indicated intact polyhydroxyalkanoates producing flourescent cells of B. cereus but damage and deformities in S. degradans cells. This study suggests that AgNPs can selectively inhibit growth of S. degradans and retain B. cereus at MIC of S. degradans. This report is a case study for selective inhibition of one bacteria and growth of the other in a culture using plant-synthesized silver nanoparticles.

  19. Enrichment of a mixed microbial culture for polyhydroxyalkanoates production: Effect of pH and N and P concentrations.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Jarillo, Gabriela; Carrera, Julián; Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are biopolymers that can be an alternative against conventional plastics. The study reported herein evaluated the enrichment of a mixed microbial culture (MMC) operated under feast/famine regime and different pHs in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using acetate as sole carbon source to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). The enrichment step was evaluated at controlled pH of 7.5 and also without pH control (averaged value of 9.0). The acetate uptake rate (-qS) of both enrichments at the end of the experimental period exhibited similar behaviour being about 0.18CmolAcCmolX(-1)h(-1) and 0.19CmolAcCmolX(-1)h(-1) for SBR-A and SBR-B, respectively. However, the PHA-storing capacity of the biomass enriched without pH control was better, exhibiting a maximum PHA content of 36% (gPHAg(-1) VSS) with a PHA production rate (qPHA) of 0.16CmolPHACmolX(-1)h(-1). Batch experiments were performed to evaluate PHA-storing capacity of the enriched culture at different pHs and nutrients concentrations. In the pH experiments (without nutrient limitation), it was found that in the absence of controlled pH, the enriched biomass exhibited a PHA content of 44% gPHAg(-1) VSS with -qS and PHA to substrate yield (YPHA/Ac) of 0.57CmolAcCmolX(-1)h(-1) and 0.33CmolPHACmolAc(-1), respectively. Regarding the experiments at variable nutrients concentration (pH ranging 8.8 to 9.2), the results indicate that the PHA content in the enriched biomass is significantly higher being around 51% gPHAg(-1) VSS under nitrogen limitation. This work demonstrated the feasibility of the enrichment of a MMC with PHA storage ability without pH control. Results also suggest that better PHAs contents and substrate uptake rates are obtained without controlling the pH in the accumulation step. Finally, this work also highlights the importance of understanding the role of nutrients concentration during the accumulation step.

  20. Transcriptomic and metabolic responses of Staphylococcus aureus in mixed culture with Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus durans in milk.

    PubMed

    Zdenkova, Kamila; Alibayov, Babek; Karamonova, Ludmila; Purkrtova, Sabina; Karpiskova, Renata; Demnerova, Katerina

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major food-borne pathogen due to the production of enterotoxin and is particularly prevalent in contaminated milk and dairy products. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as biocontrol agents in fermented foods which can inhibit pathogenic flora. In our work, we investigated the influence of three strains of LAB (Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus thermophilus and Enterococcus durans) on the relative expression of three enterotoxin genes (sea, sec, sell) and eight virulence and/or regulatory genes (sarA, saeS, codY, srrA, rot, hld/RNAIII, agrA/RNAII, sigB) in two S. aureus strains (MW2 and Sa1612) in TSB and reduced-fat milk (1.5 %) at 30 °C over a 24-h period. The tested LAB and S. aureus strains proved to be mutually non-competitive or only slightly competitive during co-cultivation. In addition, under the above-mentioned conditions, differential gene expression between the S. aureus MW2 and Sa1612 strains was well documented. S. aureus growth was changed in mixed culture with LAB; however, its effect on the repression of sea and sec expression correlated with production of these virulence factors. In comparison, the presence of LAB strains generally inhibited the expression of sec, sell, sarA, seaS, agrA/RNAII and hld/RNAIII genes. The effect of LAB strains presence on the expression of sea, codY, srrA, rot and sigB genes was medium, time, LAB and S. aureus strain specific. SEA and SEC production was significantly reduced in milk compared to TSB in pure culture. After the 24-h cultivation, S. aureus MW2 and Sa1612 SEC production was 187 and 331 times lower in milk compared to TSB, respectively (0.07 and 0.39 ng/mL in milk, versus 13.1 and 129.2 ng/mL in TSB, respectively). At the same time S. aureus MW2 and Sa1612 SEA production was 77 and 68 times lower in milk compared to TSB, respectively (0.99 and 0.17 ng/mL in milk, versus 76.4 and 11.5 ng/mL in TSB, respectively). This study has revealed new insights into the

  1. The statistical performance of an MCF-7 cell culture assay evaluated using generalized linear mixed models and a score test.

    PubMed

    Rey deCastro, B; Neuberg, Donna

    2007-05-30

    Biological assays often utilize experimental designs where observations are replicated at multiple levels, and where each level represents a separate component of the assay's overall variance. Statistical analysis of such data usually ignores these design effects, whereas more sophisticated methods would improve the statistical power of assays. This report evaluates the statistical performance of an in vitro MCF-7 cell proliferation assay (E-SCREEN) by identifying the optimal generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) that accurately represents the assay's experimental design and variance components. Our statistical assessment found that 17beta-oestradiol cell culture assay data were best modelled with a GLMM configured with a reciprocal link function, a gamma error distribution, and three sources of design variation: plate-to-plate; well-to-well, and the interaction between plate-to-plate variation and dose. The gamma-distributed random error of the assay was estimated to have a coefficient of variation (COV) = 3.2 per cent, and a variance component score test described by X. Lin found that each of the three variance components were statistically significant. The optimal GLMM also confirmed the estrogenicity of five weakly oestrogenic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs 17, 49, 66, 74, and 128). Based on information criteria, the optimal gamma GLMM consistently out-performed equivalent naive normal and log-normal linear models, both with and without random effects terms. Because the gamma GLMM was by far the best model on conceptual and empirical grounds, and requires only trivially more effort to use, we encourage its use and suggest that naive models be avoided when possible.

  2. Differential ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectra for characterizing metal ions binding onto extracellular polymeric substances in different mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Cuiqin; Meng, Fangang; Meng, Yabing; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorbance spectra was adopted to quantify the binding of major metal ions (e.g., Na(I), Ca((II)), Fe(III), Cu(II), and Pb(II)) on extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) extracted from different mixed cultures. The results showed that the differential absorbance spectra (DAS) provided discernible features for revealing the changes in optical properties of EPSs induced by metals, i.e., the intensity of DAS increased largely with incrementally increased metal concentrations (Fe(III), Cu(II), and Pb(II)). It can be assumed attributable to the changes in the conformations and inter-chromophores of the EPS biomolecules. In addition, the changes in spectral parameters of DSlope325-375 (spectral slope in the range of wavelengths 325-375 nm) and DA300 (differential absorbance at 300 nm) were found to be closely related to the amounts of metals bound onto all extracted EPSs, particularly for Fe(III) and Cu(II). The decreased SR (the ratio of slope275-295 to slope350-400) of the EPS solutions after dosage of metals suggested increased molecular weight or size of the EPS biomolecules. Deconvolution of the DAS yielded six Gaussian bands, which were present in all of the EPS samples with various metals. Moreover, the relative contributions of different Gaussian bands in the DAS were determined by the nature of EPS-metal ions interactions good correlated with the covalent-bonding index. This study concluded that DAS and selected spectral parameters (DA300, DSlope325-375 and SR) can be used to successfully characterize the binding of metals onto EPS at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  3. Capture, Release and Culture of Circulating Tumor Cells from Pancreatic Cancer Patients using an Enhanced Mixing Chip

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Weian; Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O.; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Jinling; George, Thomas J.; Liu, Chen; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from peripheral blood hold important information for cancer diagnosis and disease monitoring. Analysis of this “liquid biopsy” holds the promise to usher in a new era of personalized therapeutic treatments and real-time monitoring for cancer patients. But the extreme rarity of CTCs in blood makes their isolation and characterization technologically challenging. This paper reports the development of a geometrically enhanced mixing (GEM) chip for high-efficiency and high-purity tumor cell capture. We also successfully demonstrated the release and culture of the captured tumor cells, as well as the isolation of CTCs from cancer patients. The high-performance microchip is based on geometrically optimized micromixer structures, which enhance the transverse flow and flow folding, maximizing the interaction between CTCs and antibody-coated surfaces. With the optimized channel geometry and flow rate, the capture efficiency reached >90% with a purity of >84% when capturing spiked tumor cells in buffer. The system was further validated by isolating a wide range of spiked tumor cells (50–50,000) in 1 mL of lysed blood and whole blood. With the combination of trypsinization and high flow rate washing, captured tumor cells were efficiently released. The released cells were viable and able to proliferate, and showed no difference compared with intact cells that were not subjected to the capture and release process. Furthermore, we applied the device for detecting CTCs from metastatic pancreatic cancer patients’ blood; and CTCs were found from 17 out of 18 samples (>94%). We also tested the potential utility of the device in monitoring the response to anti-cancer drug treatment in pancreatic cancer patients, and the CTC numbers correlated with the clinical computed tomograms (CT scans) of tumors. The presented technology shows great promise for accurate CTC enumeration, biological studies of CTCs and cancer metastasis, as well as for cancer

  4. Enrichment of Secondary Wastewater Sludge for Production of Hydrogen from Crude Glycerol and Comparative Evaluation of Mono-, Co- and Mixed-Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pachapur, Vinayak Laxman; Kutty, Prianka; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Ramirez, Antonio Avalos

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion using mixed-culture with broader choice of pretreatments for hydrogen (H2) production was investigated. Pretreatment of wastewater sludge by five methods, such as heat, acid, base, microwave and chloroform was conducted using crude glycerol (CG) as substrate. Results for heat treatment (100 °C for 15 min) showed the highest H2 production across the pretreatment methods with 15.18 ± 0.26 mmol/L of medium at 30 °C in absence of complex media and nutrient solution. The heat-pretreated inoculum eliminated H2 consuming bacteria and produced twice as much as H2 as compared to other pretreatment methods. The fermentation conditions, such as CG concentration (1.23 to 24 g/L), percentage of inoculum size (InS) (1.23% to 24% v/v) along with initial pH (2.98 to 8.02) was tested using central composite design (CCD) with H2 production as response parameter. The maximum H2 production of 29.43 ± 0.71 mmol/L obtained at optimum conditions of 20 g/L CG, 20% InS and pH 7. Symbiotic correlation of pH over CG and InS had a significant (p-value: 0.0011) contribution to H2 production. The mixed-culture possessed better natural acclimatization activity for degrading CG, at substrate inhibition concentration and provided efficient inoculum conditions in comparison to mono- and co-culture systems. The heat pretreatment step used across mixed-culture system is simple, cheap and industrially applicable in comparison to mono-/co-culture systems for H2 production. PMID:26771607

  5. Enrichment of Secondary Wastewater Sludge for Production of Hydrogen from Crude Glycerol and Comparative Evaluation of Mono-, Co- and Mixed-Culture Systems.

    PubMed

    Pachapur, Vinayak Laxman; Kutty, Prianka; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Ramirez, Antonio Avalos

    2016-01-13

    Anaerobic digestion using mixed-culture with broader choice of pretreatments for hydrogen (H₂) production was investigated. Pretreatment of wastewater sludge by five methods, such as heat, acid, base, microwave and chloroform was conducted using crude glycerol (CG) as substrate. Results for heat treatment (100 °C for 15 min) showed the highest H₂ production across the pretreatment methods with 15.18 ± 0.26 mmol/L of medium at 30 °C in absence of complex media and nutrient solution. The heat-pretreated inoculum eliminated H₂ consuming bacteria and produced twice as much as H₂ as compared to other pretreatment methods. The fermentation conditions, such as CG concentration (1.23 to 24 g/L), percentage of inoculum size (InS) (1.23% to 24% v/v) along with initial pH (2.98 to 8.02) was tested using central composite design (CCD) with H₂ production as response parameter. The maximum H₂ production of 29.43 ± 0.71 mmol/L obtained at optimum conditions of 20 g/L CG, 20% InS and pH 7. Symbiotic correlation of pH over CG and InS had a significant (p-value: 0.0011) contribution to H₂ production. The mixed-culture possessed better natural acclimatization activity for degrading CG, at substrate inhibition concentration and provided efficient inoculum conditions in comparison to mono- and co-culture systems. The heat pretreatment step used across mixed-culture system is simple, cheap and industrially applicable in comparison to mono-/co-culture systems for H₂ production.

  6. Biological synthesis of very small silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia: The effects of visible-light irradiation and the liquid mixing process

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhtari, Narges; Daneshpajouh, Shahram; Seyedbagheri, Seyedali; Atashdehghan, Reza; Abdi, Khosro; Sarkar, Saeed; Minaian, Sara; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2009-06-03

    This study has investigated different visible-light irradiation's effect on the formation of silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate using the culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia. Our study shows that visible-light emission can significantly prompt the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Also, the study experimentally investigated the liquid mixing process effect on silver nanoparticle synthesis by visible-light irradiation. This study successfully synthesized uniformly dispersed silver nanoparticles with a uniform size and shape in the range of 1-6 nm with an average size of 3 nm. Furthermore, the study investigated the mechanism of the reduction of silver ions by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia, and used X-ray diffraction to characterize silver chloride as an intermediate compound. Silver chloride was prepared synthetically and used as a substrate for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia. The silver nanoparticles have been prepared from silver chloride during this investigation for the first time.

  7. Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    Twelve conference papers on cultural aspects of second language instruction include: "Towards True Multiculturalism: Ideas for Teachers" (Brian McVeigh); Comparing Cultures Through Critical Thinking: Development and Interpretations of Meaningful Observations" (Laurel D. Kamada); "Authority and Individualism in Japan and the…

  8. Comparison of S9 mix and hepatocytes as external metabolizing systems in mammalian cell cultures: cytogenetic effects of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene and aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Madle, E.; Tiedemann, G.; Madle, S.; Oett, A.; Kaufmann, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two external metabolizing systems, S9 mix from Aroclor-induced rat livers and freshly isolated hepatocytes, were used for activation in cultures of human lymphocytes and V79 cells. 7, 12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) were employed as indirectly acting reference mutagens. Mutagenic effects were measured by induction of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). With DMBA, SCE-inducing effects were found to be quite similar after activation by S9 mix and activation by hepatocytes. In contrast with AFB1, S9 activation led to a stronger SCE induction than hepatocyte activation in both target cells. The induction of chromosomal aberrations by AFB1 after activation by the two metabolizing systems was also analyzed in V79 cells. This experiment again revealed that AFB1 was more efficiently activated by S9 mix than by hepatocytes. The experiments have shown that the suitability of hepatocytes as an activation system is not restricted to microbial or eukaryotic point mutation assays, but that hepatocyte metabolism can also be successfully included in cytogenetic tests with short- and long-term cultures of mammalian target cells.

  9. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques.

    PubMed

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-09-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion.

  10. Characterization of wheat straw-degrading anaerobic alkali-tolerant mixed cultures from soda lake sediments by molecular and cultivation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Porsch, Katharina; Wirth, Balázs; Tóth, Erika M; Schattenberg, Florian; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline pretreatment has the potential to enhance the anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass to biogas. However, the elevated pH of the substrate may require alkalitolerant microbial communities for an effective digestion. Three mixed anaerobic lignocellulolytic cultures were enriched from sediments from two soda lakes with wheat straw as substrate under alkaline (pH 9) mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The gas production of the three cultures ceased after 4 to 5 weeks, and the produced gas was composed of carbon dioxide and methane. The main liquid intermediates were acetate and propionate. The physiological behavior of the cultures was stable even after several transfers. The enrichment process was also followed by molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene and of the mcrA/mrtA functional gene for methanogens. The main shift in the microbial community composition occurred between the sediment samples and the first enrichment, whereas the structure was stable in the following transfers. The bacterial communities mainly consisted of Sphingobacteriales, Clostridiales and Spirochaeta, but differed at genus level. Methanothermobacter and Methanosarcina genera and the order Methanomicrobiales were predominant methanogenes in the obtained cultures. Additionally, single cellulolytic microorganisms were isolated from enrichment cultures and identified as members of the alkaliphilic or alkalitolerant genera. The results show that anaerobic alkaline habitats harbor diverse microbial communities, which can degrade lignocellulose effectively and are therefore a potential resource for improving anaerobic digestion. PMID:25737100

  11. Reduction of Salmonella Typhimurium by Fermentation Metabolites of Diamond V Original XPC in an In Vitro Anaerobic Mixed Chicken Cecal Culture

    PubMed Central

    Rubinelli, Peter; Roto, Stephanie; Kim, Sun Ae; Park, Si Hong; Pavlidis, Hilary O.; McIntyre, Don; Ricke, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Fermentation metabolites of Diamond V Original XPC™ (XPC), a biological product derived from yeast fermentation, were evaluated for their ability to reduce the Salmonella Typhimurium population using an in vitro mixed anaerobic culture system containing cecal microbiota to simulate chicken hindgut conditions. Four different samples were prepared: anaerobic mixed culture containing (1) feed only, (2) cecal only (ceca were harvested from 42 days old broiler chickens), (3) feed and cecal contents, and (4) feed, cecal contents, and 1% XPC. Two experimental conditions were investigated: Group 1, in which the cecal content was added at the same time as a S. Typhimurium marker strain and Group 2, in which the cecal content was preincubated for 24 h prior to the inoculation with the S. Typhimurium marker strain. The mixed cultures were incubated anaerobically at 37°C, and the S. Typhimurium marker strain was enumerated at 0, 24, and 48 h. Analysis of short chain fatty acids was also conducted for 24 h. In the Group 1 experiment, adding XPC did not exhibit significant reduction of S. Typhimurium. However, the presence of XPC resulted in rapid reduction of S. Typhimurium in Group 2. S. Typhimurium was reduced from 6.81 log10 CFU/ml (0 h) to 3.73 log10 CFU/ml and 1.19 log10 CFU/ml after 24 and 48 h, respectively. These levels were also 2.47 log10 and 2.72 log10 lower than the S. Typhimurium level recovered from the control culture with feed and cecal contents, but without XPC. Based on these results, it appears that the ability of XPC to reduce S. Typhimurium requires the presence of the cecal microbiota. Short chain fatty acid analysis indicated that acetate and butyrate concentrations of cultures containing XPC were twofold greater than the control cultures by 24 h of anaerobic growth. Results from the present study suggest that dietary inclusion of XPC may influence cecal microbiota fermentation and has the potential to reduce Salmonella in the cecum

  12. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups on spread plates of mixed cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Windham, William R.; Ladely, Scott; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Narang, Neelam; Cray, William C.

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging for rapid presumptive-positive screening of six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) on spread plates of mixed cultures. Although the traditional culture method is still the "gold standard" for presumptive-positive pathogen screening, it is time-consuming, labor-intensive, not effective in testing large amount of food samples, and cannot completely prevent unwanted background microflora from growing together with target microorganisms on agar media. A previous study was performed using the data obtained from pure cultures individually inoculated on spot and/or spread plates in order to develop multivariate classification models differentiating each colony of the six non-O157 STEC serogroups and to optimize the models in terms of parameters. This study dealt with the validation of the trained and optimized models with a test set of new independent samples obtained from colonies on spread plates of mixed cultures. A new validation protocol appropriate to a hyperspectral imaging study for mixed cultures was developed. One imaging experiment with colonies obtained from two serial dilutions was performed. A total of six agar plates were prepared, where O45, O111 and O121 serogroups were inoculated into all six plates and each of O45, O103 and O145 serogroups was added into the mixture of the three common bacterial cultures. The number of colonies grown after 24-h incubation was 331 and the number of pixels associated with the grown colonies was 16,379. The best model found from this validation study was based on pre-processing with standard normal variate and detrending (SNVD), first derivative, spectral smoothing, and k-nearest neighbor classification (kNN, k=3) of scores in the principal component subspace spanned by 6 principal components. The independent testing results showed 95% overall

  13. Activity of Moxifloxacin, Imipenem, and Ertapenem against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis in Monocultures and Mixed Cultures in an In Vitro Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model Simulating Concentrations in the Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    The activities of moxifloxacin, imipenem, and ertapenem against pathogens causing severe necrotizing pancreatitis were studied in an in vitro pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) model. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis were exposed in monocultures and mixed cultures to concentrations of the three agents comparable to those in the human pancreas. Moxifloxacin was more active than the two carbapenems in monocultures and mixed cultures, reducing the numbers of CFU more drastically and more rapidly. PMID:23070164

  14. Collagen-graft mixed cellulose esters membrane maintains undifferentiated morphology and markers of potential pluripotency in feeder-free culture of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lotfalah Moradi, Sadegh; Hajishafieeha, Zahra; Nojedehi, Shahrzad; Dinarvand, Vida; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Roy, Ram V; Ardeshirylajimi, Abdolreza; Soleimani, Masoud

    2016-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are unique and unlimited clinical sources of stem cell therapy for the regenerative medicine. Feeder layer preparation is an important step for iPSCs production, which is expensive, time-consuming and requires conversance. In the present study, we investigated the maintenance of pluripotency, and stemness of the iPSCs through feeder-free culture on a collagen-grafted Mixed Cellulose Esters membrane (MCE-COL) after three passages during twelve days. Results have demonstrated that the iPSCs cultured on MCE-COL membrane had a fine, typical undifferentiated morphology, increased proliferation rate and significant multi-lineage differentiation potential. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and pluripotency associated gene markers expression further confirmed that iPSCs cultured on the surface of MCE-COL had more ALP positive colonies and enhanced expression of Oct-4, Nanog, Sox-2 and ALP in comparison with MCE and control groups. Since MCE-COL membrane has three dimensional structure and bioactivity, it has the potential for usage in the feeder-free culture of iPSCs, and could be a suitable candidate to use as a feeder layer in stem cells preparation.

  15. Grooming and cultural socialization: a mixed method study of caregiving practices in Burma (Myanmar) and the United States.

    PubMed

    Thein-Lemelson, Seinenu M

    2015-02-01

    Grooming behaviours are thought to be a crucial aspect of parenting and integral to the sociality of non-human mammals, but there have been few empirical studies on how grooming might be relevant to parenting and socialization processes in humans. Study 1 is a quantitative cross-cultural comparison of grooming practices in two cultural settings: an urban centre in Burma (Myanmar) and an urban centre in the United States. The study uses naturalistic video data of 57 families to analyse grooming behaviours directed at children. A broad range of ages was sampled in each culture to examine the developmental trajectory of grooming behaviours. Results indicate that significant cultural differences exist between Burma and the United States, with Burmese children being groomed by their caregivers more often than U.S. children. Results also indicate that cultural differences in grooming practices begin early and remain constant across age. An unexpected finding was that Burmese families were more variable in their behaviour than U.S. families. Study 2 attempts to explain this variability by using ethnography to describe how sociodemographic changes in Burma are leading to changes in parental values and socialization practices in the schools, but how embodied primary care in the homes appear resistant to change.

  16. PCR detection of Salmonella typhimurium in pharmaceutical raw materials and products contaminated with a mixed bacterial culture using the BAX system.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, L; Scalici, C; Smalls, S; Bosko, Y; Ignar, R

    2001-01-01

    The BAX system, a PCR-based assay, was evaluated for detecting Salmonella typhimurium in pharmaceutical raw materials and products contaminated with mixed bacterial cultures of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhimurium. Artificially contaminated samples were preenriched in lactose broth with and without Tween 20. After preenrichment, samples were analyzed by PCR and standard methods. Ten of 25 samples did not show presence of the specific Salmonella spp. 740-base pair DNA fragment. However, S. typhimurium was isolated and identified by standard methods from all 25 samples. To optimize S. typhimurium detection in PCR negative samples, lactose broth was replaced by buffered peptone water (BPW) as the preenrichment broth. When BPW was used, all 10 samples were PCR positive. BPW enrichments increased S. typhimurium growth resulting in rapid PCR detection. The presence of non-Salmonella bacteria influenced the performance of the PCR-based assay. Optimization of S. typhimurium PCR detection in mixed culture required the use of different preenrichment broths. However, the BAX system detected S. typhimurium within 27 hours while standard methods required 5-7 days.

  17. Using consumer perspectives to inform the cultural adaptation of psychological treatments for depression: A mixed methods study from South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Balaji, Madhumitha; Kumar, Shuba; Mohanraj, Rani; Rahman, Atif; Verdeli, Helena; Araya, Ricardo; Jordans, M.J.D.; Chowdhary, Neerja; Patel, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrating consumer perspectives in developing and adapting psychological treatments (PTs) can enhance their acceptability in diverse cultural contexts. Objective To describe the explanatory models (EMs) of depression in South Asia with the goal of informing the content of culturally appropriate PTs for this region. Methods Two methods were used: a systematic review of published literature on the EMs of depression in South Asia; and in-depth interviews with persons with depression and family caregivers in two sites in India. Findings from both were analysed independently and then triangulated. Results There were 19 studies meeting our inclusion criteria. Interviews were conducted with 27 patients and 10 caregivers. Findings were grouped under four broad categories: illness descriptions, perceived impact, causal beliefs and self-help forms of coping. Depression was characterised predominantly by somatic complaints, stress, low mood, and negative and ruminative thoughts. Patients experienced disturbances in interpersonal relationships occupational functioning, and stigma. Negative life events, particularly relationship difficulties, were perceived as the main cause. Patients mostly engaged in distracting activities, religious practices, and received support from family and friends to cope with the illness. Limitations The primary data are entirely from India but the studies from the literature review covering South Asia are consistent with these findings. This study also does not include literature in local languages or explore how consumer perspectives change over time. Conclusions EMs can inform cultural adaptations to PTs for depression in South Asia by defining target outcomes, content for psycho-education, and culturally appropriate treatment strategies. PMID:24836093

  18. A low ethanol dose affects all types of cells in mixed long-term embryonic cultures of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Chris; Wicher, Grzegorz; Rosendahl, Sofi; Schiöth, Helgi B; Fex-Svenningsen, Asa

    2010-06-01

    The beneficial effect of the '1-drink-a-day' lifestyle is suggested by studies of cardiovascular health, and this recommendation is increasingly followed in many countries. The main objective of this study was to determine whether this pattern of ethanol use would be detrimental to a pregnant woman. We exposed a primary culture of rat cerebellum from embryonic day 17 (corresponding to second trimester in humans) to ethanol at a concentration of 17.6 mM which is roughly equivalent to one glass of wine. Acutely, there was no change in cell viability after 5 or 8 days of exposure relative to control. By 11 days, a reduction in the number of viable cells was observed without an accompanying change in caspase-3 activity (marker of apoptotic cell death), suggesting changes in cell proliferation. As the proportion of nestin-positive cells was higher in the ethanol-treated cultures after 5 days, we hypothesized that an increase in differentiation to neurons would compensate for the ongoing neuronal death. However, there were limits to this compensatory ability as the relative proportion of nestin-positive cells was decreased after 11 days. To further illustrate the negative long-term effects of this ethanol dose, cultures were exposed for 30 days. After this period, virtually no neurons or myelinating oligodendrocytes were present in the ethanol-treated cultures. In conclusion, chronic exposure to ethanol, even at small doses, dramatically and persistently affects normal development.

  19. Promises and Problems of Teaching with Popular Culture: A Linguistic Ethnographic Analysis of Discourse Genre Mixing in a Literacy Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This article problematises a broad consensus in favour of importing popular culture into classrooms as a means of engaging pupils, transforming interactional norms and facilitating pupil understanding. A literacy lesson in which an English primary school teacher invoked the televised talent show, "X factor", in organising the class to…

  20. Inflammatory responses of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model to mono and mixed infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Accumulated evidence points to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia as three major etiologic agents of chronic periodontitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages play a major role in the host response to periodontopathogens, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by these host cells is believed to contribute to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model following mono or mixed infections with the above three periodontopathogens. An in vitro co-culture model composed of epithelial-like transformed cells (HeLa cell line) and macrophage-like cells (phorbol myristic acid-differentiated U937 monocytic cell line) was challenged with whole cells or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, individually and in combination. Following stimulation, the production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and MMP-9 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunoassays. We observed that mono or mixed infections of the co-culture model induced the secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PGE2, and MMP-9. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia induced an increase in RANTES secretion, whereas T. denticola alone or in combination resulted in a significant decrease in RANTES levels. All LPS challenges induced an increase in chemokine, MMP-9, and PGE2 production. No synergistic effect on the production of cytokines, chemokines, PGE2, and MMP-9 was observed for any of the bacterial or LPS mixtures tested. This study supports the view that P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia may induce high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and MMP-9 in periodontal lesions, thus contributing to the progression of periodontitis.

  1. Optimization of a biological process for treating potato chips industry wastewater using a mixed culture of Aspergillus foetidus and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B K; Arora, Anju; Lata

    2004-08-01

    Potato chips industry wastewater was collected and analyzed for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS) and total carbohydrates. Two Aspergillus species, A. foetidus and A. niger, were evaluated for their ability to grow and produce biomass and reduce the organic load of the wastewater. A. foetidus MTCC 508 and A. niger ITCC 2012 were able to reduce COD by about 60% and produce biomass 2.4 and 2.85 gl(-1), respectively. Co-inoculation of both Aspergillus strains resulted in increased fungal biomass production and higher COD reduction than in individual culture at different culture pH. pH 6 was optimum for biomass production and COD reduction. Amendment of the wastewater with different N and P sources, increased the biomass production and COD reduction substantially. Under standardized conditions of pH 6 and amendment of wastewater with 0.1% KH2PO4 and 0.1% (NH4)2 SO4, a mixed culture gave 90% reduction in COD within 60 h of incubation.

  2. An electron-flow model can predict complex redox reactions in mixed-culture fermentative bioH2: microbial ecology evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung-Sool; Krajmalinik-Brown, Rosa; Zhang, Husen; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2009-11-01

    We developed the first model for predicting community structure in mixed-culture fermentative biohydrogen production using electron flows and NADH2 balances. A key assumption of the model is that H2 is produced only via the pyruvate decarboxylation-ferredoxin-hydrogenase pathway, which is commonly the case for fermentation by Clostridium and Ethanoligenens species. We experimentally tested the model using clone libraries to gauge community structures with mixed cultures in which we did not pre-select for specific bacterial groups, such as spore-formers. For experiments having final pHs 3.5 and 4.0, where H2 yield and soluble end-product distribution were distinctly different, we established stoichiometric reactions for each condition by using experimentally determined electron equivalent balances. The error in electron balancing was only 3% at final pH 3.5, in which butyrate and acetate were dominant organic products and the H2 yield was 2.1 mol H2/mol glucose. Clone-library analysis showed that clones affiliated with Clostridium sp. BL-22 and Clostridium sp. HPB-16 were dominant at final pH 3.5. For final pH 4.0, the H2 yield was 0.9 mol H2/mol glucose, ethanol, and acetate were the dominant organic products, and the electron balance error was 13%. The significant error indicates that a second pathway for H2 generation was active. The most abundant clones were affiliated with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which uses the formate-cleavage pathway for H2 production. Thus, the clone-library analyses confirmed that the model predictions for when the pyruvate decarboxylation-ferredoxin-hydrogenase pathway was (final pH 3.5) or was not (final pH 4.0) dominant. With the electron-flow model, we can easily assess the main mechanisms for H2 formation and the dominant H2-producing bacteria in mixed-culture fermentative bioH2.

  3. Biodiesel production by simultaneous extraction and conversion of total lipids from microalgae, cyanobacteria, and wild mixed-cultures.

    PubMed

    Wahlen, Bradley D; Willis, Robert M; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2011-02-01

    Microalgae have been identified as a potential biodiesel feedstock due to their high lipid productivity and potential for cultivation on marginal land. One of the challenges in utilizing microalgae to make biodiesel is the complexities of extracting the lipids using organic solvents followed by transesterification of the extracts to biodiesel. In the present work, reaction conditions were optimized that allow a single step extraction and conversion to biodiesel in high yield from microalgae. From the optimized conditions, it is demonstrated that quantitative conversion of triglycerides from several different microalgae and cyanobacteria could be achieved, including from mixed microbial biomass collected from a municipal wastewater lagoon. Evidence is presented that for some samples, significantly more biodiesel can be produced than would be expected from available triglycerides, indicating conversion of fatty acids contained in other molecules (e.g., phospholipids) using this approach. The effectiveness of the approach on wet algae is also reported.

  4. Unraveling the Physiological Roles of the Cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD and Other Black Band Disease Community Members through Genomic Analysis of a Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Den Uyl, Paul A.; Richardson, Laurie L.; Jain, Sunit

    2016-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacterial-dominated polymicrobial mat that propagates on and migrates across coral surfaces, necrotizing coral tissue. Culture-based laboratory studies have investigated cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, but the metabolic potential of various BBD microbial community members and interactions between them remain poorly understood. Here we report genomic insights into the physiological and metabolic potential of the BBD-associated cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 and six associated bacteria that were also present in the non-axenic culture. The essentially complete genome of Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 contains a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase gene for oxidation of sulfide, suggesting a mechanism for tolerating the sulfidic conditions of BBD mats. Although the operon for biosynthesis of the cyanotoxin microcystin was surprisingly absent, potential relics were identified. Genomic evidence for mixed-acid fermentation indicates a strategy for energy metabolism under the anaerobic conditions present in BBD during darkness. Fermentation products may supply carbon to BBD heterotrophic bacteria. Among the six associated bacteria in the culture, two are closely related to organisms found in culture-independent studies of diseased corals. Their metabolic pathways for carbon and sulfur cycling, energy metabolism, and mechanisms for resisting coral defenses suggest adaptations to the coral surface environment and biogeochemical roles within the BBD mat. Polysulfide reductases were identified in a Flammeovirgaceae genome (Bacteroidetes) and the sox pathway for sulfur oxidation was found in the genome of a Rhodospirillales bacterium (Alphaproteobacteria), revealing mechanisms for sulfur cycling, which influences virulence of BBD. Each genomic bin possessed a pathway for conserving energy from glycerol degradation, reflecting adaptations to the glycerol-rich coral environment. The presence of genes for detoxification

  5. In vitro fermentation of oat bran obtained by debranning with a mixed culture of human fecal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Gopal; Vázquez, José A; Charalampopoulos, Dimitris; Pandiella, Severino S

    2009-04-01

    The prebiotic potential of oat samples was investigated by in vitro shaker-flask anaerobic fermentations with human fecal cultures. The oat bran fraction was obtained by debranning and was compared with other carbon sources such as whole oat flour, glucose, and fructo-oligosaccharide. The oat bran fraction showed a decrease in culturable anaerobes and clostridia and an increase in bifidobacteria and lactobacilli populations. A similar pattern was observed in fructo-oligosaccharide. Butyrate production was higher in oat bran compared to glucose and similar to that in fructo-oligosaccharide. Production of propionate was higher in the two oat media than in fructo-oligosaccharide and glucose, which can be used as energy source by the liver. This study suggests that the oat bran fraction obtained by debranning is digested by the gut ecosystem and increases the population of beneficial bacteria in the indigenous gut microbiota. This medium also provides an energy source preferred by colonocytes when it is metabolized by the gut flora.

  6. Fate of β-hexachlorocyclohexane in the mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) three-stage polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production process from cheese whey.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Francesco; Riccardi, Carmela; Campanari, Sabrina; Pomata, Donatella; Majone, Mauro

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to study the fate and effect of β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) during several steps of PHA production and purification, by using an artificially contaminated cheese whey (CW) as the feedstock. Most of β-HCH (around 90%) was adsorbed on CW solids and it was removed after the acidogenic fermentation step, when residual CW solids are separated along with anaerobic biomass from the liquid-phase. Purification steps also contributed strongly to the removal of residual β-HCH; overall, the PHA production process removed about 99.9% of initial β-HCH content. Moreover, it has been shown that β-HCH has neither detrimental effect on acidogenic fermentation nor on PHA accumulation, that were performed by using unacclimated mixed microbial cultures.

  7. A Clostridium Group IV Species Dominates and Suppresses a Mixed Culture Fermentation by Tolerance to Medium Chain Fatty Acids Products

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Stephen J.; De Groof, Vicky; Khor, Way Cern; Roume, Hugo; Props, Ruben; Coma, Marta; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-01-01

    A microbial community is engaged in a complex economy of cooperation and competition for carbon and energy. In engineered systems such as anaerobic digestion and fermentation, these relationships are exploited for conversion of a broad range of substrates into products, such as biogas, ethanol, and carboxylic acids. Medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs), for example, hexanoic acid, are valuable, energy dense microbial fermentation products, however, MCFA tend to exhibit microbial toxicity to a broad range of microorganisms at low concentrations. Here, we operated continuous mixed population MCFA fermentations on biorefinery thin stillage to investigate the community response associated with the production and toxicity of MCFA. In this study, an uncultured species from the Clostridium group IV (related to Clostridium sp. BS-1) became enriched in two independent reactors that produced hexanoic acid (up to 8.1 g L−1), octanoic acid (up to 3.2 g L−1), and trace concentrations of decanoic acid. Decanoic acid is reported here for the first time as a possible product of a Clostridium group IV species. Other significant species in the community, Lactobacillus spp. and Acetobacterium sp., generate intermediates in MCFA production, and their collapse in relative abundance resulted in an overall production decrease. A strong correlation was present between the community composition and both the hexanoic acid concentration (p = 0.026) and total volatile fatty acid concentration (p = 0.003). MCFA suppressed species related to Clostridium sp. CPB-6 and Lactobacillus spp. to a greater extent than others. The proportion of the species related to Clostridium sp. BS-1 over Clostridium sp. CPB-6 had a strong correlation with the concentration of octanoic acid (p = 0.003). The dominance of this species and the increase in MCFA resulted in an overall toxic effect on the mixed community, most significantly on the Lactobacillus spp., which resulted in a decrease in total

  8. Effect of dilution rate and methanol-glycerol mixed feeding on heterologous Rhizopus oryzae lipase production with Pichia pastoris Mut(+) phenotype in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Canales, Christian; Altamirano, Claudia; Berrios, Julio

    2015-01-01

    The induction using substrate mixtures is an operational strategy for improving the productivity of heterologous protein production with Pichia pastoris. Glycerol as a cosubstrate allows for growth at a higher specific growth rate, but also has been reported to be repressor of the expression from the AOX1 promoter. Thus, further insights about the effects of glycerol are required for designing the induction stage with mixed substrates. The production of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) was used as a model system to investigate the application of methanol-glycerol feeding mixtures in fast metabolizing methanol phenotype. Cultures were performed in a simple chemostat system and the response surface methodology was used for the evaluation of both dilution rate and methanol-glycerol feeding composition as experimental factors. Our results indicate that productivity and yield of ROL are strongly affected by dilution rate, with no interaction effect between the involved factors. Productivity showed the highest value around 0.04-0.06 h(-1) , while ROL yield decreased along the whole dilution rate range evaluated (0.03-0.1 h(-1) ). Compared to production level achieved with methanol-only feeding, the highest specific productivity was similar in mixed feeding (0.9 UA g-biomass(-1) h(-1) ), but volumetric productivity was 70% higher. Kinetic analysis showed that these results are explained by the effects of dilution rate on specific methanol uptake rate, instead of a repressor effect caused by glycerol feeding. It is concluded that despite the effect of dilution rate on ROL yield, mixed feeding strategy is a proper process option to be applied to P. pastoris Mut(+) phenotype for heterologous protein production.

  9. Biogenic amine content in dry fermented sausages as influenced by a producer, spice mix, starter culture, sausage diameter and time of ripening.

    PubMed

    Komprda, T; Sládková, P; Dohnal, V

    2009-11-01

    Sixteen types of dry fermented sausages were commercially produced as combinations of two producers (designated K and R), two starter cultures (Pediococcus pentosaceus, C; Lactobacillus curvatus+Staphylococcus carnosus, F), two spicing mixtures (H; P) and two casing diameters (4.5cm, T; 7cm, W), and were sampled at days zero, 14, 28 (end of ripening), 49, 70, 91 and 112 (samples were stored at 15°C and relative humidity of 70% between days 28 and 112). Tyramine and putrescine content (Y, mgkg(-1)) increased (P<0.01) with increasing time of ripening/storage (X, days): Y=52.0+5.19X-0.0275X(2) (R(2)=0.60) and Y=37.0+3.45X-0.0192X(2) (R(2)=0.23), respectively. Smaller diameter (T), spice mix containing red pepper (P) and starter culture C decreased (P<0.05) both tyramine and putrescine content in the sausages as compared to the W, H and F counterparts, respectively; content of both amines was lower (P<0.05) in the K-sausages than in the R-sausages. Tyramine content in the sausages at the time interval 28days of ripening+21days of storage was in the range from 170 (KHCU sausage combination) to 382 (RHFS) mgkg(-1).

  10. Optimization of wastewater feeding for single-cell protein production in an anaerobic wastewater treatment process utilizing purple non-sulfur bacteria in mixed culture condition.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo; Fukushi, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2006-10-01

    Impacts of operation timing of feeding and withdrawal on anaerobic wastewater treatment utilizing purple non-sulfur bacteria have been investigated in mixed culture condition with acidogenic bacteria. Simulated wastewater containing glucose was treated in a laboratory-scale chemostat reactor, changing the timing of wastewater feeding and withdrawal. Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which does not utilize glucose as a substrate, was inoculated in the reactor. Rps. palustris was detected by a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique using the specific Rpal686 probe. As a result, population ratios of Rps. palustris were over 20% through the operation. Rps. palustris could grow by utilizing metabolites of acidogenic bacteria that coexisted in the reactor. A morning feed was effective for a good growth of purple non-sulfur bacteria. A protein content of cultured bacteria was the highest when wastewater was fed in the morning. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal was 94% independent of the timing control. Consequently, feeding in the morning is the optimum feed-timing control from the aspects of growth of purple non-sulfur bacteria and single-cell protein production.

  11. Novel pH control strategy for efficient production of optically active l-lactic acid from kitchen refuse using a mixed culture system.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yukihiro; Inokuchi, Shota; Poudel, Pramod; Okugawa, Yuki; Miyamoto, Hirokuni; Miayamoto, Hisashi; Sakai, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Uninvestigated control factors of meta-fermentation, the fermentative production of pure chemicals and fuels in a mixed culture system, were examined for production of optically pure l-lactic acid (LA) from food waste. In meta-fermentations by pH swing control, l-LA production with 100% optical purity (OPl-LA) was achieved even using unsterilized model kitchen refuse medium with preferential proliferation of l-LA-producing Bacillus coagulans, a minor member in the seed, whereas agitation decreased OPl-LA drastically. pH constant control shortened the fermentation time but decreased OPl-LA and LA selectivity (SLA) by stimulating growth of heterofermentative Bacillus thermoamylovorans. Deliberately switching from pH swing control to constant control exhibited the best performance for l-LA production: maximum accumulation, 39.2gL(-1); OPl-LA, 100%; SLA, 96.6%; productivity, 1.09gL(-1)h(-1). These results present a novel pH control strategy for efficient l-LA production in meta-fermentation based on a concept different from that of pure culture systems.

  12. A Fast and Practical Yeast Transformation Method Mediated by Escherichia coli Based on a Trans-Kingdom Conjugal Transfer System: Just Mix Two Cultures and Wait One Hour

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ohmine, Yuta; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Trans-kingdom conjugation is a phenomenon by which DNA is transferred into a eukaryotic cell by a bacterial conjugal transfer system. Improvement in this method to facilitate the rapid co-cultivation of donor bacterial and recipient eukaryotic cell cultures could make it the simplest transformation method, requiring neither isolation of vector DNA nor preparation of competent recipient cells. To evaluate this potential advantage of trans-kingdom conjugation, we examined this simple transformation method using vector combinations, helper plasmids, and recipient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. Mixing donor Escherichia coli and recipient S. cerevisiae overnight cultures (50 μL each) consistently yielded on the order of 101 transformants using the popular experimental strain BY4742 derived from S288c and a shuttle vector for trans-kingdom conjugation. Transformation efficiency increased to the order of 102 using a high receptivity trans-kingdom conjugation strain. In addition, either increasing the amount of donor cells or pretreating the recipient cells with thiols such as dithiothreitol improved the transformation efficiency by one order of magnitude. This simple trans-kingdom conjugation-mediated transformation method could be used as a practical yeast transformation method upon enrichment of available vectors and donor E. coli strains. PMID:26849654

  13. Rapid detection and identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli as pure and mixed cultures in bottled drinking water using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah M; Al-Holy, Murad A; Lin, Mengshi; Alami, Nivin I; Cavinato, Anna G; Rasco, Barbara A

    2006-08-09

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and multivariate analysis were used to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 inoculated into bottled drinking water. Three inoculation treatments were examined: (i) E. coli ATCC 25922 (N = 3), (ii) P. aeruginosa (N = 3), and (iii) a 1:1 (v:v) mixed culture of both P. aeruginosa and E. coli ATCC 25922 (N = 3). The control treatment was noninoculated drinking water (N = 3). Second derivative transformation and loadings plots over the range of 1800-900 cm(-1) indicate variations in the following bacterial constituents: amide I band ca. 1650 cm(-1), amide II band ca. 1540 cm(-1), phosphodiester backbone of nucleic acids ca. 1242 and 1080 cm(-1), and polysaccharide compounds ca. 1050-950 cm(-1). Cells with the different treatments were clearly segregated from a mean centered principal component analysis. By using soft independent modeling of class analogy analysis, spectra from a given treatment could be correctly classified 83-88% of the time. These results suggest that FT-IR spectroscopy can determine whether a pure culture is present, in addition to confirming that this method can discriminate between closely related bacteria based on differences in biochemical and phenotypic characteristics that can be detected in this spectral region.

  14. High-loading-substrate enzymatic hydrolysis of palm plantation waste followed by unsterilized-mixed-culture fermentation for bio-ethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardant, Teuku Beuna; Winarni, Ina; Sukmana, Hadid

    2017-01-01

    It was desired to obtain a general formula for producing bio-ethanol from any part of lignocelluloses wastes that came from palm oil industries due to its abundance. Optimum condition that obtained by using RSM for conducting high-loading-substrate enzymatic hydrolysis of palm oil empty fruit bunch was applied to palm oil trunks and then followed by unsterilized fermentation for producing bio-ethanol. From several optimized conditions investigated, the resulted ethanol concentration could reach 7.92 %v by using 36.5 %w of palm oil trunks but the results were averagely 2.46 %v lower than palm oil empty fruit bunch. The results was statistically compared and showed best correlative coefficient at 0.808 (in scale 0-1) which support the conclusion that the optimum condition for empty fruit bunch and trunks are similar. Utilization of mixed-culture yeast was investigated to produce ethanol from unsterilized hydrolysis product but the improvement wasn't significant compares to single culture yeast.

  15. Dynamic model-based analysis of furfural and HMF detoxification by pure and mixed batch cultures of S. cerevisiae and S. stipitis.

    PubMed

    Hanly, Timothy J; Henson, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Inhibitory compounds that result from biomass hydrolysis are an obstacle to the efficient production of second-generation biofuels. Fermentative microorganisms can reduce compounds such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), but detoxification is accompanied by reduced growth rates and ethanol yields. In this study, we assess the effects of these furan aldehydes on pure and mixed yeast cultures consisting of a respiratory deficient mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and wild-type Scheffersomyces stipitis using dynamic flux balance analysis. Uptake kinetics and stoichiometric equations for the intracellular reduction reactions associated with each inhibitor were added to genome-scale metabolic reconstructions of the two yeasts. Further modification of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network was necessary to satisfactorily predict the amount of acetate synthesized during HMF reduction. Inhibitory terms that captured the adverse effects of the furan aldehydes and their corresponding alcohols on cell growth and ethanol production were added to attain qualitative agreement with batch experiments conducted for model development and validation. When the two yeasts were co-cultured in the presence of the furan aldehydes, inoculums that reduced the synthesis of highly toxic acetate produced by S. cerevisiae yielded the highest ethanol productivities. The model described here can be used to generate optimal fermentation strategies for the simultaneous detoxification and fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysates by S. cerevisiae and/or S. stipitis.

  16. Physical and cultural determinants of postpartum pelvic floor support and symptoms following vaginal delivery: a protocol for a mixed-methods prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Clark, Erin; Clark, Lauren; Egger, Marlene J; Hitchcock, Robert; Hsu, Yvonne; Norton, Peggy; Sanchez-Birkhead, Ana; Shaw, Janet; Sheng, Xiaoming; Varner, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic floor disorders (PFDs), including pelvic organ prolapse (POP), stress and urgency urinary incontinence, and faecal incontinence, are common and arise from loss of pelvic support. Although severe disease often does not occur until women become older, pregnancy and childbirth are major risk factors for PFDs, especially POP. We understand little about modifiable factors that impact pelvic floor function recovery after vaginal birth. This National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Program Project, ‘Bridging physical and cultural determinants of postpartum pelvic floor support and symptoms following vaginal delivery’, uses mixed-methods research to study the influences of intra-abdominal pressure, physical activity, body habitus and muscle fitness on pelvic floor support and symptoms as well as the cultural context in which women experience those changes. Methods and analysis Using quantitative methods, we will evaluate whether pelvic floor support and symptoms 1 year after the first vaginal delivery are affected by biologically plausible factors that may impact muscle, nerve and connective tissue healing during recovery (first 8 weeks postpartum) and strengthening (remainder of the first postpartum year). Using qualitative methods, we will examine cultural aspects of perceptions, explanations of changes in pelvic floor support, and actions taken by Mexican-American and Euro-American primipara, emphasising early changes after childbirth. We will summarise project results in a resource toolkit that will enhance opportunities for dialogue between women, their families and providers, and across lay and medical discourses. We anticipate enrolling up to 1530 nulliparous women into the prospective cohort study during the third trimester, following those who deliver vaginally 1 year postpartum. Participants will be drawn from this cohort to meet the project's aims. Ethics and dissemination The University of Utah and Intermountain Healthcare

  17. Cultivating conditions effects on kefiran production by the mixed culture of lactic acid bacteria imbedded within kefir grains.

    PubMed

    Zajšek, Katja; Goršek, Andreja; Kolar, Mitja

    2013-08-15

    The influence of fermentation temperature, agitation rate, and additions of carbon sources, nitrogen sources, vitamins and minerals on production of kefiran by kefir grains lactic acid bacteria was studied in a series of experiments. The main aim of the work was to increase the exopolysaccharide (EPS) production where customised milk was used as fermentation medium. It was proved that the controlling of culturing conditions and the modifying of fermentation medium conditions (i.e., carbon, nitrogen, mineral sources and vitamins) can dramatically enhance the production of the EPS. The temperature and agitation rate were critical for kefiran production during the 24 h cultivation of grains; our optimised conditions being 25°C and 80 rpm, respectively. In addition, when optimising the effects of additional nutrition, it was found that 5% (w/v) lactose, 0.1% (w/v) thiamine, and 0.1% (w/v) FeCl3 led to the maximal production of EPS. The results indicate that nutrients can be utilised to improve the production of EPS and that good kefir grains growth does not appear to be a determining factor for a high production yield of EPS.

  18. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga E; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-24

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested.

  19. Asian couples in negotiation: a mixed-method observational study of cultural variations across five Asian regions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai-Yung; Nakamura, Shin-Ichi; Chung, Moon Ja; Chun, Young Ju; Fu, Meng; Liang, Shu-Chuan; Liu, Cui-Lian

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore variations in how contemporary couples from five different Asian regions negotiate disagreements. Video recordings of 50 couples (10 each from Japan, Korea, Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) discussing unresolved disagreements provided raw data for quantitative and qualitative analyses. First, teams of coders from each region used a common protocol to make quantitative ratings of content themes and interaction patterns for couples from their own region. An interregional panel of investigators then performed in-depth qualitative reviews for half of these cases, noting cultural differences not only in observed patterns of couple behavior but also in their own perceptions of these patterns. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses revealed clear regional differences on dimensions such as overt negativity, demand-withdraw interaction, and collaboration. The qualitative results also provided a richer, more nuanced view of other (e.g., gender-linked) conflict management patterns that the quantitative analyses did not capture. Inconsistencies between qualitative and quantitative data and between the qualitative observations of investigators from different regions were most pronounced for couples from Korea and Japan, whose conflict styles were subtler and less direct than those of couples from the other regions.

  20. Growth of mono- and mixed cultures of Nannochloropsis salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on struvite as a nutrient source.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ryan W; Siccardi, Anthony J; Huysman, Nathan D; Wyatt, Nicholas B; Hewson, John C; Lane, Todd W

    2015-12-01

    The suitability of crude and purified struvite (MgNH4PO4), a major precipitate in wastewater streams, was investigated for renewable replacement of conventional nitrogen and phosphate resources for cultivation of microalgae. Bovine effluent wastewater stone, the source of crude struvite, was characterized for soluble N/P, trace metals, and biochemical components and compared to the purified mineral. Cultivation trials using struvite as a major nutrient source were conducted using two microalgae production strains, Nannochloropsis salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, in both lab and outdoor pilot-scale raceways in a variety of seasonal conditions. Both crude and purified struvite-based media were found to result in biomass productivities at least as high as established media formulations (maximum outdoor co-culture yield ∼20±4gAFDW/m(2)/day). Analysis of nutrient uptake by the alga suggest that struvite provides increased nutrient utilization efficiency, and that crude struvite satisfies the trace metals requirement and results in increased pigment productivity for both microalgae strains.

  1. Growth of mono- and mixed cultures of Nannochloropsis salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum on struvite as a nutrient source

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Ryan W.; Siccardi, Anthony J.; Huysman, Nathan D.; Wyatt, Nicholas B.; Hewson, John C.; Lane, Todd W.

    2015-09-26

    In this paper, the suitability of crude and purified struvite (MgNH4PO4), a major precipitate in wastewater streams, was investigated for renewable replacement of conventional nitrogen and phosphate resources for cultivation of microalgae. Bovine effluent wastewater stone, the source of crude struvite, was characterized for soluble N/P, trace metals, and biochemical components and compared to the purified mineral. Cultivation trials using struvite as a major nutrient source were conducted using two microalgae production strains, Nannochloropsis salina and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, in both lab and outdoor pilot-scale raceways in a variety of seasonal conditions. Both crude and purified struvite-based media were found to result in biomass productivities at least as high as established media formulations (maximum outdoor co-culture yield ~20 ± 4 g AFDW/m2/day). Finally, analysis of nutrient uptake by the alga suggest that struvite provides increased nutrient utilization efficiency, and that crude struvite satisfies the trace metals requirement and results in increased pigment productivity for both microalgae strains.

  2. Comparative evaluation of rRNA depletion procedures for the improved analysis of bacterial biofilm and mixed pathogen culture transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Olga E.; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Zampaloni, Claudia; Sauer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Global transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq is often hampered by the high abundance of ribosomal (r)RNA in bacterial cells. To remove rRNA and enrich coding sequences, subtractive hybridization procedures have become the approach of choice prior to RNA-seq, with their efficiency varying in a manner dependent on sample type and composition. Yet, despite an increasing number of RNA-seq studies, comparative evaluation of bacterial rRNA depletion methods has remained limited. Moreover, no such study has utilized RNA derived from bacterial biofilms, which have potentially higher rRNA:mRNA ratios and higher rRNA carryover during RNA-seq analysis. Presently, we evaluated the efficiency of three subtractive hybridization-based kits in depleting rRNA from samples derived from biofilm, as well as planktonic cells of the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our results indicated different rRNA removal efficiency for the three procedures, with the Ribo-Zero kit yielding the highest degree of rRNA depletion, which translated into enhanced enrichment of non-rRNA transcripts and increased depth of RNA-seq coverage. The results indicated that, in addition to improving RNA-seq sensitivity, efficient rRNA removal enhanced detection of low abundance transcripts via qPCR. Finally, we demonstrate that the Ribo-Zero kit also exhibited the highest efficiency when P. aeruginosa/Staphylococcus aureus co-culture RNA samples were tested. PMID:28117413

  3. Strategies for efficiently selecting PHA producing mixed microbial cultures using complex feedstocks: Feast and famine regime and uncoupled carbon and nitrogen availabilities.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catarina S S; Silva, Carlos E; Carvalho, Gilda; Reis, Maria A

    2017-07-25

    Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by open mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) has been attracting increasing interest as an alternative technology to PHA production by pure cultures, due to the potential for lower costs associated with the use of open systems (eliminating the requirement for sterile conditions) and the utilisation of cheap feedstock (industrial and agricultural wastes). Such technology relies on the efficient selection of an MMC enriched in PHA-accumulating organisms. Fermented cheese whey, a protein-rich complex feedstock, has been used previously to produce PHA using the feast and famine regime for selection of PHA accumulating cultures. While this selection strategy was found efficient when operated at relatively low organic loading rate (OLR, 2g-CODL(-1)d(-1)), great instability and low selection efficiency of PHA accumulating organisms were observed when higher OLR (ca. 6g-CODL(-1)d(-1)) was applied. High organic loading is desirable as a means to enhance PHA productivity. In the present study, a new selection strategy was tested with the aim of improving selection for high OLR. It was based on uncoupling carbon and nitrogen supply and was implemented and compared with the conventional feast and famine strategy. For this, two selection reactors were fed with fermented cheese whey applying an OLR of ca. 8.5g-CODL(-1) (with 3.8g-CODL(-1) resulting from organic acids and ethanol), and operated in parallel under similar conditions, except for the timing of nitrogen supplementation. Whereas in the conventional strategy nitrogen and carbon substrates were added simultaneously at the beginning of the cycle, in the uncoupled substrates strategy, nitrogen addition was delayed to the end of the feast phase (i.e. after exogenous carbon was exhausted). The two different strategies selected different PHA-storing microbial communities, dominated by Corynebacterium and a Xantomonadaceae, respectively with the conventional and the new approaches. The new

  4. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) storage within a mixed-culture biomass with simultaneous growth as a function of accumulation substrate nitrogen and phosphorus levels.

    PubMed

    Valentino, Francesco; Karabegovic, Lamija; Majone, Mauro; Morgan-Sagastume, Fernando; Werker, Alan

    2015-06-15

    The response of a mixed-microbial-culture (MMC) biomass for PHA accumulation was evaluated over a range of relative nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availabilities with respect to the supply of either complex (fermented whey permeate - FWP) or simpler (acetic acid) organic feedstocks. Fed-batch feed-on-demand PHA accumulation experiments were conducted where the feed N/COD and P/COD ratios were varied ranging from conditions of nutrient starvation to excess. A feast-famine enrichment (activated sludge) biomass, produced in a pilot-scale aerobic sequencing batch reactor on FWP and with a long history of stable PHA accumulation performance, was used for all the experiments as reference material. FWP with N/COD ratios of (2, 5, 15, 70 mg/g all with P/COD = 8 mg/g) as well as simulated FWP with nutrient starvation (N/COD = P/COD = 0) conditions were applied. For the acetic acid accumulations, nutrient starvation as well as N/COD variations (2.5, 5, 50 mg/g all with P/COD = 9 mg/g) and P/COD variations (0.5, 2, 9, 15 mg/g all with N/COD = 10 mg/g) were evaluated. An optimal range of combined N and P limitation with N/COD from 2 to 15 mg/g and P/COD from 0.5 to 3 mg/g was considered to offer consistent improvement of productivity over the case of nutrient starvation. Productivity increased due to active biomass growth of the PHA storing biomass without observed risk for a growth response overtaking PHA storage activity. PHA production with respect to the initial active biomass was significantly higher even in cases of excess nutrient additions when compared to the cases of nutrient starvation. The 24-h PHA productivities were enhanced as much as 4-fold from a base value of 1.35 g-PHA per gram initial active biomass with respect nutrient starvation feedstock. With or without nutrient loading the biomass consistently accumulated similar and significant PHA (nominally 60% g-PHA/g-VSS). Based on results from replicate experiments some variability in the extant biomass maximum

  5. [System construction of early warning for ecological security at cultural and natural heritage mixed sites and its application: a case study of Wuyishan Scenery District].

    PubMed

    You, Wei-Bin; He, Dong-Jin; Qin, De-Hua; Ji, Zhi-Rong; Wu, Li-Yun; Yu, Jian-An; Chen, Bing-Rong; Tan, Yong

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposed a new concept of ecological security for protection by a comprehensive analysis of the contents and standards of world heritage sites. A frame concept model named "Pressure-State-Control" for early warning of ecological security at world heritage mixed sites was constructed and evaluation indicators of this frame were also selected. Wuyishan Scenery District was chosen for a case study, which has been severely disturbed by natural and artificial factors. Based on the frame model of "Pressure-State-Control" and by employing extension analysis, the matter-element model was established to assess the ecological security status of this cultural and natural world heritage mixed site. The results showed that the accuracy of ecological security early warning reached 84%. Early warning rank was I level (no alert status) in 1997 and 2009, but that in 2009 had a higher possibility to convert into II level. Likewise, the early-warning indices of sensitive ranks were different between 1997 and 2009. Population density, population growth rate, area index for tea garden, cultivated land owned per capita, level of drought, and investment for ecological and environmental construction were the main limiting factors to hinder the development of ecological security from 2009 to future. In general, the status of Wuyishan Scenery District ecological security was relatively good and considered as no alert level, while risk conditions also existed in terms of a few early-warning indicators. We still need to pay more attention to serious alert indicators and adopt effective prevention and control measures to maintain a good ecological security status of this heritage site.

  6. Setup of an In Vitro Test System for Basic Studies on Biofilm Behavior of Mixed-Species Cultures with Dental and Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Standar, Kerstin; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Redanz, Sylvio; Münter, Wanja L.; Laue, Michael; Podbielski, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Background Caries and periodontitis are important human diseases associated with formation of multi-species biofilms. The involved bacteria are intensively studied to understand the molecular basis of the interactions in such biofilms. This study established a basic in vitro single and mixed-species culture model for oral bacteria combining three complimentary methods. The setup allows a rapid screening for effects in the mutual species interaction. Furthermore, it is easy to handle, inexpensive, and reproducible. Methods Streptococcus mitis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis, typical inhabitants of the healthy oral cavity, S. mutans as main carriogenic species, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, S. intermedius and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as periodontitis-associated bacteria, were investigated for their biofilm forming ability. Different liquid growth media were evaluated. Safranin-staining allowed monitoring of biofilm formation under the chosen conditions. Viable counts and microscopy permitted investigation of biofilm behavior in mixed-species and transwell setups. Findings S. mitis, F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis and P. micra failed to form biofilm structures. S. mutans, S. sanguinis, S. intermedius and S. salivarius established abundant biofilm masses in CDM/sucrose. A. actinomycetemcomitans formed patchy monolayers. For in depth analysis S. mitis, S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans were chosen, because i) they are representatives of the physiological-, cariogenic and periodontitis-associated bacterial flora, respectively and ii) their difference in their biofilm forming ability. Microscopic analysis confirmed the results of safranin staining. Investigation of two species combinations of S. mitis with either S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans revealed bacterial interactions influencing biofilm mass, biofilm structure and cell viability. Conclusions This setup shows safranin staining, microscopic analysis and

  7. Effects of disciplinary cultures of researchers and research trainees on the acceptability of nanocarriers for drug delivery in different contexts of use: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Chenel, Vanessa; Boissy, Patrick; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Patenaude, Johane

    The acceptability of nanomedical applications, which have the potential to generate ethical and societal impacts, is a significant factor in the deployment of nanomedicine. A lack of fit between nanomedical applications and society's values may result from a partial consideration of such impacts. New approaches for technological evaluation focused on impact perception, acceptance, and acceptability are needed to go beyond traditional technology assessment approaches used with nanotechnology, which focus mainly on toxicological and safety criteria. Using a new evaluative approach based on perceived impacts of nanotechnology, the objective of this study was to assess perceptions among researchers and research trainees familiar with emergent technologies and from different disciplinary background the scope of acceptability judgments made towards the use of nanocarriers. This mixed-methods study was based on scenarios presenting two types of drug-delivery nanocarriers (carbon, synthetic DNA) in two contexts of use (lung cancer treatment, seasonal flu treatment). Researchers and research trainees in the natural sciences and engineering, and the social sciences and the humanities were invited by email to take part in this project. An online questionnaire followed by semi-directed interviews allowed characterization of disciplinary divergences regarding to impact perception, acceptance, and acceptability of the scenarios. The results suggest that impact perception is influenced by disciplinary culture. Also, trends can be seen between respondents' profiles and variables of acceptance and acceptability, and certain components of the acceptability judgement are specific to each disciplinary culture. The acknowledgment and consideration of these disciplinary divergences could allow, among others, for opening up interdisciplinary dialogue on matters related to the acceptability of nanomedical applications and their developments.

  8. Combinational effects of prebiotic oligosaccharides on bifidobacterial growth and host gene expression in a simplified mixed culture model and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Tatsuya; Izumi, Hirohisa; Tsuda, Muneya; Nakazato, Yuki; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Namba, Kazuyoshi; Takeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    It is important to provide formula-fed infants with a bifidobacteria-enriched gut microbiota similar to those of breastfed infants to ensure intestinal health. Prebiotics, such as certain oligosaccharides, are a useful solution to this problem, but the combinational benefits of these oligosaccharides have not been evaluated. This study investigated the benefits of oligosaccharide combinations and screened for an optimal combination of oligosaccharides to promote healthy gut microbiota of formula-fed infants. In vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to assess the bifidogenic effects of lactulose (LAC) alone and LAC combined with raffinose (RAF) and/or galacto-oligosaccharide (GOS), using a mixed culture model and neonatal mice orally administered with these oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium breve. In the in vitro culture model, the combination of the three oligosaccharides (LAC-RAF-GOS) significantly increased cell numbers of B. breve and Bifidobacterium longum (P<0·05) compared with either LAC alone or the combination of two oligosaccharides, and resulted in the production of SCFA under anaerobic conditions. In the in vivo experiment, the LAC-RAF-GOS combination significantly increased cell numbers of B. breve and Bacteroidetes in the large intestinal content (P<0·05) and increased acetate concentrations in the caecal content and serum of neonatal mice. Genes related to metabolism and immune responses were differentially expressed in the liver and large intestine of mice administered with LAC-RAF-GOS. These results indicate a synergistic effect of the LAC-RAF-GOS combination on the growth of bifidobacteria and reveal possible benefits of this combination to the gut microbiota and health of infants.

  9. Organic acid blend with pure botanical product treatment reduces Escherichia coli and Salmonella populations in pure culture and in in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Ester; Bari, Riccardo; Piva, Andrea; Edrington, Tom S; Pitta, Dipti W; Pinchak, William E; Nisbet, David J; Callaway, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne pathogenic bacteria can live in the intestinal tract of food animals and can be transmitted to humans via food or indirectly through animal or fecal contact. Organic acid blend products have been used as nonantibiotic modifiers of the gastrointestinal fermentation of food animals to improve growth performance efficiency. However, the impact of these organic acid products on the microbial population, including foodborne pathogens, remains unknown. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effects of a commercial organic acid and botanical blend product (OABP) on populations of the foodborne pathogenic bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium. Pure cultures (2×10(6) colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) of each pathogen were added to tubes that contained water-solubilized OABP added at concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10% (vol/vol; n=3). Water-solubilized OABP reduced (p<0.05) the growth rate and final populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in pure culture at concentrations >2%. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were added (2×10(5) and 3×10(6) CFU/mL, respectively) to in vitro mixed ruminal microorganism fermentations that contained water-solubilized OABP at concentrations of 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10% (vol/vol; n=3) that were incubated for 24 h. OABP addition reduced (p<0.05) final populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in the ruminal fluid at concentrations ≥5%. The acetate-to-propionate ratios from the in vitro fermentations were reduced (p<0.05) by OABP treatment ≥5%. Treatments to reduce foodborne pathogens must be economically feasible to implement, and results indicate that organic acid products, such as OABP, can enhance animal growth efficiency and can be used to reduce populations of pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Effect of Feeding a Mixed Microbial Culture Fortified with Trace Minerals on the Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Late-fattening Hanwoo Steers: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Kwak, W S; Kim, Y I; Lee, S M; Lee, Y H; Choi, D Y

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding a trace minerals-fortified microbial culture (TMC) on the performance and carcass characteristics of late-fattening Hanwoo steers. A mixture of microbes (0.6% [v/w] of Enterobacter sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Saccharomyces sp.) was cultured with 99% feedstuff for ensiling and 0.4% trace minerals (zinc, selenium, copper, and cobalt). Sixteen late-fattening steers (mean age, 21.8 months) were allocated to two diets: a control diet (concentrate mix and rice straw) and a treated diet (control diet+3.3% TMC). At a mean age of 31.1 months, all the steers were slaughtered. The addition of TMC to the diet did not affect the average daily weight gain of the late fattening steers, compared with that of control steers. Moreover, consuming the TMC-supplemented diet did not affect cold carcass weight, yield traits such as back fat thickness, longissimus muscle area, yield index or yield grade, or quality traits such as meat color, fat color, texture, maturity, marbling score, or quality grade. However, consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet increased the concentrations of zinc, selenium, and sulfur (p<0.05) in the longissimus muscle. With respect to amino acids, animals consuming TMC showed increased (p<0.05) concentrations of lysine, leucine, and valine among essential amino acids and a decreased (p<0.05) concentration of proline among non-essential amino acids. In conclusion, the consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet during the late-fattening period elevated the concentrations of certain trace minerals and essential amino acids in the longissimus muscle, without any deleterious effects on performance and other carcass characteristics of Hanwoo steers.

  11. Effect of Feeding a Mixed Microbial Culture Fortified with Trace Minerals on the Performance and Carcass Characteristics of Late-fattening Hanwoo Steers: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, W. S.; Kim, Y. I.; Lee, S. M.; Lee, Y. H.; Choi, D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding a trace minerals-fortified microbial culture (TMC) on the performance and carcass characteristics of late-fattening Hanwoo steers. A mixture of microbes (0.6% [v/w] of Enterobacter sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., and Saccharomyces sp.) was cultured with 99% feedstuff for ensiling and 0.4% trace minerals (zinc, selenium, copper, and cobalt). Sixteen late-fattening steers (mean age, 21.8 months) were allocated to two diets: a control diet (concentrate mix and rice straw) and a treated diet (control diet+3.3% TMC). At a mean age of 31.1 months, all the steers were slaughtered. The addition of TMC to the diet did not affect the average daily weight gain of the late fattening steers, compared with that of control steers. Moreover, consuming the TMC-supplemented diet did not affect cold carcass weight, yield traits such as back fat thickness, longissimus muscle area, yield index or yield grade, or quality traits such as meat color, fat color, texture, maturity, marbling score, or quality grade. However, consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet increased the concentrations of zinc, selenium, and sulfur (p<0.05) in the longissimus muscle. With respect to amino acids, animals consuming TMC showed increased (p<0.05) concentrations of lysine, leucine, and valine among essential amino acids and a decreased (p<0.05) concentration of proline among non-essential amino acids. In conclusion, the consumption of a TMC-supplemented diet during the late-fattening period elevated the concentrations of certain trace minerals and essential amino acids in the longissimus muscle, without any deleterious effects on performance and other carcass characteristics of Hanwoo steers. PMID:26580283

  12. Microbial bio-based plastics from olive-mill wastewater: Generation and properties of polyhydroxyalkanoates from mixed cultures in a two-stage pilot scale system.

    PubMed

    Ntaikou, I; Valencia Peroni, C; Kourmentza, C; Ilieva, V I; Morelli, A; Chiellini, E; Lyberatos, G

    2014-10-20

    The operational efficiency of a two stage pilot scale system for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) production from three phase olive oil mill wastewater (OMW) was investigated in this study. A mixed anaerobic, acidogenic culture derived from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, was used in the first stage, aiming to the acidification of OMW. The effluent of the first bioreactor that was operated in continuous mode, was collected in a sedimentation tank in which partial removal of the suspended solids was taking place, and was then forwarded to an aerobic reactor, operated in sequential batch mode under nutrient limitation. In the second stage an enriched culture of Pseudomonas sp. was used as initial inoculum for the production of PHAs from the acidified waste. Clarification of the acidified waste, using aluminium sulphate which causes flocculation and precipitation of solids, was also performed, and its effect on the composition of the acidified waste as well as on the yields and properties of PHAs was investigated. It was shown that clarification had no significant qualitative or quantitative effect on the primary carbon sources, i.e. short chain fatty acids and residual sugars, but only on the values of total suspended solids and total chemical oxygen demand of the acidified waste. The type and thermal characteristics of the produced PHAs were also similar for both types of feed. However the clarification of the waste seemed to have a positive impact on final PHAs yield, measured as gPHAs/100g of VSS, which reached up to 25%. Analysis of the final products via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed the existence of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and 3-hydroxyoctanoate (HO) units, leading to the conclusion that the polymer could be either a blend of P3HB and P3HO homopolymers or/and the 3HB-co-3HO co-polymer, an unusual polymer occurring in nature with advanced properties.

  13. Effects of disciplinary cultures of researchers and research trainees on the acceptability of nanocarriers for drug delivery in different contexts of use: a mixed-methods study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenel, Vanessa; Boissy, Patrick; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre; Patenaude, Johane

    2015-04-01

    The acceptability of nanomedical applications, which have the potential to generate ethical and societal impacts, is a significant factor in the deployment of nanomedicine. A lack of fit between nanomedical applications and society's values may result from a partial consideration of such impacts. New approaches for technological evaluation focused on impact perception, acceptance, and acceptability are needed to go beyond traditional technology assessment approaches used with nanotechnology, which focus mainly on toxicological and safety criteria. Using a new evaluative approach based on perceived impacts of nanotechnology, the objective of this study was to assess perceptions among researchers and research trainees familiar with emergent technologies and from different disciplinary background the scope of acceptability judgments made towards the use of nanocarriers. This mixed-methods study was based on scenarios presenting two types of drug-delivery nanocarriers (carbon, synthetic DNA) in two contexts of use (lung cancer treatment, seasonal flu treatment). Researchers and research trainees in the natural sciences and engineering, and the social sciences and the humanities were invited by email to take part in this project. An online questionnaire followed by semi-directed interviews allowed characterization of disciplinary divergences regarding to impact perception, acceptance, and acceptability of the scenarios. The results suggest that impact perception is influenced by disciplinary culture. Also, trends can be seen between respondents' profiles and variables of acceptance and acceptability, and certain components of the acceptability judgement are specific to each disciplinary culture. The acknowledgment and consideration of these disciplinary divergences could allow, among others, for opening up interdisciplinary dialogue on matters related to the acceptability of nanomedical applications and their developments.

  14. Protein Characterization of Extracellular Microvesicles/Exosomes Released from Cytotoxin-Challenged Rat Cerebrocortical Mixed Culture and Mouse N2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dhwani; Manek, Rachna; Raghavan, Vijaya; Wang, Kevin K

    2017-03-10

    A number of neuronal and glial proteins were previously found to be released in free-standing soluble form from cultured brain cells into cell-conditioned media. Here, we sought to examine if similar proteins are also contained in neural and astroglial cell-released extracellular microvesicles/exosomes (MV/E). In this study, MV/E were isolated from cell-conditioned media from control and cytotoxin-challenged rat cerebrocortical mixed culture (CTX) and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cytotoxin challenges included pro-necrosis calcium ionophore A23187, pro-apoptosis staurosporine (STS), and excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate. Based on established nanoparticle characterization method (dynamic light scattering, NanoTracker, and transmission electron microscopy), we confirmed that these released vesicles are in fact characteristic representation of MV/E by morphology (lipid bilayered vesicles) and by particle size (132-142 nm for CTX and 49-77 nm for N2a cells). We indeed identified neural cell body protein UCH-L1, axonal injury marker αII-spectrin and its breakdown products (SBDPs), astroglial markers GFAP and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP), dendritic protein BIII-tubulin, synaptic protein synaptophysin, and exosome marker Alix in microvesicles from CTX and/or N2a cells. Furthermore, SBDPs, GFAP-BDP, UCH-L1, and synaptophysin are especially dominant in MV/E isolated from cytotoxin-treated CTX cells. Similarly, SBDPs, βIII-tubulin, and UCH-L1 are more prominently observed in cytotoxin-challenged N2a cells. Lastly, when isolated MV/E from A23187- or STS-challenged N2a cells were introduced to healthy N2a culture, they are capable of evoking cytotoxicity in the latter. Taken together, our study identified that microvesicles/exosomes isolated form healthy and injured brain cells contain certain neural and astroglial proteins, as well as possibly other cytotoxic factors that are capable of propagating cytotoxic effects.

  15. Comparison of Different Strategies for Selection/Adaptation of Mixed Microbial Cultures Able to Ferment Crude Glycerol Derived from Second-Generation Biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    Varrone, C.; Heggeset, T. M. B.; Le, S. B.; Haugen, T.; Markussen, S.; Skiadas, I. V.; Gavala, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective of this study was the selection and adaptation of mixed microbial cultures (MMCs), able to ferment crude glycerol generated from animal fat-based biodiesel and produce building-blocks and green chemicals. Various adaptation strategies have been investigated for the enrichment of suitable and stable MMC, trying to overcome inhibition problems and enhance substrate degradation efficiency, as well as generation of soluble fermentation products. Repeated transfers in small batches and fed-batch conditions have been applied, comparing the use of different inoculum, growth media, and Kinetic Control. The adaptation of activated sludge inoculum was performed successfully and continued unhindered for several months. The best results showed a substrate degradation efficiency of almost 100% (about 10 g/L glycerol in 21 h) and different dominant metabolic products were obtained, depending on the selection strategy (mainly 1,3-propanediol, ethanol, or butyrate). On the other hand, anaerobic sludge exhibited inactivation after a few transfers. To circumvent this problem, fed-batch mode was used as an alternative adaptation strategy, which led to effective substrate degradation and high 1,3-propanediol and butyrate production. Changes in microbial composition were monitored by means of Next Generation Sequencing, revealing a dominance of glycerol consuming species, such as Clostridium, Klebsiella, and Escherichia. PMID:26509171

  16. Evaluating the efficiency of a mixed culture biofilm for the treatment of black liquor and molasses in a mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ali, Naeem; Yousaf, Sameen; Anam, Maira; Bangash, Zain; Maleeha, Sehrish

    2016-11-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging environment-friendly technology to recover the useful energy available in waste by using microorganisms as catalyst. In this study, double chamber mediator-less MFCs separated by proton exchange membrane (PEM; Nafion) were constructed to determine the efficiency of mixed culture in using complex substrates (molasses and black liquor). It was found that activated sludge can serve as efficient source of electricigens for biofilm development on an anode. Power density of 2.425 W/m² was generated from molasses with chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 67% as compared to power density of 3.55 W/m² produced from black liquor along with COD removal efficiency of 78%. Moreover, it was demonstrated that surface area of PEM has a significant effect on power generation. An almost 5- to 8-fold increase in voltage was observed as the size of PEM was increased from 6.5 to 25 cm².

  17. Enhancement of acetate productivity in a thermophilic (55 °C) hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor with mixed culture syngas (H2/CO2) fermentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Qi; Yu, Shi-Jin; Zhang, Fang; Xia, Xiu-Yang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-03-01

    Conversion of organic wastes to syngas is an attractive way to utilize wastes. The produced syngas can be further used to produce a variety of chemicals. In this study, a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor with mix cultures was operated at 55 °C to convert syngas (H2/CO2) into acetate. A high concentration of acetate (42.4 g/L) was reached in batch experiment while a maximum acetate production rate of 10.5 g/L/day was achieved in the continuous-flow mode at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1 day. Acetate was the main product in both batch and continuous-flow experiments. n-Butyrate was the other byproduct in the reactor. Acetate accounted for more than 98.5 and 99.1% of total volatile fatty acids in batch and continuous modes, respectively. Illumina Miseq high-throughput sequencing results showed that microorganisms were highly purified and enriched in the reactor. The main genus was Thermoanaerobacterium (66% of relative abundance), which was usually considered as H2 producer in the literature, however, likely played a role as a H2 consumer in this study. This study provides a new method to generate the high producing rate and purity of acetate from syngas.

  18. Hydraulic retention time affects stable acetate production from tofu processing wastewater in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Fang; Wang, Ting; Shen, Nan; Yu, Zhong-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Acetate is an important industrial chemical and its production from wastes via mixed culture fermentation (MCF) is economic. In this work, the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) on acetate production from tofu processing wastewater (TPW) in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) MCF was first investigated. It was found that long HRT (>3days) could lead to less acetate production while stable acetate production was achieved at short HRT (3days) with the yield of 0.57g-COD/g-CODTPW. The microbial community analysis showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter) occupied up to 90% of archaea at both HRTs of 3 and 5days. However, Coprothermobacter, the main acetate-degraders, decreased from 35.74% to 10.58% of bacteria when HRT decreased from 5 to 3days, supporting the aggravation of syntrophic acetate oxidation in long HRT. This work demonstrated that HRT was a crucial factor to maintain stable acetate production from TPW in extreme-thermophilic MCF.

  19. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    PubMed Central

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types. PMID:27485896

  20. Effects of carbon sources on the enrichment of halophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate-storing mixed microbial culture in an aerobic dynamic feeding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, You-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Lu, Peng-Fei; Peng, Yong-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production serves as a substitute for petroleum-based plastics. Enriching mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) with the capacity to store PHA is a key precursor for low-cost PHA production. This study investigated the impact of carbon types on enrichment outcomes. Three MMCs were separately fed by acetate sodium, glucose, and starch as an enriching carbon source, and were exposed to long-term aerobic dynamic feeding (ADF) periods. The PHA production capacity, kinetics and stoichiometry of the enrichments, the PHA composition, and the microbial diversity and community composition were explored to determine carbon and enrichment correlations. After 350-cycle enriching periods under feast-famine (F-F) regimes, the MMCs enriched by acetate sodium and glucose contained a maximum PHA content of 64.7% and 60.5% cell dry weight (CDW). The starch-enriched MMC only had 27.3% CDW of PHA. High-throughput sequencing revealed that non-PHA bacteria survived alongside PHA storing bacteria, even under severe F-F selective pressure. Genus of Pseudomonas and Stappia were the possible PHA accumulating bacteria in acetate-enriched MMC. Genus of Oceanicella, Piscicoccus and Vibrio were found as PHA accumulating bacteria in glucose-enriched MMC. Vibrio genus was the only PHA accumulating bacteria in starch-enriched MMC. The community diversity and composition were regulated by the substrate types.

  1. Effect of supplementing orchardgrass herbage with a total mixed ration or flaxseed on fermentation profile and bacterial protein synthesis in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Soder, K J; Brito, A F; Rubano, M D

    2013-05-01

    A 4-unit dual-flow continuous culture fermentor system was used to evaluate the effects of supplementing fresh herbage with a total mixed ration (TMR) or flaxseed on nutrient digestibility, fermentation profile, and bacterial N synthesis. Diets were randomly assigned to fermentors in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Each fermentor was fed a total of 70 g of dry matter/d of 1 of 4 diets: (1) 100% freeze-dried orchardgrass herbage (Dactylis glomerata L.; HERB), (2) 100% freeze-dried TMR (100TMR), (3) 50% orchardgrass herbage supplemented with 50% TMR (50TMR), or (4) 90% orchardgrass herbage supplemented with 10% ground flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.; FLAX). Preplanned, single degree of freedom orthogonal contrasts were constructed to assess the effects of feeding system (HERB vs. 100TMR), herbage supplementation (HERB vs. 50TMR + FLAX), and herbage supplemental source (50TMR vs. FLAX). Compared with the HERB diet, the 100TMR diet significantly reduced apparent digestibility of neutral detergent fiber. Herbage supplementation with 50TMR or FLAX significantly reduced or tended to reduce apparent digestibilities of dry matter, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber, suggesting that replacing high-quality, highly digestible fresh herbage with forage TMR likely caused depressions in nutrient digestibilities. Concentration of total volatile fatty acids, molar proportions of acetate, propionate, and isovalerate, as well as the acetate:propionate ratios were all significantly higher in fermentors fed 100TMR compared with HERB, likely in response to enhanced supply of fermentable energy. In general, feeding system, herbage supplementation, and type of supplementation did not affect N metabolism in the present study. The few significant changes in N metabolism (e.g., flows of total N and non-NH3-N) were primarily linked to increased fermentor N supply with feeding herbage-based diets (HERB and FLAX). Although TMR-based diets decreased nutrient digestibility slightly, TMR

  2. Role of fluid mixing and fault-related sulfide in the origin of the Ray Point uranium district, south Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, M.B.; Reynolds, R.L.; Rye, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    The Lamprecht and Felder deposits are two of many roll-type uranium deposits hosted by the Miocene Oakville sandstone in the Ray Point district, Live Oak County, S Texas. Both deposits show similar patterns of geochemical zonation and distribution of authigenic iron disulphide minerals, and both appear to be genetically related to the nearby Oakville fault. Distribution of U, Mo and Se are typical of roll-type deposits. Sulphur isotope data indicate four stages of FeS2 mineral formation. Geochemical data suggest that the host sandstone near the Oakville fault is the site of a complex zone of mixing between fault-derived saline brines and oxygenated meteoric water. Conditions were thus provided in this zone for the proliferation of sulphate-reducing bacteria that in turn gave rise to the ore mineralization. A detailed discussion of the geological evolution of these deposits is presented.-J.E.S.

  3. Addition of potassium carbonate to continuous cultures of mixed ruminal bacteria shifts volatile fatty acids and daily production of biohydrogenation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, T C; Bridges, W C; Harrison, J H; Young, K M

    2014-02-01

    A recent study reported a 0.4 percentage unit increase in milk fat of lactating dairy cattle when dietary K was increased from 1.2 to 2% with potassium carbonate. Because milk fat yield has been associated with ruminal production of certain conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, 2 studies were conducted to determine if increasing potassium carbonate in the rumen would alter patterns of fermentation and biohydrogenation. In experiment 1, 5 dual-flow continuous fermenters were injected just before each feeding with a 10% (wt/wt) stock potassium carbonate solution to provide the equivalent of 1.1 (K1), 2.2 (K2), and 3.3 (K3) % of diet dry matter (DM) as added K. One of the remaining fermenters received no K (K0) and the last fermenter (NaOH) was injected with adequate NaOH stock solution (10%, wt/wt) to match the pH observed for the K3 treatment. For experiment 2, 6 dual-flow continuous fermenters were used to evaluate 6 treatments arranged in a 2 × 3 factorial to examine 2 levels of soybean oil (0 and 3.64% of diet DM) and added K at 0, 1.6, and 3.3% of diet DM. In both experiments, fermenters were fed 55 to 57 g of DM/d of a typical dairy diet consisting of 1:1 forage (10% alfalfa hay and 90% corn silage) to concentrate mix in 2 equal portions at 0800 and 1630 h, and fed the respective diets for 10-d periods. Potassium carbonate addition increased pH in both experiments. Acetate:propionate ratio and pH in experiment 1 increased linearly for K0 to K3. Acetate:propionate ratio was lower for NaOH compared with K3 but the pH was the same. The trans-11 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 CLA production rates (mg/d) increased linearly from K0 to K3, but K3 and NaOH did not differ. Production of trans-10 18:1 decreased and that of trans-10,cis-12 tended to decrease from K0 to K3, but production of trans-10,cis-12 CLA remained high for NaOH. Addition of K to the cultures in experiment 2 decreased propionate and increased acetate and acetate:propionate ratio for the 0% fat diet but

  4. Relative biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy on cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Kakuji; Kinashi, Yuko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kitajima, Erika; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is important in order to improve the efficacy of the therapy and to reduce side effects. In the present study, cell viability and DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and their radiosensitive mutant cells (xrs5, Ku80-deficient), following neutron mixed-beam irradiation for BNCT. Cell viability was significantly impaired in the neutron irradiation groups compared to the reference gamma-ray irradiation group. The relative biological effectiveness for 10% cell survival was 3.3 and 1.2 for CHO-K1 and xrs5 cells, respectively. There were a similar number of 53BP1 foci, indicators of DNA-DSBs, in the neutron mixed-beam and the gamma-ray groups. In addition, the size of the foci did not differ between groups. However, neutron mixed-beam irradiation resulted in foci with different spatial distributions. The foci were more proximal to each other in the neutron mixed-beam groups than the gamma-ray irradiation groups. These findings suggest that neutron beams may induce another type of DNA damage, such as clustered DNA-DSBs, as has been indicated for other high-LET irradiation. PMID:22966174

  5. Integrating Mixed Method Data in Psychological Research: Combining Q Methodology and Questionnaires in a Study Investigating Cultural and Psychological Influences on Adolescent Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Anke; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, combining quantitative and qualitative research methods in the same study has become increasingly acceptable in both applied and academic psychological research. However, a difficulty for many mixed methods researchers is how to integrate findings consistently. The value of using a coherent framework throughout the research…

  6. Establishing a Culture of Learning: A Mixed Methodology Exploration regarding the Phases of Change for Professional Learning Communities and Literacy Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, James E.

    2010-01-01

    This research serves as a mixed methodological study that presents a conceptual framework which focuses on the relationship between professional learning communities, high yield literacy strategies, and their phases of change. As a result, the purpose of this study is threefold. First, a conceptual framework integrating professional learning…

  7. Anaerobic thermophilic culture system

    DOEpatents

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Wiegel, Jurgen K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A mixed culture system of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus ATCC31550 and the microorganism Clostridium thermocellum ATCC31549 is described. In a mixed nutrient culture medium that contains cellulose, these microorganisms have been coupled and cultivated to efficiently ferment cellulose to produce recoverable quantities of ethanol under anaerobic, thermophilic conditions.

  8. THE IN VITRO TRANSFORMATION OF FROZEN-STORED LYMPHOCYTES IN THE MIXED LYMPHOCYTE REACTION AND IN CULTURE WITH PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININ AND SPECIFIC ANTIGENS

    PubMed Central

    Mangi, Richard J.; Mardiney, Michael R.

    1970-01-01

    We have investigated the in vitro transformation of lymphocytes that have been frozen and stored at low temperatures. Cells frozen at different times and stored for various times do transform in a reproducible manner when placed in culture with PHA or as one population of the two-way or the one-way MLR. When frozen-stored lymphocytes are cultured with specific antigen or as both partners in the MLR the response is minimal. The freezing process destroys neutrophils, and the remaining population transforms in a manner similar to cultures of purified lymphocytes. Practical aspects of the technique are discussed and we have suggested possible practical applications for future investigation. PMID:5523965

  9. Use of {sup 13}C NMR to assess the biodegradation of 1-{sup 13}C-labeled acenaphthene in the presence of creosote polynuclear hydrocarbons (PAHs) and naphthalene by mixed bacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Selifonov, S.A.; Bortiatynski, J.M.; Nanny, M.A.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1996-10-01

    1-{sup 13}C-acenaphthene mixed with creosote PAH`s or naphthalene was incubated with bacterial strains known to degrade naphthalene, phenanthrene and acenaphthene. After incubation, the reaction mixtures were extracted with organic solvent, and the biodegradation products were identified by {sup 13}C NMR. An accumulation of intermediate degradation products was identified and attributed to the non-specific action of naphthalene catabolic pathways of the mixed bacterial cultures. An acenaphthene degrading strain, Pseudomonas sp. strain A2279 was added to the nixed bacterial cultures to minimize the formation of the observed dead-end products. The {sup 13}C NMR spectra obtained from the experiments in which strain A2279 was present clearly showed the complete biodegradation of 1-{sup 13}C-acenaphthene without the accumulation of {sup 13}C-labeled products. This set of experiments clearly demonstrates the utility of {sup 13}C NMR as an effective tool for the assessment of the biodegradation of PAH`s such as 1-{sup 13}C-acenaphthene by various microbial strains.

  10. Interactions of allogeneic human mononuclear cells in the two-way mixed leucocyte culture (MLC): influence of cell numbers, subpopulations and cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Deiwick, A; Raddatz, G; Koyama, K; Schlitt, H J

    1999-01-01

    With organ allografts considerable numbers of donor-type mononuclear cells are transferred to the recipient, leading to bilateral immunological interactions between donor and recipient lymphocytes. To study such bilateral immune reactions in detail, human two-way MLC were performed. In this model proliferation kinetics, patterns of activation, and survival of the two populations were analysed, and the relevance of initial cell subset composition, relative cell numbers, and the effect of immunosuppression on this co-culture were evaluated. It could be demonstrated that with an initial 50:50 ratio of two populations of allogeneic cells one population dominated after 21 days of co-culture in 78 out of 80 combinations (97%) tested; the other population decreased markedly after an initially stable phase of 6–7 days. With unequal starting conditions the larger population dominated when resting cells were used, but small populations of preactivated cells or separated CD8+ cells could also dominate. Depletion of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells and of CD2− cells (B cell and monocytes) had no effect on domination. Addition of cyclosporin delayed or blocked the domination process while addition of IL-2 accelerated it. Disappearance of one population was associated with detection of apoptotic cells. The findings indicate that co-cultures of allogeneic mononuclear cells are generally not stable for more than 1 week, but lead to active elimination of one population. CD8+ cells and particularly preactivated cells seem to play the most important role in that process, while NK cells are of less importance. Cyclosporin can prolong survival of allogeneic cells in co-culture. These observations suggest that under the conditions of clinical organ transplantation even small amounts of immunocompetent donor cells transferred by the graft may persist for some time and may, thereby, have the chance to exert immunomodulatory functions. PMID:9933457

  11. Copper sulphate reduces the metabolic activity of Gammarus fossarum in laboratory and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Lara; von Fumetti, Stefanie; Nagel, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The specialised fauna of freshwater springs is affected by contamination of the water with xenobiotics from human activities in the surrounding landscape. We assessed the effects of exposure to toxins in laboratory and field experiments by using copper sulphate as a model substance and Gammarus fossarum Koch, 1836, as the model organism. This amphipod is a common representative of the European spring fauna and copper is a widespread contaminant, mainly from agricultural practice. The experiments were conducted in test chambers placed in flow channels and directly in a spring. The gammarids were fed with conditioned beech leaf discs, which had been exposed to a 0.8 mg Cu/L solution for 96 h. The feeding activity of the amphipods was quantified on the level of the organism; and the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) assay was conducted in order to determine changes on the cellular level in the test organisms. The results show that the feeding activity, when the leaf discs were contaminated with copper, was not significantly different from the control. The ETS activity of the gammarids, which had been feeding on the copper contaminated leaf discs was however significantly reduced. The results followed the same pattern for gammarids from both the laboratory and the spring. By conducting the experiments not only in a laboratory but also directly in a spring in the field, we took a crucial step towards a more realistic approach when examining environmental pollutants on an organism. Our findings demonstrate the importance of conducting experiments out in the field, in natural conditions, as well as in the laboratory.

  12. Biohydrogen production based on the evaluation of kinetic parameters of a mixed microbial culture using glucose and fruit-vegetable waste as feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Peña, E I; Canul-Chan, M; Chairez, I; Salgado-Manjarez, E; Aranda-Barradas, J

    2013-09-01

    Hydrogen (H2) production from the organic fraction of solid waste such as fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) is a novel and feasible energy technology. Continuous application of this process would allow for the simultaneous treatment of organic residues and energy production. In this study, batch experiments were conducted using glucose as substrate, and data of H2 production obtained were successfully adjusted by a logistic model. The kinetic parameters (μ max = 0.101 h(-1), K s = 2.56 g/L) of an H2-producing microbial culture determined by the Monod and Haldane-Andrews growth models were used to establish the continuous culture conditions. This strategy led to a productive steady state in continuous culture. Once the steady state was reached in the continuous reactor, a maximum H2 production of 700 mL was attained. The feasibility of producing H2 from the FVW obtained from a local market in Mexico City was also evaluated using batch conditions. The effect of the initial FVW concentration on the H2 production and waste organic material degradation was determined. The highest H2 production rate (1.7 mmol/day), the highest cumulative H2 volume (310 mL), and 25 % chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were obtained with an initial substrate (FVW) concentration of 37 g COD/L. The lowest H2 production rates were obtained with relatively low initial substrate concentrations of 5 and 11 g COD/L. The H2 production rates with FVW were also characterized by the logistic model. Similar cumulative H2 production was obtained when glucose and FVW were used as substrates.

  13. Mixed heterolobosean and novel gregarine lineage genes from culture ATCC 50646: Long-branch artefacts, not lateral gene transfer, distort α-tubulin phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Contradictory and confusing results can arise if sequenced 'monoprotist' samples really contain DNA of very different species. Eukaryote-wide phylogenetic analyses using five genes from the amoeboflagellate culture ATCC 50646 previously implied it was an undescribed percolozoan related to percolatean flagellates (Stephanopogon, Percolomonas). Contrastingly, three phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA alone, did not place it within Percolozoa, but as an isolated deep-branching excavate. I resolve that contradiction by sequence phylogenies for all five genes individually, using up to 652 taxa. Its 18S rRNA sequence (GQ377652) is near-identical to one from stained-glass windows, somewhat more distant from one from cooling-tower water, all three related to terrestrial actinocephalid gregarines Hoplorhynchus and Pyxinia. All four protein-gene sequences (Hsp90; α-tubulin; β-tubulin; actin) are from an amoeboflagellate heterolobosean percolozoan, not especially deeply branching. Contrary to previous conclusions from trees combining protein and rRNA sequences or rDNA trees including Eozoa only, this culture does not represent a major novel deep-branching eukaryote lineage distinct from Heterolobosea, and thus lacks special significance for deep eukaryote phylogeny, though the rDNA sequence is important for gregarine phylogeny. α-Tubulin trees for over 250 eukaryotes refute earlier suggestions of lateral gene transfer within eukaryotes, being largely congruent with morphology and other gene trees.

  14. The influence of metal speciation in combustion waste on the efficiency of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cr bioleaching in a mixed culture of sulfur-oxidizing and biosurfactant-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Karwowska, Ewa; Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Andrzejewska, Dorota

    2015-12-15

    Metal leachability from ash and combustion slag is related to the physico-chemical properties, including their speciation in the waste. Metals speciation is an important factor that influences the efficiency of metal bioleaching from combustion wastes in a mixed culture of acidophilic and biosurfactant-producing bacteria. It was observed that individual metals tended to occur in different fractions, which reflects their susceptibility to bioleaching. Cr and Ni were readily removed from wastes when present with a high fraction bound to carbonates. Cd and Pb where not effectively bioleached when present in high amounts in a fraction bound to organic matter. The best bioleaching results were obtained for power plant slag, which had a high metal content in the exchangeable, bound to carbonates and bound to Fe and Mg oxides fractions- the metal recovery percentage for Zn, Cu and Ni from this waste exceeded 90%.

  15. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Lewy bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from ... commonly with Alzheimer's disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive ...

  16. Wastewater nutrient removal in a mixed microalgae-bacteria culture: effect of light and temperature on the microalgae-bacteria competition.

    PubMed

    González-Camejo, J; Barat, R; Pachés, M; Murgui, M; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2017-03-27

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light intensity and temperature on nutrient removal and biomass productivity in a microalgae-bacteria culture and their effects on the microalgae-bacteria competition. Three experiments were carried out at constant temperature and various light intensities: 40, 85 and 125 µE m(-2) s(-1). Other two experiments were carried out at variable temperatures: 23 ± 2°C and 28 ± 2°C at light intensity of 85 and 125 µE m(-2) s(-1), respectively. The photobioreactor was fed by the effluent from an anaerobic membrane bioreactor. High nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies (about 99%) were achieved under the following operating conditions: 85-125 µE m(-2) s(-1) and 22 ± 1°C. In the microalgae-bacteria culture studied, increasing light intensity favoured microalgae growth and limited the nitrification process. However, a non-graduated temperature increase (up to 32°C) under the light intensities studied caused the proliferation of nitrifying bacteria and the nitrite and nitrate accumulation. Hence, light intensity and temperature are key parameters in the control of the microalgae-bacteria competition. Biomass productivity significantly increased with light intensity, reaching 50.5 ± 9.6, 80.3 ± 6.5 and 94.3 ± 7.9 mgVSS L(-1) d(-1) for a light intensity of 40, 85 and 125 µE m(-2) s(-1), respectively.

  17. The physiological characteristics of the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis in fully fermentative conditions with cell recycling and in mixed cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciana Filgueira; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; Avansini, Simoni Helena; Neto, Adauto Gomes Barbosa; Brasileiro, Bereneuza Tavares Ramos Valente; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina; de Morais, Marcos Antonio

    2012-03-01

    The yeast Dekkera bruxellensis plays an important role in industrial fermentation processes, either as a contaminant or as a fermenting yeast. In this study, an analysis has been conducted of the fermentation characteristics of several industrial D. bruxellensis strains collected from distilleries from the Southeast and Northeast of Brazil, compared with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that all the strains of D. bruxellensis showed a lower fermentative capacity as a result of inefficient sugar assimilation, especially sucrose, under anaerobiosis, which is called the Custer effect. In addition, most of the sugar consumed by D. bruxellensis seemed to be used for biomass production, as was observed by the increase of its cell population during the fermentation recycles. In mixed populations, the surplus of D. bruxellensis over S. cerevisiae population could not be attributed to organic acid production by the first yeast, as previously suggested. Moreover, both yeast species showed similar sensitivity to lactic and acetic acids and were equally resistant to ethanol, when added exogenously to the fermentation medium. Thus, the effects that lead to the employment of D. bruxellensis in an industrial process and its effects on the production of ethanol are multivariate. The difficulty of using this yeast for ethanol production is that it requires the elimination of the Custer effect to allow an increase in the assimilation of sugar under anaerobic conditions.

  18. Adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol by mixed culture using activated carbon as a supporting medium-reactor performance and model verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hui

    2016-12-01

    A non-steady-state mathematical model system for the kinetics of adsorption and biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) by attached and suspended biomass on activated carbon process was derived. The mechanisms in the model system included 2-CP adsorption by activated carbon, 2-CP mass transport diffusion in biofilm, and biodegradation by attached and suspended biomass. Batch kinetic tests were performed to determine surface diffusivity of 2-CP, adsorption parameters for 2-CP, and biokinetic parameters of biomass. Experiments were conducted using a biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor system with high recycled rate to approximate a completely mixed flow reactor for model verification. Concentration profiles of 2-CP by model predictions indicated that biofilm bioregenerated the activated carbon by lowering the 2-CP concentration at the biofilm-activated carbon interface as the biofilm grew thicker. The removal efficiency of 2-CP by biomass was approximately 98.5% when 2-CP concentration in the influent was around 190.5 mg L-1 at a steady-state condition. The concentration of suspended biomass reached up to about 25.3 mg L-1 while the thickness of attached biomass was estimated to be 636 μm at a steady-state condition by model prediction. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model predictions.

  19. Culture scale-up and immobilisation of a mixed methanotrophic consortium for methane remediation in pilot-scale bio-filters.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Obulisamy Parthiba; Saravanan, Nadarajan; Cirés, Samuel; Alvarez-Roa, Carlos; Razaghi, Ali; Chidambarampadmavathy, Karthigeyan; Velu, Chinnathambi; Subashchandrabose, Gobalakrishnan; Heimann, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    Robust methanotrophic consortia for methane (CH4) remediation and by-product development are presently not readily available for industrial use. In this study, a mixed methanotrophic consortium (MMC), sequentially enriched from a marine sediment, was assessed for CH4 removal efficiency and potential biomass-generated by-product development. Suitable packing material for bio-filters to support MMC biofilm establishment and growth was also evaluated. The enriched MMC removed ∼7-13% CH4 under a very high gas flow rate (2.5 L min(-1); 20-25% CH4) in continuous-stirred tank reactors (∼10 L working volume) and the biomass contained long-chain fatty acids (i.e. C16 and C18). Cultivation of the MMC on plastic bio-balls abated ∼95-97% CH4 in pilot-scale non-sterile outdoor-operated bio-filters (0.1 L min(-1); 1% CH4). Contamination by cyanobacteria had beneficial effects on treating low-level CH4, by providing additional oxygen for methane oxidation by MMC, suggesting that the co-cultivation of MMC with cyanobacterial mats does not interfere with and may actually be beneficial for remediation of CH4 and CO2 at industrial scale.

  20. Mixed oxide nanoparticles and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Zhang, Chuanlun; Roh, Yul

    2002-09-03

    Methods and apparatus for producing mixed oxide nanoparticulates are disclosed. Selected thermophilic bacteria cultured with suitable reducible metals in the presence of an electron donor may be cultured under conditions that reduce at least one metal to form a doped crystal or mixed oxide composition. The bacteria will form nanoparticles outside the cell, allowing easy recovery. Selection of metals depends on the redox potentials of the reducing agents added to the culture. Typically hydrogen or glucose are used as electron donors.

  1. Effect of betaine on the growth performance of chicks inoculated with mixed cultures of avian Eimeria species and on invasion and development of Eimeria tenella and Eimeria acervulina in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Augustine, P C; McNaughton, J L; Virtanen, E; Rosi, L

    1997-06-01

    At 7 d postinoculation (DPI) with a mixed culture of avian Eimeria species, 21-d-old chicks maintained in batteries and floor pens on a diet containing 0.15% (3 lb/ton) betaine plus 66 ppm (60 g/ton) salinomycin were significantly heavier and had significantly lower feed conversion ratios and mortality than chicks fed diets containing 0.15% betaine or 66 ppm salinomycin alone, or the control diet. At 31 DPI, when the chicks were 45 d old, the differences between the diet groups were not as great as at 7 DPI. In vitro, except at high concentrations, betaine was nontoxic to sporozoites of Eimeria tenella or Eimeria acervulina and had little effect on their invasion and development in cultured cells. In vivo, invasion by E. tenella and E. acervulina sporozoites was significantly reduced in all chicks fed diets containing betaine or salinomycin compared with that in control chicks. There was a significant interaction between betaine and salinomycin that impacted on invasion by both species. Overall development of E. tenella did not appear to be adversely affected by addition of betaine to diets containing salinomycin. Conversely, development of E. acervulina was reduced in chicks fed diets containing 0.075% (1.5 lb/ton) betaine plus 66 ppm salinomycin as compared with that in chicks fed salinomycin alone.

  2. Feed intake, digestibility, nitrogen utilization, ruminal condition and blood metabolites in wethers fed ground bamboo pellets cultured with white-rot fungus (Ceriporiopsis subvermispora) and mixed with soybean curd residue and soy sauce cake.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Michimasa; Okano, Kanji; Ieki, Hajime; Kitagawa, Masayuki; Tadokoro, Osamu; Sano, Yoshinori; Oishi, Kazato; Hirooka, Hiroyuki; Kumagai, Hajime

    2013-09-01

    Three types of bamboo pellets as a ruminant feed: P1 (ground bamboo (GB) cultured with the fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (CGB) : soybean curd residue (T) : soy sauce cake (S) in a 5:4:1 ratio on a dry matter (DM) basis); P2 (GB : T : S = 5:4:1 on a DM basis); and P3 (CGB : T : S = 5.5:0.8:3.7 on a DM basis) were prepared. Four wethers were assigned in a 4 × 4 Latin square design experiment to evaluate the applicability of the bamboo pellets. The experimental treatments were C (control): fed alfalfa hay cubes (AC) only, and T1, T2 and T3: fed P1, P2, and P3 with AC by 1:1 on a DM basis, respectively. The digestibility of the DM, organic matter and acid detergent fiber of P1 were significantly higher than those of P2 and P3 (P < 0.05). The total digestible nutrient (TDN) contents of AC, P1, P2 and P3 were 56.5%, 60.2%, 53.2% and 47.0%, respectively. No significant differences in nitrogen retention or ruminal pH and NH₃ were observed among the treatment groups. The results indicate that bamboo pellets cultured with C. subvermispora and mainly mixed with soybean curd residue improved nutritional quality of ground bamboo because of its high digestibility and TDN content.

  3. Cytokine Release Patterns in Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) of T-Cells with Dendritic Cells (DC) Generated from AML Blasts Contribute to Predict anti-Leukaemic T-Cell Reactions and Patients' Response to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fischbacher, Dorothea; Merle, Marion; Liepert, Anja; Grabrucker, Christine; Kroell, Tanja; Kremser, Andreas; Dreyßig, Julia; Freudenreich, Markus; Schuster, Friedhelm; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kraemer, Doris; Koehne, Claus-Henning; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Schmid, Christoph; Schmetzer, Helga Maria

    To enlighten interactions between autologous, allogeneic or T-cells from patients after stem cell transplantation with leukaemia-derived-dendritic-cells containing dendritic cells or blast containing mononuclear cells (n = 21, respectively), we determined cytokine-concentrations (interleukin 2, 4, 6, 10, tumor-necrosis-factor-α, interferon-γ) in supernatants of mixed-lymphocyte-culture and in serum (n = 16) of 20 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and three patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by cytometric-bead-assay. We correlated our data with lytic capabilities of stimulated T-cells in a fluorolysis-assay and clinical data: Dendritic-cell-/mononuclear-cell-stimulation of T-cells resulted in increased cytokine-levels in culture-medium compared to serum. There were no significant differences between cytokine-patterns of cases with/without lytic T-cell-activity, response to immunotherapy (stem cell transplantation/donor-lymphocyte-infusion) or graft-versus-host-disease. However, some predictive cytokine-cut-off-values for antileukaemic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease could be defined. Cytokine-profiles alone, without functional assays, are no useful tool to predict antileukaemic T-cell-function, although they can indicate lytic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease.

  4. Evaluating the toxicity of bDtBPP on CHO-K1 cells for testing of single-use bioprocessing systems considering media selection, cell culture volume, mixing, and exposure duration.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rhythm R; Linville, Taylor W; Whynot, Andrew D; Brazel, Christopher S

    2016-09-01

    Single-use bioprocessing bags are gaining popularity due to ease of use, lower risk of contamination, and ease of process scale-up. Bis(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphate (bDtBPP), a degradant of tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphite, marketed as Irgafos 168®, which is an antioxidant stabilizer added to resins, has been identified as a potentially toxic leachate which may impact the performance of single-use, multilayer bioprocessing bags. In this study, the toxicity of bDtBPP was tested on CHO-K1 cells grown as adherent or suspended cells. The EC50 (effective concentration to cause 50% cell death) for adherent cells was found to be one order of magnitude higher than that for suspended CHO-K1 cells. While CHO-K1 cells had good cell viability when exposed to moderate concentrations of bDtBPP, the degradant was shown to impact the viable cell density (VCD) at much lower concentrations. Hence, in developing an industry-standard assay for testing the cytotoxicity of leachates, suspended cells (as commonly used in the bioprocessing industry) would likely be most sensitive, particularly when reporting EC50 values based on VCD. The effects of mixing, cell culture volume, and exposure duration were also evaluated for suspended CHO-K1 cells. It was found that the sensitivity of cell culture to leachates from single-use plastic bags was enhanced for suspended cells cultured for longer exposure times and when the cells were subjected to continuous agitation, both of which are important considerations in the production of biopharmaceuticals. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1318-1323, 2016.

  5. Ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of the ion-mixing phenomenon are summarized. Ion mixing is differentiated from ion implantation and shown to be a useful technique for overcoming the sputter-dependent limitations of implantation processes. The fundamental physical principles of ion/solid interactions are explored. The basic experimental configurations currently in use are characterized: bilayered samples, multilayered samples, and samples with a thin marker layer. A table listing the binary systems (metal-semiconductor or metal-metal) which have been investigated using each configuration is presented. Results are discussed, and some sample data are plotted. The prospects for future application of ion mixing to the alteration of solid surface properties are considered. Practical applications are seen as restricted by economic considerations to the production of small, expensive components or to fields (such as the semiconductor industry) which already have facilities for ion implantation.

  6. Biomass conversion to mixed alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, M.T.; Loescher, M.; Ross, M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the MixAlco Process which converts a wide variety of biomass materials (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, agricultural residues) to mixed alcohols. First, the biomass is treated with lime to enhance its digestibility. Then, a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms converts the lime-treated biomass to volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. To maintain fermentor pH, a neutralizing agent (e.g. calcium carbonate or lime) is added, so the fermentation actually produces VFA salts such as calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The VFA salts are recovered and thermally converted to ketones (e.g. acetone, methylethyl ketone, diethyl ketone) which are subsequently hydrogenated to mixed alcohols (e.g. isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol). Processing costs are estimated at $0.72/gallon of mixed alcohols making it potentially attractive for transportation fuels.

  7. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    apl.uw.edu/dasaro LONG-TERM GOALS I seek to understand the processes controlling lateral mixing in the ocean, particularly at the submesoscale ...APPROACH During AESOP, Lee and D’Asaro pioneered an innovative approach to measuring submesoscale structure in strong fronts. An adaptive measurement...injection of potential vorticity and scalars is predicted to create an intense ‘ submesoscale soup’ of high small-scale variance. The combination of small

  8. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . 1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for...integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal opportunity to...2011 I also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the

  9. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  10. A comparative study on the effects of tylosin on select bacteria during continuous-flow culture of mixed populations of gut microflora derived from a feral and a domestic pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures, in duplicate, were continuously infused subtherapeutic (25 ug/ml) levels of tylosin and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes, ...

  11. A common soil flagellate (Cercomonas sp.) grows slowly when feeding on the bacterium Rhodococcus fascians in isolation, but does not discriminate against it in a mixed culture with Sphingopyxis witflariensis.

    PubMed

    Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Rønn, Regin

    2008-07-01

    Flagellates are very important predators on bacteria in soil. Because of their high growth rates, flagellate populations respond rapidly to changes in bacterial numbers. Previous results indicate that actinobacteria are generally less suitable than proteobacteria as food for flagellates. In this study, we investigated the growth of the flagellate Cercomonas sp. (ATCC 50334) on each of the two bacteria Sphingopyxis witflariensis (Alphaproteobacteria) and Rhodococcus fascians (actinobacteria) separately and in combination. The growth rate of the flagellate was lower and the lag phase was longer when fed with R. fascians than when fed with S. witflariensis. This supports our initial hypothesis that the actinobacterium is less suitable as food than the alphaproteobacterium. However, after longer periods of growth the peak abundance of flagellates was higher on R. fascians, indicating that the food quality of bacterial prey depends on the time perspective of the flagellate-bacterial interaction. There was no evidence that the flagellates selected against the actinobacterium when feeding in mixed cultures of the two bacteria. Experiments where flagellates were fed with washed bacterial cells or with bacteria growing with different substrate concentrations suggested that the low food quality of R. fascians is related both to the intrinsic cell properties and to the extracellular metabolites.

  12. American Mixed Race. The Culture of Microdiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zack, Naomi, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers on microdiversity that underscore the reality and scholarship of racial difference within single individuals and groups. The book includes 22 papers in 5 parts. Part 1, "Autobiography," includes: (1) "Five Arrows" (Susan Clements); (2) "Color Fades Over Time" (Brunetta R.…

  13. On culture artefacts in coccolith morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Gerald; Oetjen, Kerstin; Brenneis, Tina

    2013-06-01

    Coccolith malformations occur more frequently in cultured specimens than in specimens from natural samples, a phenomenon commonly termed `culture artefacts'. The causes of culture artefacts are unknown. Here, we tested the effect of culture flask shape, mixing, and cell density on the morphology of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths. While there was no effect of different culture flask types typically used in coccolithophore culturing, continuous mixing reduced the percentage of malformations by ca. 11 % in exponential-phase cells (cell density ca. 80 × 103 cells per ml) and ca. 17 % in stationary-phase cells (cell density ca. 2 × 106 cells per ml). Stationary-phase cells displayed 19 % more malformations than mid-exponential-phase cells when not mixed at all and 20 % more malformations when continuously mixed. It is concluded that the lack of mixing and unnaturally high cell densities, typical for coccolithophore stock cultures, are partly responsible for culture artefacts.

  14. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for glial and neural-related molecules in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures: neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lisak, Robert P; Benjamins, Joyce A; Bealmear, Beverly; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Yao, Bin; Land, Susan; Studzinski, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis, inflammatory cells are found in both active and chronic lesions, and it is increasingly clear that cytokines are involved directly and indirectly in both formation and inhibition of lesions. We propose that cytokine mixtures typical of Th1 or Th2 lymphocytes, or monocyte/macrophages each induce unique molecular changes in glial cells. Methods To examine changes in gene expression that might occur in glial cells exposed to the secreted products of immune cells, we have used gene array analysis to assess the early effects of different cytokine mixtures on mixed CNS glia in culture. We compared the effects of cytokines typical of Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M) on CNS glia after 6 hours of treatment. Results In this paper we focus on changes with potential relevance for neuroprotection and axon/glial interactions. Each mixture of cytokines induced a unique pattern of changes in genes for neurotrophins, growth and maturation factors and related receptors; most notably an alternatively spliced form of trkC was markedly downregulated by Th1 and M/M cytokines, while Th2 cytokines upregulated BDNF. Genes for molecules of potential importance in axon/glial interactions, including cell adhesion molecules, connexins, and some molecules traditionally associated with neurons showed significant changes, while no genes for myelin-associated genes were regulated at this early time point. Unexpectedly, changes occurred in several genes for proteins initially associated with retina, cancer or bone development, and not previously reported in glial cells. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures induced specific changes in gene expression that could be altered by pharmacologic strategies to promote protection of the central nervous system. PMID:18088439

  15. Mixed cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo

    2008-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), type II and type III, refers to the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum and manifests clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgias. It is considered to be a rare disorder, but its true prevalence remains unknown. The disease is more common in Southern Europe than in Northern Europe or Northern America. The prevalence of 'essential' MC is reported as approximately 1:100,000 (with a female-to-male ratio 3:1), but this term is now used to refer to a minority of MC patients only. MC is characterized by variable organ involvement including skin lesions (orthostatic purpura, ulcers), chronic hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse vasculitis, and, less frequently, interstitial lung involvement and endocrine disorders. Some patients may develop lymphatic and hepatic malignancies, usually as a late complication. MC may be associated with numerous infectious or immunological diseases. When isolated, MC may represent a distinct disease, the so-called 'essential' MC. The etiopathogenesis of MC is not completely understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suggested to play a causative role, with the contribution of genetic and/or environmental factors. Moreover, MC may be associated with other infectious agents or immunological disorders, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or primary Sjögren's syndrome. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory findings. Circulating mixed cryoglobulins, low C4 levels and orthostatic skin purpura are the hallmarks of the disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis involving medium- and, more often, small-sized blood vessels is the typical pathological finding, easily detectable by means of skin biopsy of recent vasculitic lesions. Differential diagnoses include a wide range of systemic, infectious and neoplastic disorders, mainly autoimmune hepatitis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarthritis, and B

  16. A comparative study on the effects of tylosin on select bacteria during continuous flow culture of mixed populations of gut microflora derived from a feral and a domestic pig.

    PubMed

    Ramlachan, Nicole; Anderson, Robin C; Andrews, Kathleen; Harvey, Roger B; Nisbet, David J

    2008-02-01

    Continuous flow cultures of feral (culture FC) and domesticated (culture RPCF) pig gut microflora were established in steady state. Cultures were continuously infused with 25 or 100 microg tylosin/mL and sampled at intervals to assess effects on total culturable anaerobes, Bacteroides and Enterococcus via plating to agar supplemented without or with 100 microg tylosin/mL, the latter to assess bacterial sensitivity to tylosin. Endogenous tylosin-insensitive anaerobes within the cultures, while similar prior to tylosin administration, responded differently during tylosin administration, with concentrations in RPCF cultures becoming enriched more than in FC cultures. Tylosin-insensitive anaerobes in RPCF cultures persisted at increased concentrations after cessation of tylosin administration whereas concentrations in FC cultures decreased slightly. Concentrations of Bacteroides and endogenous Enterococcus recovered on medium without tylosin decreased to near or below detectable levels in FC cultures administered 25 or 100 microg tylosin/mL. Tylosin-insensitive Bacteroides were enriched to >5 log10 CFU/mL in RPCF cultures after 25 microg tylosin/mL but not at 100 microg tylosin/mL. Populations of endogenous tylosin-insensitive Enterococcus were enriched in RPCF but not FC cultures administered 25 or 100 microg tylosin/mL. In cultures administered 100 microg tylosin/mL, an exogenous-sourced E. faecium possessing tylosin resistance maintained itself only in the presence of tylosin. These results indicate that under the conditions of these tests, antibiotic exposure may enrich for antibiotic-insensitive bacteria populations of endogenous or exogenous origin but that the ability of an exogenous tylosin-resistant E. faecium to persist is reduced in the absence of the antibiotic, likely due to exclusion by native flora.

  17. Stool Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Stool Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Bacterial Culture, stool; Feces Culture Formal name: Enteric Pathogens Culture, ...

  18. Phylogenetic and Metabolic Diversity of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX)-transforming Bacteria in Strictly Anaerobic Mixed Cultures Enriched on RDX as Nitrogen Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    International (Menlo Park, CA, USA). All other chemicals used were of reagent grade. The basic salts and vitamins medium were prepared as described...wastewater to methane (70% of the total gas released). The following compounds were added to the basic salts and vitamins medium to enrich bacteria using RDX...6 months. The ¢nal enrichment cultures did not show any growth in the basic salts media in the absence of RDX (Table 1). The enrichment cultures were

  19. ACETOGENIC AND SULPHATE-REDUCING BACTERIA INHABITING THE RHIZOPLANE AND DEEP CORTEX CELLS OF THE SEAGRASS HALODULE WRIGHTII

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent declines in sea grass distribution underscore the importance of understanding microbial community structure-function relationships in sea grass rhizosphere that might affect the viability of these plants. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses showed that sulfate-reducing bacter...

  20. Using a Mixed Methods Sequential Design to Identify Factors Associated with African American Mothers' Intention to Vaccinate Their Daughters Aged 9 to 12 for HPV with a Purpose of Informing a Culturally-Relevant, Theory-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential, explanatory mixed methods research study was to understand what factors influenced African American maternal intentions to get their daughters aged 9 years to 12 years vaccinated in Alabama. In the first, quantitative phase of the study, the research questions focused on identifying the predictive power of eleven…

  1. Mixed Heritage in Young Adult Literature. Scarecrow Studies in Young Adult Literature #32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Nancy Thalia

    2009-01-01

    Mixed-heritage people are one of the fastest-growing groups in the United States, yet culturally they have been largely invisible, especially in young adult literature. "Mixed Heritage in Young Adult Literature" is a critical exploration of how mixed-heritage characters (those of mixed race, ethnicity, religion, and/or adoption) and real-life…

  2. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  3. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  4. Cultural Variations in Learning and Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omidvar, Pegah; Tan, Bee Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The need for cross-cultural understanding of the relationship between culture and learning style is becoming increasingly important because of the changing cultural mix of classrooms and society at large. The research done regarding the two variables is mostly quantitative. This review summarizes results of the existing research on cultural…

  5. Mixed methods research.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  6. Suppression of mixed lymphocyte reactivity by human chorionic gonadotrophin

    PubMed Central

    Beling, C. G.; Weksler, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Highly purified human chorionic gonadotrophin inhibits the response of lymphocytes from both male and female subjects to allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte culture. Human chorionic gonadotrophin is not cytotoxic for human lymphocytes. PMID:4283122

  7. Urine culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture and sensitivity - urine ... when urinating. You also may have a urine culture after you have been treated for an infection. ... when bacteria or yeast are found in the culture. This likely means that you have a urinary ...

  8. Urine Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Urine Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Urine Culture and Sensitivity; Urine C and S Formal name: Culture, ...

  9. Safeguards Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2012-07-01

    The concepts of nuclear safety and security culture are well established; however, a common understanding of safeguards culture is not internationally recognized. Supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, the authors prepared this report, an analysis of the concept of safeguards culture, and gauged its value to the safeguards community. The authors explored distinctions between safeguards culture, safeguards compliance, and safeguards performance, and evaluated synergies and differences between safeguards culture and safety/security culture. The report concludes with suggested next steps.

  10. Mixed Methods in Intervention Research: Theory to Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Hitchcock, John; Sarkar, Sreeroopa; Burkholder, Gary; Varjas, Kristen; Jayasena, Asoka

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of mixed methods research designs to multiyear programmatic research and development projects whose goals include integration of cultural specificity when generating or translating evidence-based practices. The authors propose a set of five mixed methods designs related to different…

  11. Avian influenza: mixed infections and missing viruses.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, LeAnn L; Kelly, Terra R; Plancarte, Magdalena; Schobel, Seth; Lin, Xudong; Dugan, Vivien G; Wentworth, David E; Boyce, Walter M

    2013-08-05

    A high prevalence and diversity of avian influenza (AI) viruses were detected in a population of wild mallards sampled during summer 2011 in California, providing an opportunity to compare results obtained before and after virus culture. We tested cloacal swab samples prior to culture by matrix real-time PCR, and by amplifying and sequencing a 640bp portion of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene. Each sample was also inoculated into embryonated chicken eggs, and full genome sequences were determined for cultured viruses. While low matrix Ct values were a good predictor of virus isolation from eggs, samples with high or undetectable Ct values also yielded isolates. Furthermore, a single passage in eggs altered the occurrence and detection of viral strains, and mixed infections (different HA subtypes) were detected less frequently after culture. There is no gold standard or perfect reference comparison for surveillance of unknown viruses, and true negatives are difficult to distinguish from false negatives. This study showed that sequencing samples prior to culture increases the detection of mixed infections and enhances the identification of viral strains and sequences that may have changed or even disappeared during culture.

  12. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  13. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  14. Mixed waste minimization/mixed waste avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Todisco, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes methods for the minimization and volume reduction of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. Many methods are presented including: source reduction, better waste monitoring activities, waste segregation, recycling, administrative controls, and optimization of waste-generating processes.

  15. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet,...

  16. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet,...

  17. 21 CFR 529.469 - Competitive exclusion culture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Competitive exclusion culture. 529.469 Section 529... Competitive exclusion culture. (a) Specifications. Each packet of lyophilized culture contains either 2,000 or... contents of one 2,000-dose packet of lyophilized culture. Mix thoroughly. (2) For 5,000-dose packet,...

  18. Dilution Zone Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies to characterize dilution zone mixing; experiments on the effects of free-stream turbulence on a jet in crossflow; and the development of an interactive computer code for the analysis of the mixing of jets with a confined crossflow are reviewed.

  19. MHD turbulent mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Benjamin, R.A.; Cho, J.; Leitner, S.N.

    2005-09-28

    Turbulent mixing layers have been proposed to explain observations of line ratios of highly ionized elements in the interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of numerical simulations of turbulent mixing layers in a magnetized medium. We developed a MHD code with radiative cooling. The magnetic field is expected to be a controlling factor by suppressing instabilities that lead to the turbulent mixing. Our results suggest that the difference in turbulent mixing in the unmagnetized case as compared to the case of a weak magnetic field, {beta} = Pgas/Pmag {approx} 10, is insignificant. With a more thorough exploration of parameter space, this work will provide more reliable diagnostics of turbulent mixing layers than those available today.

  20. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  1. Hydrogen production by geobacter species and a mixed consortium in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas F; Wagner, Rachel C; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-12-01

    A hydrogen utilizing exoelectrogenic bacterium (Geobacter sulfurreducens) was compared to both a nonhydrogen oxidizer (Geobacter metallireducens) and a mixed consortium in order to compare the hydrogen production rates and hydrogen recoveries of pure and mixed cultures in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). At an applied voltage of 0.7 V, both G. sulfurreducens and the mixed culture generated similar current densities (ca. 160 A/m3), resulting in hydrogen production rates of ca. 1.9 m(3) H2/m3/day, whereas G. metallireducens exhibited lower current densities and production rates of 110 +/- 7 A/m3 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 m3 H2/m3/day, respectively. Before methane was detected in the mixed-culture MEC, the mixed consortium achieved the highest overall energy recovery (relative to both electricity and substrate energy inputs) of 82% +/- 8% compared to G. sulfurreducens (77% +/- 2%) and G. metallireducens (78% +/- 5%), due to the higher coulombic efficiency of the mixed consortium. At an applied voltage of 0.4 V, methane production increased in the mixed-culture MEC and, as a result, the hydrogen recovery decreased and the overall energy recovery dropped to 38% +/- 16% compared to 80% +/- 5% for G. sulfurreducens and 76% +/- 0% for G. metallireducens. Internal hydrogen recycling was confirmed since the mixed culture generated a stable current density of 31 +/- 0 A/m3 when fed hydrogen gas, whereas G. sulfurreducens exhibited a steady decrease in current production. Community analysis suggested that G. sulfurreducens was predominant in the mixed-culture MEC (72% of clones) despite its relative absence in the mixed-culture inoculum obtained from a microbial fuel cell reactor (2% of clones). These results demonstrate that Geobacter species are capable of obtaining similar hydrogen production rates and energy recoveries as mixed cultures in an MEC and that high coulombic efficiencies in mixed culture MECs can be attributed in part to the recycling of hydrogen into current.

  2. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  3. Culturing Protozoa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Paul

    1980-01-01

    Compares various nutrient media, growth conditions, and stock solutions used in culturing protozoa. A hay infusion in Chalkey's solution maintained at a stable temperature is recommended for producing the most dense and diverse cultures. (WB)

  4. Bronchoscopic culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003748.htm Bronchoscopic culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bronchoscopic culture is a laboratory exam to check a piece ...

  5. Throat Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Throat Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Collecting | ... treatment | Getting results | see BLOOD SAMPLE Collecting A culture is a test that is often used to ...

  6. Bile culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... these risks. Alternative Names Culture - bile Images Bile culture References Hall GS, Woods GL. Medical bacteriology. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods . 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  7. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - esophageal ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  8. Culturing conditions determine neuronal and glial excitability.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2010-12-15

    The cultivation of pure neuronal cultures is considered advantageous for the investigation of cell-type specific responses (such as transmitter release and also pharmacological agents), however, divergent results are a likely consequence of media modifications and culture composition. Using Fura-2 based imaging techniques, we here set out to compare calcium responses of rat hippocampal neurones and glia to excitatory stimulation with l-glutamate in different culture types and media. Neurones in neurone-enriched cultures had increased responses to 10 μM and 100 μM l-glutamate (+43 and 45%, respectively; p's< 0.001) and a slower recovery compared to mixed cultures, indicating heightened excitability. In matured (15-20 days in vitro) mixed cultures, neuronal responder rates were suppressed in a neurone-supportive medium (Neurobasal-A, NB: 65%) compared to a general-purpose medium (supplemented minimal essential medium, MEM: 96%). Glial response size in contrast did not differ greatly in isolated or mixed cultures maintained in MEM, but responder rates were suppressed in both culture types in NB (e.g. 10 μM l-glutamate responders in mixed cultures: 29% in NB, 71% in MEM). This indicates that medium composition is more important for glial excitability than the presence of neurones, whereas the presence of glia has an important impact on neuronal excitability. Therefore, careful consideration of culturing conditions is crucial for interpretation and comparison of experimental results. Especially for investigations of toxicity and neuroprotection mixed cultures may be more physiologically relevant over isolated cultures as they comprise aspects of mutual influences between glia and neurones.

  9. International multiphase mixed methods study protocol to develop a cross-cultural patient-reported outcome instrument for children and young adults with cleft lip and/or palate (CLEFT-Q)

    PubMed Central

    Wong Riff, Karen W Y; Tsangaris, Elena; Goodacre, Tim; Forrest, Christopher R; Pusic, Andrea L; Cano, Stefan J; Klassen, Anne F

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments should be developed according to rigorous guidelines in order to provide clinically meaningful, scientifically sound measurement. Understanding the methodology behind instrument development informs the selection of the most appropriate tool. This mixed methods protocol describes the development of an internationally applicable PRO instrument, the CLEFT-Q, for evaluating outcomes of treatment for cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P). Methods and analysis The study includes three main phases that occur iteratively and interactively. In phase I, we determine what concepts are important to patients regarding their outcome. A conceptual framework for the CLEFT-Q is formed through a systematic review and an extensive international qualitative study. The systematic review ascertains what concepts have previously been measured in patients with CL/P. The qualitative study employs interpretive description and involves in-depth interviews with patients in high-income and lower-middle income countries. Preliminary items are generated from the qualitative data. Preliminary scales are then created for each theme in the framework. Cognitive debriefing interviews and expert clinician input are used to refine the scales in an iterative process. In phase II, the preliminary scales are administered to a large international group of patients with CL/P. The modern psychometric method of Rasch Measurement Theory analysis is employed to define the measurement characteristics. The preliminary scales are shortened based on these results. In phase III, further tests assess reliability, validity and responsiveness of the instrument. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by Research Ethics Boards for each participating site. Findings from this study will be published in open access peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Integrated knowledge translation is employed to engage stakeholders from

  10. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  11. Beyond Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the lack of literature relating to cultural differences and school library media programs and reviews the book "Beyond Culture" by Edward T. Hall. Highlights include the population/environment crisis, cultural literacy, the use of technology, and Marshall McLuhan's idea of the global village. (LRW)

  12. The mixing of fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ottino, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    What do the eruption of Krakatau, the manufacture of puff pastry and the brightness of stars have in common Each involves some aspect of mixing. Mixing also plays a critical role in modern technology. Chemical engineers rely on mixing to ensure that substances react properly, to produce polymer blends that exhibit unique properties and to disperse drag-reducing agents in pipelines. Yet in spite of its of its ubiquity in nature and industry, mixing is only imperfectly under-stood. Indeed, investigators cannot even settle on a common terminology: mixing is often referred to as stirring by oceanographers and geophysicists, as blending by polymer engineers and as agitation by process engineers. Regardless of what the process is called, there is little doubt that it is exceedingly complex and is found in a great variety of systems. In constructing a theory of fluid mixing, for example, one has to take into account fluids that can be miscible or partially miscible and reactive or inert, and flows that are slow and orderly or very fast and turbulent. It is therefore not surprising that no single theory can explain all aspect of mixing in fluids and that straightforward computations usually fail to capture all the important details. Still, both physical experiments and computer simulations can provide insight into the mixing process. Over the past several years the authors and his colleague have taken both approaches in an effort to increase understanding of various aspect of the process-particularly of mixing involving slow flows and viscous fluids such as oils.

  13. Mixing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Green, Norman W.

    1982-06-15

    Method of mixing particulate materials comprising contacting a primary source and a secondary source thereof whereby resulting mixture ensues; preferably at least one of the two sources has enough motion to insure good mixing and the particulate materials may be heat treated if desired. Apparatus for such mixing comprising an inlet for a primary source, a reactor communicating therewith, a feeding means for supplying a secondary source to the reactor, and an inlet for the secondary source. Feeding means is preferably adapted to supply fluidized materials.

  14. Nearly discontinuous chaotic mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lim, Hyun K; Yu, Yan; Glimm, James G

    2009-01-01

    A new scientific approach is presented for a broad class of chaotic problems involving a high degree of mixing over rapid time scales. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows are typical of such problems. Microscopic mixing properties such as chemical reaction rates for turbulent mixtures can be obtained with feasible grid resolution. The essential dependence of (some) fluid mixing observables on transport phenomena is observed. This dependence includes numerical as well as physical transport and it includes laminar as well as turbulent transport. A new approach to the mathematical theory for the underlying equations is suggested.

  15. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  16. Differential effects of Th1, monocyte/macrophage and Th2 cytokine mixtures on early gene expression for molecules associated with metabolism, signaling and regulation in central nervous system mixed glial cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lisak, Robert P; Benjamins, Joyce A; Bealmear, Beverly; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Studzinski, Diane; Retland, Ernest; Yao, Bin; Land, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background Cytokines secreted by immune cells and activated glia play central roles in both the pathogenesis of and protection from damage to the central nervous system (CNS) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We have used gene array analysis to identify the initial direct effects of cytokines on CNS glia by comparing changes in early gene expression in CNS glial cultures treated for 6 hours with cytokines typical of those secreted by Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages (M/M). Results In two previous papers, we summarized effects of these cytokines on immune-related molecules, and on neural and glial related proteins, including neurotrophins, growth factors and structural proteins. In this paper, we present the effects of the cytokines on molecules involved in metabolism, signaling and regulatory mechanisms in CNS glia. Many of the changes in gene expression were similar to those seen in ischemic preconditioning and in early inflammatory lesions in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), related to ion homeostasis, mitochondrial function, neurotransmission, vitamin D metabolism and a variety of transcription factors and signaling pathways. Among the most prominent changes, all three cytokine mixtures markedly downregulated the dopamine D3 receptor, while Th1 and Th2 cytokines downregulated neuropeptide Y receptor 5. An unexpected finding was the large number of changes related to lipid metabolism, including several suggesting a switch from diacylglycerol to phosphatidyl inositol mediated signaling pathways. Using QRT-PCR we validated the results for regulation of genes for iNOS, arginase and P glycoprotein/multi-drug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) seen at 6 hours with microarray. Conclusion Each of the three cytokine mixtures differentially regulated gene expression related to metabolism and signaling that may play roles in the pathogenesis of MS, most notably with regard to mitochondrial function and neurotransmitter signaling in glia. PMID

  17. Artificial upwelling and mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The authors present results related to artificial upwelling and coastal mariculture using deep ocean water and mixing in coastal waters. They discuss the application of research results for marine waste disposal.

  18. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  19. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  20. Performance of low temperature Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) catalyzed by mixed bacterial consortia.

    PubMed

    Tkach, Olga; Sangeetha, Thangavel; Maria, Spiridonova; Wang, Aijie

    2017-02-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) are a promising technology for treating wastewater in a sustainable manner. In potential applications, low temperatures substantially reduce MFC performance. To better understand the effect of temperature and particularly how bioanodes respond to changes in temperature, we investigated the current generation of mixed-culture and pure-culture MFCs at two low temperatures, 10°C and 5°C. The results implied that the mixed-culture MFC sustainably performed better than the pure-culture (Shewanella) MFC at 10°C, but the electrogenic activity of anodic bacteria was substantially reduced at the lower temperature of 5°C. At 10°C, the maximum output voltage generated with the mixed-culture was 540-560mV, which was 10%-15% higher than that of Shewanella MFCs. The maximum power density reached 465.3±5.8mW/m(2) for the mixed-culture at 10°C, while only 68.7±3.7mW/m(2) was achieved with the pure-culture. It was shown that the anodic biofilm of the mixed-culture MFC had a lower overpotential and resistance than the pure-culture MFC. Phylogenetic analysis disclosed the prevalence of Geobacter and Pseudomonas rather than Shewanella in the mixed-culture anodic biofilm, which mitigated the increase of resistance or overpotential at low temperatures.

  1. Unique Pathways to Resilience across Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Michael; Brown, Marion; Liebenberg, Linda; Othman, Rasha; Kwong, Wai Man; Armstrong, Mary; Gilgun, Jane

    2007-01-01

    An international mixed methods study of resilience of 14 sites in eleven countries identified seven tensions that youth resolve in culturally specific ways. Resolution of these tensions is foundational to experiences of resilience. This paper reports on the qualitative findings from interviews with 89 youth. Results support a culturally embedded…

  2. RO1 Funding for Mixed Methods Research: Lessons learned from the Mixed-Method Analysis of Japanese Depression Project

    PubMed Central

    Arnault, Denise Saint; Fetters, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed methods research has made significant in-roads in the effort to examine complex health related phenomenon. However, little has been published on the funding of mixed methods research projects. This paper addresses that gap by presenting an example of an NIMH funded project using a mixed methods QUAL-QUAN triangulation design entitled “The Mixed-Method Analysis of Japanese Depression.” We present the Cultural Determinants of Health Seeking model that framed the study, the specific aims, the quantitative and qualitative data sources informing the study, and overview of the mixing of the two studies. Finally, we examine reviewer's comments and our insights related to writing mixed method proposal successful for achieving RO1 level funding. PMID:25419196

  3. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  4. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  5. Nasopharyngeal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - nasopharyngeal; Swab for respiratory viruses; Swab for staph carriage ... The test identifies viruses and bacteria that cause upper respiratory ... Staphylococcus aureus Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus ...

  6. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePlus

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  7. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  8. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  9. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  10. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controllable mixing system (210) in which a plurality of mixing assemblies (10a-10e) are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly (10) employs a central chamber (16) and two outer, upper and lower, chambers (12, 14). Valves (18, 20) are positioned between chambers, and these valves (18, 20) for a given mixing assembly (10) are operated by upper and lower control rotors (29), which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors (270, 270b). Additionally, a hoop (278) is compressed around upper control rotors (29) and a hoop (278b) is compressed around lower control rotors (29) to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors (29) and drive rotors (270, 270b). The drive rollers (270, 270b) are driven by a motor (213).

  11. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  12. Mixing navigation on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao

    2008-05-01

    In this article, we propose a mixing navigation mechanism, which interpolates between random-walk and shortest-path protocol. The navigation efficiency can be remarkably enhanced via a few routers. Some advanced strategies are also designed: For non-geographical scale-free networks, the targeted strategy with a tiny fraction of routers can guarantee an efficient navigation with low and stable delivery time almost independent of network size. For geographical localized networks, the clustering strategy can simultaneously increase efficiency and reduce the communication cost. The present mixing navigation mechanism is of significance especially for information organization of wireless sensor networks and distributed autonomous robotic systems.

  13. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  14. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  15. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  16. Ryukyuan Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafton, Terry

    The Ryukyu Islands of Japan, of which Okinawa is the best known, possess a lengthy history and a sophisticated cultural background, an exploration of which helps to shed light on this area and on mainland Japan. This document is an exposition of Ryukuan culture. Divided into eight sections, the areas covered include: (1) Historical perspective;…

  17. Organizational Barriers to Cultural Competence in Hospice.

    PubMed

    Reese, Dona J; Beckwith, Samira K

    2015-11-01

    This national mixed method study with directors of 207 hospices identified major barriers to cultural competence, including (1) lack of funding for additional staff for community outreach or development of culturally competent programs, (2) lack of applications from diverse professionals, and (3) lack of knowledge about diverse cultures and what cultural groups in the community are not being served. Qualitative results indicated that elements of an organizational culture, which create barriers to access included (1) failure to prioritize cultural competence, (2) failure to budget for culturally competent services, and (3) a staff that does not value awareness of cultural differences, is uncomfortable with diversity, and stereotypes diverse individuals. In phase 2, an interactive session with a 100-symposium audience provided strategies to address the barriers.

  18. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie; Welch, Cynthia F.; Goodwin, Lynne Alese; Keller, Jennie

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  19. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  20. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  1. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  2. True Anonymity Without Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Jimenez, C.; Marshall, L.

    2002-04-01

    Anonymizers based on mix computers interposed between the sender and the receiver of an e-mail message have been used in the Internet for several years by senders of e-mail messages who do not wish to disclose their identity. Unfortunately, the degree of anonymity provided by this paradigm is limited and fragile. First, the messages sent are not truly anonymous but pseudo-anonymous since one of the mixes, at least, always knows the sender's identity. Secondly, the strength of the system to protect the sender's identity depends on the ability and the willingness of the mixes to keep the secret. If the mixes fail, the sender/'s anonymity is reduced to pieces. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for sending truly anonymous messages over the Internet where the anonymous message is sent from a PDA which uses dynamically assigned temporary, non-personal, random IP and MAC addresses. Anonymous E-cash is used to pay for the service.

  3. Radial Mixing in Turbomachines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    Belgium March 31, 1991 Final Scientific Report June 1, 1989 - July 31, 1990 VUB -STR -17 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. - Prepared ...secondary flows and turbulence as sources of mixing was investigated by conducting experiments using hot-wire anemometry and ehtylene tracer gas

  4. Cultural History and Cultural Materialism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ronald

    1990-01-01

    Historicism critiques cultural history and cultural materialism as a methodology for literary analysis. Questions the finality of interpretation, how original values change, and whether dramatic history implies actual history. Using Shakespearean plays, analyzes the power and politics of a play in relation to its audience; posits that cultural…

  5. Paramilitary Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, James William

    1989-01-01

    Identifies the movie, "Rambo," and "Soldier of Fortune" magazine as artifacts of "paramilitary culture." Contends that they are a social phenomenon which helps legitimate the United States government's rapid escalation of military forces. (MS)

  6. Blood culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - blood ... A blood sample is needed . The site where blood will be drawn is first cleaned with an antiseptic such ... organism from the skin getting into (contaminating) the blood sample and causing a false-positive result (see ...

  7. Fecal culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fecal culture is a lab test to find organisms in the stool (feces) that can cause gastrointestinal ... Results There are no abnormal bacteria or other organisms in the sample. Talk to your provider about ...

  8. COMBINATION OF IRON AND MIXED ANAEROBIC CULTURE FOR PERCHLOROETHENE DEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRB's) are an emerging, alternative in-situ approach for remediating contaminated groundwater that combine subsurface fluid flow management with a passive chemical treatment zone. PRB's are a potentially more cost effective treatment option at severa...

  9. Cometabolism of Monochloramine by Distribution System Relevant Mixed Culture Nitrifiers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monochloramine (NH2Cl) is increasingly used as a residual disinfectant. A major problem related to NH2Cl is nitrification in distribution systems, leading to rapid NH2Cl residual loss. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which oxidize ammonia (NH3) to nitrite, can cometabolize chem...

  10. Mixing by individual swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri; Shum, Henry; Yeomans, Julia

    2012-11-01

    Despite their evolutionary and technological importance, different biomixing mechanisms, their effectiveness and universality remain poorly understood. In this talk we focus on the Lagrangian transport of the surrounding fluid by swimmers. Low Re passive tracers advected by swimmers move in loops that are, in general, almost closed. We analyze the reasons for this behavior and, as non-closedness of the loops is a natural requirement for an efficient mixing, propose a classification of possible mechanisms for biogenic mixing. Next, we discuss the universal (common to all swimmers) and the swimmer-dependent features of the resulting tracer displacements and analyze the Darwin drift, the total fluid volume displaced by a swimmer passing from and to infinity. We show that the Darwin drift is finite for force-free swimmers and can be decomposed into a universal and a swimmer-dependent part. We illustrate our consideration with examples for model swimmers and biological data.

  11. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  12. Magnetically driven surface mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, M.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2009-07-01

    Magnetic microparticles suspended on the surface of liquid and energized by vertical alternating magnetic field exhibit complex collective behavior. Various immobile and self-propelled self-assembled structures have been observed. Here, we report on experimental studies of mixing and surface diffusion processes in this system. We show that the pattern-induced surface flows have properties of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence. Correspondingly, the surface advection of tracer particle exhibits properties of Brownian diffusion.